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Sample records for pediatric myelodysplastic syndromes

  1. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy ... can lead to infection, anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do not cause early symptoms and are ...

  2. Cytogenetics and clinical features of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Koichi; Manabe, Atsushi; Taketani, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Akira; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2014-11-01

    We analyzed the cytogenetics and clinical features of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in Japan. Data on patients (<16 years) diagnosed with MDS from 1990 to 2000 were retrospectively collected from pediatric hematologists in 234 institutions. Chromosome analysis was successfully performed in 255 of 277 MDS patients. The numbers of patients with refractory anemia, refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB), refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEBt), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia were 67 (24%), 51 (18%), 51 (18%), 20 (7%), and 65 (23%), respectively. The other 23 patients (8%) could not be classified specifically. The distribution of childhood MDS in Japan according to the French-American-British subclassification was similar to that in other countries. However, we identified a higher incidence of therapy-related cases. As for relationship between cytogenetics and prognoses, abnormal karyotypes were related to poorer prognoses than normal karyotype (P < 0.01). However, patients with trisomy 8 had prognoses comparable to those with normal karyotypes. Complex karyotypes were associated with poorer prognoses among RAEB and RAEBt patients. In conclusion, prognosis of pediatric MDS is related to cytogenetics. A more precise diagnosis and classification system is needed for childhood MDS.

  3. Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? Since smoking is linked to the ... Syndromes? Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  4. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  5. General Information about Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic Syndromes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  7. How Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndromes Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes Scored? Doctors often group cancers into different stages ... Ask Your Doctor About Myelodysplastic Syndromes? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  8. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Odenike, Olatoyosi; Anastasi, John; Le Beau, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The myelodysplastic syndromes are a diverse group of clonal stem cell disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenias, and an increased propensity to evolve to acute myeloid leukemia. The molecular pathogenesis of these disorders is poorly understood, but recurring chromosomal abnormalities occur in ~50% of cases, and are the focus of much investigation. The availability of newer molecular techniques has allowed the identification of additional genetic aberrations, including mutations and epigenetic changes of prognostic and potential therapeutic importance. This review will focus on the key role of cytogenetic analysis in MDS in the context of the diagnosis, prognosis, and pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:22118747

  9. Do We Know What Causes Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Factors, and Prevention Do We Know What Causes Myelodysplastic Syndromes? Some cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are linked ... Syndromes? Can Myelodysplastic Syndromes Be Prevented? More In Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  10. Cytogenetic studies of Brazilian pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome cases: challenges and difficulties in a large and emerging country

    PubMed Central

    Velloso, E.D.R.P.; Chauffaille, M.L.; Peliçario, L.M.; Tanizawa, R.S.S.; Toledo, S.R.C.; Gaiolla, R.D.; Lopes, L.F.

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) are rare hematopoietic stem cell diseases affecting children. Cytogenetics plays an important role in the diagnosis of these diseases. We report here the experience of the Cytogenetic Subcommittee of the Brazilian Cooperative Group on Pediatric Myelodysplastic Syndromes (BCG-MDS-PED). We analyzed 168 cytogenetic studies performed in 23 different cytogenetic centers; 84 of these studies were performed in patients with confirmed MDS (primary MDS, secondary MDS, JMML, and acute myeloid leukemia/MDS+Down syndrome). Clonal abnormalities were found in 36.9% of the MDS cases and cytogenetic studies were important for the detection of constitutional diseases and for differential diagnosis with other myeloid neoplasms. These data show the importance of the Cooperative Group for continuing education in order to avoid a late or wrong diagnosis. PMID:23314345

  11. What Are the Key Statistics about Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes What Are the Key Statistics About Myelodysplastic Syndromes? In the United States, myelodysplastic ... Types of Myelodysplastic Syndromes What Are the Key Statistics About Myelodysplastic Syndromes? What's New in Myelodysplastic Syndrome ...

  12. Infections in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Andréa; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Cordonnier, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are associated with a risk of severe infections. While neutropenia is likely to be the main predisposing factor, several other immune defects have been reported, including impaired neutrophil function, B-, T- and NK-cell defects and the possible consequences of iron overload due to red blood cell transfusions. The advanced age of most patients, their frequent comorbidities, and the fact that drugs such as hypomethylating agents and lenalidomide, which are effective in myelodysplastic syndromes but can transiently worsen neutropenia, may increase the risk of infection and their severity in this context. The majority of infections in myelodysplastic syndromes are bacterial, while the incidence of fungal infections is not well known and viral infections seem to be rare. No prophylactic measures against infections have demonstrated efficacy in myelodysplastic syndromes. However, pending more data, we propose here some recommendations for the management of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In the future, an important contribution can be made by prospective trials testing the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to infection in these patients, especially in the context of the new drugs available for myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:22733024

  13. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  14. Ibrutinib and Azacitidine for Treatment of Higher Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-20

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  15. Hereditary Predispositions to Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Sarah A.; DiNardo, Courtney D.

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia, and peripheral cytopenias. Familial forms of MDS have traditionally been considered rare, especially in adults; however, the increasing availability of somatic and germline genetic analyses has identified multiple susceptibility loci. Bone marrow failure syndromes have been well-described in the pediatric setting, e.g., Fanconi anemia (FA), dyskeratosis congenita (DC), Diamond–Blackfan anemia (DBA), and Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SBS), hallmarked by clinically-recognizable phenotypes (e.g., radial ray anomalies in FA) and significantly increased risks for MDS and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the setting of bone marrow failure. However, additional families with multiple cases of MDS or AML have long been reported in the medical literature with little known regarding potential hereditary etiologies. Over the last decade, genomic investigation of such families has revealed multiple genes conferring inherited risks for MDS and/or AML as the primary malignancy, including RUNX1, ANKRD26, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, and SRP72. As these syndromes are increasingly appreciated in even apparently de novo presentations of MDS, it is important for hematologists/oncologists to become familiar with these newly-described syndromes. Herein, we provide a review of familial MDS syndromes and practical aspects of management in patients with predisposition syndromes. PMID:27248996

  16. The role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in serum-induced leukemia inhibitory factor secretion by bone marrow stromal cells from pediatric myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Simone V; Roela, Rosimeire A; Junqueira, Mara Souza; Arantes, Camila; Brentani, M Mitzi

    2010-04-01

    Stromal cells from pediatric myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) associated with MDS (MDS-AML) present high expression of leukemia inhibitor factor (LIF). We demonstrated using mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors that in stromal cells from pediatric MDS and MDS-AML, p38MAPK was critical in serum-induced secretion of LIF. The serum induction of phosphorylated p38MAPK form was observed only in stromal cells from healthy children, whereas in MDS and MDS-AML basal levels were maintained suggesting constitutive p38MAPK activation. Our study suggested the possible importance in pediatric MDS of p38MAPK signaling pathway which may be a future therapeutic target.

  17. What's New in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Myelodysplastic Syndromes About Myelodysplastic Syndromes What's New in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Research and Treatment? Genetics and ... research unfolds, it may be used to design new drugs or eventually in developing gene therapy. This ...

  18. Differentiation Therapy With Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Thrombocytopenia

  19. Innate Immunity Dysregulation in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Expression of Toll-40 like receptor 9 in bone marrow cells of myelodysplastic syndromes is down -regulated during 41 transformation to overt...Myelodysplastic Syndromes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yue Wei CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Houston TX...30 Sept 2013 – 29 Sept 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE “Innate Immunity Dysregulation in Myelodysplastic Syndromes ” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  20. [Familial incidence of myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Wróbel, Tomasz; Mazur, Grzegorz; Pyszel, Angelika; Biedroń, Monika; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz

    2006-01-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are heterogeneous group of clonal disorders of hematopoietic stem cells, which manifestation is cytopenia and hypercellular, dysplastic bone marrow, often with increased amount of blasts. The pathogenesis of majority of MDS remains unexplained. It is regarded that genetic predisposition and exposure to toxic environmental agents contribute to genetic mutations in MDS. Molecular abnormalities have attracted interest over past years because of their presence in most cases of MDS, even without noticeable disorders in kariotype. Familial incidence of myelodysplastic syndromes may be helpful in understanding genetic factors of the disease. We describe two families in which MDS occurred in siblings (3 brothers; sister and brother). Kariotype abnormalities have been noted only in one person of each family. The rest of patients had a normal kariotype. This suggests that molecular abnormalities are the cause of their disease. The occupational exposure to precise mutagens (aluminium, greases, diesels, petrol, metals) was noted in two persons in the first family and correspondingly in one person in the second. There was absence of one mutagen common for every member of two reported families.

  1. Lenalidomide in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-10

    Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  2. Clonal evolution in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    da Silva-Coelho, Pedro; Kroeze, Leonie I.; Yoshida, Kenichi; Koorenhof-Scheele, Theresia N.; Knops, Ruth; van de Locht, Louis T.; de Graaf, Aniek O.; Massop, Marion; Sandmann, Sarah; Dugas, Martin; Stevens-Kroef, Marian J.; Cermak, Jaroslav; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; de Witte, Theo; Blijlevens, Nicole M. A.; Muus, Petra; Huls, Gerwin; van der Reijden, Bert A.; Ogawa, Seishi; Jansen, Joop H.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer development is a dynamic process during which the successive accumulation of mutations results in cells with increasingly malignant characteristics. Here, we show the clonal evolution pattern in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients receiving supportive care, with or without lenalidomide (follow-up 2.5–11 years). Whole-exome and targeted deep sequencing at multiple time points during the disease course reveals that both linear and branched evolutionary patterns occur with and without disease-modifying treatment. The application of disease-modifying therapy may create an evolutionary bottleneck after which more complex MDS, but also unrelated clones of haematopoietic cells, may emerge. In addition, subclones that acquired an additional mutation associated with treatment resistance (TP53) or disease progression (NRAS, KRAS) may be detected months before clinical changes become apparent. Monitoring the genetic landscape during the disease may help to guide treatment decisions. PMID:28429724

  3. Monitoring of hematopoietic chimerism after transplantation for pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome: real-time or conventional short tandem repeat PCR in peripheral blood or bone marrow?

    PubMed

    Willasch, Andre M; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Shayegi, Nona; Rettinger, Eva; Meyer, Vida; Zabel, Marion; Lang, Peter; Kremens, Bernhard; Meisel, Roland; Strahm, Brigitte; Rossig, Claudia; Gruhn, Bernd; Klingebiel, Thomas; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Bader, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has been proposed as a highly sensitive method for monitoring hematopoietic chimerism and may serve as a surrogate marker for the detection of minimal residual disease minimal residual disease in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), until specific methods of detection become available. Because a systematic comparison of the clinical utility of qPCR with the gold standard short tandem repeat (STR)-PCR has not been reported, we retrospectively measured chimerism by qPCR in 54 children transplanted for MDS in a previous study. Results obtained by STR-PCR in the initial study served as comparison. Because the detection limit of qPCR was sufficiently low to detect an autologous background, we defined the sample as mixed chimera if the proportion of recipient-derived cells exceeded .5%. The true positive rates were 100% versus 80% (qPCR versus STR-PCR, not significant), and mixed chimerism in most cases was detected earlier by qPCR than by STR-PCR (median, 31 days) when chimerism was quantified concurrently in peripheral blood and bone marrow. Both methods revealed a substantial rate of false positives (22.7% versus 13.6%, not significant), indicating the importance of serial testing of chimerism to monitor its progression. Finally, we propose criteria for monitoring chimerism in pediatric MDS with regard to the subtypes, specimens, PCR method, and timing of sampling.

  4. [Transformation of myelodysplastic syndrome to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: 2 new cases].

    PubMed

    Guillén, M; Madero, L; Parra, L; Hernández, C; Herrero, B; Carceller, F; Lassaletta, A; Sevilla, J

    2013-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders of hematopoietic stem cells, with a variable risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Progression into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is an extremely rare event, with very few cases published in children. In this report, we describe two cases of myelodysplastic syndromes that progressed to ALL. Moreover, we review previously reported cases of MDS transformation to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pediatric population whose prognosis seems to be similar to that for adults.

  5. [Marked hemosiderosis in myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Klinz, C

    1999-01-29

    A 68-year-old man was admitted because of symptoms of lumbar pain. He was known to have chronic anemia with ring sideroblasts and diabetes melitus and to be in heart failure. Three months before he had been given 7 units of red cell concentrate. On admission the outstanding features were brown discoloration of the skin, absent body hair, tachycardia, hepatomegaly and small testicles. He had a normocytic anemia, hyperglycemia and raised transaminases, hypogonadism and vitamin D3 deficiency. The serum levels of iron, transferrin saturation and feritin were markedly elevated. Liver iron content/g dried liver was 4.2 g (by biomagnetometer). Radiology of the lumbar vertebrae showed osteoporosis and sonography confirmed hepatomegaly. The known myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) had fed to secondary hemosiderosis with heart failure, liver involvement, diabetes mellitus, hypogonadism and osteoporosis. Symptomatic treatment was unsuccessfully complemented by desferoxamine (up to 4 g/12 h) to release iron. But very good iron excretion was then achieved with deferiprone (3 x 1 g/d). The patient later died of the sequelae of hemosiderosis. Even when they have not required transfusions, patients with long-standing MDS should be examined regularly for the possible development of secondary hemosiderosis so that iron-chelating agents can be administered as needed.

  6. Cytogenetic features in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a group of bone marrow diseases characterized by profound heterogeneity in morphologic presentation, clinical course, and cytogenetic features. Roughly 50% of patients display clonal chromosome abnormalities. In several multicentric studies, the karyotype turned out to be one of the most important prognostic parameters and was incorporated into statistical models aiming for a better prediction of the individual prognosis like the International Prognostic Scoring System. However, due to the profound cytogenetic heterogeneity, the impact of many rare abnormalities as well as combinations of anomalies occurring in a substantial portion of patients with MDS is still unknown and can only be delineated on the basis of large international multicentric cooperations. Recently, the German–Austrian MDS Study Group presented cytogenetic findings in 2,072 patients with MDS, which serve as a basis for the characterization of the cytogenetic subgroups discussed in this article. The availability of new therapeutic options for low- and high-risk MDS targeted against distinct entities characterized by specific chromosome abnormalities, like 5q-deletions, monosomy 7, and complex abnormalities underlines the important role of cytogenetics for the clinical management of MDS. This article thus focuses on the clinical and prognostic relevance, the molecular background, and therapeutic perspectives in these three cytogenetic subgroups. PMID:18414863

  7. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  8. Darbepoetin alfa for anemia with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seastone, David J; Gerds, Aaron T

    2015-04-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes are characterized by refractory cytopenias that lead to symptomatic anemia, bleeding, and increased risk for infections. For almost two decades, the use of darbepoetin and other erythropoietin stimulating agents to treat symptomatic anemia in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes has been a standard of care. This practice is supported by numerous Phase I/II studies and one Phase III study demonstrating the benefit of using erythropoietin stimulating agents alone, or in combination with granulocyte colony stimulating factor, for treatment of symptomatic anemia with the goal of decreasing red blood cell transfusion requirements. This review summarizes the published experience regarding the use of erythropoietin stimulating agents, with a special focus on darbepoetin, in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and symptomatic anemia.

  9. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Molecular Pathogenesis of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Visconte, Valeria; Selleri, Carmine; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Tiu, Ramon V.

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of clonal hematologic disorders characterized by inefficient hematopoiesis, hypercellular bone marrow, dysplasia of blood cells and cytopenias. Most patients are diagnosed in their late 60s to early 70s. MDS is a risk factor for the development of acute myeloid leukemia which can occur in 10-15% of patients with MDS. A variety of pathophysiologic mechanisms contributes to the genesis and persistence of MDS including immunologic, epigenetic, cytogenetic and genetic factors. The only potential curative option for MDS is hematopoietic cell transplantation which is suitable for only a few patients. Currently approved therapeutic options for MDS, including lenalidomide, decitabine, and 5-azacytidine, are targeted to improve transfusion requirements and quality of life. Moreover, 5-azacytidine has also been demonstrated to improve survival in some patients with higher risk MDS. New ways to predict which patients will better gain benefit from currently available therapeutic agents are the primary challenges in MDS. In the last 10 years, chromosome scanning and high throughput technologies (single nucleotide polymorphism array genotyping, comparative genomic hybridization, and whole genome/ exome sequencing) have tremendously increased our knowledge of MDS pathogenesis. Indeed, the molecular heterogeneity of MDS supports the idea of different therapeutic approaches which will take into account the diverse morphologic and clinical presentations of MDS patients rather than a restricted therapeutic strategy. This review will summarize the molecular abnormalities in key relevant components of the biology and pathogenesis of MDS and will provide an update on the clinical impact and therapeutic response in MDS patients. PMID:24778995

  11. Myelodysplastic syndrome in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Baumann, Irith

    2008-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and subsequent frequent development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In children and adolescents, MDS are uncommon disorders, accounting for less than 5% of hematopoietic malignancy, with great heterogeneity in presentation and clinical course. The genetic changes predisposing children to MDS are largely obscure. Monosomy 7 is the most common chromosomal abnormality, often occurring as a sole abnormality. The recent pediatric modification of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification has greatly facilitated the diagnostic process. Refractory cytopenia (RC) is the most common MDS subtype in children, occurring in about half of all MDS cases. There is consensus that the relationship between MDS with increased blast count and de novo AML is better defined by biological and clinical features than by blast count. Because monosomy 7 is the only chromosomal abnormality strongly suggestive of MDS, children presenting with a low blast count and other chromosomal aberrations or normal karyotype must be closely observed before a diagnosis of MDS can be established. With an increasing number of children surviving primary cancer with chemotherapy or radiation therapy, the incidence of secondary therapy-related MDS is rising. The MDS risk is also increased in patients with inherited bone marrow failure disorders; this relationship provides valuable insights into MDS biology. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from a matched related or suitable unrelated donor is the choice for most children with MDS and can rescue a large proportion of patients.

