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Sample records for pediatric myelodysplastic syndromes

  1. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy ... can lead to infection, anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do not cause early symptoms and are ...

  2. Cytogenetics and clinical features of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Koichi; Manabe, Atsushi; Taketani, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Akira; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2014-11-01

    We analyzed the cytogenetics and clinical features of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in Japan. Data on patients (<16 years) diagnosed with MDS from 1990 to 2000 were retrospectively collected from pediatric hematologists in 234 institutions. Chromosome analysis was successfully performed in 255 of 277 MDS patients. The numbers of patients with refractory anemia, refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB), refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEBt), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia were 67 (24%), 51 (18%), 51 (18%), 20 (7%), and 65 (23%), respectively. The other 23 patients (8%) could not be classified specifically. The distribution of childhood MDS in Japan according to the French-American-British subclassification was similar to that in other countries. However, we identified a higher incidence of therapy-related cases. As for relationship between cytogenetics and prognoses, abnormal karyotypes were related to poorer prognoses than normal karyotype (P < 0.01). However, patients with trisomy 8 had prognoses comparable to those with normal karyotypes. Complex karyotypes were associated with poorer prognoses among RAEB and RAEBt patients. In conclusion, prognosis of pediatric MDS is related to cytogenetics. A more precise diagnosis and classification system is needed for childhood MDS.

  3. Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? Since smoking is linked to the ... Syndromes? Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  4. General Information about Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  5. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  6. How Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndromes Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes Scored? Doctors often group cancers into different stages ... Ask Your Doctor About Myelodysplastic Syndromes? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. Do We Know What Causes Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Factors, and Prevention Do We Know What Causes Myelodysplastic Syndromes? Some cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are linked ... Syndromes? Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  8. Cytogenetic studies of Brazilian pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome cases: challenges and difficulties in a large and emerging country

    PubMed Central

    Velloso, E.D.R.P.; Chauffaille, M.L.; Peliçario, L.M.; Tanizawa, R.S.S.; Toledo, S.R.C.; Gaiolla, R.D.; Lopes, L.F.

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) are rare hematopoietic stem cell diseases affecting children. Cytogenetics plays an important role in the diagnosis of these diseases. We report here the experience of the Cytogenetic Subcommittee of the Brazilian Cooperative Group on Pediatric Myelodysplastic Syndromes (BCG-MDS-PED). We analyzed 168 cytogenetic studies performed in 23 different cytogenetic centers; 84 of these studies were performed in patients with confirmed MDS (primary MDS, secondary MDS, JMML, and acute myeloid leukemia/MDS+Down syndrome). Clonal abnormalities were found in 36.9% of the MDS cases and cytogenetic studies were important for the detection of constitutional diseases and for differential diagnosis with other myeloid neoplasms. These data show the importance of the Cooperative Group for continuing education in order to avoid a late or wrong diagnosis. PMID:23314345

  9. What Are the Key Statistics about Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myelodysplastic Syndromes What Are the Key Statistics About Myelodysplastic Syndromes? In the United States, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) occur ... in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Research and Treatment? More ... Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  10. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  11. Ibrutinib and Azacitidine for Treatment of Higher Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-20

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  12. Hereditary Predispositions to Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Sarah A.; DiNardo, Courtney D.

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia, and peripheral cytopenias. Familial forms of MDS have traditionally been considered rare, especially in adults; however, the increasing availability of somatic and germline genetic analyses has identified multiple susceptibility loci. Bone marrow failure syndromes have been well-described in the pediatric setting, e.g., Fanconi anemia (FA), dyskeratosis congenita (DC), Diamond–Blackfan anemia (DBA), and Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SBS), hallmarked by clinically-recognizable phenotypes (e.g., radial ray anomalies in FA) and significantly increased risks for MDS and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the setting of bone marrow failure. However, additional families with multiple cases of MDS or AML have long been reported in the medical literature with little known regarding potential hereditary etiologies. Over the last decade, genomic investigation of such families has revealed multiple genes conferring inherited risks for MDS and/or AML as the primary malignancy, including RUNX1, ANKRD26, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, and SRP72. As these syndromes are increasingly appreciated in even apparently de novo presentations of MDS, it is important for hematologists/oncologists to become familiar with these newly-described syndromes. Herein, we provide a review of familial MDS syndromes and practical aspects of management in patients with predisposition syndromes. PMID:27248996

  13. The role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in serum-induced leukemia inhibitory factor secretion by bone marrow stromal cells from pediatric myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Simone V; Roela, Rosimeire A; Junqueira, Mara Souza; Arantes, Camila; Brentani, M Mitzi

    2010-04-01

    Stromal cells from pediatric myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) associated with MDS (MDS-AML) present high expression of leukemia inhibitor factor (LIF). We demonstrated using mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors that in stromal cells from pediatric MDS and MDS-AML, p38MAPK was critical in serum-induced secretion of LIF. The serum induction of phosphorylated p38MAPK form was observed only in stromal cells from healthy children, whereas in MDS and MDS-AML basal levels were maintained suggesting constitutive p38MAPK activation. Our study suggested the possible importance in pediatric MDS of p38MAPK signaling pathway which may be a future therapeutic target.

  14. What's New in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes What's New in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Research and Treatment? Genetics and ... research unfolds, it may be used to design new drugs or eventually in developing gene therapy. This ...

  15. Differentiation Therapy With Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Thrombocytopenia

  16. Lenalidomide in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-10

    Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  17. Monitoring of hematopoietic chimerism after transplantation for pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome: real-time or conventional short tandem repeat PCR in peripheral blood or bone marrow?

    PubMed

    Willasch, Andre M; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Shayegi, Nona; Rettinger, Eva; Meyer, Vida; Zabel, Marion; Lang, Peter; Kremens, Bernhard; Meisel, Roland; Strahm, Brigitte; Rossig, Claudia; Gruhn, Bernd; Klingebiel, Thomas; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Bader, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has been proposed as a highly sensitive method for monitoring hematopoietic chimerism and may serve as a surrogate marker for the detection of minimal residual disease minimal residual disease in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), until specific methods of detection become available. Because a systematic comparison of the clinical utility of qPCR with the gold standard short tandem repeat (STR)-PCR has not been reported, we retrospectively measured chimerism by qPCR in 54 children transplanted for MDS in a previous study. Results obtained by STR-PCR in the initial study served as comparison. Because the detection limit of qPCR was sufficiently low to detect an autologous background, we defined the sample as mixed chimera if the proportion of recipient-derived cells exceeded .5%. The true positive rates were 100% versus 80% (qPCR versus STR-PCR, not significant), and mixed chimerism in most cases was detected earlier by qPCR than by STR-PCR (median, 31 days) when chimerism was quantified concurrently in peripheral blood and bone marrow. Both methods revealed a substantial rate of false positives (22.7% versus 13.6%, not significant), indicating the importance of serial testing of chimerism to monitor its progression. Finally, we propose criteria for monitoring chimerism in pediatric MDS with regard to the subtypes, specimens, PCR method, and timing of sampling.

  18. [Transformation of myelodysplastic syndrome to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: 2 new cases].

    PubMed

    Guillén, M; Madero, L; Parra, L; Hernández, C; Herrero, B; Carceller, F; Lassaletta, A; Sevilla, J

    2013-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders of hematopoietic stem cells, with a variable risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Progression into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is an extremely rare event, with very few cases published in children. In this report, we describe two cases of myelodysplastic syndromes that progressed to ALL. Moreover, we review previously reported cases of MDS transformation to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pediatric population whose prognosis seems to be similar to that for adults.

  19. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  20. Darbepoetin alfa for anemia with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seastone, David J; Gerds, Aaron T

    2015-04-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes are characterized by refractory cytopenias that lead to symptomatic anemia, bleeding, and increased risk for infections. For almost two decades, the use of darbepoetin and other erythropoietin stimulating agents to treat symptomatic anemia in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes has been a standard of care. This practice is supported by numerous Phase I/II studies and one Phase III study demonstrating the benefit of using erythropoietin stimulating agents alone, or in combination with granulocyte colony stimulating factor, for treatment of symptomatic anemia with the goal of decreasing red blood cell transfusion requirements. This review summarizes the published experience regarding the use of erythropoietin stimulating agents, with a special focus on darbepoetin, in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and symptomatic anemia.

  1. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation.

  2. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-06

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-1; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. 5-Fluoro-2'-Deoxycytidine and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daniel J. Lindner, M.D., Ph.D...YYYY) 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 201 31 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones...vitro and engrafted in the marrow of SG3, but not NSG mice. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Myelodysplastic syndrome , lentivirus, cDNA libraries

  6. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Ring Sideroblasts; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation

  8. [Immunomorphometric study of megakaryocytes in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Marisavljević, D; Rolović, Z

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse, by immunomorphometry, megakaryocytopoiesis in patients with myelodysplatsic syndrome. The results revealed that, in spite of marked megakaryocyte hyperplasia, patients with myelodysplastic syndrome suffer from severe peripheral thrombocytopenia. Megakaryocytes in myelodisplastic syndrome have, in average, small cellular and nuclear diameter and 35.3% of them (s. c. micromegakaryocyres) can be identified only by using immunohistochemical technique. In conclusion, there is severe maturation disturbancy, ineffectiveness and disregulation of megakaryocytopoiesis in myelodysplastic syndrome.

  9. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Occurring in a Patient with Gorlin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mull, Jamie L; Madden, Lisa M; Bayliss, Susan J

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) occurring in an African American boy with Gorlin syndrome with a novel PTCH1 mutation. Before developing MDS, the patient had been treated with chemotherapy and radiation for a medulloblastoma. He received a bone marrow transplant for the MDS and eventually died of treatment complications. Secondary hematologic malignancies are a known complication of certain chemotherapeutics, although whether a patient with Gorlin syndrome has a greater propensity for the development of such malignancies is unclear.

  10. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    were validated; they induced myeloid colonies in vitro and engrafted in the marrow of SG3, but not NSG mice. Myelodysplastic syndrome , lentivirus...cDNA libraries, complementation The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Cleveland, OH 44195 Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with...Martin-Padura, P. Mancuso, P. Marighetti, C. Rabascio, G. Pruneri, L. D. Shultz, and F. Bertolini. 2008. Human acute leukemia cells injected in NOD

  12. Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries Daniel Lindner The Cleveland Clinic Cleveland, OH 44195 We have...MDS cell pools. This validation will ensure that the insert causes the desired phenotype. Myelodysplastic syndrome , lentivirus, cDNA libraries...A., I. Martin-Padura, P. Mancuso, P. Marighetti, C. Rabascio, G. Pruneri, L. D. Shultz, and F. Bertolini. 2008. Human acute leukemia cells injected

  13. Azacitidine With or Without Lenalidomide or Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-21

    Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia-1; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  14. The myelodysplastic syndromes: towards a functional classification.

    PubMed

    Mijović, A; Mufti, G J

    1998-06-01

    The French-American-British classification of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) has contributed greatly to better communication and conduct of clinical trials. However, the advent of novel cytogenetic, immunological and molecular techniques in recent years warrant some alterations to this purely morphological classification. This review aims at highlighting the advances which reflect more closely the unique biological and clinical features of various subtypes of MDS. We propose a comprehensive classification of MDS, to include the newly defined categories, as well as those not included in previous classifications, such as the therapy-induced and hereditary MDS. We hope that this classification will help in focusing attention on the biological features of MDS, the understanding of which will be crucial to combat this disease.

  15. Epigenetic changes in the myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Issa, Jean-Pierre

    2010-04-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, drive stable, clonally propagated changes in gene expression and can therefore serve as molecular mediators of pathway dysfunction in neoplasia. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is characterized by frequent epigenetic abnormalities, including the hypermethylation of genes that control proliferation, adhesion, and other characteristic features of this leukemia. Aberrant DNA hypermethylation is associated with a poor prognosis in MDS that can be accounted for by more rapid progression to acute myeloid leukemia. In turn, treatment with drugs that modify epigenetic pathways (DNA methylation and histone deacetylation inhibitors) induces durable remissions and prolongs life in MDS, offering some hope and direction in the future management of this deadly disease.

  16. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Iron Chelation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Angelucci, Emanuele; Urru, Silvana Anna Maria; Pilo, Federica; Piperno, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Over recent decades we have been fortunate to witness the advent of new technologies and of an expanded knowledge and application of chelation therapies to the benefit of patients with iron overload. However, extrapolation of learnings from thalassemia to the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) has resulted in a fragmented and uncoordinated clinical evidence base. We’re therefore forced to change our understanding of MDS, looking with other eyes to observational studies that inform us about the relationship between iron and tissue damage in these subjects. The available evidence suggests that iron accumulation is prognostically significant in MDS, but levels of accumulation historically associated with organ damage (based on data generated in the thalassemias) are infrequent. Emerging experimental data have provided some insight into this paradox, as our understanding of iron-induced tissue damage has evolved from a process of progressive bulking of organs through high-volumes iron deposition, to one of ‘toxic’ damage inflicted through multiple cellular pathways. Damage from iron may, therefore, occur prior to reaching reference thresholds, and similarly, chelation may be of benefit before overt iron overload is seen. In this review, we revisit the scientific and clinical evidence for iron overload in MDS to better characterize the iron overload phenotype in these patients, which differs from the classical transfusional and non-transfusional iron overload syndrome. We hope this will provide a conceptual framework to better understand the complex associations between anemia, iron and clinical outcomes, to accelerate progress in this area. PMID:28293409

  17. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  18. Loss of B cells and their precursors is the most constant feature of GATA-2 deficiency in childhood myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nováková, Michaela; Žaliová, Markéta; Suková, Martina; Wlodarski, Marcin; Janda, Aleš; Froňková, Eva; Campr, Vít; Lejhancová, Kateřina; Zapletal, Ondřej; Pospíšilová, Dagmar; Černá, Zdeňka; Kuhn, Tomáš; Švec, Peter; Pelková, Vendula; Zemanová, Zuzana; Kerndrup, Gitte; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; van der Velden, Vincent; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Kalina, Tomáš; Trka, Jan; Starý, Jan; Hrušák, Ondřej; Mejstříková, Ester

    2016-01-01

    GATA-2 deficiency was recently described as common cause of overlapping syndromes of immunodeficiency, lymphedema, familiar myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia. The aim of our study was to analyze bone marrow and peripheral blood samples of children with myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia to define prevalence of the GATA2 mutation and to assess whether mutations in GATA-2 transcription factor exhibit specific immunophenotypic features. The prevalence of a GATA2 mutation in a consecutively diagnosed cohort of children was 14% in advanced forms of myelodysplastic syndrome (refractory anemia with excess blasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation, and myelodysplasia-related acute myeloid leukemia), 17% in refractory cytopenia of childhood, and 0% in aplastic anemia. In GATA-2-deficient cases, we found the most profound B-cell lymphopenia, including its progenitors in blood and bone marrow, which correlated with significantly diminished intronRSS-Kde recombination excision circles in comparison to other myelodysplastic syndrome/aplastic anemia cases. The other typical features of GATA-2 deficiency (monocytopenia and natural killer cell lymphopenia) were less discriminative. In conclusion, we suggest screening for GATA2 mutations in pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, preferentially in patients with impaired B-cell homeostasis in bone marrow and peripheral blood (low number of progenitors, intronRSS-Kde recombination excision circles and naïve cells). PMID:27013649

  19. Lactobacillus in Preventing Infection in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  20. Immunological Derangement in Hypocellular Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Serio, B; Risitano, AM; Giudice, V; Montuori, N; Selleri, C

    2014-01-01

    Hypocellular or hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndromes (HMDS) are a distinct subgroup accounting for 10–15% of all MDS patients, that are characterized by the presence of bone marrow (BM) hypocellularity, various degree of dysmyelopoiesis and sometimes abnormal karyotype. Laboratory and clinical evidence suggest that HMDS share several immune-mediated pathogenic mechanisms with acquired idiopathic aplastic anemia (AA). Different immune-mediated mechanisms have been documented in the damage of marrow hematopoietic progenitors occurring in HMDS; they include oligoclonal expansion of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), polyclonal expansion of various subtypes of T helper lymphocytes, overexpression of FAS-L and of the TNF–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), underexpression of Flice-like inhibitory protein long isoform (FLIPL) in marrow cells as well as higher release of Th1 cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). It has also been documented that some HMDS patients have higher frequency of polymorphisms linked both to high production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and transforming growth factor-β and to the inhibition of T-cell mediated immune responses such as interleukin-10, further suggesting that immune-mediated mechanisms similar to those seen in AA patients may also operate in HMDS. Clinically, the strongest evidence for immune–mediated hematopoietic suppression in some HMDS is the response to immunosuppression including mainly cyclosporine, anti-thymocyte globulin and/or cyclosporine, or alemtuzumab. Here we review all these immune mechanisms as well as the influence of this deranged cellular and humoral immunologic mileau on the initiation and possible progression of MDS. All these observations are pivotal not only for a better understanding of MDS pathophysiology, but also for their immediate clinical implications, eventually leading to the identification of MDS patients who may benefit from

  1. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome associated with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Hikichi, Takuto; Takahashi, Yuta; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Kumakawa, Hiromi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS) associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). A 54-year-old woman, diagnosed as MDS the prior year after evaluation of anemia, visited our hospital with the chief complaint of epigastric discomfort. She also had dysgeusia, alopecia, atrophic nail change, and pigmentation of the palm, all of which began several months ago. Blood tests revealed severe hypoalbuminemia. Colonoscopy (CS) showed numerous, dense, red polyps throughout the colon and rectum. Biopsy specimens showed stromal edema, infiltration of lymphocytes, and cystic dilatation of the crypt. Her clinical manifestations and histology were consistent with CCS. We prescribed corticosteroids, which dramatically improved her physical findings, laboratory data, and endoscopic findings. This is the first report of CCS in a patient with MDS. PMID:19998513

  2. Regulation and Function of TIFAB in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    cytopenias due to ineffective hematopoiesis, genomic instability, and a predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The most commonly recurring...ineffective hematopoiesis, genomic instability, and a predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The most commonly recurring genomic alteration in MDS...focuses on the molecular, cellular, and genetic basis of hematologic malignancies, with a specific focus on Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and Acute

  3. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H.; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2014-01-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:25107891

  4. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H Joachim

    2014-12-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

  5. Regulation and Function of TIFAB in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome / Acute Myeloid Leukemia depend on autophagy-mediated lysosomal degradation of TRAF6 and repression of PSMA1. (2012) Blood... syndrome / Acute Myeloid Leukemia depend on autophagy-mediated lysosomal degradation of TRAF6 and repression of PSMA1. Blood. June 8, 2012 - Abstracts at...defined by blood cytopenias due to ineffective hematopoiesis, genomic instability, and a predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia

  6. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Innate Immunity Dysregulation in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    proteins linking innate and acquired 22 immunity. Nature immunology 2001; 2(8): 675-680. 23 24 57. Li J, Wang X, Zhang F, Yin H. Toll-like receptors...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0221 TITLE: Innate Immunity Dysregulation in...30 Sept 2013 – 29 Sept 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE “ Innate Immunity Dysregulation in Myelodysplastic Syndromes” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  8. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Vorinostat and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  11. Erythroleukemia shares biological features and outcome with myelodysplastic syndromes with excess blasts: a rationale for its inclusion into future classifications of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Xavier; Arenillas, Leonor; Luño, Elisa; Senent, Leonor; Arnan, Montserrat; Ramos, Fernando; Ardanaz, María Teresa; Pedro, Carme; Tormo, Mar; Montoro, Julia; Díez-Campelo, María; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Xicoy, Blanca; Bonanad, Santiago; Jerez, Andrés; Nomdedeu, Benet; Ferrer, Ana; Sanz, Guillermo F; Florensa, Lourdes

    2016-12-01

    Erythroleukemia was considered an acute myeloid leukemia in the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification and is defined by the presence of ≥50% bone marrow erythroblasts, having <20% bone marrow blasts from total nucleated cells but ≥20% bone marrow myeloblasts from nonerythroid cells. Erythroleukemia shares clinicopathologic features with myelodysplastic syndromes, especially with erythroid-predominant myelodysplastic syndromes (≥50% bone marrow erythroblasts). The upcoming WHO revision proposes to eliminate the nonerythroid blast cell count rule and to move erythroleukemia patients into the appropriate myelodysplastic syndrome category on the basis of the absolute blast cell count. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with de novo erythroleukemia and compared their clinico-biological features and outcome with those of de novo myelodysplastic syndromes, focusing on erythroid-predominant myelodysplastic syndromes. Median overall survival of 405 erythroid-predominant myelodysplastic syndromes without excess blasts was significantly longer than that observed in 57 erythroid-predominant refractory anemias with excess blasts-1 and in 59 erythroleukemias, but no significant difference was observed between erythroid-predominant refractory anemias with excess blasts-1 and erythroleukemias. In this subset of patients with ≥50% bone marrow erythroblasts and excess blasts, the presence of a high-risk karyotype defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System or by the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System was the main prognostic factor. In the same way, the survival of 459 refractory anemias with excess blasts-2, independently of having ≥20% bone marrow blasts from nonerythroid cells or not, was almost identical to the observed in 59 erythroleukemias. Interestingly, 11 low-blast count erythroleukemias with 5 to <10% bone marrow blasts from total nucleated cells showed similar survival than the rest of erythroleukemias. Our data

  12. Platelet peroxidase deficiency in a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Imbert, M; Jarry, M T; Tulliez, M; Breton-Gorius, J

    1983-01-01

    Morphological and functional abnormalities of the megakaryocytic series have been well described in myelodysplastic syndromes. Platelet peroxidase has always been demonstrated in abnormal megakaryocytes and early megakaryoblasts in such syndromes. We have studied a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with marked morphological abnormalities of megakaryocytes in which ultrastructural studies showed the coexistence of platelet peroxidase positive and platelet peroxidase negative megakaryocytes. This enzymatic deficiency was confirmed by the ultrastructural study of circulating platelets. This case appears to be the first report of a partial platelet peroxidase deficiency. It adds to the enzymatic abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndrome already described for the red cells and the granulocytic cells. Images PMID:6630573

  13. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D

    2016-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are hematologic diseases that frequently affect older adults. Treatment is challenging. Management of older adults with MDS and AML needs to be individualized, accounting for both the heterogeneity of disease biology and patient characteristics, which can influence life expectancy and treatment tolerance. Clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and physiologic changes of aging are needed to define optimal standards of care. This article highlights key evidence related to the management of older adults with MDS and AML and highlights future directions for research.

  14. Treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes: practical tools for effective management.

    PubMed

    Kurtin, Sandra E; Demakos, Erin P; Hayden, Janet; Boglione, Claudia

    2012-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of myeloid malignancies with variability in clinical presentation, disease trajectory, treatment goals, and expected outcomes. The treatment of patients with MDS, therefore, often differs from patient to patient. Tools are needed to aid effective communication with patients, their caregivers, and their dedicated team of healthcare professionals. The use of methods often employed in clinical trials can help healthcare providers diagnose and classify risk status, track trends within patient responses, manage adverse events, set treatment expectations, and provide ongoing supportive care. This article discusses several tools and strategies available for the management of patients with MDS throughout the continuum of their disease.

  15. Implementation of erythroid lineage analysis by flow cytometry in diagnostic models for myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Eline M.P.; Westers, Theresia M.; Alhan, Canan; Cali, Claudia; Visser-Wisselaar, Heleen A.; Chitu, Dana A.; van der Velden, Vincent H.J.; te Marvelde, Jeroen G.; Klein, Saskia K.; Muus, Petra; Vellenga, Edo; de Greef, Georgina E.; Legdeur, Marie-Cecile C.J.C.; Wijermans, Pierre W.; Stevens-Kroef, Marian J.P.L.; da Silva-Coelho, Pedro; Jansen, Joop H.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2017-01-01

    Flow cytometric analysis is a recommended tool in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes. Current flow cytometric approaches evaluate the (im)mature myelo-/monocytic lineage with a median sensitivity and specificity of ~71% and ~93%, respectively. We hypothesized that the addition of erythroid lineage analysis could increase the sensitivity of flow cytometry. Hereto, we validated the analysis of erythroid lineage parameters recommended by the International/European LeukemiaNet Working Group for Flow Cytometry in Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and incorporated this evaluation in currently applied flow cytometric models. One hundred and sixty-seven bone marrow aspirates were analyzed; 106 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, and 61 cytopenic controls. There was a strong correlation between presence of erythroid aberrancies assessed by flow cytometry and the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes when validating the previously described erythroid evaluation. Furthermore, addition of erythroid aberrancies to two different flow cytometric models led to an increased sensitivity in detecting myelodysplastic syndromes: from 74% to 86% for the addition to the diagnostic score designed by Ogata and colleagues, and from 69% to 80% for the addition to the integrated flow cytometric score for myelodysplastic syndromes, designed by our group. In both models the specificity was unaffected. The high sensitivity and specificity of flow cytometry in the detection of myelodysplastic syndromes illustrates the important value of flow cytometry in a standardized diagnostic approach. The trial is registered at www.trialregister.nl as NTR1825; EudraCT n.: 2008-002195-10 PMID:27658438

  16. Monocyte-Derived Macrophages Are Impaired in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background. The myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) comprises a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell diseases characterized by cytopenia, dysplasia in one or more of the major myeloid lineages, ineffective hematopoiesis, and increased risk of development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Macrophages are innate immune cells that ingest and degrade abnormal cells, debris, and foreign material and orchestrate inflammatory processes. We analyzed the role of macrophages from MDS patients in vitro. Methods. Macrophages were induced from peripheral blood of patients with MDS via granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Phagocytic capacity of macrophages was measured with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester and fluorescent microspheres. CD206 and signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα) on macrophages were detected by flow cytometry. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was measured by ELISA method. Results. Compared with normal control group, the number of monocytes increased in MDS patients. However, the monocytes showed impaired ability to induce macrophages and the number of macrophages induced from MDS samples was lower. Further, we demonstrated that the ex vivo phagocytic function of macrophages from MDS patients was impaired and levels of reorganization receptors CD206 and SIRPα were lower. Levels of iNOS secreted by macrophages in MDS were increased. Conclusions. Monocyte-derived macrophages are impaired in myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:28074192

  17. Beyond the Niche: Myelodysplastic Syndrome Topobiology in the Laboratory and in the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Figueroa, Eugenia; Gratzinger, Dita

    2016-01-01

    We review the murine and human microenvironment and hematopoietic stem cell niche in the context of intact bone marrow architecture in man and mouse, both in normal and in myelodysplastic syndrome marrow. We propose that the complexity of the hematopoietic stem cell niche can usefully be approached in the context of its topobiology, and we provide a model that incorporates in vitro and in vivo models as well as in situ findings from intact human marrow to explain the changes seen in myelodysplastic syndrome patients. We highlight the clinical application of the study of the bone marrow microenvironment and its topobiology in myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:27089321

  18. Beyond the Niche: Myelodysplastic Syndrome Topobiology in the Laboratory and in the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Flores-Figueroa, Eugenia; Gratzinger, Dita

    2016-04-13

    We review the murine and human microenvironment and hematopoietic stem cell niche in the context of intact bone marrow architecture in man and mouse, both in normal and in myelodysplastic syndrome marrow. We propose that the complexity of the hematopoietic stem cell niche can usefully be approached in the context of its topobiology, and we provide a model that incorporates in vitro and in vivo models as well as in situ findings from intact human marrow to explain the changes seen in myelodysplastic syndrome patients. We highlight the clinical application of the study of the bone marrow microenvironment and its topobiology in myelodysplastic syndromes.

  19. Clinical significance of previously cryptic copy number alterations and loss of heterozygosity in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome determined using combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Jin Ok; Seo, Eul Ju; Lee, Seong Wook; Suh, Jin Kyung; Im, Ho Joon; Seo, Jong Jin

    2014-07-01

    The combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray (CGH+SNP microarray) platform can simultaneously detect copy number alterations (CNA) and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Eighteen children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n=15) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n=3) were studied using CGH+SNP microarray to evaluate the clinical significance of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations. CGH+SNP microarray revealed CNAs at 14 regions in 9 patients, while metaphase cytogenetic (MC) analysis detected CNAs in 11 regions in 8 patients. Using CGH+SNP microarray, LOHs>10 Mb involving terminal regions or the whole chromosome were detected in 3 of 18 patients (17%). CGH+SNP microarray revealed cryptic LOHs with or without CNAs in 3 of 5 patients with normal karyotypes. CGH+SNP microarray detected additional cryptic CNAs (n=2) and LOHs (n=5) in 6 of 13 patients with abnormal MC. In total, 9 patients demonstrated additional aberrations, including CNAs (n=3) and/or LOHs (n=8). Three of 15 patients with AML and terminal LOH>10 Mb demonstrated a significantly inferior relapse-free survival rate (P=0.041). This study demonstrates that CGH+SNP microarray can simultaneously detect previously cryptic CNAs and LOH, which may demonstrate prognostic implications.

  20. Clinical management of myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm overlap syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Clara, Joseph A.; Sallman, David A.; Padron, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPNs) are a unique group of hematologic malignancies characterized by concomitant myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative features. According to the 2008 WHO classification, the category includes atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN-U), and the provisional entity refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis (RARS-T). Although diagnosis currently remains based on clinicopathologic features, the incorporation of next-generation platforms has allowed for the recent molecular characterization of these diseases which has revealed unique and complex mutational profiles that support their distinct biology and is anticipated to soon play an integral role in diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment. Future goals of research should include the development of disease-modifying therapies, and further genetic understanding of the category will likely form the foundation of these efforts. PMID:27807503

  1. Biclonal chromosomal aberrations in a child with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Z; Balogh, E; Kiss, C; Pajor, L; Oláh, E

    1999-01-01

    Hematological malignancies and premalignant diseases are generally of monoclonal origin. The prognostic and therapeutic significance of finding two genetically independent clones remains to be determined. We followed a case of childhood myelodysplastic syndrome showing biclonal chromosomal abnormalities (+8, -7) by conventional cytogenetic examination and double target fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). A 7-year-old girl presented with Plaut-Vincent angina and leukopenia. The cytogenetic aberration of +8 was the first sign to suggest MDS. Serial bone marrow controls, prompted by a progressive clinical course detected myelodysplastic changes and a new clonal aberration (-7). The presence of -7 and +8 in two independent clones was verified by double-target FISH. While at diagnosis and during cytokine treatment more cells showed +8, after successful all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) therapy, the clone with -7 predominated. Following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation the patient displayed donor-derived hematopoesis. Our data stress the significance of cytogenetic and FISH examinations in detecting specific genetic abnormalities and progressive clonal changes as an indicator and guideline for therapy. Different cell clones characterized by different genetic changes might be associated with different biologic features reflected in their response to treatment.

  2. 5'-Azacitidine for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes after non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Salaroli, Adriano; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Martelli, Maurizio; D'Elia, Gianna Maria; Nanni, Mauro; Mauro, Francesca Romana; Alimena, Giuliana

    2011-10-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes are possible complications in patients treated for previous hematologic malignancies. Therapeutic strategies in these type of disorders are still not well defined: azacitidine has been recently approved for the treatment of higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes, but few data are published relating possible efficacy in therapy-related dysplastic disorders. We reported here 4 patients treated with azacitidine for therapy related dysplasia after chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  3. An Analysis of microRNA Expression in the Myelodysplastic Syndromes Using Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Acute   Myeloid   Leukemia  and  the   Myelodysplastic   Syndromes .    Session  661.  Malignant  Stem  and  Progenitor... Myeloid   Leukemia   (AML)   and   the   Myelodysplastic   Syndromes  (MDS).  Session  9:   Leukemia .   3. American  Society...Therapeutic  Target  on  Disease   Stem   Cells   in

  4. Importance of Classical Morphology in the Diagnosis of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Invernizzi, Rosangela; Quaglia, Federica; Porta, Matteo Giovanni Della

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplastic, ineffective, clonal and neoplastic hematopoiesis. MDS represent a complex hematological problem: differences in disease presentation, progression and outcome have necessitated the use of classification systems to improve diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment selection. However, since a single biological or genetic reliable diagnostic marker has not yet been discovered for MDS, quantitative and qualitative dysplastic morphological alterations of bone marrow precursors and peripheral blood cells are still fundamental for diagnostic classification. In this paper, World Health Organization (WHO) classification refinements and current minimal diagnostic criteria proposed by expert panels are highlighted, and related problematic issues are discussed. The recommendations should facilitate diagnostic and prognostic evaluations in MDS and selection of patients for new effective targeted therapies. Although, in the future, morphology should be supplemented with new molecular techniques, the morphological approach, at least for the moment, is still the cornerstone for the diagnosis and classification of these disorders. PMID:25960863

  5. Importance of classical morphology in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Invernizzi, Rosangela; Quaglia, Federica; Porta, Matteo Giovanni Della

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplastic, ineffective, clonal and neoplastic hematopoiesis. MDS represent a complex hematological problem: differences in disease presentation, progression and outcome have necessitated the use of classification systems to improve diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment selection. However, since a single biological or genetic reliable diagnostic marker has not yet been discovered for MDS, quantitative and qualitative dysplastic morphological alterations of bone marrow precursors and peripheral blood cells are still fundamental for diagnostic classification. In this paper, World Health Organization (WHO) classification refinements and current minimal diagnostic criteria proposed by expert panels are highlighted, and related problematic issues are discussed. The recommendations should facilitate diagnostic and prognostic evaluations in MDS and selection of patients for new effective targeted therapies. Although, in the future, morphology should be supplemented with new molecular techniques, the morphological approach, at least for the moment, is still the cornerstone for the diagnosis and classification of these disorders.

  6. [Morphology: a critical phase in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Zini, Gina

    2014-03-01

    Diagnosis and classification of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are based on the integration of morphology, immunophenotype, histology, genetics and molecular analysis. The role of cytomorphology in this context, however, remains fundamental and preliminary to the application of the other methods. The first modern classification of MDS, originally published by the FAB (French-American-British) Group in 1985, was based on the recognition of five different diagnostic categories. The more recent 2008 WHO classification of hematopoietic neoplasms has widened and modified the FAB approach, by including seven different cytomorphological entities and decreasing the threshold of the blast cell percentage to 19% for the discrimination of MDS from acute myeloid leukemias. In addition, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is now included in the new group or MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms. Finally, precise quantitative and qualitative criteria are provided, with the aim to improve microscope method standardization.

  7. Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and autoimmune disorders (AD): cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Braun, Thorsten; Fenaux, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) are frequently associated with clinical manifestations of autoimmune disorders (AD) and inflammatory response of the immune system. AD accompanying MDS and CMML include vasculitis, seronegative polyarthritis and neutrophilic dermatosis. Rare AD including relapsing polychondritis is strongly associated with MDS as in a high proportion of those patients MDS is diagnosed during disease course. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are frequently found among MDS patients without clinical manifestation of AD. In a subset of patients, MDS and resulting cytopenias appear to be the consequence of auto reactive immunologic activity and may respond to immunosuppressive treatment (IST). Increased release of inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-(TNF)-α and interferon (IF)-γ triggers apoptosis of myeloid precursor cells leading to cytopenias. Impaired function of immune cells including cytotoxic, regulatory (Treg), helper (Th17) T cells and NK cells also appears to predict response to IST, outcome and occurrence of AD.

  8. [Molecular biology in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemias "smoldering"].

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Sartor, Chiara; Papayannidis, Cristina; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Paolini, Stefania; Clissa, Cristina; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Finelli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders of the myeloid lineage characterized by peripheral cytopenias and frequent leukemic evolution. MDS differ for clinical presentation, disease behavior and progression and this is the reflection of remarkable variability at molecular level. To this moment disease diagnosis is still dependent on bone marrow morphology that, although high concordance rates among experts are reported, remains subjective. Karyotype analysis is mandatory but diagnosis may be difficult in presence of normal karyotype or non-informative cytogenetics. Standardized molecular markers are needed to better define diagnosis, prediction of disease progression and prognosis. Furthermore, a molecular biology analysis could provide an important therapeutic tool towards tailored therapy and new insights in the disease's biology.

  9. Iron chelation therapy in myelodysplastic syndromes: where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Mhairi; Gore, Steven D; Zeidan, Amer M

    2014-01-01

    Anemia leading to transfusion dependency (TD) and iron overload (IO) is commonly observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In MDS, TD and IO have been retrospectively associated with inferior survival and worse clinical outcomes, including cardiac, hepatic and endocrine dysfunction, and, in some analyses, with leukemic progression and infectious complications. Although suggested by retrospective analyses, clear prospective documentation of the beneficial effects of iron chelation therapy (ICT) on organ function and survival in MDS patients with TD and IO is currently lacking. Consequently, the role of ICT in MDS patients with TD and IO remains a very controversial aspect in the management of MDS. In this review, the authors summarize the current knowledge regarding IO in MDS and the role of ICT. PMID:23991926

  10. Telomere dysfunction drives aberrant hematopoietic differentiation and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Colla, Simona; Ong, Derrick Sek Tong; Ogoti, Yamini; Marchesini, Matteo; Mistry, Nipun A; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Ang, Sonny A; Storti, Paola; Viale, Andrea; Giuliani, Nicola; Ruisaard, Kathryn; Ganan Gomez, Irene; Bristow, Christopher A; Estecio, Marcos; Weksberg, David C; Ho, Yan Wing; Hu, Baoli; Genovese, Giannicola; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Multani, Asha S; Jiang, Shan; Hua, Sujun; Ryan, Michael C; Carugo, Alessandro; Nezi, Luigi; Wei, Yue; Yang, Hui; D'Anca, Marianna; Zhang, Li; Gaddis, Sarah; Gong, Ting; Horner, James W; Heffernan, Timothy P; Jones, Philip; Cooper, Laurence J N; Liang, Han; Kantarjian, Hagop; Wang, Y Alan; Chin, Lynda; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; DePinho, Ronald A

    2015-05-11

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) risk correlates with advancing age, therapy-induced DNA damage, and/or shorter telomeres, but whether telomere erosion directly induces MDS is unknown. Here, we provide the genetic evidence that telomere dysfunction-induced DNA damage drives classical MDS phenotypes and alters common myeloid progenitor (CMP) differentiation by repressing the expression of mRNA splicing/processing genes, including SRSF2. RNA-seq analyses of telomere dysfunctional CMP identified aberrantly spliced transcripts linked to pathways relevant to MDS pathogenesis such as genome stability, DNA repair, chromatin remodeling, and histone modification, which are also enriched in mouse CMP haploinsufficient for SRSF2 and in CD34(+) CMML patient cells harboring SRSF2 mutation. Together, our studies establish an intimate link across telomere biology, aberrant RNA splicing, and myeloid progenitor differentiation.

  11. Myelodysplastic syndromes in Chernobyl clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Gluzman, Daniil F; Sklyarenko, Lilia M; Koval, Stella V; Rodionova, Nataliia K; Zavelevich, Michael P; Ivanivskaya, Tetiana S; Poludnenko, Liudmyla Yu; Ukrainskaya, Nataliia I

    2015-10-01

    The studies of the recent decades posed the question of the association between radiation exposure and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). This association has been proved in secondary MDS originating upon exposure to chemotherapeutics and/or radiation therapy. The long-term study in Japanese atomic (A)-bomb survivors demonstrated the significant linear dose-response for MDS confirming the link between radiation exposure and this form of hematopoietic malignancies. All these findings provide the strong basis for studying MDS in the persons exposed to radiation following the Chernobyl disaster, especially those in the cohort of Chernobyl clean-up workers of 1986-1987. The data on MDS among Chernobyl clean-up workers (1986-1987) diagnosed in 1996-2012 at the reference laboratory of RE Kavetsky Institute of Experimental Pathology, Oncology and Radiobiology are summarized. MDS cases were diagnosed in 23 persons (21 males and 2 females) having been exposed to radiation as clean-up workers of 1986-1987. Refractory anemia (RA) has been detected in 13, refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS)-in 2, and refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB)-in 8 patients. The median age of those MDS patients was 62.0 years. In addition, 5 cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) were recorded in the group of Chernobyl clean-up workers with the median time of 14.8 years from 1986-1987 to diagnosis. The association between radiation exposure and MDS is discussed. The suggested life-long risk for myelodysplastic syndromes among A-bomb survivors in Japan highlights the importance of the continuing follow-up studies in the affected populations in the post-Chernobyl period.

  12. Therapeutic approaches in myelofibrosis and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative overlap syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sochacki, Andrew L; Fischer, Melissa A; Savona, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of JAK2V617F a decade ago led to optimism for a rapidly developing treatment revolution in Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms. Unlike BCR–ABL, however, JAK2 was found to have a more heterogeneous role in carcinogenesis. Therefore, for years, development of new therapies was slow, despite standard treatment options that did not address the overwhelming symptom burden in patients with primary myelofibrosis (MF), post-essential thrombocythemia MF, post-polycythemia vera MF, and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) syndromes. JAK–STAT inhibitors have changed this, drastically ameliorating symptoms and ultimately beginning to show evidence of impact on survival. Now, the genetic foundations of myelofibrosis and MDS/MPN are rapidly being elucidated and contributing to targeted therapy development. This has been empowered through updated response criteria for MDS/MPN and refined prognostic scoring systems in these diseases. The aim of this article is to summarize concisely the current and rationally designed investigational therapeutics directed at JAK–STAT, hedgehog, PI3K–Akt, bone marrow fibrosis, telomerase, and rogue epigenetic signaling. The revolution in immunotherapy and novel treatments aimed at previously untargeted signaling pathways provides hope for considerable advancement in therapy options for those with chronic myeloid disease. PMID:27143923

  13. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of transfusional iron overload in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Emmanouil; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Karali, Vasiliki; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Sfikakis, Petros P.; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes represent a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic neoplasms derived from an abnormal multipotent progenitor cell, characterized by a hyperproliferative bone marrow, dysplasia of the cellular hemopoietic elements and ineffective erythropoiesis. Anemia is a common finding in myelodysplastic syndrome patients, and blood transfusions are the only therapeutic option in approximately 40% of cases. The most serious side effect of regular blood transfusion is iron overload. Currently, cardiovascular magnetic resonance using T2 is routinely used to identify patients with myocardial iron overload and to guide chelation therapy, tailored to prevent iron toxicity in the heart. This is a major validated non-invasive measure of myocardial iron overloading and is superior to surrogates such as serum ferritin, liver iron, ventricular ejection fraction and tissue Doppler parameters. The indication for iron chelation therapy in myelodysplastic syndrome patients is currently controversial. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance may offer an excellent non-invasive, diagnostic tool for iron overload assessment in myelodysplastic syndromes. Further studies are needed to establish the precise indications of chelation therapy and the clinical implications of this treatment on survival in myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:26190429

  14. The biology of myelodysplastic syndromes: unity despite heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Azra; Cruz, Raymond; Latif, Tahir; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Galili, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) traditionally have been grouped together as a disease entity based on clinical phenomena seen in association. Despite the similarities, there is great heterogeneity among the syndromes. Recent insights have shown, however, that there exists a biologically cohesive theme that unifies and thereby validates the conceptual interconnectedness. The first suggestion that such a relationship existed where biology could directly explain the observed cytopenias was the finding of excessive premature apoptosis of hematopoietic cells in MDS marrows. This apoptosis was mediated by paracrine as well as autocrine factors implicating both the seed and the soil in the pathology of the disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines in the marrow microenvironment were mainly the paracrine mediators of apoptosis, but how the clonal cells committed suicide because of autocrine stimulation had remained a mystery for more than a decade. It has been shown now that deregulation of ribosome biogenesis can initiate a stress response in the cell through the p53 signaling pathway. Congenital anemias had been associated with mutations in ribosomal protein genes. The surprise came with the investigation of 5q- syndrome patients where haplo-insufficiency of the ribosomal protein gene RPS14 was found to be the cause of this MDS subtype. Similar ribosomal deregulation was shown to be present in all varieties of MDS patients, serving as another unifying characteristic. In addition to these findings, there are other DNA-related abnormalities such as uniparental disomy, mutations in the TET2 gene, and epigenetic phenomena that are associated with and occur across all types of MDS. This paper summarizes the themes unifying this heterogeneous group of diseases. PMID:22184517

  15. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. Beyond hypomethylating agents failure in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Amer M.; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Komrokji, Rami S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Although hypomethylating agents (HMAs) significantly improve outcomes in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), only half the patients achieve objective responses, and most responders lose response within 1–2 years. Azacitidine prolongs survival by a median of only 9.5 months. Failure of HMA therapy is associated with a very dismal prognosis. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches are clearly needed. Recent findings The sequential use of the alternative HMA after failure of first line HMA is associated with modest efficacy. The improved understanding of the biologic underpinnings of the disease have opened the door to study investigational agents that target disrupted molecular pathways critical to the pathogenesis of MDS. Combination treatment strategies using an azacitidine backbone are demonstrating promising early results. Expanding the applicability of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), the only curative modality, by reducing toxicity and relapse rates is another area of active research. Summary Sequential switching to the alternative HMA, clinical trials of novel targeted therapies, azacitidine-based combination therapeutic strategies, and improvements in the alloSCT platform are the main directions in improving outcomes of MDS post HMA failure. PMID:24335709

  18. The myelodysplastic syndrome as a prototypical epigenetic disease.

    PubMed

    Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2013-05-09

    The myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal disorder characterized by increased stem cell proliferation coupled with aberrant differentiation resulting in a high rate of apoptosis and eventual symptoms related to bone marrow failure. Cellular differentiation is an epigenetic process that requires specific and highly ordered DNA methylation and histone modification programs. Aberrant differentiation in MDS can often be traced to abnormal DNA methylation (both gains and losses of DNA methylation genome wide and at specific loci) as well as mutations in genes that regulate epigenetic programs (TET2 and DNMT3a, both involved in DNA methylation control; EZH2 and ASXL1, both involved in histone methylation control). The epigenetic nature of MDS may explain in part the serendipitous observation that it is the disease most responsive to DNA methylation inhibitors; other epigenetic-acting drugs are being explored in MDS as well. Progression in MDS is characterized by further acquisition of epigenetic defects as well as mutations in growth-controlling genes that seem to tip the proliferation/apoptosis balance and result in the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. Although MDS is clinically and physiologically heterogeneous, a case can be made that subsets of the disease can be largely explained by disordered stem cell epigenetics.

  19. Diagnostic flow cytometry for low-grade myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kiyoyuki

    2008-12-01

    It has long been considered that flow cytometry (FCM) has little role in clinical practice in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, recent advances in the analytical method and knowledge of MDS FCM are changing this stereotype. This paper reviews the concept and current status of FCM in the diagnosis of low-grade MDS. The diagnosis of low-grade MDS in the absence of ringed sideroblasts and chromosomal aberration is not always straightforward, and a report from a recent international working conference has proposed FCM as an adjunctive diagnostic test for such cases. Currently, only a limited number of laboratories are applying FCM to the diagnosis of MDS. Furthermore, standard analytical methods in FCM for MDS have not been established, and no single FCM parameter is sufficiently sensitive and specific to make the diagnosis of MDS. To establish MDS FCM as a widely accepted, dependable diagnostic tool, prospective studies should increase flow parameters that can be analysed reproducibly and determine their sensitivity and specificity, either alone or in combination. CD34+ cell-related parameters that are applicable for diagnosing low-grade MDS in many laboratories are introduced here.

  20. Methylation inhibitor therapy in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Lewis R; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2005-12-01

    The class of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors is represented by azacitidine and decitabine. Azacitidine is approved for the treatment of patients in both low- and high-risk subtypes of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and decitabine is currently under review by the FDA. Azacitidine phase III trial data, based upon the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) study 9221, showed durable clinical and symptomatic improvement in bone marrow function, a reduction in the risk of leukemic transformation, and significant improvements in the quality of life of patients treated with azacitidine compared with supportive care alone. This study also provided data suggestive of improvement in survival in MDS patients. The experience with decitabine comprises a number of phase I/II studies and a phase III trial yet to be published. While there is a strong base of experience supporting the efficacy of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors in the treatment of MDS, a number of practical issues need to be explored further. These include the optimization of the timing and duration of treatment, and the prediction of response to therapy. Along with current experience, future studies will lead to the development of treatment algorithms, strategies for selecting patients (e.g. according to age, risk, classification, and cytogenetic profile), and the combination strategies, particularly with histone deacetylase inhibitors, in the management of MDS.

  1. Costs and quality of life in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lucioni, Carlo; Finelli, Carlo; Mazzi, Silvio; Oliva, Esther N

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) encompass a range of myeloid neoplasms characterised by a defect in haematopoietic stem cell maturation, resulting in peripheral cytopenias. As a major consequence, most MDS patients become anaemic, so as to require red blood cell transfusions. To investigate the costs and the impact on quality of life (QOL) of MDS-separately in transfusion-independent (TI) and -dependent (TD) patients-a literature search was conducted. From Medline and Embase, 742 studies were identified, of which 17 were considered eligible. Total medical costs per patient/year range from $ 9,840 to $ 19,811 for the TI condition and from $ 29,608 to $ 51,066 in the TD condition, more than doubling when moving from the former condition to the latter. With regard to QOL, in the transition from TI to TD, QOL could be reduced by half depending on the studies. The TD condition negatively impacts on costs and the QOL of patients with MDS. Therapeutic strategies that reduce transfusion dependence may lead to broad benefits for patients and the community. PMID:23997987

  2. Efficacy and safety of deferasirox in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2013-07-01

    Transfusion dependence in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients may lead to organ damage due to accumulation of non-transferrin-bound iron with consequent increased oxidative stress. Iron chelation has been reported in retrospective studies to improve overall survival in low-risk MDS patients, but this information needs to be validated in prospective trials. The oral iron chelator, deferasirox, has been shown to reduce serum ferritin levels in chelation naïve and pre-treated patients and to reduce labile plasma iron, independently from the efficacy on iron overload. Deferasirox is a potent NF-kB inhibitor, tested in vivo and on acute myeloid leukemia and MDS cell lines, and this effect may explain in part the phenomenon of hematological improvements reported in case reports and in different clinical trials. The drug has an acceptable safety profile, with the most common side effects reported being non-progressive change in serum creatinine level, gastrointestinal disturbances, and skin rash. In this review, we report the results of different studies testing safety and efficacy of deferasirox in MDS patients, side effects associated with the drug, and suggested management of iron overload.

  3. Diagnostic Utility of Flow Cytometry in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Della Porta, Matteo G.; Picone, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The pathological hallmark of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is marrow dysplasia, which represents the basis of the WHO classification of these disorders. This classification provides clinicians with a useful tool for defining the different subtypes of MDS and individual prognosis. The WHO proposal has raised some concern regarding minimal diagnostic criteria particularly in patients with normal karyotype without robust morphological markers of dysplasia (such as ring sideroblasts or excess of blasts). Therefore, there is clearly need to refine the accuracy to detect marrow dysplasia. Flow cytometry (FCM) immunophenotyping has been proposed as a tool to improve the evaluation of marrow dysplasia. The rationale for the application of FCM in the diagnostic work up of MDS is that immunophenotyping is an accurate method for quantitative and qualitative evaluation of hematopoietic cells and that MDS have been found to have abnormal expression of several cellular antigens. To become applicable in clinical practice, FCM analysis should be based on parameters with sufficient specificity and sensitivity, data should be reproducible between different operators, and the results should be easily understood by clinicians. In this review, we discuss the most relevant progresses in detection of marrow dysplasia by FCM in MDS PMID:28293405

  4. Strategies for achieving transfusion independence in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mary Laudon

    2007-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of complex diseases of the myeloid stem cell that result in chronic cytopenias. In some instances, these disorders may progress to acute myeloid leukemia. Patients with MDS frequently experience chronic, symptomatic anemia, and many become dependent on chronic transfusions of packed red blood cells. However, long-term transfusion dependence has clinical and economic consequences, including a potentially negative impact on patients' quality of life (QOL). Recently, studies have investigated various strategies to reduce or eliminate transfusion needs in MDS patients. Supportive measures with hematopoietic growth factors such as erythropoietin are often less effective in MDS-associated anemia than in anemia from other causes, but some patients may benefit from this approach. Treatment with other agents, such as antithymocyte globulin, azacitidine, decitabine, thalidomide, and lenalidomide, has resulted in transfusion independence in some subsets of MDS patients. Nurses who care for patients with MDS should be aware of the impact of transfusion dependence on the patient's QOL, as well as the benefits and risks of the various other treatment options available to these patients. Such knowledge will enable the nurse to provide accurate, relevant information, so that patients can make informed choices regarding treatment options for MDS.

  5. Epidemiology and risk factors for infections in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, L R; Sekeres, M A; Shrestha, N K; Maciejewski, J P; Tiu, R V; Butler, R; Mossad, S B

    2013-12-01

    We conducted a case-control study to describe the epidemiology and risk factors for infections requiring hospitalization in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Of 497 patients identified, 103 patients developed 201 episodes of infection. The probability of acquiring an infection 1 year from date of MDS diagnosis was 15% (95% confidence interval [CI] 12-18%). Patients developing infections had decreased survival compared to those who did not (P = 0.007). Significant risk factors for infection were higher risk MDS (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.7-4.1, P < 0.0001), nadir absolute neutrophil count <500/mL (HR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.7, P < 0.007), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.4-4.9, P < 0.003), history of other malignancy (HR 2.0, 95% CI = 1.3-3.1, P < 0.003), and autoimmune disease (HR 2.9, 95% CI = 1.4-6.0, P < 0.005). Age, nadir platelet count <20,000/mL, diabetes mellitus, and MDS treatment were not significant risk factors. Pneumonia was the most common infection, and bacteria the predominant pathogens.

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes in older adults.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Rao, Arati V; Pardee, Timothy S

    2014-08-20

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases.

  7. Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Rao, Arati V.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases. PMID:25071138

  8. Clinical and biological implications of driver mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gerstung, Moritz; Malcovati, Luca; Tauro, Sudhir; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Yoon, Chris J.; Ellis, Peter; Wedge, David C.; Pellagatti, Andrea; Shlien, Adam; Groves, Michael John; Forbes, Simon A.; Raine, Keiran; Hinton, Jon; Mudie, Laura J.; McLaren, Stuart; Hardy, Claire; Latimer, Calli; Della Porta, Matteo G.; O’Meara, Sarah; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Galli, Anna; Butler, Adam P.; Walldin, Gunilla; Teague, Jon W.; Quek, Lynn; Sternberg, Alex; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Cross, Nicholas C. P.; Green, Anthony R.; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Vyas, Paresh; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Bowen, David; Cazzola, Mario; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of chronic hematological malignancies characterized by dysplasia, ineffective hematopoiesis and a variable risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Sequencing of MDS genomes has identified mutations in genes implicated in RNA splicing, DNA modification, chromatin regulation, and cell signaling. We sequenced 111 genes across 738 patients with MDS or closely related neoplasms (including chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and MDS–myeloproliferative neoplasms) to explore the role of acquired mutations in MDS biology and clinical phenotype. Seventy-eight percent of patients had 1 or more oncogenic mutations. We identify complex patterns of pairwise association between genes, indicative of epistatic interactions involving components of the spliceosome machinery and epigenetic modifiers. Coupled with inferences on subclonal mutations, these data suggest a hypothesis of genetic “predestination,” in which early driver mutations, typically affecting genes involved in RNA splicing, dictate future trajectories of disease evolution with distinct clinical phenotypes. Driver mutations had equivalent prognostic significance, whether clonal or subclonal, and leukemia-free survival deteriorated steadily as numbers of driver mutations increased. Thus, analysis of oncogenic mutations in large, well-characterized cohorts of patients illustrates the interconnections between the cancer genome and disease biology, with considerable potential for clinical application. PMID:24030381

  9. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss as an initial presentation of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jung; Yoon, Yong Joo

    2012-01-01

    This study reports an unusual case in which myelodysplastic syndrome presented bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss as the first symptom of the disease. The aural symptoms and signs such as tinnitus, dizziness, and hearing impairment of a hematologic disease are common. However, sudden hearing loss as the first manifestation of a hematologic disease is extremely rare. A 76-year-old woman presented with bilateral sudden hearing loss. The patient was found to have myelodysplastic syndrome during a workup for her hearing loss. Unfortunately, the patient's hearing loss did not improve after the medical treatment.

  11. Anemia as the Main Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a constellation of different diseases sharing anemia in the great majority of cases, and this cytopenia defines these pathologies and their most dramatic clinical manifestations. Anemia in MDS is due to ineffective erythropoiesis, with a high degree of apoptosis of marrow erythroid progenitors. These progenitors show distinctive dysplastic features that consent diagnosis, and are recognizable and differentiated, although not easily, from other morphologic alterations present in other types of anemia. Reaching the diagnosis of MDS in a macrocytic anemia and alleviating the symptoms of anemia are therefore an essential objective of the treating physician. In this work, the signs and symptoms of anemia in MDS, as well as its peculiar pathophysiology, are discussed. Erythopoietic stimulating agents (ESAs) are providing the best treatment for anemic MDS patients, but their use is still not approved by health agencies. While still waiting for this waiver, their clinical use is widespread and their effectivness is well known, as well as the dismal prognosis of patients who do not respond to ESAs and require transfusions. MDS with del5q constitute a unique model of anemia whose complex pathophysiology has been clarified at least partially, defining its link to ribosomal alterations likewise what observed in hereditary anemias like Blackfan Diamond anemia. Lenalidomide is the agent that has shown striking and specific erythropoietic activity in del5q MDS, and the basis of this response is starting to be understood. Several new agents are under evaluation for ESA refractory/relapsed MDS patients, targeting different putative mechanisms of ineffective erythropoiesis, and are here reviewed.

  12. Stem and progenitor cell alterations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Aditi; Will, Britta; Steidl, Ulrich; Verma, Amit

    2017-03-23

    Recent studies have demonstrated that myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) arise from a small population of disease-initiating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that persist and expand through conventional therapies and are major contributors to disease progression and relapse. MDS stem and progenitor cells are characterized by key founder and driver mutations and are enriched for cytogenetic alterations. Quantitative alterations in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) numbers are also seen in a stage-specific manner in human MDS samples as well as in murine models of the disease. Overexpression of several markers such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP), CD99, T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3, and CD123 have begun to differentiate MDS HSPCs from healthy counterparts. Overactivation of innate immune components such as Toll-like receptors, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase/tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-6, IL8/CXCR2, and IL1RAP signaling pathways has been demonstrated in MDS HSPCs and is being targeted therapeutically in preclinical and early clinical studies. Other dysregulated pathways such as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulinlike and EGF-like domains 1/angiopoietin-1, p21-activated kinase, microRNA 21, and transforming growth factor β are also being explored as therapeutic targets against MDS HSPCs. Taken together, these studies have demonstrated that MDS stem cells are functionally critical for the initiation, transformation, and relapse of disease and need to be targeted therapeutically for future curative strategies in MDSs.

  13. Pleural effusions in patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Saadia A; Bashoura, Lara; Lei, Xiudong; Sampat, Keeran R; Brown, Tiffany C; Eapen, George A; Morice, Rodolfo C; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jimenez, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Pleural effusions are rarely observed in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Therefore the underlying etiology of pleural effusions and the efficacy and safety of pleural procedures in this population has not been well studied. In a retrospective review of cases from 1997 to 2007, we identified 111 patients with acute leukemia or MDS/MPN who underwent pleural procedures. Clinical characteristics were reviewed, and survival outcomes were estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 270 pleural procedures were performed in 111 patients (69 AML, 27 ALL, 15 MDS/MPN). The main indications for pleural procedures were possible infection (49%) and respiratory symptoms (48%), and concomitant clinical symptoms included fever (34%), dyspnea (74%), chest pain (24%) and cough (37%). Most patients had active disease (61%). The most frequent etiology of pleural effusions was infection (47%), followed by malignancy (36%). Severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 20 × 10(3)/µL) was present in 43% of the procedures, yet the procedural complication rate was only 1.9%. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age, AML, MDS/MPN and active disease status were associated with a shorter median overall survival. Infection and malignant involvement are the most common causes of pleural effusion in patients with acute leukemia or MDS. After optimizing platelet count and coagulopathy, thoracentesis may be performed safely and with high diagnostic yield in this population. Survival in these patients is determined by the response to treatment of the hematologic malignancy.

  14. Familial Aggregation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Goldin, Lynn R.; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Liang, Xueying Sharon; Derolf, Åsa R.; Landgren, Ola; Björkholm, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Apart from rare pedigrees with multiple cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there is limited data on familial aggregation of AML and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) in the population. Patients and Methods Swedish population-based registry data were used to evaluate risk of AML, MDS, and other malignancies among 24,573 first-degree relatives of 6,962 patients with AML and 1,388 patients with MDS compared with 106,224 first-degree relatives of matched controls. We used a marginal survival model to calculate familial aggregation. Results AML and/or MDS did not aggregate significantly in relatives of patients with AML. There was a modest risk ratio (RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.9 to 1.8) in myeloproliferative/myeloid malignancies combined. The risks for any hematologic or any solid tumor were modestly but significantly increased. Relatives of patients with MDS did not show an increased risk for any hematologic tumors. In contrast, we found a significantly increased risk (RR, 6.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 38.0) of AML/MDS and of all myeloid malignancies combined (RR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.0 to 9.8) among relatives of patients diagnosed at younger than age 21 years. Conclusion We did not find evidence for familial aggregation of the severe end of the spectrum of myeloid malignancies (AML and MDS). The risks of myeloproliferative neoplasms were modestly increased with trends toward significance, suggesting a possible role of inheritance. In contrast, although limited in sample size, relatives of young patients with AML were at increased risk of AML/MDS, suggesting that germline genes may play a stronger role in these patients. The increased risk of all hematologic malignancies and of solid tumors among relatives of patients with AML suggests that genes for malignancy in general and/or other environmental factors may be shared. PMID:22162584

  15. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  16. Excessive naked megakaryocyte nuclei in myelodysplastic syndrome mimicking idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a complicated pre- and post-transplantation course.

    PubMed

    Olcay, Lale; Tuncer, A Murat; Okur, Hamza; Erdemli, Esra; Uysal, Zumrut; Cetin, Mualla; Duru, Feride; Cetinkaya, Duygu Uckan

    2009-09-01

    A boy 3 years 7 months old with thrombocytopenia and history of intracranial hemorrhage who underwent bone marrow transplantation is presented. He was refractory to steroids, immunoglobulin G, vincristine, azathioprine, cyclosporine A, interleukin-11, chemotherapy, and splenectomy. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was excluded by light /electron microscopic and flow cytometric findings; the diagnosis of refractory cytopenia, a subgroup of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, was made. Naked megakaryocyte nuclei were 55.38 +/- 28.2% vs. 31.67 +/- 23.22% of all megakaryocytes in the patient and the control group of 9 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, respectively (p = .016). The posttransplatation course was complicated by delayed platelet engraftment, bronchiolitis obliterans associated with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, which resolved completely.

  17. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. HIGH-RESOLUTION GENOMIC ARRAYS FACILITATE DETECTION OF NOVEL CRYPTIC CHROMOSOMAL LESIONS IN MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, Christine L.; Tiu, Ramon; Gondek, Lukasz P.; Powers, Jennifer; Theil, Karl S.; Kalaycio, Matt; Lichtin, Alan; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Unbalanced chromosomal aberrations are common in myelodysplastic syndromes, and have prognostic implications. An increased frequency of cytogenetic changes may reflect an inherent chromosomal instability due to failure of DNA repair. Therefore, it is likely that chromosomal defects in myelodysplastic syndromes may be more frequent than predicted by metaphase cytogenetics and new cryptic lesions may be revealed by precise analysis methods. Methods We used a novel high-resolution karyotyping technique, array-based comparative genomic hybridization, to investigate the frequency of cryptic chromosomal lesions in a cohort of 38 well-characterized myelodysplastic syndromes patients; results were confirmed by microsatellite quantitative PCR or single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Results As compared to metaphase karyotyping, chromosomal abnormalities detected by array-based analysis were encountered more frequently and in a higher proportion of patients. For example, chromosomal defects were found in patients with a normal karyotype by traditional cytogenetics. In addition to verifying common abnormalities, previously cryptic defects were found in new regions of the genome. Cryptic changes often overlapped chromosomes and regions frequently identified as abnormal by metaphase cytogenetics. Conclusion The results underscore the instability of the myelodysplastic syndromes genome and highlight the utility of array-based karyotyping to study cryptic chromosomal changes which may provide new diagnostic information. PMID:17258073

  19. First report of sepsis caused by Rhodococcus corynebacterioides in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yuka; Sawabe, Etsuko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Tojo, Naoko; Tohda, Shuji

    2012-03-01

    We report a case of sepsis caused by Rhodococcus corynebacterioides, identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, in a myelodysplastic syndrome patient who had undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This is the first report of R. corynebacterioides infection in a human.

  20. First Report of Sepsis Caused by Rhodococcus corynebacterioides in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Yuka; Sawabe, Etsuko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Tojo, Naoko

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of sepsis caused by Rhodococcus corynebacterioides, identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, in a myelodysplastic syndrome patient who had undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This is the first report of R. corynebacterioides infection in a human. PMID:22205796

  1. Immunophenotypic analysis of erythroid dysplasia in myelodysplastic syndromes. A report from the IMDSFlow working group.