  12. Azacitidine With or Without Lenalidomide or Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-06

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia-1; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia-2; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-1; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  13. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. 5-Fluoro-2'-Deoxycytidine and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-06

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-1; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daniel J. Lindner, M.D., Ph.D...YYYY) 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 201 31 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones...vitro and engrafted in the marrow of SG3, but not NSG mice. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Myelodysplastic syndrome , lentivirus, cDNA libraries

  17. The molecular basis of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, A; Darley, R L; Padua, R

    1997-01-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes comprise a heterogeneous group of neoplastic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis with an increased tendency to evolve to acute leukemia. Clinically, the common manifestations include peripheral blood cytopenias of one or more lineages and a normal to hyperplastic marrow. MDS has been defined on the basis of morphological criteria, namely the percentage of blast cells in the bone marrow, by the French-American-British study group. Scoring systems have been developed to include such factors as hemoglobin, leukocyte count and age in the evaluation of MDS prognosis. Although useful in the prediction of clinical course and design of therapy regimens, our understanding of the basis of MDS has come from recent advances in molecular analysis of these disorders. This review describes some of the established and recent contributions to our understanding of the molecular basis of the myelodysplastic syndromes. The authors of the present review have been working in the field of myelodysplastic syndromes for several years and have contributed original papers on the molecular pathogenesis of these disorders. In addition, in the present review they have critically examined articles and abstracts published in journals covered by the Science Citation Index and Medline. Cytogenetic anomalies and proto-oncogene abnormalities point to new understanding of the pathogenesis of MDS as a sequence of DNA lesions leading to the evolution of the pre-malignant clone. The prognostic significance of these factors in predicting leukemic transformation and survival remains controversial. Characterization of MDS cells in vitro in response to combinations of exogenous growth factors have not only provided valuable information regarding ineffective hematopoiesis in MDS but have provided a new insight into treatment of MDS. One major development in our understanding of MDS is the possible explanation for the apparent paradox of a cellular marrow in

  18. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Ring Sideroblasts; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation

  19. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. [Immunomorphometric study of megakaryocytes in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Marisavljević, D; Rolović, Z

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse, by immunomorphometry, megakaryocytopoiesis in patients with myelodysplatsic syndrome. The results revealed that, in spite of marked megakaryocyte hyperplasia, patients with myelodysplastic syndrome suffer from severe peripheral thrombocytopenia. Megakaryocytes in myelodisplastic syndrome have, in average, small cellular and nuclear diameter and 35.3% of them (s. c. micromegakaryocyres) can be identified only by using immunohistochemical technique. In conclusion, there is severe maturation disturbancy, ineffectiveness and disregulation of megakaryocytopoiesis in myelodysplastic syndrome.

  1. Deconstructing innate immune signaling in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Varney, Melinda E.; Melgar, Katelyn; Starczynowski, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of immune-related genes is widely reported in Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and chronic immune stimulation increases the risk for developing MDS. Aberrant innate immune activation, such as due to increased Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, in MDS can contribute to systemic effects on hematopoiesis in addition to cell-intrinsic defects on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) function. This review will deconstruct aberrant function of TLR signaling mediators within MDS HSPC that may contribute to cell intrinsic consequences on hematopoiesis and disease pathogenesis. We will discuss the contribution of chronic TLR signaling to the pathogenesis of MDS based on evidence from patients and mouse genetic models. PMID:26143580

  2. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Occurring in a Patient with Gorlin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mull, Jamie L; Madden, Lisa M; Bayliss, Susan J

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) occurring in an African American boy with Gorlin syndrome with a novel PTCH1 mutation. Before developing MDS, the patient had been treated with chemotherapy and radiation for a medulloblastoma. He received a bone marrow transplant for the MDS and eventually died of treatment complications. Secondary hematologic malignancies are a known complication of certain chemotherapeutics, although whether a patient with Gorlin syndrome has a greater propensity for the development of such malignancies is unclear.

  3. Hemopoietic cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Benesch, Martin; Deeg, H Joachim

    2003-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are clonal stem cell disorders, and allogeneic hemopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only therapy with curative potential. Among patients with less-advanced myelodysplastic syndromes, 3-year survivals of 65% to 75% are achievable with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical related and HLA-matched unrelated donors. The probability of relapse is less than 5%. Among patients with advanced disease (> or = 5% marrow blasts), 35% to 45% and 25% to 30%, respectively, are surviving in remission after transplantation from related or unrelated donors. The incidence of post-transplant relapse is 10% to 35%. Criteria of the International Prognostic Scoring System, originally developed for nontransplanted patients, also predict relapse and survival after HCT. Refined conditioning regimens have permitted successful HCT even in patients in their seventh decade of life. Results with a regimen using a combination of busulfan (targeted to predetermined plasma levels) and cyclophosphamide are particularly encouraging. Improved survival with transplants from unrelated volunteer donors reflects selection of donors on the basis of high-resolution (allele-level) HLA typing. Nevertheless, transplant-related morbidity and mortality, including graft-versus-host disease, remain challenges that need to be addressed with innovative approaches. Some patients who achieve a chemotherapy-induced complete remission may also benefit from autologous HCT.

  4. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    were validated; they induced myeloid colonies in vitro and engrafted in the marrow of SG3, but not NSG mice. Myelodysplastic syndrome , lentivirus...cDNA libraries, complementation The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Cleveland, OH 44195 Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with...Martin-Padura, P. Mancuso, P. Marighetti, C. Rabascio, G. Pruneri, L. D. Shultz, and F. Bertolini. 2008. Human acute leukemia cells injected in NOD

  6. Iron Chelation Therapy in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Messa, Emanuela; Cilloni, Daniela; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous disorder of the hematopoietic stem cells, frequently characterized by anemia and transfusion dependency. In low-risk patients, transfusion dependency can be long lasting, leading to iron overload. Iron chelation therapy may be a therapeutic option for these patients, especially since the approval of oral iron chelators, which are easier to use and better accepted by the patients. The usefulness of iron chelation in MDS patients is still under debate, mainly because of the lack of solid prospective clinical trials that should take place in the future. This review aims to summarize what is currently known about the incidence and clinical consequences of iron overload in MDS patients and the state-of the-art of iron chelation therapy in this setting. We also give an overview of clinical guidelines for chelation in MDS published to date and some perspectives for the future. PMID:20672005

  7. The myelodysplastic syndromes: towards a functional classification.

    PubMed

    Mijović, A; Mufti, G J

    1998-06-01

    The French-American-British classification of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) has contributed greatly to better communication and conduct of clinical trials. However, the advent of novel cytogenetic, immunological and molecular techniques in recent years warrant some alterations to this purely morphological classification. This review aims at highlighting the advances which reflect more closely the unique biological and clinical features of various subtypes of MDS. We propose a comprehensive classification of MDS, to include the newly defined categories, as well as those not included in previous classifications, such as the therapy-induced and hereditary MDS. We hope that this classification will help in focusing attention on the biological features of MDS, the understanding of which will be crucial to combat this disease.

  8. Epigenetic changes in the myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Issa, Jean-Pierre

    2010-04-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, drive stable, clonally propagated changes in gene expression and can therefore serve as molecular mediators of pathway dysfunction in neoplasia. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is characterized by frequent epigenetic abnormalities, including the hypermethylation of genes that control proliferation, adhesion, and other characteristic features of this leukemia. Aberrant DNA hypermethylation is associated with a poor prognosis in MDS that can be accounted for by more rapid progression to acute myeloid leukemia. In turn, treatment with drugs that modify epigenetic pathways (DNA methylation and histone deacetylation inhibitors) induces durable remissions and prolongs life in MDS, offering some hope and direction in the future management of this deadly disease.

  9. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Iron Chelation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Angelucci, Emanuele; Urru, Silvana Anna Maria; Pilo, Federica; Piperno, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Over recent decades we have been fortunate to witness the advent of new technologies and of an expanded knowledge and application of chelation therapies to the benefit of patients with iron overload. However, extrapolation of learnings from thalassemia to the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) has resulted in a fragmented and uncoordinated clinical evidence base. We’re therefore forced to change our understanding of MDS, looking with other eyes to observational studies that inform us about the relationship between iron and tissue damage in these subjects. The available evidence suggests that iron accumulation is prognostically significant in MDS, but levels of accumulation historically associated with organ damage (based on data generated in the thalassemias) are infrequent. Emerging experimental data have provided some insight into this paradox, as our understanding of iron-induced tissue damage has evolved from a process of progressive bulking of organs through high-volumes iron deposition, to one of ‘toxic’ damage inflicted through multiple cellular pathways. Damage from iron may, therefore, occur prior to reaching reference thresholds, and similarly, chelation may be of benefit before overt iron overload is seen. In this review, we revisit the scientific and clinical evidence for iron overload in MDS to better characterize the iron overload phenotype in these patients, which differs from the classical transfusional and non-transfusional iron overload syndrome. We hope this will provide a conceptual framework to better understand the complex associations between anemia, iron and clinical outcomes, to accelerate progress in this area. PMID:28293409

  10. Rare Cytogenetic Abnormalities in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bacher, Ulrike; Schanz, Julie; Braulke, Friederike; Haase, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    The karyotype represents one of the main cornerstones for the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the revised IPSS-R (IPSS-R) that are most widely used for prognostication in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities in MDS, i.e. del(5q), -7/del(7q), +8, complex karyotypes, or −Y have been extensively explored for their prognostic impact. The IPSS-R also considers some less frequent abnormalities such as del(11q), isochromosome 17, +19, or 3q abnormalities. However, more than 600 different cytogenetic categories had been identified in a previous MDS study. This review aims to focus interest on selected rare cytogenetic abnormalities in patients with MDS. Examples are numerical gains of the chromosomes 11 (indicating rapid progression), of chromosome 14 or 14q (prognostically intermediate to favorable), -X (in females, with an intermediate prognosis), or numerical abnormalities of chromosome 21. Structural abnormalities are also considered, e.g. del(13q) that is associated with bone marrow failure syndromes and favorable response to immunosuppressive therapy. These and other rare cytogenetic abnormalities should be integrated into existing prognostication systems such as the IPSS-R. However, due to the very low number of cases, this is clearly dependent on international collaboration. Hopefully, this article will help to inaugurate this process. PMID:25960862

  11. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  12. Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome after hydroxychloroquine therapy.

    PubMed

    Muslimani, Alaa A; Spiro, Timothy P; Chaudhry, Asif A; Daw, Hamed A

    2007-07-01

    Primary myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) occur in the absence of exposure to ionizing radiation, chemotherapeutic agents or myelotoxic drugs, whereas secondary MDS occurs in the presence of such exposure. We encountered 4 patients among 217 patients on hydroxychloroquine for rheumatological conditions in 2005 diagnosed with MDS. Two patients were male and two were female; the median age was 69.75 years, (range 65-76). The dose of hydroxychloroquine for all patients was 400 mg daily with median treatment duration of 10.5 years and a range of 6-16. All patients had bone marrow biopsy confirmation of the diagnosis of MDS. The incidence of MDS in a group older than 70 years ranges from 15 to 50/100,000 persons per year. The diagnosis of 4 cases of MDS among 217 patients in 1 year is approximately 123-137-fold higher than the risk of MDS in the general population aged more than 70 years (P < 0.001) and suggests that long-term treatment with hydroxychloroquine is associated with an increased risk of developing secondary MDS.

  13. Chromosomal abnormalities in primary myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Anila; Khurshid, Mohammad; Shaikh, Usman; Adil, Salman

    2014-09-01

    To determine the frequency of cytogenetic abnormalities in patients diagnosed as primary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) using conventional karyotyping. Case series. The Clinical Laboratory, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, between January 2006 - June 2012. Patients of all ages and either gender who fulfilled WHO criteria for MDS were included. Cytogenetic analysis was conducted at the time of diagnosis. Patients who had secondary MDS were excluded from analysis. Chromosome identification and karyotype description was done according to the International System for Chromosome Nomenclature (ISCN, 1995) and described as frequency percentage. Out of the 122 cases of MDS, 71 patients had their karyotype done at the time of diagnosis, including 42 males (59.2%) and 29 females (40.8%) with median age of 60 years. Forty one (57.7%) showed normal karyotype and 30 (42.3%) showed clonal karyotypic abnormalities at diagnosis. Out of which 14 (19.7%) had single, 11 (15.5%) had complex and 6 (8.5%) had double cytogenetic abnormalities. The common abnormalities found were: trisomy 8 in 7 cases (9.9%), -7/del (7q) in 3 cases (4.2%), -Y and complex 5q in 2 cases (2.8%) each, complex trisomy 8, del 11q , inversion 9, trisomy 19 and del 20q were found in 1 case (1.4%) each. Other abnormalities were found in 11 cases (15.5%). Trisomy 8 was the most common disorder/abnormality found in this study population followed by the complex cytogenetics.

  14. Chromosomal deletions in the myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mufti, G J

    1992-01-01

    Karyotypic abnormalities in primary myelodysplastic syndrome (P-MDS) are less frequent than in secondary myelodysplasia. A review of the literature involving over 3000 reported cases, shows the incidence of karyotypically abnormal clones at presentation in nearly 48% of cases. Approximately 50% of the abnormalities comprise of deletions of chromosomes 5, 7, 11, 12, 13 and 20. Localisation of a number of haemopoietic growth factors and their receptors to the deleted segments of the chromosomes, has invoked considerable interest in the molecular pathology of the interstitial deletions and their consequent role in the multistep pathogenesis of MDS. Present evidence suggests chromosome abnormalities are a later event in the multistep painogenesis, and it is suggested their occurrence may be restricted to a restricted myeloid progenitor cell, although the initial event(s) occur at the common lymphoid-myeloid progenitor. Much has been gleaned from the dominant modes of leukaemogenesis, such as the occurrence of missense mutations at specific positions of RAS and FMS mutations. It is suggested that a similar enquiry into the mechanisms of chromosomal deletions in P-MDS is required in order to delineate the role of these abnormalities in the clonal evolution of this group of diseases.