    PubMed

    Westers, Theresia M; Cremers, Eline M P; Oelschlaegel, Uta; Johansson, Ulrika; Bettelheim, Peter; Matarraz, Sergio; Orfao, Alberto; Moshaver, Bijan; Brodersen, Lisa Eidenschink; Loken, Michael R; Wells, Denise A; Subirá, Dolores; Cullen, Matthew; Te Marvelde, Jeroen G; van der Velden, Vincent H J; Preijers, Frank W M B; Chu, Sung-Chao; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle; Psarra, Katherina; Porwit, Anna; Saft, Leonie; Ireland, Robin; Milne, Timothy; Béné, Marie C; Witte, Birgit I; Della Porta, Matteo G; Kern, Wolfgang; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A

    2017-02-01

    Current recommendations for diagnosing myelodysplastic syndromes endorse flow cytometry as an informative tool. Most flow cytometry protocols focus on the analysis of progenitor cells and the evaluation of the maturing myelomonocytic lineage. However, one of the most frequently observed features of myelodysplastic syndromes is anemia, which may be associated with dyserythropoiesis. Therefore, analysis of changes in flow cytometry features of nucleated erythroid cells may complement current flow cytometry tools. The multicenter study within the IMDSFlow Working Group, reported herein, focused on defining flow cytometry parameters that enable discrimination of dyserythropoiesis associated with myelodysplastic syndromes from non-clonal cytopenias. Data from a learning cohort were compared between myelodysplasia and controls, and results were validated in a separate cohort. The learning cohort comprised 245 myelodysplasia cases, 290 pathological, and 142 normal controls; the validation cohort comprised 129 myelodysplasia cases, 153 pathological, and 49 normal controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis performed in the learning cohort revealed that analysis of expression of CD36 and CD71 (expressed as coefficient of variation), in combination with CD71 fluorescence intensity and the percentage of CD117(+) erythroid progenitors provided the best discrimination between myelodysplastic syndromes and non-clonal cytopenias (specificity 90%; 95% confidence interval: 84-94%). The high specificity of this marker set was confirmed in the validation cohort (92%; 95% confidence interval: 86-97%). This erythroid flow cytometry marker combination may improve the evaluation of cytopenic cases with suspected myelodysplasia, particularly when combined with flow cytometry assessment of the myelomonocytic lineage.

  2. Immunophenotypic analysis of erythroid dysplasia in myelodysplastic syndromes. A report from the IMDSFlow working group

    PubMed Central

    Westers, Theresia M.; Cremers, Eline M.P.; Oelschlaegel, Uta; Johansson, Ulrika; Bettelheim, Peter; Matarraz, Sergio; Orfao, Alberto; Moshaver, Bijan; Brodersen, Lisa Eidenschink; Loken, Michael R.; Wells, Denise A.; Subirá, Dolores; Cullen, Matthew; te Marvelde, Jeroen G.; van der Velden, Vincent H.J.; Preijers, Frank W.M.B.; Chu, Sung-Chao; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle; Psarra, Katherina; Porwit, Anna; Saft, Leonie; Ireland, Robin; Milne, Timothy; Béné, Marie C.; Witte, Birgit I.; Della Porta, Matteo G.; Kern, Wolfgang; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2017-01-01

    Current recommendations for diagnosing myelodysplastic syndromes endorse flow cytometry as an informative tool. Most flow cytometry protocols focus on the analysis of progenitor cells and the evaluation of the maturing myelomonocytic lineage. However, one of the most frequently observed features of myelodysplastic syndromes is anemia, which may be associated with dyserythropoiesis. Therefore, analysis of changes in flow cytometry features of nucleated erythroid cells may complement current flow cytometry tools. The multicenter study within the IMDSFlow Working Group, reported herein, focused on defining flow cytometry parameters that enable discrimination of dyserythropoiesis associated with myelodysplastic syndromes from non-clonal cytopenias. Data from a learning cohort were compared between myelodysplasia and controls, and results were validated in a separate cohort. The learning cohort comprised 245 myelodysplasia cases, 290 pathological, and 142 normal controls; the validation cohort comprised 129 myelodysplasia cases, 153 pathological, and 49 normal controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis performed in the learning cohort revealed that analysis of expression of CD36 and CD71 (expressed as coefficient of variation), in combination with CD71 fluorescence intensity and the percentage of CD117+ erythroid progenitors provided the best discrimination between myelodysplastic syndromes and non-clonal cytopenias (specificity 90%; 95% confidence interval: 84–94%). The high specificity of this marker set was confirmed in the validation cohort (92%; 95% confidence interval: 86–97%). This erythroid flow cytometry marker combination may improve the evaluation of cytopenic cases with suspected myelodysplasia, particularly when combined with flow cytometry assessment of the myelomonocytic lineage. PMID:27758818

  3. Fatal bacteremia by neisseria cinerea in a woman with myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaofei; Li, Min; Cao, Huiling; Yang, Xuewen

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea has been rarely found in blood cultures. In this study, we are reporting a case of a Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) patient in whose blood Neisseria cinerea was found and led a fatal consequence. This case will call our attentions to the uncommon pathogens in the pathogenicity of end-stage patients. PMID:26131259

  4. Fatal bacteremia by neisseria cinerea in a woman with myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofei; Li, Min; Cao, Huiling; Yang, Xuewen

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea has been rarely found in blood cultures. In this study, we are reporting a case of a Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) patient in whose blood Neisseria cinerea was found and led a fatal consequence. This case will call our attentions to the uncommon pathogens in the pathogenicity of end-stage patients.

  5. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  7. Prevalence, clinical characteristics, and prognosis of GATA2-related myelodysplastic syndromes in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wlodarski, Marcin W; Hirabayashi, Shinsuke; Pastor, Victor; Starý, Jan; Hasle, Henrik; Masetti, Riccardo; Dworzak, Michael; Schmugge, Markus; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; Ussowicz, Marek; De Moerloose, Barbara; Catala, Albert; Smith, Owen P; Sedlacek, Petr; Lankester, Arjan C; Zecca, Marco; Bordon, Victoria; Matthes-Martin, Susanne; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Kühl, Jörn Sven; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Albert, Michael H; Przychodzien, Bartlomiej; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Schwarz, Stephan; Göhring, Gudrun; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Cseh, Annámaria; Noellke, Peter; Yoshimi, Ayami; Locatelli, Franco; Baumann, Irith; Strahm, Brigitte; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2016-03-17

    Germline GATA2 mutations cause cellular deficiencies with high propensity for myeloid disease. We investigated 426 children and adolescents with primary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 82 cases with secondary MDS enrolled in 2 consecutive prospective studies of the European Working Group of MDS in Childhood (EWOG-MDS) conducted in Germany over a period of 15 years. Germline GATA2 mutations accounted for 15% of advanced and 7% of all primary MDS cases, but were absent in children with MDS secondary to therapy or acquired aplastic anemia. Mutation carriers were older at diagnosis and more likely to present with monosomy 7 and advanced disease compared with wild-type cases. For stratified analysis according to karyotype, 108 additional primary MDS patients registered with EWOG-MDS were studied. Overall, we identified 57 MDS patients with germline GATA2 mutations. GATA2 mutations were highly prevalent among patients with monosomy 7 (37%, all ages) reaching its peak in adolescence (72% of adolescents with monosomy 7). Unexpectedly, monocytosis was more frequent in GATA2-mutated patients. However, when adjusted for the selection bias from monosomy 7, mutational status had no effect on the hematologic phenotype. Finally, overall survival and outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) were not influenced by mutational status. This study identifies GATA2 mutations as the most common germline defect predisposing to pediatric MDS with a very high prevalence in adolescents with monosomy 7. GATA2 mutations do not confer poor prognosis in childhood MDS. However, the high risk for progression to advanced disease must guide decision-making toward timely HSCT.

  8. Targeted re-sequencing analysis of 25 genes commonly mutated in myeloid disorders in del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Mercado, Marta; Burns, Adam; Pellagatti, Andrea; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Germing, Ulrich; Agirre, Xabier; Prosper, Felipe; Aul, Carlo; Killick, Sally; Wainscoat, James S.; Schuh, Anna; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of chromosome 5q is the most common chromosomal abnormality in myelodysplastic syndromes. The catalogue of genes involved in the molecular pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes is rapidly expanding and next-generation sequencing technology allows detection of these mutations at great depth. Here we describe the design, validation and application of a targeted next-generation sequencing approach to simultaneously screen 25 genes mutated in myeloid malignancies. We used this method alongside single nucleotide polymorphism-array technology to characterize the mutational and cytogenetic profile of 43 cases of early or advanced del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. A total of 29 mutations were detected in our cohort. Overall, 45% of early and 66.7% of advanced cases had at least one mutation. Genes with the highest mutation frequency among advanced cases were TP53 and ASXL1 (25% of patients each). These showed a lower mutation frequency in cases of 5q- syndrome (4.5% and 13.6%, respectively), suggesting a role in disease progression in del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. Fifty-two percent of mutations identified were in genes involved in epigenetic regulation (ASXL1, TET2, DNMT3A and JAK2). Six mutations had allele frequencies <20%, likely below the detection limit of traditional sequencing methods. Genomic array data showed that cases of advanced del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome had a complex background of cytogenetic aberrations, often encompassing genes involved in myeloid disorders. Our study is the first to investigate the molecular pathogenesis of early and advanced del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes using next-generation sequencing technology on a large panel of genes frequently mutated in myeloid malignancies, further illuminating the molecular landscape of del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:23831921

  9. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 criteria for myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Senent, Leonor; Arenillas, Leonor; Luño, Elisa; Ruiz, Juan C; Sanz, Guillermo; Florensa, Lourdes

    2013-04-01

    The reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 classification for myelodysplastic syndromes is uncertain and its assessment was the major aim of this study. The different peripheral blood and bone marrow variables required for an adequate morphological classification were blindly evaluated by four cytomorphologists in samples from 50 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. The degree of agreement among observers was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient and the generalized kappa statistic for multiple raters. The degree of agreement for the percentages of blasts in bone marrow and peripheral blood, ring sideroblasts in bone marrow, and erythroid, granulocytic and megakaryocytic dysplastic cells was strong (P<0.001 in all instances). After stratifying the percentages according to the categories required for the assignment of World Health Organization subtypes, the degree of agreement was not statistically significant for cases with 5-9% blasts in bone marrow (P=0.07), 0.1-1% blasts in peripheral blood (P=0.47), or percentage of erythroid dysplastic cells (P=0.49). Finally, the interobserver concordance for World Health Organization-defined subtypes showed a moderate overall agreement (P<0.001), the reproducibility being lower for cases with refractory anemia with excess of blasts type 1 (P=0.05) and refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (P=0.09). In conclusion, the reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 classification for myelodysplastic syndromes is acceptable but the defining criteria for blast cells and features of erythroid dysplasia need to be refined.

  11. Reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 criteria for myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Senent, Leonor; Arenillas, Leonor; Luño, Elisa; Ruiz, Juan C.; Sanz, Guillermo; Florensa, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    The reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 classification for myelodysplastic syndromes is uncertain and its assessment was the major aim of this study. The different peripheral blood and bone marrow variables required for an adequate morphological classification were blindly evaluated by four cytomorphologists in samples from 50 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. The degree of agreement among observers was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient and the generalized kappa statistic for multiple raters. The degree of agreement for the percentages of blasts in bone marrow and peripheral blood, ring sideroblasts in bone marrow, and erythroid, granulocytic and megakaryocytic dysplastic cells was strong (P<0.001 in all instances). After stratifying the percentages according to the categories required for the assignment of World Health Organization subtypes, the degree of agreement was not statistically significant for cases with 5-9% blasts in bone marrow (P=0.07), 0.1-1% blasts in peripheral blood (P=0.47), or percentage of erythroid dysplastic cells (P=0.49). Finally, the interobserver concordance for World Health Organization-defined subtypes showed a moderate overall agreement (P<0.001), the reproducibility being lower for cases with refractory anemia with excess of blasts type 1 (P=0.05) and refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (P=0.09). In conclusion, the reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 classification for myelodysplastic syndromes is acceptable but the defining criteria for blast cells and features of erythroid dysplasia need to be refined. PMID:23065505

  12. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Acute Cerebral Infarction as a Rare Thrombotic Event in Myelodysplastic Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by cytopenia that results in high risks of infection and bleeding. However, there are few reports of cerebral infarction in MDS. We reported a 72-year-old female with MDS who developed acute cerebral infarction. Clinical history of the patient revealed no definite risk factors for stroke except diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia that was well controlled. This case represented the rare occurrence of arterial thrombosis causing acute cerebral infarction in MDS, which may be due to complex chromosomal abnormality and inflammatory processes. PMID:28119848

  15. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Pediatric Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; Barker, Kristen; Brown, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Research on pediatric Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is reviewed in this article. Many recent articles in this area highlight the existence of key differences between the adult and pediatric forms of the illness. This review article provides an overview of pediatric ME/CFS, including epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, treatment, and prognosis. Challenges to the field are identified with the hope that in the future pediatric cases of ME/CFS can be more accurately diagnosed and successfully managed. PMID:24340168

  17. Multicentric study underlining the interest of adding CD5, CD7 and CD56 expression assessment to the flow cytometric Ogata score in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Bardet, Valérie; Wagner-Ballon, Orianne; Guy, Julien; Morvan, Céline; Debord, Camille; Trimoreau, Franck; Benayoun, Emmanuel; Chapuis, Nicolas; Freynet, Nicolas; Rossi, Cédric; Mathis, Stéphanie; Gourin, Marie-Pierre; Toma, Andréa; Béné, Marie C.; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous recent publications have demonstrated interest in multiparameter flow cytometry in the investigation of myelodysplastic disorders, it is perceived by many laboratory hematologists as difficult and expensive, requiring a high level of expertise. We report a multicentric open real-life study aimed at evaluating the added value of the technically simple flow cytometry score described by the Ogata group for the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes. A total of 652 patients were recruited prospectively in four different centers: 346 myelodysplastic syndromes, 53 myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms, and 253 controls. The Ogata score was assessed using CD45 and CD34 staining, with the addition of CD10 and CD19. Moreover, labeling of CD5, CD7 and CD56 for the evaluation of myeloid progenitors and monocytes was tested on a subset of 294 patients. On the whole series, the specificity of Ogata score reached 89%. Respective sensitivities were 54% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, 68% and 84% for type 1 and type 2 refractory anemia with excess of blasts, and 72% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. CD5 expression was poorly informative. When adding CD56 or CD7 labeling to the Ogata score, sensitivity rose to 66% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, to 89% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and to 97% for refractory anemia with excess of blasts. This large multicenter study confirms the feasibility of Ogata scoring in routine flow cytometry diagnosis but highlights its poor sensitivity in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes. The addition of CD7 and CD56 in flow cytometry panels improves the sensitivity but more sophisticated panels would be more informative. PMID:25637056

  18. Multicentric study underlining the interest of adding CD5, CD7 and CD56 expression assessment to the flow cytometric Ogata score in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Valérie; Wagner-Ballon, Orianne; Guy, Julien; Morvan, Céline; Debord, Camille; Trimoreau, Franck; Benayoun, Emmanuel; Chapuis, Nicolas; Freynet, Nicolas; Rossi, Cédric; Mathis, Stéphanie; Gourin, Marie-Pierre; Toma, Andréa; Béné, Marie C; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle

    2015-04-01

    Although numerous recent publications have demonstrated interest in multiparameter flow cytometry in the investigation of myelodysplastic disorders, it is perceived by many laboratory hematologists as difficult and expensive, requiring a high level of expertise. We report a multicentric open real-life study aimed at evaluating the added value of the technically simple flow cytometry score described by the Ogata group for the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes. A total of 652 patients were recruited prospectively in four different centers: 346 myelodysplastic syndromes, 53 myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms, and 253 controls. The Ogata score was assessed using CD45 and CD34 staining, with the addition of CD10 and CD19. Moreover, labeling of CD5, CD7 and CD56 for the evaluation of myeloid progenitors and monocytes was tested on a subset of 294 patients. On the whole series, the specificity of Ogata score reached 89%. Respective sensitivities were 54% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, 68% and 84% for type 1 and type 2 refractory anemia with excess of blasts, and 72% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. CD5 expression was poorly informative. When adding CD56 or CD7 labeling to the Ogata score, sensitivity rose to 66% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, to 89% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and to 97% for refractory anemia with excess of blasts. This large multicenter study confirms the feasibility of Ogata scoring in routine flow cytometry diagnosis but highlights its poor sensitivity in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes. The addition of CD7 and CD56 in flow cytometry panels improves the sensitivity but more sophisticated panels would be more informative.

  19. [Transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to atypical chronic myeloid leukemia in a female patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Gritsaev, S V; Kostroma, I I; Zapreeva, I M; Shmidt, A V; Tiranova, S A; Balashova, V A; Martynkevich, I S; Chubukina, Zh V; Semenova, N Yu; Chechetkin, A V

    Secondary myeloid neoplasia may be a complication of intensive cytostatic therapy. The most common types of secondary neoplasias are acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The development of secondary atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) is an extremely rare phenomenon. The paper describes transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to aCML 6 months after its diagnosis. The development of aCML was accompanied by additional chromosomal aberration as monosomy of chromosome 17. No mutations in the JAK2, MPL, and CalR genes were detected. It is concluded that the clinical course of secondary myeloid neoplasias is variable.

  20. Autoimmune Syndromes Presenting as a Paraneoplastic Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Clinical Features, Course, Treatment and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Bradley T.; Foltz, Lynda; Leitch, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune manifestations (AIM) are reported in up to 10-30% of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients; this association is not well defined. We present herein a retrospective chart review of single center MDS patients for AIM, a case discussion and a literature review. Of 252 MDS patients examined, 11 (4.4%) had AIM around MDS diagnosis. International Prognostic Scoring System scores were: low or intermediate (int)-1 (n=7); int-2 or high (n=4). AIM were: culture negative sepsis (n=7); inflammatory arthritis (n=3); vasculitis (n=4); sweats; pericarditis; polymyalgia rheumatica (n=2 each); mouth ulcers; pulmonary infiltrates; suspicion for Behcet’s; polychondritis and undifferentiated (n=1 each). AIM treatment and outcome were: prednisone +/- steroid sparing agents, n=8, ongoing symptoms in 5; azacitidine (n=3), 2 resolved; and observation, n=1, ongoing symptoms. At a median follow up of 13 months, seven patients are alive. In summary, 4.4% of MDS patients presented with concomitant AIM. MDS should remain on the differential diagnosis of patients with inflammatory symptoms. PMID:27499837

  1. α-Thalassemia, Mental Retardation, and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes three rare syndromes in which the presence of α-thalassemia provided an important clue to the molecular basis of the underlying condition. It exemplifies how rare diseases allied with careful clinical observation can lead to important biological principles. Two of the syndromes, ATR-16 and ATR-X, are characterized by α-thalassemia in association with multiple developmental abnormalities including mental retardation. The third condition, ATMDS, is an acquired disorder in which α-thalassemia arises in the context of myelodysplasia. Intriguingly, mutations in the chromatin remodeling factor, ATRX, are common to both ATR-X syndrome and ATMDS. PMID:23028133

  2. Myelodysplastic syndrome complicated by central diabetes insipidus and cerebral salt wasting syndrome with peculiar change in magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Sano, Soichi; Yamagami, Keiko; Morikawa, Takashi; Yoshioka, Katsunobu

    2010-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) could occurs in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML), because of infiltration of leukemic cells into the neurohypophysis or some other reason and it is closely associated with abnormalities of chromosome 7. We report a case of MDS with abnormalities of chromosome 7, presenting as CDI followed by deterioration of polyuria and hyponatremia with a decreased extracellular fluid volume. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed symmetrically enhanced lesions in the hypothalamus. Fludrocortisone treatment normalized his serum sodium level and cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) was suspected.

  3. Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia with Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Corticosteroid Monotherapy Led to Successful Ventilator Weaning

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mari; Murata, Kengo; Kiriu, Takahiro; Kouzai, Yasuji; Takamori, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old man with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) presented to our hospital with a high fever. Although treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was initiated, his respiratory status worsened to the point that he required mechanical ventilation. However, he was successfully treated with a corticosteroid without immunosuppression. Sequential transbronchial lung biopsies revealed abundant fibrin exudate in the alveolar spaces, which was subsequently replaced by fibroblasts, showing that acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) gradually changes into organizing pneumonia. Our case demonstrated both the efficacy of corticosteroid-monotherapy and the histological course of AFOP. PMID:27803411

  4. Practical use of azacitidine in higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes: an expert panel opinion.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, Pierre; Bowen, David; Gattermann, Norbert; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Sanz, Guillermo; Santini, Valeria

    2010-11-01

    Azacitidine is currently the only drug to have shown a significant survival benefit over conventional care regimens in patients with International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) intermediate-2 (Int-2) and high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), establishing it as an important new treatment for these individuals. However, several aspects of the practical use of azacitidine remain uncertain. This manuscript outlines recommendations discussed by a panel of experts, providing a practical guide for physicians to ensure optimal management of Int-2 and high-risk patients receiving azacitidine.

  5. Improving clinical outcome in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and iron overload using iron chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Heather A

    2007-12-01

    Until recently, little information on the benefits of iron chelation therapy (ICT) in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and iron overload was known. A recent retrospective study showed improved survival in transfusion-dependent patients with MDS (Low or Intermediate-1 risk IPSS) receiving ICT, compared with those not receiving ICT; median overall survival was not reached at 160 months versus 40 months, respectively. Significantly more patients receiving ICT survived to 4 years (80% versus 44%; p < 0.03), suggesting that MDS patients with iron overload might benefit from ICT. Prospective studies to confirm the benefit of ICT in MDS are warranted.

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis in two patients with myelodysplastic syndrome treated with azacitidine.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shiue-Wei; Huang, Tzu-Chuan; Ye, Ren-Hua; Wu, Yi-Ying

    2015-03-01

    Azacitidine is a novel agent for treating myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). It has a relatively safe toxicity profile with very few reported skin toxicities. Patients with MDS were prone to get severe infections, especially via respiratory tract, urinary system, and bloodstream. However, necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a relatively rare event in patients with MDS, and it is hard to diagnose early. Here, we report two MDS cases that developed NF in lower extremities while receiving azacitidine treatment. One of them survives after emergent fasciotomy along with the administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin.

  7. Efficacy of a single, weekly dose of recombinant erythropoietin in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Musto, Pellegrino; Falcone, Antonietta; Sanpaolo, Grazia; Bodenizza, Carlo; La Sala, Antonio; Perla, Gianni; Carella, Angelo Michele

    2003-07-01

    Thirteen patients with low-to-intermediate risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) received recombinant erythropoietin (r-EPO) at the single, weekly dose of 40.000 U for at least 8 weeks. Five patients (38.4%) achieved a major erythroid response (increased haemoglobin levels > 2 g/dl and/or transfusion independence), which is currently maintained after 3-11 months, without modification of r-EPO dose. This study suggests that 40.000 U r-EPO given once a week may be at least as effective as the more frequent (daily or three times a week) administrations of the drug usually employed in MDS patients.

  8. A simple method to predict response to immunosuppressive therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saunthararajah, Yogen; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Wesley, Robert; Wang, Qiong J; Barrett, A John

    2003-10-15

    Immunosuppression with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) or cyclosporine (CSA) can be used to treat the cytopenia associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Previously, we identified HLA-DR15, younger age, and shorter duration of red cell transfusion dependence as pretreatment variables that correlate significantly with a response. Using these pretreatment variables we have devised a simple method to prospectively identify patients with low or high probabilities of response to immunosuppression. The ability of this system to predict response was confirmed in a separate cohort of 23 patients with MDS treated with immunosuppression.

  9. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Molina Moguel, J L; Ruiz Illezcas, R; Forsbach Sánchez, S; Carreño Alvarez, S; Picco Díaz, I

    1990-12-01

    The object of this study was to determine how many of the patients treated at the Pediatric Odontology Clinic, a branch of the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service at the Veinte de Noviembre Regional Hospital, ISSSTE, are VIH-positive of show serious manifestations of Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). For such purpose, 100 pediatric patients suffering from different systemic or local diseases were evaluated, the most common being hematological alterations. Results evidenced the presence of VIH in the blood of five of the pediatric subjects, all suffering from Hemophilia.

  10. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. [Research advances in value of flow cytometric immunophenotyping in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lu, Dan; Liu, Yan-Rong

    2013-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are myeloid neoplasms characterized by dysplasia in one or more linages of cells and increased risk of development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Along with the deeply understanding of myelodysplastic syndrome, the diagnosis standards of this disease experienced a leap in essence: from a single standard of morphological test in FAB to multiple detecting means in WHO standard of 2008, flow cytometry has been proposed as an adjunctive diagnostic test in the 2007 Vienna standards and the 2008 WHO standards. Recently, A heterogeneous spectrum of immunophenotypic abnormalities have been reported in MDS, and some of which are of great significance to the diagnosis, classification, prognosis assessment, and treatment of the disease. In the year of 2003, a flow cytometric scoring system (FCSS) was built to evaluate the prognosis of MDS patients, which was able to qualify the phenotypic aberrancies in the myelomonocytic, erythroid, and megakaryocytic lineage. It filled the gap of the international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) and the WHO classification-based prognostic scoring system (WPSS), and was of great value to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of MDS. In this article, the value of MDS immunophenotyping in diagnosis and prognosis evaluation of MDS is reviewed in term of MDS immunophenotypic abnormalities and flow cytometric scoring system.

  12. Aplastic anaemia and the hypocellular myelodysplastic syndrome: histomorphological, diagnostic, and prognostic features.

    PubMed Central

    Fohlmeister, I; Fischer, R; Mödder, B; Rister, M; Schaefer, H E

    1985-01-01

    In a retrospective study of 111 patients with aplastic anaemia iliac crest biopsies were evaluated for the presence of morphological features statistically related to the evolution of the disease. Prognostic variables for a transition to acute non-lymphatic leukaemia were: cellular atypias of the three haemopoietic lineages, as observed in the myelodysplastic syndrome, and especially "micromegakaryocytes"; high numbers or irregular distribution of megakaryocytes, or both; and (slight) marrow fibrosis. Clinical variables did not influence these prognostic correlations. Prognosis in relation to death from bone marrow failure without leukaemia might well have been influenced by a strong plasma cell reaction, but this correlation was weakened by clinical factors. On the basis of this study aplastic anaemia can thus be subdivided morphologically into two disease entities--namely, hypocellular myelodysplastic syndrome with a 23-82% risk of acute non-lymphatic leukaemia developing within three years, depending on how many variables associated with acute non-lymphatic leukaemia are present, and non-dysplastic myelohypoplasia. Images PMID:4066981

  13. Changes in the Updated 2016: WHO Classification of the Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Related Myeloid Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bennett, John M

    2016-11-01

    In comparison with the 2008 World Health Organization "Blue Book" on hematopoietic neoplasms, a small number of changes have been made in the classification. In the lower-risk patients, Refractory Cytopenias with Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts (RCMD-RS) has been separated from RCMD to recognize the importance of the SF3B1 mutation. Often there has been confusion as to the degree of morphologic dysplasia and/or cytopenias to define some of the lower-risk subtypes. In addition, the type of dysplasia or cytopenias is not always concordant. Therefore, it seems prudent to apply the more general term "myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)" with single- or multiple-lineage dysplasia. Refractory neutropenia or thrombocytopenia has been deemphasized because most patients have multilineage dysplasia. In the higher-risk patients, the terms Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts (RAEB) 1 or 2 have been simplified to Myelodysplastic Syndrome-Excess Blasts (MDS-EB) 1 or 2 to emphasize the importance of the percentage of blasts that dictate therapy. Patients with Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) can be classified into 3 groups: CMML 0, 1, or 2, based on the percentage of blasts (< 5%, 5%-9%, 10%-19%). Cases with 50% or more erythroid precursors will not have the percentage of blasts based on the nonerythroid precursors. Previous cases of acute erythroid leukemia (myeloid:erythroid type) can be included in the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtype: AML with MDS-related features.

  14. Myeloid sarcoma of the Gingiva with myelodysplastic syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seong-Ho; Park, Gyeongsin; Ko, Youngkyung; Park, Jun-Beom

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a case of myeloid sarcoma of the gingiva with myelodysplastic syndrome.A 52-year-old male diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome with skin lesions presented with gingival swelling and gingival redness involving the maxillary left second premolar and the maxillary left first molar. The patient was referred from the Department of Hematology for a biopsy of the lesion. Full-thickness flaps were elevated and inflamed, and neoplastic soft tissue was removed from a lesion and the samples sent for histopathologic analysis.Histopathologic results showed leukemic cell infiltration beneath the oral epithelium, and the specimen was positive for the leukocyte marker. The diagnosis was myeloid sarcoma. Uneventful healing was observed at 2-week follow-up, but relapse of the lesions with the hyperplastic and neoplastic tissue was noted at 4-week follow-up. Further follow-up or treatment could not be performed because the patient did not visit at the next follow-up.In conclusion, myeloid sarcoma should be a diagnosis option for gingival growth because it can involve intraoral lesion. In this report, a biopsy was performed due to referral considering the patient's medical history. Although myeloid sarcoma in the oral cavity is extremely rare, a small biopsy and consultation with a hematologist may be beneficial for patients and may provide a differential diagnosis.

  15. Impaired cytotoxicity associated with defective natural killer cell differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Maryam; Manser, Angela R; Fröbel, Julia; Kündgen, Andrea; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Schönberg, Kathrin; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert; Uhrberg, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Natural killer cells are well known to mediate anti-leukemic responses in myeloid leukemia but their role in myelodysplastic syndromes is not well understood. Here, in a cohort of newly diagnosed patients (n=75), widespread structural and functional natural killer cell defects were identified. One subgroup of patients (13%) had a selective deficiency of peripheral natural killer cells (count <10/mm(3) blood) with normal frequencies of T and natural killer-like T cells. Natural killer cell-deficient patients were predominantly found in high-risk subgroups and deficiency of these cells was significantly associated with poor prognosis. In the second subgroup, comprising the majority of patients (76%), natural killer cells were present but exhibited poor cytotoxicity. The defect was strongly associated with reduced levels of perforin and granzyme B. Notably, natural killer cell function and arming of cytotoxic granules could be fully reconstituted by in vitro stimulation. Further phenotypic analysis of these patients revealed an immature natural killer cell compartment that was biased towards CD56(bright) cells. The residual CD56(dim) cells exhibited a significant increase of the unlicensed NKG2A(-)KIR(-) subset and a striking reduction in complexity of the repertoire of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that the widespread defects in natural killer cell function occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are mostly due to either unsuccessful or inefficient generation of mature, functionally competent natural killer cells, which might contribute to disease progression through impaired immune surveillance.

  16. A Zebrafish Model of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Produced through tet2 Genomic Editing

    PubMed Central

    Gjini, Evisa; Mansour, Marc R.; Sander, Jeffry D.; Moritz, Nadine; Nguyen, Ashley T.; Kesarsing, Michiel; Gans, Emma; He, Shuning; Chen, Si; Ko, Myunggon; Kuang, You-Yi; Yang, Song; Zhou, Yi; Rodig, Scott; Zon, Leonard I.; Joung, J. Keith; Rao, Anjana

    2014-01-01

    The ten-eleven translocation 2 gene (TET2) encodes a member of the TET family of DNA methylcytosine oxidases that converts 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) to initiate the demethylation of DNA within genomic CpG islands. Somatic loss-of-function mutations of TET2 are frequently observed in human myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), which is a clonal malignancy characterized by dysplastic changes of developing blood cell progenitors, leading to ineffective hematopoiesis. We used genome-editing technology to disrupt the zebrafish Tet2 catalytic domain. tet2m/m (homozygous for the mutation) zebrafish exhibited normal embryonic and larval hematopoiesis but developed progressive clonal myelodysplasia as they aged, culminating in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) at 24 months of age, with dysplasia of myeloid progenitor cells and anemia with abnormal circulating erythrocytes. The resultant tet2m/m mutant zebrafish lines show decreased levels of 5hmC in hematopoietic cells of the kidney marrow but not in other cell types, most likely reflecting the ability of other Tet family members to provide this enzymatic activity in nonhematopoietic tissues but not in hematopoietic cells. tet2m/m zebrafish are viable and fertile, providing an ideal model to dissect altered pathways in hematopoietic cells and, for small-molecule screens in embryos, to identify compounds with specific activity against tet2 mutant cells. PMID:25512612

  17. Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome Is More Frequently Associated With Myelodysplastic Syndromes Than the Classical Neutrophilic Variant

    PubMed Central

    Ghoufi, Lisa; Ortonne, Nicolas; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Barhoumi, Walid; Begon, Edouard; Haioun, Corinne; Pautas, Cécile; Beckerich, Florence; Robin, Christine; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Cordonnier, Catherine; Chosidow, Olivier; Toma, Andréa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome (H-SS) is a histological variant of Sweet syndrome (SS) differing from classical neutrophilic SS (N-SS) by a dermal infiltrate mainly composed of lymphocytes and histiocytoid myeloperoxidase-positive cells. We aimed to report a large series of H-SS and compare the frequency and type of hematological malignancies associated to H-SS and N-SS. We included 62 patients with a coding histopathologic diagnosis of SS prospectively registered between 2005 and 2014 in the database of our Department of Pathology. Overall, 22 (35.5%) and 40 (64.5%) patients had a histological diagnosis of H-SS and N-SS, respectively. Median age, sex ratio, and cutaneous lesions were similar in the 2 groups. The frequency of extra-cutaneous manifestations was similar (50% vs 37.5%, P = 0.42). Recurrent forms were significantly more frequent in H-SS than in N-SS patients (21% vs 2.5%, P = 0.01). A hematological malignancy was diagnosed in 22 patients, 12 (55.5%) with H-SS and 10 (25%) with N-SS (P = 0.019). Hematological malignancy was of myeloid origin in 8/22 (36.3%) H-SS and 5/40 (12.5%) N-SS patients (P = 0.02), and of lymphoid origin without myeloid component in 4/22 (18.1%) H-SS and 4/40 (10%) N-SS patients (P = 0.35), respectively. One N-SS patient had a hematological malignancy of mixed (myeloid and lymphoid) phenotype. A myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) was diagnosed in 7/22 (31.8%) H-SS and 1/40 (2.5%) N-SS patients (P < 0.001). Hematological disease was diagnosed before (in 8 H-SS and 3 N-SS patients) or at the time of the occurrence of the cutaneous lesions (in 1 H-SS and 7 N-SS patients). However, in 3 H-SS patients, all with MDS, cutaneous lesions preceded the hematological disease by ≤6 months. In conclusion, H-SS was associated with MDS in one third of patients but also with lymphoid malignancies, and cutaneous lesions could precede the hematological diagnosis in patients with MDS. A complete hematological assessment is

  18. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  20. Sirolimus and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia That is Recurrent or Not Eligible for Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. SRSF2 Is Essential for Hematopoiesis, and Its Myelodysplastic Syndrome-Related Mutations Dysregulate Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Komeno, Yukiko; Huang, Yi-Jou; Qiu, Jinsong; Lin, Leo; Xu, YiJun; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Liang; Monterroza, Dora D.; Li, Hairi; DeKelver, Russell C.; Yan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of neoplasms characterized by ineffective myeloid hematopoiesis and various risks for leukemia. SRSF2, a member of the serine/arginine-rich (SR) family of splicing factors, is one of the mutation targets associated with poor survival in patients suffering from myelodysplastic syndromes. Here we report the biological function of SRSF2 in hematopoiesis by using conditional knockout mouse models. Ablation of SRSF2 in the hematopoietic lineage caused embryonic lethality, and Srsf2-deficient fetal liver cells showed significantly enhanced apoptosis and decreased levels of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Induced ablation of SRSF2 in adult Mx1-Cre Srsf2flox/flox mice upon poly(I):poly(C) injection demonstrated a significant decrease in lineage− Sca+ c-Kit+ cells in bone marrow. To reveal the functional impact of myelodysplastic syndromes-associated mutations in SRSF2, we analyzed splicing responses on the MSD-L cell line and found that the missense mutation of proline 95 to histidine (P95H) and a P95-to-R102 in-frame 8-amino-acid deletion caused significant changes in alternative splicing. The affected genes were enriched in cancer development and apoptosis. These findings suggest that intact SRSF2 is essential for the functional integrity of the hematopoietic system and that its mutations likely contribute to development of myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:26124281

  2. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-17

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  3. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia after treatment with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Jung; Park, Tae Sung; Lee, Seung Tae; Song, Jaewoo; Suh, Borum; Kim, Se Hoon; Jang, Seon Jung; Lee, Chang Hoon; Choi, Jong Rak

    2009-01-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia after treatment with temozolomide have rarely been described in the literature. Only 10 cases in association with temozolomide have been documented. The cases included anaplastic astrocytoma (4 cases), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (2 cases), low grade astrocytoma (2 cases), low grade oligodendroglioma (1 case), and one case of secondary Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Here we report a novel case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia associated with der(1;7)(q10;p10) in a glioblastoma multiforme patient treated with temozolomide. Results of bone marrow morphology, chromosome, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, as well as the clinical history, strongly suggest a treatment-related etiology in our case. In past reports, karyotypes in cases of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia mostly demonstrated abnormalities in chromosomes 5 and 7. However, we report a case of temozolomide-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with der(1;7)(q10;p10), possibly the first reported case, to the authors' knowledge.

  4. [Lenalidomide treatment in myelodysplastic syndrome with 5q deletion--Czech MDS group experience].

    PubMed

    Jonášová, Anna; Červinek, Libor; Bělohlávková, Petra; Čermák, Jaroslav; Beličková, Monika; Rohoň, Petr; Černá, Olga; Hochová, Ivana; Šišková, Magda; Kačmářová, Karla; Janoušová, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a common hematological disease in patients over sixty. Despite intensive research, the therapy of this heterogeneous blood disease is complicated. In recent years, two new therapeutic approaches have been proposed: immunomodulation and demethylation therapy. Immunomodulation therapy with lenalidomide represents a meaningful advance in the treatment of anemic patients, specifically those with 5q- aberrations. As much as 60-70% of patients respond and achieve transfusion independence. We present the initial lenalidomide experience of the Czech MDS group. We analyze Czech MDS register data of 34 (31 female; 3 male; median age 69 years) chronically transfused low risk MDS patients with 5q- aberration treated by lenalidomide. Twenty-seven (79.4%) patients were diagnosed with 5q- syndrome, 5 patients with refractory anemia with multilineage dysplasia, 1 patient with refractory anemia with excess of blasts 1, and 1 patient with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative unclassified. Response, as represented by achieving complete transfusion independence, was achieved in 91% of patients. A true 5q- syndrome diagnosis in most our patients may be responsible for such a high response rate. Complete cytogenetic response was reached in 15% of patients and partial cytogenetic response in 67%, within a median time of 12 months. TP53 mutation was detected in 15% (3 from 18 tested) and 2 of these patients progressed to higher grade MDS. The majority of patients tolerated lenalidomide very well. Based on this albeit small study, we present our findings of high lenalidomide efficacy as well as the basic principles and problems of lenalidomide therapy.

  5. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Early lymphocyte recovery predicts superior overall survival after unmanipulated haploidentical blood and marrow transplant for myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia evolving from myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Jun; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Xu, Lan-Ping; Liu, Dai-Hong; Liu, Kai-Yan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Han, Wei; Chen, Huan; Wang, Feng-Rong; Lv, Meng; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2013-12-01

    We investigated whether early lymphocyte recovery, after unmanipulated, haploidentical, blood and marrow transplant (HBMT), affected clinical outcomes in 78 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia evolving from MDS. Lymphocyte recovery was based on the absolute lymphocyte count on day 30 (ALC-30). Patients with high ALC-30 (≥ 300 cells/μL) had lower relapse rates (13.8% vs. 35.5%, p = 0.049) and lower incidence of bacterial infections (3.4% vs. 25.8%, p = 0.015) than those with low ALC-30 values. Multivariate analysis showed that a high ALC-30 was associated with improved overall survival (OS, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.099, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.029-0.337; p < 0.0001), improved leukemia-free survival (HR: 0.245, 95% CI: 0.112-0.539; p < 0.0001), lower relapse rate (HR: 0.096, 95% CI: 0.011-0.827; p = 0.033) and lower transplant-related mortality (TRM, HR: 0.073, 95% CI: 0.016-0.324; p = 0.001). Combinations of three mismatches in the human leukocyte antigen loci were associated with a higher TRM (HR: 5.026, 95% CI: 1.392-18.173; p = 0.014). Our results suggest that the ALC-30 can predict a favorable OS after unmanipulated HBMT.

  7. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. RAS gene mutations in acute and chronic myelocytic leukemias, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, J W; Steenvoorden, A C; Lyons, J; Anger, B; Böhlke, J U; Bos, J L; Seliger, H; Bartram, C R

    1987-01-01

    We report on investigations aimed at detecting mutated RAS genes in a variety of preleukemic disorders and leukemias of myeloid origin. DNA transfection analyses (tumorigenicity assay) and hybridization to mutation-specific oligonucleotide probes established NRAS mutations in codon 12 or 61 of 4/9 acute myelocytic leukemias (AML) and three AML lines. Leukemic cells of another AML patient showed HRAS gene activation. By using a rapid and sensitive dot-blot screening procedure based on the combination of in vitro amplification of RAS-specific sequences and oligonucleotide hybridization we additionally screened 15 myelodysplastic syndromes, 26 Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelocytic leukemias in chronic or acute phase, and 19 other chronic myeloproliferative disorders. A mutation within NRAS codon 12 could thus be demonstrated in a patient with idiopathic myelofibrosis and in another with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Moreover, mutated NRAS sequences were detected in lymphocytes, in granulocytes, as well as in monocytes/macrophages of the latter case. Images PMID:3122217

  9. RAS gene mutations in acute and chronic myelocytic leukemias, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, and myelodysplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, J.W.G.; Steenvoorden, A.C.M.; Lyons, J.; Anger, B.; Boehlke, J.U.; Bos, J.L.; Seliger, H.; Bartram, C.R.

    1987-12-01

    The authors report on investigations aimed at detecting mutated RAS genes in a variety of preleukemic disorders and leukemias of myeloid origin. DNA transfection analyses (tumorigenicity assay) and hybridization to mutation-specific oligonucleotide probes established NRAS mutations in codon 12 or 61 of 4/9 acute myelocytic leukemias (AML) and three AML lines. Leukemic cells of another AML patient showed HRAS gene activation. By using a rapid and sensitive dot-blot screening procedure based on the combination of in vitro amplification of RAS-specific sequences and oligonucleotide hybridization they additionally screened 15 myelodysplastic syndromes, 26 Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelocytic leukemias in chronic or acute phase, and 19 other chronic myeloproliferative disorders. A mutation within NRAS codon 12 could thus be demonstrated in a patient with idiopathic myelofibrosis and in another with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Moreover, mutated NRAS sequences were detected in lymphocytes, in granulocytes, as well as in monocytes/macrophages of the latter case.

  10. The DAC system and associations with acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bug, Gesine; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2010-12-01

    Imbalances of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and deacetylase activity (DAC) that result in deregulated gene expression are commonly observed in leukemias. These alterations provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches that target the epigenetic mechanisms implicated in leukemogenesis. As the acetylation status of histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation of genes involved particularly in differentiation and apoptosis, DAC inhibitors (DACi) have attracted considerable attention for treatment of hematologic malignancies. DACi encompass a structurally diverse family of compounds that are being explored as single agents as well as in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs, small molecule inhibitors of signaling pathways and hypomethylating agents. While DACi have shown clear evidence of activity in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes and lymphoid malignancies, their precise role in treatment of these different entities remain to be elucidated. Successful development of these compounds as elements of novel targeted treatment strategies for leukemia will require that clinical studies be performed in conjunction with translational research including efforts to identify predictive biomarkers.

  11. In-Silico Identification Of Micro-Loops In Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Dominik; Brandl, Miriam; Pham, Tuan D.; Chang, Chung-Che; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2011-06-01

    Micro-loops are regulatory network motifs that leverage transcriptional and posttranscriptional control to effectively regulate the transcriptome. In this paper a regulatory network for Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDSs) was constructed from the literature and publicly available data sources. The network was filtered using data from deep-sequencing of small RNAs, exon and microarrays. Motif discovery showed that micro-loops might exist in MDS. We further used the identified micro-loops and performed basic network analysis to identify the known disease gene RUNX1/AML, as well as miRNA family hsa-mir-181. This suggested that the concept of micro-loops can be applied to enhance disease gene identification and biomarker discovery.

  12. Late effect of atomic bomb radiation on myeloid disorders: leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2012-03-01

    Leukemia was the first malignancy linked to radiation exposure in atomic bomb survivors. Clear evidence of the dose-dependent excess risk of three major types of leukemia (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia [AML], and chronic myeloid leukemia) was found, especially in people exposed at young ages. Such leukemia risks were at their highest in the late 1950s, and declined gradually thereafter over the past 50 years. Findings from recent risk analyses, however, suggest the persistence of AML risk even after 1990, and evidence of increased risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) due to atomic bomb radiation has recently been shown. High-risk MDS and forms involving complex chromosomal aberrations were found to be much more frequent in people exposed to higher radiation doses. These lines of epidemiological evidence suggest that the risk of radiation-induced hematological malignancies has persisted for six decades since the initial exposure.

  13. Autonomous proliferation and bcl-2 expression involving haematopoietic cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bincoletto, C.; Saad, S. T.; Soares da Silva, E.; Queiroz, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the autonomous proliferation, bcl-2 expression and number of apoptotic cells in the bone marrow of patients with confirmed diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Normal bone marrow cells obtained from donors of the Clinical Hospital of this university were used as a control. The autonomous proliferation, evaluated by clonal culture without exogenous growth factor, and the number of apoptotic cells in bone marrow kept for 10 days in liquid cultures at 37 degrees C and 5% carbon dioxide, were significantly greater in MDS patients than in control subjects (P = 0.001, Wilcoxon). However, bcl-2 expression, measured by immunocytochemistry, was significantly lower in MDS patients than in normal individuals (P = 0.002, Wilcoxon). These results suggest that the high proliferation activity in MDS patients may be counteracted by the high level of medullar cell death, which might be related to the lower bcl-2 expression. PMID:9744502

  14. Hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome transformed in acute myeloid leukemia after androgens and cyclosporin. A treatment.

    PubMed

    Gologan, R; Ostroveanu, Daniela; Dobrea, Camelia; Gioadă, Liliana

    2003-01-01

    The apparent contradiction between clonal expansion and marrow failure encountered in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is more evident in hypocellular forms at presentation. Hypoplastic MDS (hMDS) appears to be a distinct clinicopathologic entity, accounting for about 15% from all MDS. The pathogeny is supposed to result from immunosupressive mechanisms and some observations on successful treatment with Cyclosporine A (CsA) are reported. The case of a young female patient diagnosed by bone marrow core biopsy with hMDS - refractory anemia (FAB and WHO classification) with normal karyotype and scarce CD34(+) cells by immunohistophenotyping is presented. She was treated with androgens followed by CsA for a few months and shortly after she developed an acute myeloid leukemia (M4) which responded to low-doses of daily oral melphalan. This is one of the first few reports on such an event during the immunosuppressive therapy in MDS and the possible explanations for this unusual evolution are discussed.

  15. Combining gene mutation with gene expression data improves outcome prediction in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gerstung, Moritz; Pellagatti, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Porta, Matteo G Della; Jädersten, Martin; Dolatshad, Hamid; Verma, Amit; Cross, Nicholas C. P.; Vyas, Paresh; Killick, Sally; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Cazzola, Mario; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J.; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease, but two patients rarely have identical genotypes. Similarly, patients differ in their clinicopathological parameters, but how genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity are interconnected is not well understood. Here we build statistical models to disentangle the effect of 12 recurrently mutated genes and 4 cytogenetic alterations on gene expression, diagnostic clinical variables and outcome in 124 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Overall, one or more genetic lesions correlate with expression levels of ~20% of all genes, explaining 20–65% of observed expression variability. Differential expression patterns vary between mutations and reflect the underlying biology, such as aberrant polycomb repression for ASXL1 and EZH2 mutations or perturbed gene dosage for copy-number changes. In predicting survival, genomic, transcriptomic and diagnostic clinical variables all have utility, with the largest contribution from the transcriptome. Similar observations are made on the TCGA acute myeloid leukaemia cohort, confirming the general trends reported here. PMID:25574665

  16. Comprehensive scanning of somatic mitochondrial DNA alterations in acute leukemia developing from myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Linnartz, Bjoern; Anglmayer, Roswitha; Zanssen, Stefanie

    2004-03-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis resulting in refractory cytopenias. Transformation resulting in acute myeloblastic leukemia is the final stage in the multistep process of MDS evolution. Functional relevant mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been related to sideroblastic anemia and MDS. To investigate the role of mtDNA in malignant transformation to acute leukemia, we used high-resolution techniques such as single-strand conformational polymorphism and fluorescence sequencing for investigation of the whole mitochondrial genome from blood cells of 10 patients with MDS. Functionally relevant point mutations in mitochondrial RNA and polypeptide-encoding genes were detected in 50% of patients with MDS. Their increasing mutation load connects MDS and the developing acute myeloid leukemias. Several point mutations of mtDNA, including secondary point mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, occur in one bone marrow and may synergically affect bone marrow stem cells by an apoptotic pathway.

  17. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clinically Presenting with the “Classic TTP Pentad”

    PubMed Central

    Polanco Jácome, Evelyn Carolina; Guevara, Elizabeth; Mattoo, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    The clinical presentation of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is not specific. Many patients can be asymptomatic and can be detected only due to an abnormal complete blood cell count (CBC) on routine exam or for other reasons while others can be symptomatic as a consequence of underlying cytopenias. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) usually is suspected under the evidence of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) and thrombocytopenia and because it is a life-threatening condition (medical emergency) immediate initiation of plasmapheresis could be life-saving. The following case illustrates an unusual presentation of MDS in a patient who came in to the emergency room with the classic TTP “pentad” of fever, renal involvement, MAHA, mental status changes, and thrombocytopenia. We will focus our discussion in the clinical presentation of this case. PMID:28255478

  18. Hematologic improvements in a myelodysplastic syndromes with myelofibrosis (MDS-F) patient treated with azacitidine.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Daisuke; Matsuda, Akira; Ishikawa, Maho; Maeda, Tomoya; Tanae, Ken; Kohri, Mika; Takahashi, Naoki; Kawai, Nobutaka; Asou, Norio; Bessho, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes with myelofibrosis (MDS-F) is a poor prognostic hematopoietic disorder. Azacitidine was shown to prolong survival of high-risk MDS patients. However, the effects of azacitidine on MDS-F have yet to be elucidated. Azacitidine was administered to a 74-year-old man with MDS-F at a dose of 75 mg/m(2)/daily subcutaneously for 7 days every 28 days. Hematologic improvements were observed according to the International Working Group 2006 criteria after 8 cycles of the azacitidine treatment, and complete remission was achieved after 14 cycles. The grade of myelofibrosis was also improved. The therapeutic activity of azacitidine was confirmed in our MDS-F patient.

  19. Primary antifungal prophylaxis in acute myeloblastic leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome--still an open question?

    PubMed

    Rüping, Maria J G T; Vehreschild, Jörg J; Cornely, Oliver A

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we aim to compare different early treatment strategies of invasive fungal diseases in patients undergoing induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Three treatment approaches--prophylactic, empiric, and preemptive treatment--are subject to continuous discussion among physicians treating patients at risk. Considering the available clinical basis of evidence, we opt for antifungal prophylaxis with posaconazole 200 mg tid po as our primary prophylactic strategy, while the employment of preemptive treatment should be delayed until more accurate diagnostic tools become available. In addition to antifungal prophylaxis, empiric treatment with caspofungin or L-AmB may be administered to patients with fever resistant to broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and without radiographic findings typical of invasive fungal disease.

  20. Screening features to improve the class prediction of acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaishi; Yang, Meixue; Sablok, Gaurav; Fan, Jianping; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2013-01-10

    After more than three decades of intensive investigations, the underpinning mechanism of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis still remains largely uncharacterized, and their diagnosis relies heavily on the subjective factors. Recently gene expression profiling technique showed significant improvement in classifying some subtypes of AML, but the model's discriminating power of MDS from AML is still in its infancy. Feature selection plays an important role in the classification of the samples on the basis of the gene expression profiles. Our hypothesis explains that a better choice of features could improve the classification of the diseased and normal stage samples, and the potential application of feature screening to produce feature sets, with better accuracies and lowest number of embedded features. The observed results suggest that feature selection proves to be an essential and affirmative step in the biomedical data mining models based on gene expression profiles.

  1. Splicing factor gene mutations in the myelodysplastic syndromes: impact on disease phenotype and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Splicing factor gene mutations are the most frequent mutations found in patients with the myeloid malignancy myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), suggesting that spliceosomal dysfunction plays a major role in disease pathogenesis. The aberrantly spliced target genes and deregulated cellular pathways associated with the commonly mutated splicing factor genes in MDS (SF3B1, SRSF2 and U2AF1) are being identified, illuminating the molecular mechanisms underlying MDS. Emerging data from mouse modeling studies indicate that the presence of splicing factor gene mutations can lead to bone marrow hematopoietic stem/myeloid progenitor cell expansion, impaired hematopoiesis and dysplastic differentiation that are hallmarks of MDS. Importantly, recent evidence suggests that spliceosome inhibitors and splicing modulators may have therapeutic value in the treatment of splicing factor mutant myeloid malignancies.

  2. [Myelodysplastic syndrome in the elderly: comprehensive geriatric assessment and therapeutic recommendations].

    PubMed

    López Arrieta, Jesús María; De Paz, Raquel; Altés, Albert; del Cañizo, Consuelo

    2012-02-18

    The onset of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is usually around the age of 70. Despite this, most clinical trials are restricted to younger subjects. Thus, the management of elderly patients with MDS is not always optimal. Physiologically, elderly patients show characteristics that differ from those of younger patients and that condition their pharmacological treatment. In this regard, the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) becomes particularly important. This document gathers conclusions from the 1(st) Meeting of Members of the Sociedad Española de Medicina Geriátrica and the Sociedad Española de Hematología y Hemoterapia, with the objective of proposing the establishment of CGA instruments to assist in the decision-making process of elderly patients with MDS. The results of this consensus document will focus on the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and management of adverse events in this age group.

  3. A pediatric case of idiopathic Harlequin syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Moon Souk; Kim, Seung Yeon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Soo Jin; You, Chur Woo; Kim, Jon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Harlequin syndrome, which is a rare disorder caused by dysfunction of the autonomic system, manifests as asymmetric facial flushing and sweating in response to heat, exercise, or emotional factors. The syndrome may be primary (idiopathic) with a benign course, or can occur secondary to structural abnormalities or iatrogenic factors. The precise mechanism underlying idiopathic harlequin syndrome remains unclear. Here, we describe a case of a 6-year-old boy who reported left hemifacial flushing and sweating after exercise. He had an unremarkable birth history and no significant medical history. Complete ophthalmological and neurological examinations were performed, and no other abnormalities were identified. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to exclude lesions of the cerebrum and cervicothoracic spinal cord, and no abnormalities were noted. His final diagnosis was classic idiopathic harlequin syndrome. Herein, we report the first pediatric case of idiopathic harlequin syndrome in Korea. PMID:28018464

  4. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... as fatigue and to prevent bleeding and infections. Blood transfusions Blood transfusions can be used to replace red blood cells, ... darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp), can reduce the need for blood transfusions by increasing red blood cells. Others may help ...

  5. Myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Koeffler, H P

    1996-04-01

    These two issues of the Seminars in Hematology will provide the physician the necessary knowledge to help make sense of this somewhat confusing array of diseases. The subdivisions of MDS reflect the precision of our techniques of dissection, with morphological and histochemical analyses forming the foundation to identify and subdivide MDS. Although steady refinement has occurred over the last half-century, the basic morphologic technique is unchanged. Cytogenetic analysis, which has been possible since the 1960s and 1970s, should be done at least at initial presentation in all patients to provide refinement of diagnosis and prognosis. FISH is not, at this time, useful as a screening technique. Although the 1990s is an era of rapidly growing knowledge and technical abilities in molecular biology, the use of these techniques in MDS is in its infancy. Very few genes have been identified which are altered in MDS, although many must exist. The molecular assays continue to be cumbersome and impractical to use in the clinical laboratory and remain the domain of the research scientist. Nevertheless, in the future, molecular biology will enable the internist to give each individual a clearer diagnosis and prognosis and may even provide targetted therapies of patients with MDS. At this time the center of management is good supportive care. Some patients, however, will benefit from special interventions, which include the use of growth factors, BMT, and in selected patients, aggressive chemotherapy. Induction of differentiation of the abnormal hematopoietic clone remains only a dream, although some of the differentiation agents may have applicability for their ability to induce apoptosis and prevent growth of the MDS clone of cells. Many of the major advances in our knowledge of cancer developed through the study of hematopoietic malignancy. A lot of these advances are due to the ease of obtaining the abnormal cells. MDS provides an excellent model for studying the progression of cells from their normal to preneoplastic and fully transformed states. A lucid understanding of this progression can form the paradigm for basic science to study neoplastic progression, and the molecular biology techniques used for these studies will be the basic tools used by hematologists and oncologists in the future.

  6. Coalesced Multicentric Analysis of 2,351 Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes Indicates an Underestimation of Poor-Risk Cytogenetics of Myelodysplastic Syndromes in the International Prognostic Scoring System

    PubMed Central

    Schanz, Julie; Steidl, Christian; Fonatsch, Christa; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Nösslinger, Thomas; Tuechler, Heinz; Valent, Peter; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Aul, Carlo; Lübbert, Michael; Stauder, Reinhard; Krieger, Otto; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop; Germing, Ulrich; Haase, Detlef; Estey, Elihu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) remains the most commonly used system for risk classification in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs). The IPSS gives more weight to blast count than to cytogenetics. However, previous publications suggested that cytogenetics are underweighted in the IPSS. Here we investigate the prognostic impact of cytogenetic subgroups compared with that of bone marrow blast count in a large, multicentric, international patient cohort. Patients and Methods In total, 2,351 patients with MDS who have records in the German-Austrian and the MD Anderson Cancer Center databases were included and analyzed in univariate and multivariate models regarding overall survival and risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The data were analyzed separately for patients treated with supportive care without specific therapy, with AML-like chemotherapy, or with other therapy regimens (low-dose chemotherapy, demethylating agents, immune modulating agents, valproic acid, and cyclosporine). Results The prognostic impact of poor-risk cytogenetic findings (as defined by the IPSS classification) on overall survival was as unfavorable as an increased (> 20%) blast count. The hazard ratio (compared with an abnormal karyotype or a bone marrow blast count < 5%) was 3.3 for poor-risk cytogenetics, 4.8 for complex abnormalities harboring chromosomes 5 and/or 7, and 3.1 for a blast count of 21% to 30% (P < .01 for all categories). The predictive power of the IPSS cytogenetic subgroups was unaffected by type of therapy given. Conclusion The independent prognostic impact of poor-risk cytogenetics on overall survival is equivalent to the impact of high blast counts. This finding should be considered in the upcoming revision of the IPSS. PMID:21519021

  7. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  8. Aortic Involvement in Pediatric Marfan syndrome: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ekhomu, Omonigho; Naheed, Zahra J

    2015-06-01

    Outlining specific protocols for the management of pediatric patients with Marfan syndrome has been challenging. This is mostly due to a dearth of clinical studies performed in pediatric patients. In Marfan syndrome, the major sources of morbidity and mortality relate to the cardiovascular system. In this review, we focus on aortic involvement seen in pediatric patients with Marfan syndrome, ranging from aortic dilatation to aortic rupture and heart failure. We discuss the histological, morphological, and pathogenetic basis of the cardiac manifestations seen in pediatric Marfan syndrome and use a specific case to depict our experienced range of cardiovascular manifestations. The survival for patients with Marfan syndrome may approach the expected survival for non-affected patients, with optimal management. With this potentiality in mind, we explore possible and actual management considerations for pediatric Marfan syndrome, examining both medical and surgical therapy modalities that can make the possibility of improved survival a reality.

  9. Chromothripsis: Basis of a Concurrent Unusual Association between Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, Wael

    2014-01-01

    A 20 year old male was initially diagnosed suffering from Primary ciliary dyskinesia with symptoms of bronchiectasis, severe frontal, maxillary and ethmoid sinus disease. At the age of 20, the patient was also diagnosed with Myelodysplastic syndrome requiring Bone marrow transplant due to the advanced stage at time of presentation. Primary ciliary dyskinesia and Myelodsyplastic syndrome are both rare clinical conditions found in the general population, especially in young adults. This rare combination of disorders has never been reported in literature to the best of the author's knowledge. The presence of an advanced cancer and a genetic abnormality due to two deletions occurring in two arms of the same chromosome can be explained on the base of chromothripsis. A number of evidences have been published in the literature, about multiple deletions in chromosome 5 and advanced stages of MDS being associated with chromothripsis however this is the first case report on two deletions in chromosome 7 giving rise to two different clinical entities requiring multiple modes of management. PMID:25254125

  10. Molecular pathology of myelodysplastic syndromes: biology of medullary stromal and hematopoietic cells (review).

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Masanobu; Kurata, Morito; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Abe, Shinya; Suzuki, Shiho; Umeda, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have been defined as a disease entity based on clinical features and morphological findings. Despite similarities in clinical manifestations, genetic abnormalities occurring in hematopoietic cells are heterogeneous among the syndromes. However, recent investigations have revealed that there are common biological events in the bone marrow of MDS cases. Most notably, excessive apoptosis of hematopoietic cells was observed to be induced by the bone marrow microenvironment. The apoptosis was mediated by paracrine as well as autocrine factors, suggesting that medullary stromal and hematopoietic cells play a role in the pathology of disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα, in the bone marrow microenvironment are predominantly paracrine mediators of apoptosis. Regarding autocrine stimulation mechanisms, it has recently been shown that the deregulation of ribosomal protein is capable of initiating a stress response in the hematopoietic cell through a p53-mediated signaling pathway. Thus, both the stromal cells of the bone marrow microenvironment and hematopoietic cells themselves possess a common and characteristic biology in this heterogeneous disease entity.

  11. Allo-SCT conditioning for myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with clofarabine, cytarabine and ATG.

    PubMed

    Martin, M G; Uy, G L; Procknow, E; Stockerl-Goldstein, K; Cashen, A; Westervelt, P; Abboud, C N; Augustin, K; Luo, J; DiPersio, J F; Vij, R

    2009-07-01

    The application of myeloablative Allo-SCT is limited by its associated morbidity and mortality. Reduced-intensity conditioning regimens attempt to diminish these, but are associated with a higher risk of disease relapse. Given the evidence of activity of clofarabine and cytarabine in myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML), we explored a novel reduced-intensity conditioning regimen based on this backbone. Patients received clofarabine 40 mg/m(2) i.v. on days -6 to -2, cytarabine 1 g/m(2) i.v. on days -6 to -2 and anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) 1 mg/kg on day -4 and 2.5 mg/kg x 2 days on days -3 and -2. Seven patients were enrolled. Their median age was 54 years; three were with MDS and four with AML. The median duration of neutropenia was 14 days and that of thrombocytopenia was 22 days. Toxicities included hand-foot syndrome (57% grade 2), elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (57% grade 3), elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (86% grade 3) and hyperbilirubinemia (29% grade 3-5). No acute GVHD was observed. Enrollment to the trial was halted after three of the first seven patients expired on days +15, +26 and +32. Three of the four surviving patients have relapsed with a median TTP of 152 days. This regimen was not sufficiently immunosuppressive to ensure engraftment, and was associated with substantial morbidity and mortality.

  12. Myeloablative Versus Reduced-Intensity Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Bart L; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Logan, Brent R; Wu, Juan; Devine, Steven M; Porter, David L; Maziarz, Richard T; Warlick, Erica D; Fernandez, Hugo F; Alyea, Edwin P; Hamadani, Mehdi; Bashey, Asad; Giralt, Sergio; Geller, Nancy L; Leifer, Eric; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Mendizabal, Adam M; Horowitz, Mary M; Deeg, H Joachim; Horwitz, Mitchell E

    2017-04-10

    Purpose The optimal regimen intensity before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is unknown. We hypothesized that lower treatment-related mortality (TRM) with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) would result in improved overall survival (OS) compared with myeloablative conditioning (MAC). To test this hypothesis, we performed a phase III randomized trial comparing MAC with RIC in patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes. Patients and Methods Patients age 18 to 65 years with HCT comorbidity index ≤ 4 and < 5% marrow myeloblasts pre-HCT were randomly assigned to receive MAC (n = 135) or RIC (n = 137) followed by HCT from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors. The primary end point was OS 18 months post-random assignment based on an intent-to-treat analysis. Secondary end points included relapse-free survival (RFS) and TRM. Results Planned enrollment was 356 patients; accrual ceased at 272 because of high relapse incidence with RIC versus MAC (48.3%; 95% CI, 39.6% to 56.4% and 13.5%; 95% CI, 8.3% to 19.8%, respectively; P < .001). At 18 months, OS for patients in the RIC arm was 67.7% (95% CI, 59.1% to 74.9%) versus 77.5% (95% CI, 69.4% to 83.7%) for those in the MAC arm (difference, 9.8%; 95% CI, -0.8% to 20.3%; P = .07). TRM with RIC was 4.4% (95% CI, 1.8% to 8.9%) versus 15.8% (95% CI, 10.2% to 22.5%) with MAC ( P = .002). RFS with RIC was 47.3% (95% CI, 38.7% to 55.4%) versus 67.8% (95% CI, 59.1% to 75%) with MAC ( P < .01). Conclusion OS was higher with MAC, but this was not statistically significant. RIC resulted in lower TRM but higher relapse rates compared with MAC, with a statistically significant advantage in RFS with MAC. These data support the use of MAC as the standard of care for fit patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes.

  13. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in the Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common disorder characterized by hyperandrogenism and disordered gonadotropin secretion, often associated with insulin resistance. The syndrome, which modulates both hormonal and metabolic processes, is the most common endocrinopathy in reproductive-age women and increases a woman's risk of infertility, endometrial pathology, and cardiometabolic disease. As it is currently defined, PCOS most likely encompasses several distinct diseases with similar clinical phenotypes but different underlying pathophysiological processes. However, hyperandrogenism remains the syndrome's clinical hallmark. The clinical manifestations of PCOS often emerge during childhood or in the peripubertal years, suggesting that the syndrome is influenced by fetal programming and/or early postnatal events. However, given that the full clinical spectrum of PCOS does not typically appear until puberty, a “two-hit” hypothesis has been proposed: (1) a girl develops hyperandrogenism via one or more of many different potential mechanisms; (2) the preexisting hyperandrogenism subsequently disturbs the hypothalamic–pituitary–ovarian axis, resulting in ovulatory dysfunction and sustained hyperandrogenism. No consensus guidelines exist regarding the diagnosis and management of PCOS in the pediatric population; however, because the syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, the clinical evaluation of girls suspected of having PCOS is aimed at excluding other causes of androgen excess and menstrual dysfunction. For the syndrome's management, emphasis is placed on lifestyle and symptom-directed treatment. PMID:20939704

  14. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; CD45-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  15. Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  16. Minimally invasive colopexy for pediatric Chilaiditi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Wayne A; Cafasso, Danielle E; Fernandez, Minela; Edwards, Mary J

    2011-03-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by abdominal pain, respiratory distress, constipation, and vomiting in association with Chilaiditi's sign. Chilaiditi's sign is the finding on plain roentgenogram of colonic interposition between the liver and diaphragm and is usually asymptomatic. Surgery is typically reserved for cases of catastrophic colonic volvulus or perforation because of the syndrome. We present a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with Chilaiditi syndrome and resulting failure to thrive because of severe abdominal pain and vomiting, which did not improve with laxatives and dietary changes. He underwent a laparoscopic gastrostomy tube placement and laparoscopic colopexy of the transverse colon to the falciform ligament and anterior abdominal wall. Postoperatively, his symptoms resolved completely, as did his failure to thrive. His gastrostomy tube was removed 3 months after surgery and never required use. This is the first case of Chilaiditi syndrome in the pediatric literature we are aware of that was treated with an elective, minimally invasive colopexy. In cases of severe Chilaiditi syndrome refractory to medical treatment, a minimally invasive colopexy should be considered as a possible treatment option and potentially offered before development of life-threatening complications such as volvulus or perforation.

  17. Trisomy 8, a Cytogenetic Abnormality in Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Is Constitutional or Not?

    PubMed

    Saumell, Sílvia; Solé, Francesc; Arenillas, Leonor; Montoro, Julia; Valcárcel, David; Pedro, Carme; Sanzo, Carmen; Luño, Elisa; Giménez, Teresa; Arnan, Montserrat; Pomares, Helena; De Paz, Raquel; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Jerez, Andrés; Martínez, Ana B; Sánchez-Castro, Judith; Rodríguez-Gambarte, Juan D; Raya, José M; Ríos, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Rivera, María; Espinet, Blanca; Florensa, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Isolated trisomy 8 is not considered presumptive evidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in cases without minimal morphological criteria. One reason given is that trisomy 8 (+8) can be found as a constitutional mosaicism (cT8M). We tried to clarify the incidence of cT8M in myeloid neoplasms, specifically in MDS, and the diagnostic value of isolated +8 in MDS. Twenty-two MDS and 10 other myeloid neoplasms carrying +8 were studied. Trisomy 8 was determined in peripheral blood by conventional cytogenetics (CC) and on granulocytes, CD3+ lymphocytes and oral mucosa cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In peripheral blood CC, +8 was seen in 4/32 patients. By FISH, only one patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia showed +8 in all cell samples and was interpreted as a cT8M. In our series +8 was acquired in all MDS. Probably, once discarded cT8M by FISH from CD3+ lymphocytes and non-hematological cells, +8 should be considered with enough evidence to MDS.

  18. Predictors of Neuropsychological Change in Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Mary-Ellen; Chang, Grace; Jones, Jennifer A.; Antin, Joseph R.; Orav, E. John

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the course of neuropsychological functioning in patients with chronic myelogeous leukemia (n = 91) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 15) who underwent standard treatment for their disease or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at baseline, 12 months, and 18 months post-treatment. At baseline, 23% of the participants (n = 75) in the longitudinal sample had Z-scores on at least one of the neuropsychological tests that were <1.4. Participants in the study showed improvement over baseline at the 12 and 18 months assessments. The average Z-scores for the six cognitive domains in the longitudinal data set over the course of the study ranged from −0.89 to 0.59. Significant predictors of change in neuropsychological test scores included age, with older participants showing less improvement over time. Other predictors included baseline cognitive domains (language, memory, and attention), previous cocaine use, disease status, intelligence quotient, and quality of life measures. Findings support previous studies in patients with hematological malignancies who showed cognitive impairments at baseline prior to HSCT. However, there was little evidence for further cognitive decline over the course of 18 months. PMID:23391504

  19. Gene Expression and Methylation Pattern in HRK Apoptotic Gene in Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zaker, Farhad; Amirizadeh, Naser; Nasiri, Nahid; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Mehrasa, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are a clonal bone marrow (BM) disease characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, dysplastic maturation and progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Methylation silencing of HRK has been found in several human malignancies. In this study, we explored the association of HRK methylation status with its expression, clinical parameters and MDS subtypes in MDS patients. To study the methylation status of HRK gene, we applied Methylation Sensitive-High Resolution Melting Curve Analysis (MS-HRM) in MDS patients, as well as healthy controls and EpiTect®PCR Control DNA. Real time RT-PCR was used for gene expression analysis. Methylation frequency in promoter region of HRK in patient samples was 20.37%. Methylation of HRK was significantly related to transcriptional downregulation (P=0.023). The difference in frequency of hypermethylated HRK gene was significant between good (10%) and poor (71.42%) cytogenetic risk groups (P= 0.001), advanced stage MDS patients (66.66%) in comparison with early stage MDS patients (2.56%) (P= 0.00), higher- risk MDS group (61.53%) and lower- risk MDS group (7.31%) (P= 0.00). HRK hypermethylation was associated with advanced- stage MDS and downregulation of HRK gene may play a role in the progression of MDS.

  20. Gene Expression and Methylation Pattern in HRK Apoptotic Gene in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zaker, Farhad; Amirizadeh, Naser; Nasiri, Nahid; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Mehrasa, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are a clonal bone marrow (BM) disease characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, dysplastic maturation and progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Methylation silencing of HRK has been found in several human malignancies. In this study, we explored the association of HRK methylation status with its expression, clinical parameters and MDS subtypes in MDS patients. To study the methylation status of HRK gene, we applied Methylation Sensitive-High Resolution Melting Curve Analysis (MS-HRM) in MDS patients, as well as healthy controls and EpiTect®PCR Control DNA. Real time RT-PCR was used for gene expression analysis. Methylation frequency in promoter region of HRK in patient samples was 20.37%. Methylation of HRK was significantly related to transcriptional downregulation (P=0.023). The difference in frequency of hypermethylated HRK gene was significant between good (10%) and poor (71.42%) cytogenetic risk groups (P= 0.001), advanced stage MDS patients (66.66%) in comparison with early stage MDS patients (2.56%) (P= 0.00), higher- risk MDS group (61.53%) and lower- risk MDS group (7.31%) (P= 0.00). HRK hypermethylation was associated with advanced- stage MDS and downregulation of HRK gene may play a role in the progression of MDS. PMID:27478805

  1. Impact of iron overload and potential benefit from iron chelation in low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Niraj; Vallumsetla, Nishanth; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer; Verma, Amit; Ginzburg, Yelena

    2014-08-07

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are a group of heterogeneous clonal bone marrow disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral blood cytopenias, and potential for malignant transformation. Lower/intermediate-risk MDSs are associated with longer survival and high red blood cell (RBC) transfusion requirements resulting in secondary iron overload. Recent data suggest that markers of iron overload portend a relatively poor prognosis, and retrospective analysis demonstrates that iron chelation therapy is associated with prolonged survival in transfusion-dependent MDS patients. New data provide concrete evidence of iron's adverse effects on erythroid precursors in vitro and in vivo. Renewed interest in the iron field was heralded by the discovery of hepcidin, the main serum peptide hormone negative regulator of body iron. Evidence from β-thalassemia suggests that regulation of hepcidin by erythropoiesis dominates regulation by iron. Because iron overload develops in some MDS patients who do not require RBC transfusions, the suppressive effect of ineffective erythropoiesis on hepcidin may also play a role in iron overload. We anticipate that additional novel tools for measuring iron overload and a molecular-mechanism-driven description of MDS subtypes will provide a deeper understanding of how iron metabolism and erythropoiesis intersect in MDSs and improve clinical management of this patient population.

  2. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome in a case of cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Naofumi; Shinohara, Kenji; Ota, Ituro; Muraki, Kazuhiko; Shimohakamada, Yoko

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) in adult T-cell lymphoma. A 69-year-old man suffered from cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma, which was treated with radiation to the skin and combination chemotherapy of CHOP-V-MMV and VEPA-B. After 14 months of these therapies, anemia and thrombocytopenia appeared, and bone marrow aspiration smears showed immature myeloblasts, dysplastic erythroblasts, and micromegakaryocytes. Therapy-related MDS of refractory anemia with an excess of blasts was diagnosed. Cytogenetic study of the bone marrow cells showed 5q- and additional abnormalities. Rearrangement of the MLL gene was observed in the bone marrow cells. Mutations of N-ras codons at 12,13, and 61, p53 tumor suppressor gene, and monoclonal integration of human T-lymphotrophic virus -1 provirus DNA were not observed in the bone marrow cells. The patient died of pneumonia 21 months after diagnosis of cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma.

  3. T-cell large granular lymphocyte proliferation in myelodysplastic syndromes: Clinicopathological features and prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Sokol, Lubomir; Bennett, John M; Moscinski, Lynn C; List, Alan; Zhang, Ling

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory and immune dysregulation are crucial in the initiation and development of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). It is noted that clonal T-cell large granular lymphocyte (T-LGL) proliferation associated with MDS is not uncommon. However, clinicopathological features, and prognostic and predictive value of presence of T-LGL proliferation in MDS patients is not very clear. This study compared 35 MDS patients with T-LGL proliferation with 36 MDS patients without T-LGL proliferation and summarized clinicopathologic features, including peripheral blood LGL cell counts, immunophenotype, T cell receptor gene rearrangement, bone marrow hematopoietic status, and adjuvant immunosuppressive therapy. The peripheral blood CD3+/CD57+ cell counts were significantly different (p<0.01) between the two groups. Notably, on examination of the bone marrow, MDS patients with T-LGL proliferation showed more frequent hypocellularity and/or lineage hypoplasia, particularly erythroid hypoplasia. On survival analysis, no overall difference was noted between MDS patients with T-LGL proliferation and those without T-LGL proliferation, and between the patients who received therapy for LGL and those who did not receive adjuvant therapy for LGL in the same risk group. In conclusion, T-LGL proliferation present in MDS patients can be associated with bone marrow hypocellularity and lineage hypoplasia. Although immunosuppressive therapy to eliminate T-LGL cells is potentially beneficial to the MDS patients with associated T-LGL proliferation, there is no overall survival benefit to the patients who received such treatment.

  4. The myelodysplastic syndromes flow cytometric score: a three-parameter prognostic flow cytometric scoring system.

    PubMed

    Alhan, C; Westers, T M; Cremers, E M P; Cali, C; Witte, B I; Ossenkoppele, G J; van de Loosdrecht, A A

    2016-03-01

    The prognosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is currently estimated by using the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). Several studies have shown that further refinement of prognostication for MDS can be achieved by adding flow cytometric parameters. However, widespread implementation of flow cytometry for the prognosis of MDS is hampered by complexity of the analysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to construct a robust and practical flow cytometric score that could be implemented as a routine procedure. To achieve this, bone marrow aspirates of 109 MDS patients were analyzed by flow cytometry. A second cohort consisting of 103 MDS patients was used to validate the MDS flow cytometric score (MFS). The parameters forming the MFS were sideward light scatter and CD117 expression of myeloid progenitor cells and CD13 expression on monocytes. Three MFS risk categories were formed. Patients with MDS and intermediate MFS scores had significantly better overall survival (OS) compared with the patients with high MFS scores. The MFS further refined prognostication within the IPSS-R low-risk category, by identifying patients with worse OS in case of high MFS. In conclusion, a practical three parameter flow cytometric prognostic score was constructed enabling further refinement of prognostication of MDS.

  5. Management of patients receiving antithymocyte globulin for aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bevans, Margaret F; Shalabi, Reem A

    2004-08-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used commonly in patients with severe aplastic anemia and those undergoing renal transplant. Its utility also is being explored in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome, conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and prophylaxis of graft-versus-host disease. As indications for ATG expand, knowledge regarding its administration and management of associated toxicities is needed. These toxicities range from life-threatening anaphylaxis associated with the infusion to flu-like symptoms that occur one to two weeks after the infusion. Adverse effects are classified according to the severity and system impacted. Mild toxicities respond to comfort measures and include fever, chills, urticarial rash, and vomiting. Moderate toxicities require acute interventions and include fluid-responsive hypotension, nonischemic chest pain, and reversible oxygen desaturation. Severe toxicities require intensive support and include those refractory to earlier intervention. Management of these toxicities usually is limited to fluid resuscitation and noninvasive monitoring. Occurrence of infusion-related toxicities may require premature discontinuation of therapy. Therefore, an educated healthcare team and interdisciplinary clinical management guidelines are important to ensure the safe administration and complete course of ATG.

  6. Lenalidomide for myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q): how long should it last?

    PubMed

    Vozella, Federico; Latagliata, Roberto; Carmosino, Ida; Volpicelli, Paola; Montagna, Chiara; Romano, Angela; Roberto, Amanda; Finsinger, Paola; Mancini, Marco; Breccia, Massimo; Oliva, Esther; Oliva, Esther

    2015-03-01

    Lenalidomide induces in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and del(5q) erythroid and cytogenetic response rates as high as 75% and 50%, respectively. It is still unclear, however, how long lenalidomide treatment should be continued and whether or not the drug could be interrupted. To assess the feasibility of lenalidomide discontinuation, we revised a cohort of 16 low-risk MDS patients with del(5q) treated at our institute in a phase II multicentric Italian study. Among the 12 responding patients, four discontinued lenalidomide while in complete response. All four patients needed during treatment a permanent lenalidomide reduction from 10 to 5 mg/day because of haematological toxicity (three patients) or grade 3 muscular and bone pain (one patient). At lenalidomide discontinuation after 16, 20, 27 and 20 months from the start, respectively, all four patients were in complete hematologic response and three forth in complete cytogenetic response. Three patients are still in response after 36, 30 and 20 months from lenalidomide discontinuation, respectively: The remaining patient relapsed after 20 months, and she is now receiving a new course of lenalidomide. In conclusion, long-lasting remissions are achievable in MDS patients with del(5q) in complete response after lenalidomide discontinuation.

  7. Outcomes for Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tambaro, Francesco Paolo; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; O’Brien, Susan M.; Faderl, Stefan H.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Burger, Jan A.; Pierce, Sherry; Wang, Xuemei; Do, Kim-Anh; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Keating, Michael J.; Wierda, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia (AL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are uncommon in CLL. We retrospectively identified 95 patients with CLL also diagnosed with AL (n=38) or MDS (n=57), either concurrently (n=5) or subsequent (n=90) to CLL diagnosis and report their outcomes. Median number of CLL treatments prior to AL and MDS was 2(0–9) and 1(0–8), respectively; the most common regimen was purine analogue combined with alkylating agent±CD20 mAb. Twelve had no prior CLL treatment. Among 38 with AL, 33 had AML, 3 had ALL (1Ph+), 1 had biphenotypic, and 1 had extramedullary (bladder) AML. Unfavorable AML karyotype was noted in 26, intermediate-risk in 7. There was no association between survival from AL and number of prior CLL regimens or karyotype. Expression of CD7 on blasts was associated with shorter survival. Among MDS cases, all IPSS were represented; karyotype was unfavorable in 36, intermediate in 6, and favorable in 12 patients; 10 experienced transformation to AML. Shorter survival from MDS correlated with higher-risk IPSS, poor-risk karyotype, and increased number of prior CLL treatments. Overall, outcomes for patients with CLL subsequently diagnosed with AL or MDS were poor; AL/MDS occurred without prior CLL treatment. Effective therapies for these patients are desperately needed. PMID:26290497

  8. Mutational hierarchies in myelodysplastic syndromes dynamically adapt and evolve upon therapy response and failure.

    PubMed

    Mossner, Maximilian; Jann, Johann-Christoph; Wittig, Janina; Nolte, Florian; Fey, Stephanie; Nowak, Verena; Obländer, Julia; Pressler, Jovita; Palme, Iris; Xanthopoulos, Christina; Boch, Tobias; Metzgeroth, Georgia; Röhl, Henning; Witt, Stephanie H; Dukal, Helene; Klein, Corinna; Schmitt, Steffen; Gelß, Patrick; Platzbecker, Uwe; Balaian, Ekaterina; Fabarius, Alice; Blum, Helmut; Schulze, Torsten J; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Trumpp, Andreas; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Medyouf, Hind; Nowak, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Clonal evolution is believed to be a main driver for progression of various types of cancer and implicated in facilitating resistance to drugs. However, the hierarchical organization of malignant clones in the hematopoiesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and its impact on response to drug therapy remain poorly understood. Using high-throughput sequencing of patient and xenografted cells, we evaluated the intratumoral heterogeneity (n= 54) and reconstructed mutational trajectories (n = 39) in patients suffering from MDS (n = 52) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia-1 (n = 2). We identified linear and also branching evolution paths and confirmed on a patient-specific level that somatic mutations in epigenetic regulators and RNA splicing genes frequently constitute isolated disease-initiating events. Using high-throughput exome- and/or deep-sequencing, we analyzed 103 chronologically acquired samples from 22 patients covering a cumulative observation time of 75 years MDS disease progression. Our data revealed highly dynamic shaping of complex oligoclonal architectures, specifically upon treatment with lenalidomide and other drugs. Despite initial clinical response to treatment, patients' marrow persistently remained clonal with rapid outgrowth of founder-, sub-, or even fully independent clones, indicating an increased dynamic rate of clonal turnover. The emergence and disappearance of specific clones frequently correlated with changes of clinical parameters, highlighting their distinct and far-reaching functional properties. Intriguingly, increasingly complex mutational trajectories are frequently accompanied by clinical progression during the course of disease. These data substantiate a need for regular broad molecular monitoring to guide clinical treatment decisions in MDS.

  9. The role of epigenetics in the regulation of apoptosis in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karlic, Heidrun; Herrmann, Harald; Varga, Franz; Thaler, Roman; Reitermaier, Rene; Spitzer, Silvia; Ghanim, Viviane; Blatt, Katharina; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter; Pfeilstöcker, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Disordered stem cell epigenetics and apoptosis-regulating mechanisms contribute essentially to the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and may trigger disease-progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Expression of apoptosis-mediators FAS (CD95) and DAPK1 the latter being also known for its association with autophagy are upregulated in neoplastic cells in patients with low-risk MDS and epigenetically silenced and downregulated in high-risk MDS and AML as confirmed by a study 50 MDS and 30 AMLs complementing this review. 5-Azacytidine (AZA) and 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine (DAC), promoted FAS and DAPK1 gene demethylation and their (re)expression as well as apoptosis in leukemic cell lines (HL-60, KG1) which can be reversed by siRNA against FAS. Thus, promoter-demethylation of FAS and DAPK1 represents a critical mechanism of drug-induced apoptosis in neoplastic cells in MDS and AML which underscores the clinical implication of epigenetically active therapies.

  10. Donor lymphocyte infusion to treat relapse after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Depil, S; Deconinck, E; Milpied, N; Sutton, L; Witz, F; Jouet, J P; Damaj, G; Yakoub-Agha, I

    2004-03-01

    Donor lymphocyte infusion has become established as a salvage therapy for patients with hematological disorders relapsing after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The role of donor lymphocyte infusion for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) remains to be established. Between July 1993 and October 2001, 14 patients with MDS relapsing after allogeneic BMT received DLI as salvage therapy. At the time of BMT, one patient had RA, nine had RAEB, of whom three were in CR after induction-type chemotherapy, two had RAEB-T, one had CMML and one had AML. Donors were HLA-matched siblings (n=12), HLA-matched other relative (n=1) and unrelated (n=1). At the time of relapse, the median marrow blast count was 9%. The median CD3+ cell dose administered was 6.3 x 10(7)/kg. With a median follow-up of 49 months, six patients were alive, of whom two were in CR after DLI alone and remained disease-free, two were in CR after a second BMT and two had active disease. Eight patients died of disease progression. Although DLI alone seems to be effective in a small number of patients with MDS, other treatment strategies, including prior debulking chemotherapy, deserve investigation.

  11. Functional evidence implicating chromosome 7q22 haploinsufficiency in myelodysplastic syndrome pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jasmine C; Weinfurtner, Kelley M; Alzamora, Maria Del Pilar; Kogan, Scott C; Burgess, Michael R; Zhang, Yan; Nakitandwe, Joy; Ma, Jing; Cheng, Jinjun; Chen, Shann-Ching; Ho, Theodore T; Flach, Johanna; Reynaud, Damien; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Downing, James R; Shannon, Kevin

    2015-07-20

    Chromosome 7 deletions are highly prevalent in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and likely contribute to aberrant growth through haploinsufficiency. We generated mice with a heterozygous germ line deletion of a 2-Mb interval of chromosome band 5A3 syntenic to a commonly deleted segment of human 7q22 and show that mutant hematopoietic cells exhibit cardinal features of MDS. Specifically, the long-term hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment is expanded in 5A3(+/del) mice, and the distribution of myeloid progenitors is altered. 5A3(+/del) HSCs are defective for lymphoid repopulating potential and show a myeloid lineage output bias. These cell autonomous abnormalities are exacerbated by physiologic aging and upon serial transplantation. The 5A3 deletion partially rescues defective repopulation in Gata2 mutant mice. 5A3(+/del) hematopoietic cells exhibit decreased expression of oxidative phosphorylation genes, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, and perturbed oxygen consumption. These studies provide the first functional data linking 7q22 deletions to MDS pathogenesis.

  12. Safety and efficacy of azacitidine in elderly patients with intermediate to high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Navada, Shyamala C.; Silverman, Lewis R.

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by morphologic features of dyspoiesis, a hyperproliferative bone marrow, and one or more peripheral blood cytopenias. In patients classified according to the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (R-IPSS) with intermediate or higher-risk disease, there is an increased risk of death due to progressive bone marrow failure or transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Azacitidine was the first DNA hypomethylating agent approved by the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of MDS and the only therapy that has demonstrated a significant survival benefit over conventional care regimens (CCRs) in patients with intermediate or higher-risk disease. Prolonged survival is independent of achieving a complete remission. Azacitidine has been used in older patients with both clinical and hematological improvement as well as an acceptable side effect profile. The most common adverse effect is myelosuppression. These findings support the use of azacitidine as an effective treatment in older patients with higher-risk MDS. PMID:28042456

  13. Massive hyperdiploidy and tetraploidy in acute myelocytic leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Renuka V; Sait, Sheila N J; Matsui, Sei-Ichi; Block, AnneMarie W; Barcos, Maurice; Slack, James L; Wetzler, Meir; Baer, Maria R

    2004-01-01

    Massive hyperdiploidy (>50 chromosomes) and tetraploidy (4n) are rare cytogenetic abnormalities in myelocytic malignancies, and their significance is unknown. We report on 11 patients with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and two patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with massive hyperdiploidy (10 patients) or tetraploidy (3 patients) seen at our institution over a 12-year period. Eleven patients were male and two were female. Age range was 44-84 years (median, 70 years). Only one AML patient had a previous MDS, and no patient had therapy-related disease. One or more copies of chromosomes 8 and 19 were gained in eight patients each; other frequently gained chromosomes included 13, 15, and 21. Eight patients had structural abnormalities in addition to chromosome gain; del(5q) was most common (five patients). Eleven patients received induction chemotherapy, but only four achieved complete remission. Survival ranged from 1 to 22 months, with a median of 6 months. We conclude that massive hyperdiploidy and tetraploidy are infrequent abnormalities in AML and MDS, are seen primarily in de novo disease in older male patients and are associated with a low remission rate and short survival. Massive hyperdiploidy and tetraploidy define a prognostically unfavorable cytogenetic group in de novo AML.

  14. The incorporation of comorbidities in the prognostication of patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Falantes, Jose F; Márquez-Malaver, Francisco J; Knight, Teresa; Calderón-Cabrera, Cristina; Martino, María L; González, Jose; Montero, Isabel; Espigado, Ildefonso; Pérez-Simón, Jose A

    2017-08-01

    Chronic medical diseases, evaluated by several comorbidities indexes have been reported to influence on overall survival in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). However, these studies included patients with lower and higher-risk disease by IPSS. This study retrospectively evaluates the role of comorbidities (evaluated by the MDS comorbidity index; MDS-CI) together with clinical parameters in a series of 232 patients with LR-MDS (defined as either an IPSS score of low/intermediate-1 and favorable cytogenetic categories by IPSS-R). In multivariate analysis, together with age >75 years, diabetes requiring therapy and hemoglobin <10 g/dL; the incorporation of comorbidities by the MDS-CI (HR = 2.5; p< 0.0001) were independently associated to the probability of nonleukemic death (NLD). The combination of these variables allowed development of a model, which categorizes patients in three different groups with significantly different probability of NLD overtime (p< 0.001). This integrated score confirms the importance of comorbidities at diagnosis of patients with LR-MDS.

  15. Functional evidence implicating chromosome 7q22 haploinsufficiency in myelodysplastic syndrome pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jasmine C; Weinfurtner, Kelley M; Alzamora, Maria del pilar; Kogan, Scott C; Burgess, Michael R; Zhang, Yan; Nakitandwe, Joy; Ma, Jing; Cheng, Jinjun; Chen, Shann-Ching; Ho, Theodore T; Flach, Johanna; Reynaud, Damien; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Downing, James R; Shannon, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 7 deletions are highly prevalent in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and likely contribute to aberrant growth through haploinsufficiency. We generated mice with a heterozygous germ line deletion of a 2-Mb interval of chromosome band 5A3 syntenic to a commonly deleted segment of human 7q22 and show that mutant hematopoietic cells exhibit cardinal features of MDS. Specifically, the long-term hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment is expanded in 5A3+/del mice, and the distribution of myeloid progenitors is altered. 5A3+/del HSCs are defective for lymphoid repopulating potential and show a myeloid lineage output bias. These cell autonomous abnormalities are exacerbated by physiologic aging and upon serial transplantation. The 5A3 deletion partially rescues defective repopulation in Gata2 mutant mice. 5A3+/del hematopoietic cells exhibit decreased expression of oxidative phosphorylation genes, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, and perturbed oxygen consumption. These studies provide the first functional data linking 7q22 deletions to MDS pathogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07839.001 PMID:26193121

  16. Effectiveness of azacitidine in unselected high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes: results from the Spanish registry.

    PubMed

    Bernal, T; Martínez-Camblor, P; Sánchez-García, J; de Paz, R; Luño, E; Nomdedeu, B; Ardanaz, M T; Pedro, C; Amigo, M L; Xicoy, B; del Cañizo, C; Tormo, M; Bargay, J; Valcárcel, D; Brunet, S; Benlloch, L; Sanz, G

    2015-09-01

    The benefit of azacitidine treatment in survival of high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients compared with conventional care treatment (CCT) has not been established outside clinical trials. To assess its effectiveness, we compared overall survival (OS) between azacitidine and conventional treatment (CCT) in high-risk MDS patients, excluding those undergoing stem cell transplantation, submitted to the Spanish MDS registry from 2000 to 2013. Several Cox regression and competing risk models, considering azacitidine as a time-dependent covariate, were used to assess survival and acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) progression. Among 821 patients included, 251 received azacitidine. Median survival was 13.4 (11.8-16) months for azacitidine-treated patients and 12.2 (11-14.1) for patients under CCT (P=0.41). In a multivariate model, age, International prognostic scoring system and lactate dehydrogenase were predictors of OS whereas azacitidine was not (adjusted odds ratio 1.08, 95% confidence interval 0.86-1.35, P=0.49). However, in patients with chromosome 7 abnormalities, a trend toward a better survival was observed in azacitidine-treated patients (median survival 13.3 (11-18) months) compared with CCT (median survival 8.6 (5-10.4) months, P=0.08). In conclusion, our data show that, in spite of a widespread use of azacitidine, there is a lack of improvement in survival over the years. Identification of predicting factors of response and survival is mandatory.

  17. Some aspects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: advances and controversy.

    PubMed

    Blau, Olga; Blau, Igor Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous group of myeloid disorders. MDS remains a disease of elderly patients; moreover, the incidence of high risk MDS is proportionally greater in elderly patients, with increased frequency of secondary acute myeloid leukemia, as well as adverse cytogenetic abnormalities. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a therapeutic approach with known curative potential for patients with MDS that allows the achievement of long-term disease control. Numerous controversies still exist regarding transplantation in MDS: timing of transplantation, disease status at transplantation and comorbidity, conditioning intensity, pretransplant therapy, and stem cell source. Various transplant modalities of different intensities and alternative donor sources are now in use. Current advances in transplant technology are allowing the consideration of older patients. This should result in a greater number of older patients benefiting from this potentially curative treatment modality. Despite advances in transplantation technology, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality associated with this approach. Nevertheless, with the introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning and thereby reduced early mortality, transplant numbers in MDS patients have significantly increased. Moreover, recent new developments with innovative drugs, including hypomethylating agents, have extended the therapeutic alternatives for MDS patients. Hypomethylating agents allow the delay of allogeneic stem cell transplantation by serving as an effective and well-tolerated means to reduce disease burden.

  18. The Interactions Between Diabetes Mellitus and Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Current State of Evidence and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Hamoudeh, Eyad; Zeidan, Amer M; Barbarotta, Lisa; Rosano, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer are disorders of global importance. Multiple epidemiologic studies show that diabetic patients have an increased risk of developing cancer of different types. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are among the most common hematologic malignancies and include a heterogeneous group of hematopoietic neoplasms characterized by dysplastic changes, low blood counts, and an increased risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Potential epigenetic and metabolic interferences between DM and MDS have been reported but are poorly understood. DM and MDS share some predisposing risk factors such as obesity. Patients with MDS and DM can experience worsening of diabetic control due to multiple factors that exacerbate hyperglycemia and insulin resistance such as stress, infections, adjunct drugs (e.g. steroids to control nausea), and others. In addition, accurate assessment of glucose control in diabetic patients who have MDS can be complicated. Alternatively, DM when associated with end-organ damage can complicate management of MDS, increase risks of complications, and limit the applicability of intensive therapeutic interventions. Here we review the current knowledge of the interactions between DM and MDS at the pathogenetic, clinical and epidemiologic levels, discuss how this knowledge could be used therapeutically to improve the outcome of patients affected by both conditions, and delineate important unmet needs that should be addressed in future research.

  19. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelodysplastic syndromes: a prospective evaluation including mutational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Fernando; Robledo, Cristina; Izquierdo-García, Francisco Miguel; Suárez-Vilela, Dimas; Benito, Rocío; Fuertes, Marta; Insunza, Andrés; Barragán, Eva; del Rey, Mónica; de Morales, José María García-Ruiz; Tormo, Mar; Salido, Eduardo; Zamora, Lurdes; Pedro, Carmen; Sánchez-del-Real, Javier; Díez-Campelo, María; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Sanz, Guillermo F.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús María

    2016-01-01

    The biological and molecular events that underlie bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are poorly understood, and its prognostic role in the era of the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) is not yet fully determined. We have evaluated the clinical and biological events that underlie bone marrow fibrotic changes, as well as its prognostic role, in a well-characterized prospective patient cohort (n=77) of primary MDS patients. The degree of marrow fibrosis was linked to parameters of erythropoietic failure, marrow cellularity, p53 protein accumulation, WT1 gene expression, and serum levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10, but not to other covariates including the IPSS-R score. The presence of bone marrow fibrosis grade 2 or higher was associated with the presence of mutations in cohesin complex genes (31.5% vs. 5.4%, p=0.006). By contrast, mutations in CALR, JAK2, PDGFRA, PDGFRB, and TP53 were very rare. Survival analysis showed that marrow fibrosis grade 2 or higher was a relevant significant predictor for of overall survival, and independent of age, performance status, and IPSS-R score in multivariate analysis. PMID:27127180

  20. [Research Progress on Gene Expression Abnormality of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells in Myelodysplastic Syndromes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Ma, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal disease involving one or more series of hematopoietic cells. Its pathogenesis is still unclear. No effective targeted drug is available to prevent this disease progression. MDS originates in hematopoietic stem cells. Recent researches found that the complex abnormal gene expression occurred in bone marrow CD34⁺ cells plays a key role in development of MDS. Some of these genes are closely related with the patient's prognosis and survival, such as DLK1, ribosomal transcripts gene, Toll-like receptors gene, EPA-1 and interferon-stimulated genes. Due to heterogeneity of this disease, abnormal gene expression profiles in bone marrow CD34⁺ cells are closely associated with particular FAB or cytogenetic subtypes. To elucidate the pathogenesis of MDS and investigate its therapeutic target, this article reviews progress of researches on abnormal gene expression profiles of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in low-risk, high-risk patients and MDS patients who carry common cytogenetic abnormalities.

  1. [Point mutations of genes encoding proteins involvedin RNA splicing in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Barańska, Marta; Czerwińska-Rybak, Joanna; Gil, Lidia; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2015-01-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) constitute heterogeneous group of clonal disorders, characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenia and increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia development. Molecular mechanisms behind MDS have not been fully explained, however recent studies based on new technologies confirmed that epigenetic abnormalities and somatic mutation in the spliceasome machinery are crucial in pathogenesis of these diseases. Abnormal mRNA splicing (excision of intronic sequences from mRNA) has been found in over half of all MDS patients and resulted in accumulation of cytogenetical and molecular changes. The biological impact of splicing factor genes mutations has been evaluated only in a limited extend and current studies concentrate on analysis of MDS transcriptome. Molecular characteristic of classical and alternative splicing is presented in the paper, according to current knowledge. We review the most prominent findings from recent years concerning mutation in the spliceasome machinery with respect to MDS phenotype and disease prognosis. Perspectives in applying of novel diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities for myelodysplasia, based on spliceosome mutations identification are also presented.

  2. Phenotypic and Cytogenetic Characterization of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Goonasekera, H. W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are vital in hematopoiesis. Whether BM-MSCs alter their characteristics in Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) is still controversial. We characterized MSCs of de novo MDS patients in Sri Lanka who have not been reported previously in the literature. We also analyzed MSCs derived from different MDS subtypes. MSCs were culture-expanded, characterized by flow cytometry, and induced towards osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Growth properties were determined using growth curves and population doubling times. Karyotyping and FISH were performed on MSCs. Cell morphology, differentiation potential, and CD marker expression of MDS-MSCs of all subtypes were comparable to those of control-MSCs. No significant growth differences were observed between control MSCs and MDS-MSCs of all subtypes (p > 0.05). 31% of MDS-MSCs had chromosomal aberrations (der(3),del(6q),del(7p), loss of chromosomes) whose BM karyotypes were normal. Highest percentage of karyotypic abnormalities was observed in RCMD-MSCs. Patients with abnormal BM karyotypes had no aberrant MSC clones. Results show that in spite of presence of genetically abnormal clones in MDS-MSC populations, in vitro phenotypic and growth characteristics of MSCs in MDS remain unchanged. Further, the occurrence of genetic abnormalities in BM-MSCs in MDS could be considered as an autonomous event from that of their hematopoietic counterparts. PMID:27660743

  3. Therapeutic Advances in Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Over the Past 40 Years

    PubMed Central

    Kantarjian, Hagop; O'Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Wierda, William; Faderl, Stefan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Estey, Elihu; Keating, Michael; Freireich, Emil J.

    2015-01-01

    Major therapeutic progress has been accomplished in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) over the past 40 years, which may not be fully appreciated by the larger medical community. The objective of this review was to briefly highlight the treatment breakthroughs in leukemia and MDS. Therapeutic progress happened through better understanding of disease pathophysiologies and rational development of targeted agents, like imatinib mesylate in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and through astute, empirical discoveries in the clinic, like all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and chlorodeoxyadenosine in hairy cell leukemia (HCL). Today, the 5- to 10-year survival rates in patients with APL and HCL exceed 80%. In patients with CML, imatinib therapy has been associated with estimated 5- to 7-year survival rates from 85% to 90%. In patients with adult acute lymphocytic leukemia, modern intensive regimens have improved the 5-year survival rates from 20% up to 40%. In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chemoimmunotherapy recently produced high rates of quality responses and improved long-term outcome. In younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the 5-year survival rates range from 40% to 50%, although elderly AML remains a therapeutic challenge. In patients with MDS, it was recently demonstrated that epigenetic therapy with hypomethylating agents improved survival. Much therapeutic progress has been witnessed in leukemia and MDS, and much more is expected to occur soon. PMID:18798533

  4. A rare case of acquired hemophilia A associated with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Mihir; Kallamadi, Rekha; Bande, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    84 year old male with past medical history of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) presented with progressive subcutaneous and muscle bleed in the right forearm and arm. Workup revealed elevated activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) - 71.8 seconds (normal 23 - 32 seconds) which was persistently elevated after mixing study (37.1 seconds immediately and 51.1 seconds after 1 hour). Further laboratory work up revealed low factor VIII level (3%) and elevated factor VIII inhibitor by Bethesda assay (3 units/ml of blood). Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) diagnosis was established and patient was treated with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVlla) to control the bleeding and also prednisone for immunosuppression. Subsequent monitoring suggested reduction of factor VIII inhibitor - antibody levels to undetectable level in 3 days and increase of factor VIII level from 3% to 50% in 5 days. Despite of improvement in the laboratory values he continued to have progression of his bleeding which involved posterior chest wall and also left arm. Due to the progression of the condition and prior expressed wish family decided to stop the aggressive treatment and patient died nine days after the diagnosis. The case report describes a rare presentation of AHA in MDS (With bone marrow cytogenetics abnormality) patient with fatal outcome. PMID:22837802

  5. YKL-40 in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Wang, Tao; Lee, Stephanie J.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Zhu, Xiaochun; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Müller, Carlheinz; Verneris, Michael R.; Müller, Klaus; Johansen, Julia S.; Vindelov, Lars; Garred, Peter

    2016-01-01

    YKL-40, also called chitinase3-like-1 protein, is an inflammatory biomarker which has been associated with disease severity in inflammatory and malignant diseases, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), multiple myeloma and lymphomas. The objective of the current study was to assess the prognostic value of pre-transplant recipient and donor plasma YKL-40 concentrations in patients with AML (n=624) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n=157) treated with allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In recipients, the plasma YKL-40 concentrations were increased when the HCT-comorbidity index was ≥5 (p=0.028). There were no significant associations between plasma YKL-40 concentrations in recipients and any outcome measures. In donors with YKL-40 plasma concentrations above the age adjusted 95th percentile a trend towards increased grade II-IV acute graft versus host disease in recipients was observed (adjusted hazard ratio 1.39 (95% confidence interval 1.00–1.94), P=0.050), with no significant associations with overall survival, treatment-related mortality or relapse. In conclusion, our study shows that YKL-40 does not aid risk stratification of patients undergoing allogeneic HCT, but suggests that YKL-40 may aid donor selection when multiple, otherwise equal, donors are available. PMID:27427920

  6. SLC7A5 act as a potential leukemic transformation target gene in myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Song, Jing; Chen, Bobin; Xu, Xiaoping; Lin, Guowei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogenous group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by increased risk of leukemic transformation. This study identifies microRNAs(miRNA) and miRNA targets that might represent leukemic transformation markers for MDS. Methods Based on our previously established nested case-control study cohort of MDS patients, we chose paired patients to undergo Angilent 8 × 15K human miRNA microarrays. Target prediction analysis was administrated using targetscan 5.1 software. We further investigated the function of target gene in MDS cell line using siRNA method, including cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, cell cycle and electron microscope. Results Finally we screened a subset of 7 miRNAs to be significantly differentially expressed between the case (at the end of follow up with leukemic transformation) and control group (at the end of follow up without leukemic transformation). Target prediction analysis revealed SLC7A5 was the common target gene of these 7 miRNAs. Further study on the function of SLC7A5 gene in SKM-1 cell line showed that downregulation of SLC7A5 inhibited SKM-1 cells proliferation, increased apoptosis and caused cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 stage. Conclusion Our data indicate that SLC7A5 gene may act as a potential leukemic transformation target gene in MDS. PMID:26657287

  7. 5-azacitidine efficacy and safety in patients aged >65 years with myelodysplastic syndromes outside clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Salaroli, Adriano; Serrao, Alessandra; Petrucci, Luigi; Mancini, Marco; Alimena, Giuliana

    2012-08-01

    The efficacy and safety of azacitidine in elderly patients (aged >65 years) with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) treated outside clinical trials are reported. Thirty-eight patients with MDS received azacitidine (75 mg/m(2), schedule 5+2 +2): seven patients were classified as having refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD), nine patients with refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) type 1, 18 patients with RAEB type 2 and four patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia type 2 (CMML-2). According to International Working Group (IWG) 2006 criteria, after the first four cycles we detected complete remission in seven patients (CR, 18%), improvement of bone marrow dysplasia and reduction of blast percentage in seven patients (partial response, 18%), stable disease in 20 patients (53%) and progression to acute leukemia in four patients (10%). Median overall survival for all patients treated was 16.4 months. Only mild non-hematologic toxicity was detected (grade 1-2 nausea and pruritus), whereas 55% of patients experienced hematologic side effects (25% grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia and 30% grade 3-4 neutropenia). Our results suggest that advanced age should not preclude effective treatment with azacitidine in non-selected elderly patients wih MDS.

  8. Analyzing transformation of myelodysplastic syndrome to secondary acute myeloid leukemia using a large patient database.

    PubMed

    Shukron, Ofir; Vainstein, Vladimir; Kündgen, Andrea; Germing, Ulrich; Agur, Zvia

    2012-09-01

    One-third of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) progress to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML), with its concomitant poor prognosis. Recently, multiple mutations have been identified in association with MDS-to-sAMLtransition, but it is still unclear whether all these mutations are necessary for transformation. If multiple independent mutations are required for the transformation, sAML risk should increase with time from MDS diagnosis. In contrast, if a single critical biological event determines sAML transformation; its risk should be constant in time elapsing from MDS diagnosis. To elucidate this question, we studied a database of 1079 patients with MDS. We classified patients according to the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), using either the French-American-British (FAB) or the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, and statistically analyzed the resulting transformation risk curves of each group. The risk of transformation after MDS diagnosis remained constant in time within three out of four risk groups, and in all four risk groups, when patients were classified according to FAB or to the WHO-determined criteria, respectively. Further subdivision by blast percentage or cytogenetics had no influence on this result. Our analysis suggests that a single random biological event leads to transformation to sAML, thus calling for the exclusion of time since MDS diagnosis from the clinical decision-making process.

  9. Abrupt evolution of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Akiko; Sakoda, Hiroto; Iwamoto, Yoshihiro; Inano, Shojiro; Sueki, Yuki; Yanagida, Soshi; Arima, Nobuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal disorder arising from an alteration in multipotent stem cells, which lose the ability of normal proliferation and differentiation. Disease progression occurs in approximately 30% MDS cases. Specific chromosomal alterations seem responsible for each step in the evolution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Multiple genetic aberrations occur during the clonal evolution of MDS; however, few studies report the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. We report a rare case of Ph-positive AML, which evolved during the course of low-risk MDS. The patient, a 76-year-old man with mild leukocytopenia, was diagnosed with MDS, refractory neutropenia (RN). After 1.5 yr, his peripheral blood and bone marrow were suddenly occupied by immature basophils and myeloblasts, indicating the onset of AML. A bone marrow smear showed multilineage dysplasia, consistent with MDS evolution. Chromosomal analysis showed an additional t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation. Because progression occurred concurrently with emergence of the Ph chromosome, we diagnosed this case as Ph-positive AML with basophilia arising from the clonal evolution of MDS. The patient was initially treated with nilotinib. A hematological response was soon achieved with disappearance of the Ph chromosome in the bone marrow. Emergence of Ph-positive AML in the course of low-risk MDS has rarely been reported. We report this case as a rare clinical course of MDS.

  10. ST-elevation myocardial infarction and myelodysplastic syndrome with acute myeloid leukemia transformation.

    PubMed

    Jao, Geoffrey T; Knovich, Mary Ann; Savage, Rodney W; Sane, David C

    2014-04-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syndrome, and newly recognized acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Standard antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy were contraindicated by the patient's thrombocytopenia and by his reported ecchymosis and gingival bleeding upon admission. He declined cardiac catheterization, was provided palliative care, and died 2 hours after hospital admission. We searched the English-language medical literature, found 8 relevant reports, and determined that the prognosis for patients with concomitant STEMI and acute myeloid leukemia is clearly worse than that for either individual condition. No guidelines exist to direct the management of STEMI and concomitant acute myeloid leukemia. In 2 reports, dual antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, and drug-eluting stent implantation were used without an increased risk of bleeding in the short term, even in the presence of thrombocytopenia. However, we think that a more conservative approach--balloon angioplasty with the provisional use of bare-metal stents--might be safer. Simultaneous chemotherapy for the acute myeloid leukemia is crucial. Older age seems to be a major risk factor: patients too frail for emergent treatment can die within hours or days.

  11. Decitabine treatment sensitizes tumor cells to T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; He, Qi; Tao, Ying; Guo, Juan; Xu, Feng; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhao, You-Shan; Wu, Dong; Zhou, Li-Yu; Su, Ji-Ying; Song, Lu-Xi; Xiao, Chao; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chun-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Decitabine treatment improves immunological recognition that increases expression of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) against solid tumors. The mechanisms of decitabine enhancement of immunogenicity when used for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) remain unclear. In the present study, we found relatively low baseline expression of MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3, and SP17 in MDS-derived cell lines. Decitabine treatment significantly improved MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3, and SP17 expression in these cell lines and in MDS patients. Decitabine-treated K562 and SKM-1 target cells with incrementally induced MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3, or SP17 levels up-regulated T lymphocyte function. Decitabine treatment improved CTA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) recognition of MDS cells via the up-regulation of CTAs. This response was accompanied by enhanced T lymphocyte function and HLA class antigen expression, and increased ICAM-1. These findings suggested that decitabine may have a broad range of therapeutic applications when it is used in association with active adaptive immunity responses against up-regulated CTAs. PMID:28337274

  12. Hypocellular myelodysplastic syndrome with myelofibrosis in acute myeloid leukemia transformation: A case report.

    PubMed

    Song, Kui; Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Min

    2015-07-01

    Primary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with myelofibrosis is a rare hematological disorder that should be classified as a distinct subgroup of MDS. Treatment of MDS with myelofibrosis remains problematic and the prognosis is poor in these patients, particularly following transformation into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The current study presents the case of a 28-year-old male diagnosed with MDS associated with myelofibrosis, together with hypocellular bone marrow features. Following induction chemotherapy consisting of mitoxantrone and cytarabine, the patient achieved complete remission, but developed severe myelofibrosis. The patient relapsed and the disease transformed into AML 12 months later. However, the extent of the myelofibrosis was markedly alleviated upon administration of a FLAG regimen that consisted of fludarabine, cytarabine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during the AML transformation. After one course of the FLAG regimen, the patient achieved a second complete remission. As there was no suitable donor for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the patient relapsed and succumbed shortly after. In conclusion, MDS with fibrosis is an aggressive disease, but the degree of myelofibrosis may not be associated with the progression of hypocellular MDS, and allogeneic HSCT remains a potentially curative option for affected patients.

  13. Up-front allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia arising from the myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yunsuk; Kim, Sung-Doo; Park, Young-Hoon; Lee, Jae Seok; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Seol, Miee; Lee, Young-Shin; Kang, Young-Ah; Jeon, Mijin; Jung, Ah Rang; Lee, Je-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    In patients with secondary acute myeloid leukemia (s-AML) arising from the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), treatment outcome is unsatisfactory. We compared up-front allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to induction chemotherapy (IC) as an initial treatment in patients with s-AML arising from MDS. This retrospective study included 85 patients who were diagnosed with s-AML arising from MDS; 11 patients proceeded to up-front HCT without IC (HCT group) and 74 received IC (IC group) as an initial treatment for s-AML, 28 of whom subsequently underwent HCT. In the IC group, 41.9% achieved complete remission (CR) compared to 81.8% in the HCT group (p = 0.013). The HCT group showed a significantly longer event-free survival (EFS) than the IC group (median 29.2 vs. 5.2 months, p = 0.042). Overall survival of the HCT group was higher than that of the IC group, but the difference was not statistically significant (median 34.6 vs. 7.6 months, p = 0.149). After adjustment for other clinical factors, outcome in the HCT group was significantly better than in the IC group in terms of CR rate (hazard ratio, HR, 11.195; p = 0.007) and EFS (HR, 0.384; p = 0.029). Up-front HCT is a viable option in s-AML arising from MDS if an appropriate donor is available.

  14. Incidence, etiology and timing of infections following azacitidine therapy for myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Trubiano, Jason A; Dickinson, Michael; Thursky, Karin A; Spelman, Timothy; Seymour, John F; Slavin, Monica A; Worth, Leon J

    2017-02-28

    We examine the infective complications occurring during azacitidine (AZA) therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A retrospective review of patients receiving ≥1 cycle of AZA for MDS or AML was performed. Patient demographics, infection prophylaxis/episodes and outcomes were evaluated. Sixty eight patients received 884 AZA cycles. Bacterial infections occurred in 25% of cycle-1 and 27% of cycle-2 AZA therapy. Febrile neutropenia complicated 5.3% of AZA cycles, bacteremia 2% and invasive Aspergillosis 0.3%. Using Poisson modeling, a very high IPSS-R (RR 10.26, 95% CI 1.20, 87.41, p= .033) was identified as an independent risk factor for infection. Infection-related attributable mortality was 23%. The burden of infection is high in AZA-treated patients, associated with high attributable mortality. Over 25% of AZA cycles 1 and 2 were complicated by infection, predominantly bacterial, rates dropping to <10% after cycle-5.

  15. TP53 mutations predict decitabine-induced complete responses in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Kang; Zhao, You-Shan; Xu, Feng; Guo, Juan; Zhang, Zheng; He, Qi; Wu, Dong; Wu, Ling-Yun; Su, Ji-Ying; Song, Lu-Xi; Xiao, Chao; Li, Xiao

    2017-02-01

    To identify the molecular signatures that predict responses to decitabine (DAC), we examined baseline gene mutations (28 target genes) in 109 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients at diagnosis. We determined that TP53 mutations predicted complete response (CR), as 10 of 15 patients (66·7%) who possessed TP53 mutations achieved a CR. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that TP53 mutations are the only molecular signatures predictive of a CR to DAC in MDS. Among the ten patients with TP53 mutations who achieved a CR, nine presented with complex karyotypes due to abnormalities involving chromosome 5 and/or chromosome 7, and eight possessed monosomies. Although TP53 mutations were associated with a higher frequency of CRs, they were not associated with improved survival. Poor outcomes were attributed to early relapses and transformation to acute myeloid leukaemia after CR. Post-DAC therapy patient gene mutation profiles showed that most CR patients exhibited fewer gene mutations after achieving a CR. It seems that suppression of these gene mutations was facilitated by DAC, resulting in a CR. In summary, TP53 mutations might predict decitabine-induced complete responses in patients with MDS. DAC-induced responses may result from partial suppression of malignant clones containing mutated TP53 genes.

  16. Hepcidin levels and their determinants in different types of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria; Girelli, Domenico; Sanna, Alessandro; Martinelli, Nicola; Duca, Lorena; Campostrini, Natascia; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Corbella, Michela; Bosi, Alberto; Reda, Gianluigi; Olivieri, Oliviero; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2011-01-01

    Iron overload may represent an additional clinical problem in patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS), with recent data suggesting prognostic implications. Beyond red blood cells transfusions, dysregulation of hepcidin, the key iron hormone, may play a role, but studies until now have been hampered by technical problems. Using a recently validated assay, we measured serum hepcidin in 113 patients with different MDS subtypes. Mean hepcidin levels were consistently heterogeneous across different MDS subtypes, with the lowest levels in refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS, 1.43 nM) and the highest in refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB, 11.3 nM) or in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML, 10.04 nM) (P = 0.003 by ANOVA). MDS subtypes remained significant predictors of hepcidin in multivariate analyses adjusted for ferritin and transfusion history. Consistently with current knowledge on hepcidin action/regulation, RARS patients had the highest levels of toxic non-transferrin-bound-iron, while RAEB and CMML patients had substantial elevation of C-Reactive Protein as compared to other MDS subtypes, and showed lost of homeostatic regulation by iron. Growth differentiation factor 15 did not appear as a primary hepcidin regulator in this series. If confirmed, these results may help to calibrate future treatments with chelating agents and/or hepcidin modulators in MDS patients.

  17. [Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicated with relapsed myelodysplastic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hiroshi; Nakane, Takahiko; Fujino, Keizo; Koh, Shiro; Yoshimura, Takuro; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Hino, Masayuki

    2015-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is known to often be complicated by a range of autoimmune diseases. We herein present a case with MDS complicated by cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia (cold AIHA). The patient was a 51-year-old woman. She was diagnosed with MDS (refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia) in May 2009. In January 2010, she underwent unrelated allogeneic bone marrow transplantation but was re-admitted in October 2010 for treatment of relapsed MDS. Despite daily transfusions of red blood cells, her anemia failed to improve. Her laboratory examinations showed a low haptoglobin level and elevation of indirect bilirubin and LDH. The direct Coombs test was positive at a low and at room temperature and cold agglutinin was negative. After confirming the diagnosis of cold AIHA, all transfusion fluids were warmed but her anemia still failed to improve. In addition to the warmed transfusion fluids, we administered corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. This management strategy ameliorated the patient's hemolytic anemia. To our knowledge, MDS cases complicated by cold AIHA are rare. Our patient thus provides a valuable contribution to medical knowledge.

  18. Trisomy 8, a Cytogenetic Abnormality in Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Is Constitutional or Not?

    PubMed Central

    Saumell, Sílvia; Solé, Francesc; Arenillas, Leonor; Montoro, Julia; Valcárcel, David; Pedro, Carme; Sanzo, Carmen; Luño, Elisa; Giménez, Teresa; Arnan, Montserrat; Pomares, Helena; De Paz, Raquel; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Jerez, Andrés; Martínez, Ana B.; Sánchez-Castro, Judith; Rodríguez-Gambarte, Juan D.; Raya, José M.; Ríos, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Rivera, María; Espinet, Blanca; Florensa, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Isolated trisomy 8 is not considered presumptive evidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in cases without minimal morphological criteria. One reason given is that trisomy 8 (+8) can be found as a constitutional mosaicism (cT8M). We tried to clarify the incidence of cT8M in myeloid neoplasms, specifically in MDS, and the diagnostic value of isolated +8 in MDS. Twenty-two MDS and 10 other myeloid neoplasms carrying +8 were studied. Trisomy 8 was determined in peripheral blood by conventional cytogenetics (CC) and on granulocytes, CD3+ lymphocytes and oral mucosa cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In peripheral blood CC, +8 was seen in 4/32 patients. By FISH, only one patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia showed +8 in all cell samples and was interpreted as a cT8M. In our series +8 was acquired in all MDS. Probably, once discarded cT8M by FISH from CD3+ lymphocytes and non-hematological cells, +8 should be considered with enough evidence to MDS. PMID:26066831

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of primary myelodysplastic syndromes in adults: recommendations from the European LeukemiaNet

    PubMed Central

    Malcovati, Luca; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Bowen, David; Adès, Lionel; Cermak, Jaroslav; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Della Porta, Matteo G.; Fenaux, Pierre; Gattermann, Norbert; Germing, Ulrich; Jansen, Joop H.; Mittelman, Moshe; Mufti, Ghulam; Platzbecker, Uwe; Sanz, Guillermo F.; Selleslag, Dominik; Skov-Holm, Mette; Stauder, Reinhard; Symeonidis, Argiris; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2013-01-01

    Within the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) work package of the European LeukemiaNet, an Expert Panel was selected according to the framework elements of the National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Program. A systematic review of the literature was performed that included indexed original papers, indexed reviews and educational papers, and abstracts of conference proceedings. Guidelines were developed on the basis of a list of patient- and therapy-oriented questions, and recommendations were formulated and ranked according to the supporting level of evidence. MDSs should be classified according to the 2008 World Health Organization criteria. An accurate risk assessment requires the evaluation of not only disease-related factors but also of those related to extrahematologic comorbidity. The assessment of individual risk enables the identification of fit patients with a poor prognosis who are candidates for up-front intensive treatments, primarily allogeneic stem cell transplantation. A high proportion of MDS patients are not eligible for potentially curative treatment because of advanced age and/or clinically relevant comorbidities and poor performance status. In these patients, the therapeutic intervention is aimed at preventing cytopenia-related morbidity and preserving quality of life. A number of new agents are being developed for which the available evidence is not sufficient to recommend routine use. The inclusion of patients into prospective clinical trials is strongly recommended. PMID:23980065

  20. Use of azacitidine for myelodysplastic syndromes: controversial issues and practical recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Jin; Jang, Jun Ho; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Lee, Je-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Azacitidine is recommended for patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) who are not eligible for intensive therapy or for patients with lower-risk MDS who have thrombocytopenia or neutropenia or have anemia that is unresponsive to other therapies. However, standard treatment with azacitidine has not been optimized and many issues about the use of azacitidine remain unresolved. The use of azacitidine is expanding rapidly, but limited comparative clinical trial data are available to (i) define the optimal use of azacitidine in patients with higher-risk MDS or around the time of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, (ii) identify those patients with lower-risk MDS who may benefit from treatment, and (iii) guide physicians on alternative therapies after treatment failure. Increasing evidence suggests that the clinical features, prognostic factors, and cytogenetic profiles of patients with MDS in Asia differ significantly from those of patients in Western countries, so the aim of this review is to summarize the evidence and provide practical recommendations on the use of azacitidine in patients with MDS in the Republic of Korea. Evidence considered in this review is based on published clinical data and on the clinical experience of an expert panel from the acute myeloid leukemia/MDS Working Party of the Korean Society of Hematology. PMID:23826577

  1. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y. H.; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  2. Genetics and Epigenetics of Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Response to Drug Therapy: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Shahrabi, Saeid; Khosravi, Abbas; Shahjahani, Mohammad; Rahim, Fakher; Saki, Najmaldin

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hematologic neoplasms ocurring mostly in the elderly. The clinical outcome of MDS patients is still poor despite progress in treatment approaches. About 90% of patients harbor at least one somatic mutation. This review aimed to assess the potential of molecular abnormalities in understanding pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis and in guiding choice of proper therapy in MDS patients. Papers related to this topic from 2000 to 2016 in PubMed and Scopus databases were searched and studied. The most common molecular abnormalities were TET2, ASXL1 as well as molecules involved in spliceosome machinery (U2AF1, SRSF2 and SF3B1). Patients with defects in TET2 molecule show better response to treatment with azacitidine. IDH and DNMT3A mutations are associated with a good response to decitabine therapy. In addition, patients with del5q subtype harboring TP53 mutation do not show a good response to lenalidomide therapy. In general, the results of this study show that molecular abnormalities can be associated with the occurrence of a specific morphological phenotype in patients. Therefore, considering the morphology of patients, different gene profiling methods can be selected to choice the most appropriate therapeutic measure in these patients in addition to faster and more cost-effective diagnosis of molecular abnormalities. PMID:28058097

  3. Cardiac iron overload in chronically transfused patients with thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Montalembert, Mariane; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Brousse, Valentine; Guerci-Bresler, Agnes; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Dumesnil, Cécile; Lahary, Agnès; Touati, Mohamed; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Cavazzana, Marina; Chauzit, Emmanuelle; Baptiste, Amandine; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Puy, Hervé; Elie, Caroline; Karim, Zoubida; Ernst, Olivier; Rose, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The risk and clinical significance of cardiac iron overload due to chronic transfusion varies with the underlying disease. Cardiac iron overload shortens the life expectancy of patients with thalassemia, whereas its effect is unclear in those with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA), iron does not seem to deposit quickly in the heart. Our primary objective was to assess through a multicentric study the prevalence of cardiac iron overload, defined as a cardiovascular magnetic resonance T2*<20 ms, in patients with thalassemia, SCA, or MDS. Patient inclusion criteria were an accurate record of erythrocyte concentrates (ECs) received, a transfusion history >8 ECs in the past year, and age older than 6 years. We included from 9 centers 20 patients with thalassemia, 41 with SCA, and 25 with MDS in 2012-2014. Erythrocytapharesis did not consistently prevent iron overload in patients with SCA. Cardiac iron overload was found in 3 (15%) patients with thalassemia, none with SCA, and 4 (16%) with MDS. The liver iron content (LIC) ranged from 10.4 to 15.2 mg/g dry weight, with no significant differences across groups (P = 0.29). Abnormal T2* was not significantly associated with any of the measures of transfusion or chelation. Ferritin levels showed a strong association with LIC. Non-transferrin-bound iron was high in the thalassemia and MDS groups but low in the SCA group (P<0.001). Hepcidin was low in thalassemia, normal in SCA, and markedly elevated in MDS (P<0.001). Two mechanisms may explain that iron deposition largely spares the heart in SCA: the high level of erythropoiesis recycles the iron and the chronic inflammation retains iron within the macrophages. Thalassemia, in contrast, is characterized by inefficient erythropoiesis, unable to handle free iron. Iron accumulation varies widely in MDS syndromes due to the competing influences of abnormal erythropoiesis, excess iron supply, and inflammation.

  4. Cardiac iron overload in chronically transfused patients with thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Montalembert, Mariane; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Brousse, Valentine; Guerci-Bresler, Agnes; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Dumesnil, Cécile; Lahary, Agnès; Touati, Mohamed; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Cavazzana, Marina; Chauzit, Emmanuelle; Baptiste, Amandine; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Puy, Hervé; Elie, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    The risk and clinical significance of cardiac iron overload due to chronic transfusion varies with the underlying disease. Cardiac iron overload shortens the life expectancy of patients with thalassemia, whereas its effect is unclear in those with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA), iron does not seem to deposit quickly in the heart. Our primary objective was to assess through a multicentric study the prevalence of cardiac iron overload, defined as a cardiovascular magnetic resonance T2*<20 ms, in patients with thalassemia, SCA, or MDS. Patient inclusion criteria were an accurate record of erythrocyte concentrates (ECs) received, a transfusion history >8 ECs in the past year, and age older than 6 years. We included from 9 centers 20 patients with thalassemia, 41 with SCA, and 25 with MDS in 2012-2014. Erythrocytapharesis did not consistently prevent iron overload in patients with SCA. Cardiac iron overload was found in 3 (15%) patients with thalassemia, none with SCA, and 4 (16%) with MDS. The liver iron content (LIC) ranged from 10.4 to 15.2 mg/g dry weight, with no significant differences across groups (P = 0.29). Abnormal T2* was not significantly associated with any of the measures of transfusion or chelation. Ferritin levels showed a strong association with LIC. Non-transferrin-bound iron was high in the thalassemia and MDS groups but low in the SCA group (P<0.001). Hepcidin was low in thalassemia, normal in SCA, and markedly elevated in MDS (P<0.001). Two mechanisms may explain that iron deposition largely spares the heart in SCA: the high level of erythropoiesis recycles the iron and the chronic inflammation retains iron within the macrophages. Thalassemia, in contrast, is characterized by inefficient erythropoiesis, unable to handle free iron. Iron accumulation varies widely in MDS syndromes due to the competing influences of abnormal erythropoiesis, excess iron supply, and inflammation. PMID:28257476

  5. Certain Autoimmune Manifestations Are Associated With Distinctive Karyotypes and Outcomes in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jin; Park, Jin Kyun; Lee, Eun Young; Joo, Sang Hyun; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Lee, Eun Bong; Song, Yeong Wook; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune manifestations (AIMs) are common in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). This study aimed to investigate whether AIMs are associated with a specific cytogenetic abnormalities and worse survival in patients with MDS. A total of 67 MDS patients with AIMs and 134 age- and sex-matched MDS patients without AIMs, all of whom received medical care at Seoul National University Hospital from January 2000 through July 2014, were enrolled. The clinical features, chromosomal abnormalities, and outcomes were examined. The effect of AIMs on mortality was estimated after adjusting for age, sex, and the International Prognostic Scoring System. The mean age (±SD) at the time of MDS diagnosis was 54.5 ± 17.1 years, and 44.8% of patients were male. Neutrophilic dermatosis (ND; Sweet syndrome and pyoderma gangrenosum) was the most prevalent AIM (n = 24 36%]), followed by Behcet disease (10 [15%]), rheumatoid arthritis (9 [13%]), vasculitis (8 [12%]), myositis (3 [4%]), spondyloarthropathy (3 [4%]), and systemic lupus erythematous (2 [3%]). ND and vasculitis occurred at the time of MDS diagnosis, whereas other AIMs occurred years after MDS diagnosis. Deletion of 5q was associated with ND (P = 0.001), whereas trisomy 8 was associated with Behcet disease (P = 0.015). Strikingly, ND was associated with a 1.8-fold increase in mortality (95% CI 1.033–3.093; P = 0.038). Certain AIMs in MDS patients are associated with distinctive karyotypes and worse survival. A larger study is needed to confirm whether the presence of AIMs influences disease outcome in MDS. PMID:27043672

  6. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant in adult patients with myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN) overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prashant; Shinde, Shivani S; Damlaj, Moussab; Hefazi Rorghabeh, Mehrdad; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Litzow, Mark R; Hogan, William J; Gangat, Naseema; Elliott, Michelle A; Al-Kali, Aref; Tefferi, Ayalew; Patnaik, Mrinal M

    2017-04-01

    MDS/MPN (myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm) overlap syndromes are myeloid malignancies for which allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) is potentially curative. We describe transplant outcomes of 43 patients - 35 with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, CMML (of which 17 had blast transformation, BT) and eight with MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN,U). At median follow-up of 21 months, overall survival (OS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) and non-relapse mortality (NRM) were 55%, 29%, and 25% respectively in CMML without BT and 47%, 40%, and 34% respectively in CMML with BT. Higher HSCT-comorbidity index (HSCT-CI >3 versus ≤3; p = 0.015) and splenomegaly (p = 0.006) predicted worse OS in CMML without BT. In CMML with BT, engraftment failure (p = 0.006) and higher HSCT-CI (p = 0.03) were associated with inferior OS, while HSCT within 1-year of diagnosis was associated with improved OS (p = 0.045). In MDS/MPN,U, at median follow-up of 15 months, OS, CIR, and NRM were 62%, 30%, and 14%, respectively.