  15. Loss of B cells and their precursors is the most constant feature of GATA-2 deficiency in childhood myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nováková, Michaela; Žaliová, Markéta; Suková, Martina; Wlodarski, Marcin; Janda, Aleš; Froňková, Eva; Campr, Vít; Lejhancová, Kateřina; Zapletal, Ondřej; Pospíšilová, Dagmar; Černá, Zdeňka; Kuhn, Tomáš; Švec, Peter; Pelková, Vendula; Zemanová, Zuzana; Kerndrup, Gitte; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; van der Velden, Vincent; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Kalina, Tomáš; Trka, Jan; Starý, Jan; Hrušák, Ondřej; Mejstříková, Ester

    2016-01-01

    GATA-2 deficiency was recently described as common cause of overlapping syndromes of immunodeficiency, lymphedema, familiar myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia. The aim of our study was to analyze bone marrow and peripheral blood samples of children with myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia to define prevalence of the GATA2 mutation and to assess whether mutations in GATA-2 transcription factor exhibit specific immunophenotypic features. The prevalence of a GATA2 mutation in a consecutively diagnosed cohort of children was 14% in advanced forms of myelodysplastic syndrome (refractory anemia with excess blasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation, and myelodysplasia-related acute myeloid leukemia), 17% in refractory cytopenia of childhood, and 0% in aplastic anemia. In GATA-2-deficient cases, we found the most profound B-cell lymphopenia, including its progenitors in blood and bone marrow, which correlated with significantly diminished intronRSS-Kde recombination excision circles in comparison to other myelodysplastic syndrome/aplastic anemia cases. The other typical features of GATA-2 deficiency (monocytopenia and natural killer cell lymphopenia) were less discriminative. In conclusion, we suggest screening for GATA2 mutations in pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, preferentially in patients with impaired B-cell homeostasis in bone marrow and peripheral blood (low number of progenitors, intronRSS-Kde recombination excision circles and naïve cells). PMID:27013649

  16. Lactobacillus in Preventing Infection in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  17. Immunological Derangement in Hypocellular Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Serio, B; Risitano, AM; Giudice, V; Montuori, N; Selleri, C

    2014-01-01

    Hypocellular or hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndromes (HMDS) are a distinct subgroup accounting for 10–15% of all MDS patients, that are characterized by the presence of bone marrow (BM) hypocellularity, various degree of dysmyelopoiesis and sometimes abnormal karyotype. Laboratory and clinical evidence suggest that HMDS share several immune-mediated pathogenic mechanisms with acquired idiopathic aplastic anemia (AA). Different immune-mediated mechanisms have been documented in the damage of marrow hematopoietic progenitors occurring in HMDS; they include oligoclonal expansion of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), polyclonal expansion of various subtypes of T helper lymphocytes, overexpression of FAS-L and of the TNF–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), underexpression of Flice-like inhibitory protein long isoform (FLIPL) in marrow cells as well as higher release of Th1 cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). It has also been documented that some HMDS patients have higher frequency of polymorphisms linked both to high production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and transforming growth factor-β and to the inhibition of T-cell mediated immune responses such as interleukin-10, further suggesting that immune-mediated mechanisms similar to those seen in AA patients may also operate in HMDS. Clinically, the strongest evidence for immune–mediated hematopoietic suppression in some HMDS is the response to immunosuppression including mainly cyclosporine, anti-thymocyte globulin and/or cyclosporine, or alemtuzumab. Here we review all these immune mechanisms as well as the influence of this deranged cellular and humoral immunologic mileau on the initiation and possible progression of MDS. All these observations are pivotal not only for a better understanding of MDS pathophysiology, but also for their immediate clinical implications, eventually leading to the identification of MDS patients who may benefit from

  18. Inhibitors of DNA methylation: beyond myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, Pierre

    2005-12-01

    DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors, azacitidine (Vidaza, Pharmion, Boulder, CO, USA) and decitabine (Dacogen; SuperGen Inc, Dublin, CA, USA, and MGI Pharma Inc, Bloomington, MN, USA), have had a significant impact on the treatment paradigm of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs), previously managed mainly by supportive care and hematopoietic-stem-cell transplantation. The positive clinical experience seen in MDS to date coupled with the persistent challenges faced in the treatment of other hematologic malignancies has served as the impetus for further exploration of the therapeutic value of DNMT inhibitors beyond MDS. In that respect, the majority of data for these agents are in the setting of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Experience with these agents in patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (reclassified by the World Health Organization as AML) was also reported in the clinical trials submitted to the FDA for approval of azacitidine for MDS. Some use has also been described in chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. Further studies are needed to clarify the appropriate dose and the number and duration of cycles in the treatment of leukemias, and to identify ideal candidates for therapy, explore the role of DNMT inhibitors in combination with other agents, especially histone deacetylase inhibitors, delineate differences between the commercially available agents, and establish the long-term safety of these agents. To this end, experience with DNMT inhibitors in hematologic malignancies other than MDS is reviewed in an effort to better understand the therapeutic potential of these agents and to define areas of future exploration in these settings.

  19. Hematological Changes Mimicking Myelodysplastic Syndrome Following Treatment for Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Løhmann, Ditte J A; Hasle, Henrik

    2015-04-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML) is a feared long-term complication of pediatric cancer. Few osteosarcoma patients develop t-MDS/AML, but the frequency of hematological abnormalities after therapy is unknown. We reviewed biochemistry from osteosarcoma patients up to 3 years posttreatment. All children diagnosed with osteosarcoma at our department from 2006 to 2012 without relapse 1 month posttherapy were included (n=14). Serial blood counts posttherapy were analyzed. The median increase of mean corpuscular volume (MCV) from baseline was 8 fL 6 months posttherapy and remained >5 throughout follow-up. All posttreatment levels of MCV were above 90 fL in 5 patients. Six months posttherapy, the median difference for platelets, white blood count, and absolute neutrophil count had decreased from baseline. They remained under baseline throughout follow-up. Hemoglobin remained stable. Ferritin level was associated with increased MCV. MDS with monosomy 7 was diagnosed in 1 patient. Hypoplastic refractory cytopenia was found in another patient showing spontaneous normalization of hematologic values. More than a third of patients treated for osteosarcoma developed hematological abnormalities mimicking early MDS, but only 1 developed t-MDS/AML. Close hematological monitoring of patients recovering from osteosarcoma is essential and it is worth noting that hematological abnormalities are frequent and may be transitory.

  20. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome associated with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Hikichi, Takuto; Takahashi, Yuta; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Kumakawa, Hiromi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS) associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). A 54-year-old woman, diagnosed as MDS the prior year after evaluation of anemia, visited our hospital with the chief complaint of epigastric discomfort. She also had dysgeusia, alopecia, atrophic nail change, and pigmentation of the palm, all of which began several months ago. Blood tests revealed severe hypoalbuminemia. Colonoscopy (CS) showed numerous, dense, red polyps throughout the colon and rectum. Biopsy specimens showed stromal edema, infiltration of lymphocytes, and cystic dilatation of the crypt. Her clinical manifestations and histology were consistent with CCS. We prescribed corticosteroids, which dramatically improved her physical findings, laboratory data, and endoscopic findings. This is the first report of CCS in a patient with MDS. PMID:19998513

  1. Regulation and Function of TIFAB in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    cytopenias due to ineffective hematopoiesis, genomic instability, and a predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The most commonly recurring...ineffective hematopoiesis, genomic instability, and a predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The most commonly recurring genomic alteration in MDS...focuses on the molecular, cellular, and genetic basis of hematologic malignancies, with a specific focus on Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and Acute

  2. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H Joachim

    2014-12-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

  3. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H.; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2014-01-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:25107891

  4. Regulation and Function of TIFAB in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome / Acute Myeloid Leukemia depend on autophagy-mediated lysosomal degradation of TRAF6 and repression of PSMA1. (2012) Blood... syndrome / Acute Myeloid Leukemia depend on autophagy-mediated lysosomal degradation of TRAF6 and repression of PSMA1. Blood. June 8, 2012 - Abstracts at...defined by blood cytopenias due to ineffective hematopoiesis, genomic instability, and a predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia

  5. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-10

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  6. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Vorinostat and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  8. Thrombopoietin mimetics for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Dodillet, Helga; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Monsef, Ina; Skoetz, Nicole

    2017-09-30

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is one of the most frequent haematologic malignancies of the elderly population and characterised by progenitor cell dysplasia with ineffective haematopoiesis and a high rate of transformation to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Thrombocytopenia represents a common problem for patients with MDS. ranging from mild to serious bleeding events and death. To manage thrombocytopenia, the current standard treatment includes platelet transfusion, unfortunately leading to a range of side effects. Thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetics represent an alternative treatment option for MDS patients with thrombocytopenia. However, it remains unclear, whether TPO mimetics influence the increase of blast cells and therefore to premature progression to AML. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetics for patients with MDS. We searched for randomised controlled trials in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (January 2000 to August 2017), trials registries (ISRCTN, EU clinical trials register and clinicaltrials.gov) and conference proceedings. We did not apply any language restrictions. Two review authors independently screened search results, disagreements were solved by discussion. We included randomised controlled trials comparing TPO mimetics with placebo, no further treatment or another TPO mimetic in patients with MDS of all risk groups, without gender, age or ethnicity restrictions. Additional chemotherapeutic treatment had to be equal in both arms. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the quality of trials, disagreements were resolved by discussion. Risk ratio (RR) was used to analyse mortality during study, transformation to AML, incidence of bleeding events, transfusion requirement, all adverse events, adverse events >= grade 3, serious adverse events and platelet response. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) have been extracted as hazard ratios, but

  9. Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome Diagnosed with Concurrent Myelodysplastic Syndrome with t(1;3) on Bone Marrow Examination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-08

    Concurrent Myelodysplastic with t(1;3) on Bone Marrow Examination presented at/published to College of American Pathologists Annual meeting, National Harbor...MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome Diagnosed with Concurrent Myelodysplastic Syndrome with t( I ;3) on Bone Marrow ...Concurrent Myelodysplastic Syndrome with t(1 ;3) on Bone Marrow Examination • Authors: Capt Kelly A. Haeusler, MD, Maj Kevin J. Krauland, MD, LTC

  10. [Precursors of acute leukemia: myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Kreipe, H H

    2011-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) represent neoplastic proliferations of hematopoietic stem cells, which may progress to loss of differentiation and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Transitions between MDSs and MPNs as well as combinations between both disorders occur and MPNs may acquire dysplastic features combined with cytopenia. Myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms show dysplastic and myeloproliferative properties and have in common genetic aberrations at the stem cell level (TET2, ASXL 1, CBL, IDH 1, IDH 2, EZH2, p53, Runx1), which may be found in one cell or may affect different hematopoietic stem cells, expanding in parallel. Progress to AML follows a linear clonal evolution only in a subset of cases. Alternatively AML derives from secondary clones, devoid of any marker mutation or originates from a common aberrant progenitor cell which shares other but not the JAK2 ( V617F ) mutation.

  11. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  12. IDH1 mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are associated with an unfavorable prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Thol, Felicitas; Weissinger, Eva M.; Krauter, Jürgen; Wagner, Katharina; Damm, Frederik; Wichmann, Martin; Göhring, Gudrun; Schumann, Christiane; Bug, Gesine; Ottmann, Oliver; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Ganser, Arnold; Heuser, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Myelodysplastic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of hematopoietic stem cell disorders with a high propensity to transform into acute myeloid leukemia. Heterozygous missense mutations in IDH1 at position R132 and in IDH2 at positions R140 and R172 have recently been reported in acute myeloid leukemia. However, little is known about the incidence and prognostic impact of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes. Design and Methods We examined 193 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and 53 patients with acute myeloid leukemia arising from myelodysplastic syndromes for mutations in IDH1 (R132), IDH2 (R172 and R140), and NPM1 by direct sequencing. Results We found that mutations in IDH1 occurred with a frequency of 3.6% in myelodysplastic syndromes (7 mutations in 193 patients) and 7.5% in acute myeloid leukemia following myelodysplastic syndromes (4 mutations in 53 patients). Three mutations in codon R140 of IDH2 and one mutation in codon R172 were found in patients with acute myeloid leukemia following myelodysplastic syndromes (7.5%). No IDH2 R140 or R172 mutations were identified in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. The presence of IDH1 mutations was associated with a shorter overall survival (HR 3.20; 95% CI 1.47–6.99) and a higher rate of transformation into acute myeloid leukemia (67% versus 28%, P=0.04). In multivariate analysis when considering karyotype, transfusion dependence and International Prognostic Scoring System score, IDH1 mutations remained an independent prognostic marker in myelodysplastic syndromes (HR 3.57; 95% CI 1.59–8.02; P=0.002). Conclusions These results suggest that IDH1 mutations are recurrent molecular aberrations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, and may become useful as a poor risk marker in these patients. These findings await validation in prospective trials. PMID:20494930

  13. Erythroleukemia shares biological features and outcome with myelodysplastic syndromes with excess blasts: a rationale for its inclusion into future classifications of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Xavier; Arenillas, Leonor; Luño, Elisa; Senent, Leonor; Arnan, Montserrat; Ramos, Fernando; Ardanaz, María Teresa; Pedro, Carme; Tormo, Mar; Montoro, Julia; Díez-Campelo, María; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Xicoy, Blanca; Bonanad, Santiago; Jerez, Andrés; Nomdedeu, Benet; Ferrer, Ana; Sanz, Guillermo F; Florensa, Lourdes

    2016-12-01

    Erythroleukemia was considered an acute myeloid leukemia in the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification and is defined by the presence of ≥50% bone marrow erythroblasts, having <20% bone marrow blasts from total nucleated cells but ≥20% bone marrow myeloblasts from nonerythroid cells. Erythroleukemia shares clinicopathologic features with myelodysplastic syndromes, especially with erythroid-predominant myelodysplastic syndromes (≥50% bone marrow erythroblasts). The upcoming WHO revision proposes to eliminate the nonerythroid blast cell count rule and to move erythroleukemia patients into the appropriate myelodysplastic syndrome category on the basis of the absolute blast cell count. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with de novo erythroleukemia and compared their clinico-biological features and outcome with those of de novo myelodysplastic syndromes, focusing on erythroid-predominant myelodysplastic syndromes. Median overall survival of 405 erythroid-predominant myelodysplastic syndromes without excess blasts was significantly longer than that observed in 57 erythroid-predominant refractory anemias with excess blasts-1 and in 59 erythroleukemias, but no significant difference was observed between erythroid-predominant refractory anemias with excess blasts-1 and erythroleukemias. In this subset of patients with ≥50% bone marrow erythroblasts and excess blasts, the presence of a high-risk karyotype defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System or by the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System was the main prognostic factor. In the same way, the survival of 459 refractory anemias with excess blasts-2, independently of having ≥20% bone marrow blasts from nonerythroid cells or not, was almost identical to the observed in 59 erythroleukemias. Interestingly, 11 low-blast count erythroleukemias with 5 to <10% bone marrow blasts from total nucleated cells showed similar survival than the rest of erythroleukemias. Our data

  14. Acquired Myelodysplasia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Clearing the Fog

    PubMed Central

    Natelson, Ethan A.; Pyatt, David

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by progressive peripheral blood cytopenias associated with ineffective myelopoiesis. They are typically considered neoplasms because of frequent genetic aberrations and patient-limited survival with progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or death related to the consequences of bone marrow failure including infection, hemorrhage, and iron overload. A progression to AML has always been recognized among the myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) but occurs only rarely among those with essential thrombocythemia (ET). Yet, the World Health Organization (WHO) has chosen to apply the designation myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), for all MPD but has not similarly recommended that all MDS become the myelodysplastic neoplasms (MDN). This apparent dichotomy may reflect the extremely diverse nature of MDS. Moreover, the term MDS is occasionally inappropriately applied to hematologic disorders associated with acquired morphologic myelodysplastic features which may rather represent potentially reversible hematological responses to immune-mediated factors, nutritional deficiency states, and disordered myelopoietic responses to various pharmaceutical, herbal, or other potentially myelotoxic compounds. We emphasize the clinical settings, and the histopathologic features, of such AMD that should trigger a search for a reversible underlying condition that may be nonneoplastic and not MDS. PMID:24194760

  15. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D

    2016-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are hematologic diseases that frequently affect older adults. Treatment is challenging. Management of older adults with MDS and AML needs to be individualized, accounting for both the heterogeneity of disease biology and patient characteristics, which can influence life expectancy and treatment tolerance. Clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and physiologic changes of aging are needed to define optimal standards of care. This article highlights key evidence related to the management of older adults with MDS and AML and highlights future directions for research.

  16. Myelodysplastic syndromes: From pathogenesis and prognosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, Pierre

    2004-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal hematologic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis resulting in peripheral cytopenia and by increased progression to acute myelocytic leukemia (AML). With the exception of allogeneic stem cell transplantation, there is generally no curative treatment for these disorders. As the contribution of diverse pathologic processes to ineffective hematopoiesis in MDS continues to be clarified, promising new avenues for treatment are being identified. Agents that interact with newly defined biologic targets and that are under investigation include arsenic trioxide, DNA methylation inhibitors, farnesyl transferase inhibitors, thalidomide, immunomodulating agents, and histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  17. Treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes: practical tools for effective management.

    PubMed

    Kurtin, Sandra E; Demakos, Erin P; Hayden, Janet; Boglione, Claudia

    2012-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of myeloid malignancies with variability in clinical presentation, disease trajectory, treatment goals, and expected outcomes. The treatment of patients with MDS, therefore, often differs from patient to patient. Tools are needed to aid effective communication with patients, their caregivers, and their dedicated team of healthcare professionals. The use of methods often employed in clinical trials can help healthcare providers diagnose and classify risk status, track trends within patient responses, manage adverse events, set treatment expectations, and provide ongoing supportive care. This article discusses several tools and strategies available for the management of patients with MDS throughout the continuum of their disease.

  18. Platelet peroxidase deficiency in a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Imbert, M; Jarry, M T; Tulliez, M; Breton-Gorius, J

    1983-01-01

    Morphological and functional abnormalities of the megakaryocytic series have been well described in myelodysplastic syndromes. Platelet peroxidase has always been demonstrated in abnormal megakaryocytes and early megakaryoblasts in such syndromes. We have studied a case of myelodysplastic syndrome with marked morphological abnormalities of megakaryocytes in which ultrastructural studies showed the coexistence of platelet peroxidase positive and platelet peroxidase negative megakaryocytes. This enzymatic deficiency was confirmed by the ultrastructural study of circulating platelets. This case appears to be the first report of a partial platelet peroxidase deficiency. It adds to the enzymatic abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndrome already described for the red cells and the granulocytic cells. Images PMID:6630573

  19. [Large vessel vasculitis with myelodysplastic syndrome: A rare association].