  7. [Review of evidence of thalidomide and lenalidomide in different hematological diseases: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, primary amyloidosis, myelofibrosis and syndrome myelodysplastic].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Lozano, I; Juárez Jiménez, J C

    2013-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug approved by the AEMPS and the EMA, in combination with dexamethasone, for the treatment of multiple myeloma in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy. Moreover, it has recently been approved for the treatment of patients with transfusion-dependent anaemia due to low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndromes associated with an isolated deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality when other therapeutic options are insufficient or inadequate. It has also shown to be active in other hematologic and no hematologic diseases. Growing evidence of its use entails a challenge when situating the drug in a cost-effective way to treat these diseases. On this article we review the available evidence on the use of lenalidomide in the second line treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, primary amyloidosis and primary myelofibrosis, and in the first line treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, and also the evidence of other immunomodulators. Different clinical practice guidelines and scientific evidence portals consider lenalidomide a valid alternative in the first-line treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, specially those with the deletion of 5q, and in second line for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, the available evidence of lenalidomide in the treatment of patients with primary amyloidosis and primary myelofibrosis is limited, ant thus is not considered as the first choice treatment. In any case, the treatment of choice should consider the safety profile in each patient, the previous treatments that has received and the own therapeutic protocols of each center.

  8. p53 protein expression independently predicts outcome in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q)

    PubMed Central

    Saft, Leonie; Karimi, Mohsen; Ghaderi, Mehran; Matolcsy, András; Mufti, Ghulam J.; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Göhring, Gudrun; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Muus, Petra; Sanz, Guillermo; Mittelman, Moshe; Bowen, David; Porwit, Anna; Fu, Tommy; Backstrom, Jay; Fenaux, Pierre; MacBeth, Kyle J.; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System as low- or intermediate-1-risk (lower-risk) are considered to have an indolent course; however, recent data have identified a subgroup of these patients with more aggressive disease and poorer outcomes. Using deep sequencing technology, we previously demonstrated that 18% of patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes carry TP53 mutated subclones rendering them at higher risk of progression. In this study, bone marrow biopsies from 85 patients treated with lenalidomide in the MDS-004 clinical trial were retrospectively assessed for p53 expression by immunohistochemistry in association with outcome. Strong p53 expression in ≥1% of bone marrow progenitor cells, observed in 35% (30 of 85) of patients, was significantly associated with higher acute myeloid leukemia risk (P=0.0006), shorter overall survival (P=0.0175), and a lower cytogenetic response rate (P=0.009), but not with achievement or duration of 26-week transfusion independence response. In a multivariate analysis, p53-positive immunohistochemistry was the strongest independent predictor of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.0035). Pyrosequencing analysis of laser-microdissected cells with strong p53 expression confirmed the TP53 mutation, whereas cells with moderate expression predominantly had wild-type p53. This study validates p53 immunohistochemistry as a strong and clinically useful predictive tool in patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. This study was based on data from the MDS 004 trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00179621). PMID:24682512

  9. Pediatric obesity, metabolic syndrome, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Mary A

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the pediatric population has dramatically increased in the last 30 years. While the adverse health effects of obesity have long been recognized in adults, many of these complications are now understood to begin in early childhood. Obese children and adolescents are significantly more likely than their peers of healthy weight to suffer from obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome. In turn, affected individuals may experience myriad serious clinical sequelae; neuro-cognitive, psychiatric, cardiovascular, and endocrinologic complications have each been extensively documented. Thus, the spectrum of obesity-related disease represents a serious but preventable threat to personal and family wellness; additionally, it is a source of considerable health care expenditure and represents a national and international health crisis. The optimal care of these patients will be best achieved through the pediatric health care provider's timely recognition of these clinical problems and knowledge of appropriate intervention strategies.

  10. The sudden onset of mastocytosis in the course of venom-induced anaphylactic reaction in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rybicka, Malwina; Helbig, Grzegorz; Woźniczka, Krzysztof; Kopera, Małgorzata; Pająk, Jacek; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a disease resulting from a proliferation of clonal, abnormal mast cells in tissues and organs, defined as Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasm. We present a male patient with clinically, morphologically and immunohistochemically confirmed mastocytosis with preceding myelodysplastic syndrome, occurred after wasp bite in the course of anaphylactic reaction. The propensity to hymenoptera venom-induced anaphylaxis and the presence of an increased population of atypical mast cells in bone marrow found after anaphylactic shock may suggest the possible relationship between hymenoptera venom allergy and anaphylaxis and the development of mastocytosis of unusual course in a predisposed person.

  11. Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome after hematopoietic cell transplantation for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, S; Suzuki, R; Hatano, K; Fukushima, K; Iida, H; Morishima, S; Suehiro, Y; Fukuda, T; Uchida, N; Uchiyama, H; Ikeda, H; Yokota, A; Tsukasaki, K; Yamaguchi, H; Kuroda, J; Nakamae, H; Adachi, Y; Matsuoka, K-I; Nakamura, Y; Atsuta, Y; Suzumiya, J

    2017-04-03

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (t-AML/MDS) represent severe late effects in patients receiving hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for lymphoma. The choice between high-dose therapy with autologous HCT and allogeneic HCT with reduced-intensity conditioning remains controversial in patients with relapsed lymphoma. We retrospectively analyzed incidence and risk factors for the development of t-AML/MDS in lymphoma patients treated with autologous or allogeneic HCT. A total of 13 810 lymphoma patients who received autologous (n=9963) or allogeneic (n=3847) HCT between 1985 and 2012 were considered. At a median overall survival (OS) of 52 and 46 months in autologous and allogeneic HCT groups, respectively, lymphoma patients receiving autologous HCT (1.38% at 3 years after autologous HCT) had a significant risk for developing t-AML/MDS compared to allogeneic HCT (0.37% at 3 years after allogeneic HCT, P<0.001). Significant risk factors for the development of t-AML/MDS after autologous and allogeneic HCT were high-stage risk at HCT (P=0.04) or secondary malignancies (P<0.001) and receiving cord blood stem cell (P=0.03) or involved field radiotherapy (P=0.002), respectively. Strategies that carefully select lymphoma patients for autologous HCT, by excluding lymphoma patients with high-stage risk at HCT, may allow the identification of individual lymphoma patients at particular high risk for t-AML/MDS.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 3 April 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.52.

  12. [Predict response to decitabine in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and related neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y S; Guo, J; Xu, F; Wu, D; Wu, L Y; Song, L L; Xiao, C; Li, X; Chang, C K

    2017-02-14

    Objective: To identify clinical and molecular signatures for predicting response to decitabine (DAC) in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and related neoplasms. Methods: The clinical characteristics of 109 patients with MDS and related neoplasms who were treated with DAC were analyzed retrospectively and the next target sequencing was performed to define recurrently mutated genes in these disease samples, to examine the association of the clinical and molecular signatures with response to DAC treatment. Results: Of 109 MDS and related neoplasms patients, there were 70 males and 39 females, the median age was 61 years old (ranges: 17-85 years old) . According to the international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) , 46 cases were included in the relatively low risk group (low risk and intermediate-1 risk) , 63 in the relative high risk group (intermediate-2 and high risk) . There were 21 cases with complex karyotype, 17 chromosome 7 abnormality and 17 monosomal karyotype. The median courses of DAC treatment was 4 (2-11) . A total of 74 patients achieved response (67.9%) and 30 (27.5%) achieved complete response (CR) . Univariate analysis found that CR was higher in patients with high risk of IPSS, complex karyotypes, monosomal karyotypes, chromosome 7 abnormality, and platelet doubling after one cycle of DAC treatment. Patients with TP53 gene mutation were more likely to receive CR, 10 of 15 patients with TP53 mutations achieved CR. (66.7%) , which was significantly higher than that of the patients without TP53 gene mutation (21.3%) (P=0.001) . Multivariate analysis showed that TP53 gene mutation, platelet doubling after one cycle of DAC treatment and the complex karyotype were independent prognostic factors for CR. Of them, TP53 gene mutation is the strongest predictor (OR=4.39, 95%CI, 1.20-16.06, P=0.026) . Conclusion: TP53 mutation, platelet doubling after one cycle of DAC treatment and complex karyotypes could predict CR to DAC.

  13. Feedback signals in myelodysplastic syndromes: increased self-renewal of the malignant clone suppresses normal hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Walenda, Thomas; Stiehl, Thomas; Braun, Hanna; Fröbel, Julia; Ho, Anthony D; Schroeder, Thomas; Goecke, Tamme W; Rath, Björn; Germing, Ulrich; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are triggered by an aberrant hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). It is, however, unclear how this clone interferes with physiologic blood formation. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that the MDS clone impinges on feedback signals for self-renewal and differentiation and thereby suppresses normal hematopoiesis. Based on the theory that the MDS clone affects feedback signals for self-renewal and differentiation and hence suppresses normal hematopoiesis, we have developed a mathematical model to simulate different modifications in MDS-initiating cells and systemic feedback signals during disease development. These simulations revealed that the disease initiating cells must have higher self-renewal rates than normal HSCs to outcompete normal hematopoiesis. We assumed that self-renewal is the default pathway of stem and progenitor cells which is down-regulated by an increasing number of primitive cells in the bone marrow niche--including the premature MDS cells. Furthermore, the proliferative signal is up-regulated by cytopenia. Overall, our model is compatible with clinically observed MDS development, even though a single mutation scenario is unlikely for real disease progression which is usually associated with complex clonal hierarchy. For experimental validation of systemic feedback signals, we analyzed the impact of MDS patient derived serum on hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro: in fact, MDS serum slightly increased proliferation, whereas maintenance of primitive phenotype was reduced. However, MDS serum did not significantly affect colony forming unit (CFU) frequencies indicating that regulation of self-renewal may involve local signals from the niche. Taken together, we suggest that initial mutations in MDS particularly favor aberrant high self-renewal rates. Accumulation of primitive MDS cells in the bone marrow then interferes with feedback signals for normal hematopoiesis--which then results in cytopenia.

  14. A calcium- and calpain-dependent pathway determines the response to lenalidomide in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing; Liu, Xiaona; Bolanos, Lyndsey; Barker, Brenden; Rigolino, Carmela; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Oliva, Esther N; Cuzzola, Maria; Grimes, H Leighton; Fontanillo, Celia; Komurov, Kakajan; MacBeth, Kyle; Starczynowski, Daniel T

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high response rates of individuals with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with deletion of chromosome 5q (del(5q)) to treatment with lenalidomide (LEN) and the recent identification of cereblon (CRBN) as the molecular target of LEN, the cellular mechanism by which LEN eliminates MDS clones remains elusive. Here we performed an RNA interference screen to delineate gene regulatory networks that mediate LEN responsiveness in an MDS cell line, MDSL. We identified GPR68, which encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor that has been implicated in calcium metabolism, as the top candidate gene for modulating sensitivity to LEN. LEN induced GPR68 expression via IKAROS family zinc finger 1 (IKZF1), resulting in increased cytosolic calcium levels and activation of a calcium-dependent calpain, CAPN1, which were requisite steps for induction of apoptosis in MDS cells and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. In contrast, deletion of GPR68 or inhibition of calcium and calpain activation suppressed LEN-induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, expression of calpastatin (CAST), an endogenous CAPN1 inhibitor that is encoded by a gene (CAST) deleted in del(5q) MDS, correlated with LEN responsiveness in patients with del(5q) MDS. Depletion of CAST restored responsiveness of LEN-resistant non-del(5q) MDS cells and AML cells, providing an explanation for the superior responses of patients with del(5q) MDS to LEN treatment. Our study describes a cellular mechanism by which LEN, acting through CRBN and IKZF1, has cytotoxic effects in MDS and AML that depend on a calcium- and calpain-dependent pathway.

  15. Tumor suppressor microRNAs are downregulated in myelodysplastic syndrome with spliceosome mutations

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Derya; Garde, Christian; Nygaard, Mette Katrine; Helbo, Alexandra Søgaard; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Hansen, Jakob Werner; Severinsen, Marianne Tang; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Sjø, Lene Dissing; Grønbæk, Kirsten; Kristensen, Lasse Sommer

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosome mutations are frequently observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, it is largely unknown how these mutations contribute to the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs, which have been implicated in most human cancers due to their role in post transcriptional gene regulation. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of spliceosome mutations on the expression of miRNAs in a cohort of 34 MDS patients. In total, the expression of 76 miRNAs, including mirtrons and splice site overlapping miRNAs, was accurately quantified using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR. The majority of the studied miRNAs have previously been implicated in MDS. Stably expressed miRNA genes for normalization of the data were identified using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. High-resolution melting assays covering all mutational hotspots within SF3B1, SRSF2, and U2AF1 (U2AF35) were developed, and all detected mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Overall, canonical miRNAs were downregulated in spliceosome mutated samples compared to wild-type (P = 0.002), and samples from spliceosome mutated patients clustered together in hierarchical cluster analyses. Among the most downregulated miRNAs were several tumor-suppressor miRNAs, including several let-7 family members, miR-423, and miR-103a. Finally, we observed that the predicted targets of the most downregulated miRNAs were involved in apoptosis, hematopoiesis, and acute myeloid leukemia among other cancer- and metabolic pathways. Our data indicate that spliceosome mutations may play an important role in MDS pathophysiology by affecting the expression of tumor suppressor miRNA genes involved in the development and progression of MDS. PMID:26848861

  16. An exploratory clinical trial of bortezomib in patients with lower risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Daher, May; Hidalgo Lopez, Juliana Elisa; Randhawa, Jasleen K; Jabbar, Kausar Jabeen; Wei, Yue; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Borthakur, Gautam; Kadia, Tapan; Konopleva, Marina; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Hearn, Katherine; Estrov, Zeev; Reyes, Steven; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2017-03-31

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and an increased risk of transformation. Few effective therapies are available for lower risk MDS patients, especially after the failure of hypomethylating agents. MDS progenitor cells are dependent on the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) for survival, which makes it an attractive therapeutic target. As a proteosomal inhibitor, bortezomib is thought to have inhibitory activity against NF-κB. We designed a proof-of-principle study of subcutaneous (SC) bortezomib in lower risk MDS patients with evidence of NF-κB activation in their bone marrow. Fifteen patients were treated, their median age was 71 (range 56-87), 33% were low and 67% int-1 by IPSS, median number of prior therapies was 2, all patients were transfusion dependent. Baseline median pp65 percentage was 31% and 11 patients had evidence of ring sideroblasts. SC bortezomib was safe, well tolerated with no excess toxicity. Three patients out of the 15 (20%) had evidence of response with hematologic improvement (HI-E). Bortezomib caused a decrease in pp65 levels in 7 out of 13 evaluable patients (54%, p=0.025). Of interest, unexpectedly, we observed a significant decrease in ring sideroblasts in 7 out of 10 (70%) evaluable patients during treatment. In conclusion, this study suggests that NF-κB activation, measured by pp65 levels, may be a useful biomarker in MDS. Bortezomib is safe in this patient population but has modest clinical activity. The role of the proteasome in the genesis of ring sideroblasts needs further study. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular matching for Rh and K reduces red blood cell alloimmunisation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guelsin, Gláucia A.S.; Rodrigues, Camila; Visentainer, Jeane E.L.; de Melo Campos, Paula; Traina, Fabíola; Gilli, Simone C.O.; Saad, Sara T.O.; Castilho, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Background Matching for Rh and K antigens has been used in an attempt to reduce antibody formation in patients receiving chronic transfusions but an extended phenotype matching including Fya and Jka antigens has also been recommended. The aim of this study was to identify an efficient transfusion protocol of genotype matching for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. We also examined a possible association of HLA class II alleles with red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunisation. Materials and methods We evaluated 43 patients with MDS undergoing transfusion therapy with and without antibody formation. We investigated antigen-matched RBC units for ABO, D, C, c, E, e, K, Fya, Fyb, Jka, Jkb, S, s, Doa, Dob and Dia on the patients’ samples and on the donor units serologically matched for them based on their ABO, Rh and K phenotypes and presence of antibodies. We also determined the frequencies of HLA-DRB1 alleles in the alloimmunised and non-alloimmunised patients. Results Seventeen of the 43 patients had discrepancies or mismatches for multiple antigens between their genotype-predicted profile and the antigen profile of the units of blood serologically matched for them. We verified that 36.8% of patients had more than one RBC alloantibody and 10.5% of patients had autoantibodies. Although we were able to find a better match for the patients in our extended genotyped/phenotyped units, we verified that matching for Rh and K would be sufficient for most of the patients. We also observed an over-representation of the HLA-DRB1*13 allele in the non-alloimmunised group of patients with MDS. Discussion In our population molecular matching for C, c, E, e, K was able to reduce RBC alloimmunisation in MDS patients. An association of HLA-DRB1*13 and protection from RBC alloimmunisation should be confirmed. PMID:24960644

  18. Effect of IL-7 and IL-15 on T cell phenotype in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen; Ding, Tingting; Wu, Lei; Ren, Xiubao; Epling-Burnette, P K; Yang, Lili

    2016-05-10

    Aberrant T cell phenotype is one of the characteristics of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In this study, we detected an increased concentration of IL-15 in the plasma of MDS patients (n = 20) compared with that in the plasma of healthy controls (n = 20). In MDS patients, reduced naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells [16.11 ± 6.56 vs. 24.11 ± 7.18 for CD4+ T cells (p < 0.001) and 13.15 ± 5.67 vs. 23.51 ± 6.25 for CD8+ T cells (p < 0.001)] were observed. The reduced naïve and increased effector memory T cells were significantly correlated with IL-15 plasma level. Then, the effect of IL-15 and IL-7 was tested in vitro. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from MDS were treated for 15 days with IL-15. This treatment significantly decreased naïve CD4+ (p < 0.001) and CD8+ (p < 0.001) T cells and correspondingly increased terminal memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (p < 0.001). Treatment with IL-7 increased naïve CD4+ (p < 0.05) and CD8+ (p < 0.001) T cells. Our results indicated that exposure to high levels of IL-15 may be involved in the T cell phenotype conversion observed in MDS. IL-7 may be one of the promising therapeutic candidates for recovering the effector immune compartment in MDS patients.

  19. Effect of lenalidomide treatment on clonal architecture of myelodysplastic syndromes without 5q deletion

    PubMed Central

    Chesnais, Virginie; Renneville, Aline; Toma, Andrea; Lambert, Jérôme; Passet, Marie; Dumont, Florent; Chevret, Sylvie; Lejeune, Julie; Raimbault, Anna; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Rose, Christian; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Delaunay, Jacques; Solary, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Preudhomme, Claude; Kosmider, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Non-del(5q) transfusion-dependent low/intermediate-1 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients achieve an erythroid response with lenalidomide in 25% of cases. Addition of an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent could improve response rate. The impact of recurrent somatic mutations identified in the diseased clone in response to lenalidomide and the drug’s effects on clonal evolution remain unknown. We investigated recurrent mutations by next-generation sequencing in 94 non-del(5q) MDS patients randomized in the GFM-Len-Epo-08 clinical trial to lenalidomide or lenalidomide plus epoetin β. Clonal evolution was analyzed after 4 cycles of treatment in 42 cases and reanalyzed at later time points in 18 cases. The fate of clonal architecture of single CD34+CD38− hematopoietic stem cells was also determined in 5 cases. Mutation frequency was >10%: SF3B1 (74.5%), TET2 (45.7%), DNMT3A (20.2%), and ASXL1 (19.1%). Analysis of variant allele frequencies indicated a decrease of major mutations in 15 of 20 responders compared with 10 of 22 nonresponders after 4 cycles. The decrease in the variant allele frequency of major mutations was more significant in responders than in nonresponders (P < .001). Genotyping of single CD34+CD38− cell–derived colonies showed that the decrease in the size of dominant subclones could be associated with the rise of founding clones or of hematopoietic stem cells devoid of recurrent mutations. These effects remained transient, and disease escape was associated with the re-emergence of the dominant subclones. In conclusion, we show that, although the drug initially modulates the distribution of subclones, loss of treatment efficacy coincides with the re-expansion of the dominant subclone. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01718379. PMID:26626993

  20. Distinct mutation profile and prognostic relevance in patients with hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndromes (h-MDS).

    PubMed

    Yao, Chi-Yuan; Hou, Hsin-An; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Lin, Chien-Chin; Chou, Wen-Chien; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Wu, Shang-Ju; Liao, Xiu-Wen; Lin, Chien-Ting; Ko, Bor-Shen; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Li, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shang-Yi; Yao, Ming; Tang, Jih-Luh; Tsay, Woei; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2016-09-27

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies. Although most MDS patients have normal or increased BM cellularity (NH-MDS), some have hypocellular BM (h-MDS). The reports concerning the differences in genetic alterations between h-MDS and NH-MDS patients are limited. In this study, 369 MDS patients diagnosed according to the WHO 2008 criteria were recruited. h-MDS patients had lower PB white blood cell and blast counts, and lower BM blast percentages, than those with NH-MDS. h-MDS was closely associated with lower-risk MDS, defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and revised IPSS (IPSS-R). IPSS-R could properly predict the prognosis in h-MDS (P<0.001) as in NH-MDS patients. The h-MDS patients had lower incidences of RUNX1, ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2 and TP53 mutations than NH-MDS patients. The cumulated incidence of acute leukemic transformation at 5 years was 19.3% for h-MDS and 40.4% for NH-MDS patients (P= 0.001). Further, the patients with h-MDS had longer overall survival (OS) than those with NH-MDS (P= 0.001), and BM hypocellularity remains an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS irrespective of age, IPSS-R, and gene mutations. Our findings provide evidence that h-MDS indeed represent a distinct clinico-biological subgroup of MDS and can predict better leukemia-free survival and OS.

  1. Inter-observer variance with the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) following the 2008 WHO classification.

    PubMed

    Font, P; Loscertales, J; Benavente, C; Bermejo, A; Callejas, M; Garcia-Alonso, L; Garcia-Marcilla, A; Gil, S; Lopez-Rubio, M; Martin, E; Muñoz, C; Ricard, P; Soto, C; Balsalobre, P; Villegas, A

    2013-01-01

    Morphology is the basis of the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The WHO classification offers prognostic information and helps with the treatment decisions. However, morphological changes are subject to potential inter-observer variance. The aim of our study was to explore the reliability of the 2008 WHO classification of MDS, reviewing 100 samples previously diagnosed with MDS using the 2001 WHO criteria. Specimens were collected from 10 hospitals and were evaluated by 10 morphologists, working in five pairs. Each observer evaluated 20 samples, and each sample was analyzed independently by two morphologists. The second observer was blinded to the clinical and laboratory data, except for the peripheral blood (PB) counts. Nineteen cases were considered as unclassified MDS (MDS-U) by the 2001 WHO classification, but only three remained as MDS-U by the 2008 WHO proposal. Discordance was observed in 26 of the 95 samples considered suitable (27 %). Although there were a high number of observers taking part, the rate of discordance was quite similar among the five pairs. The inter-observer concordance was very good regarding refractory anemia with excess blasts type 1 (RAEB-1) (10 of 12 cases, 84 %), RAEB-2 (nine of 10 cases, 90 %), and also good regarding refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (37 of 50 cases, 74 %). However, the categories with unilineage dysplasia were not reproducible in most of the cases. The rate of concordance with refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia was 40 % (two of five cases) and 25 % with RA with ring sideroblasts (two of eight). Our results show that the 2008 WHO classification gives a more accurate stratification of MDS but also illustrates the difficulty in diagnosing MDS with unilineage dysplasia.

  2. Novel therapeutic strategies using hypomethylating agents in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takayuki

    2014-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic neoplasm with high rates of leukemic transformation. MDS had been an intractable disease for which the mainstream of therapeutic approach was best supportive care. Recently, however, treatment of hematological malignancies has benefited from advances in molecular targeted drug discovery such as the revolutionary drug imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, and from the reappraisal of forgotten drugs such as thalidomide for multiple myeloma. Two azanucleotide drugs, azacitidine (AZA) and decitabine, were created as anti-neoplastic drugs in the 1960s with little success. In the 1980s, they were reassessed as hypomethylating agents (HMAs), and the introduction of low-dose schedules of them has shown dramatic effects in the delay of leukemic evolution for high-risk MDS. AZA was approved in Japan in March 2011 and has become a standard drug of choice in the treatment of high-risk MDS. Its position as a treatment for low-risk MDS remains to be established. Only half of patients with high-risk MDS can gain benefit from AZA. For example, those with complex karyotypes experience only a limited extension in survival. In addition, AZA resistance develops sooner or later. To achieve a more sustained disease control of high-risk MDS, the combined use of HMAs with other therapeutic approaches will be inevitable. Clinical trials of histone deacetylase inhibitors, lenalidomide, thrombopoietin agonists, or anticancer drugs in combination with HMAs are ongoing. In addition, HMAs are being used as a bridging therapy prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) and the salvage therapy of relapsed disease after AHSCT. Thus, HMAs will continue to be key drugs for the management of MDS.

  3. Vatalanib population pharmacokinetics in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: CALGB 10105 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Owzar, Kouros; Gupta, Pankaj; Larson, Richard A; Mulkey, Flora; Miller, Antonius A; Lewis, Lionel D; Hurd, David; Vij, Ravi; Ratain, Mark J; Murry, Daryl J

    2014-01-01

    Aims Vatalanib is an oral anti-angiogenesis agent that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, which in patients showed auto induction of metabolism and variability in pharmacokinetic (PK) disposition. The objective was to characterize the population PK and time-dependent change in vatalanib clearance and assess exposure–toxicity relationship in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Methods This was an open-label phase II study of vatalanib in MDS patients receiving 750–1250 mg once daily in 28-day cycles. Serial blood samples were obtained and plasma vatalanib concentrations measured by HPLC. Population PK analysis was performed using nonmem 7.2 with FO estimation since FOCE failed. The final model was evaluated using goodness-of-fit plots, bootstrap analysis, and visual predictive check. Results Pharmacokinetic data were complete for 137 patients (86 M, 51 F), of median age 70 years (range 20–91). A one-compartment model with lagged first-order absorption and time-dependent change in oral clearance was fitted to the vatalanib plasma concentration versus time data. The population means for pre-induction and post-induction oral clearance were 24.1 l h–1 (range: 9.6–45.5) and 54.9 l h–1 (range: 39.8–75.6), respectively. The apparent oral clearance increased 2.3-fold, (range: 1.7–4.1-fold) from first dose to steady state. Our data did not identify a significant relationship of the predefined covariates with vatalanib pharmacokinetics, although power to detect such a relationship was limited. Conclusions Vatalanib pharmacokinetics were highly variable and the extent of auto induction was not determined to correlate with any of the pre-defined covariates. PMID:24838014

  4. Impairment of FOS mRNA stabilization following translation arrest in granulocytes from myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaomin; Shikama, Yayoi; Shichishima, Tsutomu; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Kazuei; Kimura, Hideo; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kimura, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Although quantitative and qualitative granulocyte defects have been described in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the underlying molecular basis of granulocyte dysfunction in MDS is largely unknown. We recently found that FOS mRNA elevation under translation-inhibiting stimuli was significantly smaller in granulocytes from MDS patients than in healthy individuals. The aim of this study is to clarify the cause of the impaired FOS induction in MDS. We first examined the mechanisms of FOS mRNA elevation using granulocytes from healthy donors cultured with the translation inhibitor emetine. Emetine increased both transcription and mRNA stability of FOS. p38 MAPK inhibition abolished the emetine-induced increase of FOS transcription but did not affect FOS mRNA stabilization. The binding of an AU-rich element (ARE)-binding protein HuR to FOS mRNA containing an ARE in 3'UTR was increased by emetine, and the knockdown of HuR reduced the FOS mRNA stabilizing effect of emetine. We next compared the emetine-induced transcription and mRNA stabilization of FOS between MDS patients and healthy controls. Increased rates of FOS transcription by emetine were similar in MDS and controls. In the absence of emetine, FOS mRNA decayed to nearly 17% of initial levels in 45 min in both groups. In the presence of emetine, however, 76.7±19.8% of FOS mRNA remained after 45 min in healthy controls, versus 37.9±25.5% in MDS (P<0.01). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating attenuation of stress-induced FOS mRNA stabilization in MDS granulocytes.

  5. Maintenance Therapy with Decitabine after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Iskra; Choi, Jaebok; Fiala, Mark A; Gao, Feng; Holt, Matthew; Cashen, Amanda F; Vij, Ravi; Abboud, Camille N; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E; Jacoby, Meghan A; Uy, Geoffrey L; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2015-10-01

    Decitabine is a hypomethylating agent that irreversibly inhibits DNA methyltransferase I, inducing leukemic differentiation and re-expression of epigenetically silenced putative tumor antigens. We assessed safety and efficacy of decitabine maintenance after allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Decitabine maintenance may help eradicate minimal residual disease, decrease the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and facilitate a graft-versus-leukemia effect by enhancing the effect of T regulatory lymphocytes. Patients with AML/MDS in complete remission (CR) after allotransplantation started decitabine between day +50 and +100. We investigated 4 decitabine doses in cohorts of 4 patients: 5, 7.5, 10, and 15 mg/m(2)/day × 5 days every 6 weeks, for a maximum 8 cycles. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the maximum dose at which ≤ 25% of people experience dose-limiting toxicities during the first cycle of treatment. Twenty-four patients were enrolled and 22 were evaluable. All 4 dose levels were completed and no MTD was reached. Overall, decitabine maintenance was well tolerated. Grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicities were experienced by 75% of patients, including all patients treated at the highest dose level. Nine patients completed all 8 cycles and 8 of them remain in CR. Nine patients died from relapse (n = 4), infectious complications (n = 3), and GVHD (n = 2). Most occurrences of acute GVHD were mild and resolved without interruption of treatment; 1 patient died of acute gut GVHD. Decitabine maintenance did not clearly impact the rate of chronic GVHD. Although there was a trend of increased FOXP3 expression, results were not statistically significant. In conclusion, decitabine maintenance is associated with acceptable toxicities when given in the post-allotransplantation setting. Although the MTD was not reached, the dose of 10 mg/m(2) for 5 days every 6 weeks appeared to be the

  6. Chromothripsis Is a Recurrent Genomic Abnormality in High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Abáigar, María; Robledo, Cristina; Benito, Rocío; Ramos, Fernando; Díez-Campelo, María; Hermosín, Lourdes; Sánchez-del-Real, Javier; Alonso, Jose M.; Cuello, Rebeca; Megido, Marta; Rodríguez, Juan N.; Martín-Núñez, Guillermo; Aguilar, Carlos; Vargas, Manuel; Martín, Ana A.; García, Juan L.; Kohlmann, Alexander; del Cañizo, M. Consuelo; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    To explore novel genetic abnormalities occurring in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) through an integrative study combining array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a series of MDS and MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) patients. 301 patients diagnosed with MDS (n = 240) or MDS/MPN (n = 61) were studied at the time of diagnosis. A genome-wide analysis of DNA copy number abnormalities was performed. In addition, a mutational analysis of DNMT3A, TET2, RUNX1, TP53 and BCOR genes was performed by NGS in selected cases. 285 abnormalities were identified in 71 patients (23.6%). Three high-risk MDS cases (1.2%) displayed chromothripsis involving exclusively chromosome 13 and affecting some cancer genes: FLT3, BRCA2 and RB1. All three cases carried TP53 mutations as revealed by NGS. Moreover, in the whole series, the integrative analysis of aCGH and NGS enabled the identification of cryptic recurrent deletions in 2p23.3 (DNMT3A; n = 2.8%), 4q24 (TET2; n = 10%) 17p13 (TP53; n = 8.5%), 21q22 (RUNX1; n = 7%), and Xp11.4 (BCOR; n = 2.8%), while mutations in the non-deleted allele where found only in DNMT3A (n = 1), TET2 (n = 3), and TP53 (n = 4). These cryptic abnormalities were detected mainly in patients with normal (45%) or non-informative (15%) karyotype by conventional cytogenetics, except for those with TP53 deletion and mutation (15%), which had a complex karyotype. In addition to well-known copy number defects, the presence of chromothripsis involving chromosome 13 was a novel recurrent change in high-risk MDS patients. Array CGH analysis revealed the presence of cryptic abnormalities in genomic regions where MDS-related genes, such as TET2, DNMT3A, RUNX1 and BCOR, are located. PMID:27741277

  7. Telomere stability is frequently impaired in high-risk groups of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ohyashiki, J H; Iwama, H; Yahata, N; Ando, K; Hayashi, S; Shay, J W; Ohyashiki, K

    1999-05-01

    Genomic instability induces an accumulation of genetic changes and may play a role in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). To clarify the possible association between genomic instability and clinical outcome in MDS patients, we compared telomere dynamics to the recently established International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) risk groups for MDS. We measured the terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) of 93 patients with MDS at the time of diagnosis, and telomerase activity was analyzed in 62 patients with MDS using the PCR-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. A total of 53 of 93 MDS patients had TRFs within the age-matched normal range, and the remaining patients showed shortened TRFs (35 patients) or elongated TRFs (5 patients). MDS patients with shortened TRFs had a significantly low hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.04), a high percentage of marrow blasts (P = 0.02), and a high incidence of cytogenetic abnormalities (P < 0.05). The incidence of leukemic transformation was significantly high in patients with shortened TRF length (P < 0.05). In addition, patients with shortened TRF length were frequently seen in the IPSS high-risk group (P < 0.01). Most of the MDS patients had normal-to-low levels of telomerase activity, suggesting that changes in TRF length rather than telomerase activity may more accurately reflect the pathophysiology of MDS. MDS patients with shortened TRF length had a very poor prognosis (P < 0.01), suggesting that telomere dynamics may be linked to clinical outcome in MDS patients. Thus, an abnormal mechanism of telomere maintenance in subgroups of MDS patients may be an early indication of genomic instability. This study demonstrates that telomere stability is frequently impaired in a high-risk group of MDS patients and suggests that, in combination with the IPSS classification system, measurement of TRFs may be useful in the future to stratify MDS patients according to risk and manage the care of MDS

  8. Genomic Array as Compared to Karyotyping in Myelodysplastic Syndromes in a Prospective Clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian J; Olde Weghuis, Daniel; ElIdrissi-Zaynoun, Najat; van der Reijden, Bert; Cremers, Eline M P; Alhan, Canan; Westers, Theresia M; Visser-Wisselaar, Heleen A; Chitu, Dana A; Cunha, Sonia M; Vellenga, Edo; Klein, Saskia K; Wijermans, Pierre; de Greef, Georgine E; Schaafsma, M R; Muus, Petra; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Jansen, Joop H

    2017-02-25

    Karyotyping is considered as the gold standard in the genetic subclassification of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Oligo/SNP-based genomic array profiling is a high-resolution tool that also enables genome wide analysis. We compared karyotyping with oligo/SNP-based array profiling in 104 MDS patients from the HOVON-89 study. Oligo/SNP-array identified all cytogenetically defined genomic lesions, except for subclones in two cases and balanced translocations in three cases. On the other hand oligo/SNP-based genomic array profiling had a higher success rate, showing 55 abnormal cases, while an abnormal karyotype was found in only 35 patients. In 9 patients whose karyotyping was unsuccessful because of insufficient metaphases or failure, oligo/SNP-based array analysis was successful. Based on cytogenetic visible abnormalities as identified by oligo/SNP-based genomic array prognostic scores based on IPSS/-R were assigned. These prognostic scores were identical to the IPSS/-R scores as obtained with karyotyping in 95-96% of the patients. In addition to the detection of cytogenetically defined lesions, oligo/SNP-based genomic profiling identified focal copy number abnormalities or regions of copy neutral loss of heterozygosity that were out of the scope of karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of interest, in 26 patients we demonstrated such cytogenetic invisible abnormalities. These abnormalities often involved regions that are recurrently affected in hematological malignancies, and may therefore be of clinical relevance. Our findings indicate that oligo/SNP-based genomic array can be used to identify the vast majority of recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities in MDS. Furthermore, oligo/SNP-based array profiling yields additional genetic abnormalities that may be of clinical importance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. TP53 overexpression is an independent adverse prognostic factor in de novo myelodysplastic syndromes with fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Loghavi, Sanam; Al-Ibraheemi, Alyaa; Zuo, Zhuang; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Yabe, Mariko; Wang, Sa A; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Yin, Cameron C; Miranda, Roberto N; Luthra, Raja; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Khoury, Joseph D

    2015-10-01

    Bone marrow (BM) fibrosis is associated with poor prognosis in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). TP53 mutations and TP53 (p53) overexpression in MDS are also associated with poor patient outcomes. The prevalence and significance of TP53 mutations and TP53 overexpression in MDS with fibrosis are unknown. We studied 67 patients with de novo MDS demonstrating moderate to severe reticulin fibrosis (MDS-F). Expression of TP53 was evaluated in BM core biopsy specimens using dual-colour CD34/TP53 immunohistochemistry with computer-assisted image analysis. Mutation analysis was performed using next-generation sequencing, or Sanger sequencing methods. TP53 mutations were present in 47·1% of cases. TP53 mutation was significantly associated with TP53 expression (P = 0·0294). High levels of TP53 expression (3 +  in ≥10% cells) were associated with higher BM blast counts (P = 0·0149); alterations of chromosomes 5 (P = 0·0009) or 7 (P = 0·0141); complex karyotype (P = 0·0002); high- and very-high risk IPSS-R groups (P = 0·009); and TP53 mutations (P = 0·0003). High TP53 expression independently predicted shorter overall survival (OS) by multivariate analysis (P = <0·001). Expression of TP53 by CD34-positive cells was associated with shorter OS and leukaemia-free survival (P = 0·0428). TP53 overexpression is a predictor of poor outcome in patients with MDS-F.

  10. Distinct mutation profile and prognostic relevance in patients with hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndromes (h-MDS)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzung-Yi; Lin, Chien-Chin; Chou, Wen-Chien; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Wu, Shang-Ju; Liao, Xiu-Wen; Lin, Chien-Ting; Ko, Bor-Shen; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Li, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shang-Yi; Yao, Ming; Tang, Jih-Luh; Tsay, Woei; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies. Although most MDS patients have normal or increased BM cellularity (NH-MDS), some have hypocellular BM (h-MDS). The reports concerning the differences in genetic alterations between h-MDS and NH-MDS patients are limited. In this study, 369 MDS patients diagnosed according to the WHO 2008 criteria were recruited. h-MDS patients had lower PB white blood cell and blast counts, and lower BM blast percentages, than those with NH-MDS. h-MDS was closely associated with lower-risk MDS, defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and revised IPSS (IPSS-R). IPSS-R could properly predict the prognosis in h-MDS (P<0.001) as in NH-MDS patients. The h-MDS patients had lower incidences of RUNX1, ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2 and TP53 mutations than NH-MDS patients. The cumulated incidence of acute leukemic transformation at 5 years was 19.3% for h-MDS and 40.4% for NH-MDS patients (P= 0.001). Further, the patients with h-MDS had longer overall survival (OS) than those with NH-MDS (P= 0.001), and BM hypocellularity remains an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS irrespective of age, IPSS-R, and gene mutations. Our findings provide evidence that h-MDS indeed represent a distinct clinico-biological subgroup of MDS and can predict better leukemia-free survival and OS. PMID:27527853

  11. Validation of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System in treated patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Asmita; Corrales-Yepez, Maria; Ali, Najla Al; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K.; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Lancet, Jeffrey E.; List, Alan F.; Komrokji, Rami S.

    2015-01-01

    The International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) was recently revised (IPSS-R) under the auspices of the MDS Foundation as a collaborative international effort to refine its prognostic power. Our purpose was to externally validate this new risk model using a large single-institution cohort, determine its prognostic power in patients receiving active treatment, and explore its utility in guiding therapeutic decisions. Data were collected retrospectively from our myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) database and verified by chart review. Of the data available for 1,088 patients, 152 (14%), 353 (32%), 237 (22%), 190 (18%), and 156 (14%) patients were classified as very low, low, intermediate, high, and very high risk, respectively, with median overall survival (OS) of 90 (95%CI 71–109), 54 (95%CI 50–59), 34 (95%CI 26–43), 21 (95%CI 17–25), and 13 months (95%CI 11– 15), respectively (P < 0.005). We found that the IPSS-R further refined prognostic discrimination in all IPSS risk categories, particularly in the intermediate 1 and 2 groups. Among high and very high IPSS-R patients receiving azacitidine, OS was significantly improved versus patients not receiving azacitidine, with corresponding median OS of 25 versus 18 months (P = 0.028) and 15 versus 9 months (P = 0.005), respectively. Similarly, patients with IPSS-R high- and very high-risk disease who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had significantly improved OS versus nontransplant approaches (P < 0.005). High and very high IPSS-R patients derived a survival advantage from disease-modifying therapies. Our data validate the prognostic value of the proposed IPSS-R and show that its refined IPSS prognostic discrimination can be applied to actively treated patients. PMID:23605934

  12. Review of stem-cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndromes in older patients in the context of the Decision Memo for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndrome emanating from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

    PubMed

    Giralt, Sergio A; Horowitz, Mary; Weisdorf, Daniel; Cutler, Corey

    2011-02-10

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic stem-cell disorders that result in varying degrees of cytopenia and risk of transformation into acute leukemia. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (SCT) is the only known cure for this disease. The treatment is routinely used for younger patients, but only a minority of patients older than the age of 60 undergo this procedure. The overall MDS incidence is 3.3 per 100,000, but the incidence in patients older than age 70 is between 15 and 50 per 100,000. The median age at presentation is 76 years. Medicare-age patients 65 or older represent 80% of the total population receiving an MDS diagnosis. In the United States, one of the obstacles to SCT for older patients with MDS has been lack of third party reimbursement. On August 4, 2010, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released their Decision Memo for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Myelodysplastic Syndrome. This memo states: "Allogeneic HSCT for MDS is covered by Medicare only for beneficiaries with MDS participating in an approved clinical study that meets the criteria below…. " In this review, we will summarize what is known regarding the role of allogeneic SCT in older patients as well as other elements that should be included within clinical trials that can provide the evidence necessary to demonstrate that allogeneic SCT should be a covered benefit for Medicare beneficiaries.

  13. Gastrointestinal microbiome signatures of pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intestinal microbiomes of healthy children and pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are not well defined. Studies in adults have indicated that the gastrointestinal microbiota could be involved in IBS. We analyzed 71 samples from 22 children with IBS (pediatric Rome III criteri...

  14. Fatal Relapse of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in a Patient with HIV/Hepatitis C Coinfection Treated with Simeprevir/Sofosbuvir.

    PubMed

    Diejomaoh, Efemena Michael; Gathe, Joseph Clayton; Mayberry, Carl Craig; Clemmons, John Benjamin; Miguel, Bernie; Glombicki, Alan; Daquioag, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Registrational studies and observational cohorts clearly suggest sustained virologic response (SVR) rates in HIV-/hepatitis C-coinfected patients are similar to monoinfected patients when utilizing interferon-free regimens, and this can be accomplished with agents that are well tolerated with minimal adverse events. These randomized trials that led to the approval of several of our new direct-acting antiviral agents, however, specifically excluded patients who had significant comorbidities and none to our knowledge accepted patients with a history of cancer. Therefore, the effect of treatment of active hepatitis C in such patients and the effect on preexisting neoplasia are relatively unknown. We prospectively followed a 62-year-old male coinfected with HIV/hepatitis C who had a history of anal squamous cell carcinoma, prostate carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma all clinically cured and a myelodysplastic syndrome that was in remission. The patient achieved an SVR of hepatitis C with simeprevir/sofosbuvir without ribavirin and died shortly thereafter of a fatal relapse of his previously clinically controlled myelodysplastic syndrome.

  15. Development of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia 15 years after hydroxyurea use in a patient with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Baz, Walid; Najfeld, Vesna; Yotsuya, Matthew; Talwar, Jotica; Terjanian, Terenig; Forte, Frank

    2012-01-01

    We report a 41 year old male with sickle cell disease who developed a myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with complex karyotype involving chromosomes 5, 7 and 17 after 15 years of hydroxyurea treatment. He responded poorly to induction chemotherapy with cytarabine/idarubicin followed by high dose cytarabine and succumbed to neutropenic sepsis. Multiple systematic reviews, observational studies and clinical trials were conducted to identify the toxicity profile of hydroxurea. Only six cases of leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome were identified in patients with sickle cell anemia treated with hydroxyurea. Subsequently, it was concluded that hydroxyurea is not leukemogenic. However, it was noted that most of the published studies had only up to 9 years of follow-up. Our patient was started on hydroxyurea in 1990, before the widespread use of the drug and took hydroxyurea for 15 years. His presentation may reflect an outcome otherwise not yet observed because of the short follow-up of prior studies. We believe that the leukemogenic risk of hydroxyurea should be discussed with the patients and their families. Studies evaluating the adverse effects of hydroxyurea should have longer follow-up before definitive conclusions are drawn.

  16. Antiretroviral activity of 5-azacytidine during treatment of a HTLV-1 positive myelodysplastic syndrome with autoimmune manifestations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are often accompanied by autoimmune phenomena. The underlying mechanisms for these associations remain uncertain, although T cell activation seems to be important. Human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) has been detected in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, mostly in regions of the world which are endemic for the virus, and where association of HTLV-1 with rheumatological manifestation is not rare. We present here the case of a 58 year old man who presented with cytopenias, leukocytoclastic vasculitis of the skin and glomerulopathy, and was diagnosed as MDS (refractory anemia with excess blasts - RAEB 1). The patient also tested positive for HTLV-1 by PCR. After 8 monthly cycles of 5-azacytidine he achieved a complete hematologic remission. Following treatment, a second PCR for HTLV-1 was carried out and found to be negative. This is the first report in the literature of a HTLV-1-positive MDS with severe autoimmune manifestations, which was treated with the hypomethylating factor 5-azacitidine, achieving cytogenetic remission with concomitant resolution of the autoimmune manifestations, as well as HTLV-1-PCR negativity. HTLV-1-PCR negativity may be due to either immune mediated clearance of the virus, or a potential antiretroviral effect of 5-azacytidine. 5-azacytidine is known for its antiretroviral effects, although there is no proof of its activity against HTLV-1 infection in vivo. PMID:22214262

  17. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total Body Irradiation Followed by a Donor Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Polycythemia Vera; Polycythemia Vera, Post-Polycythemic Myelofibrosis Phase; Primary Myelofibrosis; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  18. Recurrent unbalanced whole-arm t(1;10)(q10;p10) in myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Odish, Omar Ferkad Faraj; Gotoh, Akihiko; Liu, Yi-Chang; Shoji, Nohoko; Kimura, Yukihiko; Kodama, Atsushi; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2007-01-15

    We report a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome (refractory anemia) showing the karyotype 46,XY,+1,der(1;10)(q10;p10), resulting in trisomy 1q and monosomy 10q abnormality. This finding suggests that either trisomy of 1q or centromeric connection between chromosomes 1 and 10, rather than the absence of 10q, might be essential toward neoplastic transformation.

  19. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  20. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  1. Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Benzene Exposure Among Petroleum Workers: An International Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Benzene at high concentrations is known to cause acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but its relationship with other lymphohematopoietic (LH) cancers remains uncertain, particularly at low concentrations. In this pooled analysis, we examined the risk of five LH cancers relative to lower levels of benzene exposure in petroleum workers. Methods We updated three nested case–control studies from Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom with new incident LH cancers among petroleum distribution workers through December 31, 2006, and pooled 370 potential case subjects and 1587 matched LH cancer-free control subjects. Quantitative benzene exposure in parts per million (ppm) was blindly reconstructed using historical monitoring data, and exposure certainty was scored as high, medium, or low. Two hematopathologists assigned diagnoses and scored the certainty of diagnosis as high, medium, or low. Dose–response relationships were examined for five LH cancers, including the three most common leukemia cell-types (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia [CML], and chronic lymphoid leukemia [CLL]) and two myeloid tumors (myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS] and myeloproliferative disease [MPD]). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, and time period. Results Cumulative benzene exposure showed a monotonic dose–response relationship with MDS (highest vs lowest tertile, >2.93 vs ≤0.348 ppm-years, OR = 4.33, 95% CI = 1.31 to 14.3). For peak benezene exposures (>3 ppm), the risk of MDS was increased in high and medium certainty diagnoses (peak exposure vs no peak exposure, OR = 6.32, 95% CI = 1.32 to 30.2) and in workers having the highest exposure certainty (peak exposure vs no peak exposure, OR = 5.74, 95% CI = 1.05 to 31.2). There was little evidence of dose–response relationships for AML, CLL, CML, or MPD. Conclusions Relatively low-level exposure to benzene experienced by petroleum

  2. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation is Underutilized in Older Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Getta, Bartlomiej M; Kishtagari, Ashwin; Hilden, Patrick; Tallman, Martin S; Maloy, Molly; Gonzales, Patrick; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Giralt, Sergio; Tamari, Roni; Klimek, Virginia

    2017-03-20

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is the only curative treatment for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The proportion of MDS patients referred for transplant evaluation, those undergoing transplantation and the reasons for not undergoing transplant are unknown. In this retrospective analysis, pre-defined HCT eligibility and indications criteria were applied to 362 unselected patients with newly diagnosed MDS seen by Leukemia faculty between 2008 and 2015 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Two hundred ninety four patients (81%) were deemed eligible for transplant and among these, transplant was considered indicated in 244 (83%). Of these, 158/244 (65%) were referred for transplant evaluation at a median of 3.9 months from diagnosis. Overall 120/362 (33%) underwent transplant at a median of 7.7 months from diagnosis. Metastatic solid organ malignancy was the major reason for transplant ineligibility (54%), and death due to MDS, which occurred in 41% of candidates who were not transplanted, was the major reason for not undergoing transplant. Factors associated with a lower likelihood of referral for transplant evaluation included age ≥65 (p<0.001), ≥2 co-morbidities (p=0.008), intermediate-1/low risk MDS (p<0.001), <5% blasts at diagnosis (overall p<0.001), having medicare/medicaid health insurance (p<0.001), not being married (p=0.017) and diagnosis between 2008-2011 (p=0.035). On multivariate analysis adjusting for all of the previous, diagnosis between 2008-2011 (p<0.001), age ≥65 (p=0.001) and <5% blasts at diagnosis (overall p=0.031) were associated with a lower likelihood of referral for transplant evaluation. Factors associated with a lower likelihood of undergoing transplant included age ≥65 (p<0.001), ≥2 co-morbidities (p=0.003), intermediate-1/low risk MDS (p<0.001), <5% blasts (overall p<0.001), very low/low/intermediate risk IPSS-R karyotype (p=0.018) and having medicare/medicaid health insurance (p<0.001). In

  3. Myelodysplastic syndrome after autologous bone marrow transplantation: an additional late complication of curative cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Miller, J S; Arthur, D C; Litz, C E; Neglia, J P; Miller, W J; Weisdorf, D J

    1994-06-15

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a complication of conventional antineoplastic therapy but has rarely been reported after autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). We reviewed records of 206 patients who underwent ABMT for lymphoma at the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN) between 1974 and 1993. Of 206 patients who underwent ABMT for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) or Hodgkin's disease (HD), 9 patients developed an MDS or secondary acute leukemia between 5 and 60 months (median 34 months) post-BMT. Two patients had relapsed after transplant and received additional therapy before the diagnosis of MDS. They were censored from the statistical analysis, resulting in a cumulative incidence of 14.5% +/- 11.6% (95% confidence interval) at 5 years. Three patients (15.2% +/- 18.0%) had HD, and four (14.0% +/- 14.7%) had NHL. In vitro BM purging had no affect on the incidence of MDS, although patients receiving peripheral blood stem cells had a projected MDS incidence of 31% +/- 33% versus 10.5% +/- 12% if BM cells were used (p = .0035). The patients had received a median of 14 cycles (range, 6 to 40) of chemotherapy before autologous transplantation; Five of nine patients received radiation therapy before BMT conditioning, and all patients received radiation before the diagnosis of MDS. No BM cytogenetic abnormalities were evident pretransplant in three of three patients studied, and all nine had normal pretransplant BM morphology. All patients had morphologic BM findings typical of MDS, and six of six studied had clonal cytogenetic abnormalities. At the diagnosis of MDS, all nine patients were without clinical, radiographic, or autopsy evidence of recurrent lymphoma; Three of the nine patients have died from complications of cytopenias at 23, 36, and 45 months after transplant (3 to 10 months after the diagnosis of MDS), whereas 6 survive 8 to 63 months after transplantation (1 to 34 months post-MDS). These data emphasize the cumulative leukemogenic potential of

  4. Molecular Testing in Myelodysplastic Syndromes for the Practicing Oncologist: Will the Progress Fulfill the Promise?

    PubMed Central

    Nazha, Aziz; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Gore, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are heterogeneous hematopoietic neoplasms that are driven by somatically acquired genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations. Accurate risk stratification is essential for delivery of risk-adaptive therapeutic interventions. The current prognostic tools sum the impact of clinical, pathologic, and laboratory parameters. Newer technologies with next-generation targeted deep sequencing and whole-genome and -exome sequencing have identified several recurrent mutations that play a vital role in the pathophysiology of MDS and the impact of these genetic changes on disease phenotype. Equally important, well-annotated databases of MDS patients with paired clinicopathologic and genetic data have enabled better understanding of the independent prognostic impact of several molecular mutations on important clinical endpoints such as overall survival and probability of leukemic progression. Cumulative evidence suggests that genomic data can also be used clinically to aid with the diagnosis, prognosis, prediction of response to specific therapies, and the development of novel and rationally targeted therapies. However, the optimal use of this mutational profiling remains a work in progress and currently there is no standard set of genes or techniques that are recommended for routine use in the clinic. In this review, we discuss the genomic revolution and its impact on our understanding of MDS biology and risk stratification. We also discuss the current role and the challenges of the application of genetic mutational data into daily clinical practice and how future research could help improve the prognostication precision and specific therapy selection for patients with MDS. Implications for Practice: Heterogeneity in clinical outcomes of MDS is partly related to interpatient variability of recurrent somatic mutations that drive disease phenotype and progression. Although clinical risk stratification tools have functioned well in prognostication

  5. [Mutation of mitochondria cytochrome oxidase gene in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hou, Li; Liu, Ting; Meng, Wen-Tong

    2008-08-01

    The relationship between mitochondria gene mutation and hematological malignancies has been focusing on as a key point in recent studies. This study was aimed to investigate whether in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) exists mitochoudria cytochrome oxidase COI and COII gene mutations different from normal tissues and to analyze whether these mutations are "hot spot" mutations. Eighteen MDS patients aged from 20 to 70 years old were brought into this study, including 2 of RA, 3 of RCMD, 7 of RAEB, 5 of AML (transformation from MDS), and 1 of MDS/MPD. The total DNA was extracted both from bone marrow cells and buccal cells of the same patients. A pair of primers was designed to amplify a fragment with 528 base pair (7181 - 7709) by PCR technique, which contained high frequency mutation area of cytochrome oxidase COI and COII gene based on the literature reports. The PCR products were purified and sequenced as bidirection to confirm if there is any mutation. The results of sequence of COI and COII gene from MDS patient bone marrow cells were compared with both the standard sequence from GenBank and the sequence from MDS patient buccal cells. The results showed that 3 single nucleotide changes in 528 bp cytochrome oxidase gene fragment from 18 MDS patients were confirmed. They were 7674 T-->C, 7353 A-->G, and an insert mutation of G at 7702. The former two mutations caused isoleucine-->methionine, and methionine-->viline. The 7702G ins was only confirmed with marrow cells in a patient, and caused a frame shift, which suggested that the mutation might be related to MDS cells. It is concluded that some of "hot spots" of mtDNA mutation in cytochrome oxidase (COI, COII) gene from our MDS patients are failed to be confirmed, but 3 new mutations on this gene are found, which suggested that mitochondria DNA mutations in MDS patients still have much complexity and heterogeneity, mtDNA mutation may be a prophase or an accompany phenomenon of this disease.

  6. Mechanisms of Impaired Neutrophil Migration by MicroRNAs in Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Meiwan; Shikama, Yayoi; Kimura, Hideo; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ono, Tomoyuki; Ogawa, Kazuei; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kimura, Junko

    2017-03-01

    In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), functional defects of neutrophils result in high mortality because of infections; however, the molecular basis remains unclear. We recently found that miR-34a and miR-155 were significantly increased in MDS neutrophils. To clarify the effects of the aberrant microRNA expression on neutrophil functions, we introduced miR-34a, miR-155, or control microRNA into neutrophil-like differentiated HL60 cells. Ectopically introduced miR-34a and miR-155 significantly attenuated migration toward chemoattractants fMLF and IL-8, but enhanced degranulation. To clarify the mechanisms for inhibition of migration, we studied the effects of miR-34a and miR-155 on the migration-regulating Rho family members, Cdc42 and Rac1. The introduced miR-34a and miR-155 decreased the fMLF-induced active form of Cdc42 to 29.0 ± 15.9 and 39.7 ± 4.8% of that in the control cells, respectively, although Cdc42 protein levels were not altered. miR-34a decreased a Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) 8, whereas miR-155 reduced another Cdc42-specific GEF, FYVE, RhoGEF, and PH domain-containing (FGD) 4. The knockdown of DOCK8 and FGD4 by small interfering RNA suppressed Cdc42 activation and fMLF/IL-8-induced migration. miR-155, but not miR-34a, decreased Rac1 protein, and introduction of Rac1 small interfering RNA attenuated Rac1 activation and migration. Neutrophils from patients showed significant attenuation in migration compared with healthy cells, and protein levels of DOCK8, FGD4, and Rac1 were well correlated with migration toward fMLF (r = 0.642, 0.686, and 0.436, respectively) and IL-8 (r = 0.778, 0.659, and 0.606, respectively). Our results indicated that reduction of DOCK8, FGD4, and Rac1 contributes to impaired neutrophil migration in MDS.

  7. [Clinical observation of decitabine-treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Wang, Quan-Shun; Han, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Wen-Rong; Jing, Yu; Wang, Shu-Hong; Zhang, Song-Song; Mei, Jun-Hui; Yu, Li

    2013-02-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the clinical efficiencies and adverse reactions of treating the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by using decitabine. The clinical data of 12 MDS and AML patients treated with decitabine were analyzed retrospectively. Among 12 patients there were 1 case of MDS-RA, 2 cases of MDS-RAEB-I, 3 cases of MDS-RAEB-II, 2 cases of AML-M4, 2 cases of AML-M5, 1 case of AML-M6 and 1 case of AML-M0. In decitabine chemotherapy program for 5 days (n = 8), decitabine 20 mg/(m(2)·d) × 5 days was applied, 4 weeks for 1 cycle; in program for 3 days (n = 2), decitabine 15 mg/m(2), once 8 h for 3 days, 6 weeks for 1 cycle; another program (n = 2), decitabine 20 mg/(m(2)·d) every other day for 5 times. For 1 patient achieved complete remission (CR) after treatment with decitabine, ID4 gene methylated level was detected by MS-PCR and ML-PCR before and after treatment. The results showed that 2 cases achieved CR, 1 case partial remission, 5 cases stable disease, 1 case progress of disease and 3 cases died. Disease control rate was 66.67% (8/12), the effective rate 25% (3/12). The average survival time was (11.5 ± 2.1) months. 1-year OS rate was 40%, 2-year OS rate was 16.7%. MS-PCR detection showed that the decitabine could significantly reduce the ID4 gene methylation level. It is concluded that decitabine can stabilize disease status of MDS patients, reduce blood transfusion dependence and improve the life quality of patients, and even some patients who transformed from MDS to leukemia achieved CR after treatment with decitabine. Decitabine can reduce the ID4 gene methylation level. The main adverse reaction of decitabine was myelosuppression, infection and so on. So the blood transfusions, antibiotics and other supportive treatments for these patients are needed. Most of patients well tolerate the adverse effects of decitabine after active symptomatic and supportive treatment. The efficacy and survival rate of

  8. Suppression of the DNA damage response in acute myeloid leukemia versus myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boehrer, S; Adès, L; Tajeddine, N; Hofmann, W K; Kriener, S; Bug, G; Ottmann, O G; Ruthardt, M; Galluzzi, L; Fouassier, C; Tailler, M; Olaussen, K A; Gardin, C; Eclache, V; de Botton, S; Thepot, S; Fenaux, P; Kroemer, G

    2009-06-04

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the evolution from the preleukemic entities of low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) to the less favorable forms of high-risk MDS, as well as those enabling transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML), are still incompletely understood. Abundant evidence from solid tumors demonstrates that preneoplastic lesions activate signaling pathways of a DNA damage response (DDR), which functions as an 'anticancer barrier' hindering tumorigenesis. Testing the hypothesis that subgroups of MDS and AML differ with respect to DDR, we first assessed markers of DDR (phosphorylation of ATM, Chk-1, Chk-2 and H2AX) in cell lines representing different entities of MDS (P39, MOLM-13) and AML (MV4-11, KG-1) before and after gamma-irradiation. Although gamma-irradiation induced apoptosis and G(2)/M arrest and a concomitant increase in the phosphorylation of ATM, Chk-1 and H2AX in MDS-derived cell lines, this radiation response was attenuated in the AML-derived cell lines. It is noteworthy that KG-1, but not P39 cells exhibit signs of an endogenous activation of the DDR. Similarly, we found that the frequency of P-ATM(+) cells detectable in bone marrow (BM) biopsies increased in samples from patients with AML as compared with high-risk MDS samples and significantly correlated with the percentage of BM blasts. In contrast, the frequency of gamma-H2AX(+) cells was heterogeneous in all subgroups of AML and MDS. Whereas intermediate-1 MDS samples contained as little P-Chk-1 and P-Chk-2 as healthy controls, staining for both checkpoint kinases increased in intermediate-2 and high-risk MDS, yet declined to near-to-background levels in AML samples. Thus the activation of Chk-1 and Chk-2 behaves in accord with the paradigm established for solid tumors, whereas ATM is activated during and beyond transformation. In conclusion, we demonstrate the heterogeneity of the DDR response in MDS and AML and provide evidence for its selective suppression in AML

  9. The evaluation of iron overload through hepcidin level and its related factors in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shucheng; Song, Xiaoli; Zhao, Youshan; Guo, Juan; Fei, Chengming; Xu, Feng; Wu, Lingyun; Zhang, Xi; Zhao, Jungong; Chang, Chunkang; Li, Xiao

    2013-09-01

    We chose hepcidin and its related factors as evaluating indicators to determine the degrees of iron overload in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients. A total of 73 patients and 28 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. We performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure both bone marrow and peripheral blood serum hepcidin. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the gene expression of growth differentiation factor 15 and twisted gastrulation 1. Serum ferritin (SF), C-reactive protein (CRP), and erythropoietin were measured by routine standard laboratory assays. CD4(+) and CD19(+) lymphocytes and Th polarization were detected by flow cytometry. Twenty-four MDS patients were measured their cardiac and liver iron deposition levels through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2* examination. No significant difference was found between the bone marrow hepcidin levels and peripheral blood hepcidin levels (P = 0.134). Stratified according to different World Health Organization subtypes, refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts patients had the lowest hepcidin levels (105.40 ± 5.13 ng/ml), while refractory anemia with excess blasts-1 had the highest levels (335.71 ± 25.16 ng/ml). Stratified according to International Prognostic Scoring System and WHO Classification-based Prognostic Scoring System, there was a significant difference of hepcidin levels between low-risk group and high-risk group in two systems, respectively (P = 0.033 and 0.009). The hepcidin levels of CD4(+) high-expression group were demonstrated higher than the normal expression groups (P = 0.02), but the CD19(+) high-expression group did not show the same result (P = 0.206). Meanwhile, patients with a Th1 polarization trend had a high level of hepcidin versus normal group (P < 0.001). Liver iron concentration (LIC) measured by MRI T2* had a closer correlation (r = 0.582, P < 0.001) to hepcidin than serum ferritin, by stepwise regression. C

  10. Clinical, hematological, and cytogenetic profile of adult myelodysplastic syndrome in a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Santhosh

    2017-01-01

    Background Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a disorder of clonal hematopoiesis, is an important clinical entity, but most of the studies available are conducted among the Western population. Its etiological factors and clinicohematological profile in the Indian population are quite diverse. The information regarding its prognostic factors and cytogenetics is very scarce. Objectives (1) To assess the clinicohematological profile, cytogenetics, prognostic factors, and outcome of MDS and (2) to study its progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the selected patients over the study period. Methods A prospective observational study was performed with patients from Department of Medicine and Hematology, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, who were diagnosed with MDS within the study period (from 1 January 2014 to 31 July 2015). Secondary causes of dysplasia were excluded. In possible cases, the international prognostic scoring system was followed. These patients were followed up for an additional 6 months to assess the progression of MDS to AML based on symptoms, signs, hemogram, or repeat peripheral smear/bone marrow studies. Results Of the 60 patients, 73% were aged >60 years. Disease was common in males, with a male:female ratio of 7:3. Thirty-five percent of the patients were working in agricultural and allied fields and had pesticide exposure. Patients with prior radiation exposure had significant association with adverse outcome. Fatigue was the prominent symptom and was reported by 90% of the patients. Blasts were >5% in peripheral smear; bone marrow cytopenia and dysplasia at the time of diagnosis had significant association with risk of transforming to AML. Refractory anemia (RA), observed in 22 patients, was the most common type of MDS. Most of the patients with RA with excess blasts type-1 and RA with excess blasts type-2 transformed to AML, and the association was statistically significant. Deletion of short arm of fifth chromosome (5q deletion) was

  11. Analysis of the erythropoietin receptor gene in patients with myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mittelman, M; Gardyn, J; Carmel, M; Malovani, H; Barak, Y; Nir, U

    1996-06-01

    The human erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) gene has been cloned and characterized. Very few EpoR genetic abnormalities have been reported so far. Polycythemia vera (PV) is characterized by low/normal serum erythropoietin (Epo) levels with proposed Epo hypersensitivity. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by refractory anemia with variable serum Epo levels. Several reports have suggested EpoR abnormalities in both types of stem cell disorders. We analyzed DNA obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of seven healthy controls, 20 patients with myeloproliferative disorders (MPD, 11 patients with PV, five agnogenic myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis, four essential thrombocytosis) and eight patients with refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS), an MDS variant. The DNA was digested with four restriction enzymes (BamHI, Bgl II, Sacl and HindIII), followed by Southern blot, using a 32P radiolabeled probe, containing 1.5 kb of the human EpoR cDNA. All 20 MPD patients and seven out of the eight MDS patients demonstrated a restriction pattern which was identical to the seven normal controls, as well as to the erythroid cell line K562, and also consistent with the expected restriction map, for all four enzymes tested. One RARS patient had a normal pattern with three enzymes but a different one with HindIII. The HindIII 12 kb large band was replaced by a faint 12 kb band and a new (about 9 kb) band appeared. The EpoR restriction map and the normal pattern obtained with the other three enzymes suggest that this patient has a 3 kb upstream deletion in one allelic EpoR gene. The same molecular pattern was detected in the patient's sister, who suffers from anemia with mild bone marrow (BM) dyserythropoiesis and plasmacytosis. Northern blot analysis showed that the patient's BM RNA carried normal EpoR message. This familial pattern may represent polymorphism. However, the patient's very high serum Epo level, her resistance to treatment with

  12. Somatic mutations predict outcomes of hypomethylating therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Seon-Hee; Kim, Hye-Jung; Kwon, Yong-Rim; Hur, Eun-Hye; Goo, Bon-Kwan; Choi, Yun-Suk; Lee, Sug Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Je-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Although hypomethylating therapy (HMT) is the first line therapy in higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), predicting response to HMT remains an unresolved issue. We aimed to identify mutations associated with response to HMT and survival in MDS. A total of 107 Korean patients with MDS who underwent HMT (57 responders and 50 non-responders) were enrolled. Targeted deep sequencing (median depth of coverage 1,623X) was performed for 26 candidate MDS genes. In multivariate analysis, no mutation was significantly associated with response to HMT, but a lower hemoglobin level (<10g/dL, OR 3.56, 95% CI 1.22-10.33) and low platelet count (<50,000/μL, OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.05-5.93) were independent markers of poor response to HMT. In the subgroup analysis by type of HMT agents, U2AF1 mutation was significantly associated with non-response to azacitidine, which was consistent in multivariate analysis (OR 14.96, 95% CI 1.67-134.18). Regarding overall survival, mutations in DNMT1 (P=0.031), DNMT3A (P=0.006), RAS (P=0.043), and TP53 (P=0.008), and two clinical variables (male-gender, P=0.002; IPSS-R H/VH, P=0.026) were independent predicting factors of poor prognosis. For AML-free survival, mutations in DNMT3A (P<0.001), RAS (P=0.001), and TP53 (P=0.047), and two clinical variables (male-gender, P=0.024; IPSS-R H/VH, P=0.005) were independent predicting factors of poor prognosis. By combining these mutations and clinical predictors, we developed a quantitative scoring model for response to azacitidine, overall- and AML-free survival. Response to azacitidine and survival rates became worse significantly with increasing risk-scores. This scoring model can make prognosis prediction more reliable and clinically applicable. PMID:27419369

  13. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  14. MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. The Simultaneous Elevation of Oxidative Stress Markers and Wilms' Tumor 1 Gene during the Progression of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Naomi; Hasunuma, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Matsuzawa, Yasuo; Iwashita, Youichi; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Yokota, Hiromitsu

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is closely related to iron overload in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and induces DNA damage. We evaluated the oxidative stress markers derivatives of reactive oxidative metabolites (dROM) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) during azacitidine treatment in an MDS patient. Simultaneous with an increase in the expression of Wilms' Tumor 1 (WT1) gene in the peripheral blood, the serum dROM level was elevated, and this increase was observed earlier than the increases in ferritin and 8-OHdG. Throughout the clinical course, dROM and 8-OHdG correlated significantly with WT1 and with ferritin, suggesting that changes in the oxidative stress marker levels reflect not only iron overload but also disease progression of MDS. PMID:27980269

  18. Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Treated by Thrombectomy in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Severe Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Onder, Halil; Murat Arsava, E.; Arat, Anıl; Akif Topcuoglu, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Experience on thrombolysis and/or thrombectomy for acute major ischemic strokes in the setting of deep (less than 40,000/mm3) thrombocytopenia is limited. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results A 63-year-old female with myelodysplastic syndrome presented with left middle cerebral artery stroke within 2 hours of symptom onset. Severe thrombocytopenia (10.000/mm3) precluded systemic thrombolysis. However, endovascular thrombectomy provided successful recanalization and dramatic clinical recovery with NIHSS score decreasing from 20 to 2 soon after the procedure. Her modified Rankin scale was 1 at the end of the third month. Conclusion This exceptional case highlights that neurothrombectomy could be feasible and of justifiable merit even in the setting of critically low thrombocytopenia if a meticulous procedure is followed in subjects with severe acute stroke. PMID:26576212

  19. Meeting report: Vienna 2008 Workshop of the German-Austrian Working Group for Studying Prognostic Factors in Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Büsche, Guntram; Sotlar, Karl; Horny, Hans-Peter; Haase, Detlef; Haferlach, Torsten; Kern, Wolfgang; Bettelheim, Peter; Baumgartner, Christian; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Nösslinger, Thomas; Wimazal, Friedrich; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A; Lübbert, Michael; Krieger, Otto; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Stauder, Reinhard; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Gattermann, Norbert; Fonatsch, Christa; Aul, Carlo; Germing, Ulrich

    2009-07-01

    Criteria, scoring systems, and treatment algorithms for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have been updated repeatedly in recent years. This apparently results from increased awareness and early recognition of the disease, an increasing number of new diagnostic and prognostic markers and tools, and new therapeutic options that may change the course and thus prognosis in MDS. To address these challenges and to create useful new diagnostic and prognostic parameters and scores, the German-Austrian Working Group for Studying Prognostic Factors in MDS was established in 2003 and later was extended to centers in Switzerland (D-A-CH group). In addition, the group cooperates with the European LeukemiaNet, the MDS Foundation, and other national and international working groups in order to improve diagnosis and prognostication. The current article represents a meeting report from the latest workshop organized by the group in Vienna in October 2008.

  20. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute leukemia after multiple myeloma in the era of novel agents.

    PubMed

    Gertz, Morie A; Terpos, Evangelos; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kumar, Shaji; Shah, Rupin A; Orlowski, Robert; Kastritis, Efstathios; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Shah, Jatin

    2015-06-01

    Survival for patients with multiple myeloma has increased. Both melphalan and lenalidomide are associated with subsequent development of myelodysplasia. We reviewed the cases of all patients with multiple myeloma who had subsequent development of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) during a 12-year period in three centers. Of 55 patients identified, two received only lenalidomide before myelodysplasia developed. The median time between the diagnoses of multiple myeloma and MDS/ANLL was 52.7 months. Median survival after the diagnosis of MDS or ANLL was 6.7 months. Treatment of MDS comprised allogeneic stem cell transplant in eight patients (median survival, 219 days; one patient alive at 624 days) and a hypomethylating agent in 21 patients (response of stable or better in five patients). Myelodysplasia remains a devastating complication of therapy for multiple myeloma, with short survival and poor response rates to available modalities.

  1. Reduced-intensity bone marrow transplantation from an alternative unrelated donor for myelodysplastic syndrome of first-donor origin.

    PubMed

    Komeno, Yukiko; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Kandabashi, Koji; Kawazu, Masahito; Goyama, Susumu; Takeshita, Masataka; Nannya, Yasuhito; Niino, Miyuki; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Kurokawa, Mineo; Tsujino, Shiho; Ogawa, Seishi; Aoki, Katsunori; Chiba, Shigeru; Motokura, Toru; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-03-01

    A male patient had a relapse of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) 2 years after BMT from a female matched unrelated donor. Conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and short-tandem repeat chimerism analysis proved a relapse of donor origin. He underwent reduced-intensity BMT after a conditioning with fludarabine and busulfan, since he had impaired renal, liver, and pulmonary functions. Chimerism analysis on day 28 after the second BMT showed mixed chimerism of the first and the second donors, which later turned to full second-donor chimerism on day 60. He developed grade II acute GVHD of the skin and cytomegalovirus reactivation, but both were improved with methylprednisolone and ganciclovir, respectively. He remains in complete remission 6 months after the second BMT. Reduced-intensity second BMT from an alternative donor appeared to be a tolerable treatment option for donor-derived leukemia/MDS after the first conventional transplantation.

  2. Orocraniofacial findings of a Pediatric Patient with Joubert Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula; Verma, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder, involving agenesis or dysgenesis of cerebellar vermis and brain stem. The neurological features of JS include hypotonia, ataxia, developmental delay, intellectual disability, abnormal eye movements, and neonatal breathing dysregulation. These may be associated with multiorgan involvement, mainly retinal dystrophy, nephronophthisis, hepatic fibrosis, and polydactyly. An obligatory hallmark feature associated with JS is the molar tooth sign (MTS), a complex midbrain-hindbrain malformation visible on brain imaging. This case report presents a pediatric case of JS in a 7-year-old girl. Joubert syndrome cases have been reported by various medical specialties in medical journals; however, this probably could be the first report of this rare developmental disorder in dental and oral health. How to cite this article Goswami M, Rajwar AS, Verma M. Orocraniofacial findings of a Pediatric Patient with Joubert Syndrome. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):379-383. PMID:28127172

  3. Brown-McLean Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Tourkmani, Abdo Karim; Martinez, Jaime D; Berrones, David; Juárez-Domínguez, Brenda Y; Beltrán, Francisco; Galor, Anat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to report the case of a 12-year-old patient who presented for routine ophthalmic examination after congenital cataract surgery performed at 2 months of age. The patient was diagnosed with bilateral Brown-McLean syndrome by slit lamp examination. No treatment was required because the patient was asymptomatic and had a clear central cornea. This is the first described case of Brown-McLean syndrome in a pediatric patient, representing the importance of clinical examination in the pediatric age group after cataract surgery because of the risk for patients of developing peripheral edema.

  4. Brown-McLean Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tourkmani, Abdo Karim; Martinez, Jaime D.; Berrones, David; Juárez-Domínguez, Brenda Y.; Beltrán, Francisco; Galor, Anat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to report the case of a 12-year-old patient who presented for routine ophthalmic examination after congenital cataract surgery performed at 2 months of age. The patient was diagnosed with bilateral Brown-McLean syndrome by slit lamp examination. No treatment was required because the patient was asymptomatic and had a clear central cornea. This is the first described case of Brown-McLean syndrome in a pediatric patient, representing the importance of clinical examination in the pediatric age group after cataract surgery because of the risk for patients of developing peripheral edema. PMID:26034485

  5. Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  6. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies.

  8. Down-regulation of Dicer1 promotes cellular senescence and decreases the differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youshan; Wu, Dong; Fei, Chengming; Guo, Juan; Gu, Shuncheng; Zhu, Yang; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Lingyun; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang

    2015-02-01

    Although it has been reported that mesenchymal stromal cells are unable to provide sufficient hematopoietic support in myelodysplastic syndrome, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we found that mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome displayed a significant increase in senescence, as evidenced by their decreased proliferative capacity, flattened morphology and increased expression of SA-β-gal and p21. Senescent mesenchymal stromal cells from patients had decreased differentiation potential and decreased stem cell support capacity. Gene knockdown of Dicer1, which was down-regulated in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients, induced senescence. The differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities were significantly inhibited by Dicer1 knockdown. Overexpression of Dicer1 in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients reversed cellular senescence and enhanced stem cell properties. Furthermore, we identified reduced expression in the microRNA-17 family (miR-17-5p, miR-20a/b, miR-106a/b and miR-93) as a potential factor responsible for increased p21 expression, a key senescence mediator, in Dicer1 knockdown cells. Moreover, we found that miR-93 and miR-20a expression levels were significantly reduced in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients and miR-93/miR-20a gain of function resulted in a decrease of cellular senescence. Collectively, the results of our study show that mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome are prone to senescence and that Dicer1 down-regulation promotes cellular senescence and decreases the differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells. Dicer1 down-regulation seems to contribute to the insufficient hematopoietic support capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

  9. Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome: a clinical and morphologic study of 65 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Michels, S.D.; McKenna, R.W.; Arthur, D.C.; Brunning, R.D.

    1985-06-01

    This study consists of 65 patients (pts) who developed a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (39 pts) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (26 pts) following chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy; the interval from the onset of therapy to bone marrow abnormality ranged from 11 to 192 months (median, 58). Thirty-three patients had been previously treated for lymphoproliferative diseases, 29 for carcinoma, and three for a nonneoplastic disorder. Approximately 30% of the cases presenting in the MDS phase evolved to AML in one to 12 months (median, 3.5). The AML in 49% of the cases was not readily classified according to French-American-British (FAB) criteria; the primary difficulty in classification related to the involvement of multiple cell lines. Among the cases that could be classified, all FAB types were represented except for M1; M2 was the most frequent type. Clonal chromosome abnormalities were found in marrow specimens from 22 of 24 (92%) patients studied with G banding; 11 had abnormalities of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. The median survival for all patients was four months with no significant difference between those treated and not treated with antileukemic therapy. The median survival was three months for the patients presenting with AML, six months for the patients with AML following an MDS, and four months for the patients with an MDS that did not evolve to AML. The findings in the present study suggest that there are three stages of therapy-related panmyelosis: (1) pancytopenia with associated myelodysplastic changes, (2) a frank MDS, and (3) overt AML. Many patients will present in the stage of overt AML that differs from de novo AML primarily by the high incidence of trilineage involvement, difficulty in classification, frequent cytogenetic abnormalities, and poor response to antileukemic therapy.

  10. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  11. Update on pediatric opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hero, Barbara; Schleiermacher, Gudrun

    2013-12-01

    Opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (dancing eye syndrome) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by opsoclonus, myoclonus, and ataxia, usually accompanied by behavioral abnormalities. In adults, opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome has been reported in association with different types of cancer; whereas in children, the syndrome may be associated with neuroblastic tumors. Although a direct proof is lacking, the syndrome is assumed to be of autoimmune origin. The treatment is corticosteroid based with the addition of other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs if intensification seems necessary. Because of the rarity of the disease, international collaborations as well on research as on therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. A European consortium just started a trial for this rare condition.

  12. Azacitidine for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Edlin, R; Connock, M; Tubeuf, S; Round, J; Fry-Smith, A; Hyde, C; Greenheld, W

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of azacitidine (aza) compared with conventional care regimes (CCR) for higher risk patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), based on the evidence submission from the manufacturer to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal process. The patient outcomes governing relative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness were defined as overall survival, time to progression (TTP) to AML, adverse events and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The clinical evidence was derived from an open-label randomised controlled trial referred to as study AZA-001. It compared aza with CCR in 358 patients with higher risk MDS, CMML and AML 20-30% blasts. The outcomes reported in AZA-001 included overall survival, TTP to AML and adverse events. No HRQoL results were reported; however, outcomes likely to impact on HRQoL were provided. The results showed that: the median overall survival was 24.5 months on aza, compared with 15.0 months in the CCR group (p = 0.0001); the response rates were low (complete remission 17% aza versus 8% CCR); the median time to transformation to AML was greater in the aza group (17.8 versus 11.5 months; p < 0.0001); and of patients who were red blood cell (RBC) transfusion-dependent at baseline, 45% of those on aza became RBC transfusion-independent during the treatment period, compared with 11.8% in the CCR group (p < 0.0001). The ERG reran the submission's search strategies after some modifications incorporating minor improvements. The ERG analysed the submitted economic model (model 1) and identified a number of inconsistencies and errors within the model. The manufacturer submitted a revised model for analysis by the ERG. Using the issues identified in the earlier analysis, the ERG conducted

  13. [Clinical studies of pediatric malabsorption syndromes].

    PubMed

    Hosoyamada, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    Multiple cases with various types of pediatric malabsorption syndromes were evaluated. The clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, pathophysiology, and histopathological descriptions of each patient were analyzed in an effort to clear the pathogenesis of the malabsorption syndromes and the treatments were undertaken. The cases studied, included one patient with cystic fibrosis, two with lactose intolerance with lactosuria (Durand type), one with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, two with familial hypobetalipoproteinemia, one with Hartnup disease, one with congenital chroride diarrhea, one with acrodermatitis enteropathica, one with intestinal nodular lymphoid hyperplasia (NLH), five with intractable diarrhea of early infancy and four with glycogenosis type Ia. Each case description and outcome is described below: 1. A 15-year-old Japanese boy with cystic fibrosis presented with severe symptoms, including pancreatic insufficiency, bronchiectasis, pneumothorax and hemoptysis. His prognosis was poor. Analysis of the CFTR genes of this patient revealed a homozygous large deletion from intron 16 to 17b. 2. In the sibling case of Durand type lactose intolerance, the subjects'disaccaridase activity of the small bowel, including lactase, were within normal limits. The results of per oral and per intraduodenal lactose tolerance tests confirmed lactosuria in both. These observations suggested, not only an abnormal gastric condition, but also duodenal and intestinal mucosal abnormal permeability of lactose. 3. In the case of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, the subject had a lymphedematous right arm and hand, a grossly coarsened mucosal pattern of the upper gastrointestinal tract (identified via radiologic examination) and the presence of lymphangiectasia (confirmed via duodenal mucosal biopsy). The major laboratory findings were hypoalbuminemia, decreased immunoglobulin levels and lymphopenia resulting from loss of lymph fluid and protein into the gastro

  14. Overweight and Obesity in Pediatric Secondary Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Grace l.; Sheldon, Claire A.; Burrows, Evanette K.; Chilutti, Marianne R.; Liu, Grant T.; Mccormack, Shana E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the clinical, demographic, and anthropometric patient characteristics of secondary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome in children and adolescents based on the recently revised diagnostic criteria. Design Retrospective observational case series. Methods Patients seen at a tertiary children's hospital for pseudotumor cerebri syndrome were classified as having either primary idiopathic (n = 59) or secondary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (n = 16), as rigorously defined by recently revised diagnostic criteria. Outcomes included body mass index Z-scores (BMI-Z), height and weight Z-scores, demographics, and clinical features at presentation, such as headache, sixth nerve palsy, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressure. Results In this cohort, the associated conditions and exposures seen in definite secondary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome included tetracycline-class antibiotics (n = 11), chronic kidney disease (n = 3), withdrawal from chronic glucocorticoids (n = 1), and lithium (n = 1). Other associations observed in the possible secondary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome group included Down syndrome, vitamin A derivatives, and growth hormone. In comparison with primary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome, definite secondary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome patients were on average older (15.0 vs 11.6 years; P = .003, Mann-Whitney test). According to US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) classifications, 79% of children with secondary pseudotumor cerebri syndrome were either overweight or obese (36% overweight [n = 5] and 43% obese [n = 6]), as compared to 32% nationally. Conclusions Even when a potential inciting exposure is identified for pediatric pseudotumor cerebri syndrome, the possible contribution of overweight and obesity should be considered. PMID:25447107

  15. Absence of aberrant myeloid progenitors by flow cytometry is associated with favorable response to azacitidine in higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Alhan, Canan; Westers, Theresia M; van der Helm, Lieke H; Eeltink, Corien; Huls, Gerwin; Witte, Birgit I; Buchi, Francesca; Santini, Valeria; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A

    2014-01-15

    Background: In intermediate-2 and high risk patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), treatment with azacitidine is associated with hematological responses and prolonged overall survival in patients who respond to therapy. However, only half of the patients that are treated will benefit from this treatment. It is a major challenge to predict which patients are likely to respond to treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of immunophenotyping for response to treatment with azacitidine of Int-2 and high risk MDS patients. Methods: Bone marrow aspirates were analyzed by flow cytometry in 42 patients with Int-2 and high risk MDS, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia or low blast count acute myeloid leukemia before treatment and after every third cycle of azacitidine. A flow score was calculated using the flow cytometric scoring system (FCSS). Results: The presence of myeloid progenitors with an aberrant immunophenotype was significantly associated with lack of response (p=0.02). A low pretreatment FCSS was associated with significantly better overall survival compared with a high pretreatment FCSS (p=0.03). A significant decrease in FCSS was observed in patients with complete response after three cycles azacitidine compared to patients with progressive disease (p=0.006). Conclusions: Absence of aberrant myeloid progenitor cells at baseline and/or a decrease in the FCSS during treatment identified Int-2 and high risk MDS patients who are likely to respond to treatment with azacitidine. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  16. Deferasirox Decreases Liver Iron Concentration in Iron-Overloaded Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Aplastic Anemia and Other Rare Anemias.

    PubMed

    Kohgo, Yutaka; Urabe, Akio; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Agaoglu, Leyla; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Miyamura, Koichi; Lim, Lay Cheng; Glaser, Sabine; Wang, Candace; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw

    2015-01-01

    Iron overload in transfusion-dependent patients with rare anemias can be managed with chelation therapy. This study evaluated deferasirox efficacy and safety in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), aplastic anemia (AA) or other rare anemias. A 1-year, open-label, multicenter, single-arm, phase II trial was performed with deferasirox (10–40 mg/kg/day, based on transfusion frequency and therapeutic goals), including an optional 1-year extension. The primary end point was a change in liver iron concentration (LIC) after 1 year. Secondary end points included changes in efficacy and safety parameters (including ophthalmologic assessments) overall as well as in a Japanese subpopulation. Overall, 102 patients (42 with MDS, 29 with AA and 31 with other rare anemias) were enrolled; 57 continued into the extension. Mean absolute change in LIC was –10.9 mg Fe/g dry weight (d.w.) after 1 year (baseline: 24.5 mg Fe/g d.w.) and –13.5 mg Fe/g d.w. after 2 years. The most common drug-related adverse event was increased serum creatinine (23.5%), predominantly in MDS patients. Four patients had suspected drug-related ophthalmologic abnormalities. Outcomes in Japanese patients were generally consistent with the overall population. Results confirm deferasirox efficacy in patients with rare anemias, including a Japanese subpopulation. The safety profile was consistent with previous studies and ophthalmologic parameters generally agreed with baseline values (EUDRACT 2006-003337-32).

  17. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction in Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Possible Contribution of a Defective Vascular Niche to Myelodysplasia12

    PubMed Central

    Teofili, Luciana; Martini, Maurizio; Nuzzolo, Eugenia Rosa; Capodimonti, Sara; Iachininoto, Maria Grazia; Cocomazzi, Alessandra; Fabiani, Emiliano; Voso, Maria Teresa; Larocca, Luigi M.

    2015-01-01

    We set a model to replicate the vascular bone marrow niche by using endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs), and we used it to explore the vascular niche function in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Overall, we investigated 56 patients and we observed higher levels of ECFCs in MDS than in healthy controls; moreover, MDS ECFCs were found variably hypermethylated for p15INK4b DAPK1, CDH1, or SOCS1. MDS ECFCs exhibited a marked adhesive capacity to normal mononuclear cells. When normal CD34 + cells were co-cultured with MDS ECFCs, they generated significant lower amounts of CD11b + and CD41 + cells than in co-culture with normal ECFCs. At gene expression profile, several genes involved in cell adhesion were upregulated in MDS ECFCs, while several members of the Wingless and int (Wnt) pathways were underexpressed. Furthermore, at miRNA expression profile, MDS ECFCs hypo-expressed various miRNAs involved in Wnt pathway regulation. The addition of Wnt3A reduced the expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 on MDS ECFCs and restored the defective expression of markers of differentiation. Overall, our data demonstrate that in low-risk MDS, ECFCs exhibit various primary abnormalities, including putative MDS signatures, and suggest the possible contribution of the vascular niche dysfunction to myelodysplasia. PMID:26025663

  18. Efficacy and safety of extended dosing schedules of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manero, G; Gore, S D; Kambhampati, S; Scott, B; Tefferi, A; Cogle, C R; Edenfield, W J; Hetzer, J; Kumar, K; Laille, E; Shi, T; MacBeth, K J; Skikne, B

    2016-01-01

    CC-486, the oral formulation of azacitidine (AZA), is an epigenetic modifier and DNA methyltransferase inhibitor in clinical development for treatment of hematologic malignancies. CC-486 administered for 7 days per 28-day treatment cycle was evaluated in a phase 1 dose-finding study. AZA has a short plasma half-life and DNA incorporation is S-phase-restricted; extending CC-486 exposure may increase the number of AZA-affected diseased target cells and maximize therapeutic effects. Patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) received 300 mg CC-486 once daily for 14 days (n=28) or 21 days (n=27) of repeated 28-day cycles. Median patient age was 72 years (range 31–87) and 75% of patients had International Prognostic Scoring System Intermediate-1 risk MDS. Median number of CC-486 treatment cycles was 7 (range 2–24) for the 14-day dosing schedule and 6 (1–24) for the 21-day schedule. Overall response (complete or partial remission, red blood cell (RBC) or platelet transfusion independence (TI), or hematologic improvement) (International Working Group 2006) was attained by 36% of patients receiving 14-day dosing and 41% receiving 21-day dosing. RBC TI rates were similar with both dosing schedules (31% and 38%, respectively). CC-486 was generally well-tolerated. Extended dosing schedules of oral CC-486 may provide effective long-term treatment for patients with lower-risk MDS. PMID:26442612

  19. Serum proteome profiling detects myelodysplastic syndromes and identifies CXC chemokine ligands 4 and 7 as markers for advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Aivado, Manuel; Spentzos, Dimitrios; Germing, Ulrich; Alterovitz, Gil; Meng, Xiao-Ying; Grall, Franck; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A. N.; Klement, Giannoula; Steidl, Ulrich; Otu, Hasan H.; Czibere, Akos; Prall, Wolf C.; Iking-Konert, Christof; Shayne, Michelle; Ramoni, Marco F.; Gattermann, Norbert; Haas, Rainer; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Fung, Eric T.; Libermann, Towia A.

    2007-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are among the most frequent hematologic malignancies. Patients have a short survival and often progress to acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis of MDS can be difficult; there is a paucity of molecular markers, and the pathophysiology is largely unknown. Therefore, we conducted a multicenter study investigating whether serum proteome profiling may serve as a noninvasive platform to discover novel molecular markers for MDS. We generated serum proteome profiles from 218 individuals by MS and identified a profile that distinguishes MDS from non-MDS cytopenias in a learning sample set. This profile was validated by testing its ability to predict MDS in a first independent validation set and a second, prospectively collected, independent validation set run 5 months apart. Accuracy was 80.5% in the first and 79.0% in the second validation set. Peptide mass fingerprinting and quadrupole TOF MS identified two differential proteins: CXC chemokine ligands 4 (CXCL4) and 7 (CXCL7), both of which had significantly decreased serum levels in MDS, as confirmed with independent antibody assays. Western blot analyses of platelet lysates for these two platelet-derived molecules revealed a lack of CXCL4 and CXCL7 in MDS. Subtype analyses revealed that these two proteins have decreased serum levels in advanced MDS, suggesting the possibility of a concerted disturbance of transcription or translation of these chemokines in advanced MDS. PMID:17220270

  20. Analysis of the efficacy of lenalidomide in patients with intermediate-1 risk myelodysplastic syndrome without 5q deletion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Gao, Sujun; Fan, Hongqiong; Lin, Hai; Li, Wei; Wang, Juan

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of lenalidomide in the treatment of intermediate-1 risk non-5q deletion [non-del (5q)] myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). A total of 30 patients with MDS were classified through G-banding chromosome karyotype analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). According to the International Prognostic Scoring System scores, among the 30 patients, 23 and seven cases had scores of 0.5 and 1.0, respectively. Lenalidomide (Revlimid(®)), 10 mg/day) was administered for 21 days every 28 days. All 30 cases were treated with lenalidomide for at least three cycles, including 20 cases with four cycles. The patients did not require erythropoietin, cyclosporine or iron chelation treatments. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS statistical software version 13.0, and comparisons among groups were conducted using a t-test. The efficacy of lenalidomide was demonstrated in patients with intermediate-1 risk non-del (5q) MDS. Peripheral blood cell counts were improved following treatment, and absolute neutrophil, haemoglobin and platelet counts increased following 2-4 cycles of treatment. All patients became stable having undergone three cycles of treatment; however, 17 patients with chromosomal abnormalities had no cytogenetic response to the treatment, as confirmed through the FISH test. Patients with intermediate-1 risk non-del (5q) MDS treated with lenalidomide did not achieve complete haematological remission, although they demonstrated haematological improvement.

  1. A phase II Open-label Study of the Intravenous Administration of Homoharringtonine in the treatment of Myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Daver, Naval; Vega-Ruiz, Arturo; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Estrov, Zeev; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Kornblau, Steve; Verstovsek, Srdan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge E.

    2013-01-01

    Homoharringtonine is an alkaloid inhibitor of protein synthesis with activity in myeloid malignancies. We report a phase II pilot study of homoharringtonine in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Induction consisted of homoharringtonine at 2.5 mg/m2 via continuous infusion for seven days. Maintenance was given every 4 weeks. Nine patients were enrolled: five with refractory anaemia with excess blasts, two with refractory anaemia with excess blasts in transformation, one each with refractory anaemia and chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia, respectively. Median age was 70 years (55–84) and 6 (66%) were male. Per International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) two patients were intermediate-1, five intermediate-2 and two high-risk. Median chemotherapy courses were one (1–3). One patient (11%) responded with complete hematologic and cytogenetic remission after one course. Eight patients did not respond (four had stable disease, two progressed to acute leukaemia and two died during induction - from aspergillus pneumonia and intracerebral haemorrhage, respectively). Grade 3/4 myelosuppression seen in 56% (5/9). Serious non-hematologic toxicities included one case of grade 4 left bundle branch heart block and one grade 3 nephrotoxicity. Median time between courses was 42 days (35–72 days). In conclusion homoharringtonine might have clinical activity in some patients with MDS. PMID:23701251

  2. TP53 and MDM2 single nucleotide polymorphisms influence survival in non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sallman, David A.; Basiorka, Ashley A.; Irvine, Brittany A.; Zhang, Ling; Epling-Burnette, P.K.; Rollison, Dana E.; Mallo, Mar; Sokol, Lubomir; Solé, Francesc; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; List, Alan F.

    2015-01-01

    P53 is a key regulator of many cellular processes and is negatively regulated by the human homolog of murine double minute-2 (MDM2) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of either gene alone, and in combination, are linked to cancer susceptibility, disease progression, and therapy response. We analyzed the interaction of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 SNPs in relationship to outcome in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Sanger sequencing was performed on DNA isolated from 208 MDS cases. Utilizing a novel functional SNP scoring system ranging from +2 to −2 based on predicted p53 activity, we found statistically significant differences in overall survival (OS) (p = 0.02) and progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.02) in non-del(5q) MDS patients with low functional scores. In univariate analysis, only IPSS and the functional SNP score predicted OS and PFS in non-del(5q) patients. In multivariate analysis, the functional SNP score was independent of IPSS for OS and PFS. These data underscore the importance of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 SNPs in MDS, and provide a novel scoring system independent of IPSS that is predictive for disease outcome. PMID:26416416

  3. Prognostic Impact of IPSS-R and Chromosomal Translocations in 751 Korean Patients with Primary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Inho; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Shin, Dong-Yeop; Koh, Youngil; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Min, Yoo Hong; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Lee, Yun-Gyoo; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Bang, Soo-Mee; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Seong, Chu-Myoung; Park, Yong; Kim, Byung-Soo; Hong, Junshik; Park, Jinny; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Sung-Yong; Lee, Hong Ghi

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are rare in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and their impact on overall survival (OS) and response to hypomethylating agents (HMA) is unknown. The prognostic impact of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) and for chromosomal translocations was assessed in 751 patients from the Korea MDS Registry. IPSS-R effectively discriminated patients according to leukaemia evolution risk and OS. We identified 40 patients (5.3%) carrying translocations, 30 (75%) of whom also fulfilled complex karyotype criteria. Translocation presence was associated with a shorter OS (median, 12.0 versus 79.7 months, P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that translocations (hazard ratio [HR] 1.64 [1.06–2.63]; P = 0.03) as well as age, sex, IPSS-R, and CK were independent predictors of OS. In the IPSS-R high and very high risk subgroup (n = 260), translocations remained independently associated with OS (HR 1.68 [1.06–2.69], P = 0.03) whereas HMA treatment was not associated with improved survival (median OS, 20.9 versus 21.2 months, P = 0.43). However, translocation carriers exhibited enhanced survival following HMA treatment (median 2.1 versus 12.4 months, P = 0.03). Our data suggest that chromosomal translocation is an independent predictor of adverse outcome and has an additional prognostic value in discriminating patients with MDS having higher risk IPSS-R who could benefit from HMA treatment. PMID:27824923

  4. Genomic loss of EZH2 leads to epigenetic modifications and overexpression of the HOX gene clusters in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Li; Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Shi, Wen-Hui; Guo, Juan; Zhu, Yang; Zhao, You-Shan; Gu, Shu-Cheng; Fei, Cheng-Ming; Li, Xiao

    2016-02-16

    The role of EZH2 in cancer is complex and may vary depending on cancer type or stage. We examined the effect of altered EZH2 levels on H3K27 methylation, HOX gene expression, and malignant phenotype in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cell lines and an in vivo xenograft model. We also studied links between EZH2 expression and prognosis in MDS patients. Patients with high-grade MDS exhibited lower levels of EZH2 expression than those with low-grade MDS. Low EZH2 expression was associated with high percentages of blasts, shorter survival, and increased transformation of MDS into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MDS patients frequently had reductions in EZH2 copy number. EZH2 knockdown increased tumor growth capacity and reduced H3K27me3 levels in both MDS-derived leukemia cells and in a xenograft model. H3K27me3 levels were reduced and HOX gene cluster expression was increased in MDS patients. EZH2 knockdown also increased HOX gene cluster expression by reducing H3K27me3, and H3K27 demethylating agents increased HOX gene cluster expression in MDS-derived cell lines. These findings suggest genomic loss of EZH2 contributes to overexpression of the HOX gene clusters in MDS through epigenetic modifications.

  5. Efficacy and safety of extended dosing schedules of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manero, G; Gore, S D; Kambhampati, S; Scott, B; Tefferi, A; Cogle, C R; Edenfield, W J; Hetzer, J; Kumar, K; Laille, E; Shi, T; MacBeth, K J; Skikne, B

    2016-04-01

    CC-486, the oral formulation of azacitidine (AZA), is an epigenetic modifier and DNA methyltransferase inhibitor in clinical development for treatment of hematologic malignancies. CC-486 administered for 7 days per 28-day treatment cycle was evaluated in a phase 1 dose-finding study. AZA has a short plasma half-life and DNA incorporation is S-phase-restricted; extending CC-486 exposure may increase the number of AZA-affected diseased target cells and maximize therapeutic effects. Patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) received 300 mg CC-486 once daily for 14 days (n=28) or 21 days (n=27) of repeated 28-day cycles. Median patient age was 72 years (range 31-87) and 75% of patients had International Prognostic Scoring System Intermediate-1 risk MDS. Median number of CC-486 treatment cycles was 7 (range 2-24) for the 14-day dosing schedule and 6 (1-24) for the 21-day schedule. Overall response (complete or partial remission, red blood cell (RBC) or platelet transfusion independence (TI), or hematologic improvement) (International Working Group 2006) was attained by 36% of patients receiving 14-day dosing and 41% receiving 21-day dosing. RBC TI rates were similar with both dosing schedules (31% and 38%, respectively). CC-486 was generally well-tolerated. Extended dosing schedules of oral CC-486 may provide effective long-term treatment for patients with lower-risk MDS.

  6. Clinical and cytogenetic features of 508 Chinese patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and comparison with those in Western countries.

    PubMed

    Chen, B; Zhao, W-L; Jin, J; Xue, Y-Q; Cheng, X; Chen, X-T; Cui, J; Chen, Z-M; Cao, Q; Yang, G; Yao, Y; Xia, H-L; Tong, J-H; Li, J-M; Chen, J; Xiong, S-M; Shen, Z-X; Waxman, S; Chen, Z; Chen, S-J

    2005-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and leukemia progression. Racial differences may exist on clinical pictures and the molecular events leading to MDS, which are heterogeneous. To better define the clinical and cytogenetic features in Chinese patients, a retrospective multicentric study was performed in 508 MDS cases. Compared with Western countries, Chinese patients showed younger age (median: 49 vs 65-73 years), lower percentages of RARS (2.8 vs 6.6-15.3%), and CMML (5.2 vs 11.7-30.6%). Cytogenetically, among 367 cases with evaluable data, abnormal karyotypes were found in 136 cases, including 56 numerical and 80 structural changes. Incidences of single chromosome 5 and 7 abnormalities were lower than those in Western countries (2.2 vs 17.8-42.5%). However, complex cytogenetic aberrations and chromosome translocations were frequently observed and related to poor prognosis. Both multiple chromosome deletions and translocations were detected in advanced subtypes (RAEB and RAEB-T). Analysis of 200 cases revealed a higher incidence of hepatitis-B-virus infection than that in non-MDS population (21.00 vs 9.75%). This study further confirmed: (1) different genetic/environmental backgrounds between Asian and Western MDS populations; (2) a strong predictive value of cytogenetic abnormalities on disease outcome and involvement of genomic instability in leukemia clone development.

  7. Recent advances in the treatment of lower-risk non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).

    PubMed

    Almeida, Antonio; Fenaux, Pierre; List, Alan F; Raza, Azra; Platzbecker, Uwe; Santini, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are affected primarily by symptoms of chronic anemia and fatigue rather than progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Severe thrombocytopenia, although less common in lower-risk MDS, is associated with increased risk of bleeding. For anemic patients, the principal aim of treatment is to improve anemia and decrease red blood cell transfusions. For transfusion-dependent patients with lower-risk MDS without chromosome 5q deletion [non-del(5q) MDS], there are limited effective treatments. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are generally first-line therapy, yielding frequent responses with a median duration of 18-24 months. Immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic stem cell transplantation are restricted to select patients. New strategies for ESA-refractory or relapsed patients include lenalidomide, alone or in combination with ESAs; oral azacitidine; and new molecules such as the activin receptor type II ligand traps luspatercept and sotatercept. In thrombocytopenic patients, thrombopoietin receptor agonists are under evaluation. While trials to evaluate these treatment strategies are underway, efforts are needed to optimize therapies through better patient selection and response prediction as well as integrating molecular and genetic data into clinical practice. We provide an overview of current treatment approaches for lower-risk non-del(5q) MDS and explore promising directions for future research.

  8. Deletion 5q is frequent in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients diagnosed with interstitial lung diseases (ILD): Mayo Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Nanah, Rama; Zblewski, Darci; Patnaik, Mrinal S; Begna, Kebede; Ketterling, Rhett; Iyer, Vivek N; Hogan, William J; Litzow, Mark R; Al-Kali, Aref

    2016-11-01

    A variety of interstitial Lung Diseases (ILD) have been described in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with possible etiologies including autoimmunity, drug related toxicity, and recurrent infections. A comprehensive study of ILD in MDS patients has not been previously performed. Out of 827 consecutive biopsy proven MDS patients seen at our institution from June 1970-May 2010, 18 (2%) were found to have ILD. There was no statistical significance in baseline characteristics between patients with ILD (ILD +) vs those without ILD (ILD-). Cytogenetic studies were reported in 14 ILD+patients out of whom 43% had 5q- abnormalities (21% isolated and 22% part of complex karyotype). Prevalence of high risk MDS was similar between both groups (22% vs 29% in ILD-) with similar overall survival. ILD was diagnosed prior to MDS in the majority of cases (72%) with a median time to MDS diagnosis of 22.3 months. Our study suggests that ILD are present in a higher percentage than anticipated in the MDS population. Deletion 5q was frequent in ILD+ cases and this requires further study. Prior MDS treatment and autoimmunity seemed to play no significant role in ILD development.

  9. T-replete haploidentical allogeneic transplantation using post-transplantation cyclophosphamide in advanced AML and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Devillier, R; Bramanti, S; Fürst, S; Sarina, B; El-Cheikh, J; Crocchiolo, R; Granata, A; Chabannon, C; Morabito, L; Harbi, S; Faucher, C; Santoro, A; Weiller, P-J; Vey, N; Carlo-Stella, C; Castagna, L; Blaise, D

    2016-02-01

    Unmanipulated haploidentical transplantation (Haplo-SCT) using post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy) represents an alternative for patients with high-risk diseases lacking HLA-identical donor. Although it provides low incidences of GVHD, the efficacy of Haplo-SCT is still questioned, especially for patients with myeloid malignancies. Thus, we analyzed 60 consecutive patients with refractory (n=30) or high-risk CR (n=30) AML or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) who underwent PT-Cy Haplo-SCT. The median age was 57 years (22-73 years), hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index was ⩾3 in 38 patients (63%) and Haplo-SCT was the second allogeneic transplantation for 10 patients (17%). Although most of patients received PBSC as graft source (n=48, 80%), we found low incidences of grade 3-4 acute (2%) and severe chronic GVHD (4%). Among patients with high-risk CR diseases, 1-year non-relapse mortality, cumulative incidence of relapse, progression-free and overall survivals were 20%, 32%, 47% and 62%, respectively. In patients with refractory disease, corresponding results were 34%, 35%, 32% and 37%, respectively. We conclude that PT-Cy Haplo-SCT could provide promising anti-leukemic effect even in the setting of very advanced diseases. Thus, it represents a viable alternative for high-risk AML/MDS patients without HLA-identical donor.

  10. Significance of genome-wide analysis of copy number alterations and UPD in myelodysplastic syndromes using combined CGH - SNP arrays.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ausaf; Iqbal, M Anwar

    2012-01-01

    Genetic information is an extremely valuable data source in characterizing the personal nature of cancer. Chromosome instability is a hallmark of most cancer cells. Chromosomal abnormalities are correlated with poor prognosis, disease classification, risk stratification, and treatment selection. Copy number alterations (CNAs) are an important molecular signature in cancer initiation, development, and progression. Recent application of whole-genome tools to characterize normal and cancer genomes provides the powerful molecular cytogenetic means to enumerate the multiple somatic, genetic and epigenetic alterations that occur in cancer. Combined array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array is a useful technique allowing detection of CNAs and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) or uni-parental disomy (UPD) together in a single experiment. It also provides allelic information on deletions, duplications, and amplifications. UPD can result in an abnormal phenotype when the chromosomes involved are imprinted. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are the most common clonal stem cell hematologic malignancy characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, which leads to rapid progression into acute myeloid leukemia. UPD that occurs without concurrent changes in the gene copy number is a common chromosomal defect in hematologic malignancies, especially in MDS. Approximately 40-50% of MDS patients do not have karyotypic abnormalities that are detectable using classical metaphase cytogenetic techniques (MC) because of inherent limitations of MC, low resolution and the requirement of having dividing cells. In this review, we highlight advances in the clinical application of microarray technology in MDS and discuss the clinical potential of microarray.

  11. Increased PD-1/STAT1 ratio may account for the survival benefit in decitabine therapy for lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Guo, Juan; Tao, Ying; Wu, Ling-Yun; Xu, Feng; Wu, Dong; Zhou, Li-Yu; Su, Ji-Ying; Song, Lu-Xi; Xiao, Chao; Li, Xiao

    2017-04-01

    Decitabine is an effective therapy for patients with lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). However, the mechanisms of decitabine's therapeutic effect are not well established. Forty-four lower risk MDS patients received decitabine therapy. 59.1% patients achieved treatment response, and 53.8% patients who were RBC/platelet-dependent cast off the transfusion burden. The median overall survival (OS) was 19.0 months after decitabine treatment. Moreover, polarization toward type 1 in the CD8 + subset was enhanced, and a significantly increased expression of the PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-1/STAT1 ratio was observed in these lower risk MDS. The patients with amplification of PD-1/STAT1 ratio (2-4) achieved longer OS. Thus, our results suggest that the effect mechanism of decitabine toward lower risk MDS may be the moderate increase of PD-1/STAT1, which contributes to hematopoietic improvement. These findings suggest that a different PD-1-related strategy from those used to treat higher risk patients could be used for lower risk MDS patients.

  12. Prognostic features of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes aged < 50 years: update of a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Finsinger, Paola; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Santopietro, Michelina; Salaroli, Adriano; Serrao, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Volpicelli, Paola; Petrucci, Luigi; Nanni, Mauro; Alimena, Giuliana

    2012-12-01

    Fewer than 10% of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are younger than 50 years. A series of 91 younger patients (median age 44 years with female prevalence) are reported and compared with elderly patients. Frequent karyotypic changes were trisomy 8 (9.8%) and monosomy 7 (5%). Twenty-three patients had occupational exposure to potential mutagens (benzene and solvents), with a male predominance, higher frequency of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD) (52%) and higher frequency of monosomy 7 (21.7%). At a median follow-up of 72 months, 22 patients (24%) evolved to acute leukemia, with higher frequency being observed among the exposed cohort (39% vs. 19% non-exposed). Unfavorable factors for overall survival were: age > 40 years, > 5% of blasts, trilinear bone marrow involvement and intermediate-high World Health Organization Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) risk. The present results suggest that younger MDS could be identified as a distinct subset. For patients belonging to the low/intermediate-I risk group, due to a low transformation rate, aggressive approaches should rarely be recommended.

  13. Assessment of Drug Sensitivity in Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells From Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Katherine L B; Finn, Laura E; Smith, B Douglas; Hess, Allan D; Foran, James M; Karp, Judith E; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2016-11-07

    : Current understanding suggests that malignant stem and progenitor cells must be reduced or eliminated for prolonged remissions in myeloid neoplasms such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Multicolor flow cytometry has been widely used to distinguish stem and myeloid progenitor cells from other populations in normal and malignant bone marrow. In this study, we present a method for assessing drug sensitivity in MDS and AML patient hematopoietic stem and myeloid progenitor cell populations ex vivo using the investigational Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 and standard-of-care agent cytarabine as examples. Utilizing a multicolor flow cytometry antibody panel for identification of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors, common myeloid progenitors, granulocyte-monocyte progenitors, and megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors present in mononuclear cell fractions isolated from bone marrow aspirates, we compare stem and progenitor cell counts after treatment for 24 hours with drug versus diluent. We demonstrate that MLN4924 exerts a cytotoxic effect on MDS and AML stem and progenitor cell populations, whereas cytarabine has more limited effects. Further application of this method for evaluating drug effects on these populations ex vivo and in vivo may inform rational design and selection of therapies in the clinical setting.

  14. Immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, and mutational characterization of cell lines derived from myelodysplastic syndrome patients after progression to acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Palau, Anna; Mallo, Mar; Palomo, Laura; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ines; Diesch, Jeannine; Campos, Diana; Granada, Isabel; Juncà, Jordi; Drexler, Hans G; Solé, Francesc; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2017-03-01

    Leukemia cell lines have been widely used in the hematology field to unravel mechanistic insights and to test new therapeutic strategies. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and frequent progress to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A few cell lines have been established from MDS patients after progression to AML but their characterization is incomplete. Here we provide a detailed description of the immunophenotypic profile of the MDS-derived cell lines SKK-1, SKM-1, F-36P; and MOLM-13. Specifically, we analyzed a comprehensive panel of markers that are currently applied in the diagnostic routine for myeloid disorders. To provide high-resolution genetic data comprising copy number alterations and losses of heterozygosity we performed whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism-based arrays and included the cell line OHN-GM that harbors the frequent chromosome arm 5q deletion. Furthermore, we assessed the mutational status of 83 disease-relevant genes. Our results provide a resource to the MDS and AML field that allows researchers to choose the best-matching cell line for their functional studies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Assessment of Drug Sensitivity in Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells from Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Katherine L B; Finn, Laura E; Smith, B Douglas; Hess, Allan D; Foran, James M; Karp, Judith E; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2017-03-01

    Current understanding suggests that malignant stem and progenitor cells must be reduced or eliminated for prolonged remissions in myeloid neoplasms such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Multicolor flow cytometry has been widely used to distinguish stem and myeloid progenitor cells from other populations in normal and malignant bone marrow. In this study, we present a method for assessing drug sensitivity in MDS and AML patient hematopoietic stem and myeloid progenitor cell populations ex vivo using the investigational Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 and standard-of-care agent cytarabine as examples. Utilizing a multicolor flow cytometry antibody panel for identification of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors, common myeloid progenitors, granulocyte-monocyte progenitors, and megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors present in mononuclear cell fractions isolated from bone marrow aspirates, we compare stem and progenitor cell counts after treatment for 24 hours with drug versus diluent. We demonstrate that MLN4924 exerts a cytotoxic effect on MDS and AML stem and progenitor cell populations, whereas cytarabine has more limited effects. Further application of this method for evaluating drug effects on these populations ex vivo and in vivo may inform rational design and selection of therapies in the clinical setting. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:840-850.

  16. A phase I/II trial of Erlotinib in higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia after azacitidine failure.

    PubMed

    Thepot, Sylvain; Boehrer, Simone; Seegers, Valérie; Prebet, Thomas; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Wattel, Eric; Delaunay, Jacques; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Hunault, Mathilde; Jourdan, Eric; Chermat, Fatiha; Sebert, Marie; Kroemer, Guido; Fenaux, Pierre; Adès, Lionel

    2014-12-01

    Survival after azacitidine (AZA) failure in higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is poor and new treatment options are needed. Erlotinib, an oral inhibitor of the epidermal-growth-factor-receptor (EGFR), has shown in preclinical models some efficacy in higher risk MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this phase I/II trial, 30 patients received 100mg/day (n=5) or 150mg/day (n=25) of Erlotinib orally after primary or secondary resistance to AZA treatment. Eighteen MDS and 12 AML patients were treated. This outpatient treatment was well tolerated with limited grade III-IV extra hematological toxicities (skin (n=1), and diarrhea (n=3). Response was observed in 6 patients (20%) including 1 complete remission (CR), 1 marrow CR and 4 hematological improvement (2 erythroid and 2 on platelets). Median duration of response was 5 months. Erlotinib appears to induce a significant number of responses in higher risk MDS/AML having failed AZA treatment. Given the good safety profile of Erlotinib, its combination with other drugs could be tested in the future in MDS and AML.

  17. Prognostic significance of SETBP1 mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and chronic neutrophilic leukemia: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Li-Hong; Cao, Dan; Dong, Xiao-Hui; Fang, Qiu; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Yan; Fei, Ju-Ping; Xu, Bao-Lian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This meta-analysis investigates the prognostic effect of SET binding protein 1 (SETBP1) mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), or chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL). Methods Eligible studies from Pubmed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched from database inception through April 2016. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of overall survival (OS) were pooled to calculate the prognostic significance of SETBP1 mutation in patients. Results A total of 12 studies with 2321 patients were included in this meta-analysis; 4 studies for MDS, 5 studies for CMML, and 3 studies for CNL. Pooled results suggested that MDS and CMML patients with SETBP1 mutations had a significantly poorer prognosis when compared with patients with wild-type SETBP1 (MDS: HR = 1.808, 95% CI (1.218–2.685), P = 0.001; CMML: HR = 2.223, 95% CI (1.493–3.308), P<0.001). SETBP1 mutations in CNL patients however, showed no significant effect on the overall survival (HR = 1.773, 95% CI (0.877–3.582), P = 0.111). The Begg’s and Egger’s tests did not show significant publication bias in any groups. Conclusions Current evidence shows that SETBP1 mutation is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with MDS and CMML, but not in patients with CNL. PMID:28158286

  18. Acute myeloid leukemia after myelodysplastic syndrome and failure of therapy with hypomethylating agents: an emerging entity with a poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias; Ghanem, Hady; Huang, Xuelin; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stephan; Pierce, Sherry; Choi, Sangbum; Verstovsek, Srdan; Brandt, Mark; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-04-01

    We assessed the outcomes of 63 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) arising from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) after hypomethylating agent failure. Their median age was 63 years. All 63 patients had received ≥ 1 salvage regimens for AML, and 35 patients (55%) had received ≥ 2. Of the 31 patients (49%) who had received high-dose cytarabine (HDAC) at first relapse, 2 (6%) achieved complete remission (CR) and 4 (13%) CR with incomplete platelet recovery (overall response rate, 19%). Of the 32 patients (51%) who had received other treatments, including investigational agents, 4 (12%) achieved CR and 4 (12%) CR with incomplete platelet recovery (overall response rate, 24%). The median response duration was 20 weeks. With a median follow-up of 42 months from the AML diagnosis, the median survival (21 weeks) was similar between the 2 groups. The 1- and 2-year survival rate was 19% and 8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified low albumin, HDAC treatment, and platelet count < 50 × 10(9)/L as independent adverse factors for CR and a platelet count < 50 × 10(9)/L and age > 65 years as independent adverse factors for survival. Thus, the outcome of AML evolving from MDS after hypomethylating agent failure is poor and not improved with HDAC. Novel therapies directed toward this emerging entity are urgently needed.

  19. Successful use of rituximab in platelet transfusion refractoriness in a multi-transfused patient with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing-Hong; Shen, Yi-Ping; Ye, Bao-Dong; Zhou, Yu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with newly diagnosed INT-1 risk myelodysplastic syndrome--refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (MDS-RCMD) was not responsive to treatment, such as androgen, thalidomide, granulocyte--colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) combined with erythropoietin (EPO), interleukin-11 (IL-11) and thrombopoietin (TPO), and became transfusion dependent. Due to repeated blood transfusions, he developed platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR) to platelets from cross-matched donors as well as random donors. Anti-HLA class I antibodies were positive with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; however, HLA-compatible platelet products were unavailable. PTR was unresponsive to high-dose immunoglobulin and plasma exchange. The patient was then treated with rituximab 375 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8, and 100 mg total dose on days 15 and 22. Already after the first dose of rituximab, the patient was able to received successful platelet transfusion from all donors. Therefore rituximab may be considered as a potential therapy for PTR.

  20. Pre-transplant weight loss predicts inferior outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Becker, Natalia; Benner, Axel; Penack, Olaf; Platzbecker, Uwe; Stölzel, Friedrich; Bornhäuser, Martin; Hegenbart, Ute; Ho, Anthony D; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2015-10-27

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) represents a curative therapeutic option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM) limit treatment efficacy. Based on our previous observation in acute myeloid leukemia we investigated the impact of pre-transplant weight loss on post-transplant outcome in MDS patients. A total of 111 patients diagnosed with MDS according to WHO criteria transplanted between 2000 and 2012 in three different transplant centers were included into the analysis. Data on weight loss were collected from medical records prior to conditioning therapy and 3-6 months earlier. Patient, disease and transplant characteristics did not differ between patients with weight loss (2-5%, n = 17; > 5%, n = 17) and those without (n = 77). In a mixed effect model, weight loss was associated with higher risk MDS (p = 0.046). In multivariable analyses, pre-transplant weight loss exceeding 5% was associated with a higher incidence of relapse (p < 0.001) and NRM (p = 0.007). Pre-transplant weight loss of 2-5% and > 5% were independent predictors of worse disease-free (p = 0.023 and p < 0.001, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.043 and p < 0.001, respectively). Our retrospective study suggests that MDS patients losing weight prior to alloSCT have an inferior outcome after transplantation. Prospective studies addressing pre-transplant nutritional interventions are highly warranted.

  1. Imprint of 5-azacytidine on the natural killer cell repertoire during systemic treatment for high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sohlberg, Ebba; Pfefferle, Aline; Andersson, Sandra; Baumann, Bettina C; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-10-27

    5-azacytidine (5-aza) is a hypomethylating agent approved for the treatment of high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). It is assumed to act by demethylating tumor suppressor genes and via direct cytotoxic effects on malignant cells. In vitro treatment with hypomethylating agents has profound effects on the expression of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like (KIR) receptors on natural killer (NK) cells, as these receptors are epigenetically regulated via methylation of the promoters. Here we investigated the influence of 5-aza on the NK-cell repertoire during cytokine-induced proliferation in vitro and homeostatic proliferation in vivo in patients with high-risk MDS. In vitro treatment of NK cells from both healthy donors and MDS patients with low doses of 5-aza led to a significant increase in expression of multiple KIRs, but only in cells that had undergone several rounds of cell division. Proliferating 5-aza exposed NK cells exhibited increased IFN-γ production and degranulation towards tumor target cells. MDS patients had lower proportions of educated KIR-expressing NK cells than healthy controls but after systemic treatment with 5-aza, an increased proportion of Ki-67+ NK cells expressed multiple KIRs suggesting uptake of 5-aza in cycling cells in vivo. Hence, these results suggest that systemic treatment with 5-aza may shape the NK cell repertoire, in particular during homeostatic proliferation, thereby boosting NK cell-mediated recognition of malignant cells.

  2. Proteome Changes in the Plasma of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients with Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts Subtype 2

    PubMed Central

    Majek, Pavel; Riedelova-Reicheltova, Zuzana; Pecankova, Klara; Cermak, Jaroslav; Dyr, Jan E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the plasma proteome of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts subtype 2 (RAEB-2) in comparison to healthy controls. 20 plasma samples were separated with 2D electrophoresis and statistically processed with Progenesis SameSpots software. 47 significantly differing (P < 0.05) spots were observed, and 27 different proteins were identified by nano-LC-MS/MS. Mass spectrometry-based relative label-free quantification showed a 2-fold increase of the leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRAG) peptide levels in the RAEB-2 group. Changes in the fragments of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4) protein were observed. Western blot analysis showed no differences in albumin and ITIH4 levels, while increased expression was observed for LRAG in the RAEB-2 group. Quantification using ELISA showed decreased plasma level of alpha-2-HS glycoprotein in the RAEB-2 group. In conclusion, this is the first time that alpha-2-HS glycoprotein and LRAG were proposed as new biomarkers of RAEB-2 and advanced MDS, respectively. Alpha-2-HS glycoprotein, a protein involved in the bone marrow development and previously proposed as a MDS biomarker candidate, was significantly decreased in RAEB-2. Increased expression and changes in modification(s) were observed for LRAG, a protein involved in granulocytic and neutrophil differentiation, and angiogenesis. PMID:24958999

  3. Results of treatment with azacitidine in patients aged ≥ 75 years included in the Spanish Registry of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Xicoy, Blanca; Jiménez, María-José; García, Olga; Bargay, Joan; Martínez-Robles, Violeta; Brunet, Salut; Arilla, María-Jesús; Pérez de Oteyza, Jaime; Andreu, Rafael; Casaño, Francisco-Javier; Cervero, Carlos-Javier; Bailén, Alicia; Díez, María; González, Bernardo; Vicente, Ana-Isabel; Pedro, Carme; Bernal, Teresa; Luño, Elisa; Cedena, María-Teresa; Palomera, Luis; Simiele, Adriana; Calvo, José-Manuel; Marco, Víctor; Gómez, Eduardo; Gómez, Marta; Gallardo, David; Muñoz, Juan; de Paz, Raquel; Grau, Javier; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Benlloch, Luis-Enrique; Sanz, Guillermo

    2014-06-01

    The tolerability of azacitidine (AZA) allows its administration in elderly patients. The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical and biological characteristics, transfusion independence (TI), overall survival (OS) and toxicity in a series of 107 patients ≥ 75 years of age from the Spanish Registry of Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) treated with AZA. The median age (range) was 78 (75-90) years. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification, 86/102 (84%) had MDS, 10/102 (10%) had mixed myeloproferative/myelodysplastic disorder and 6/102 (6%) had acute myeloblastic leukemia. Regarding MDS by the International Prognostic Scoring System on initiation of AZA, 38/84 (45%) were low-intermediate-1 risk and 46/84 (55%) were intermediate-2-high risk. Ninety-five patients (89%) were red blood cell or platelet transfusion dependent. The AZA schedule was 5-0-0 in 39/106 (37%) patients, 5-2-2 in 36/106 (34%) patients and 7 consecutive days in 31/106 (29%) patients. The median number of cycles administered was 8 (range, 1-30). Thirty-eight out of 94 (40%) patients achieved TI. Median OS (95% confidence interval [CI]) was significantly better in patients achieving TI (n = 38) compared to patients who did not (n = 56) (22 [20.1-23.9] months vs. 11.1 [4.8-17.5] months, p = 0.001). No significant differences were observed in TI rate and OS among the three different schedules. With a median follow-up of 14 (min-max, 1-50) months, the median OS (95% CI) of the 107 patients was 18 (12-23) months and the probability of OS (95% CI) at 2 years was 34% (22-46%). Cycles were delayed in 31/106 (29%) patients and 47/101 patients (47%) were hospitalized for infection. These results show that treatment with AZA was feasible and effective in this elderly population, with 40% achieving TI, having a better OS than patients not achieving it. The schedule of AZA administration did not affect efficacy and toxicity.

  4. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  5. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. von Willebrand factor is the most reliable immunohistochemical marker for megakaryocytes of myelodysplastic syndrome and chronic myeloproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Chuang, S S; Jung, Y C; Li, C Y; Yung, Y C

    2000-04-01

    To find the best immunohistochemical marker for megakaryocytes in normal marrow, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD), 57 marrow biopsy specimens were studied semiquantitatively with immunohistochemical methods using a panel of 7 antibodies. The staining intensity was graded 0 to 3 for scoring 100 consecutive megakaryocytes in each stained section. The final score for each stain was the sum of these 100 megakaryocytes individually multiplied by their corresponding grade. In normal marrow (11 cases), the average scores for antivon Willebrand factor (vWF) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) were 177.1 and 195.1, respectively. The scores for the other 5 markers, including anti-platelet-derived growth factor-BB, 2 anti-transforming growth factor-beta 3, anti-CD61, and anti-CD79a ranged from 96.1 to 124.1. In MDS (27 cases), the scores were 200.8 (vWF), 152.6 (UEA-1), and 28.7 to 98.5 (others). In CMPD (19 cases), the scores were 220.5 (vWF), 179.2 (UAE-1), and 64.8 to 101.2 (others). These results show that vWF and UEA-1 are good immunohistochemical markers for megakaryocytes in normal marrow, and vWF is the best marker in MDS and CMPD. For routine practice, vWF is the most reliable marker for identifying atypical megakaryocytes, especially in the cases of 5q-syndrome and agnogenic myeloid metaplasia.

  7. NAD(P)H: Quinone Oxidoreductase 1 Deficiency Conjoint with Marginal Vitamin C Deficiency Causes Cigarette Smoke Induced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Archita; Dey, Neekkan; Ghosh, Arunava; Das, Tanusree; Chatterjee, Indu B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The etiology of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is largely unknown. Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is reported to be associated with MDS risk. There is inconsistent evidence that deficiency of NAD(P)H-quinone: oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) increases the risk of MDS. Earlier we had shown that CS induces toxicity only in marginal vitamin C-deficient guinea pigs but not in vitamin C-sufficient ones. We therefore considered that NQO1 deficiency along with marginal vitamin C deficiency might produce MDS in CS-exposed guinea pigs. Methodology and Principal Findings Here we show that CS exposure for 21 days produces MDS in guinea pigs having deficiency of NQO1 (fed 3 mg dicoumarol/day) conjoint with marginal vitamin C deficiency (fed 0.5 mg vitamin C/day). As evidenced by morphology, histology and cytogenetics, MDS produced in the guinea pigs falls in the category of refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia (RCUD): refractory anemia; refractory thrombocytopenia that is associated with ring sideroblasts, micromegakaryocytes, myeloid hyperplasia and aneuploidy. MDS is accompanied by increased CD34(+) cells and oxidative stress as shown by the formation of protein carbonyls and 8-oxodeoxyguanosine. Apoptosis precedes MDS but disappears later with marked decrease in the p53 protein. MDS produced in the guinea pigs are irreversible. MDS and all the aforesaid pathophysiological events do not occur in vitamin C-sufficient guinea pigs. However, after the onset of MDS vitamin C becomes ineffective. Conclusions and Significance CS exposure causes MDS in guinea pigs having deficiency of NQO1 conjoint with marginal vitamin C deficiency. The syndromes are not produced in singular deficiency of NQO1 or marginal vitamin C deficiency. Our results suggest that human smokers having NQO1 deficiency combined with marginal vitamin C deficiency are likely to be at high risk for developing MDS and that intake of a moderately large dose of vitamin C would prevent MDS. PMID:21655231

  8. Shrinking lung syndrome complicating pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Burns, Natalie S; Stevens, Anne M; Iyer, Ramesh S

    2014-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) can affect the lungs and pleura, usually manifesting with pleural effusions or diffuse parenchymal disease. A rare manifestation of SLE is shrinking lung syndrome, a severe restrictive respiratory disorder. While pleuropulmonary complications of pediatric SLE are common, shrinking lung syndrome is exceedingly rare in children. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl previously diagnosed with lupus, who developed severe dyspnea on exertion and restrictive pulmonary physiology. Her chest radiographs on presentation demonstrated low lung volumes, and CT showed neither pleural nor parenchymal disease. Fluoroscopy demonstrated poor diaphragmatic excursion. While shrinking lung syndrome is described and studied in adults, there is only sparse reference to shrinking lung syndrome in children.

  9. Nutrition: A Primary Therapy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bryan; Typpo, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition is an essential component of intensive care management of children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is linked to patient outcomes. One out of every two children in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) will develop malnutrition or have worsening of baseline malnutrition and present with specific micronutrient deficiencies. Early and adequate enteral nutrition (EN) is associated with improved 60-day survival after pediatric critical illness, and, yet, despite early EN guidelines, critically ill children receive on average only 55% of goal calories by PICU day 10. Inadequate delivery of EN is due to perceived feeding intolerance, reluctance to enterally feed children with hemodynamic instability, and fluid restriction. Underlying each of these factors is large practice variation between providers and across institutions for initiation, advancement, and maintenance of EN. Strategies to improve early initiation and advancement and to maintain delivery of EN are needed to improve morbidity and mortality from pediatric ARDS. Both, over and underfeeding, prolong duration of mechanical ventilation in children and worsen other organ function such that precise calorie goals are needed. The gut is thought to act as a “motor” of organ dysfunction, and emerging data regarding the role of intestinal barrier functions and the intestinal microbiome on organ dysfunction and outcomes of critical illness present exciting opportunities to improve patient outcomes. Nutrition should be considered a primary rather than supportive therapy for pediatric ARDS. Precise nutritional therapies, which are titrated and targeted to preservation of intestinal barrier function, prevention of intestinal dysbiosis, preservation of lean body mass, and blunting of the systemic inflammatory response, offer great potential for improving outcomes of pediatric ARDS. In this review, we examine the current evidence regarding dose, route, and timing of nutrition

  10. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, and/or Advanced Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm With 10% Blasts or Higher

  11. Clinical features of three cases with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis secondary to myelodysplastic syndrome developed during the course of Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Handa, Tomohiro; Nakatsue, Takeshi; Baba, Motoo; Takada, Toshinori; Nakata, Koh; Ishii, Haruyuki

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is the most common underlying disease in cases of secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). Here, we present 3 MDS cases in which PAP developed during the course of Behçet's disease (BD). All patients carried trisomy 8 in the bone marrow. Chest HRCT scans showed variable distribution of ground glass opacities, but none of the scans showed so called "crazy paving appearance". Two patients with intestinal BD who underwent potent immunosuppressive therapy died of sepsis. These findings demonstrate that PAP secondary to MDS may be occasionally associated with BD.