    PubMed

    Galland, J; Kawski, H; Guichard, J-F; Maurier, F

    2017-07-01

    The vasculitis can be the consequence of malignancy: most often hematologic rather than solid tumors. The association between large vessels vasculitis and myelodysplastic syndrome is rare. A 55-year-old man experienced asthenia, fever, polyarthritis and inflammatory syndrome. Haematological investigations found a type 2 refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB-2) with discovery of severe anemia (Hb: 7,8g/dl) and thrombopenia (platelets: 40,000/mm(3)). Radiological examinations found thoracic aortitis and carotid vasculitis. Treatment in the form of steroids and azacitidine was instituted. The lack of control of both RAEB-2 and vasculitis was responsible for the death of the patient. Myelodysplastic syndrome and large vessels vasculitis is a rare but serious association disease. The lack of efficiency of corticosteroids seems to be common. Prognosis depends on the haematological treatment effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Cushing syndrome in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-12-01

    Cushing syndrome is characterized by truncal obesity, growth deceleration, skin changes, muscle weakness, and hypertension. Cushing syndrome in childhood usually results from the exogenous administration of glucocorticoids. This article presents the causes and discusses the treatment of endogenous Cushing syndrome. It also discusses the clinical and molecular genetics of inherited forms of this syndrome. Cushing syndrome needs to be diagnosed and treated properly when first recognized; improper treatment can turn this otherwise completely curable disorder into a chronic ailment. Barriers to optimal care of a pediatric patient with Cushing syndrome are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Implementation of erythroid lineage analysis by flow cytometry in diagnostic models for myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Eline M.P.; Westers, Theresia M.; Alhan, Canan; Cali, Claudia; Visser-Wisselaar, Heleen A.; Chitu, Dana A.; van der Velden, Vincent H.J.; te Marvelde, Jeroen G.; Klein, Saskia K.; Muus, Petra; Vellenga, Edo; de Greef, Georgina E.; Legdeur, Marie-Cecile C.J.C.; Wijermans, Pierre W.; Stevens-Kroef, Marian J.P.L.; da Silva-Coelho, Pedro; Jansen, Joop H.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2017-01-01

    Flow cytometric analysis is a recommended tool in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes. Current flow cytometric approaches evaluate the (im)mature myelo-/monocytic lineage with a median sensitivity and specificity of ~71% and ~93%, respectively. We hypothesized that the addition of erythroid lineage analysis could increase the sensitivity of flow cytometry. Hereto, we validated the analysis of erythroid lineage parameters recommended by the International/European LeukemiaNet Working Group for Flow Cytometry in Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and incorporated this evaluation in currently applied flow cytometric models. One hundred and sixty-seven bone marrow aspirates were analyzed; 106 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, and 61 cytopenic controls. There was a strong correlation between presence of erythroid aberrancies assessed by flow cytometry and the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes when validating the previously described erythroid evaluation. Furthermore, addition of erythroid aberrancies to two different flow cytometric models led to an increased sensitivity in detecting myelodysplastic syndromes: from 74% to 86% for the addition to the diagnostic score designed by Ogata and colleagues, and from 69% to 80% for the addition to the integrated flow cytometric score for myelodysplastic syndromes, designed by our group. In both models the specificity was unaffected. The high sensitivity and specificity of flow cytometry in the detection of myelodysplastic syndromes illustrates the important value of flow cytometry in a standardized diagnostic approach. The trial is registered at www.trialregister.nl as NTR1825; EudraCT n.: 2008-002195-10 PMID:27658438

  2. Clinical significance of SF3B1 mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Malcovati, Luca; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Bowen, David T.; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Della Porta, Matteo G.; Pascutto, Cristiana; Travaglino, Erica; Groves, Michael J.; Godfrey, Anna L.; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Gallì, Anna; Da Vià, Matteo C.; Conte, Simona; Tauro, Sudhir; Keenan, Norene; Hyslop, Ann; Hinton, Jonathan; Mudie, Laura J.; Wainscoat, James S.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study, we identified somatic mutations of SF3B1, a gene encoding a core component of RNA splicing machinery, in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Here, we define the clinical significance of these mutations in MDS and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN). The coding exons of SF3B1 were screened using massively parallel pyrosequencing in patients with MDS, MDS/MPN, or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) evolving from MDS. Somatic mutations of SF3B1 were found in 150 of 533 (28.1%) patients with MDS, 16 of 83 (19.3%) with MDS/MPN, and 2 of 38 (5.3%) with AML. There was a significant association of SF3B1 mutations with the presence of ring sideroblasts (P < .001) and of mutant allele burden with their proportion (P = .002). The mutant gene had a positive predictive value for ring sideroblasts of 97.7% (95% confidence interval, 93.5%-99.5%). In multivariate analysis including established risk factors, SF3B1 mutations were found to be independently associated with better overall survival (hazard ratio = 0.15, P = .025) and lower risk of evolution into AML (hazard ratio = 0.33, P = .049). The close association between SF3B1 mutations and disease phenotype with ring sideroblasts across MDS and MDS/MPN is consistent with a causal relationship. Furthermore, SF3B1 mutations are independent predictors of favorable clinical outcome, and their incorporation into stratification systems might improve risk assessment in MDS. PMID:21998214

  3. Beyond the Niche: Myelodysplastic Syndrome Topobiology in the Laboratory and in the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Figueroa, Eugenia; Gratzinger, Dita

    2016-01-01

    We review the murine and human microenvironment and hematopoietic stem cell niche in the context of intact bone marrow architecture in man and mouse, both in normal and in myelodysplastic syndrome marrow. We propose that the complexity of the hematopoietic stem cell niche can usefully be approached in the context of its topobiology, and we provide a model that incorporates in vitro and in vivo models as well as in situ findings from intact human marrow to explain the changes seen in myelodysplastic syndrome patients. We highlight the clinical application of the study of the bone marrow microenvironment and its topobiology in myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:27089321

  4. Beyond the Niche: Myelodysplastic Syndrome Topobiology in the Laboratory and in the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Flores-Figueroa, Eugenia; Gratzinger, Dita

    2016-04-13

    We review the murine and human microenvironment and hematopoietic stem cell niche in the context of intact bone marrow architecture in man and mouse, both in normal and in myelodysplastic syndrome marrow. We propose that the complexity of the hematopoietic stem cell niche can usefully be approached in the context of its topobiology, and we provide a model that incorporates in vitro and in vivo models as well as in situ findings from intact human marrow to explain the changes seen in myelodysplastic syndrome patients. We highlight the clinical application of the study of the bone marrow microenvironment and its topobiology in myelodysplastic syndromes.

  5. Biclonal chromosomal aberrations in a child with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Z; Balogh, E; Kiss, C; Pajor, L; Oláh, E

    1999-01-01

    Hematological malignancies and premalignant diseases are generally of monoclonal origin. The prognostic and therapeutic significance of finding two genetically independent clones remains to be determined. We followed a case of childhood myelodysplastic syndrome showing biclonal chromosomal abnormalities (+8, -7) by conventional cytogenetic examination and double target fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). A 7-year-old girl presented with Plaut-Vincent angina and leukopenia. The cytogenetic aberration of +8 was the first sign to suggest MDS. Serial bone marrow controls, prompted by a progressive clinical course detected myelodysplastic changes and a new clonal aberration (-7). The presence of -7 and +8 in two independent clones was verified by double-target FISH. While at diagnosis and during cytokine treatment more cells showed +8, after successful all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) therapy, the clone with -7 predominated. Following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation the patient displayed donor-derived hematopoesis. Our data stress the significance of cytogenetic and FISH examinations in detecting specific genetic abnormalities and progressive clonal changes as an indicator and guideline for therapy. Different cell clones characterized by different genetic changes might be associated with different biologic features reflected in their response to treatment.

  6. Clinical management of myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm overlap syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Clara, Joseph A.; Sallman, David A.; Padron, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPNs) are a unique group of hematologic malignancies characterized by concomitant myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative features. According to the 2008 WHO classification, the category includes atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN-U), and the provisional entity refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis (RARS-T). Although diagnosis currently remains based on clinicopathologic features, the incorporation of next-generation platforms has allowed for the recent molecular characterization of these diseases which has revealed unique and complex mutational profiles that support their distinct biology and is anticipated to soon play an integral role in diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment. Future goals of research should include the development of disease-modifying therapies, and further genetic understanding of the category will likely form the foundation of these efforts. PMID:27807503

  7. An Analysis of microRNA Expression in the Myelodysplastic Syndromes Using Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0082 TITLE: An Analysis of microRNA Expression in the Myelodysplastic Syndromes Using Hematopoietic Stem Cells...COVERED 15 Jul 2013 - 14 Jul 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER An Analysis of microRNA Expression in the Myelodysplastic Syndromes Using...in MDS hematopoietic stem cells (MDS HSCs) as compared with normal HSCs. MiRNAs differentially expressed between MDS HSCs and normal HSCs overlapped

  8. 5'-Azacitidine for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes after non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Salaroli, Adriano; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Martelli, Maurizio; D'Elia, Gianna Maria; Nanni, Mauro; Mauro, Francesca Romana; Alimena, Giuliana

    2011-10-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes are possible complications in patients treated for previous hematologic malignancies. Therapeutic strategies in these type of disorders are still not well defined: azacitidine has been recently approved for the treatment of higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes, but few data are published relating possible efficacy in therapy-related dysplastic disorders. We reported here 4 patients treated with azacitidine for therapy related dysplasia after chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  9. Chronic myelodysplastic syndrome (preleukemia) with the Philadelphia chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, D.G.; Richman, C.M.; Rowley, J.D.

    1980-08-01

    A patient with severe anemia, reticulocytopenia, and erythroid hyperplasia of the bone marrow developed fatal acute nonlymphocytic leukemia after 3 yr. A Philadelphia chromosome with the typical 9/22 translocation was identified by banding techniques in a small number of bone marrow cells throughout the preleukemic phase of the illness (14% to 38% of the metaphases) and during the acute transformation (50%). Granulocytic colony formation in vitro was abnormal in the preleukemic phase. The diagnosis of chronic granulocytic leukemia was excluded on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. The identification of the Ph/sup 1/ chromosome in this form of chronic myelodysplastic syndrome (preleukemia) provides a new example of a hematologic disorder predisposing to acute leukemia in which this chromosomal abnormality occurs.

  10. Iron chelation therapy in myelodysplastic syndromes: where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Mhairi; Gore, Steven D; Zeidan, Amer M

    2014-01-01

    Anemia leading to transfusion dependency (TD) and iron overload (IO) is commonly observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In MDS, TD and IO have been retrospectively associated with inferior survival and worse clinical outcomes, including cardiac, hepatic and endocrine dysfunction, and, in some analyses, with leukemic progression and infectious complications. Although suggested by retrospective analyses, clear prospective documentation of the beneficial effects of iron chelation therapy (ICT) on organ function and survival in MDS patients with TD and IO is currently lacking. Consequently, the role of ICT in MDS patients with TD and IO remains a very controversial aspect in the management of MDS. In this review, the authors summarize the current knowledge regarding IO in MDS and the role of ICT. PMID:23991926

  11. [Molecular biology in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemias "smoldering"].

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Sartor, Chiara; Papayannidis, Cristina; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Paolini, Stefania; Clissa, Cristina; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Finelli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders of the myeloid lineage characterized by peripheral cytopenias and frequent leukemic evolution. MDS differ for clinical presentation, disease behavior and progression and this is the reflection of remarkable variability at molecular level. To this moment disease diagnosis is still dependent on bone marrow morphology that, although high concordance rates among experts are reported, remains subjective. Karyotype analysis is mandatory but diagnosis may be difficult in presence of normal karyotype or non-informative cytogenetics. Standardized molecular markers are needed to better define diagnosis, prediction of disease progression and prognosis. Furthermore, a molecular biology analysis could provide an important therapeutic tool towards tailored therapy and new insights in the disease's biology.

  12. Importance of classical morphology in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Invernizzi, Rosangela; Quaglia, Federica; Porta, Matteo Giovanni Della

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplastic, ineffective, clonal and neoplastic hematopoiesis. MDS represent a complex hematological problem: differences in disease presentation, progression and outcome have necessitated the use of classification systems to improve diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment selection. However, since a single biological or genetic reliable diagnostic marker has not yet been discovered for MDS, quantitative and qualitative dysplastic morphological alterations of bone marrow precursors and peripheral blood cells are still fundamental for diagnostic classification. In this paper, World Health Organization (WHO) classification refinements and current minimal diagnostic criteria proposed by expert panels are highlighted, and related problematic issues are discussed. The recommendations should facilitate diagnostic and prognostic evaluations in MDS and selection of patients for new effective targeted therapies. Although, in the future, morphology should be supplemented with new molecular techniques, the morphological approach, at least for the moment, is still the cornerstone for the diagnosis and classification of these disorders.

  13. [Morphology: a critical phase in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Zini, Gina

    2014-03-01

    Diagnosis and classification of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are based on the integration of morphology, immunophenotype, histology, genetics and molecular analysis. The role of cytomorphology in this context, however, remains fundamental and preliminary to the application of the other methods. The first modern classification of MDS, originally published by the FAB (French-American-British) Group in 1985, was based on the recognition of five different diagnostic categories. The more recent 2008 WHO classification of hematopoietic neoplasms has widened and modified the FAB approach, by including seven different cytomorphological entities and decreasing the threshold of the blast cell percentage to 19% for the discrimination of MDS from acute myeloid leukemias. In addition, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is now included in the new group or MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms. Finally, precise quantitative and qualitative criteria are provided, with the aim to improve microscope method standardization.

  14. Patient and family resources for living with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kurtin, Sandra E; Paterson, Phyllis; Wintrich, Sophie; Iraca, Tracey; Hassan, Audrey Ann; Murray, Deborah; Hogan, Sue

    2012-06-01

    Primarily a disease affecting older adults, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a class of incurable myeloid malignancies with variable clinical presentation, treatment recommendations, and prognoses. Although effective communication between healthcare professionals and patients and their caregivers is a significant part of optimizing clinical outcomes, studies have shown that all three frequently have an incomplete understanding of MDS, its therapeutic options, and the fact that MDS is a malignancy. In addition, the advanced age of the patient population, high frequency of comorbidities, and variability of disease outcomes based on risk status require consistent communication across a wide number and type of healthcare providers as well as an individualized approach to patient and caregiver education. This article discusses these challenges and provides a number of resources designed to help educate healthcare professionals, patients, and caregivers.

  15. Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and autoimmune disorders (AD): cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Braun, Thorsten; Fenaux, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) are frequently associated with clinical manifestations of autoimmune disorders (AD) and inflammatory response of the immune system. AD accompanying MDS and CMML include vasculitis, seronegative polyarthritis and neutrophilic dermatosis. Rare AD including relapsing polychondritis is strongly associated with MDS as in a high proportion of those patients MDS is diagnosed during disease course. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are frequently found among MDS patients without clinical manifestation of AD. In a subset of patients, MDS and resulting cytopenias appear to be the consequence of auto reactive immunologic activity and may respond to immunosuppressive treatment (IST). Increased release of inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-(TNF)-α and interferon (IF)-γ triggers apoptosis of myeloid precursor cells leading to cytopenias. Impaired function of immune cells including cytotoxic, regulatory (Treg), helper (Th17) T cells and NK cells also appears to predict response to IST, outcome and occurrence of AD.

  16. Importance of Classical Morphology in the Diagnosis of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Invernizzi, Rosangela; Quaglia, Federica; Porta, Matteo Giovanni Della

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplastic, ineffective, clonal and neoplastic hematopoiesis. MDS represent a complex hematological problem: differences in disease presentation, progression and outcome have necessitated the use of classification systems to improve diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment selection. However, since a single biological or genetic reliable diagnostic marker has not yet been discovered for MDS, quantitative and qualitative dysplastic morphological alterations of bone marrow precursors and peripheral blood cells are still fundamental for diagnostic classification. In this paper, World Health Organization (WHO) classification refinements and current minimal diagnostic criteria proposed by expert panels are highlighted, and related problematic issues are discussed. The recommendations should facilitate diagnostic and prognostic evaluations in MDS and selection of patients for new effective targeted therapies. Although, in the future, morphology should be supplemented with new molecular techniques, the morphological approach, at least for the moment, is still the cornerstone for the diagnosis and classification of these disorders. PMID:25960863

  17. Myelodysplastic syndromes: challenges to improving patient and caregiver satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Smith, B Douglas

    2012-07-01

    The task of improving patient and caregiver satisfaction in the management of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) poses many challenges for physicians and patient care teams. Advances in the understanding of MDS biology have resulted in the approval of 3 agents for the treatment of MDS by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the past decade. However, according to a retrospective physician survey, the majority of recently diagnosed patients with MDS still receive supportive care only. Interestingly, a survey performed in patients with MDS suggests that patient understanding of treatment goals and prognosis is often limited, with a third of patients reporting that prognosis was not discussed with their physician. Efforts to improve patient awareness of their disease severity and establishing clear treatment goals are crucial for setting up an individualized treatment plan and ensuring optimal patient and caregiver satisfaction.

  18. Telomere dysfunction drives aberrant hematopoietic differentiation and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Colla, Simona; Ong, Derrick Sek Tong; Ogoti, Yamini; Marchesini, Matteo; Mistry, Nipun A; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Ang, Sonny A; Storti, Paola; Viale, Andrea; Giuliani, Nicola; Ruisaard, Kathryn; Ganan Gomez, Irene; Bristow, Christopher A; Estecio, Marcos; Weksberg, David C; Ho, Yan Wing; Hu, Baoli; Genovese, Giannicola; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Multani, Asha S; Jiang, Shan; Hua, Sujun; Ryan, Michael C; Carugo, Alessandro; Nezi, Luigi; Wei, Yue; Yang, Hui; D'Anca, Marianna; Zhang, Li; Gaddis, Sarah; Gong, Ting; Horner, James W; Heffernan, Timothy P; Jones, Philip; Cooper, Laurence J N; Liang, Han; Kantarjian, Hagop; Wang, Y Alan; Chin, Lynda; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; DePinho, Ronald A

    2015-05-11

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) risk correlates with advancing age, therapy-induced DNA damage, and/or shorter telomeres, but whether telomere erosion directly induces MDS is unknown. Here, we provide the genetic evidence that telomere dysfunction-induced DNA damage drives classical MDS phenotypes and alters common myeloid progenitor (CMP) differentiation by repressing the expression of mRNA splicing/processing genes, including SRSF2. RNA-seq analyses of telomere dysfunctional CMP identified aberrantly spliced transcripts linked to pathways relevant to MDS pathogenesis such as genome stability, DNA repair, chromatin remodeling, and histone modification, which are also enriched in mouse CMP haploinsufficient for SRSF2 and in CD34(+) CMML patient cells harboring SRSF2 mutation. Together, our studies establish an intimate link across telomere biology, aberrant RNA splicing, and myeloid progenitor differentiation.

  19. Myelodysplastic syndromes in Chernobyl clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Gluzman, Daniil F; Sklyarenko, Lilia M; Koval, Stella V; Rodionova, Nataliia K; Zavelevich, Michael P; Ivanivskaya, Tetiana S; Poludnenko, Liudmyla Yu; Ukrainskaya, Nataliia I

    2015-10-01

    The studies of the recent decades posed the question of the association between radiation exposure and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). This association has been proved in secondary MDS originating upon exposure to chemotherapeutics and/or radiation therapy. The long-term study in Japanese atomic (A)-bomb survivors demonstrated the significant linear dose-response for MDS confirming the link between radiation exposure and this form of hematopoietic malignancies. All these findings provide the strong basis for studying MDS in the persons exposed to radiation following the Chernobyl disaster, especially those in the cohort of Chernobyl clean-up workers of 1986-1987. The data on MDS among Chernobyl clean-up workers (1986-1987) diagnosed in 1996-2012 at the reference laboratory of RE Kavetsky Institute of Experimental Pathology, Oncology and Radiobiology are summarized. MDS cases were diagnosed in 23 persons (21 males and 2 females) having been exposed to radiation as clean-up workers of 1986-1987. Refractory anemia (RA) has been detected in 13, refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS)-in 2, and refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB)-in 8 patients. The median age of those MDS patients was 62.0 years. In addition, 5 cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) were recorded in the group of Chernobyl clean-up workers with the median time of 14.8 years from 1986-1987 to diagnosis. The association between radiation exposure and MDS is discussed. The suggested life-long risk for myelodysplastic syndromes among A-bomb survivors in Japan highlights the importance of the continuing follow-up studies in the affected populations in the post-Chernobyl period.

  20. Clinical significance of previously cryptic copy number alterations and loss of heterozygosity in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome determined using combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Jin Ok; Seo, Eul Ju; Lee, Seong Wook; Suh, Jin Kyung; Im, Ho Joon; Seo, Jong Jin

    2014-07-01

    The combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray (CGH+SNP microarray) platform can simultaneously detect copy number alterations (CNA) and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Eighteen children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n=15) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n=3) were studied using CGH+SNP microarray to evaluate the clinical significance of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations. CGH+SNP microarray revealed CNAs at 14 regions in 9 patients, while metaphase cytogenetic (MC) analysis detected CNAs in 11 regions in 8 patients. Using CGH+SNP microarray, LOHs>10 Mb involving terminal regions or the whole chromosome were detected in 3 of 18 patients (17%). CGH+SNP microarray revealed cryptic LOHs with or without CNAs in 3 of 5 patients with normal karyotypes. CGH+SNP microarray detected additional cryptic CNAs (n=2) and LOHs (n=5) in 6 of 13 patients with abnormal MC. In total, 9 patients demonstrated additional aberrations, including CNAs (n=3) and/or LOHs (n=8). Three of 15 patients with AML and terminal LOH>10 Mb demonstrated a significantly inferior relapse-free survival rate (P=0.041). This study demonstrates that CGH+SNP microarray can simultaneously detect previously cryptic CNAs and LOH, which may demonstrate prognostic implications.

  1. Therapeutic approaches in myelofibrosis and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative overlap syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sochacki, Andrew L; Fischer, Melissa A; Savona, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of JAK2V617F a decade ago led to optimism for a rapidly developing treatment revolution in Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms. Unlike BCR–ABL, however, JAK2 was found to have a more heterogeneous role in carcinogenesis. Therefore, for years, development of new therapies was slow, despite standard treatment options that did not address the overwhelming symptom burden in patients with primary myelofibrosis (MF), post-essential thrombocythemia MF, post-polycythemia vera MF, and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) syndromes. JAK–STAT inhibitors have changed this, drastically ameliorating symptoms and ultimately beginning to show evidence of impact on survival. Now, the genetic foundations of myelofibrosis and MDS/MPN are rapidly being elucidated and contributing to targeted therapy development. This has been empowered through updated response criteria for MDS/MPN and refined prognostic scoring systems in these diseases. The aim of this article is to summarize concisely the current and rationally designed investigational therapeutics directed at JAK–STAT, hedgehog, PI3K–Akt, bone marrow fibrosis, telomerase, and rogue epigenetic signaling. The revolution in immunotherapy and novel treatments aimed at previously untargeted signaling pathways provides hope for considerable advancement in therapy options for those with chronic myeloid disease. PMID:27143923

  2. Deferasirox for managing iron overload in people with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meerpohl, Joerg J; Schell, Lisa K; Rücker, Gerta; Fleeman, Nigel; Motschall, Edith; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Bassler, Dirk

    2014-10-28

    The myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) comprises a diverse group of haematopoietic stem cell disorders. Due to symptomatic anaemia, most people with MDS require supportive therapy including repeated red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. In combination with increased iron absorption, this contributes to the accumulation of iron resulting in secondary iron overload and the risk of organ dysfunction and reduced life expectancy. Since the human body has no natural means of removing excess iron, iron chelation therapy, i.e. the pharmacological treatment of iron overload, is usually recommended. However, it is unclear whether or not the newer oral chelator deferasirox leads to relevant benefit. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of oral deferasirox for managing iron overload in people with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We searched the following databases up to 03 April 2014: MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, Biosis Previews, Web of Science, Derwent Drug File and four trial registries: Current Controlled Trials (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), ICTRP (www.who.int./ictrp/en/), and German Clinical Trial Register (www.drks.de). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing deferasirox with no therapy, placebo or with another iron-chelating treatment schedule. We did not identify any trials eligible for inclusion in this review. No trials met our inclusion criteria. However, we identified three ongoing and one completed trial (published as an abstract only and in insufficient detail to permit us to decide on inclusion) comparing deferasirox with deferoxamine, placebo or no treatment. We planned to report evidence from RCTs that evaluated the effectiveness of deferasirox compared to either placebo, no treatment or other chelating regimens, such as deferoxamine, in people with MDS. However, we did not identify any completed RCTs addressing this question.We found three ongoing and one completed RCT (published as an abstract only and

  3. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of transfusional iron overload in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Emmanouil; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Karali, Vasiliki; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Sfikakis, Petros P.; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes represent a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic neoplasms derived from an abnormal multipotent progenitor cell, characterized by a hyperproliferative bone marrow, dysplasia of the cellular hemopoietic elements and ineffective erythropoiesis. Anemia is a common finding in myelodysplastic syndrome patients, and blood transfusions are the only therapeutic option in approximately 40% of cases. The most serious side effect of regular blood transfusion is iron overload. Currently, cardiovascular magnetic resonance using T2 is routinely used to identify patients with myocardial iron overload and to guide chelation therapy, tailored to prevent iron toxicity in the heart. This is a major validated non-invasive measure of myocardial iron overloading and is superior to surrogates such as serum ferritin, liver iron, ventricular ejection fraction and tissue Doppler parameters. The indication for iron chelation therapy in myelodysplastic syndrome patients is currently controversial. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance may offer an excellent non-invasive, diagnostic tool for iron overload assessment in myelodysplastic syndromes. Further studies are needed to establish the precise indications of chelation therapy and the clinical implications of this treatment on survival in myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:26190429

  4. The biology of myelodysplastic syndromes: unity despite heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Azra; Cruz, Raymond; Latif, Tahir; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Galili, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) traditionally have been grouped together as a disease entity based on clinical phenomena seen in association. Despite the similarities, there is great heterogeneity among the syndromes. Recent insights have shown, however, that there exists a biologically cohesive theme that unifies and thereby validates the conceptual interconnectedness. The first suggestion that such a relationship existed where biology could directly explain the observed cytopenias was the finding of excessive premature apoptosis of hematopoietic cells in MDS marrows. This apoptosis was mediated by paracrine as well as autocrine factors implicating both the seed and the soil in the pathology of the disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines in the marrow microenvironment were mainly the paracrine mediators of apoptosis, but how the clonal cells committed suicide because of autocrine stimulation had remained a mystery for more than a decade. It has been shown now that deregulation of ribosome biogenesis can initiate a stress response in the cell through the p53 signaling pathway. Congenital anemias had been associated with mutations in ribosomal protein genes. The surprise came with the investigation of 5q- syndrome patients where haplo-insufficiency of the ribosomal protein gene RPS14 was found to be the cause of this MDS subtype. Similar ribosomal deregulation was shown to be present in all varieties of MDS patients, serving as another unifying characteristic. In addition to these findings, there are other DNA-related abnormalities such as uniparental disomy, mutations in the TET2 gene, and epigenetic phenomena that are associated with and occur across all types of MDS. This paper summarizes the themes unifying this heterogeneous group of diseases. PMID:22184517

  5. Immunomodulatory drugs: new options for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Roberto; Cassin, Ramona; Cannavò, Antonino; Cugno, Massimo

    2013-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are common adult hematologic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis with progressive cytopenia and a risk of evolving into currently incurable acute myeloid leukemia. Until recently, the only treatment was bone marrow transplantation, but, over the past few years, a new therapeutic approach based on immunomodulatory drugs (IMiD) has been developed. IMiDs belong to a therapeutic class whose progenitor is thalidomide, a synthetic derivative of glutamate that was initially used because of its sedative and antiemetic properties but was then withdrawn because of its teratogenic effects. IMiDs represent a major advance in the treatment of multiple myeloma at different disease stages, 5q minus syndrome, acute myeloid leukemia with the 5q deletion, mantle cell lymphoma, relapsing or unresponsive high-grade lymphoma, and relapsing indolent lymphoma. Medical databases and conference proceedings were searched to identify articles and clinical trials that have investigated or are investigating the use of IMiDs on MDS. An important part of their in vivo efficacy is attributed to their immunomodulatory properties because they potentiate the immune response by restoring dendritic cell function and inhibiting T-cell regulatory activity, which leads to the activation of T lymphocytes and natural killer T cells by increasing the production of interleukin-2 and interferon gamma. IMiDs are characterized by antitumoral and antiangiogenic activities, and they also induce the apoptosis of neoplastic cells. Thalidomide and its derivative lenalidomide have been proposed for the treatment of MDS because of their action on the immune mechanisms that appear to play an important role in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. This article examines the pharmacology and molecular action of IMiDs and the evidence of their efficacy in treating patients with MDS in different risk classes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Strategies for achieving transfusion independence in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mary Laudon

    2007-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of complex diseases of the myeloid stem cell that result in chronic cytopenias. In some instances, these disorders may progress to acute myeloid leukemia. Patients with MDS frequently experience chronic, symptomatic anemia, and many become dependent on chronic transfusions of packed red blood cells. However, long-term transfusion dependence has clinical and economic consequences, including a potentially negative impact on patients' quality of life (QOL). Recently, studies have investigated various strategies to reduce or eliminate transfusion needs in MDS patients. Supportive measures with hematopoietic growth factors such as erythropoietin are often less effective in MDS-associated anemia than in anemia from other causes, but some patients may benefit from this approach. Treatment with other agents, such as antithymocyte globulin, azacitidine, decitabine, thalidomide, and lenalidomide, has resulted in transfusion independence in some subsets of MDS patients. Nurses who care for patients with MDS should be aware of the impact of transfusion dependence on the patient's QOL, as well as the benefits and risks of the various other treatment options available to these patients. Such knowledge will enable the nurse to provide accurate, relevant information, so that patients can make informed choices regarding treatment options for MDS.

  7. Diagnostic Utility of Flow Cytometry in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Della Porta, Matteo G.; Picone, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The pathological hallmark of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is marrow dysplasia, which represents the basis of the WHO classification of these disorders. This classification provides clinicians with a useful tool for defining the different subtypes of MDS and individual prognosis. The WHO proposal has raised some concern regarding minimal diagnostic criteria particularly in patients with normal karyotype without robust morphological markers of dysplasia (such as ring sideroblasts or excess of blasts). Therefore, there is clearly need to refine the accuracy to detect marrow dysplasia. Flow cytometry (FCM) immunophenotyping has been proposed as a tool to improve the evaluation of marrow dysplasia. The rationale for the application of FCM in the diagnostic work up of MDS is that immunophenotyping is an accurate method for quantitative and qualitative evaluation of hematopoietic cells and that MDS have been found to have abnormal expression of several cellular antigens. To become applicable in clinical practice, FCM analysis should be based on parameters with sufficient specificity and sensitivity, data should be reproducible between different operators, and the results should be easily understood by clinicians. In this review, we discuss the most relevant progresses in detection of marrow dysplasia by FCM in MDS PMID:28293405

  8. Immune alterations in untreated and treated myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mewawalla, Prerna; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2011-05-01

    Current literature suggests a variety of immune abnormalities are present in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients. However, they have not been comprehensively characterized or systematized to date. As a result, their clinical implications remain largely unknown. In addition, an increased incidence of various autoimmune conditions has been documented in MDS patients. The authors offer a comprehensive review of the existing literature on immune mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of MDS, various immune abnormalities documented in its course, their link with the clonal evolution of MDS as well as immune alterations induced by the existing MDS therapies. The course of MDS is accompanied by complex immune alterations, including T-cell and NK-cell defects, decreased functional abilities of neutrophils and antigen-presenting cells, altered antibody and cytokine production. While contemporary MDS therapies are shown to possess some immunomodulatory properties, authentic autoimmune conditions have also been documented with lenalidomide and recombinant erythropoietin. Caution should be exerted with the use of these agents in MDS patients with evidence of autoimmune disorders, as exacerbation of autoimmune phenomena can be anticipated. While the heterogeneity of MDS represents an inherent limitation, integration of emerging information from molecular biology, genetics, immunology research and clinical practice could translate into improved outcomes of this disease spectrum.

  9. The myelodysplastic syndrome as a prototypical epigenetic disease.

    PubMed

    Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2013-05-09

    The myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal disorder characterized by increased stem cell proliferation coupled with aberrant differentiation resulting in a high rate of apoptosis and eventual symptoms related to bone marrow failure. Cellular differentiation is an epigenetic process that requires specific and highly ordered DNA methylation and histone modification programs. Aberrant differentiation in MDS can often be traced to abnormal DNA methylation (both gains and losses of DNA methylation genome wide and at specific loci) as well as mutations in genes that regulate epigenetic programs (TET2 and DNMT3a, both involved in DNA methylation control; EZH2 and ASXL1, both involved in histone methylation control). The epigenetic nature of MDS may explain in part the serendipitous observation that it is the disease most responsive to DNA methylation inhibitors; other epigenetic-acting drugs are being explored in MDS as well. Progression in MDS is characterized by further acquisition of epigenetic defects as well as mutations in growth-controlling genes that seem to tip the proliferation/apoptosis balance and result in the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. Although MDS is clinically and physiologically heterogeneous, a case can be made that subsets of the disease can be largely explained by disordered stem cell epigenetics.

  10. Qualitative flow cytometric analysis of Malaysian myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients.

    PubMed

    Mohadese Hashem, Broojerdi; Rajesh, Ramasamy; Sabariah, M Noor; Zainina, Binti Seman

    2012-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of haematological malignancies categorized by ineffective hematopoiesis that result in dysplasia. Although morphological diagnosis is a traditional and standard technique that is used for the diagnosis of MDS, the heterogeneous blood and bone marrow characteristics of MDS patients can potentially obscure the right diagnosis. Thus, we have utilized flow cytometric immunophenotyping as a supportive mechanism to obtain a more accurate and faster method for detection of abnormal markers in MDS. Flow cytometry was used for analyzing bone marrow samples from newly diagnosed MDS patients to investigate the abnormal antigen expression patterns in granulocytic, monocytic, erythroid, lymphoid lineages and myeloid precursors. The results were compared with those obtained from cases that had Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP) as a control. The most common abnormality found in the granulocytic lineage was the decrease of CD10. Low expressions of CD13 were the most frequent abnormality in the monocytic lineage. The erythroid lineage was found to have low expression of CD235A+/CD71+, reduce of CD71 and decreased CD235a. In conclusion, this method is useful for confirming cases in which it is difficult to make a diagnosis by morphology.