  12. Parameters detected by geriatric and quality of life assessment in 195 older patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia are highly predictive for outcome

    PubMed Central

    Deschler, Barbara; Ihorst, Gabriele; Platzbecker, Uwe; Germing, Ulrich; März, Eva; de Figuerido, Marcelo; Fritzsche, Kurt; Haas, Peter; Salih, Helmut R.; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; de Witte, Theo; Wijermans, Pierre; Lübbert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia exemplify the complexity of treatment allocation in older patients as options range from best supportive care, non-intensive treatment (e.g. hypomethylating agents) to intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation. Novel metrics for non-disease variables are urgently needed to help define the best treatment for each older patient. We investigated the feasibility and prognostic value of geriatric/quality of life assessments aside from established disease-specific variables in 195 patients aged 60 years or over with myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia. These patients were grouped according to treatment intensity and assessed. Assessment consisted of eight instruments evaluating activities of daily living, depression, mental functioning, mobility, comorbidities, Karnofsky Index and quality of life. Patients with a median age of 71 years (range 60-87 years) with myelodysplastic syndromes (n=63) or acute myeloid leukemia (n=132) were treated either with best supportive care (n=47), hypomethylating agents (n=73) or intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation (n=75). After selection of variables, pathological activities of daily living and quality of life/fatigue remained highly predictive for overall survival in the entire patient group beyond disease-related risk factors adverse cytogenetics and blast count of 20% or over. In 107 patients treated non-intensively activities of daily living of less than 100 (hazard ratio, HR 2.94), Karnofsky Index below 80 (HR 2.34) and quality of life/’fatigue’ of 50 or over (HR 1.77) were significant prognosticators. Summation of adverse features revealed a high risk of death (HR 9.36). In-depth evaluation of older patients prior to individual treatment allocation is feasible and provides additional information to standard assessment. Patients aged 60 years or over with newly diagnosed myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia and

  13. Response to recombinant erythropoietin alpha, without the adjunct of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, is associated with a longer survival in patients with transfusion-dependent myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Musto, Pellegrino; Villani, Oreste; Martorelli, Maria Carmen; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; Guariglia, Roberto; Mansueto, Giovanna; D'Auria, Fiorella; Grieco, Vitina; Bianchino, Gabriella; Sparano, Anna; Zonno, Antonia; Lerose, Rosa; Sanpaolo, Grazia; Falcone, Antonietta

    2010-08-01

    This was a retrospective, comparative study focused on the extended follow-up of 192 transfusion-dependent patients with myelodysplastic syndromes treated (n. 83) or not treated (n. 109) with recombinant erythropoietin alpha (r-EPO) as single agent during the course of their disease. The results supported the safety of this treatment in the long term and also showed a significant survival advantage (median 52 months vs. 31 months, p<0.0095) in responding patients as compared to non-responding ones or to subjects never treated with r-EPO. At multivariate analysis, response to r-EPO maintained an independent prognostic value on OS.

  14. Abnormal dicentric chromosome with co-amplification of sequences from chromosomes 11 and 19: a novel rearrangement in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome transforming to acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Heaps, L S; Sharma, P; Jarvis, A; Forsyth, C

    2001-10-01

    A 66-year-old man with a myelodysplastic syndrome transforming to acute myeloid leukemia showed a complex abnormal karyotype on bone marrow aspirate. An unbalanced dicentric translocation with a very long der(11) long arm-dic(11;19)(q25;p13.4)-was present. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies utilised paints for chromosomes 11 and 19 as well as the locus specific probe MLL, localised to 11q23. The abnormal chromosome 11q contained 6 copies of intact MLL and 6 copies of chromosome 19 (unidentified) sequences. To our knowledge, gene co-amplification of chromosomes 11 and 19 sequences has not been reported before.

  15. Role of minimal residual disease and chimerism after reduced-intensity and myeloablative allo-transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Teresa; Diez-Campelo, María; Godoy, Vicky; Rojas, Silvia; Colado, Enrique; Alcoceba, Miguel; González, Marcos; Vidriales, Belén; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín M; López-Corral, Lucía; Luño, Elisa; del Cañizo, Consuelo

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the impact of detection of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry (FCMRD) and CD3 chimerism in relapse in a cohort of 87 patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing stem cell transplantation. Patients with a positive FCMRD at day +100 after transplantation showed higher relapse rates and worse overall survival. In multivariate analysis, a positive FCMRD after transplantation was a significant predictor of relapse. Mixed chimerism showed a trend to statistical signification. We conclude that FCMRD at day 100 after SCT is the best predictor of relapse after SCT in patients with aggressive myeloid malignancies.

  16. A Pediatric Case of Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Derin, Serhan; Derin, Hatice; Sahan, Murat; Çaksen, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS) is characterized by facial paralysis, inner ear dysfunction, periauricular pain, and herpetiform vesicles. The reported incidence in children is 2.7/100,000. The pathogenesis involves the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) in the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. The recovery rate is better in children than in adults. This paper discusses a 12-year-old girl with a rare case of peripheral facial paralysis caused by RHS and reviews the literature. PMID:25276457

  17. Artesunate induces apoptosis through caspase-dependent and -independent mitochondrial pathways in human myelodysplastic syndrome SKM-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Jingci; Chen, Li; Wang, Jiamin; Wang, Yaqian; Luo, Jianmin; Pan, Ling; Zhang, Xuejun

    2014-08-05

    Artesunate (ART) is a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin extracted from Artemisia annua (sweet wormwood) that is conventionally used in anti-malarial drugs and more recently in medications that induce tumor cell apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects and mechanistic pathways of ART in human myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a condition that commonly progresses to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Human MDS SKM-1 cells, primary bone marrow (PBM) mononuclear cells from patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB) or MDS-AML (MDS cell group), and PBM stromal cells from three patients without hematological diseases (non-MDS cell group) were cultured for 24, 48, or 72 h with or without various ART concentrations. CCK-8, western blot, JC-1 fluorescence, and Annexin-V/Propidium iodide (PI) labeling were used to assess cell proliferation, protein levels, mitochondrial membrane potentials (MMPs) and apoptosis, respectively. ART administration dose- and time-dependently inhibited SKM-1 proliferation. At 24, 48, and 72 h, ART IC₅₀ values were 89.92, 4.24, and 1.28 μmol/L, respectively. ART only significantly inhibited proliferation in the MDS cell group, but it has little impact on proliferation of non-MDS cells. ART decreased MMPs, and dose-dependently induced SKM-1 cell apoptosis, peaking at 82.9% when treated with 200 μmol/L ART for 24h. Caspase-3 and -9 activation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio and apoptosis inducing factor nuclear localization were implicated in apoptosis. Our results indicate that ART effectively induces apoptosis in SKM-1 cells through both caspase-dependent and -independent mitochondrial pathways.

  18. Clinical features and prognosis of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes who were exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Masatoshi; Iwanaga, Masako; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Soda, Midori; Jo, Tatsuro; Horio, Kensuke; Takasaki, Yumi; Kawaguchi, Yasuhisa; Tsushima, Hideki; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Imanishi, Daisuke; Taguchi, Jun; Sawayama, Yasushi; Hata, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2016-10-01

    There is evidence that radiation exposure is a causative factor of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, little is known about whether radiation exposure is also a prognostic factor of MDS. We investigated the impact of radiation exposure on the prognosis of MDS in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors using the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the revised version (IPSS-R). Subjects were 140 patients with primary MDS diagnosed between 1985 and 2011 and evaluable for IPSS, IPSS-R, and exposure distance. Of those, 31 were exposed at <1.5 km, 35 at 1.5-2.99 km, and 74 at ≥3.0 km. By the end of March 2014, 47 patients (34%) progressed to overt leukemia and 106 (75.7%) died. By comparing with patients exposed at ≥3.0 km, those exposed at <1.5 km had significantly higher frequencies of abnormal chromosome (P = 0.02), intermediate/poor IPSS, and intermediate/poor/very poor IPSS-R cytogenetic category (P = 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, respectively). As with de novo MDS, multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that cytogenetic abnormalities, IPSS karyotype, and IPSS-R cytogenetics were significantly associated with poor survival, and cumulative incidence of leukemic transformation in MDS among atomic bomb survivors, but exposure distance was not associated with any poor outcomes. These suggest that exposure to the greater dose of atomic bomb radiation is associated with developing poor cytogenetic abnormalities in MDS, which might consequently lead to overt leukemia among atomic bomb survivors.

  19. Subsequent primary malignancies and acute myelogenous leukemia transformation among myelodysplastic syndrome patients treated with or without lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Rollison, Dana E; Shain, Kenneth H; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Hampras, Shalaka S; Fulp, William; Fisher, Kate; Al Ali, Najla H; Padron, Eric; Lancet, Jeffrey; Xu, Qiang; Olesnyckyj, Martha; Kenvin, Laurie; Knight, Robert; Dalton, William; List, Alan; Komrokji, Rami S

    2016-07-01

    The few studies that have examined rates of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation in lenalidomide-treated myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients have been limited to deletion 5q MDS. The association between lenalidomide and subsequent primary malignancies (SPMs) in MDS patients has not been evaluated previously. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the risk of both SPM and AML in association with lenalidomide. A cohort of MDS patients (n = 1248) treated between 2004 and 2012 at Moffitt Cancer Center were identified, and incident cases of SPM and AML transformation were ascertained. Using a nested case-control design, MDS controls were 1:1 matched to SPM (n = 41) and AML (n = 150) cases, on age and date of MDS diagnosis, gender, follow-up time, IPSS, and del (5q). Associations between lenalidomide and (1) SPM incidence and (2) AML transformation were estimated with hazards ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in the cohort and odds ratios (OR) in the case-control analysis. SPM incidence did not differ significantly between cohort MDS patients treated with (0.7 per 100 person-years) or without lenalidomide (1.4 per 100 person-years) (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.40-2.74), whereas a significantly reduced SPM risk was observed in the case-control sample (OR = 0.03, 95% CI = <0.01-0.63). Lenalidomide was not associated with AML transformation in the cohort analysis (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.44-1.27) or in the case-control analyses (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 0.52-2.56), after adjustment for potential confounders. Lenalidomide was not associated with increased risk of SPM or AML transformation in a large cohort of MDS patients mostly including nondeletion 5q MDS.

  20. Short- and long-term benefits of lenalidomide treatment in patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Komrokji, R S; List, A F

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) begins with assessment of karyotype and risk. Lenalidomide is approved for the treatment of patients who have transfusion-dependent anemia due to lower-risk MDS with chromosome 5q deletion (del(5q)) with or without additional cytogenetic abnormalities, and isolated del(5q) only in the European Union. Mounting evidence suggests that lenalidomide is effective not only in reducing red blood cell (RBC) transfusion burden, but also in modifying the disease natural history by suppressing the malignant clone. Data discussed here from the pivotal phase 2 (MDS-003) and phase 3 (MDS-004) studies of lenalidomide demonstrate that lenalidomide treatment was associated with both short- and long-term benefits. These clinical benefits included high rates of RBC-transfusion independence (TI) with prolonged durations of response, high rates of cytogenetic response (CyR) associated with achievement of durable RBC-TI, no significant difference in rates of progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and improvements in health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Achievement of RBC-TI and CyR with lenalidomide treatment was associated with extended survival and time to AML progression. Achievement of RBC-TI and hemoglobin response was additionally associated with HRQOL benefits. Recent data describing the impact of TP53 mutations and p53 expression on the prognosis of patients with del(5q) and the impact on response to lenalidomide are also discussed. The authors provide practical recommendations for the use of lenalidomide in patients with lower-risk del(5q) MDS.

  1. Risk of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia post radiation treatment for breast cancer: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Henry; Malmgren, Judith; De Roos, Anneclaire J

    2013-02-01

    Ionizing radiation is a known cause of myeloid leukemia, but it is not known whether therapeutic doses for breast cancer (BC) pose an increased risk. We hypothesized that BC radiation treatment is associated with increased risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) as seen in a previously conducted study. We used 2001-2009 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database records to identify a cohort of women with first primary stage 0 BC who were treated with radiation, a group which is not treated with chemotherapy. We identified subsequent MDS/AML diagnoses in the cohort using SEER to query appropriate ICD-O-3 codes. We compared observed MDS/AML rates in the BC cohort to expected rates, estimated as first primary MDS/AML in the entire female population, and calculated observed/expected rate ratios with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Overall, a very small number of cases of MDS/AML occurred in this cohort with 22 observed cases versus 9.4 expected cases using national incidence data. We estimated an increased risk of 2.34 for MDS/AML in stage 0 BC cases treated with radiation compared to the general population (95 % CI 1.49, 3.46, p < 0.001). The age adjusted relative risk is 1.46, (95 % CI 0.93, 2.16, p = 0.08). Our results suggest that radiation treatment for BC is associated with an increased risk of MDS/AML and affects a very small number of patients.

  2. Label-free imaging and identification of typical cells of acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome by Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vanna, R; Ronchi, P; Lenferink, A T M; Tresoldi, C; Morasso, C; Mehn, D; Bedoni, M; Picciolini, S; Terstappen, L W M M; Ciceri, F; Otto, C; Gramatica, F

    2015-02-21

    In clinical practice, the diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) start from the manual examination of stained smears of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) by using an optical microscope. This step is subjective and scarcely reproducible. Therefore, the development of subjective and potentially automatable methods for the recognition of typical AML/MDS cells is necessary. Here we have used Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing myeloblasts, promyelocytes, abnormal promyelocytes and erhytroblasts, which have to be counted for a correct diagnosis and morphological classification of AML and MDS. BM samples from patients affected by four different AML subtypes, mostly characterized by the presence of the four subpopulations selected for this study, were analyzed. First, each cell was scanned by acquiring 4096 spectra, thus obtaining Raman images which demonstrate an accurate description of morphological features characteristic of each subpopulation. Raman imaging coupled with hierarchical cluster analysis permitted the automatic discrimination and localization of the nucleus, the cytoplasm, myeloperoxidase containing granules and haemoglobin. Second, the averaged Raman fingerprint of each cell was analysed by multivariate analysis (principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis) in order to study the typical vibrational features of each subpopulation and also for the automatic recognition of cells. The leave-one-out cross validation of a Raman-based classification model demonstrated the correct classification of myeloblasts, promyelocytes (normal/abnormal) and erhytroblasts with an accuracy of 100%. Normal and abnormal promyelocytes were distinguished with 95% accuracy. The overall classification accuracy considering the four subpopulations was 98%. This proof-of-concept study shows that Raman micro-spectroscopy could be a valid approach for developing label-free, objective and automatic

  3. Short- and long-term benefits of lenalidomide treatment in patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Komrokji, R. S.; List, A. F.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) begins with assessment of karyotype and risk. Lenalidomide is approved for the treatment of patients who have transfusion-dependent anemia due to lower-risk MDS with chromosome 5q deletion (del(5q)) with or without additional cytogenetic abnormalities, and isolated del(5q) only in the European Union. Mounting evidence suggests that lenalidomide is effective not only in reducing red blood cell (RBC) transfusion burden, but also in modifying the disease natural history by suppressing the malignant clone. Data discussed here from the pivotal phase 2 (MDS-003) and phase 3 (MDS-004) studies of lenalidomide demonstrate that lenalidomide treatment was associated with both short- and long-term benefits. These clinical benefits included high rates of RBC-transfusion independence (TI) with prolonged durations of response, high rates of cytogenetic response (CyR) associated with achievement of durable RBC-TI, no significant difference in rates of progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and improvements in health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Achievement of RBC-TI and CyR with lenalidomide treatment was associated with extended survival and time to AML progression. Achievement of RBC-TI and hemoglobin response was additionally associated with HRQOL benefits. Recent data describing the impact of TP53 mutations and p53 expression on the prognosis of patients with del(5q) and the impact on response to lenalidomide are also discussed. The authors provide practical recommendations for the use of lenalidomide in patients with lower-risk del(5q) MDS. PMID:26504152

  4. Diabetes Insipidus as an Initial Presentation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Diagnosis with Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Array-Based Karyotyping.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruixue; Wang, Chun; Zhong, Xushu; Wu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of clonal hematopoietic diseases characterized by cytopenia, dysplasia and increased risk of development to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Unfavorable cytogenetic changes such as complex karyotypes or chromosome 7 anomalies are predictive of the progression to AML and poor prognosis. Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is the result of a deficiency of arginine vasopressin, and its major causes are idiopathic, primary or secondary tumors, neurosurgery and trauma. Importantly, CDI is a rare complication of MDS. To date, only 5 cases of MDS co-occurring with CDI have been reported; 3 of 5 had cytogenetic abnormalities uncovered by metaphase cytogenetics and 3 of 5 evolved to AML. Here, we describe a 74-year-old woman who presented with CDI as her initial symptom of MDS and eventually progressed to AML. The metaphase cytogenetics, combined with the single-nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A)-based karyotyping, with superiority in resolution and detecting copy number variation, revealed a complex karyotype that included monosomy of chromosome 7, deletion of 20q, and absence of heterogeneity (AOH) in more than one chromosome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of MDS co-occurring with CDI with numerous cytogenetic abnormalities revealed by the SNP-A-based karyotyping. Our case supports that the cytogenetic abnormalities may be associated with the clinical features and the prognosis of MDS co-occurring with CDI. The SNP-A-based karyotyping is helpful in revealing more subtle cytogenetic abnormalities and unveiling their roles in the pathogenesis of MDS.

  5. New Recurrent Balanced Translocations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 8461

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Alison; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Rao, Kathleen W.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Sterling, Lisa J.; Marcucci, Guido; Carroll, Andrew J.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2013-01-01

    Acquired chromosome abnormalities in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are among the most valuable determinants of diagnosis and prognosis. In search of new recurrent balanced translocations we reviewed the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) cytogenetics database containing pretreatment and relapse karyotypes of 4,701 adults with AML and 565 with MDS who were treated on CALGB trials. We identified all cases with balanced structural rearrangements occurring as a sole abnormality or in addition to one other abnormality, excluded abnormalities known to be recurrent, and then reviewed the literature to determine whether any of what we considered unique, previously unknown abnormalities had been reported. As a result, we identified seven new recurrent balanced translocations in AML or MDS: t(7;11)(q22;p15.5), t(10;11)(q23;p15), t(2;12)(p13;p13), t(12;17)(p13;q12), t(2;3)(p21;p21), t(5;21)(q31;q22) and t(8;14)(q24.1;q32.2), and, additionally, t(10;12)(p11;q15), a new translocation in AML previously reported in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Herein we report hematologic and clinical characteristics, and treatment outcomes of patients with these newly recognized recurrent translocations. We also report 52 unique balanced translocations, together with the clinical data of patients harboring them, that to our knowledge have not been previously published. We hope that once the awareness of their existence is increased, some of these translocations may become recognized as novel recurring abnormalities. Identification of additional cases with both the new recurrent and the unique balanced translocations will enable determination of their prognostic significance and help to provide insights into the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis in patients with these rare abnormalities. PMID:23225546

  6. Dual epigenetic targeting with panobinostat and azacitidine in acute myeloid leukemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tan, P; Wei, A; Mithraprabhu, S; Cummings, N; Liu, H B; Perugini, M; Reed, K; Avery, S; Patil, S; Walker, P; Mollee, P; Grigg, A; D'Andrea, R; Dear, A; Spencer, A

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic options are limited for elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A phase Ib/II study was undertaken to evaluate the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) and preliminary efficacy of the pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat (LBH589) in combination with azacitidine in patients with AML or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) naïve to intensive chemotherapy. Thirty-nine patients (AML=29, MDS=10) received azacitidine 75 mg/m2 subcutaneously (days 1–5) and oral panobinostat (starting on day 5, thrice weekly for seven doses) in 28-day cycles until toxicity or disease progression. Dose-limiting toxicities during the phase Ib stage were observed in 0/4 patients receiving 10 mg panobinostat, in 1/7 patients (fatigue) receiving 20 mg, in 1/6 patients (fatigue) receiving 30 mg and in 4/5 patients (fatigue, syncope, hyponatremia and somnolence) receiving 40 mg. In phase II, an additional 17 patients received panobinostat at a MTD of 30 mg. The overall response rate (ORR=CR+CRi+PR) in patients with AML was 31% (9/29) and that in patients with MDS was 50% (5/10). After a median follow-up of 13 months, the median overall survival was 8 and 16 months in patients with AML and MDS, respectively. Increased histone H3 and H4 acetylation was a useful early biomarker of clinical response. Combining panobinostat with azacitidine was tolerable and clinically active in high-risk MDS/AML patients, warranting further exploration. PMID:24413064

  7. Flow cytometry in myelodysplastic syndrome: analysis of diagnostic utility using maturation pattern-based and quantitative approaches.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Anita; Pati, Haraprasad; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Mishra, Pravas; Seth, Tulika; Kumar, Suman; Singh, Saroj; Pandey, Sangita; Kumar, Rajive

    2012-09-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) is being increasingly evaluated for the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We employed multiple FCM approaches to assess MDS. Five-color FCM, morphology blind, was done on bone marrow aspirates of 57 suspected MDS and 31 normal controls. Maturation pattern, quantitative FCM for low-grade MDS that awards FCM score, and expression of selected antigens on erythroid cells and CD34(+) blasts were evaluated. FCM results were correlated with clinical and laboratory workup. Patients (n = 57) included proven MDS (n = 14), suspected MDS (n = 13), and non-MDS (n = 30). By pattern-based approach, all proven cases were FCM positive. In suspected MDS, 11 (84.61 %) were positive including morphology-negative cases, and two (15.38 %) were intermediate. In non-MDS cases, 27 of 30 (90 %) were FCM negative, 2 of 30 (6.67 %) intermediate, and 1 of 30 (3.33 %) a hematinic-responsive case, positive. Quantitative parameters that characterized MDS included FCM score of >3, percentage CD34(+) B cells, and expression of CD11b, CD15, and CD56 on myeloblasts. CD71 MFI on CD235a(+) erythroblasts and CD38 MFI on myeloblasts were significantly lower in MDS. The former was present in FCM-intermediate suspected MDS but not FCM-intermediate non-MDS cases. Used in the overall clinical context, both maturation pattern recognition and quantitative approaches, the latter for low-grade MDS, are sensitive methods of diagnosing MDS, including cases negative by morphology and cytogenetics, especially if combined with evaluation of selected antigens, CD71 on CD235a(+) cells and CD38 on CD34(+) cells. The value of FCM in morphology-negative cases needs better definition of specificity through more extensive evaluation of secondary dyspoiesis.

  8. The relationship of TP53 R72P polymorphism to disease outcome and TP53 mutation in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, K L; Zhang, L M; Rollison, D E; Basiorka, A A; Fulp, W; Rawal, B; Jerez, A; Billingsley, D L; Lin, H-Y; Kurtin, S E; Yoder, S; Zhang, Y; Guinta, K; Mallo, M; Solé, F; Calasanz, M J; Cervera, J; Such, E; González, T; Nevill, T J; Haferlach, T; Smith, A E; Kulasekararaj, A; Mufti, G; Karsan, A; Maciejewski, J P; Sokol, L; Epling-Burnette, P K; Wei, S; List, A F

    2015-01-01

    Nonsynonymous TP53 exon 4 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), R72P, is linked to cancer and mutagen susceptibility. R72P associations with specific cancer risk, particularly hematological malignancies, have been conflicting. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with chromosome 5q deletion is characterized by erythroid hypoplasia arising from lineage-specific p53 accumulation resulting from ribosomal insufficiency. We hypothesized that apoptotically diminished R72P C-allele may influence predisposition to del(5q) MDS. Bone marrow and blood DNA was sequenced from 705 MDS cases (333 del(5q), 372 non-del(5q)) and 157 controls. Genotype distribution did not significantly differ between del(5q) cases (12.6% CC, 38.1% CG, 49.2% GG), non-del(5q) cases (9.7% CC, 44.6% CG, 45.7% GG) and controls (7.6% CC, 37.6% CG, 54.8% GG) (P=0.13). Allele frequency did not differ between non-del(5q) and del(5q) cases (P=0.91) but trended towards increased C-allele frequency comparing non-del(5q) (P=0.08) and del(5q) (P=0.10) cases with controls. Median lenalidomide response duration increased proportionate to C-allele dosage in del(5q) patients (2.2 (CC), 1.3 (CG) and 0.89 years (GG)). Furthermore, C-allele homozygosity in del(5q) was associated with prolonged overall and progression-free survival and non-terminal interstitial deletions that excluded 5q34, whereas G-allele homozygozity was associated with inferior outcome and terminal deletions involving 5q34 (P=0.05). These findings comprise the largest MDS R72P SNP analysis. PMID:25768405

  9. Oxidative stress levels are correlated with P15 and P16 gene promoter methylation in myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Cortesão, Emília; Oliveiros, Barbara; Alves, Vera; Espadana, Ana Isabel; Rito, Luís; Magalhães, Emília; Pereira, Sónia; Pereira, Amélia; Costa, José Manuel Nascimento; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana Bela

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress and abnormal DNA methylation have been implicated in some types of cancer, namely in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Since both mechanisms are observed in MDS patients, we analyzed the correlation of intracellular levels of peroxides, superoxide anion, and glutathione (GSH), as well as ratios of peroxides/GSH and superoxide/GSH, with the methylation status of P15 and P16 gene promoters in bone marrow leukocytes from MDS patients. Compared to controls, these patients had lower GSH content, higher peroxide levels, peroxides/GSH and superoxide/GSH ratios, as well as higher methylation frequency of P15 and P16 gene promoters. Moreover, patients with methylated P15 gene had higher oxidative stress levels than patients without methylation (peroxides: 460 ± 42 MIF vs 229 ± 25 MIF, p = 0.001; superoxide: 383 ± 48 MIF vs 243 ± 17 MIF, p = 0.022; peroxides/GSH: 2.50 ± 0.08 vs 1.04 ± 0.34, p < 0.001; superoxide/GSH: 1.76 ± 0.21 vs 1.31 ± 0.10, p = 0.007). Patients with methylated P16 and at least one methylated gene had higher peroxide levels as well as peroxides/GSH ratio than patients without methylation. Interestingly, oxidative stress levels allow the discrimination of patients without methylation from ones with methylated P15, methylated P16, or at least one methylated (P15 or P16) promoter. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that oxidative stress is correlated with P15 and P16 hypermethylation.

  10. Inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: a multicenter retrospective study and literature review of 68 cases.

    PubMed

    Mekinian, Arsène; Braun, Thorsten; Decaux, Olivier; Falgarone, Géraldine; Toussirot, Eric; Raffray, Loic; Omouri, Mohamed; Gombert, Bruno; De Wazieres, Benoit; Buchdaul, Anne-Laure; Ziza, Jean-Marc; Launay, David; Denis, Guillaume; Madaule, Serge; Rose, Christian; Grignano, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Fain, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characteristics and outcome of inflammatory arthritis in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in a French multicenter retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with MDS (median age, 77.5 yr [interquartile range, 69-81]; 10 women) were included. Inflammatory arthritis presented as polyarthritis in 17 cases (77%) and with symmetric involvement in 15 cases (68%). At diagnosis, the median disease activity score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) was 4.5 [2-6.5]. Two patients had anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and 1 had radiologic erosions. The median time between the diagnoses of arthritis and MDS was 10 months [6-42], with a median articular symptom duration of 3 months [2-8]. The diagnosis of both diseases was concomitant in 6 cases (27%); arthritis preceded MDS in 12 cases (55%), and occurred after MDS in 4 (18%). While the number of swollen and tender joints significantly decreased during follow-up, as did the median DAS28-CRP (from 4.3 [3.8-4.6] at baseline to 2.9 [1.75-3.3]; p < 0.05), CRP remained elevated (CRP >20 mg/L) in 8 patients (42%). Nevertheless, radiographic progression and new ACPA positivity were not observed during a median follow-up of 29 months [9-76]. While most of the patients were treated with steroids (n = 16) for arthritis, additional treatment was administered in only 4 patients (hydroxychloroquine, n = 2; sulfasalazine [Salazopyrin] and etanercept, n = 1, respectively). Eleven patients died during follow-up from acute myeloid leukemia (n = 5); infections (n = 3); or cerebral bleeding, cardiorespiratory failure, or undetermined cause (n = 1, respectively). Inflammatory arthritis associated with MDS can have various presentations and is often seronegative and nonerosive. Steroids alone are the most common treatment in MDS-associated arthritis, but that treatment is insufficient to control arthritis. Steroid-sparing strategies need to be identified.

  11. Perturbed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell hierarchy in myelodysplastic syndromes patients with monosomy 7 as the sole cytogenetic abnormality.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Marios; Woll, Petter S; Mortera-Blanco, Teresa; Karimi, Mohsen; Wedge, David C; Doolittle, Helen; Douagi, Iyadh; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2016-11-08

    The stem and progenitor cell compartments in low- and intermediate-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have recently been described, and shown to be highly conserved when compared to those in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Much less is known about the characteristics of the hematopoietic hierarchy of subgroups of MDS with a high risk of transforming to AML. Immunophenotypic analysis of immature stem and progenitor cell compartments from patients with an isolated loss of the entire chromosome 7 (isolated -7), an independent high-risk genetic event in MDS, showed expansion and dominance of the malignant -7 clone in the granulocyte and macrophage progenitors (GMP), and other CD45RA+ progenitor compartments, and a significant reduction of the LIN-CD34+CD38low/-CD90+CD45RA- hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, highly reminiscent of what is typically seen in AML, and distinct from low-risk MDS. Established functional in vitro and in vivo stem cell assays showed a poor readout for -7 MDS patients irrespective of marrow blast counts. Moreover, while the -7 clone dominated at all stages of GM differentiation, the -7 clone had a competitive disadvantage in erythroid differentiation. In azacitidine-treated -7 MDS patients with a clinical response, the decreased clonal involvement in mononuclear bone marrow cells was not accompanied by a parallel reduced clonal involvement in the dominant CD45RA+ progenitor populations, suggesting a selective azacitidine-resistance of these distinct -7 progenitor compartments. Our data demonstrate, in a subgroup of high risk MDS with monosomy 7, that the perturbed stem and progenitor cell compartments resemble more that of AML than low-risk MDS.

  12. Outcome of Lower-Risk Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes Without 5q Deletion After Failure of Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Sophie; Hamel, Jean-François; Toma, Andrea; Kelaidi, Charikleia; Thépot, Sylvain; Campelo, Maria Diez; Santini, Valeria; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Balleari, Enrico; Kaivers, Jennifer; Sapena, Rosa; Götze, Katharina; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Kotsianidis, Ioannis; Komrokji, Rami; Steensma, David P; Fensterl, Jaime; Roboz, Gail J; Bernal, Teresa; Ramos, Fernando; Calabuig, Marisa; Guerci-Bresler, Agnès; Bordessoule, Dominique; Cony-Makhoul, Pascale; Cheze, Stéphane; Wattel, Eric; Rose, Christian; Vey, Norbert; Gioia, Daniela; Ferrero, Dario; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cametti, Giovanni; Pane, Fabrizio; Sanna, Alessandro; Germing, Ulrich; Sanz, Guillermo F; Dreyfus, François; Fenaux, Pierre

    2017-03-28

    Purpose Most anemic patients with non-deleted 5q lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are treated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), with a response rate of approximately 50%. Second-line treatments, including hypomethylating agents (HMAs), lenalidomide (LEN), and investigational drugs, may be used after ESA failure in some countries, but their effect on disease progression and overall survival (OS) is unknown. Here, we analyzed outcome after ESA failure and the effect of second-line treatments. Patients and Methods We examined an international retrospective cohort of 1,698 patients with non-del(5q) lower-risk MDS treated with ESAs. Results Erythroid response to ESAs was 61.5%, and median response duration was 17 months. Of 1,147 patients experiencing ESA failure, 653 experienced primary failure and 494 experienced relapse after a response. Primary failure of ESAs was associated with a higher risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) progression, which did not translate into an OS difference. Of 450 patients (39%) who received second-line treatment, 194 received HMAs, 148 received LEN, and 108 received other treatments (MISC), whereas 697 received RBC transfusions only. Five-year AML cumulative incidence was 20.3%, 20.3%, and 11.3% for those receiving HMAs, LEN, and MISC, respectively ( P = .05). Five-year OS for patients receiving HMA, LEN, and MISC was 36.5%, 41.7%, and 51%, respectively ( P = .21). In a multivariable analysis adjusted for age, sex, revised International Prognostic Scoring System score, and progression at ESA failure, there was no significant OS difference among the three groups. Conclusion In this large, multicenter, retrospective cohort of patients with non-del(5q) lower-risk MDS treated with ESAs, none of the most commonly used second-line treatments (HMA and LEN) significantly improved OS. Early failure of ESAs was associated with a higher risk of AML progression.

  13. Flow cytometry in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and the value of myeloid nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA).

    PubMed

    Bellos, Frauke; Kern, Wolfgang

    2014-09-25

    Background: Confirming diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is often challenging. Standard diagnostic methods are cytomorphology (CM) and cytogenetics (CG). Multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) is upcoming in MDS diagnostic work up, comparability and investigator experience are critical. Myeloid nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA) in myelomonocytic cells might be expressed more weakly in patients with MDS. The analysis of MNDA may thus improve diagnostic capabilities of MFC in MDS. Methods: Staining methods and antibody combinations for MFC in MDS are outlined, giving details for interpretation of results in regard to dyspoiesis. MFC results are correlated with CM and CG and with survival data. Use of myeloid nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA) in MDS diagnostics was evaluated in 239 patients with MDS, AML, other cytopenic conditions and in 30 negative controls. Results: Strong correlation between findings in CM and MFC was found; MFC results correlated well with those of CG. Patients with higher grades of dysplasia in MFC had shorter overall survival. Percentages of granulocytes and monocytes with diminished MNDA expression (%dimG, %dimM) were higher in patients with MDS and AML. Mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of MNDA in monocytes was lower in MDS and AML. Cut-off values for %dimG (12%) and %dimM (22%) as well as for MFI in monocytes (72) were defined discriminating between MDS and non-MDS. Conclusion: MFC adds significant information on dyspoiesis in the diagnostic work up for MDS and provides prognostic information. MNDA expression can be assessed by MFC and may facilitate evaluation of dyspoiesis when added to MDS MFC panels. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  14. Multiparameter flow cytometry provides independent prognostic information in patients with suspected myelodysplastic syndromes: A study on 804 patients.

    PubMed

    Kern, Wolfgang; Bacher, Ulrike; Haferlach, Claudia; Alpermann, Tamara; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) relies on well-defined cytomorphologic criteria but is challenging in a significant number of patients. The detection of aberrant antigen expression by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) is considered a promising tool to improve MDS diagnostics. We prospectively analyzed 804 unselected patients sent with suspected MDS for correlation of MFC findings with overall survival (OS) in the context of cytomorphologic and cytogenetic findings. Patients with evidence of MDS by MFC had a significantly worse OS as compared to those without (OS at 2 years, 71.2% vs. 89.4%; P<0.001). The number of aberrantly expressed antigens as a continuous variable was significantly associated with OS [P<0.001, hazards ratio (HR): 1.19 per additional aberrantly expressed antigen]. Multivariate analysis proved a diagnosis of MDS by MFC to be independently associated with OS (P=0.050; HR: 1.42). Furthermore, a diagnosis of MDS by MFC was related to inferior survival within all three cytomorphologically defined subgroups, i.e., proven MDS (median OS, 45.4 vs. 52.8 months, P<0.001), suspected MDS (2-year-OS, 75.0% vs. 82.8%; P=0.062), and MDS excluded (2-year-OS, 63.5% vs. 92.8%, P=0.020). Our data clearly demonstrate that, in the assessment of cytopenic patients with suspected MDS, a diagnosis of MDS by MFC is independently associated with OS, which had been shown in previous studies for today's standard diagnostic parameters cytomorphology and cytogenetics. MFC may, therefore, be considered an additional tool in the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected MDS.

  15. Perturbed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell hierarchy in myelodysplastic syndromes patients with monosomy 7 as the sole cytogenetic abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Marios; Karimi, Mohsen; Wedge, David C.; Doolittle, Helen; Douagi, Iyadh; Papaemmanuil, Elli

    2016-01-01

    The stem and progenitor cell compartments in low- and intermediate-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have recently been described, and shown to be highly conserved when compared to those in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Much less is known about the characteristics of the hematopoietic hierarchy of subgroups of MDS with a high risk of transforming to AML. Immunophenotypic analysis of immature stem and progenitor cell compartments from patients with an isolated loss of the entire chromosome 7 (isolated −7), an independent high-risk genetic event in MDS, showed expansion and dominance of the malignant −7 clone in the granulocyte and macrophage progenitors (GMP), and other CD45RA+ progenitor compartments, and a significant reduction of the LIN−CD34+CD38low/−CD90+CD45RA− hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, highly reminiscent of what is typically seen in AML, and distinct from low-risk MDS. Established functional in vitro and in vivo stem cell assays showed a poor readout for −7 MDS patients irrespective of marrow blast counts. Moreover, while the −7 clone dominated at all stages of GM differentiation, the −7 clone had a competitive disadvantage in erythroid differentiation. In azacitidine-treated −7 MDS patients with a clinical response, the decreased clonal involvement in mononuclear bone marrow cells was not accompanied by a parallel reduced clonal involvement in the dominant CD45RA+ progenitor populations, suggesting a selective azacitidine-resistance of these distinct −7 progenitor compartments. Our data demonstrate, in a subgroup of high risk MDS with monosomy 7, that the perturbed stem and progenitor cell compartments resemble more that of AML than low-risk MDS. PMID:27683035

  16. Deferasirox treatment for myelodysplastic syndromes: "real-life" efficacy and safety in a single-institution patient population.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Finsinger, Paola; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Federico, Vincenzo; Santopietro, Michelina; Colafigli, Gioia; Petrucci, Luigi; Salaroli, Adriano; Serrao, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2012-09-01

    We here describe a single-institution experience on 40 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) consecutively treated with deferasirox at the dose of 10-30 mg/kg/day according to Consensus Guidelines on Iron Chelation Therapy, outside of clinical trials. Serum ferritin (SF) was measured monthly, and safety assessment included monitoring of adverse events during treatment and of liver and renal parameters. Median SF at baseline of the 40 patients was 2,878 ng/ml. Median dose of deferasirox was 1,125 mg/day. At a median follow-up of 12 months of treatment, there was a significant reduction in SF from baseline, the median value being 1,400 ng/ml (p = 0.001). Interruptions due to toxicity were recorded in 40 % of patients: most common adverse events were diarrhoea (five patients, 12.5 %) and skin rash (four patients, 10 %). Seven patients had increased serum creatinine values >33 % above baseline, but there were no progressive increases. Four patients (three refractory anaemia and one refractory anaemia with excess blasts type 1) had a reduction of transfusion requirement (from a median of 5 to 1 unit/month) according to International Working Group 2006 criteria, with mean Hb value increasing from 8.5 to 10.5 g/dl, and mean Hb improvement being 2 g/dl (p = 0.02). No increased toxicity was noted when deferasirox was used concomitantly with azacitidine (eight patients who were intermediate 2 International Prognostic Scoring System risk) or lenalidomide (two patients with del(5q)). In conclusion, the oral iron chelator deferasirox is effective and safe when used in MDS patients with transfusion requirement, also if administered concomitantly with other drugs.

  17. Prognostic Limitations of Donor T Cell Chimerism after Myeloablative Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Eric; Mason, Kate; Collins, Jenny; Hockridge, Barbara; Boyd, Janis; Gorelik, Alexandra; Szer, Jeffrey; Ritchie, David S

    2017-02-06

    Donor T cell chimerism is associated with relapse outcomes after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, measures of statistical association do not adequately assess the performance of a prognostic biomarker, which is best characterized by its sensitivity and specificity for the chosen outcome. We analyzed donor T cell chimerism results at day 100 (D100chim) after myeloablative alloSCT for AML or MDS in 103 patients and determined its sensitivity and specificity for relapse-free survival at 6 months (RFS6) and 12 months (RFS12) post-alloSCT. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for RFS6 was .68, demonstrating only modest utility as a predictive biomarker, although this was greater than RFS12 at .62. Using a D100chim threshold of 65%, the specificity for RFS6 was 96.6%; however, sensitivity was poor at 26.7%. This equated to a negative predictive value of 88.5% and positive predictive value of 57.1%. Changing the threshold for D100chim to 75% or 85% modestly improved the sensitivity of D100chim for RFS6; however, this was at the expense of specificity. D100chim is specific but lacks sensitivity as a prognostic biomarker of early RFS after myeloablative alloSCT for AML or MDS. Caution is required when using D100chim to guide treatment decisions including immunologic manipulation, which may expose patients to unwarranted graft-versus-host disease.

  18. Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation Outcomes in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients Aged ≥70 Years.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Karamjeet S; Brunstein, Claudio; DeFor, Todd; Bejanyan, Nelli; Arora, Mukta; Warlick, Erica; Weisdorf, Daniel; Ustun, Celalettin

    2016-02-01

    The maximum age of patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) has been moving up over time. However, the availability of a suitable HLA-matched sibling donor may limit access of this patient population to alloHCT. We retrospectively investigated the outcomes of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) after reduced-intensity conditioning regimens in patients aged ≥70 years with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) between 2010 and 2014. During this period 70 patients with AML/MDS were referred to our center for alloHCT consideration. Twenty-two patients (33%) received alloHCT: 10 UCBT, 9 HLA full-matched sibling donor transplantation, 2 haploidentical alloHCT, and 1 unrelated donor alloHCT. In UCBT, cumulative incidences of nonrelapse mortality and relapse were 20% and 30% at 2 years, respectively. The cumulative incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at day +100 and chronic GVHD at 2 years was 10%. Seven patients had viral reactivation/infections. Rates of overall survival and disease-free survival were 60% and 50% at 2 years, respectively. Moreover, these outcomes seemed to be similar to that of patients aged 60 to 69 years receiving UCBT (n = 60) and patients aged ≥70 years receiving HLA full-matched sibling donor transplantation (n = 9). These results suggest that UCBT is feasible in selected AML/MDS patients aged ≥70 years. In fact, UCBT shortens the required time for an unrelated donor search and thus increases the chance of proceeding with alloHCT, which might contribute to higher rates of alloHCT in the referral group. Outcomes of UCBT are promising; however, larger studies with a longer follow-up are needed.

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia after aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Ayami; Strahm, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Furlan, Ingrid; Schwarz, Stephan; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Walther, Joachim-Ulrich; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Nöllke, Peter; Führer, Monika; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2014-03-01

    Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (sMDS/sAML) are the most serious secondary events occurring after immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. Here we evaluate the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 17 children and young adults with sMDS/sAML after childhood aplastic anemia. The median interval between the diagnosis of aplastic anemia and the development of sMDS/sAML was 2.9 years (range, 1.2 to 13.0 years). At a median age of 13.1 years (range, 4.4 to 26.7 years), patients underwent HSCT with bone marrow (n = 6) or peripheral blood stem cell (n = 11) grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors (n = 2), mismatched family donors (n = 2), or unrelated donors (n = 13). Monosomy 7 was detected in 13 patients. The preparative regimen consisted of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan in 11 patients and other agents in 6 patients. All patients achieved neutrophil engraftment. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 47%, and that of chronic GVHD was 70%. Relapse occurred in 1 patient. The major cause of death was transplant-related complication (n = 9). Overall survival and event-free survival at 5 years after HSCT were both 41%. In summary, this study indicates that HSCT is a curative therapy for some patients with sMDS/sAML after aplastic anemia. Future efforts should focus on reducing transplantation-related mortality.

  20. Over-expression of miR-196b-5p is significantly associated with the progression of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Huang, Ying; Li, Hongying; Zhang, Xupai; Cheng, Peng; Deng, Donghong; Peng, Zhigang; Luo, Jun; Zhao, Weihua; Lai, Yongrong; Liu, Zhenfang

    2017-02-21

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal stem cell disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis with a high risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). miRNAs function as tumor suppressors and oncogenes in various cancers and regulate the differentiation potential of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). It has been suggested that miRNAs may play an important role in progression of MDS. We analyzed bone marrow samples collected from MDS patients according to different risk stratification indicated by the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS). We demonstrated that miR-196b-5p was up-regulated in intermediate II and higher groups, and in secondary AML (s-AML) patients in particular (P < 0.01) compared with healthy controls, suggesting that the higher expression levels are associated with increased risk of the development of MDS. We observed changes in proliferation and apoptosis in MDS-L cells following transfection with miR-196-5p mimics or inhibitors. After up-regulating the expression of miR-196b-5p, proliferation of MDS-L cells was up-regulated, whereas apoptosis was down-regulated (P < 0.05). In contrast, down-regulation of miR-196b-5p expression decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis (P < 0.05). We concluded that over-expression of miR-196b-5p may be closely associated with the risk of transformation to leukemia in MDS patients.

  1. Peripheral blood cell-free DNA is an alternative tumor DNA source reflecting disease status in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Tomita, Akihiro; Nakamura, Fumika; Iriyama, Chisako; Shirahata-Adachi, Mizuho; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Akashi, Akimi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Kaneda, Norio; Kiyoi, Hitoshi

    2016-09-01

    Genetic alterations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are critical for pathogenesis. We previously showed that peripheral blood cell-free DNA (PBcfDNA) may be more sensitive for genetic/epigenetic analyses than whole bone marrow (BM) cells and mononuclear cells in peripheral blood (PB). Here we analyzed the detailed features of PBcfDNA and its utility in genetic analyses in MDS. The plasma-PBcfDNA concentration in MDS and related diseases (N = 33) was significantly higher than that in healthy donors (N = 14; P = 0.041) and in International Prognostic Scoring System higher-risk groups than that in lower-risk groups (P = 0.034). The concentration of plasma-/serum-PBcfDNA was significantly correlated with the serum lactate dehydrogenase level (both P < 0.0001) and the blast cell count in PB (P = 0.034 and 0.025, respectively). One nanogram of PBcfDNA was sufficient for one assay of Sanger sequencing using optimized primer sets to amplify approximately 160-bp PCR products. PBcfDNA (approximately 50 ng) can also be utilized for targeted sequencing. Almost all mutations detected in BM-DNA were also detected using corresponding PBcfDNA. Analyses using serially harvested PBcfDNA from an RAEB-2 patient showed that the somatic mutations and a single nucleotide polymorphism that were detected before allogeneic transplantation were undetectable after transplantation, indicating that PBcfDNA likely comes from MDS clones that reflect the disease status. PBcfDNA may be a safer and easier alternative to obtain tumor DNA in MDS.

  2. [Pathogenesis of thrombotic and hemorrhagic complications in myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Vlădăreanu, Ana-Maria; Popov, Viola; Bumbea, H; Ciufu, Cristina; Vasilache, Veronica; Petre, Anca; Onisâi, Minodora

    2011-01-01

    Chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMD) and Myelodisplastic Syndromes (MDS) represents a group of clonal pluripotent stem-cell pathologies. During their natural history, the clinical picture reveals both thrombosis and hemorrhage. The thrombosis could affect the microvessels, and also the large vessels, including even less usual territories (suprahepatic veins, porta vein, pulmonary vein). There are many factors contributing to thrombosis in myeloproliferative chronic disorders--the associated comorbidities, the numeric alterations of blood elements and also the disorders of the platelet's function. Thus, there were described quantitative and qualitative anomalies of platelet's receptors: GP Ib, GP IIb/IIIa, GP IV, GP VI, thrombopoietin receptor of the platelet cMPL, the increase of platelet activation; the increase of P selectin and thrombospondin and the increase on GP IIb/IIIa expression--they were all correlated with thrombosis. An important role has been attributed to JAK2 mutation, which affects the platelet receptor for thrombopoietin cMPL. Regarding the hemorrhage in chronic myeloproliferative syndrome, it is favored by many disorders in platelet's function, such as: the decrease of von Willebrand factor's receptor of the platelet, which leads to acquired Bernard Soulier syndrome; quantitative and qualitative disorders of dense granules of the platelet, decrease of the secretion and platelet aggregation after epinephrine, ADP and collagen stimulation. It was also described the acquired von Willebrand syndrome, most frequently type 2.

  3. [Association between multiple myeloma and acute myeloid leukemia secondary to myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Jennane, Selim; Eddou, Hicham; Mahtat, El Mehdi; Konopacki, Johanna; Souleau, Bertrand; Malfuson, Jean Valère; Foissaud, Vincent; de Revel, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of association of two distinct hematologic malignancies: refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia associated with del(5q) and symptomatic multiple myeloma associated with del(17p) and del(13q). After 16 months, the patient presented an acute leukemic transformation of the myelodysplasic syndrome.

  4. p-ERK1/2 is a predictive factor of response to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in low/int-1 myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Frisan, Emilie; Pawlikowska, Patrycja; Pierre-Eugène, Cecile; Viallon, Vivian; Gibault, Laure; Park, Sophie; Mayeux, Patrick; Dreyfus, François; Porteu, Françoise; Fontenay, Michaëla

    2010-01-01

    Serum erythropoietin level less than 100U/L and a transfusion requirement of less than 2 units per month are the best predictive factors for response to treatment by erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in low/int-1 myelodysplastic syndromes. To investigate the factors influencing the response to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, we enrolled 127 low/int-1 myelodysplastic syndrome patients at diagnosis in a biological study of erythropoiesis. The 54 non-responders had a significantly lower number of burst-forming unit-erythroid and colony-forming unit-erythroid than responders. Erythropoietin-dependent proliferation and survival, and phospho (p)-ERK1/2 expression in steady state and after erythropoietin stimulation were defective in cultured erythroblasts. By flow cytometry, p-ERK1/2 was significantly lower in bone marrow CD45−/CD71+/GPA−cells from non-responders compared to responders or controls. Receiver Operator Characteristic curve analysis showed that this flow cytometry test was a sensitive biomarker for predicting the response to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. PMID:20823131

  5. Cytogenetic follow-up by karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization: implications for monitoring patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and deletion 5q treated with lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Göhring, Gudrun; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Büsche, Guntram; Hofmann, Winfried; Kreipe, Hans Heinrich; Fenaux, Pierre; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Schlegelberger, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    In patients with low and intermediate risk myelodysplastic syndrome and deletion 5q (del(5q)) treated with lenalidomide, monitoring of cytogenetic response is mandatory, since patients without cytogenetic response have a significantly increased risk of progression. Therefore, we have reviewed cytogenetic data of 302 patients. Patients were analyzed by karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. In 85 patients, del(5q) was only detected by karyotyping. In 8 patients undergoing karyotypic evolution, the del(5q) and additional chromosomal aberrations were only detected by karyotyping. In 3 patients, del(5q) was only detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization, but not by karyotyping due to a low number of metaphases. Karyotyping was significantly more sensitive than fluorescence in situ hybridization in detecting the del(5q) clone. In conclusion, to optimize therapy control of myelodysplastic syndrome patients with del(5q) treated with lenalidomide and to identify cytogenetic non-response or progression as early as possible, fluorescence in situ hybridization alone is inadequate for evaluation. Karyotyping must be performed to optimally evaluate response. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01099267 and NCT00179621) PMID:21109690

  6. An increase in hemoglobin, platelets and white blood cells levels by iron chelation as single treatment in multitransfused patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: clinical evidences and possible biological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Voso, Maria Teresa; Aloe Spiriti, Maria Antonietta; Fenu, Susanna; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Tafuri, Agostino; Alimena, Giuliana

    2015-05-01

    Iron chelation therapy can improve hematopoiesis in myelodysplastic syndromes. Only few studies showed hematologic improvement with deferoxamine, and the erythroid responses were correlated with good compliance to long-term treatment. Indeed, single-case reports and data from clinical trials testing the efficacy of deferasirox reported hematologic improvements with varying rates of response in different lineages. Overall, about 760 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients with iron overload receiving deferasirox were included in six different studies, and an increase in hemoglobin level was reported to range from 6 to 44.5%, an increase in platelet count from 13 to 61%, and in neutrophil count from 3 to 76%. In all the published studies, hematologic improvements were not related to serum ferritin or to non-total binding iron changes; indeed, other pathways were indicated as possible pathogenetic mechanisms, such as decreased NF-kB activity, modulation of mTOR signalling, and reduced reactive oxygen species. The aims of this review are to provide all available information relating clinical and hematologic changes after chelation therapy and to discuss potential mechanisms involved in such responses.

  7. Diagnosis and Clinical Genetics of Cushing Syndrome in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-06-01

    Endogenous Cushing syndrome (CS) in pediatrics is rare; it may be caused by tumors that produce corticotropin in the pituitary gland or elsewhere, tumors that produce corticotropin-releasing hormone anywhere, and adrenocortical masses that produce cortisol. Adrenocortical cancer is a rare cause of CS in children but should be excluded first. CS in children is often caused by germline or somatic mutations with implications for patient prognosis and for their families. CS should be recognized early in children; otherwise, it can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Patients with suspected CS should be referred to specialized clinical centers for workup.

  8. Effect of low-dose cytarabine, homoharringtonine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor priming regimen on patients with advanced myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia transformed from myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingyun; Li, Xiao; Su, Jiying; Chang, Chunkang; He, Qi; Zhang, Xi; Xu, Li; Song, Luxi; Pu, Quan

    2009-09-01

    A total of 32 patients (25 with advanced MDS and 7 with t-AML) were enrolled in this study to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of the low-dose cytarabine and homoharringtonine in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) (CHG protocol) in patients with advanced myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or MDS-transformed acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). All the patients were administered the CHG regimen comprising low-dose cytarabine (25 mg/day, intravenous continuous infusion, days 1-14), homoharringtonine (1 mg/day, intravenous continuous infusion, days 1-14), and G-CSF (300 microg/day, subcutaneous injection, days 0-14, interrupted when the peripheral white blood cell count reached >20 x 10(9)/L). The overall response rate was 71.9% after the administration of one course of the CHG regimen. Of the 32 patients, 15 (46.9%) achieved complete remission (CR) and 8 (25%) achieved partial remission (PR). This regimen was followed by a post-remission therapy that included conventional chemotherapy, when CR was achieved. Of the patients with CR who just received post-remission regimens as homoharringtonine and cytarabine (HA) and daunorubicin and cytarabine (DA) 6 relapsed rapidly and just had a mean 6.1 months of CR. Otherwise, the other 8 out of 14 patients with CR alternatively received subsequent chemotherapy, which combined mitoxantrone, idarubicin, pirarubicin, or aclarubicin with cytarabine. The mean CR duration of the 8 patients had reached 10.6 months, and 5 of the 8 still kept a continuous CR. The median overall survival (OS) was 18.2 months. There were no statistically significant differences for CR, PR, and OS when the patients were grouped by age, blasts in bone marrow, and karyotypes, respectively. No treatment-related deaths were observed. Myelosuppression was mild to moderate, and no severe non-hematological toxicity was observed. Thus, a CHG priming regimen as an induction therapy was well tolerated and effective in patients with advanced MDS

  9. A nationwide survey of pediatric acquired demyelinating syndromes in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kira, R.; Ishizaki, Y.; Sakai, Y.; Sanefuji, M.; Ichiyama, T.; Oka, A.; Kishi, T.; Kimura, S.; Kubota, M.; Takanashi, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Tamai, H.; Natsume, J.; Hamano, S.; Hirabayashi, S.; Maegaki, Y.; Mizuguchi, M.; Minagawa, K.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kira, J.; Kusunoki, S.; Hara, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and epidemiologic features of pediatric acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) of the CNS in Japan. Methods: We conducted a nationwide survey and collected clinical data on children with ADS aged 15 years or younger, who visited hospitals between 2005 and 2007. Results: Among 977 hospitals enrolled, 723 (74.0%) responded to our inquiries and reported a total of 439 patients as follows: 244 with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), 117 with multiple sclerosis (MS), 14 with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and 64 with other ADS. We collected and analyzed detailed data from 204 cases, including those with ADEM (66), MS (58), and NMO (10). We observed the following: (1) the estimated annual incidence rate of pediatric ADEM in Japan was 0.40 per 100,000 children (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34–0.46), with the lowest prevalence in the north; (2) the estimated prevalence rate of MS was 0.69 per 100,000 children (95% CI, 0.58–0.80), with the lowest prevalence in the south; (3) NMO in Japan was rare, with an estimated prevalence of 0.06 per 100,000 children (95% CI, 0.04–0.08); and (4) the sex ratio and mean age at onset varied by ADS type, and (5) male/female ratios correlated with ages at onset in each ADS group. Conclusions: Our results clarify the characteristic clinical features of pediatric ADS in the Japanese population. PMID:27742816

  10. [Prolonged erythrocytic T activation, depression of blood group A and increase of fetal hemoglobin in a myelodysplastic syndrome evolving into erythroleukemia].

    PubMed

    Gioseffi, O N; Del Río, F; Pardini, P; Kitagawa, M

    1991-04-01

    T cryptantigen can be exposed on the red cell membrane as a result of removal of terminal glycosides, either by bacterial enzymes or by incomplete synthesis of the cell membrane due to somatic mutation, usually caused by a neoplasm. T-activated erythrocytes have been observed in different pathologies, but they have not been seen associated with other abnormalities of red blood cell proteins described in myelodysplastic syndromes or acute leukaemias. A patient with initial diagnosis of refractory anaemia that evolved into erythroleukaemia showed prolonged T-activation, a depressed A blood-group antigen and an increase of foetal haemoglobin, simultaneously. The evolutive pattern of T-activation suggests more an abnormal erythropoiesis than an enzymatic effect and a certain relationship with the haemolytic syndrome.

  11. The challenge of individualised risk assessment and therapy planning in elderly high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients.

    PubMed

    Stauder, Reinhard

    2012-09-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent one of the most frequent and serious haematologic diseases of the elderly. Effective therapies exist ranging from best supportive care to haematologic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Decision making, however, is rather complex in this group of patients because ageing is a multidimensional process involving not only physiological changes but also changes in functional, social, emotional and cognitive capacities. All these factors can have a significant impact on the efficacy and tolerability of a potential therapy and therefore have to be thoroughly assessed before deciding on individual treatment regimens. Risk assessment tools are available both to classify the stage and prognosis of MDS and to meet the needs of elderly patients. A tool explicitly focussing on elderly MDS patients, however, is still missing. The current report approached this issue by combining the well established MDS-risk score 'International Prognostic Scoring System' (IPSS) with the 'Multidimensional Geriatric Assessment' (MGA). As decision making is most complex in high-risk MDS patients, the new algorithm is presented exemplarily for this group of patients. In a first step, MDS-related risk is identified using IPSS, in a second step, patients are assigned to one of three risk categories of the MGA (go-go/fit, slow-go/vulnerable, no-go/frail). While go-go patients might be subjected to therapies comparable to those given to younger patients, in no-go patients, a palliative therapy combined with best supportive care will probably be most appropriate. In slow-go patients, age-related life expectancy taken from public age statistics should be compared to the MDS-related life expectancy. Based on this combined assessment procedure and also on treatment tolerance in terms of the expectations/wishes of the patient and his/her family, an individualised therapeutic approach should be developed. Specific treatment recommendations for these three groups of

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  13. General Information about Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  14. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  15. Obesity over the Life Course and Risk of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Poynter, Jenny N.; Richardson, Michaela; Blair, Cindy K.; Roesler, Michelle A.; Hirsch, Betsy A.; Nguyen, Phuong; Cioc, Adina; Warlick, Erica; Cerhan, James R.; Ross, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity are known risk factors for a number of cancers, with recent evidence suggesting that risk of hematologic cancer is also increased in obese individuals. We evaluated associations between body mass index (BMI) at differing time points during the life course in population-based case control studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplatic syndromes (MDS). Methods Cases were identified by the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System. Controls were identified through the Minnesota State driver’s license/identification card list. BMI was calculated using self-reported height and weight at ages 18, 35, and 50 years and two years prior to interview, and categorized as normal (18.5–25 kg/m2), overweight (25–29.9 kg/m2), obese class I (30–34.9 kg/m2), and obese class II/III (35+ kg/m2). All analyses were stratified by sex. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results We included 420 AML cases, 265 MDS cases and 1388 controls. Obesity two years prior to diagnosis was associated with AML in both males and females (OR=2.22, 95% CI 1.28, 3.85 and OR=1.85, 95% CI 1.08, 3.15 for BMI ≥ 35 vs. BMI 18.5–24.9, respectively). In contrast, associations between obesity and MDS were observed only in females. Weight change in adulthood was not consistently associated with either outcome. Conclusion Our results extend the emerging literature suggesting that obesity is a risk factor for hematologic malignancy and provide evidence that that the association remains regardless of timing of obesity. Obesity in adulthood is a modifiable risk factor for both MDS and AML. PMID:26720913

  16. Efficacy of azacitidine compared with that of conventional care regimens in the treatment of higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes: a randomised, open-label, phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Fenaux, Pierre; Mufti, Ghulam J; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Santini, Valeria; Finelli, Carlo; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Schoch, Robert; Gattermann, Norbert; Sanz, Guillermo; List, Alan; Gore, Steven D; Seymour, John F; Bennett, John M; Byrd, John; Backstrom, Jay; Zimmerman, Linda; McKenzie, David; Beach, C L; Silverman, Lewis R

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Drug treatments for patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes provide no survival advantage. In this trial, we aimed to assess the effect of azacitidine on overall survival compared with the three commonest conventional care regimens. Methods In a phase III, international, multicentre, controlled, parallel-group, open-label trial, patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes were randomly assigned one-to-one to receive azacitidine (75 mg/m² per day for 7 days every 28 days) or conventional care (best supportive care, low-dose cytarabine, or intensive chemotherapy as selected by investigators before randomisation). Patients were stratified by French–American–British and international prognostic scoring system classifications; randomisation was done with a block size of four. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Efficacy analyses were by intention to treat for all patients assigned to receive treatment. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00071799. Findings Between Feb 13, 2004, and Aug 7, 2006, 358 patients were randomly assigned to receive azacitidine (n=179) or conventional care regimens (n=179). Four patients in the azacitidine and 14 in the conventional care groups received no study drugs but were included in the intention-to-treat efficacy analysis. After a median follow-up of 21·1 months (IQR 15·1–26·9), median overall survival was 24·5 months (9·9–not reached) for the azacitidine group versus 15·0 months (5·6–24·1) for the conventional care group (hazard ratio 0·58; 95% CI 0·43–0·77; stratified log-rank p=0·0001). At last follow-up, 82 patients in the azacitidine group had died compared with 113 in the conventional care group. At 2 years, on the basis of Kaplan-Meier estimates, 50·8% (95% CI 42·1–58·8) of patients in the azacitidine group were alive compared with 26·2% (18·7–34·3) in the conventional care group (p<0·0001). Peripheral cytopenias were the most

  17. Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome Is More Frequently Associated With Myelodysplastic Syndromes Than the Classical Neutrophilic Variant: A Comparative Series of 62 Patients.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Lisa; Ortonne, Nicolas; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Barhoumi, Walid; Begon, Edouard; Haioun, Corinne; Pautas, Cécile; Beckerich, Florence; Robin, Christine; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Cordonnier, Catherine; Chosidow, Olivier; Toma, Andréa

    2016-04-01

    Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome (H-SS) is a histological variant of Sweet syndrome (SS) differing from classical neutrophilic SS (N-SS) by a dermal infiltrate mainly composed of lymphocytes and histiocytoid myeloperoxidase-positive cells. We aimed to report a large series of H-SS and compare the frequency and type of hematological malignancies associated to H-SS and N-SS. We included 62 patients with a coding histopathologic diagnosis of SS prospectively registered between 2005 and 2014 in the database of our Department of Pathology. Overall, 22 (35.5%) and 40 (64.5%) patients had a histological diagnosis of H-SS and N-SS, respectively. Median age, sex ratio, and cutaneous lesions were similar in the 2 groups. The frequency of extra-cutaneous manifestations was similar (50% vs 37.5%, P = 0.42). Recurrent forms were significantly more frequent in H-SS than in N-SS patients (21% vs 2.5%, P = 0.01). A hematological malignancy was diagnosed in 22 patients, 12 (55.5%) with H-SS and 10 (25%) with N-SS (P = 0.019). Hematological malignancy was of myeloid origin in 8/22 (36.3%) H-SS and 5/40 (12.5%) N-SS patients (P = 0.02), and of lymphoid origin without myeloid component in 4/22 (18.1%) H-SS and 4/40 (10%) N-SS patients (P = 0.35), respectively. One N-SS patient had a hematological malignancy of mixed (myeloid and lymphoid) phenotype. A myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) was diagnosed in 7/22 (31.8%) H-SS and 1/40 (2.5%) N-SS patients (P < 0.001). Hematological disease was diagnosed before (in 8 H-SS and 3 N-SS patients) or at the time of the occurrence of the cutaneous lesions (in 1 H-SS and 7 N-SS patients). However, in 3 H-SS patients, all with MDS, cutaneous lesions preceded the hematological disease by ≤6 months. In conclusion, H-SS was associated with MDS in one third of patients but also with lymphoid malignancies, and cutaneous lesions could precede the hematological diagnosis in patients with MDS. A complete hematological assessment is

  18. A Clinical Pharmacist's Role in Screening for Metabolic Syndrome in a Rural Pediatric Ambulatory Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benavides, Sandra; Kohler, Lisa A.; Souffrant, Garry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the pediatric population is increasing. Barriers, including the lack of consensus of a definition for metabolic syndrome and time constraints for the pediatrician, may limit the identification and diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the role…

  19. Death in pediatric Cushing syndrome is uncommon but still occurs

    PubMed Central

    Gkourogianni, Alexandra; Lodish, Maya B.; Zilbermint, Mihail; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Keil, Margaret F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2014-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) in children is rare. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of CS may be associated with increased morbidity and, unfortunately, mortality. We performed a retrospective review of all patients with CS under the age of 18 referred to the NIH from 1998 to 2013 in order to describe deceased patients among cases of pediatric CS referred to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The deaths of 4 children (3 females and 1 male), aged 7.5–15.5 years (mean age 11.2 years) with length of disease 2–4 years were recorded among 160 (2.5%) children seen at, or referred to the NIH over the last 15 years. All died at different institutions, prior to coming to the NIH (two of them) or after leaving NIH (two of them). Presenting symptoms included increasing weight and decreasing height gain, facial plethora, dorsocervical fat pad (webbed neck), striae, headache, vision disturbances and depression and other mood or behavior changes; there were no differences between how these patients presented and the others in our cohort. The causes of CS in the deceased patients were also not different, in fact, they spanned the entire spectrum of CS: pituitary disease (on of them), ectopic corticotropin production (one of them), and primary adrenal hyperplasia (1). In one patient, the cause of CS could not be verified. Three died of sepsis and one due to residual disease and complications of the primary tumor. Conclusions Despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment of pediatric CS, a 2.5% mortality rate was identified in a large cohort of patients with this condition referred to an experienced, tertiary care referral center (although these deaths occurred elsewhere). Pediatricians need to recognize the possibility of death, primarily due to sepsis, in a patient with pediatric CS and act accordingly. PMID:25241829

  20. A study of high-dose lenalidomide induction and low-dose lenalidomide maintenance therapy for patients with hypomethylating agent refractory myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Mathew A; Tibes, Raoul; Gao, Feng; Fletcher, Theresa; Fiala, Mark; Uy, Geoffrey L; Westervelt, Peter; Jacoby, Meagan A; Cashen, Amanda F; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith; DiPersio, John F; Vij, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by bone marrow failure which frequently progress to acute myeloid leukemia. Patients who fail to respond to, or progress on first-line DNA hypomethylating agents (HMA) have a poor prognosis. Conventionally dosed lenalidomide has activity in 5q-MDS. In other subtypes, it may reduce RBC transfusion requirements but does not result in cytogenetic responses. We previously reported that high-dose lenalidomide induction (50 mg/day) results in complete remissions in a high fraction of patients. We, therefore, conducted a Phase 2 trial of the same regimen in MDS refractory to HMA. Marrow complete remissions were seen in 33% of patients and hematological improvement in 8% of patients. Significant infections complicated more than 50% of cases. Future trials to explore alternative dosing schedules of high-dose lenalidomide to increase efficacy while decreasing toxicity are warranted.

  1. Clinical significance of high-Km 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II) mRNA expression in high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keijiro; Sugawara, Takeshi; Oyake, Tatsuo; Uchiyama, Toshiyuki; Aoki, Yusei; Tsukushi, Yasuhiko; Onodera, Shima; Ito, Shigeki; Murai, Kazunori; Ishida, Yoji

    2007-10-01

    We analyzed cytosolic high-Km 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II) and deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) mRNA expression in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) of patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR). At diagnosis, the cN-II mRNA expression of patients was higher than that of healthy volunteers, but the dCK mRNA expression showed no significant difference. Patients with ara-C-containing chemotherapies whose BMMNC showed a high level of cN-II expression (greater than the median value) had shorter median overall survival (15 months versus 22 months, p<0.01) and shorter median post-chemotherapy survival (10 months versus 16 months, p=0.012). These data suggest that the expression level of cN-II mRNA might be a prognostic factor of high-risk MDS.

  2. NS-018, a selective JAK2 inhibitor, preferentially inhibits CFU-GM colony formation by bone marrow mononuclear cells from high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Junya; Kodama, Ayumi; Chinen, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Yuji; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Nagoshi, Hisao; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Nakaya, Yohei; Tamura, Ayako; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Naito, Haruna; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    JAK2/STAT signaling promotes survival and expansion of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) clones, but little is known about the potential of JAK2/STAT as a therapeutic target in MDS. We investigated the effect of NS-018, a novel antagonist for JAK2, on the colony-forming ability of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) from high-risk MDS patients. NS-018 decreased colony-forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) colony numbers from MDS-derived BMMNCs in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was significantly more potent than against normal BMMNCs. In addition, NS-018 suppressed the phosphorylation of STAT3 in colony-forming cells from MDS patients. Collectively, NS-018 could be a new therapeutic option for high-risk MDS.

  3. Risk of acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS): a population-based study of 17 315 patients.

    PubMed

    Roeker, L E; Larson, D R; Kyle, R A; Kumar, S; Dispenzieri, A; Rajkumar, S V

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increased risk of acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in persons with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). We used a large population-based cohort of individuals systematically screened for the presence or absence of MGUS. MGUS status was then linked to the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and MDS. A total of 17 315 patients age 50 and older (605 MGUS and 16 710 controls) with a cumulative 435 021 person-years of follow-up were studied. MGUS patients had a significantly higher risk of developing MDS compared with controls, hazard ratio 2.4 (95% CI 1.08, 5.32), P=0.031. There was no statistically significant increase in the risk of AML (RR 1.36 P=0.675), and no increased risk of developing ALL.

  4. Patterns of infection in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia receiving azacitidine as salvage therapy. Implications for primary antifungal prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Falantes, Jose F; Calderón, Cristina; Márquez-Malaver, Francisco J; Aguilar-Guisado, Manuela; Martín-Peña, Almudena; Martino, María L; Montero, Isabel; González, Jose; Parody, Rocío; Pérez-Simón, Jose A; Espigado, Ildefonso

    2014-02-01

    Incidence, etiology, and outcome of infectious episodes in patients with myeloid neoplasms receiving azacitidine are uncertain, with no prospective data available in this group of patients. The aim of the current study was to analyze the incidence and factors related to the probability of infection in a cohort of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated with azacitidine who did not receive any type of antimicrobial prophylaxis. Significantly, the group of patients who received prior intensive chemotherapy had more infectious episodes (P = 10(-4)), and particularly, invasive aspergillosis (P = .015), than patients who received frontline azacitidine. Primary antifungal prophylaxis might be recommended in MDS and AML patients receiving azacitidine as salvage therapy after intensive regimens.

  5. A phase II study of AZD2171 (cediranib) in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Ryan; Jumonville, Alcee; Flynn, Patrick James; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Erlichman, Charles; LaPlant, Betsy; Juckett, Mark B

    2015-07-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) not fit for intensive treatment need novel therapy options. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor inhibition is one potential mechanism by which AML and MDS could be treated. The receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor AZD2171 (cediranib) has activity against VEGF receptors KDR and FLT-1. This multicenter phase II study was designed to test cediranib's activity in patients with AML or high-risk MDS. The primary endpoint was confirmed disease response defined as a composite of complete remission, partial remission or hematologic improvement. The study enrolled 23 subjects in the AML cohort and 16 subjects in the MDS cohort. There were no confirmed responses in either group. Since the study met the stopping rule after the first stage of enrollment, the trial was closed to further accrual. Common adverse events in both cohorts included thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, anemia, fatigue, dyspnea, diarrhea, nausea and dehydration.

  6. Treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in children with cancer: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Tragiannidis, Athanasios; Gombakis, Nikolaos; Papageorgiou, Maria; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Papageorgiou, Theodotis; Hatzistilianou, Maria

    2016-12-01

    Treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating early or late complication of treatment for childhood cancer related with a significant morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively studied survivors of childhood cancer. Overall, 287 patients were recorded in the databases and we identified three (1.04%) with t-MDS. The primary cancer diagnoses were Langerhans cell histiocytosis (one patient) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; two patients). The mean age of patients was 12.1 years. All patients had received systemic antifungal treatment for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis successfully treated with voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B before diagnosis of t-MDS. Two patients (66%) remain alive after a median follow-up period of 3.5 years.

  7. Cladribine, cytarabine, filgrastim, and mitoxantrone (CLAG-M) compared to standard induction in acute myeloid leukemia from myelodysplastic syndrome after azanucleoside failure.

    PubMed

    Jaglal, Michael V; Duong, Vu H; Bello, Celeste M; Al Ali, Najla H; Padron, Eric; Fernandez, Hugo F; List, Alan F; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Komrokji, Rami S

    2014-04-01

    For patients with acute myeloid leukemia from antecedent myelodysplastic syndrome particularly after azanucleoside treatment failure, outcome is poor. Here, we conducted a case-control study in these patients to compare the efficacy of CLAG-M induction (28 patients) versus standard 3+7 induction chemotherapy (24 patients). Response rates (P=0.014) and median overall survival (P=0.025) were 64% and 202 days (95% CI 37-367 days) versus 29% and 86 days (95% CI 36-136) in the CLAG-M and 3+7 cohorts, respectively. Median overall survival was 202 (95% CI 37-367 days) versus 86 days (95% CI 36-136) (P=0.025), respectively. CLAG-M has encouraging activity in this patient group.

  8. A Pediatric Case of Cowden Syndrome with Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Vera; Martins, Sofia; Antunes, Ana; Marques, Olinda; Carvalho, José Luís; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Meireles, Carla; Ferreira, Ana Margarida

    2017-01-01

    Cowden syndrome (CS) is a rare dominantly inherited multisystem disorder, characterized by an extraordinary malignant potential. In 80% of cases, the human tumor suppressor gene phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is mutated. We present a case of a 17-year-old boy with genetically confirmed CS and Graves' disease (GD). At the age of 15, he presented with intention tremor, palpitations, and marked anxiety. On examination, he had macrocephaly, coarse facies, slight prognathism, facial trichilemmomas, abdominal keratoses, leg hemangioma, and a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland. He started antithyroid drug (ATD) therapy with methimazole and, after a 2-year treatment period without achieving a remission status, a total thyroidectomy was performed. Diagnosis and management of CS should be multidisciplinary. Thyroid disease is frequent, but its management has yet to be fully defined. The authors present a case report of a pediatric patient with CS and GD and discuss treatment options. PMID:28251007

  9. Pediatric Ramsay Hunt Syndrome: Analysis of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğdu, İmran; Ataç, Enes; Saltürk, Ziya; Atar, Yavuz; Özdemir, Erdi; Uyar, Yavuz; Arslanoğlu, Ahmet; Berkiten, Güler

    2015-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS) is a disorder characterized by herpetic eruptions on the auricle, facial paralysis, and vestibulocochlear dysfunction and is attributed to varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection in the geniculate ganglion. Although it is a common cause of acute peripheral facial paralysis, children are not usually affected. The diagnosis is based on history and physical findings. Treatment of RHS uses a combination of high-dose corticosteroids and acyclovir. This paper presents three cases diagnosed as RHS in the pediatric age group in association with the literature review. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the importance of careful examination and early initiation of therapy in suspected cases of RHS. PMID:26435868

  10. Churg-strauss syndrome in the pediatric age group.

    PubMed

    El-Gamal, Yehia

    2008-02-01

    The rate of reporting of childhood Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) has increased lately because of either increased awareness to the disease or a real increase in incidence. It is defined as one of the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides, but the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positivity is less reported in pediatric cases. The cause of CSS remains unknown. Several lines of evidence suggest genetic predisposition, which may entail inherited tendency to dysregulation of the cellular immune system. With the addition of leukotriene receptor antagonists to the treatment regimen of asthma, an association to CSS was presumed. However, the nature of this relationship remains to be elucidated. In addition, some environmental factors seem to provoke transient effects that resemble the disease. Patients' symptoms are defined by various degrees of eosinophilic inflammation and necrotizing vasculitis, which may affect any organ. Three clinical stages have been described in the clinical evolution of CSS: prodromal phase involving allergic rhinitis and asthma (usually without family history of atopy), a second phase that involves peripheral eosinophilia and eosinophilic tissue infiltration, and the hallmark of the final phase is systemic vasculitis. Pulmonary disease is a central feature of pediatric CSS, but other manifestations include skin lesions, testicular pain, hypertension, seizures, and nephropathy. More subtle presentations in children include cervical lymphadenopathy, acute abdominal pain, deep venous thrombosis, oral ulceration, multiple colonic ulcers, chorea, bilateral optic neuropathy, and retinal artery occlusions. Churg-Strauss syndrome patients usually respond well to corticosteroid therapy. Several trials reported additional benefit from cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and methotrexate, whereas the therapeutic effects of etanercept, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy are controversial. The relapse rate is

  11. A randomized phase II trial of azacitidine +/− epoetin-β in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes resistant to erythropoietic stimulating agents

    PubMed Central

    Thépot, Sylvain; Ben Abdelali, Raouf; Chevret, Sylvie; Renneville, Aline; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Prébet, Thomas; Park, Sophie; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Guerci-Bresler, Agnes; Cheze, Stéphane; Tertian, Gérard; Choufi, Bachra; Legros, Laurence; Bastié, Jean Noel; Delaunay, Jacques; Chaury, Marie Pierre; Sanhes, Laurence; Wattel, Eric; Dreyfus, Francois; Vey, Norbert; Chermat, Fatiha; Preudhomme, Claude; Fenaux, Pierre; Gardin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of azacitidine in patients with anemia and with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, if relapsing after or resistant to erythropoietic stimulating agents, and the benefit of combining these agents to azacitidine in this setting are not well known. We prospectively compared the outcomes of patients, all of them having the characteristics of this subset of lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome, if randomly treated with azacitidine alone or azacitidine combined with epoetin-β. High-resolution cytogenetics and gene mutation analysis were performed at entry. The primary study endpoint was the achievement of red blood cell transfusion independence after six cycles. Ninety-eight patients were randomised (49 in each arm). Median age was 72 years. In an intention to treat analysis, transfusion independence was obtained after 6 cycles in 16.3% versus 14.3% of patients in the azacitidine and azacitidine plus epoetin-β arms, respectively (P=1.00). Overall erythroid response rate (minor and major responses according to IWG 2000 criteria) was 34.7% vs. 24.5% in the azacitidine and azacitidine plus epoetin-β arms, respectively (P=0.38). Mutations of the SF3B1 gene were the only ones associated with a significant erythroid response, 29/59 (49%) versus 6/27 (22%) in SF3B1 mutated and unmutated patients, respectively, P=0.02. Detection of at least one “epigenetic mutation” and of an abnormal single nucleotide polymorphism array profile were the only factors associated with significantly poorer overall survival by multivariate analysis. The transfusion independence rate observed with azacitidine in this lower-risk population, but resistant to erythropoietic stimulating agents, was lower than expected, with no observed benefit of added epoetin, (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01015352). PMID:27229713

  12. Vitamin D status in pediatric irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maranda, Louise; Candela, Ninfa

    2017-01-01

    Importance Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with significant morbidity in children and adolescents, and the therapeutic efficacy of available treatment options is limited. The role of vitamin D supplementation in pediatric IBS is unclear as the vitamin D status of pediatric patients with IBS is unknown. Equally, the relationship of vitamin D status with psychosomatic symptoms in children and adolescents is unclear. Aim To characterize the vitamin D status of pediatric patients with IBS using a case-control study design. Hypothesis Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration will be similar between patients with IBS and controls. Subjects and methods A retrospective case-controlled study of 116 controls (age 14.6 ± 4.3 y), female (n = 67; 58%) and 55 subjects with IBS (age 16.5 ± 3.1y), female (n = 44; 80%). Overweight was defined as BMI of ≥85th but <95th percentile, and obesity as BMI ≥95th percentile. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OH)D of <50 nmol/L, while seasons of vitamin D draw were categorized as summer, winter, spring, and fall. Major psychosomatic manifestations included in the analysis were depression, anxiety, and migraine. Results More than 50% of IBS subjects had vitamin D deficiency at a cut-off point of <50 nmol/L (53% vs. 27%, p = 0.001); and >90% of IBS subjects had vitamin D deficiency at a cut-off point of <75 nmol/L (93% vs. 75%, p = 0.006). IBS subjects had significantly lower mean 25(OH)D: 53.2 ± 15.8 nmol/L vs. 65.2 ± 28.0 nmol/L, p = 0.003; and albumin: 6.2 ± 0.6 vs. 6.5 ± 0.6 μmol/L, p = 0.0.01. IBS subjects with migraine had significantly lower mean 25(OH)D concentration compared to controls (p = 0.01). BMI z-score was similar between the controls and IBS subjects (0.5 ± 1.4 vs. 1.2 ± 2.9, p = 0.11). Conclusions Pediatric patients with IBS had significantly lower 25(OH)D concentration compared to controls despite having similar mean BMI values as controls. Only 7% of the children and adolescents with

  13. Types of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bone marrow have at least one certain chromosome abnormality that is only seen in MDS or leukemia. The number of blasts in the bone marrow is less than 5%. Because this type ... this type of MDS, the chromosomes of the bone marrow cells are normal except ...

  14. What Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... not accurate and are no longer used. See Acute Myeloid (Myelogenous) Leukemia for more information about the leukemia that develops in some MDS ... Medical Review: February 10, 2014 Last Revised: ...

  15. Perioperative posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in 2 pediatric neurosurgery patients with brainstem ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Gephart, Melanie G Hayden; Taft, Bonnie P; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Guzman, Raphael; Edwards, Michael S B

    2011-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) has been described in pediatric neurooncology patients, although it has not been documented perioperatively in pediatric neurosurgery patients not actively receiving chemotherapy. Recently at the authors' facility, 2 cases of PRES were diagnosed perioperatively in children with brainstem ependymoma. Both patients had presented with hypertension, altered mental status, and seizures and demonstrated MR imaging features consistent with PRES. The patients were treated with antiseizure and antihypertension medications, leading to improvement in both clinical symptoms and neuroimaging findings. These cases are the first to document PRES in perioperative pediatric neurosurgery patients not actively receiving chemotherapy. Both patients had ependymoma involving the brainstem, which may have led to intra- and perioperative hemodynamic instability (including hypertension) and predisposed them to this syndrome. An awareness of PRES in similar scenarios will aid in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric neurosurgery patients with this syndrome.

  16. G-CSF priming, clofarabine, and high dose cytarabine (GCLAC) for upfront treatment of acute myeloid leukemia, advanced myelodysplastic syndrome or advanced myeloproliferative neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Becker, Pamela S; Medeiros, Bruno C; Stein, Anthony S; Othus, Megan; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Forman, Stephen J; Scott, Bart L; Hendrie, Paul C; Gardner, Kelda M; Pagel, John M; Walter, Roland B; Parks, Cynthia; Wood, Brent L; Abkowitz, Janis L; Estey, Elihu H

    2015-04-01

    Prior study of the combination of clofarabine and high dose cytarabine with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming (GCLAC) in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia resulted in a 46% rate of complete remission despite unfavorable risk cytogenetics. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that the remission rate and survival with GCLAC were superior to FLAG (fludarabine, cytarabine, G-CSF) in the relapsed setting. We therefore initiated a study of the GCLAC regimen in the upfront setting in a multicenter trial. The objectives were to evaluate the rates of complete remission (CR), overall and relapse-free survival (OS and RFS), and toxicity of GCLAC. Clofarabine was administered at 30 mg m(-2) day(-1) × 5 and cytarabine at 2 g m(-2) day(-1) × 5 after G-CSF priming in 50 newly-diagnosed patients ages 18-64 with AML or advanced myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or advanced myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Responses were assessed in the different cytogenetic risk groups and in patients with antecedent hematologic disorder. The overall CR rate was 76% (95% confidence interval [CI] 64-88%) and the CR + CRp (CR with incomplete platelet count recovery) was 82% (95% CI 71-93%). The CR rate was 100% for patients with favorable, 84% for those with intermediate, and 62% for those with unfavorable risk cytogenetics. For patients with an antecedent hematologic disorder (AHD), the CR rate was 65%, compared to 85% for those without an AHD. The 60 day mortality was 2%. Thus, front line GCLAC is a well-tolerated, effective induction regimen for AML and advanced myelodysplastic or myeloproliferative disorders.

  17. G-CSF Priming, Clofarabine, and High Dose Cytarabine (GCLAC) for Upfront Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Advanced Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Pamela S.; Medeiros, Bruno C.; Stein, Anthony S.; Othus, Megan; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Forman, Stephen J.; Scott, Bart L.; Hendrie, Paul C.; Gardner, Kelda M.; Pagel, John M.; Walter, Roland B.; Parks, Cynthia; Wood, Brent L.; Abkowitz, Janis L.; Estey, Elihu H.

    2016-01-01

    Prior study of the combination of clofarabine and high dose cytarabine with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming (GCLAC) in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia resulted in a 46% rate of complete remission despite unfavorable risk cytogenetics. A multivariate analysis demonstrated that the remission rate and survival with GCLAC were superior to FLAG (fludarabine, cytarabine, G-CSF) in the relapsed setting. We therefore initiated a study of the GCLAC regimen in the upfront setting in a multicenter trial. The objectives were to evaluate the rates of complete remission (CR), overall and relapse-free survival (OS and RFS), and toxicity of GCLAC. Clofarabine was administered at 30 mg/m2/day × 5 and cytarabine at 2 gm/m2/day × 5 after G-CSF priming in 50 newly-diagnosed patients ages 18–64 with AML or advanced myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or advanced myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Responses were assessed in the different cytogenetic risk groups and in patients with antecedent hematologic disorder. The overall CR rate was 76% (95% confidence interval [CI] 64–88%) and the CR + CRp (CR with incomplete platelet count recovery) was 82% (95% CI 71–93%). The CR rate was 100% for patients with favorable, 84% for those with intermediate, and 62% for those with unfavorable risk cytogenetics. For patients with an antecedent hematologic disorder (AHD), the CR rate was 65%, compared to 85% for those without an AHD. The 60 day mortality was 2%. Thus, front line GCLAC is a well-tolerated, effective induction regimen for AML and advanced myelodysplastic or myeloproliferative disorders. PMID:25545153

  18. Maintenance treatment with azacytidine for patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myeloid leukaemia following MDS in complete remission after induction chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Grövdal, Michael; Karimi, Mohsen; Khan, Rasheed; Aggerholm, Anni; Antunovic, Petar; Astermark, Jan; Bernell, Per; Engström, Lena-Maria; Kjeldsen, Lars; Linder, Olle; Nilsson, Lars; Olsson, Anna; Holm, Mette S; Tangen, Jon M; Wallvik, Jonas; Oberg, Gunnar; Hokland, Peter; Jacobsen, Sten E; Porwit, Anna; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2010-08-01

    This prospective Phase II study is the first to assess the feasibility and efficacy of maintenance 5-azacytidine for older patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia and MDS-acute myeloid leukaemia syndromes in complete remission (CR) after induction chemotherapy. Sixty patients were enrolled and treated by standard induction chemotherapy. Patients that reached CR started maintenance therapy with subcutaneous azacytidine, 5/28 d until relapse. Promoter-methylation status of CDKN2B (P15 ink4b), CDH1 and HIC1 was examined pre-induction, in CR and 6, 12 and 24 months post CR. Twenty-four (40%) patients achieved CR after induction chemotherapy and 23 started maintenance treatment with azacytidine. Median CR duration was 13.5 months, >24 months in 17% of the patients, and 18-30.5 months in the four patients with trisomy 8. CR duration was not associated with CDKN2B methylation status or karyotype. Median overall survival was 20 months. Hypermethylation of CDH1 was significantly associated with low CR rate, early relapse, and short overall survival (P = 0.003). 5-azacytidine treatment, at a dose of 60 mg/m(2) was well tolerated. Grade III-IV thrombocytopenia and neutropenia occurred after 9.5 and 30% of the cycles, respectively, while haemoglobin levels increased during treatment. 5-azacytidine treatment is safe, feasible and may be of benefit in a subset of patients.

  19. Long-term Survival and Late Effects among 1-year Survivors of Second Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Relapsed Acute Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christine N.; Majhail, Navneet S.; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Hsu, Jack W.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kasow, Kimberly A.; Khera, Nandita; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Loren, Alison W.; Marks, David I.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Mehta, Paulette; Myers, Kasiani C.; Norkin, Maxim; Pidala, Joseph A.; Porter, David L.; Reddy, Vijay; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Schouten, Harry C.; Steinberg, Amir; Wall, Donna A.; Warwick, Anne B.; Wood, William A.; Yu, Lolie C.; Jacobsohn, David A.; Sorror, Mohamed L.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the outcomes of patients who survived disease-free for 1-year or more following second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for relapsed acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes between 1980 and 2009. A total of 1285 patients received a second allogeneic transplant following disease relapse; among these 325 survived relapse-free at 1-year after the second HCT. The median time from first to second HCT was 17 and 24 months for children and adults, respectively. A myeloablative preparative regimen was used in the second transplant in 62% of children and 45% of adult patients. The overall 10-year conditional survival rates after second transplantation in this cohort of patients who had survived disease-free for at least one year were 55% in children and 39% in adults. Relapse was the leading cause of mortality (77% and 54% of deaths in children and adults, respectively). In multivariate analyses, only disease status prior to second HCT was significantly associated with higher risk for overall mortality (HR 1.71 for patients with disease not in complete remission prior to second HCT, P<0.01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in 43% and 75% of children and adults following second transplant. Chronic GVHD was the leading cause of non-relapse mortality followed by organ failure and infection. The cumulative incidence of developing at least one of the studied late effects at 10-years after second HCT was 63% in children and 55% in adults. The most frequent late effects in children were growth disturbance (10-year cumulative incidence 22%) and cataracts (20%), and in adults were cataracts (20%) and avascular necrosis (13%). Among patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes who receive a second allogeneic HCT for relapse and survive disease-free for at least 1-year, many can be expected to survive long term. However, they continue to be at risk for relapse and non-relapse morbidity and mortality. Novel approaches

  20. Long-term survival and late effects among one-year survivors of second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Christine N; Majhail, Navneet S; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Frangoul, Haydar A; Hayashi, Robert J; Hsu, Jack W; Kamble, Rammurti T; Kasow, Kimberly A; Khera, Nandita; Lazarus, Hillard M; Loren, Alison W; Marks, David I; Maziarz, Richard T; Mehta, Paulette; Myers, Kasiani C; Norkin, Maxim; Pidala, Joseph A; Porter, David L; Reddy, Vijay; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Steinberg, Amir; Wall, Donna A; Warwick, Anne B; Wood, William A; Yu, Lolie C; Jacobsohn, David A; Sorror, Mohamed L

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the outcomes of patients who survived disease-free for 1 year or more after a second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for relapsed acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes between 1980 and 2009. A total of 1285 patients received a second allogeneic transplant after disease relapse; among these, 325 were relapse free at 1 year after the second HCT. The median time from first to second HCT was 17 and 24 months for children and adults, respectively. A myeloablative preparative regimen was used in the second transplantation in 62% of children and 45% of adult patients. The overall 10-year conditional survival rates after second transplantation in this cohort of patients who had survived disease-free for at least 1 year was 55% in children and 39% in adults. Relapse was the leading cause of mortality (77% and 54% of deaths in children and adults, respectively). In multivariate analyses, only disease status before second HCT was significantly associated with higher risk for overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.71 for patients with disease not in complete remission before second HCT, P < .01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in 43% and 75% of children and adults after second transplantation. Chronic GVHD was the leading cause of nonrelapse mortality, followed by organ failure and infection. The cumulative incidence of developing at least 1 of the studied late effects within 10 years after second HCT was 63% in children and 55% in adults. The most frequent late effects in children were growth disturbance (10-year cumulative incidence, 22%) and cataracts (20%); in adults they were cataracts (20%) and avascular necrosis (13%). Among patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes who receive a second allogeneic HCT for relapse and survive disease free for at least 1 year, many can be expected to survive long term. However, they continue to be at risk for relapse and nonrelapse morbidity and mortality. Novel

  1. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome in childhood: Changing definition and news from the Pediatric Consensus Conference].

    PubMed

    Dauger, S; Le Bourgeois, F; Guichoux, J; Brissaud, O

    2017-03-23

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a rapidly progressive hypoxemic respiratory insufficiency induced by alveolar filling mainly caused by alveolocapillary wall disruption, following direct or indirect pulmonary injury. Much less frequent in children than in adults, pediatric intensivists had long applied adult guidelines to their daily practice. In 2015, experts from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference (PALICC) published the first international guidelines specifically dedicated to pediatric ARDS. After a short summary of the history of the ARDS definition since its first report in 1967, we describe the main diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines for PALICC.

  2. SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) in adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Amy E; Gillan, Eileen; DiMario, Francis Joseph

    2014-03-01

    SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) is a rare condition that involves complex migraines with focal neurologic findings in patients following cranial irradiation for central nervous system malignancies. Little is known about the mechanisms behind the disorder, making successful treatment challenging. We report 2 new cases of SMART syndrome in pediatric patients as well as review all documented cases of the syndrome. Each of our 2 pediatric patients suffered multiple episodes. Attacks were characterized by severe headache, visual disturbance, aphasia, and weakness. Recovery occurred over several days to weeks. The data from all documented reports of SMART syndrome indicate a greater prevalence for male gender. An age-dependent pattern of onset was also observed, with a greater variability of syndrome onset in patients who received cranial irradiation at a younger age. SMART appears to be a reversible, recurrent long-term complication of radiation therapy with possible age- and gender-related influences.

  3. Characterization of the Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyal D.; McGuire, Joseph F.; Kennel, Allison; Mutch, P. Jane; Parker-Athill, E. Carla; Hanks, Camille E.; Lewin, Adam B.; Storch, Eric A.; Toufexis, Megan D.; Dadlani, Gul H.; Rodriguez, Carina A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) is a subtype of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) marked by an abrupt onset or exacerbation of neuropsychiatric symptoms. We aim to characterize the phenotypic presentation of youth with PANS. Methods: Forty-three youth (ages 4–14 years) meeting criteria for PANS were assessed using self-report and clinician-administered measures, medical record reviews, comprehensive clinical evaluation, and laboratory measures. Results: Youth with PANS presented with an early age of OCD onset (mean=7.84 years) and exhibited moderate to severe obsessive compulsive symptoms upon evaluation. All had comorbid anxiety and emotional lability, and scored well below normative means on all quality of life subscales. Youth with elevated streptococcal antibody titers trended toward having higher OCD severity, and presented more frequently with dilated pupils relative to youth without elevated titers. A cluster analysis of core PANS symptoms revealed three distinct symptom clusters that included core characteristic PANS symptoms, streptococcal-related symptoms, and cytokine-driven/physiological symptoms. Youth with PANS who had comorbid tics were more likely to exhibit a decline in school performance, visuomotor impairment, food restriction symptoms, and handwriting deterioration, and they reported lower quality of life relative to youth without tics. Conclusions: The sudden, acute onset of neuropsychiatric symptoms, high frequency of comorbidities (i.e., anxiety, behavioral regression, depression, and suicidality), and poor quality of life capture the PANS subgroup as suddenly and severely impaired youth. Identifying clinical characteristics of youth with PANS will allow clinicians to diagnose and treat this subtype of OCD with a more strategized and effective approach. PMID:25314221

  4. Exploration of the role of gene mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes through a sequencing design involving a small number of target genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Wu, Ling-Yun; He, Qi; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Zheng; Song, Lu-Xi; Zhao, You-Shan; Su, Ji-Ying; Zhou, Li-Yu; Guo, Juan; Chang, Chun-Kang; Li, Xiao

    2017-02-21

    Novel sequencing designs are necessary to supplement the recognized knowledge of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-related genomic alterations. In this study, we sequenced 28 target genes in 320 Chinese MDS patients but obtained 77.2% of recall factors and 82.8% of genetic abnormalities (including karyotype abnormalities). In addition to known relationships among mutations, some specific chromosomal abnormalities were found to link to specific gene mutations. Trisomy 8 tended to be linked to U2AF1 and ZRSR2 mutations, and 20q- exhibited higher SRSF2/WT1 and U2AF1 mutation frequency. Chromosome 7 involvement accounted for up to 50% of RUNX1 mutations and 37.5% of SETBP1 mutations. Patients carrying a complex karyotype were prone to present TP53 mutations (36.1%). However, individuals with normal karyotypes rarely possessed mutations in the TP53, RUNX1 and U2AF1. Moreover, DNMT3A, TP53, SRSF2, STAG2, ROBO1/2 and WT1 predicted poor survival and high AML transformation. By integrating these predictors into international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) or revised IPSS, we built a set of mutation-based prognostic risk models. These models could layer different degrees of risk in patients more satisfactorily. In summary, this sequencing design was able to detect a number of gene mutations and could be used to stratify patients with varied prognostic risk.

  5. The effects of azacitidine on the response and prognosis of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia involving a bone marrow erythroblast frequency of >50.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tomoyuki; Hagihara, Masao; Hua, Jian; Inoue, Morihiro

    2017-02-01

    We reviewed the cases of 68 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, n=61) or acute erythroleukemia (AEL, n=7) according to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2008 criteria and had previously been treated with azacitidine, a hypomethylating agent. Fifteen MDS patients had bone marrow erythroblast frequencies of ≥50%, and 6 out of the 7 AEL patients were reclassified as MDS (refractory anemia with excess blasts [RAEB]-1: 1, RAEB-2: 5) according to the revised WHO 2016 criteria. There was no difference between the overall response ratio (41%), as determined by a hematological improvement in at least one of 3 lineages, of these erythroid rich patients and that of the control group, which comprised 46 MDS patients with bone marrow erythroblast frequencies of <50%. Three MDS patients that exhibited erythroid predominance achieved complete remission. The overall survival period (median: 15 months) of the erythroblast-predominant group was not inferior to that of the control group (median: 16 months). These results indicate that azacitidine is a promising treatment option for MDS/AEL irrespective of the numbers of erythroid cells in the patient's bone marrow.

  6. Cryptic splicing events in the iron transporter ABCB7 and other key target genes in SF3B1-mutant myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Dolatshad, H; Pellagatti, A; Liberante, F G; Llorian, M; Repapi, E; Steeples, V; Roy, S; Scifo, L; Armstrong, R N; Shaw, J; Yip, B H; Killick, S; Kušec, R; Taylor, S; Mills, K I; Savage, K I; Smith, C W J; Boultwood, J

    2016-12-01

    The splicing factor SF3B1 is the most frequently mutated gene in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and is strongly associated with the presence of ring sideroblasts (RS). We have performed a systematic analysis of cryptic splicing abnormalities from RNA sequencing data on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) of SF3B1-mutant MDS cases with RS. Aberrant splicing events in many downstream target genes were identified and cryptic 3' splice site usage was a frequent event in SF3B1-mutant MDS. The iron transporter ABCB7 is a well-recognized candidate gene showing marked downregulation in MDS with RS. Our analysis unveiled aberrant ABCB7 splicing, due to usage of an alternative 3' splice site in MDS patient samples, giving rise to a premature termination codon in the ABCB7 mRNA. Treatment of cultured SF3B1-mutant MDS erythroblasts and a CRISPR/Cas9-generated SF3B1-mutant cell line with the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) inhibitor cycloheximide showed that the aberrantly spliced ABCB7 transcript is targeted by NMD. We describe cryptic splicing events in the HSCs of SF3B1-mutant MDS, and our data support a model in which NMD-induced downregulation of the iron exporter ABCB7 mRNA transcript resulting from aberrant splicing caused by mutant SF3B1 underlies the increased mitochondrial iron accumulation found in MDS patients with RS.

  7. Lenalidomide as a disease-modifying agent in patients with del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes: linking mechanism of action to clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Mufti, Ghulam J; Fenaux, Pierre; Germing, Ulrich; List, Alan; MacBeth, Kyle J

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, del(5q), is the most prevalent cytogenetic abnormality in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In isolation, it is traditionally associated with favorable prognosis compared with other subtypes of MDS. However, owing to the inherent heterogeneity of the disease, prognosis for patients with del(5q) MDS is highly variable depending on the presence of factors such as additional chromosomal abnormalities, >5 % blasts in the bone marrow (BM), or transfusion dependence. Over recent years, the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide has demonstrated remarkable efficacy in patients with del(5q) MDS. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease have suggested that lenalidomide targets aberrant signaling pathways caused by haplosufficiency of specific genes in a commonly deleted region on chromosome 5 (e.g., SPARC, RPS14, Cdc25C, and PP2A). As a result, the agent specifically targets del(5q) clones while also promoting erythropoiesis and repopulation of the bone marrow in normal cells. This review discusses recent developments in the understanding of the mechanism of action of lenalidomide, and how this underlies favorable outcomes in patients with del(5q) MDS. In addition, we discuss how improved understanding of the mechanism of disease will facilitate clinicians' ability to predict/monitor response and identify patients at risk of relapse.

  8. Combined assessment of WT1 and BAALC gene expression at diagnosis may improve leukemia-free survival prediction in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Minetto, Paola; Guolo, Fabio; Clavio, Marino; De Astis, Enrico; Colombo, Nicoletta; Grasso, Raffaella; Fugazza, Giuseppina; Sessarego, Mario; Lemoli, Roberto Massimo; Gobbi, Marco; Miglino, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Several genes with relevant pathogenetic and prognostic value have been identified in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Overexpression of WT1 at diagnosis has been associated with increased progression to acute myeloid leukemia and reduced leukemia free survival. Conversely, few data are available on the prognostic value of BAALC gene overexpression in AML and MDS patients. We evaluated the prognostic value of the combined expression of WT1 and BAALC genes at diagnosis in 86 MDS patients who had been stratified according to IPSS and R-IPSS scoring systems. Our results suggest that in the whole group of patients, low levels of both WT1 and BAALC were associated with a favorable outcome (3-year LFS 74.5%, median not reached), whereas patients presenting high expression levels of both genes had the worst prognosis (3-year LFS 0%, median 12 months, p<0.001). More specifically, molecular profiling was especially useful for intermediate 1 and intermediate-2/high risk groups. This study suggests that evaluating WT1 and BAALC gene expression at diagnosis may improve standard risk stratification and possibly refine the therapeutic approach for MDS patients.

  9. Aberrant expression of the microRNA cluster in 14q32 is associated with del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome and lenalidomide treatment.

    PubMed

    Krejčík, Zdeněk; Beličková, Monika; Hruštincová, Andrea; Kléma, Jiří; Zemanová, Zuzana; Michalová, Kyra; Čermák, Jaroslav; Jonášová, Anna; Dostálová Merkerová, Michaela

    2015-04-01

    Lenalidomide is a novel thalidomide analogue with immunomodulatory and antiangiogenic effects that has been successfully used for the treatment of low and intermediate-1 risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) with a del(5q) aberration. Because information about the influence of lenalidomide on the microRNA (miRNA) transcriptome is limited, we performed miRNA expression profiling of bone marrow CD34+ cells obtained from MDS patients with the del(5q) abnormality who had been subjected to lenalidomide treatment. To define differences in miRNA expression, we performed paired data analysis to compare the miRNA profiles of patients before and during lenalidomide treatment and those of healthy donors. The analysis showed that miRNAs clustering to the 14q32 region had a higher expression level in patient samples before treatment than in the healthy control samples, and this elevated expression was diminished following lenalidomide administration. Because some of the 14q32 miRNAs play important roles in hematopoiesis, stem cell differentiation, and apoptosis induction, the expression of this cluster may be associated with the pathophysiology of the disease.

  10. Multivariate time-dependent comparison of the impact of lenalidomide in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes with chromosome 5q deletion.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, Joaquín; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; Lorenzo, Ignacio; Nomdedeu, Benet; Luño, Elisa; de Paz, Raquel; Xicoy, Blanca; Valcárcel, David; Brunet, Salut; Marco-Betes, Victor; García-Pintos, Marta; Osorio, Santiago; Tormo, Mar; Bailén, Alicia; Cerveró, Carlos; Ramos, Fernando; Diez-Campelo, María; Such, Esperanza; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Azaceta, Gemma; Bargay, Joan; Arilla, María J; Falantes, José; Serrano-López, Josefina; Sanz, Guillermo F

    2014-07-01

    The impact of lenalidomide treatment on long-term outcomes of patients with lower risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and chromosome 5q deletion (del(5q)) is unclear. This study used time-dependent multivariate methodology to analyse the influence of lenalidomide therapy on overall survival (OS) and acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML) progression in 215 patients with International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) low or intermediate-1 risk and del(5q). There were significant differences in several relevant characteristics at presentation between patients receiving (n = 86) or not receiving lenalidomide (n = 129). The 5-year time-dependent probabilities of OS and progression to AML were 62% and 31% for patients receiving lenalidomide and 42% and 25% for patients not receiving lenalidomide; differences were not statistically significant in multivariate analysis that included all variables independently associated with those outcomes (OS, P = 0·45; risk of AML, P = 0·31, respectively). Achievement of RBC transfusion independency (P = 0·069) or cytogenetic response (P = 0·021) after lenalidomide was associated with longer OS in multivariate analysis. These data clearly show that response to lenalidomide results in a substantial clinical benefit in lower risk MDS patients with del(5q). Lenalidomide treatment does not appear to increase AML risk in this population of patients.

  11. Identification of a common microdeletion cluster in 7q21.3 subband among patients with myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Asou, Hiroya; Matsui, Hirotaka; Ozaki, Yuko; Nagamachi, Akiko; Nakamura, Megumi; Aki, Daisuke; Inaba, Toshiya

    2009-05-29

    Monosomy 7 and interstitial deletions in the long arm of chromosome 7 (-7/7q-) is a common nonrandom chromosomal abnormality found frequently in myeloid disorders including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). Using a short probe-based microarray comparative genomic hybridization (mCGH) technology, we identified a common microdeletion cluster in 7q21.3 subband, which is adjacent to 'hot deletion region' thus far identified by conventional methods. This common microdeletion cluster contains three poorly characterized genes; Samd9, Samd9L, and a putative gene LOC253012, which we named Miki. Gene copy number assessment of three genes by real-time PCR revealed heterozygous deletion of these three genes in adult patients with AML and MDS at high frequency, in addition to JMML patients. Miki locates to mitotic spindles and centrosomes and downregulation of Miki by RNA interference induced abnormalities in mitosis and nuclear morphology, similar to myelodysplasia. In addition, a recent report indicated Samd9 as a tumor suppressor. These findings indicate the usefulness of the short probe-based CGH to detect microdeletions. The three genes located to 7q21.3 would be candidates for myeloid tumor-suppressor genes on 7q.

  12. Pevonedistat (MLN4924), a First-in-Class NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor, in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes: a phase 1 study.

    PubMed

    Swords, Ronan T; Erba, Harry P; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Bixby, Dale L; Altman, Jessica K; Maris, Michael; Hua, Zhaowei; Blakemore, Stephen J; Faessel, Hélène; Sedarati, Farhad; Dezube, Bruce J; Giles, Francis J; Medeiros, Bruno C

    2015-05-01

    This trial was conducted to determine the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the first in class NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor, pevonedistat, and to investigate pevonedistat pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Pevonedistat was administered via a 60-min intravenous infusion on days 1, 3 and 5 (schedule A, n = 27), or days 1, 4, 8 and 11 (schedule B, n = 26) every 21-days. Dose escalation proceeded using a standard '3 + 3' design. Responses were assessed according to published guidelines. The MTD for schedules A and B were 59 and 83 mg/m(2) , respectively. On schedule A, hepatotoxicity was dose limiting. Multi-organ failure (MOF) was dose limiting on schedule B. The overall complete (CR) and partial (PR) response rate in patients treated at or below the MTD was 17% (4/23, 2 CRs, 2 PRs) for schedule A and 10% (2/19, 2 PRs) for schedule B. Pevonedistat plasma concentrations peaked after infusion followed by elimination in a biphasic pattern. Pharmacodynamic studies of biological correlates of NAE inhibition demonstrated target-specific activity of pevonedistat. In conclusion, administration of the first-in-class agent, pevonedistat, was feasible in patients with MDS and AML and modest clinical activity was observed.

  13. Cryptic splicing events in the iron transporter ABCB7 and other key target genes in SF3B1-mutant myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Dolatshad, H; Pellagatti, A; Liberante, F G; Llorian, M; Repapi, E; Steeples, V; Roy, S; Scifo, L; Armstrong, R N; Shaw, J; Yip, B H; Killick, S; Kušec, R; Taylor, S; Mills, K I; Savage, K I; Smith, C W J; Boultwood, J

    2016-01-01

    The splicing factor SF3B1 is the most frequently mutated gene in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and is strongly associated with the presence of ring sideroblasts (RS). We have performed a systematic analysis of cryptic splicing abnormalities from RNA sequencing data on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) of SF3B1-mutant MDS cases with RS. Aberrant splicing events in many downstream target genes were identified and cryptic 3′ splice site usage was a frequent event in SF3B1-mutant MDS. The iron transporter ABCB7 is a well-recognized candidate gene showing marked downregulation in MDS with RS. Our analysis unveiled aberrant ABCB7 splicing, due to usage of an alternative 3′ splice site in MDS patient samples, giving rise to a premature termination codon in the ABCB7 mRNA. Treatment of cultured SF3B1-mutant MDS erythroblasts and a CRISPR/Cas9-generated SF3B1-mutant cell line with the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) inhibitor cycloheximide showed that the aberrantly spliced ABCB7 transcript is targeted by NMD. We describe cryptic splicing events in the HSCs of SF3B1-mutant MDS, and our data support a model in which NMD-induced downregulation of the iron exporter ABCB7 mRNA transcript resulting from aberrant splicing caused by mutant SF3B1 underlies the increased mitochondrial iron accumulation found in MDS patients with RS. PMID:27211273

  14. Exploration of the role of gene mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes through a sequencing design involving a small number of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Wu, Ling-Yun; He, Qi; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Zheng; Song, Lu-Xi; Zhao, You-Shan; Su, Ji-Ying; Zhou, Li-Yu; Guo, Juan; Chang, Chun-Kang; Li, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Novel sequencing designs are necessary to supplement the recognized knowledge of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-related genomic alterations. In this study, we sequenced 28 target genes in 320 Chinese MDS patients but obtained 77.2% of recall factors and 82.8% of genetic abnormalities (including karyotype abnormalities). In addition to known relationships among mutations, some specific chromosomal abnormalities were found to link to specific gene mutations. Trisomy 8 tended to be linked to U2AF1 and ZRSR2 mutations, and 20q- exhibited higher SRSF2/WT1 and U2AF1 mutation frequency. Chromosome 7 involvement accounted for up to 50% of RUNX1 mutations and 37.5% of SETBP1 mutations. Patients carrying a complex karyotype were prone to present TP53 mutations (36.1%). However, individuals with normal karyotypes rarely possessed mutations in the TP53, RUNX1 and U2AF1. Moreover, DNMT3A, TP53, SRSF2, STAG2, ROBO1/2 and WT1 predicted poor survival and high AML transformation. By integrating these predictors into international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) or revised IPSS, we built a set of mutation-based prognostic risk models. These models could layer different degrees of risk in patients more satisfactorily. In summary, this sequencing design was able to detect a number of gene mutations and could be used to stratify patients with varied prognostic risk. PMID:28220884

  15. Decision analysis of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome stratified according to the revised international prognostic scoring system (IPSS-R).

    PubMed

    Della Porta, M G; Jackson, C H; Alessandrino, E P; Rossi, M; Bacigalupo, A; van Lint, M T; Bernardi, M; Allione, B; Bosi, A; Guidi, S; Santini, V; Malcovati, L; Ubezio, M; Milanesi, C; Todisco, E; Voso, M T; Musto, P; Onida, F; Iori, A P; Cerretti, R; Grillo, G; Molteni, A; Pioltelli, P; Borin, L; Angelucci, E; Oldani, E; Sica, S; Pascutto, C; Ferretti, V; Santoro, A; Bonifazi, F; Cazzola, M; Rambaldi, A

    2017-03-21

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) represents the only curative treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but involves non-negligible morbidity and mortality. Crucial questions in clinical decision making include the definition of optimal timing of the procedure and the benefit of cytoreduction before transplant in high risk patients. We carried out a decision analysis on 1728 MDS who received supportive care, transplantation or hypomethylating agents (HMAs). Risk assessment was based on the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). We used a continuous-time multistate Markov model to describe the natural history of disease and evaluate the effect of different treatment policies on survival. Life expectancy increased when transplantation was delayed from the initial stages to intermediate IPSS-R risk (gain of life expectancy 5.3, 4.7 and 2.8 years for patients aged ⩽55, 60 and 65 years, respectively), and then decreased for higher risks. Modelling decision analysis on IPSS-R vs original IPSS changed transplantation policy in 29% of patients, resulting in a 2-year gain in life expectancy. In advanced stages, HMAs given before transplant is associated with a 2-year gain of life expectancy, especially in older patients. These results provide a preliminary evidence to maximize the effectiveness of allo-SCT in MDS.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 21 March 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.88.

  16. Treatment cost of invasive fungal disease (Ifd) in patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (Aml) or myelodysplastic syndrome (Mds) in German hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rieger, C T; Cornely, O A; Hoppe-Tichy, T; Kiehl, M; Knoth, H; Thalheimer, M; Schuler, U; Ullmann, A J; Ehlken, B; Ostermann, H

    2012-11-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) causes increasing morbidity and mortality in haematological cancer patients. Reliable cost data for treating IFD in German hospitals is not available. Objective of the study was to determine the institutional cost of treating the IFD. Data were obtained by retrospective chart review in German hospitals. Patients had either newly diagnosed or relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Direct medical cost was calculated from hospital provider's perspective. A total of 108 patients were enrolled at 5 tertiary care hospitals, 36 IFD patients and 72 controls. The vast majority of IFD patients (74%) were diagnosed with invasive aspergillosis. On average, the hospital stay for IFD patients was 12 days longer than in control patients. All patients in the IFD group and 89% of patients in the control group received antifungal drugs. Mean direct costs per patient were €51,517 in the IFD group and €30,454 in the control group. Incremental costs of €21,063 were dominated by cost for antifungal drugs (36%), hospital stay (32%) and blood products (23%). From the perspective of hospitals in Germany the economic burden of IFD in patients with AML or MDS is substantial. Therefore, prevention of IFD is necessary with respect to both clinical and economic reasons.

  17. IDH mutations are closely associated with mutations of DNMT3A, ASXL1 and SRSF2 in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and are stable during disease evolution.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Chin; Hou, Hsin-An; Chou, Wen-Chien; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Lai, Yan-Jun; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Huang, Chi-Fei; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Fen-Yu; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Tang, Jih-Luh; Yao, Ming; Huang, Shang-Yi; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Wu, Shang-Ju; Tsay, Woei; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2014-02-01

    Current information about clinical significance of IDH mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), their association with other genetic alterations and the stability during disease progression is limited. In this study, IDH mutations were identified in 4.6% of 477 patients with MDS based on the FAB classification and in 2.2 % of 368 patients based on the 2008 WHO classification. IDH mutations were closely associated with older age, higher platelet counts, and mutations of DNMT3A (36.4% vs. 8.7%, P < 0.001), ASXL1 (47.6% vs. 22.0%, P = 0.007), and SRSF2 (45.5% vs. 11.8%, P < 0.001). IDH2 mutation was a poor prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with lower-risk MDS, based on international prognosis scoring system (IPSS), FAB classification, WHO classification, or revised IPSS (all P ≦ 0.001), but not in higher-risk groups. Sequential studies in 151 patients demonstrated that all IDH-mutated patients retained the same mutation during disease evolution while none of the IDH-wild patients acquired a novel mutation during follow-ups. In conclusion, IDH mutation is a useful biomarker for risk stratification of patients with lower-risk MDS. IDH mutations are stable during the clinical course. The mutation, in association with other genetic alterations, may play a role in the development, but not progression of MDS.

  18. Antithymocyte globulin improves the survival of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing HLA-matched unrelated donor and haplo-identical donor transplants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Liu, Hong; Zhou, Jin-Yi; Zhang, Tong-Tong; Jin, Song; Zhang, Xiang; Chen, Su-Ning; Li, Wei-Yang; Xu, Yang; Miao, Miao; Wu, De-Pei

    2017-01-01

    Significant advances have been achieved in the outcomes of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) after both HLA-matched sibling donor transplants (MSDT) and non-MSDT, the latter including HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUDT) and haplo-identical donor transplants (HIDT). In this retrospective study, we analyzed the data of 85 consecutive patients with MDS who received allogeneic HSCT between Dec 2007 and Apr 2014 in our center. These patients comprised 38 (44.7%) who received MSDT, 29 (34.1%) MUDT, and 18 (21.2%) HIDT. The median overall survival (OS) was 60.2 months, the probabilities of OS being 63%, 57%, and 48%, at the first, second, and fifth year, respectively. Median OS post-transplant (OSPT) was 57.2 months, the probabilities of OSPT being 58%, 55%, and 48% at the first, second, and fifth year, respectively. The survival of patients receiving non-MSDT was superior to that of MSDT, median OSPT being 84.0 months and 23.6 months, respectively (P = 0.042); the findings for OS were similar (P = 0.028). We also found that using ATG in conditioning regimens significantly improved survival after non-MSDT, with better OS and OSPT (P = 0.016 and P = 0.025). These data suggest that using ATG in conditioning regimens may improve the survival of MDS patients after non-MSDT. PMID:28262717

  19. Cytogenetic place in managing myelodysplastic syndromes: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH).

    PubMed

    Eclache, Virginie; Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina; Lefebvre, Christine; Penther, Dominique; Raynaud, Sophie; Tigaud, Isabelle

    2016-10-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are preleukemic diseases of elderly patients characterized by defective maturation of clonal hematopoietic progenitor cells resulting in peripheral blood cytopenias. Clonal chromosomal abnormalities are heterogeneous and can be detected in less than 50% of patients with de novo MDS and more frequently in secondary MDS (up to 80%). The karyotype plays an important role in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and prognosis to evaluate the risk of leukemic transformation and, more recently, in treatment allocation. The gold standard for cytogenetic diagnosis in MDS is conventional chromosome banding analyses of bone marrow metaphases. The most frequent abnormalities are deletions and losses of chromosomes 5 (-5/5q-) and 7 (-7/7q-) and various isolated or combined abnormalities. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and array comparative genomic hybridization can reveal cryptic genetic abnormalities but are not recommended in routine diagnosis. New techniques including next generation sequencing revealed somatic driver mutations especially those affecting genes involved in RNA splicing or those harboring important prognostic value (TP53, ASXL1…) with potential applications in clinical practice in the future.

  20. The Dicentric Chromosome dic(20;22) Is a Recurrent Abnormality in Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Is a Product of Telomere Fusion.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Ruth N; Duivenvoorden, Hendrika M; Campbell, Lynda J; Wall, Meaghan

    2017-03-04

    We describe a recurrent dicentric chromosome formed by telomere fusion between chromosome 20 and chromosome 22 in 4 cases of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). In particular, the presence of residual telomere sequences at the site of translocation in 3 of the 4 cases makes a compelling case for telomere fusion. This is the first description of a recurrent telomere fusion event in any malignant condition. The 20q subtelomeric region was retained in all 4 examples despite deletion of the 20q12 region closer to the centromere. The original dicentric chromosome in all 4 cases contained nucleolus organiser region material from the short arm of chromosome 22 and had also undergone secondary rearrangements that produced amplification of the common gained region on 20q. We propose that the sequence of events producing this chromosome abnormality is: degradation of the telomeres, formation of an unstable dicentric chromosome by 20q and 22p telomere fusion, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles causing copy number aberration between the centromeres, selection of cells with 20q12 deletion, and further selection of cells with 20q11.2 gain. The last 2 steps are driver events responsible for the abnormal chromosomes found in the malignant cells. Finding recurrent patterns in the complex genome reorganisation events that characterise poor-prognosis, complex-karyotype AML and MDS will help us understand the mechanisms and oncogenic driver mutations in these poorly understood malignancies.

  1. Whole-exome and targeted sequencing identify ROBO1 and ROBO2 mutations as progression-related drivers in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Wu, Ling-Yun; Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Li; Shi, Wen-Hui; Guo, Juan; Zhu, Yang; Zhao, You-Shan; Gu, Shu-Cheng; Fei, Cheng-Ming; Wu, Dong; Zhou, Li-Yu; Su, Ji-Ying; Song, Lu-Xi; Xiao, Chao; Li, Xiao

    2015-11-26

    The progressive mechanism underlying myelodysplastic syndrome remains unknown. Here we identify ROBO1 and ROBO2 as novel progression-related somatic mutations using whole-exome and targeted sequencing in 6 of 16 (37.5%) paired MDS patients with disease progression. Further deep sequencing detects 20 (10.4%) patients with ROBO mutations in a cohort of 193 MDS patients. In addition, copy number loss and loss of heterogeneity (LOH) of ROBO1 and ROBO2 are frequently observed in patients with progression or carrying ROBO mutations. In in vitro experiments, overexpression of ROBO1 or ROBO2 produces anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in leukaemia cells. However, this effect was lost in ROBO mutants and ROBO-SLIT2 signalling is impaired. Multivariate analysis shows that ROBO mutations are independent factors for predicting poor survival. These findings demonstrate a novel contribution of ROBO mutations to the pathogenesis of MDS and highlight a key role for ROBO-SLIT2 signalling in MDS disease progression.

  2. Review of the Results of WT1 Peptide Vaccination Strategies for Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia from Nine Different Studies

    PubMed Central

    Di Stasi, Antonio; Jimenez, Antonio M.; Minagawa, Kentaro; Al-Obaidi, Mustafa; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2015-01-01

    We performed a systematic review of data from nine clinical trials of WT1 peptide vaccination in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and/or acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML), published between 2004 and 2012. A total of 51 patients were eligible for analysis. Vaccination with WT1 peptides proved safe and feasible in patients with MDS/AML, in studies from different institutions. Additionally, clinical responses and clinical benefit were observed, with some patients achieving and maintaining remission long-term (more than 8 years). A significant correlation between induction of WT1-specific T cells and normalization/reduction of WT1 mRNA levels and progression-free survival was noted in a number of studies. However, larger studies are warranted to confirm these results. Interestingly, the majority of trials reported the presence of WT1-specific T cells with limited or absent functionality prior to vaccination, which increased in frequency and function after vaccination. In conclusion, WT1 peptide vaccination strategies were safe in this heterogeneous group of patient with MDS/AML. Larger and more homogeneous studies or randomized clinical trials are needed to quantify the contribution of WT1 peptide vaccines to clinical responses and long-term survival. PMID:25699052

  3. Pesticide Exposure as a Risk Factor for Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A Meta-Analysis Based on 1,942 Cases and 5,359 Controls

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jie; Yu, Mengxia; Hu, Chao; Ye, Li; Xie, Lili; Jin, Jin; Chen, Feifei; Tong, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pesticide exposure has been linked to increased risk of cancer at several sites, but its association with risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is still unclear. A meta-analysis of studies published through April, 2014 was performed to investigate the association of pesticide exposure with the risk of MDS. Methods Studies were identified by searching the Web of Science, Cochrane Library and PubMed databases. Summary odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random- or fixed-effect models. Results This meta-analysis included 11 case-control studies, all of which demonstrated a correlation between pesticide exposure and a statistically significant increased risk of MDS (OR = 1.95, 95% CI 1.23–3.09). In subgroup analyses, patients with pesticide exposure had increased risk of developing MDS if they were living in the Europe or Asia and had refractory anemia (RA) or RA with ringed sideroblasts (RARS). Moreover, in the analysis by specific pesticides, increased risk was associated with exposure to insecticides (OR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.22–2.40) but not exposure to herbicides or fungicides. Conclusion This meta-analysis supports the hypothesis that exposure to pesticides increases the risk of developing MDS. Further prospective cohort studies are warranted to verify the association and guide clinical practice in MDS prevention. PMID:25335083

  4. Evidence for a graft-versus-leukemia effect after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with reduced-intensity conditioning in acute myelogenous leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Martino, Rodrigo; Caballero, María Dolores; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio; Simón, José Antonio Pérez; Canals, Carmen; Solano, Carlos; Urbano-Ispízua, Alvaro; Bargay, Joan; Léon, Angel; Sarrá, Josep; Sanz, Guillermo F; Moraleda, José María; Brunet, Salut; San Miguel, Jesús; Sierra, Jorge

    2002-09-15

    We report the results of a prospective study of a reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen followed by allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) from an HLA-identical sibling in 37 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 17) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 20). The median age was 57 years, and 22 (59%) were beyond the early phase of their disease. The incidence of grade II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 19% (5% grade III-IV), and the 1-year incidence of chronic extensive GVHD was 46%. With a median follow-up of 297 days (355 days in 24 survivors), the 1-year probability of transplant-related mortality was 5%, and the 1-year progression-free survival was 66%. The 1-year incidence of disease progression in patients with and without GVHD was 13% (95% CI, 4%-34%) and 58% (95% CI, 36%-96%), respectively (P =.008). These results suggest that a graft-versus-leukemia effect plays a crucial role in reducing the risk of relapse after a RIC allograft in AML and MDS.

  5. Utility of peripheral blood flow cytometry in differentiating low grade versus high grade myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and in the evaluation of cytopenias.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Hooman H; Xu, Xiangdong; Wang, Huan-You; Shafi, Nelofar Q; Rameshkumar, Karuna; Messer, Karen; Smith, Brian R; Rose, Michal G

    2012-01-01

    The diagnostic utility of flow cytometry in the evaluation of cytopenias and in the differential diagnosis of low-grade versus high-grade myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is not widely appreciated. In this report, we measured granulocyte CD10/control fluorescence ratio in 29 patients with MDS & chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) using peripheral blood (PB) flow cytometry (FC). We found a lower ratio in high-grade MDS and CMML (mean ratio of 2.2 ± 0.7) vs. low-grade MDS (3.65 ± 0.9) and 16 cytopenic controls without MDS (3.67 ± 0.65; p<0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of CD10 ratio <3 for the group that included the high risk MDS and CMML patients were 87.5% and 100%, respectively. Our data suggests that FC of PB may be helpful in the work-up of patients with cytopenias and in the differential diagnosis of low-grade vs. high-grade MDS.

  6. BCR CDR3 length distributions differ between blood and spleen and between old and young patients, and TCR distributions can be used to detect myelodysplastic syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickman, Yishai; Dunn-Walters, Deborah; Mehr, Ramit

    2013-10-01

    Complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) is the most hyper-variable region in B cell receptor (BCR) and T cell receptor (TCR) genes, and the most critical structure in antigen recognition and thereby in determining the fates of developing and responding lymphocytes. There are millions of different TCR Vβ chain or BCR heavy chain CDR3 sequences in human blood. Even now, when high-throughput sequencing becomes widely used, CDR3 length distributions (also called spectratypes) are still a much quicker and cheaper method of assessing repertoire diversity. However, distribution complexity and the large amount of information per sample (e.g. 32 distributions of the TCRα chain, and 24 of TCRβ) calls for the use of machine learning tools for full exploration. We have examined the ability of supervised machine learning, which uses computational models to find hidden patterns in predefined biological groups, to analyze CDR3 length distributions from various sources, and distinguish between experimental groups. We found that (a) splenic BCR CDR3 length distributions are characterized by low standard deviations and few local maxima, compared to peripheral blood distributions; (b) healthy elderly people's BCR CDR3 length distributions can be distinguished from those of the young; and (c) a machine learning model based on TCR CDR3 distribution features can detect myelodysplastic syndrome with approximately 93% accuracy. Overall, we demonstrate that using supervised machine learning methods can contribute to our understanding of lymphocyte repertoire diversity.

  7. Reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia using fludarabine, busulphan, and alemtuzumab (FBC) conditioning.

    PubMed

    Ho, Aloysius Y L; Pagliuca, Antonio; Kenyon, Michelle; Parker, Jane E; Mijovic, Aleksandar; Devereux, Stephen; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2004-09-15

    Reduced-intensity conditioned (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has improved the accessibility of transplantation in patients previously ineligible. We report the results of allografting following conditioning with fludarabine, busulphan, and alemtuzumab in 62 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) (matched sibling donors [24] or volunteer unrelated donors [VUDs, 38]). The median age for sibling recipients was 56 years (range, 41-70 years) and for VUD recipients, 52 years (range, 22-65 years), with a median follow-up (survivors) of 524 days (range, 93-1392 days) and 420 days (range, 53-1495 days), respectively. The nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at days 100, 200, and 360 was 0%, 5%, and 5%, respectively, for siblings and 11%, 17%, and 21%, respectively, for VUD. The overall survival at one year was 73% for siblings and 71% for VUDs, with a disease-free survival (DFS) of 61% and 59%, respectively. The prognostic significance of the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) was preserved. Of recipients, 86% achieved full-donor chimerism. The cumulative incidence at day 100 of grades III to IV graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) for VUD recipients was 9% and for sibling recipients, 0%. There were 26 patients (16 sibling and 10 VUD) who received donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) at a median of 273 days (range, 126-1323 days). RIC allogeneic HSCT using this protocol appears to be safe and permits durable donor engraftment. Longer follow-up is required to confirm any potential survival advantage.

  8. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with del(7)(q22) in a patient with de novo AML.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang Gyun; Cho, Sun Young; Park, Tae Sung; Oh, Seung Hwan; Yoon, Hwi-Joong

    2011-01-01

    A 55-year-old Korean woman was initially diagnosed with acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AML). After induction chemotherapy was performed using cytarabine, idarubicin, and G-CSF, complete remission (CR) was subsequently achieved following reinduction chemotherapy using the same chemotherapeutic agents. Thirty-six months after the initial CR, an increase in immature cells (up to 12.0%) was observed in the patient's bone marrow. Because chromosome analysis revealed a karyotype of 46,XX,del(7)(q22) in all of the analyzed cells, the patient was diagnosed with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS). Although the patient subsequently received chemotherapy and G-CSF for neutropenia, t-MDS rapidly progressed after 3 months to therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). Although very rare, de novo AML can progress to a secondary MDS/AML with del(7q) after chemotherapy with cytarabine, idarubicin, and G-CSF. Further investigation into the role of genes located in 7q22 may provide more information about the mechanisms of leukemogenesis.

  9. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following chemotherapy (paclitaxel and carboplatin) and radiation therapy in ovarian cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, M; Nakayama, K; Rahman, M T; Rahman, M; Katagiri, H; Katagiri, A; Ishibashi, T; Iida, K; Nakayama, N; Miyazaki, K

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the incidence of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) and therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) that occur during chemotherapy for ovarian cancer has increased. While alkylating agents and topoisomerase II inhibitors are particularly mutagenic and have strong leukemogenic potential, paclitaxel and combination chemotherapy/radiation therapy also appear to induce t-MDS. The present authors report a case of t-MDS that developed during chemotherapy and radiation therapy for ovarian cancer. The patient was a 75-year-old woman who received six courses of cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/cisplatin (CAP) therapy after initial surgery for Stage IIIc grade ovarian cancer in 1995. Beginning in February 2005, the patient experienced multiple recurrences due to sternal metastasis. Chemotherapy, including paclitaxel and carboplatin (TC), was administered intermittently and was combined with radiation therapy to a sternal metastatic lesion. Pancytopenia was observed in December 2008, and she was diagnosed with t-MDS (WHO subtype, refractory cytopenias with multilineage dysplasia [RCMD]): the time from first chemotherapy to t-MDS onset was 106 months. Without evidence of blast crisis, the recurrent lesions continued to grow and caused multiple cerebral infarctions, from which she eventually died. The cumulative doses of paclitaxel and carboplatin administered to this patient were 1,968 mg and 6,480 mg, respectively.