  11. Efficacy and safety of deferasirox in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2013-07-01

    Transfusion dependence in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients may lead to organ damage due to accumulation of non-transferrin-bound iron with consequent increased oxidative stress. Iron chelation has been reported in retrospective studies to improve overall survival in low-risk MDS patients, but this information needs to be validated in prospective trials. The oral iron chelator, deferasirox, has been shown to reduce serum ferritin levels in chelation naïve and pre-treated patients and to reduce labile plasma iron, independently from the efficacy on iron overload. Deferasirox is a potent NF-kB inhibitor, tested in vivo and on acute myeloid leukemia and MDS cell lines, and this effect may explain in part the phenomenon of hematological improvements reported in case reports and in different clinical trials. The drug has an acceptable safety profile, with the most common side effects reported being non-progressive change in serum creatinine level, gastrointestinal disturbances, and skin rash. In this review, we report the results of different studies testing safety and efficacy of deferasirox in MDS patients, side effects associated with the drug, and suggested management of iron overload.

  12. Diagnostic flow cytometry for low-grade myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kiyoyuki

    2008-12-01

    It has long been considered that flow cytometry (FCM) has little role in clinical practice in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, recent advances in the analytical method and knowledge of MDS FCM are changing this stereotype. This paper reviews the concept and current status of FCM in the diagnosis of low-grade MDS. The diagnosis of low-grade MDS in the absence of ringed sideroblasts and chromosomal aberration is not always straightforward, and a report from a recent international working conference has proposed FCM as an adjunctive diagnostic test for such cases. Currently, only a limited number of laboratories are applying FCM to the diagnosis of MDS. Furthermore, standard analytical methods in FCM for MDS have not been established, and no single FCM parameter is sufficiently sensitive and specific to make the diagnosis of MDS. To establish MDS FCM as a widely accepted, dependable diagnostic tool, prospective studies should increase flow parameters that can be analysed reproducibly and determine their sensitivity and specificity, either alone or in combination. CD34+ cell-related parameters that are applicable for diagnosing low-grade MDS in many laboratories are introduced here.

  13. Methylation inhibitor therapy in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Lewis R; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2005-12-01

    The class of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors is represented by azacitidine and decitabine. Azacitidine is approved for the treatment of patients in both low- and high-risk subtypes of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and decitabine is currently under review by the FDA. Azacitidine phase III trial data, based upon the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) study 9221, showed durable clinical and symptomatic improvement in bone marrow function, a reduction in the risk of leukemic transformation, and significant improvements in the quality of life of patients treated with azacitidine compared with supportive care alone. This study also provided data suggestive of improvement in survival in MDS patients. The experience with decitabine comprises a number of phase I/II studies and a phase III trial yet to be published. While there is a strong base of experience supporting the efficacy of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors in the treatment of MDS, a number of practical issues need to be explored further. These include the optimization of the timing and duration of treatment, and the prediction of response to therapy. Along with current experience, future studies will lead to the development of treatment algorithms, strategies for selecting patients (e.g. according to age, risk, classification, and cytogenetic profile), and the combination strategies, particularly with histone deacetylase inhibitors, in the management of MDS.

  14. Costs and quality of life in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lucioni, Carlo; Finelli, Carlo; Mazzi, Silvio; Oliva, Esther N

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) encompass a range of myeloid neoplasms characterised by a defect in haematopoietic stem cell maturation, resulting in peripheral cytopenias. As a major consequence, most MDS patients become anaemic, so as to require red blood cell transfusions. To investigate the costs and the impact on quality of life (QOL) of MDS-separately in transfusion-independent (TI) and -dependent (TD) patients-a literature search was conducted. From Medline and Embase, 742 studies were identified, of which 17 were considered eligible. Total medical costs per patient/year range from $ 9,840 to $ 19,811 for the TI condition and from $ 29,608 to $ 51,066 in the TD condition, more than doubling when moving from the former condition to the latter. With regard to QOL, in the transition from TI to TD, QOL could be reduced by half depending on the studies. The TD condition negatively impacts on costs and the QOL of patients with MDS. Therapeutic strategies that reduce transfusion dependence may lead to broad benefits for patients and the community. PMID:23997987

  15. Pleural effusions in acute and chronic leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Saadia A; Sahay, Sandeep; Jimenez, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary manifestations have been well described in leukemia, but pleural disease is less common. This review highlights pleural effusions in acute and chronic leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) based on the evidence to date. Diagnostic workup and recommendations for the management of these effusions are also outlined. Pleural effusions in patients with leukemia are most often due to infection and to a lesser extent leukemic infiltration of the pleura. The prognostic implications of these effusions are unclear, but survival is most likely determined by the underlying malignancy and its response to treatment. New therapies have changed survival in these patients, and some of these treatments, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors, have emerged as important causes for these effusions. Pleural interventions may be accomplished with few complications. Pleural effusions may occur with acute and chronic leukemia and MDS. Infection remains the most common cause. Malignant pleural effusions tend to occur in advanced disease in chronic leukemia, but they can be seen at any time with acute leukemia and MDS. With standard precautions, pleural procedures may be performed safely in this population. In cases of unclear cause, pleural and bone marrow biopsy should be considered.

  16. Beyond hypomethylating agents failure in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Amer M.; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Komrokji, Rami S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Although hypomethylating agents (HMAs) significantly improve outcomes in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), only half the patients achieve objective responses, and most responders lose response within 1–2 years. Azacitidine prolongs survival by a median of only 9.5 months. Failure of HMA therapy is associated with a very dismal prognosis. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches are clearly needed. Recent findings The sequential use of the alternative HMA after failure of first line HMA is associated with modest efficacy. The improved understanding of the biologic underpinnings of the disease have opened the door to study investigational agents that target disrupted molecular pathways critical to the pathogenesis of MDS. Combination treatment strategies using an azacitidine backbone are demonstrating promising early results. Expanding the applicability of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), the only curative modality, by reducing toxicity and relapse rates is another area of active research. Summary Sequential switching to the alternative HMA, clinical trials of novel targeted therapies, azacitidine-based combination therapeutic strategies, and improvements in the alloSCT platform are the main directions in improving outcomes of MDS post HMA failure. PMID:24335709

  17. Standards and Impact of Hematopathology in Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

    PubMed Central

    Valent, Peter; Orazi, Attilio; Büsche, Guntram; Schmitt-Gräff, Annette; George, Tracy I.; Sotlar, Karl; Streubel, Berthold; Beham-Schmid, Christine; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Krieger, Otto; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan; Kern, Wolfgang; Ogata, Kiyoyuki; Wimazal, Friedrich; Csomor, Judit; Várkonyi, Judit; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Werner, Martin; Kreipe, Hans; Hans-Peter, Horny

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis, classification, and prognostication of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are usually based on clinical parameters, analysis of peripheral blood and bone marrow smears, and cytogenetic determinants. However, a thorough histologic and immunohistochemical examination of the bone marrow is often required for a final diagnosis and exact classification in these patients. Notably, histology and immunohistology may reveal dysplasia in megakaryocytes or other bone marrow lineages and/or the presence of clusters of CD34-positive precursor cells. In other cases, histology may reveal an unrelated or co-existing hematopoietic neoplasm, or may support the conclusion the patient is suffering from acute myeloid leukemia rather than MDS. Moreover, histologic investigations and immunohistology may reveal an increase in tryptase-positive cells, a coexisting systemic mastocytosis, or bone marrow fibrosis, which is of prognostic significance. To discuss diagnostic algorithms, terminologies, parameters, and specific issues in the hematopathologic evaluation of MDS, a Working Conference involving a consortium of US and EU experts, was organized in June 2010. The outcomes of the conference and resulting recommendations provided by the faculty, are reported in this article. These guidelines should assist in the diagnosis, classification, and prognostication in MDS in daily practice as well as in clinical trials. PMID:21317447

  18. Apoptosis and antiapoptotic mechanisms in the progression of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kerbauy, Daniella B; Deeg, H Joachim

    2007-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), previously known as preleukemia, comprises a spectrum of heterogeneous, clonal disorders of hematopoiesis. A patient's life expectancy can range from a few months to more than a decade. Recent studies provide some insight into the pathophysiology of MDS. One mechanism contributing to the constellation of hypercellular marrow and peripheral blood cytopenia is a significant increase in programmed cell death (apoptosis) in hematopoietic cells. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, Fas ligand, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, and other proapoptotic cytokines are upregulated in early-stage/low-risk MDS, and neutralization of these signals can improve hematopoiesis. TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand induces apoptosis preferentially in clonal cells, which can contribute to containment of the clone. In a proportion of patients, MDS will eventually evolve to acute leukemia. This progression has been correlated with upregulation of nuclear factor kappaB; altered expression of adaptor molecules, such as Flice inhibitory protein; and enhanced activity of antiapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 and inhibitors of apoptosis protein families. Also, the ratio of TNF receptors 1 and 2 changes in favor of receptor 2. The role of the microenvironment in the pathophysiology and progression of MDS has remained controversial, although there is evidence that stroma and matrix components, and their interactions with clonal cells, play an important role. Microarray gene-expression studies are consistent with dysregulation of apoptosis, but not all data are in agreement.

  19. How we treat lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, Pierre; Adès, Lionel

    2013-05-23

    Lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are defined as having low or intermediate 1 risk by the International Prognostic Scoring System and are characterized mainly by anemia in most cases. Supportive care--primarily red blood cell transfusions--remains an important component of their treatment, but exposes patients to insufficient correction of anemia, alloimmunization, and organ iron overload (for which the role of iron chelation remains debated). Treatment aimed at preventing anemia recurrence should therefore be used whenever possible. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents remain the first-line treatment of anemia in most lower-risk MDS without del(5q), whereas anemia of low-risk MDS with del 5q responds to lenalidomide in two-thirds of the cases, but this drug should be used cautiously because profound cytopenias may occur initially. Treatment after failure of those first-line therapies are disappointing overall, with many patients eventually requiring long-term transfusions, but encouraging results have been reported with hypomethylating agents and lenalidomide. Selected patients respond to antithymocyte globulins, and thrombopoietin receptor agonists are under investigation in lower-risk MDS with thrombocytopenia. Some patients, while remaining at a "lower risk" MDS level, have severe cytopenias and/or poor prognostic factors, found using newer prognostic parameters, or resistance to treatment, making them urgent candidates for more intensive approaches, including allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  20. Angiogenesis and survival in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Savic, Aleksandar; Cemerikic-Martinovic, Vesna; Dovat, Sinisa; Rajic, Nebojsa; Urosevic, Ivana; Sekulic, Borivoj; Kvrgic, Vanja; Popovic, Stevan

    2012-07-01

    Angiogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis and prognosis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In this study, we investigated the relationship between microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, common morphological and clinical factors, and survival in patients with MDS. We examined the MVD of paraffin-embedded bone marrow sections from 70 MDS patients and 31 controls. VEGF expression was determined in 50 patients and 20 controls. The median MVD in MDS patients was significantly higher than that in controls (p = 0.025), whereas there was no difference in VEGF expression between MDS patients and controls. In univariate analysis, increased MVD was associated with a shorter survival time (p = 0.023). However, in multivariate analysis, MVD was not an independent predictor of survival. The VEGF expression did not influence survival in univariate analysis. Survival was independently influenced by platelet count (p = 0.0073), cytogenetic risk category (p = 0.022), and transfusion dependence (p = 0.0073). Neither MVD nor VEGF expression were predictors for progression to acute myeloid leukemia in univariate analysis. Progression to acute myeloid leukemia was independently influenced only by the cytogenetic risk category (p = 0.022). This study confirmed increased MVD in MDS. It does not support an independent prognostic role of angiogenesis in MDS.

  1. Clinical utility of lenalidomide in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Abou Zahr, Abdallah; Saad Aldin, Ehab; Komrokji, Rami S; Zeidan, Amer M

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent a heterogeneous group of acquired clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias, paradoxical BM hypercellularity, ineffective hematopoiesis, and increased risk of leukemic transformation. Risk stratification, using different prognostic scores and markers, is at the core of MDS management. Deletion 5q [del(5q)] MDS is a distinct class of MDS characterized by the haploinsufficiency of specific genes, microRNAs, and proteins, which has been linked to increased sensitivity to the drug lenalidomide. Phase II and III clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of lenalidomide in improving clinical outcomes of patients with del(5q) MDS, including reduction in red blood cell transfusion requirements and improvements in quality of life. Lenalidomide has also demonstrated some activity in non-del(5q) lower-risk MDS as well as higher-risk MDS, especially in combination with other agents. In this paper, we review the pathogenesis of del(5q) MDS, the proposed mechanisms of action of lenalidomide, the major clinical trials that documented the activity of lenalidomide in different MDS populations, potential predictors of benefit from the drug and suggested mechanisms of resistance, and the use of combination strategies to expand the clinical utility of lenalidomide in MDS. PMID:25565910

  2. Frequent chromatin rearrangements in myelodysplastic syndromes--what stands behind?

    PubMed

    Pagáčová, E; Falk, M; Falková, I; Lukášová, E; Michalová, K; Oltová, A; Raška, I; Kozubek, S

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of clonal haematopoietic diseases characterized by a short survival and high rate of transformation to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). In spite of this variability, MDS is associated with typical recurrent non-random cytogenetic defects. Chromosomal abnormalities are detected in the malignant bone-marrow cells of approximately 40-80 % of patients with primary or secondary MDS. The most frequent chromosomal rearrangements involve chromosomes 5, 7 and 8. MDS often shows presence of unbalanced chromosomal changes, especially large deletions [del(5), del(7q), del(12p), del(18q), del(20q)] or losses of whole chromosomes (7 and Y). The most typical cytogenetic abnormality is a partial or complete deletion of 5q- that occurs in roughly 30 % of all MDS cases either as the sole abnormality or in combination with other aberrations as a part of frequently complex karyotypes. The mechanisms responsible for the formation of MDS-associated recurrent translocations and complex karyotypes are unknown. Since some of the mentioned aberrations are characteristic for several haematological malignancies, more general cellular conditions could be expected to play a role. In this article, we introduce the most common rearrangements linked to MDS and discuss the potential role of the non-random higher-order chromatin structure in their formation. A contribution of the chromothripsis - a catastrophic event discovered only recently - is considered to explain how complex karyotypes may occur (during a single event).

  3. Prognostic evaluation of the microvascular network in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Korkolopoulou, P; Apostolidou, E; Pavlopoulos, P M; Kavantzas, N; Vyniou, N; Thymara, I; Terpos, E; Patsouris, E; Yataganas, X; Davaris, P

    2001-09-01

    Considering the recently stated suggestion of neovascularization being implicated in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) pathogenesis, we evaluated multiple morphometric microvascular characteristics in MDS, in relation to clinicopathologic factors and prognosis. Trephines from 50 newly diagnosed MDS patients were immunostained for factor VIII and compared to those from 20 controls, 10 chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and 12 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Quantitation of microvessel density (MVD), area, total vascular area (TVA), major and minor axis length, perimeter, compactness, shape factor, Feret diameter, and the number of branching vessels was performed by image analysis. Overall, the MDS group had significantly higher MVD, TVA, minor axis and shape factor values and significantly lower compactness than the control group. AML was characterized by increased vascularity compared to MDS and CMML, as well as by the presence of flattened microvessels (lower values of shape factor). Hypercellular MDS showed higher MVD. RA/RARS displayed larger caliber vessels than RAEB, which explains the favorable prognostic effect of increased size-related parameters on progression and/or survival. Moreover, decreased compactness and MVD were independent predictors of longer progression-free survival. It is concluded that angiogenesis is involved in the conversion of normal marrow to MDS and ultimately to AML and that disease progression within MDS is accompanied by qualitative alterations of the microvascular network. Furthermore, size-related parameters affect survival, while shape-related parameters and MVD are more influential with regard to progression-free survival.

  4. Discovering Transcription and Splicing Networks in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Wen, Jianguo; Chang, Chung-che; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    More and more transcription factors and their motifs have been reported and linked to specific gene expression levels. However, focusing only on transcription is not sufficient for mechanism research. Most genes, especially in eukaryotes, are alternatively spliced to different isoforms. Some of these isoforms increase the biodiversity of proteins. From this viewpoint, transcription and splicing are two of important mechanisms to modulate expression levels of isoforms. To integrate these two kinds of regulation, we built a linear regression model to select a subset of transcription factors and splicing factors for each co-expressed isoforms using least-angle regression approach. Then, we applied this method to investigate the mechanism of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a precursor lesion of acute myeloid leukemia. Results suggested that expression levels of most isoforms were regulated by a set of selected regulatory factors. Some of the detected factors, such as EGR1 and STAT family, are highly correlated with progression of MDS. We discovered that the splicing factor SRSF11 experienced alternative splicing switch, and in turn induced different amino acid sequences between MDS and controls. This splicing switch causes two different splicing mechanisms. Polymerase Chain Reaction experiments also confirmed that one of its isoforms was over-expressed in MDS. We analyzed the regulatory networks constructed from the co-expressed isoforms and their regulatory factors in MDS. Many of these networks were enriched in the herpes simplex infection pathway which involves many splicing factors, and pathways in cancers and acute or chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:24244432

  5. Epidemiology and risk factors for infections in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, L R; Sekeres, M A; Shrestha, N K; Maciejewski, J P; Tiu, R V; Butler, R; Mossad, S B

    2013-12-01

    We conducted a case-control study to describe the epidemiology and risk factors for infections requiring hospitalization in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Of 497 patients identified, 103 patients developed 201 episodes of infection. The probability of acquiring an infection 1 year from date of MDS diagnosis was 15% (95% confidence interval [CI] 12-18%). Patients developing infections had decreased survival compared to those who did not (P = 0.007). Significant risk factors for infection were higher risk MDS (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.7-4.1, P < 0.0001), nadir absolute neutrophil count <500/mL (HR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.7, P < 0.007), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.4-4.9, P < 0.003), history of other malignancy (HR 2.0, 95% CI = 1.3-3.1, P < 0.003), and autoimmune disease (HR 2.9, 95% CI = 1.4-6.0, P < 0.005). Age, nadir platelet count <20,000/mL, diabetes mellitus, and MDS treatment were not significant risk factors. Pneumonia was the most common infection, and bacteria the predominant pathogens.