  10. T-cell receptor excision circle levels after allogeneic stem cell transplantation are predictive of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uzunel, Mehmet; Sairafi, Darius; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas; Uhlin, Michael

    2014-07-15

    In this retrospective study, 209 patients with malignant disease were analyzed for levels of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) for the first 24 months after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. CD3(+) cells were separated by direct antibody-coupled magnetic beads, followed by DNA extraction according to a standard protocol. The δRec-ψJα signal joint TREC was measured with real-time quantitative PCR. Patients were grouped based on malignant disease: chronic myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphatic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients were further subdivided based on TREC levels below (low-TREC) or above (high-TREC) median at each time point. TREC levels were then correlated to relapse incidence and relapse-free survival (RFS). For patients with AML, low TREC levels 2 months post-transplantation were correlated to high relapse incidence at 5 years (P<0.05). In patients with chronic leukemia, high TREC levels were correlated with improved RFS (P<0.05). For patients with MDS, high TREC levels at 9 months post-transplantation were associated with higher RFS at 5 years (P<0.02) and lower relapse incidence (P<0.02). This study shows the potential use of TREC measurement in blood to predict relapse in patients with AML and MDS after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  11. Monosomal karyotype predicts poor survival after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in chromosome 7 abnormal myelodysplastic syndrome and secondary acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    van Gelder, M; de Wreede, L C; Schetelig, J; van Biezen, A; Volin, L; Maertens, J; Robin, M; Petersen, E; de Witte, T; Kröger, N

    2013-04-01

    Treatment algorithms for poor cytogenetic-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), defined by chromosome 7 abnormalities or complex karyotype (CK), include allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT). We studied outcome of alloSCT in chromosome 7 abnormal MDS patients as this data are scarce in literature. We specifically focused on the impact of the extra presence of CK and monosomal karyotype (MK). The European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation database contained data on 277 adult MDS patients with a chromosome 7 abnormality treated with alloSCT. Median age at alloSCT was 45 years. Median follow-up of patients alive was 5 years. Five-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 22% and 28%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, statistically significant predictors for worse PFS were higher MDS stages treated, but not in complete remission (CR) (hazards ratio (HR) 1.7), and the presence of CK (HR 1.5) or MK (HR 1.8). Negative predictive factors for OS were higher MDS stages treated, but not in CR (HR 1.8), and the presence of CK (HR 1.6) or MK (HR 1.7). By means of the cross-validated log partial likelihood, MK showed to have a better predictive value than CK. The results are relevant when considering alloSCT for higher-stage MDS patients having MK including a chromosome 7 abnormality.

  12. [Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome: recommendations of the Nephrology Branch of the Chilean Society of Pediatrics. Part two].

    PubMed

    Hevia, Pilar; Nazal, Vilma; Rosati, María Pía; Quiroz, Lily; Alarcón, Claudia; Márquez, Sonia; Cuevas, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome is the most common glomerular disease in childhood, affecting 1 to 3 per 100,000 children under the age of 16. It most commonly occurs in ages between 2 and 10. Its cause is unknown, and its histology corresponds to minimal change disease in 90% of cases, or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome represents 10-20% of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome in pediatrics. It has a poor prognosis, and its management is a significant therapeutic challenge. Half of patients evolve to end-stage renal disease within 5 years, and are additionally exposed to complications secondary to persistent NS and to the adverse effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The primary goal of treatment is to achieve complete remission, but even a partial remission is associated with a better renal survival than the lack of response. This paper is the result of the collaborative effort of the Nephrology Branch of the Chilean Society of Pediatrics with aims at helping pediatricians and pediatric nephrologists to treat pediatric idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. In this second part, handling of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome as well as nonspecific therapies are discussed.

  13. Exercise-induced Pediatric Lumbar Paravertebral Compartment Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Verena M; Ward, W Timothy

    2015-09-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is described as an elevation of interstitial pressure in a closed fascial compartment that can lead to damage of the microvasculature with subsequent tissue necrosis. Although paravertebral compartment syndrome has been described there is no case of paravertebral compartment syndrome that has been described in the pediatric population. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who presented at our institution with severe, acute-onset low back pain that started shortly after a rigorous 4-hour workout. He was diagnosed with acute lumbar paravertebral compartment syndrome and underwent emergent fasciotomy with 2 more debridements.

  14. Evaluation of Retinal Changes Using Optical Coherence Tomography in a Pediatric Case of Susac Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Mehmet; Erdöl, Hidayet; Ertuğrul Atasoy, Sevil; Türk, Adem

    2017-01-01

    Susac syndrome is a rare occlusive vasculopathy affecting the retina, inner ear and brain. The cause is unknown, although it generally affects young women. This syndrome can be difficult to diagnose because its signs can only be revealed by detailed examination. These signs are not always concomitant, but may appear at different times. This report describes a pediatric case who was diagnosed with Susac syndrome when retinal lesions were identified in the inactive period with the help of optical coherence tomography (OCT). The purpose of this case report is to emphasize the importance of OCT in clarifying undefined retinal changes in Susac syndrome. PMID:28182173

  15. Comparison between a pediatric health promotion center and a pediatric obesity clinic in detecting metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hye Ran; Yi, Dae Yong; Choi, Hyoung Soo

    2014-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of health check-ups in children in detecting metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by comparing the pediatric health promotion center with the pediatric obesity clinic. Children who visited a pediatric health promotion center (n=218) or a pediatric obesity clinic (n=178) were included. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, laboratory tests, and abdominal ultrasonography were evaluated. Two different criteria were applied to diagnose metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the 2 units was 3.2%-3.7% in a pediatric health promotion center and 23%-33.2% in a pediatric obesity clinic. Significant differences were observed in the prevalence of each component of metabolic syndrome between the 2 units including abdominal adiposity, blood pressure, serum triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose (P<0.05). The prevalence of NAFLD was 8.7% and 71.9% in the 2 units according to liver enzymes and 5.9% and 61.8% according to ultrasonography (P<0.05). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and NAFLD was higher among patients visiting the obesity clinic targeting obese children than that among patients visiting the health promotion center offering routine check-ups. An obesity-oriented approach is required to prevent obesity-related health problems in children.

  16. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  17. [Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases. Part II: cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, pediatric systemic granulomatosis and PAPA syndrome].

    PubMed

    Aróstegui, Juan I; Yagüe, Jordi

    2008-03-29

    Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases result from a genetically-based dysregulated inflammatory process, and are clinically characterized by recurrent or persistent systemic inflammatory episodes, which typically occur in the absence of infectious, neoplastic or autoimmune etiology. Elucidation of their molecular basis has enabled the use of genetic analyses to achieve an accurate and definitive diagnosis, and to establish a tailored treatment. The present review is the second and last part of an updated and comprehensive overview of hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases, and will introduce persistent, non-periodic autoinflammatory diseases, such as: a) the group of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), which includes familial cold-induced autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome, and CINCA-NOMID syndrome; b) the group of pediatric systemic granulomatosis, which includes both Blau syndrome and early-onset sarcoidosis, and c) the pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome.

  18. Recurrent parotitis as a presentation of primary pediatric Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baszis, Kevin; Toib, Dana; Cooper, Megan; French, Anthony; White, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Parotitis is a common condition seen in the pediatric population, usually as an isolated occurrence associated with viral or bacterial infection. The differential diagnosis expands when recurrent parotitis is encountered. One etiology is primary pediatric Sjögren syndrome (SS), an autoimmune condition typically associated with dryness of the eyes and mouth in adults. Pediatric patients often present with isolated recurrent bilateral parotitis, however, and we describe 4 such cases in children aged 9 to 17 years at presentation. Despite lack of ocular complaints, 3 of these patients had ocular findings on ophthalmologic exam. Our patients also exhibited classic laboratory abnormalities, including positive antinuclear antibody, SS A, and SS B antibodies; presence of rheumatoid factor; and hypergammaglobulinemia. Consideration of SS in the child with recurrent parotitis is important for timely and appropriate referral and treatment. We review the differential diagnosis of parotitis in children as well as the salient features of pediatric SS.

  19. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Abnormalities in Children with Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS)

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, Thomas; Buckley, Ashura; Hommer, Rebecca; Grant, Paul; Williams, Kyle; Leckman, James F.; Swedo, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Polysomnographic investigation of sleep architecture in children presenting with pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). Methods: Fifteen consecutive subjects meeting criteria for PANS (mean age = 7.2 y; range 3–10 y) underwent single-night full polysomnography (PSG) read by a pediatric neurologist. Results: Thirteen of 15 subjects (87%) had abnormalities detected with PSG. Twelve of 15 had evidence of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep motor disinhibition, as characterized by excessive movement, laughing, hand stereotypies, moaning, or the continuation of periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) into REM sleep. Conclusions: This study shows various forms of REM sleep motor disinhibition present in a population of children with PANS. Citation: Gaughan T, Buckley A, Hommer R, Grant P; Williams K, Leckman JF, Swedo SE. Rapid eye movement sleep abnormalities in children with pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):1027–1032. PMID:27166296

  20. Development of CAPTSure(TM) - a new index for the assessment of pediatric postthrombotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Avila, M L; Brandão, L R; Williams, S; Montoya, M I; Stinson, J; Kiss, A; Feldman, B M

    2016-12-01

    Essentials We developed a discriminative and evaluative index for pediatric postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). A Delphi-survey was used for item reduction and multi-criteria decision analysis for item weighting. The new index assesses limb PTS based on the relative severity of each sign and symptom. Higher scores related to higher odds of parental dissatisfaction with their child's condition.

  1. The impact of metabolic syndrome on child weight outcomes in pediatric obesity program for Mexican Americans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adults with metabolic syndrome (MetS) are three to five times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Given the long term consequences of MetS, the growing number of children meeting criteria for MetS is concerning. In order to determine the impact of MetS on pediatric wei...

  2. Reduction of c-Fos via Overexpression of miR-34a Results in Enhancement of TNF- Production by LPS in Neutrophils from Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shikama, Yayoi; Cao, Meiwan; Ono, Tomoyuki; Feng, Xiaomin; Noji, Hideyoshi; Kimura, Hideo; Ogawa, Kazuei; Suzuki, Yuko; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kimura, Junko

    2016-01-01

    Although increased TNF-α has been considered to cause ineffective hematopoiesis in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the mechanisms of TNF-α elevation are not known. We recently found that c-Fos mRNA stabilization under translation-inhibiting stimuli was impaired in MDS-derived neutrophilic granulocytes. In the current study, we identified overexpression of c-Fos-targeting miR-34a and miR-155 as the cause of impairment. Expression levels of miR-34a but not miR-155 inversely correlated with ratios of c-Fos-positive cells in MDS-derived CD16+ neutrophils (r = -0.618, P<0.05), which were analyzed by flow cytometry. Among the seventeen patients, c-Fos was detectable in less than 60% of CD16+ cells in eight patients (Group A), while five (Group B) expressed c-Fos in more than 80% of CD16+ cells, which was consistent with the controls (88.6 ± 7.8%). Group A-derived granulocytes secreted more TNF-α in response to 1 μM LPS for 3 hours (735.4 ± 237.5 pg/mL) than Group B (143.5 ± 65.7 pg/mL, P<0.05) and healthy controls (150.8 ± 91.5 pg/mL, P<0.05). Knockdown of c-Fos in neutrophil-like differentiated HL60 increased the binding of NF-κB p65 to the promoter region of TNF-α DNA. Thus, c-Fos reduction via overexpression of miR-34a contributes to TNF-α overproduction under inflammatory stimuli in MDS. PMID:27513856

  3. Myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia in cats infected with feline leukemia virus clone33 containing a unique long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Hisasue, Masaharu; Nagashima, Naho; Nishigaki, Kazuo; Fukuzawa, Isao; Ura, Shigeyoshi; Katae, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Ryo; Yamada, Takatsugu; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2009-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) clone33 was obtained from a domestic cat with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The long terminal repeat (LTR) of this virus, like the LTRs present in FeLV from other cats with AML, differs from the LTRs of other known FeLV in that it has 3 tandem direct 47-bp repeats in the upstream region of the enhancer (URE). Here, we injected cats with FeLV clone33 and found 41% developed myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias and dysplastic changes in the bone marrow. Some of the cats with MDS eventually developed AML. The bone marrow of the majority of cats with FeLV clone33 induced MDS produced fewer erythroid and myeloid colonies upon being cultured with erythropoietin or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-SCF) than bone marrow from normal control cats. Furthermore, the bone marrow of some of the cats expressed high-levels of the apoptosis-related genes TNF-alpha and survivin. Analysis of the proviral sequences obtained from 13 cats with naturally occurring MDS reveal they also bear the characteristic URE repeats seen in the LTR of FeLV clone33 and other proviruses from cats with AML. Deletions and mutations within the enhancer elements are frequently observed in naturally occurring MDS as well as AML. These results suggest that FeLV variants that bear URE repeats in their LTR strongly associate with the induction of both MDS and AML in cats.

  4. Priority Report: Rearrangements and Amplification of IER3 (IEX-1) Represent A Novel And Recurrent Molecular Abnormality In Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

    PubMed Central

    Steensma, David P.; Neiger, Jessemy D.; Porcher, Julie C.; Keats, J. Jonathan; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Dennis, Thomas R.; Knudson, Ryan A.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Santana-Davila, Rafael; Kumar, Rajiv; Ketterling, Rhett P.

    2009-01-01

    IER3 (formerly IEX-1) encodes a 27kDa glycoprotein that regulates death receptor-induced apoptosis, interacts with NF-κb pathways, and increases expression rapidly in response to cellular stresses such as irradiation. Animal models, gene expression microarray experiments, and functional studies in cell lines have suggested a potential role for IER3 in oncogenesis, but to date no abnormalities of IER3 at the DNA level have been reported in patients with neoplasia. Here we describe breakpoint cloning of a t(6;9)(p21;q34) translocation from a patient with a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), facilitated by conversion technology and array-based comparative genomic hybridization, which revealed a rearrangement translocating the IER3 coding region away from critical flanking/regulatory elements and to a transcript-poor chromosomal region, markedly decreasing expression. Using split-signal and locus-specific FISH probes, we analyzed 204 patients with diverse hematologic malignancies accompanied by clonal chromosome 6p21 abnormalities, and found 8 additional patients with MDS with IER3 rearrangements (translocations or amplification). While FISH studies on 157 additional samples from patients with MDS and a normal-karyotype were unrevealing, and sequencing the IER3 coding and proximal promoter regions of 74 MDS patients disclosed no point mutations, RT-PCR results suggested that dysregulated expression of IER3 is common in MDS (61% >4 fold increase or decrease in expression with decreased expression primarily in early MDS and increased expression primarily in later MDS progressing towards leukemia), consistent with findings in previous microarray experiments. These data support involvement of IER3 in the pathobiology of MDS. PMID:19773435

  5. Results of Phase II Randomized Study of Low-Dose Decitabine with or without Valproic Acid in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Jean Pierre; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Huang, Xuelin; Cortes, Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Brandt, Mark; Pierce, Sherry; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypomethylating agents have shown activity in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Pre-clinical and single-arm trials have suggested that adding histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may synergize the epigenetic modulation of hypomethylating agents and improve treatment results. Study Aim To evaluate the possible benefit of adding valproic acid, an HDAC inhibitor, to decitabine, in the treatment of MDS and AML. Methods Patients with higher risk MDS or with AML and age 60 years or older were eligible. Patients were randomized in a Bayesian response-adaptive design to decitabine 20mg/m2 intravenously (IV) daily for 5 days or to decitabine with valproic acid 50mg/1kg orally daily for 7 days. Courses were repeated every 4 to 6 weeks. A maximum of 150 patients were to be treated. Results A total of 149 patients were treated on study, including 87 patients with MDS and 62 patients with AML. The median age was 69 years (range 20 to 89 years; 42% ≥ 70 years). Overall, 34% of patients achieved CR and 55% had an objective response. The median survival was 11.9 months and the estimated 2-year survival rate was 27%. Outcome was not different with the addition of valproic acid to decitabine versus decitabine alone in relation to CR, overall response, or survival. Subset analyses did not demonstrate a benefit within the MDS or AML categories. Toxicities were higher with the combination, in particular neurotoxicity. Conclusions Adding valproic acid to decitabine was not associated with improved outcome in the treatment of MDS or elderly AML. Future therapies may consider combining hypomethylating agents with better HDAC inhibitors and using different schedules. PMID:25336333

  6. Impaired proliferative potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes is associated with abnormal WNT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pavlaki, Konstantia; Pontikoglou, Charalampos G; Demetriadou, Anthi; Batsali, Aristea K; Damianaki, Athina; Simantirakis, Emmanouil; Kontakis, Michail; Galanopoulos, Athanasios; Kotsianidis, Ioannis; Kastrinaki, Maria-Christina; Papadaki, Helen A

    2014-07-15

    It has been shown that bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) display defective proliferative potential. We have probed the impaired replicative capacity of culture-expanded MSCs in MDS patients (n=30) compared with healthy subjects (n=32) by studying senescence characteristics and gene expression associated with WNT/transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFB1) signaling pathways. We have also explored the consequences of the impaired patient MSC proliferative potential by investigating their differentiation potential and the capacity to support normal CD34(+) cell growth under coculture conditions. Patient MSCs displayed decreased gene expression of the senescence-associated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B, along with PARG1, whereas the mean telomere length was upregulated in patient MSCs. MDS-derived MSCs exhibited impaired capacity to support normal CD34(+) myeloid and erythroid colony formation. No significant changes were observed between patients and controls in gene expression related to TGFB1 pathway. Patient MSCs displayed upregulated non-canonical WNT expression, combined with downregulated canonical WNT expression and upregulated canonical WNT inhibitors. MDS-derived MSCs displayed defective osteogenic and adipogenic lineage priming under non-differentiating culture conditions. Pharmacological activation of canonical WNT signaling in patient MDSs led to an increase in cell proliferation and upregulation in the expression of early osteogenesis-related genes. This study indicates abnormal WNT signaling in MSCs of MDS patients and supports the concept of a primary MSC defect that might have a contributory effect in MDS natural history.

  7. Pharmacoeconomic considerations in treating iron overload in patients with β-thalassaemia, sickle cell disease and myelodysplastic syndromes in the US: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Donga, Prina Z; Corral, Mitra; Sasane, Medha; Miller, Jeffrey D; Pashos, Chris L

    2011-06-01

    Patients with β-thalassaemia, sickle cell disease (SCD) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) require chronic blood transfusions, which can lead to iron overload and substantial morbidity and mortality. To reduce the excess iron and its deleterious effects, available iron chelation therapy (ICT) in the US includes oral deferasirox or infusional deferoxamine (DFO). The aim of this study was to review and synthesize the available pharmacoeconomic evidence on ICT in patients with β-thalassaemia, SCD and MDS in the US. We systematically identified and reviewed pharmacoeconomic studies of ICT in patients with β-thalassaemia, SCD and MDS that either were published in MEDLINE-indexed, English-language journals from 1999 to 2009, or appeared in medical society websites and scientific meeting abstracts. We assessed available cost-of-illness, cost-of-treatment, cost-consequence, cost-effectiveness, utility and patient-satisfaction studies. The majority of the 20 identified studies assessed cost of treatment, mainly focusing on acquisition and administration costs of ICTs. Gaps in the published literature include current data on direct medical costs for patients with MDS, direct medical costs associated with complications of iron overload, direct non-medical costs, indirect costs and patient utilities. Different underlying model assumptions, methodologies and comparators were found in the cost-effectiveness studies, which yielded a broad range of incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for different ICTs. Comprehensive cost-of-illness studies are needed to address data gaps in the published literature regarding the economic burden of iron overload. Comparative-effectiveness studies that evaluate clinical, economic and patient-reported outcomes would help the medical community to better understand the value of different ICTs.

  8. Radiolabeled Anti-CD45 Antibody with Reduced-Intensity Conditioning and Allogeneic Transplantation for Younger Patients with Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mawad, Raya; Gooley, Ted A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Shields, Andrew T.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Storb, Rainer; Green, Damian J.; Maloney, David G.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2014-01-01

    We treated patients under age 50 years with 131I-anti-CD45 antibody combined with fludarabine and 2 Gy total body irradiation to create an improved hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) strategy for advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients. Fifteen patients received 332–1,561 mCi of 131I, delivering an average of 27 Gy to bone marrow, 84 Gy to spleen, and 21 Gy to liver. Although a maximum dose of 28 Gy was delivered to the liver, no dose-limiting toxicity was observed. Marrow doses were arbitrarily capped at 43 Gy to avoid radiation-induced stromal damage; however no graft failure or evidence of stromal damage was observed. Twelve patients (80%) developed Grade II graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), one patient developed Grade III GVHD, and no patients developed Grade IV GVHD during the first 100 days after HCT. Of the 12 patients with chronic GVHD data, 10 developed chronic GVHD, generally involving the skin and mouth. Six patients (40%) are surviving after a median of 5.0 years (range, 4.2 to 8.3 years). The estimated survival at 1 year was 73% among the 15 treated patients. Eight patients relapsed, 7 of whom subsequently died. The median time to relapse among these 8 patients was 54 days (range, 26 to 1364 days). No cases of non-relapse mortality were observed in the first year after transplant. However, two patients died in remission from complications of chronic GVHD and cardiomyopathy, at 18 months and 14 months after transplant, respectively. This study suggests that patients may tolerate myeloablative doses >28 Gy delivered to the liver using 131I-anti-CD45 antibody in addition to standard reduced intensity conditioning. Moreover, the arbitrary limit of 43 Gy to the marrow may be unnecessarily conservative, and continued escalation of targeted radioimmunotherapy doses may be feasible to further reduce relapse. PMID:24858425

  9. Lenalidomide: a review of its use in patients with transfusion-dependent anaemia due to low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndrome associated with 5q chromosome deletion.

    PubMed

    Syed, Yahiya Y; Scott, Lesley J

    2013-07-01

    Lenalidomide (Revlimid(®)), a thalidomide analogue, is an orally administered second generation immunomodulator with anti-angiogenic, antineoplastic, anti-inflammatory and pro-erythropoietic properties. It is approved for the treatment of patients with transfusion-dependent anaemia due to International Prognostic Scoring System low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) associated with either chromosome 5q deletion [del(5q)] with or without additional cytogenetic abnormalities (US, Japan and Switzerland etc.), or with an isolated del(5q) cytogenetic abnormality when other therapeutic options are insufficient or inadequate (EU) [featured indication]. In a randomized, double-blind, multicentre, registrational trial (MDS-004; n = 205) in this patient population, a significantly higher proportion of lenalidomide recipients than placebo recipients achieved red blood cell transfusion independence for ≥26 consecutive weeks (primary endpoint for efficacy) and cytogenetic responses. The erythroid response to lenalidomide was accompanied by an increase in the haemoglobin levels. These efficacy outcomes are generally consistent with those seen in an earlier noncomparative registrational trial (MDS-003; n = 148). In MDS-004, lenalidomide also significantly improved health-related quality of life compared with placebo at 12 weeks. Retrospective analyses that compared outcomes between lenalidomide-treated patients with low- or intermediate-1-risk del(5q) MDS and multicentre registry cohorts showed that lenalidomide treatment did not appear to increase the risk of progression to acute myeloid leukaemia. Lenalidomide had a manageable safety profile in the registrational trials, with ≤20 % of patients discontinuing treatment because of adverse events. The most common adverse events (incidence ≥20 %) occurring in lenalidomide recipients were thrombocytopenia and neutropenia, which were generally managed by dosage reductions and/or interruptions, and

  10. Early lenalidomide treatment for low and intermediate-1 International Prognostic Scoring System risk myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q) before transfusion dependence.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Esther N; Lauseker, Michael; Aloe Spiriti, Maria Antonietta; Poloni, Antonella; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Palumbo, Giuseppe A; Balleari, Enrico; Sanpaolo, Grazia; Volpe, Antonio; Ricco, Alessandra; Ronco, Francesca; Alati, Caterina; D'Errigo, Maria Grazia; Santacaterina, Irene; Kündgen, Andrea; Germing, Ulrich; Latagliata, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Lenalidomide is approved for the treatment of transfusion-dependent (TD) del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, few data are available in patients with transfusion-independent (TI) del(5q) MDS. In the first, observational, part of this 2-part study, we assessed the impact of transfusion dependence on overall survival (OS) and non-leukemic death in untreated del(5q) MDS patients who were TD (n = 136), TI with hemoglobin (Hb) ≥10 mg/dL (n = 88), or TI with Hb <10 mg/dL (n = 96). In the second, interventional, part we assessed the quality-of-life (QoL) benefits and clinical efficacy of lenalidomide (10 mg/day) in 12 patients with TI del(5q) MDS and Hb <10 mg/dL. In the untreated population, OS was significantly longer in TI than in TD patients (TI [Hb ≥10 g/dL], 108 months; TI [Hb <10 g/dL], 77 months; TD, 44 months). Transfusion dependence also negatively impacted non-leukemic death rates. In the interventional part of the study, baseline Hb levels were found to correlate significantly with physical (R = 0.666, P = 0.035) and fatigue (R = 0.604, P = 0.049) QoL scores. Median physical QoL scores improved significantly after 12 weeks' treatment with lenalidomide (+12.5; P = 0.020). Evaluable TI patients experienced early increases in Hb levels, and all attained an erythroid response. Our findings suggest that TI patients with moderate anemia may benefit from early treatment with lenalidomide.

  11. High level of full-length cereblon mRNA in lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated 5q deletion is implicated in the efficacy of lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Jonasova, Anna; Bokorova, Radka; Polak, Jaroslav; Vostry, Martin; Kostecka, Arnost; Hajkova, Hana; Neuwirtova, Radana; Siskova, Magda; Sponerova, Dana; Cermak, Jaroslav; Mikulenkova, Dana; Cervinek, Libor; Brezinova, Jana; Michalova, Kyra; Fuchs, Ota

    2015-07-01

    Downregulation of cereblon (CRBN) gene expression is associated with resistance to the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide and poor survival outcomes in multiple myeloma (MM) patients. However, the importance of CRBN gene expression in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and its impact on lenalidomide therapy are not clear. In this study, we evaluate cereblon expression in mononuclear cells isolated from bone marrow [23 lower risk MDS patients with isolated 5q deletion (5q-), 37 lower risk MDS patients with chromosome 5 without the deletion of long arms (non-5q-), and 24 healthy controls] and from peripheral blood (38 patients with 5q-, 52 non-5q- patients and 25 healthy controls) to gain insight into, firstly, the role of cereblon in lower risk MDS patients with or without 5q deletion and, secondly, into the mechanisms of lenalidomide action. Patients with 5q- lower risk MDS have the highest levels of CRBN mRNA in comparison with both lower risk MDS without the deletion of long arms of chromosome 5 and healthy controls. CRBN gene expression was measured using the quantitative TaqMan real-time PCR. High levels of CRBN mRNA were detected in all lenalidomide responders during the course of therapy. A significant decrease of the CRBN mRNA level during lenalidomide treatment is associated with loss of response to treatment and disease progression. These results suggest that, similar to the treatment of MM, high levels of full-length CRBN mRNA in lower risk 5q- patients are necessary for the efficacy of lenalidomide.

  12. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay identifies additional copy number changes compared with R-band karyotype and provide more accuracy prognostic information in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zefeng; Zhang, Yue; Liu, Jinqin; Li, Bing; Fang, Liwei; Zhang, Hongli; Pan, Lijuan; Hu, Naibo; Qu, Shiqiang; Cai, Wenyu; Ru, Kun; Jia, Yujiao; Huang, Gang; Xiao, Zhijian

    2017-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis provides important diagnostic and prognostic information for patients with Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and plays an essential role in the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay is a recently developed technique to identify targeted cytogenetic aberrations in MDS patients. In the present study, we evaluated the results obtained using an MLPA assay in 437 patients with MDS to determine the efficacy of MLPA analysis. Using R-banding karyotyping, 45% (197/437) of MDS patients had chromosomal abnormalities, whereas MLPA analysis detected that 35% (153/437) of MDS cases contained at least one copy-number variations (CNVs) .2/5 individuals (40%) with R-band karyotype failures had trisomy 8 detected using only MLPA. Clonal cytogenetic abnormalities were detected in 20/235 (8.5%) MDS patients with a normal R-band karyotype, and 12/20 (60%) of those patients were reclassified into a higher-risk IPSS-R prognostic category. When sequencing and cytogenetics were combined, the fraction of patients with MDS-related oncogenic lesions increased to 87.3% (233/267 cases). MLPA analysis determined that the median OS of patients with a normal karyotype (n=218) was 65 months compared with 27 months in cases with an aberrant karyotype (P=0.002) in 240 patients with normal or failed karyotypes by R-banding karyotyping. The high-resolution MPLA assay is an efficient and reliable method that can be used in conjunction with R-band karyotyping to detect chromosomal abnormalities in patients with suspected MDS. MLPA may also provide more accurate prognostic information. PMID:27906673

  13. Curcumin reduces the expression of survivin, leading to enhancement of arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yingjian; Weng, Guangyang; Fan, Jiaxin; Li, Zhangqiu; Wu, Jianwei; Li, Yuanming; Zheng, Rong; Xia, Pingfang; Guo, Kunyuan

    2016-01-01

    Low response, treatment-related complications and relapse due to the low sensitivity of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and leukemia stem cells (LSCs) or pre-LSCs to arsenic trioxide (ATO), represent the main problems following treatment with ATO alone in patients with MDS. To solve these problems, a chemosensitization agent can be applied to increase the susceptibility of these cells to ATO. Curcumin (CUR), which possesses a wide range of anticancer activities, is a commonly used chemosensitization agent for various types of tumors, including hematopoietic malignancies. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects and potential mechanisms in MDS-SKM-1 and leukemia stem-like KG1a cells treated with CUR and ATO alone or in combination. CUR and ATO exhibited growth inhibition detected by MTT assays and apoptosis analyzed by Annexin V/PI analyses in both SKM-1 and KG1a cells. Apoptosis of SKM-1 and KG1a cells determined by Annexin V/PI was significantly enhanced in the combination groups compared with the groups treated with either agent alone. Further evaluation was performed by western blotting for two hallmark markers of apoptosis, caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP. Co-treatment of the cells with CUR and ATO resulted in significant synergistic effects. In SKM-1 and KG1a cells, 31 and 13 proteins analyzed by protein array assays were modulated, respectively. Notably, survivin protein expression levels were downregulated in both cell lines treated with CUR alone and in combination with ATO, particularly in the latter case. Susceptibility to apoptosis was significantly increased in SKM-1 and KG1a cells treated with siRNA-survivin and ATO. These results suggested that CUR increased the sensitivity of SKM-1 and KG1a cells to ATO by downregulating the expression of survivin. PMID:27430728

  14. Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Analysis of Late Relapse Using Comparative Karyotype and Chromosome Genome Array Testing

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Min; Scott, Bart L.; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Gooley, Ted; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Relapse is a major cause of failure after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We analyzed the relapse pattern in 1007 patients who underwent transplantation for MDS to identify factors that may determine the timing of relapse. Overall, 254 patients relapsed: 213 before 18 months and 41 later than 18 months after HCT, a time point frequently used in clinical trials. The hazard of relapse declined progressively with time since transplantation. A higher proportion of patients with early relapse had high-risk cytogenetics compared with patients with late relapse (P =.009). Patients with late relapse had suggestively longer postrelapse survival than patients who relapsed early, although the difference was not statistically significant (P =.07). Among 41 late relapsing patients, sequential cytogenetic data were available in 36. In 41% of these, new clonal abnormalities in addition to pre-HCT findings were identified at relapse; in 30% pre-HCT abnormalities were replaced by new clones, in 17.3% the same clone was present before HCT and at relapse, and in 9.7%, no abnormalities were present either before HCT or at relapse. Comparative chromosomal genomic array testing in 3 patients with late relapse showed molecular differences not detectable by cytogenetics between the pre-HCT clones and the clones at relapse. These data show that late relapses are not infrequent in patients who undergo transplantation for MDS. The pattern of new cytogenetic alterations at late relapse is similar to that observed in patients with early relapse and supports the concept that MDS relapse early and late after HCT is frequently due to the emergence of clones not detectable before HCT. PMID:25953732

  15. New Comprehensive Cytogenetic Scoring System for Primary Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and Oligoblastic Acute Myeloid Leukemia After MDS Derived From an International Database Merge

    PubMed Central

    Schanz, Julie; Tüchler, Heinz; Solé, Francesc; Mallo, Mar; Luño, Elisa; Cervera, José; Granada, Isabel; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Steidl, Christian; Fonatsch, Christa; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Nösslinger, Thomas; Valent, Peter; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Aul, Carlo; Lübbert, Michael; Stauder, Reinhard; Krieger, Otto; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Faderl, Stefan; Pierce, Sherry; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Bennett, John M.; Greenberg, Peter; Germing, Ulrich; Haase, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The karyotype is a strong independent prognostic factor in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Since the implementation of the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) in 1997, knowledge concerning the prognostic impact of abnormalities has increased substantially. The present study proposes a new and comprehensive cytogenetic scoring system based on an international data collection of 2,902 patients. Patients and Methods Patients were included from the German-Austrian MDS Study Group (n = 1,193), the International MDS Risk Analysis Workshop (n = 816), the Spanish Hematological Cytogenetics Working Group (n = 849), and the International Working Group on MDS Cytogenetics (n = 44) databases. Patients with primary MDS and oligoblastic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after MDS treated with supportive care only were evaluated for overall survival (OS) and AML evolution. Internal validation by bootstrap analysis and external validation in an independent patient cohort were performed to confirm the results. Results In total, 19 cytogenetic categories were defined, providing clear prognostic classification in 91% of all patients. The abnormalities were classified into five prognostic subgroups (P < .001): very good (median OS, 61 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.5; n = 81); good (49 months; HR, 1.0 [reference category]; n = 1,809); intermediate (26 months; HR, 1.6; n = 529); poor (16 months; HR, 2.6; n = 148); and very poor (6 months; HR, 4.2; n = 187). The internal and external validations confirmed the results of the score. Conclusion In conclusion, these data should contribute to the ongoing efforts to update the IPSS by refining the cytogenetic risk categories. PMID:22331955

  16. Phase I study of UCN-01 and perifosine in patients with relapsed and refractory acute leukemias and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gojo, Ivana; Perl, Alexander; Luger, Selina; Baer, Maria R.; Norsworthy, Kelly J.; Bauer, Kenneth S.; Tidwell, Michael; Fleckinger, Stephanie; Carroll, Martin; Sausville, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The PI3K-Akt pathway is frequently activated in acute leukemias and represents an important therapeutic target. UCN-01 and perifosine are known to inhibit Akt activation. Methods The primary objective of this phase I study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of UCN-01 given in combination with perifosine in patients with advanced acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndrome. Secondary objectives included safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy. Perifosine 150 mg every 6 hours was given orally on day 1 followed by 100 mg once a day continuously in 28-day cycles. UCN-01 was given intravenously over 3 hours on day 4 at three dose levels (DL1=40 mg/m2; DL2=65 mg/m2; DL3=90 mg/m2). Results Thirteen patients were treated (DL1, n=6; DL2, n=4; DL3, n=3) according to a traditional “3+3” design. Two patients at the DL3 experienced dose-limiting toxicity including grade 3-4 pericardial effusion, hypotension, hyperglycemia, hyperkalemia, constitutional symptoms and grade 5 pneumonitis. Other frequent toxicities were grade 1-2 nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, fatigue and hyperglycemia. The MTD was determined to be UCN-01 65 mg/m2 with perifosine 100 mg a day. No appreciable direct Akt inhibition could be demonstrated in patients’ mononuclear cells using Western blot, however, reduced phosphorylation of the downstream target ribosomal protein S6 in leukemic blasts was noted by intracellular flow cytometry. No objective responses were observed on this study. Conclusion UCN-01 and perifosine can be safely administered, but this regimen lacked clinical efficacy. This approach may have failed because of insufficient Akt inhibition in vivo. PMID:23443507

  17. Durable response to lenalidomide in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome associated with isolated 5q deletion and JAK2 V617F mutation despite discontinuation of treatment

    PubMed Central

    HATZIMICHAEL, ELEFTHERIA; LAGOS, KONSTANTINOS; VASSOU, AMALIA; GOUGOPOULOU, DORA; PAPOUDOU-BAI, ALEXANDRA; BRIASOULIS, EVANGELOS

    2016-01-01

    Loss of a section of the long arm of chromosome 5, as a sole cytogenetic abnormality, characterizes a rare type of myelodysplastic syndrome [del(5q) MDS] and the co-existence of the JAK2 V617F mutation occurs in a small subset of these cases. Patients with isolated del(5q) MDS have a relatively favorable prognosis, with transformation to acute myeloid leukemia occurring in <10%, and their disease responds well to lenalidomide. However the optimal therapeutic approach for patients with del(5q) MDS in coexistence with the JAK2 V617F mutation, which is common to myeloproliferative neoplasms, remains to be elucidated. The present study reports a 77-year-old, transfusion-dependent female patient diagnosed with del(5q) MDS and a concomitant JAK2 V617F mutation. The patient was started on 10 mg lenalidomide daily for 21 days in a 28 day-cycle and within the first month of treatment, the patient became transfusion-independent. The only toxicity observed was grade 3 neutropenia, which was managed with transient treatment discontinuation and dose reduction on restart (5 mg). The patient achieved a complete cytogenetic and molecular response (normal karyotype and undetected JAK2 V617F mutation) within 6 months of treatment. However, 12 months post treatment initiation and while on hematological, cytogenetic and molecular response, the patient was unwilling to continue on treatment and lenalidomide was discontinued. The patient remains in hematological response, which lasts for >5 years despite treatment discontinuation. The present case highlights the coexistence of the JAK2 V617F mutation in del(5q) MDS and suggests that lenalidomide treatment is beneficial and effective for these patients, leading to complete hematological, cytogenetic and molecular response. Hematological response may be sustained for long periods of time, even following the discontinuation of the treatment. PMID:27330758

  18. Leukemia as a cause of death among patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in a population- based cancer registry: improving estimates of MDS-related mortality in the population.

    PubMed

    Polednak, Anthony P; Phillips, Cathryn

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a heterogeneous group of myeloid neoplasms diagnosed mostly in elderly persons, are of increasing interest in an aging population and are associated with variable risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The numbers of deaths related to MDS in the population are underestimated in routine US cancer mortality statistics which are based on only the underlying cause (UC) rather than multiple causes (MCs) of death recorded on death certificates. Additional MDS-related deaths, however, may be missed if some MDS patients die with mention of leukemia but not MDS on their death certificate. This requires studies of MCs of death among all MDS patients in population-based tumor registries. This study examined MCs of death among patients diagnosed with MDS in 2001- 2009 and reported to the population-based Connecticut Tumor Registry. MDS was the UC for 199 deaths (25.7% of all 773) and was coded as other than UC for 160 (20.7%). Another 121 (15.7%) death records, however, had leukemia without mention of MDS; the majority were coded to AML and most of the others as unspecified type of acute leukemia. If these 121 deaths are added to the 359 with mention of MDS, the total of MDS-related deaths would be 480 (or 62.1% of all 773 deaths). A total of 178 deaths (23.0% of all 773) were coded to leukemia as the UC, and would be included with leukemia (not MDS) in routine cancer mortality statistics. Leukemia diagnosed since 2010 in MDS patients is reportable to registries as a new primary cancer. This new rule will help central cancer registries to confirm leukemia diagnoses coded on death records, as part of the process of improving surveillance of cancer mortality rates in the population.

  19. Factors associated with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) among patients in a population-based study of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Smith, Angela R; Warlick, Erica D; Roesler, Michelle A; Poynter, Jenny N; Richardson, Michaela; Nguyen, Phuong; Cioc, Adina; Hirsch, Betsy; Ross, Julie A

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by dysplastic changes in the bone marrow, ineffective erythropoiesis, and an increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Treatment planning for patients with MDS is a complex process, and we sought to better characterize hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes and the factors that play into decision-making regarding referral of adults with MDS for definitive therapy with HCT. Patients enrolled in a population-based study of MDS between April 2010 and January 2013 who underwent HCT within the first year after enrollment were included in this analysis. Age- and risk-matched MDS patient controls also enrolled during that time period were used as a comparison. Survival was significantly better in the HCT group (48 vs. 21 %, log-rank p value 0.009). Non-HCT patients were more likely to have comorbidities, and HCT patients were more likely to have a college degree and an income >$80,000. All three of these variables were independently associated with HCT, but none impacted survival. Patients with MDS in our study who underwent HCT had better survival than a comparable group of patients who did not undergo HCT. With refined treatment techniques, more patients may be able to be considered for this therapy. More work needs to be done to determine why education and income appear to impact the decision to pursue HCT, but these factors may impact referral to an academic center where aggressive therapy like HCT is more likely to be considered.

  20. [Distribution of abnormal cell clone with deletion of chromosome 20q in marrow cell lineages and apoptosis cells in myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Qin, Ling; Wang, Chun; Qin, You-Wen; Xie, Kuang-Cheng; Yan, Shi-Ke; Gao, Yan-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Rui; Zhao, Chu-Xian

    2008-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of abnormal clone in marrow cell lineages and apoptosis cells in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with deletion of chromosome 20q. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing myeloid precursors (CD15), erythroid precursors (GPA), T cells (CD3(+)CD56(-)CD16(-)), B cells (CD19), NK cells (CD3(-)CD56(+)CD16(+)) were used to sort bone marrow cells in a MDS patient with del (20q) by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Annexin V-FITC and PI were used to sort bone marrow Annexin V(+)PI(-) and Annexin V(-)PI(-) cells by FACS. The sorted positive cells were detected by interphase dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (D-FISH) using a LSI D20S108 probe (Spectrum Orange) and a Telvysion TM 20p probe (Spectrum Green). FACS and FISH analysis were also performed on the samples from 4 cases with normal karyotype. The results showed that the proportions of MDS clone in the myeloid and erythroid precursors were 70.50% and 93.33% respectively, in the RAEB-1 patient with del (20q) and were obviously higher than that in control group (5.39% and 6.17%). The proportions of abnormal clone in T, B and NK cells were 3.23%, 4.32% and 5.77% respectively and were less than that in control group (5.76%, 4.85%, 6.36%). The percentage of apoptotic cells in the bone marrow nucleated cells was 16.09%. The proportions of MDS clone in Annexin V(+)PI(-) and Annexin V(-)PI(-) cells were 32.48% and 70.11%, respectively. It is concluded that most myeloid and erythroid precursors are originated from the abnormal clone in MDS with del (20q). A little part of apoptotic cells are derived from the abnormal clone.

  1. Mixed T Lymphocyte Chimerism after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Transplantation Is Predictive for Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hans C; Saliba, Rima M; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Charafeddine, Yasmeen; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Alatrash, Gheath; Andersson, Borje S; Popat, Uday; Kebriaei, Partow; Ciurea, Stefan; Oran, Betul; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Chimerism testing after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represents a promising tool for predicting disease relapse, although its precise role in this setting remains unclear. We investigated the predictive value of T lymphocyte chimerism analysis at 90 to 120 days after allo-HSCT in 378 patients with AML/MDS who underwent busulfan/fludarabine-based myeloablative preparative regimens. Of 265 (70%) patients with available T lymphocyte chimerism data, 43% of patients in first or second complete remission (CR1/CR2) at the time of transplantation had complete (100%) donor T lymphocytes at day +90 to +120 compared with 60% of patients in the non-CR1/CR2 cohort (P = .005). In CR1/CR2 patients, donor T lymphocyte chimerism ≤ 85% at day +90 to +120 was associated with a higher frequency of 3-year disease progression (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 18% to 46% versus 15%; 95% CI, 9% to 23%; hazard ratio [HR], 2.1; P = .04). However, in the more advanced, non-CR1/CR2 cohort, mixed T lymphocyte chimerism was not associated with relapse (37%; 95% CI, 20% to 66% versus 34%; 95% CI, 25% to 47%; HR, 1.3; P = .60). These findings demonstrate that early T lymphocyte chimerism testing at day +90 to +120 is a useful approach for predicting AML/MDS disease recurrence in patients in CR1/CR2 at the time of transplantation.

  2. Low CD34 dose is associated with poor survival after reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Törlén, Johan; Ringdén, Olle; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Batiwalla, Minoo; Chen, Junfang; Erkers, Tom; Ho, Vincent; Kebriaei, Partow; Keever-Taylor, Carolyn; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila; Lazarus, Hillard M; Laughlin, Mary J; Lill, Michael; O'Brien, Tracey; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Rocha, Vanderson; Savani, Bipin N; Szwajcer, David; Valcarcel, David; Eapen, Mary

    2014-09-01

    Reduced-intensity conditioning/nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens are increasingly used in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Reports have shown CD34(+) dose to be important for transplantation outcome using myeloablative conditioning. The role of CD34(+) dose of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) has not been previously analyzed in a large population undergoing reduced-intensity conditioning/nonmyeloablative HCT. We studied 1054 patients, ages 45 to 75 years, with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome who underwent transplantation between 2002 and 2011. Results of multivariate analysis showed that PBPC from HLA-matched siblings containing <4 × 10(6) CD34(+)/kg was associated with higher nonrelapse mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 2.03; P = .001), overall mortality (HR, 1.48; P = .008), and lower neutrophil (odds ratio [OR], .76; P = .03) and platelet (OR, .76; P = .03) recovery. PBPC from unrelated donors with CD34(+) dose < 6 × 10(6) CD34(+)/kg was also associated with higher nonrelapse (HR, 1.38; P = .02) and overall mortality (HR, 1.20; P = .05). In contrast to reports after myeloablative HCT, CD34(+) dose did not affect relapse or graft-versus-host disease with either donor type. An upper cell dose limit was not associated with adverse outcomes. These data suggest that PBPC CD34(+) doses >4 × 10(6) CD34(+)/kg and >6 × 10(6) CD34(+)/kg are optimal for HLA-matched sibling and unrelated donor HCT, respectively.

  3. Double minute chromosomes in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia are associated with micronuclei, MYC or MLL amplification, and complex karyotype.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yang O; Tang, Guilin; Talwalkar, Sameer S; Khoury, Joseph D; Ohanian, Maro; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Abruzzo, Lynne V

    2016-01-01

    Double minute chromosomes (dmin) are small, paired chromatin bodies that lack a centromere and represent a form of extrachromosomal gene amplification. Dmin are rare in myeloid neoplasms and are generally associated with a poor prognosis. Most studies of dmin in myeloid neoplasms are case reports or small series. In the current study, we present the clinicopathologic and cytogenetic features of 22 patients with myeloid neoplasms harboring dmin. These neoplasms included acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 18), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 3), and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) (n = 1). The AML cases consisted of AML with myelodysplasia-related changes (n = 13) and therapy-related AML (n = 5). Dmin were detected in initial pre-therapy samples in 14 patients with AML or CMML; they were acquired during the disease course in 8 patients who had AML or MDS. The presence of dmin was associated with micronuclei (18/18; 100%), complex karyotype (17/22; 77.3%), and amplification of MYC (12/16; 75%) or MLL (4/16; 25%). Immunohistochemical staining for MYC performed on bone marrow core biopsy or clot sections revealed increased MYC protein in all 19 cases tested. Except for one patient, most patients failed to respond to risk-adapted chemotherapies. At last follow up, all patients had died of disease after a median of 5 months following dmin detection. In conclusion, dmin in myeloid neoplasms commonly harbor MYC or MLL gene amplification and manifest as micronuclei within leukemic blasts. Dmin are often associated with myelodysplasia or therapy-related disease, and complex karyotypes.

  4. Single nucleotide polymorphism array-based karyotyping in acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome with trisomy 8 as the sole chromosomal abnormality.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Chorong; Mun, Yeung Chul; Seong, Chu Myong; Han, Sung-Hee; Chung, Wha Soon; Huh, Jungwon

    2013-01-01

    The clinical heterogeneity of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with trisomy 8 as the sole abnormality may result from cytogenetically undetectable genetic changes. The purpose of this study was to identify hidden genomic aberrations not detected by metaphase cytogenetics (MC) using high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A)-based karyotyping in AML/MDS patients with a sole trisomy 8. The study group included 8 patients (3 AML and 5 MDS) and array-based karyotyping was done using whole-genome SNP-A (SNP 6.0 and SNP 2.7M). By SNP-A, additional genomic aberrations not detected by MC were identified in 2 patients: 1 AML patient exhibited a copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) of 3q21.1-q29 and 11q13.1-q25 and the other patient with MDS (refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia) had CN-LOH of 2p25.3-p15. In particular, the latter patient progressed to AML 18 months after the diagnosis. In 3 patients, aberrations in addition to trisomy 8 were not identified by SNP-A. In the remaining 3 patients, SNP-A could not detect trisomy 8, while trisomy 8 was found in 25-67% of metaphase cells by MC. This study suggests that additional genomic aberrations may in fact be present even in cases of trisomy 8 as sole abnormality by MC, and SNP-A could be a useful karyotyping tool to identify hidden aberrations such as CN-LOH.

  5. Therapy-related patterns of cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome post polycythemia vera: single center experience and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Swolin, Birgitta; Rödjer, Stig; Westin, Jan

    2008-06-01

    A minor fraction of patients with polycythemia vera (PV) develop a terminal acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Analysis of the cytogenetic abnormalities during AML or MDS may help in understanding if this development is part of the natural course of the disease or induced by myelosuppressive therapy. Thirty-six cases with AML or MDS post PV, collected in a single Swedish institution during a 33-year period, are described with special regard to time to development of AML or MDS, therapy given during active PV, and cytogenetic findings during AML or MDS. A further 118 cases of AML or MDS post PV, in whom type of therapy during active PV and cytogenetic findings during AML or MDS were reported, were collected from the literature. AML or MDS developed in our own series after 1-30 years with a fairly constant rate (two cases per year). The most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities were +1q, -5, 5q-, -7, 7q-, +8, +9, 11q-, 13q-, and 20q-. When patients in the total material (n = 154) were divided with regard to treatment during active PV, marked differences were observed. The highest frequency of abnormalities was found in patients given multiple lines of therapy (n = 61), dominating features being -5/5q- in 28 patients (46%), -7/7q- in 19 patients (31%), numerous translocations in 24 patients (39%), and unidentified markers in 22 patients (36%). Half of the patients treated with hydroxyurea alone showed a -5 or 5q- abnormality. In patients treated with phlebotomy alone, +8 and +9 were the most frequent findings. The type of therapy given during active PV influences the type of chromosome abnormalities present during terminal AML or MDS and can also be instrumental in the development of leukemia.

  6. Continuous sequential infusion of fludarabine and cytarabine for elderly patients with acute myeloid leukaemia secondary to a previously diagnosed myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Felicetto; Palmieri, Salvatore; Izzo, Tiziana; Criscuolo, Clelia; Riccardi, Cira

    2010-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) secondary to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is characterized by poor prognosis, namely in older patients. The combination of fludarabine (F) with cytarabine (ARA-C) ± G-CSF was proven as effective in patients with poor risk AML. The efficacy and toxicity of a regimen including F + ARA-C as sequential continuous infusion (CI-FLA) in 64 untreated patients aged >60 years, in which AML arose after a previous MDS, was investigated. Median age was 67 years (61-81). In patients achieving CR, an additional course, followed by G-CSF to mobilize CD34+ cells and subsequent autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) were programmed. Overall, 43 patients (67%) achieved complete remission (CR). There were 10 induction deaths (16%), while 11 patients (17%) were refractory to induction treatment. Thirty-four patients (79% of remitters) were eligible for the consolidation and 30 were monitorized for the mobilization of CD34+ cells, collection being successful in 20 of them (67%). Median number of CD34+ cells/kg collected was 6.8 × 10E6. Thirteen patients (20% of the whole population) received ASCT. Median disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 10 and 9 months, respectively. Survival at 5 years is projected to 15%. The only parameter significantly related to either DFS duration or OS duration was unfavourable cytogenetics, which did significantly influence also CR achievement. CI-FLA is effective in elderly patients with AML secondary to previously diagnosed MDS. Best results are achievable in the subgroup of patients with diploid karyotype.

  7. Interferon-α: A Potentially Effective Treatment for Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndrome after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Lan-Ping; Wang, Yu; Yan, Chen-Hua; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Han, Wei; Wang, Feng-Rong; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-11-01

    In this prospective clinical study, the safety and efficacy of preemptive interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment were investigated and compared with preemptive donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) in patients who were minimal residual disease (MRD)-positive after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT were eligible if they had acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome and were MRD-positive after HSCT. Patients who were able to receive DLI were assigned to a preemptive DLI group (n = 45); patients who could not or did not agree to receive DLI after HSCT received preemptive IFN-α. A total of 22 patients received preemptive IFN-α; the median treatment duration was 35 days (range, 4 to 180 days). Seven patients relapsed, and 1 patient died from severe pneumonia. The 1-year cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after intervention was 90.9% for the IFN-α group and 62.9% for the DLI group (P < .001). MRD status after preemptive intervention was comparable in the 2 groups, and the 1-year cumulative incidence of relapse after intervention was 27.3% for the IFN-α group and 35.6% for the DLI group (P = .514). The 1-year cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality after intervention was 4.5% for the IFN-α group and 4.4% for the DLI group (P = .985). The 1-year probability of disease-free survival after intervention was 68.2% for the IFN-α group and 60.0% for the DLI group (P = .517). In multivariate analysis, early-onset MRD, persistent MRD after intervention, and absence of cGVHD after intervention were significantly associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Thus, preemptive IFN-α may be a potential alternative for MRD-positive patients who cannot receive preemptive DLI after HSCT.

  8. Expression of CDKN1C in the bone marrow of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and secondary acute myeloid leukemia is associated with poor survival after conventional chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Dietrich, Sascha; Andrulis, Mindaugas; Benner, Axel; Longerich, Thomas; Pellagatti, Andrea; Nanda, Kriti; Giese, Thomas; Germing, Ulrich; Baldus, Stefan; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Ho, Anthony D; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2016-09-15

    We tested the hypothesis that proliferative activity of hematopoietic stem cells has impact on survival in newly diagnosed patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). RNA expression profiles of CD34(+) cells were analyzed in 125 MDS patients and compared to healthy controls. Prognostic impact on overall survival (OS) of mRNA proliferation signatures established for solid tumor cells was analyzed retrospectively. For validation on the protein level, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analyses in bone marrow (BM) biopsies were performed, and an independent cohort of 223 MDS and secondary AML patients was investigated. Lower proliferative activity correlated with the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C) and with shorter OS (p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, higher CDKN1C expression was associated with worse OS (p = 0.02). On the BM level, a total of 84 (38%) patients showed CDKN1C protein expression before start of treatment. Patient, disease and treatment characteristics did not differ between CDKN1C-positive and -negative patients. Positive CDKN1C BM status was associated with shorter OS in multivariable analysis (HR 1.54, p = 0.04). There was an interaction between CDKN1C BM status and subsequent treatment with negative impact on OS being most pronounced in patients receiving conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy (n = 83, 2-year OS 30% versus 58%, p = 0.002). In conclusion, low-proliferative phenotype and CDKN1C expression were associated with shorter OS. CDKN1C protein expression in the BM of newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve MDS and secondary AML patients was identified as a prognostic factor for poor survival in patients treated with antiproliferative chemotherapy.

  9. Feasible outcomes of T cell-replete haploidentical stem cell transplantation with reduced-intensity conditioning in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Jung-Ho; Jeon, Young-Woo; Yoon, Jae-Ho; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Lee, Sung-Eun; Choi, Yun-Suk; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Seok; Kim, Hee-Je; Min, Chang-Ki; Lee, Jong-Wook; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Min, Woo-Sung; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Je-Hwan

    2015-02-01

    Even with the recent optimization of haploidentical stem cell transplantation (SCT), its role for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia evolving from MDS (sAML) should be validated. We analyzed the outcomes of consecutive 60 patients with MDS or sAML who received T cell-replete haploidentical SCT after reduced-intensity conditioning with fludarabine, busulfan, and rabbit antithymocyte globuline ± 800 cGy total body irradiation. Patients achieved a rapid neutrophil engraftment after a median of 12 days (range, 8 to 23) and an early immune reconstitution without high incidences of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) II to IV and chronic GVHD (36.7% and 48.3%, respectively). After a median follow-up of 4 years, incidence of relapse and nonrelapse mortality and rate of overall survival and disease-free survival was 34.8%, 23.3%, 46.8%, and 41.9%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the disease status at peak was a significant predictor for relapse (lower-risk MDS versus higher-risk MDS or sAML; hazard ratio [HR], 5.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45 to 22.29; P = .013) and disease-free survival (HR, 4.44; 95% CI, 1.14 to 17.34; P = .032). Chronic GVHD was an additional significant predictor for relapse (no versus yes; HR, 2.87; 95% CI, 1.03 to 7.51; P = .043). Our T cell-replete haploidentical SCT may be a feasible option for patients with MDS and sAML without conventional donors.

  10. [The role of pre-transplant debulking treatment in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation for high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Jordan; Damaj, Gandhi; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) remains unsatisfactory. Variable success in the correction of blood cytopenias, reduction of the proportion of marrow myeloblasts, and normalization of cytogenetics has been achieved with a variety of treatment strategies, including the use of immunosuppressive drugs, differentiating agents, conventional chemotherapy, and hypomethylating agents (HMAs) However, in general, responses have not been complete and have been of limited duration; prolongation of survival, if achieved, on average has been in the range of months. Currently, allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains the only approach with curative potential for patients with higher risk/advanced MDS. Yet, despite the beneficial effects of allo-SCT, post-transplant relapse is a major cause of failure. Debulking prior to transplant treatment in patients with MDS is a matter of debate. The achievement of complete remission (CR) before allo-SCT improves post-transplantation outcome, although it is not clear whether this reflects the selection of patients with more responsive disease or is related to a reduction in disease burden. Higher CR rates in patients with MDS are obtained with induction chemotherapy (ICT) than with hypomethylating agents (HMAs), although HMAs may be active in patients with complex karyotypes in whom ICT almost invariably fails. Furthermore, HMAs have a good toxicity profile compared with ICT and may therefore be considered especially in older patients and in patients with comorbidities. However, all interventions aimed at reducing disease burden before allo-SCT expose patients to the risk of complications, which may prevent them from undergoing transplantation. Therefore, up-front allo-SCT is an option, particularly for patients with life-threatening cytopenias. In the absence of prospective randomized trials, the main therapeutic approaches are discussed in this review.

  11. Pediatrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  12. Pediatric anaphylaxis and hyper IgE syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dosanjh, Amrita

    2017-01-01

    Patients with autosomal-dominant (AD) hyper immunoglobulin E (IgE) syndrome (HIES) or Job syndrome develop frequent dermatologic and pulmonary infections. As patients have an extreme elevation of IgE levels, this database analysis study sought to study the association between AD HIES, Job syndrome, and anaphylaxis. HIES is a heterogeneous group of immune disorders characterized by extremely elevated levels of serum IgE. Although the molecular defects and clinical phenotypes found in association with Job syndrome are well characterized, the association with severe allergic reactions and anaphylaxis is a subject of ongoing investigation. PMID:28280372

  13. Cytogenetic features of 5q deletion and 5q- syndrome in myelodysplastic syndrome in Korea; marker chromosomes proved to be chromosome 5 with interstitial deletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Ryun; Oh, Bora; Hong, Dae Sik; Zang, Dae Young; Yoon, Hwi-Joong; Kim, Hyeoung Joon; Kim, Inho; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Cheong, June-Won; Lee, Kyung-A; Cho, Kyung Sam; Lee, Mark Hong; Bang, Soo-Mee; Kim, Tae Young; Yun, Yeo-Min; Min, Yoo Hong; Lee, You Kyoung; Lee, Dong Soon

    2010-12-01

    We characterized the cytogenetic changes and prognostic characteristics of 133 Korean patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), focusing on 5q- syndrome and MDS with chromosome abnormalities involving 5q deletion according to World Health Organization 2008 classification. In all patients, G banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization for 5q were performed, and in MDS patients with 5q deletion, the deleted region on chromosome 5 was mapped with fluorescence in situ hybridization for EGR1, CSF1R, and PDGFRB. The frequency of isolated del(5q) syndrome and 5q deletion was 2.2% (3 of 137 patients) and 15.3% (21 of 137 patients), respectively. International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) groups were low risk (5.8%), intermediate 1 (51.1%), intermediate 2 (27.8%), and high risk (15.3%). The patients with del(5q) were significantly older (62 years) and showed an unfavorable survival compared to patients without del(5q). Half (53%) of the patients with del(5q) also had complex chromosome abnormalities, including chromosome 7 abnormalities. Of the patients with del(5q), 93.3% were deleted for all three regions on 5q, compared to 66.7% of patients with isolated del(5q). Marker chromosomes proved to be chromosome 5 with interstitial deletion of q arm by fluorescence in situ hybridization in three patients. The biological characteristics of MDS in Korea seem to be markedly different from those of Caucasians, with Koreans having a younger age, lower frequencies of 5q- syndrome, higher frequencies of complex cytogenetic abnormalities including del(5q), and poorer prognosis. We infer that additional chromosome abnormalities contribute to the adverse prognostic impact in patients with del(5q).

  14. [Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome: recommendations of the Nephrology Branch of the Chilean Society of Pediatrics. Part One].

    PubMed

    Hevia, Pilar; Nazal, Vilma; Rosati, María Pía; Quiroz, Lily; Alarcón, Claudia; Márquez, Sonia; Cuevas, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome is the most common glomerular disease in childhood, affecting 1 to 3 per 100,000 children under the age of 16. It most commonly occurs in ages between 2 and 10. Its cause is unknown and its histology corresponds to minimal change disease in 90% of cases, or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. 80 to 90% of cases respond to steroids (steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome) with good prognosis and long-term preservation of renal function over time. 70% of patients with SSNS have one or more relapses in their evolution, and of these, 50% behave as frequent relapsing or steroid-dependent, a group that concentrate the risk of steroid toxicity. Patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome have a poor prognosis and 50% of them evolve to end-stage renal disease. The goal of therapy is to induce and maintain remission of the disease, reducing the risk secondary to proteinuria while minimizing the adverse effects of treatments, especially with prolonged use of corticosteroids. This paper is the result of the collaborative effort of the Nephrology Branch of the Chilean Society of Pediatrics with aims at helping pediatricians and pediatric nephrologists to treat pediatric SNI. In this first part, recommendations of steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome are discussed.

  15. Pediatric renal cryptococcosis: novel manifestations in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome era.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, Pratistadevi K; Sing, Yetish; Deonarain, Julian; Bhimma, Rajendra; Chotey, Nivesh; Sewram, Vikash

    2011-06-01

    Pediatric cryptococcosis has been documented in various organs, but pediatric renal cryptococcosis (RC) remains undocumented to date. The authors report RC in 2 children with AIDS, 7 and 9 years of age, with proteinuria. Both patients, on antiretroviral therapy (ARV) for 28 (patient 1) and 54 (patient 2) weeks each, had secured viral immunosuppression, but immune restoration was realized by patient 1 only. Cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) was diagnosed on the renal biopsy from patient 1 based on the clinicopathological profile and the presence of segmental glomerular and an interstitial lymphoplasmacytic and granulomatous reaction to Cryptococcus neoformans, with a predominance of capsule-deficient fungal forms. The renal biopsy from patient 2 demonstrated typical HIV-associated nephropathy with focal intratubular and interstitial C neoformans yeasts. Pediatric AIDS-associated renal disease must be expanded to include RC and cryptococcal IRIS, and the kidney must be included as a potential sentinel site of IRIS.

  16. Sleep/Wake Modulation of Polysomnographic Patterns has Prognostic Value in Pediatric Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Molteni, Erika; Avantaggiato, Paolo; Formica, Francesca; Pastore, Valentina; Colombo, Katia; Galbiati, Sara; Arrigoni, Filippo; Strazzer, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Sleep patterns of pediatric patients in unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) have been poorly investigated, and the prognostic potential of polysomnography (PSG) in these subjects is still uncertain. The goal of the study was to identify quantitative PSG indices to be applied as possible prognostic markers in pediatric UWS. Methods: We performed PSG in 27 children and adolescents with UWS due to acquired brain damage in the subacute phase. Patients underwent neurological examination and clinical assessment with standardized scales. Outcome was assessed after 36 mo. PSG tracks were scored for sleep stages and digitally filtered. The spectral difference between sleep and wake was computed, as the percent difference at specific spectral frequencies. We computed (1) the ratio between percent power in the delta and alpha frequency bands, (2) the ratio between alpha and theta frequency bands, and (3) the power ratio index, during wake and sleep, as proposed in previous literature. The predictive role of several clinical and PSG measures was tested by logistic regression. Results: Correlation was found between the differential measures of electroencephalographic activity during sleep and wake in several frequency bands and the clinical scales (Glasgow Outcome Score, Level of Cognitive Functioning Assessment Scale, and Disability Rating Scale) at follow-up; the Sleep Patterns for Pediatric Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (SPPUWS) scores correlated with the differential measures, and allowed outcome prediction with 96.3% of accuracy. Conclusions: The differential measure of electroencephalographic activity during sleep and wake in the beta band and, more incisively, SPPUWS can help in determining the capability to recover from pediatric UWS well before the confirmation provided by suitable clinical scales. Citation: Molteni E, Avantaggiato P, Formica F, Pastore V, Colombo K, Galbiati S, Arrigoni F, Strazzer S. Sleep/wake modulation of polysomnographic

  17. Low-dose Ara-C in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute nonlymphoid leukemia. Experience with seven patients.