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes in older adults.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Rao, Arati V; Pardee, Timothy S

    2014-08-20

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases.

  7. Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Rao, Arati V.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases. PMID:25071138

  8. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for elderly patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Nicolaus

    2012-06-14

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is well accepted as a curative treatment approach for younger patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and has become one of the most frequent indications for allogeneic SCT as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. However, MDS patients are usually elderly with a median age of approximately 75 years at diagnosis. Large register studies have confirmed the feasibility of the procedure in elderly MDS patients; and in the register of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, one-third of the allogeneic transplant procedures for MDS were performed in 2010 in patients older than 60 years. Despite its curative potential, its role in the treatment of elderly MDS patients is less defined. Because of the inherent complications of the transplantation leading to treatment-related mortality and the risk of relapse, a careful calculation of the benefit for each patient is mandatory, taking into account comorbidities, disease status, donor selection, and effective nontransplant therapies. Prospective multicenter studies are needed to define optimal intensity of the conditioning regimen, timing of transplantation within a treatment algorithm, including drug-based therapies, and posttransplant strategies to reduce the risk of relapse.

  9. Clinical and biological implications of driver mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gerstung, Moritz; Malcovati, Luca; Tauro, Sudhir; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Yoon, Chris J.; Ellis, Peter; Wedge, David C.; Pellagatti, Andrea; Shlien, Adam; Groves, Michael John; Forbes, Simon A.; Raine, Keiran; Hinton, Jon; Mudie, Laura J.; McLaren, Stuart; Hardy, Claire; Latimer, Calli; Della Porta, Matteo G.; O’Meara, Sarah; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Galli, Anna; Butler, Adam P.; Walldin, Gunilla; Teague, Jon W.; Quek, Lynn; Sternberg, Alex; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Cross, Nicholas C. P.; Green, Anthony R.; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Vyas, Paresh; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Bowen, David; Cazzola, Mario; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of chronic hematological malignancies characterized by dysplasia, ineffective hematopoiesis and a variable risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Sequencing of MDS genomes has identified mutations in genes implicated in RNA splicing, DNA modification, chromatin regulation, and cell signaling. We sequenced 111 genes across 738 patients with MDS or closely related neoplasms (including chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and MDS–myeloproliferative neoplasms) to explore the role of acquired mutations in MDS biology and clinical phenotype. Seventy-eight percent of patients had 1 or more oncogenic mutations. We identify complex patterns of pairwise association between genes, indicative of epistatic interactions involving components of the spliceosome machinery and epigenetic modifiers. Coupled with inferences on subclonal mutations, these data suggest a hypothesis of genetic “predestination,” in which early driver mutations, typically affecting genes involved in RNA splicing, dictate future trajectories of disease evolution with distinct clinical phenotypes. Driver mutations had equivalent prognostic significance, whether clonal or subclonal, and leukemia-free survival deteriorated steadily as numbers of driver mutations increased. Thus, analysis of oncogenic mutations in large, well-characterized cohorts of patients illustrates the interconnections between the cancer genome and disease biology, with considerable potential for clinical application. PMID:24030381

  10. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  13. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Cytogenetic profile of Indian patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Chaubey, Rekha; Sazawal, Sudha; Dada, Rima; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Saxena, Renu

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal haematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by ineffective haematopoiesis and leukaemia progression. Cytogenetic analysis has proven to be a mandatory part of the diagnosis of MDS as well as a major indicator for predicting clinical course and outcome. Studies on cytogenetics of MDS are reported mostly from the West and only a few are available from Asian countries. We report herein cytogenetic studies on 40 Indian patients with primary MDS to find out the occurrence and type of chromosome abnormalities and recurring defects. Methods: Cytogenetic analysis was done using GTG banding and karyotyped according to the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature (ISCN). Results: Of the 40 patients, 19 patients (47.5%) showed clonal karyotypic abnormalities with distribution as follows: 3 of 15 (20%) of refractory anaemia (RA), 4 of 7 (57%) of refractory anaemia with excess blasts-1 (RAEB-1), 4 of 6 (67%) of refractory anaemia with excess blasts 2 (RAEB-2), 2 of 3 (67%) of refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS), 2 of 4 (50%) of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD), none (0%) RCMD-ringed sideroblasts (RCMD-RS) and 4 patients with 5q syndrome. The frequent abnormalities observed in our study were -7, 5q-and trisomy 8. Interpretation & conclusions: Two rare chromosomal abnormalities (6q-, 3q-) were found with unknown prognostic significance. Hence, cytogenetic analysis may be incorporated in the routine diagnosis of MDS since there are racial differences in clinical pictures and the molecular events. PMID:22089606

  15. Bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss as an initial presentation of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jung; Yoon, Yong Joo

    2012-01-01

    This study reports an unusual case in which myelodysplastic syndrome presented bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss as the first symptom of the disease. The aural symptoms and signs such as tinnitus, dizziness, and hearing impairment of a hematologic disease are common. However, sudden hearing loss as the first manifestation of a hematologic disease is extremely rare. A 76-year-old woman presented with bilateral sudden hearing loss. The patient was found to have myelodysplastic syndrome during a workup for her hearing loss. Unfortunately, the patient's hearing loss did not improve after the medical treatment.

  16. Association Between Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Poynter, Jenny N.; Richardson, Michaela; Langer, Erica; Hooten, Anthony J.; Roesler, Michelle; Hirsch, Betsy; Nguyen, Phuong L.; Cioc, Adina; Warlick, Erica; Ross, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are used to group individuals into haplogroups reflecting human global migration and are associated with multiple diseases, including cancer. Here, we evaluate the association between mtDNA haplogroup and risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Cases were identified by the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System (MCSS). Controls were identified through the Minnesota State driver’s license/identification card list. Because haplogroup frequencies vary by race and ethnicity, we restricted analyses to non-Hispanic whites. We genotyped 15 mtSNPs that capture common European mitochondrial haplogroup variation. We used SAS v.9.3 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC) to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) overall and stratified by MDS subtype and IPSS-R risk category. We were able to classify 215 cases with confirmed MDS and 522 controls into one of the 11 common European haplogroups. Due to small sample sizes in some subgroups, we combined mt haplogroups into larger bins based on the haplogroup evolutionary tree, including HV (H+V), JT (J+T), IWX (I+W+X), UK (U+K), and Z for comparisons of cases and controls. Using haplogroup HV as the reference group, we found a statistically significant association between haplogroup JT and MDS (OR=0.58, 95% CI 0.36, 0.92, P=0.02). No statistically significant heterogeneity was observed in subgroup analyses. In this population-based study of MDS, we observed an association between mtDNA haplogroup JT and risk of MDS. While previously published studies provide biological plausibility for the observed association, further studies of the relationship between mtDNA variation and MDS are warranted in larger sample sizes. PMID:27121678

  17. Association between mitochondrial DNA haplogroup and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Poynter, Jenny N; Richardson, Michaela; Langer, Erica; Hooten, Anthony J; Roesler, Michelle; Hirsch, Betsy; Nguyen, Phuong L; Cioc, Adina; Warlick, Erica; Ross, Julie A

    2016-09-01

    Polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are used to group individuals into haplogroups reflecting human global migration and are associated with multiple diseases, including cancer. Here, we evaluate the association between mtDNA haplogroup and risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Cases were identified by the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System. Controls were identified through the Minnesota State driver's license/identification card list. Because haplogroup frequencies vary by race and ethnicity, we restricted analyses to non-Hispanic whites. We genotyped 15 mtSNPs that capture common European mitochondrial haplogroup variation. We used SAS v.9.3 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC) to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) overall and stratified by MDS subtype and IPSS-R risk category. We were able to classify 215 cases with confirmed MDS and 522 controls into one of the 11 common European haplogroups. Due to small sample sizes in some subgroups, we combined mt haplogroups into larger bins based on the haplogroup evolutionary tree, including HV (H + V), JT (J + T), IWX (I + W + X), UK (U + K), and Z for comparisons of cases and controls. Using haplogroup HV as the reference group, we found a statistically significant association between haplogroup JT and MDS (OR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.36, 0.92, P = 0.02). No statistically significant heterogeneity was observed in subgroup analyses. In this population-based study of MDS, we observed an association between mtDNA haplogroup JT and risk of MDS. While previously published studies provide biological plausibility for the observed association, further studies of the relationship between mtDNA variation and MDS are warranted in larger sample sizes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Stem and progenitor cell alterations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Aditi; Will, Britta; Steidl, Ulrich; Verma, Amit

    2017-03-23

    Recent studies have demonstrated that myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) arise from a small population of disease-initiating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that persist and expand through conventional therapies and are major contributors to disease progression and relapse. MDS stem and progenitor cells are characterized by key founder and driver mutations and are enriched for cytogenetic alterations. Quantitative alterations in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) numbers are also seen in a stage-specific manner in human MDS samples as well as in murine models of the disease. Overexpression of several markers such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP), CD99, T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3, and CD123 have begun to differentiate MDS HSPCs from healthy counterparts. Overactivation of innate immune components such as Toll-like receptors, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase/tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-6, IL8/CXCR2, and IL1RAP signaling pathways has been demonstrated in MDS HSPCs and is being targeted therapeutically in preclinical and early clinical studies. Other dysregulated pathways such as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulinlike and EGF-like domains 1/angiopoietin-1, p21-activated kinase, microRNA 21, and transforming growth factor β are also being explored as therapeutic targets against MDS HSPCs. Taken together, these studies have demonstrated that MDS stem cells are functionally critical for the initiation, transformation, and relapse of disease and need to be targeted therapeutically for future curative strategies in MDSs.

  19. Anemia as the Main Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a constellation of different diseases sharing anemia in the great majority of cases, and this cytopenia defines these pathologies and their most dramatic clinical manifestations. Anemia in MDS is due to ineffective erythropoiesis, with a high degree of apoptosis of marrow erythroid progenitors. These progenitors show distinctive dysplastic features that consent diagnosis, and are recognizable and differentiated, although not easily, from other morphologic alterations present in other types of anemia. Reaching the diagnosis of MDS in a macrocytic anemia and alleviating the symptoms of anemia are therefore an essential objective of the treating physician. In this work, the signs and symptoms of anemia in MDS, as well as its peculiar pathophysiology, are discussed. Erythopoietic stimulating agents (ESAs) are providing the best treatment for anemic MDS patients, but their use is still not approved by health agencies. While still waiting for this waiver, their clinical use is widespread and their effectivness is well known, as well as the dismal prognosis of patients who do not respond to ESAs and require transfusions. MDS with del5q constitute a unique model of anemia whose complex pathophysiology has been clarified at least partially, defining its link to ribosomal alterations likewise what observed in hereditary anemias like Blackfan Diamond anemia. Lenalidomide is the agent that has shown striking and specific erythropoietic activity in del5q MDS, and the basis of this response is starting to be understood. Several new agents are under evaluation for ESA refractory/relapsed MDS patients, targeting different putative mechanisms of ineffective erythropoiesis, and are here reviewed.

  20. Hematopoietic stem cell and progenitor cell mechanisms in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Wendy W.; Pluvinage, John V.; Price, Elizabeth A.; Sridhar, Kunju; Arber, Daniel A.; Greenberg, Peter L.; Schrier, Stanley L.; Park, Christopher Y.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of disorders characterized by variable cytopenias and ineffective hematopoiesis. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and myeloid progenitors in MDS have not been extensively characterized. We transplanted purified human HSCs from MDS samples into immunodeficient mice and show that HSCs are the disease-initiating cells in MDS. We identify a recurrent loss of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMPs) in the bone marrow of low risk MDS patients that can distinguish low risk MDS from clinical mimics, thus providing a simple diagnostic tool. The loss of GMPs is likely due to increased apoptosis and increased phagocytosis, the latter due to the up-regulation of cell surface calreticulin, a prophagocytic marker. Blocking calreticulin on low risk MDS myeloid progenitors rescues them from phagocytosis in vitro. However, in the high-risk refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB) stages of MDS, the GMP population is increased in frequency compared with normal, and myeloid progenitors evade phagocytosis due to up-regulation of CD47, an antiphagocytic marker. Blocking CD47 leads to the selective phagocytosis of this population. We propose that MDS HSCs compete with normal HSCs in the patients by increasing their frequency at the expense of normal hematopoiesis, that the loss of MDS myeloid progenitors by programmed cell death and programmed cell removal are, in part, responsible for the cytopenias, and that up-regulation of the “don’t eat me” signal CD47 on MDS myeloid progenitors is an important transition step leading from low risk MDS to high risk MDS and, possibly, to acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:23388639

  1. Familial Aggregation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Goldin, Lynn R.; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Liang, Xueying Sharon; Derolf, Åsa R.; Landgren, Ola; Björkholm, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Apart from rare pedigrees with multiple cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there is limited data on familial aggregation of AML and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) in the population. Patients and Methods Swedish population-based registry data were used to evaluate risk of AML, MDS, and other malignancies among 24,573 first-degree relatives of 6,962 patients with AML and 1,388 patients with MDS compared with 106,224 first-degree relatives of matched controls. We used a marginal survival model to calculate familial aggregation. Results AML and/or MDS did not aggregate significantly in relatives of patients with AML. There was a modest risk ratio (RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.9 to 1.8) in myeloproliferative/myeloid malignancies combined. The risks for any hematologic or any solid tumor were modestly but significantly increased. Relatives of patients with MDS did not show an increased risk for any hematologic tumors. In contrast, we found a significantly increased risk (RR, 6.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 38.0) of AML/MDS and of all myeloid malignancies combined (RR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.0 to 9.8) among relatives of patients diagnosed at younger than age 21 years. Conclusion We did not find evidence for familial aggregation of the severe end of the spectrum of myeloid malignancies (AML and MDS). The risks of myeloproliferative neoplasms were modestly increased with trends toward significance, suggesting a possible role of inheritance. In contrast, although limited in sample size, relatives of young patients with AML were at increased risk of AML/MDS, suggesting that germline genes may play a stronger role in these patients. The increased risk of all hematologic malignancies and of solid tumors among relatives of patients with AML suggests that genes for malignancy in general and/or other environmental factors may be shared. PMID:22162584

  2. Pleural effusions in patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Saadia A; Bashoura, Lara; Lei, Xiudong; Sampat, Keeran R; Brown, Tiffany C; Eapen, George A; Morice, Rodolfo C; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jimenez, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Pleural effusions are rarely observed in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Therefore the underlying etiology of pleural effusions and the efficacy and safety of pleural procedures in this population has not been well studied. In a retrospective review of cases from 1997 to 2007, we identified 111 patients with acute leukemia or MDS/MPN who underwent pleural procedures. Clinical characteristics were reviewed, and survival outcomes were estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 270 pleural procedures were performed in 111 patients (69 AML, 27 ALL, 15 MDS/MPN). The main indications for pleural procedures were possible infection (49%) and respiratory symptoms (48%), and concomitant clinical symptoms included fever (34%), dyspnea (74%), chest pain (24%) and cough (37%). Most patients had active disease (61%). The most frequent etiology of pleural effusions was infection (47%), followed by malignancy (36%). Severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 20 × 10(3)/µL) was present in 43% of the procedures, yet the procedural complication rate was only 1.9%. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age, AML, MDS/MPN and active disease status were associated with a shorter median overall survival. Infection and malignant involvement are the most common causes of pleural effusion in patients with acute leukemia or MDS. After optimizing platelet count and coagulopathy, thoracentesis may be performed safely and with high diagnostic yield in this population. Survival in these patients is determined by the response to treatment of the hematologic malignancy.

  3. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  4. A Randomized Phase IV Control Trial of Single High Dose Oral Vitamin D3 in Pediatric Patients Undergoing HSCT

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-01

    Vitamin D Deficiency; Stem Cell Transplant Complications; Pediatric Cancer; Blood Disorder; Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Pediatric Acute Lymphoid Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Sickle Cell Anemia in Children; Aplastic Anemia; Thalassemia in Children

  5. Demographic, Hematologic, and Clinical Features of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients: Results from the First Polish Myelodysplastic Syndrome Registry.

    PubMed

    Mądry, Krzysztof; Machowicz, Rafał; Waszczuk-Gajda, Anna; Drozd-Sokołowska, Joanna; Hołowiecka, Beata Stella; Wiater, Elżbieta; Mital, Andrzej; Obara, Agata; Szmigielska-Kapłon, Anna; Kołkowska-Leśniak, Agnieszka; Sikorska, Anna; Subocz, Edyta; Mendrek, Włodzimierz; Szczepańska, Magdalena; Biedroń, Monika; Jachalska, Anna; Wasilewska, Ewa; Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Guzicka-Kazimierczak, Renata; Kopacz, Agnieszka; Katinas, Katarzyna; Kruger, Witold; Dawidowska, Anna; Salamańczuk, Zoriana; Zawirska, Daria; Świderska, Alina; Jędrzejczak, Wiesław Wiktor; Dwilewicz-Trojaczek, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies on myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in Middle-Eastern Europe are scarce. No data about the demographic, clinical, and laboratory features of Polish MDS patients have been published. The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiological data and toxic exposure of Polish MDS patients and their association with hematological parameters and clinical outcomes. For 15 months, 966 living MDS patients were enrolled at 24 centers (12 university and 12 community hospitals). Follow-up was conducted for the next 55 months. The percentage of patients older than 80 years (16%) was between the values for Eastern and Western countries. In patients younger than 55 years, a female predominance was observed (male/female ratio 0.70:1 vs. 1.29:1; p < 0.001). Female patients had higher platelet counts (160 × 10⁹/l vs. 111 × 10⁹/l; p < 0.001). Patients exposed to chemicals were younger than patients without such exposure; their median age at MDS diagnosis was 66 vs. 70 years (p = 0.037). Smokers had significantly lower hemoglobin concentrations (8.6 vs. 9.1 g/dl; p = 0.032) and lower platelet counts (99 × 10⁹/l vs. 137 × 10⁹/l; p < 0.001) than nonsmokers. We provide the first description of the characteristics of Polish MDS patients. Females predominated in the group aged <60 years and they had higher platelet counts. The course of the disease is affected by toxic exposure and smoking. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Rescue of TET2 Haploinsufficiency in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients Using Turbo Cosubstrate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    prevalent in a number of myeloid malignancies such as MDS-myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS-MPN) and acute myeloid leukemia derived from MDS and MDS-MPN...Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), MDS-myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS-MPN), Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 5-methylcytosine (5mC), Mutation

  7. Immunophenotypic analysis of erythroid dysplasia in myelodysplastic syndromes. A report from the IMDSFlow working group.

    PubMed

    Westers, Theresia M; Cremers, Eline M P; Oelschlaegel, Uta; Johansson, Ulrika; Bettelheim, Peter; Matarraz, Sergio; Orfao, Alberto; Moshaver, Bijan; Brodersen, Lisa Eidenschink; Loken, Michael R; Wells, Denise A; Subirá, Dolores; Cullen, Matthew; Te Marvelde, Jeroen G; van der Velden, Vincent H J; Preijers, Frank W M B; Chu, Sung-Chao; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle; Psarra, Katherina; Porwit, Anna; Saft, Leonie; Ireland, Robin; Milne, Timothy; Béné, Marie C; Witte, Birgit I; Della Porta, Matteo G; Kern, Wolfgang; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A

    2017-02-01

    Current recommendations for diagnosing myelodysplastic syndromes endorse flow cytometry as an informative tool. Most flow cytometry protocols focus on the analysis of progenitor cells and the evaluation of the maturing myelomonocytic lineage. However, one of the most frequently observed features of myelodysplastic syndromes is anemia, which may be associated with dyserythropoiesis. Therefore, analysis of changes in flow cytometry features of nucleated erythroid cells may complement current flow cytometry tools. The multicenter study within the IMDSFlow Working Group, reported herein, focused on defining flow cytometry parameters that enable discrimination of dyserythropoiesis associated with myelodysplastic syndromes from non-clonal cytopenias. Data from a learning cohort were compared between myelodysplasia and controls, and results were validated in a separate cohort. The learning cohort comprised 245 myelodysplasia cases, 290 pathological, and 142 normal controls; the validation cohort comprised 129 myelodysplasia cases, 153 pathological, and 49 normal controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis performed in the learning cohort revealed that analysis of expression of CD36 and CD71 (expressed as coefficient of variation), in combination with CD71 fluorescence intensity and the percentage of CD117(+) erythroid progenitors provided the best discrimination between myelodysplastic syndromes and non-clonal cytopenias (specificity 90%; 95% confidence interval: 84-94%). The high specificity of this marker set was confirmed in the validation cohort (92%; 95% confidence interval: 86-97%). This erythroid flow cytometry marker combination may improve the evaluation of cytopenic cases with suspected myelodysplasia, particularly when combined with flow cytometry assessment of the myelomonocytic lineage.

  8. HIGH-RESOLUTION GENOMIC ARRAYS FACILITATE DETECTION OF NOVEL CRYPTIC CHROMOSOMAL LESIONS IN MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, Christine L.; Tiu, Ramon; Gondek, Lukasz P.; Powers, Jennifer; Theil, Karl S.; Kalaycio, Matt; Lichtin, Alan; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Unbalanced chromosomal aberrations are common in myelodysplastic syndromes, and have prognostic implications. An increased frequency of cytogenetic changes may reflect an inherent chromosomal instability due to failure of DNA repair. Therefore, it is likely that chromosomal defects in myelodysplastic syndromes may be more frequent than predicted by metaphase cytogenetics and new cryptic lesions may be revealed by precise analysis methods. Methods We used a novel high-resolution karyotyping technique, array-based comparative genomic hybridization, to investigate the frequency of cryptic chromosomal lesions in a cohort of 38 well-characterized myelodysplastic syndromes patients; results were confirmed by microsatellite quantitative PCR or single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Results As compared to metaphase karyotyping, chromosomal abnormalities detected by array-based analysis were encountered more frequently and in a higher proportion of patients. For example, chromosomal defects were found in patients with a normal karyotype by traditional cytogenetics. In addition to verifying common abnormalities, previously cryptic defects were found in new regions of the genome. Cryptic changes often overlapped chromosomes and regions frequently identified as abnormal by metaphase cytogenetics. Conclusion The results underscore the instability of the myelodysplastic syndromes genome and highlight the utility of array-based karyotyping to study cryptic chromosomal changes which may provide new diagnostic information. PMID:17258073

  9. First report of sepsis caused by Rhodococcus corynebacterioides in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yuka; Sawabe, Etsuko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Tojo, Naoko; Tohda, Shuji

    2012-03-01

    We report a case of sepsis caused by Rhodococcus corynebacterioides, identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, in a myelodysplastic syndrome patient who had undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This is the first report of R. corynebacterioides infection in a human.

  10. First Report of Sepsis Caused by Rhodococcus corynebacterioides in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Yuka; Sawabe, Etsuko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Tojo, Naoko

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of sepsis caused by Rhodococcus corynebacterioides, identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, in a myelodysplastic syndrome patient who had undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This is the first report of R. corynebacterioides infection in a human. PMID:22205796

  11. Immunophenotypic analysis of erythroid dysplasia in myelodysplastic syndromes. A report from the IMDSFlow working group

    PubMed Central

    Westers, Theresia M.; Cremers, Eline M.P.; Oelschlaegel, Uta; Johansson, Ulrika; Bettelheim, Peter; Matarraz, Sergio; Orfao, Alberto; Moshaver, Bijan; Brodersen, Lisa Eidenschink; Loken, Michael R.; Wells, Denise A.; Subirá, Dolores; Cullen, Matthew; te Marvelde, Jeroen G.; van der Velden, Vincent H.J.; Preijers, Frank W.M.B.; Chu, Sung-Chao; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle; Psarra, Katherina; Porwit, Anna; Saft, Leonie; Ireland, Robin; Milne, Timothy; Béné, Marie C.; Witte, Birgit I.; Della Porta, Matteo G.; Kern, Wolfgang; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2017-01-01

    Current recommendations for diagnosing myelodysplastic syndromes endorse flow cytometry as an informative tool. Most flow cytometry protocols focus on the analysis of progenitor cells and the evaluation of the maturing myelomonocytic lineage. However, one of the most frequently observed features of myelodysplastic syndromes is anemia, which may be associated with dyserythropoiesis. Therefore, analysis of changes in flow cytometry features of nucleated erythroid cells may complement current flow cytometry tools. The multicenter study within the IMDSFlow Working Group, reported herein, focused on defining flow cytometry parameters that enable discrimination of dyserythropoiesis associated with myelodysplastic syndromes from non-clonal cytopenias. Data from a learning cohort were compared between myelodysplasia and controls, and results were validated in a separate cohort. The learning cohort comprised 245 myelodysplasia cases, 290 pathological, and 142 normal controls; the validation cohort comprised 129 myelodysplasia cases, 153 pathological, and 49 normal controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis performed in the learning cohort revealed that analysis of expression of CD36 and CD71 (expressed as coefficient of variation), in combination with CD71 fluorescence intensity and the percentage of CD117+ erythroid progenitors provided the best discrimination between myelodysplastic syndromes and non-clonal cytopenias (specificity 90%; 95% confidence interval: 84–94%). The high specificity of this marker set was confirmed in the validation cohort (92%; 95% confidence interval: 86–97%). This erythroid flow cytometry marker combination may improve the evaluation of cytopenic cases with suspected myelodysplasia, particularly when combined with flow cytometry assessment of the myelomonocytic lineage. PMID:27758818

  12. Fatal bacteremia by neisseria cinerea in a woman with myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaofei; Li, Min; Cao, Huiling; Yang, Xuewen

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea has been rarely found in blood cultures. In this study, we are reporting a case of a Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) patient in whose blood Neisseria cinerea was found and led a fatal consequence. This case will call our attentions to the uncommon pathogens in the pathogenicity of end-stage patients. PMID:26131259

  13. Fatal bacteremia by neisseria cinerea in a woman with myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofei; Li, Min; Cao, Huiling; Yang, Xuewen

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea has been rarely found in blood cultures. In this study, we are reporting a case of a Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) patient in whose blood Neisseria cinerea was found and led a fatal consequence. This case will call our attentions to the uncommon pathogens in the pathogenicity of end-stage patients.

  14. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  16. Novel Therapeutic Approaches Targeting MDSC in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    involved in the initiation of stem cell malignancies is critical for development of effective strategies for prevention and treatment. Myelodysplastic...myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a heterogeneous group of immature myeloid cells , which play a critical role in MDS pathogenesis. A key... cell death of myeloid progenitors. MDSC-mediated suppressive activity is stimulated by the danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) heterodimer

  17. Characterization of defective megakaryocytic development in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, W K; Kalina, U; Wagner, S; Seipelt, G; Ries, C; Hoelzer, D; Ottmann, O G

    1999-03-01

    Megakaryocytic differentiation of progenitor cells was investigated in nine patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) (eight refractor anemia [RA] and one RA with ringed sideroblasts [RARS] and five patients with high-risk MDS (two RA with excess of blasts [RAEB] and three RAEB in transformation [RAEB-T]). Bone marrow-derived CD34+ cells were enriched to a purity of 87% +/- 2% (mean +/- SEM) and assayed in short-term suspension cultures in the presence of 10 ng/mL of PEGylated recombinant human megakaryocyte (MK) growth and development factor (PEG-rHuMGDF) and in addition to 50 ng/mL stem cell factor and 10 ng/mL interleukin-3. Cells of the megakaryocytic lineage were identified by flow cytometric analysis of CD42b (GP1b) and mature MKs by morphologic criteria. Transcription of c-mpl receptor-specific mRNA in the CD34+ cells of these patients was investigated by full-length reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction of the p form of c-mpl as well as of the alternative splice product c-mpl k. CD34+ cells from seven healthy bone marrow donors served as controls. Differentiation along the MK pathway was stimulated in five patients with RA. C-mpl mRNA was expressed in the CD34+ cells in all cases. In three low-risk patients the capacity for in vitro MK growth was absent or minimal even though mRNA for c-mpl receptor was detected in the CD34+ cells of this group as well. In patients with high-risk MDS, PEG-rHuMGDF stimulated in vitro MK growth from CD34+ cells in only one of five cases. As in the patients with low-risk MDS, c-mpl mRNA for both c-mpl p and c-mpl k splicing products was detected. These results indicate that the in vitro response to stimulation with c-mpl ligand discriminates between two groups of patients with low-risk MDS and that the observed defect in megakaryocytic development is unrelated to the level of c-mpl expression in both low-risk and high-risk MDS.

  18. Signal transduction inhibitors in treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of hematologic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis that results in reduced blood counts. Although MDS can transform into leukemia, most of the morbidity experienced by these patients is due to chronically low blood counts. Conventional cytotoxic agents used to treat MDS have yielded some encouraging results but are characterized by many adverse effects in the predominantly elderly patient population. Targeted interventions aimed at reversing the bone marrow failure and increasing the peripheral blood counts would be advantageous in this cohort of patients. Studies have demonstrated over-activated signaling of myelo-suppressive cytokines such as TGF-β, TNF-α and Interferons in MDS hematopoietic stem cells. Targeting these signaling cascades could be potentially therapeutic in MDS. The p38 MAP kinase pathway, which is constitutively activated in MDS, is an example of cytokine stimulated kinase that promotes aberrant apoptosis of stem and progenitor cells in MDS. ARRY-614 and SCIO-469 are p38 MAPK inhibitors that have been used in clinical trials and have shown activity in a subset of MDS patients. TGF-β signaling has been therapeutically targeted by small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-β receptor kinase, LY-2157299, with encouraging preclinical results. Apart from TGF-β receptor kinase inhibition, members of TGF-β super family and BMP ligands have also been targeted by ligand trap compounds like Sotatercept (ACE-011) and ACE-536. The multikinase inhibitor, ON-01910.Na (Rigosertib) has demonstrated early signs of efficacy in reducing the percentage of leukemic blasts and is in advanced stages of clinical testing. Temsirolimus, Deforolimus and other mTOR inhibitors are being tested in clinical trials and have shown preclinical efficacy in CMML. EGF receptor inhibitors, Erlotinib and Gefitinib have shown efficacy in small trials that may be related to off target effects. Cell cycle regulator inhibitors

  19. Excessive naked megakaryocyte nuclei in myelodysplastic syndrome mimicking idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a complicated pre- and post-transplantation course.

    PubMed

    Olcay, Lale; Tuncer, A Murat; Okur, Hamza; Erdemli, Esra; Uysal, Zumrut; Cetin, Mualla; Duru, Feride; Cetinkaya, Duygu Uckan

    2009-09-01

    A boy 3 years 7 months old with thrombocytopenia and history of intracranial hemorrhage who underwent bone marrow transplantation is presented. He was refractory to steroids, immunoglobulin G, vincristine, azathioprine, cyclosporine A, interleukin-11, chemotherapy, and splenectomy. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was excluded by light /electron microscopic and flow cytometric findings; the diagnosis of refractory cytopenia, a subgroup of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, was made. Naked megakaryocyte nuclei were 55.38 +/- 28.2% vs. 31.67 +/- 23.22% of all megakaryocytes in the patient and the control group of 9 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, respectively (p = .016). The posttransplatation course was complicated by delayed platelet engraftment, bronchiolitis obliterans associated with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, which resolved completely.

  20. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  2. A new ATRX mutation in a patient with acquired α-thalassemia myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Herbaux, Charles; Badens, Catherine; Guidez, Stéphanie; Lacoste, Caroline; Maboudou, Patrice; Rose, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Acquired α-thalassemia (α-thal) myelodysplastic syndrome (ATMDS) is a rare acquired syndrome characterized by a somatic point mutation in the ATRX gene in patients with chronic myeloid disorders. We describe the case of a 78-year-old man with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and striking microcytic, hypochromic anemia. Brilliant cresyl blue supravital stain of the peripheral blood and hemoglobin (Hb) electrophoresis showed the presence of Hb H. Sequence analysis of unfractionated peripheral blood DNA identified a G>T transition at codon 524 in exon 7 of the ATRX gene. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first description of this point mutation of the ATRX gene in an ATMDS.

  3. Prevalence, clinical characteristics, and prognosis of GATA2-related myelodysplastic syndromes in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wlodarski, Marcin W; Hirabayashi, Shinsuke; Pastor, Victor; Starý, Jan; Hasle, Henrik; Masetti, Riccardo; Dworzak, Michael; Schmugge, Markus; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; Ussowicz, Marek; De Moerloose, Barbara; Catala, Albert; Smith, Owen P; Sedlacek, Petr; Lankester, Arjan C; Zecca, Marco; Bordon, Victoria; Matthes-Martin, Susanne; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Kühl, Jörn Sven; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Albert, Michael H; Przychodzien, Bartlomiej; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Schwarz, Stephan; Göhring, Gudrun; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Cseh, Annámaria; Noellke, Peter; Yoshimi, Ayami; Locatelli, Franco; Baumann, Irith; Strahm, Brigitte; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2016-03-17

    Germline GATA2 mutations cause cellular deficiencies with high propensity for myeloid disease. We investigated 426 children and adolescents with primary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 82 cases with secondary MDS enrolled in 2 consecutive prospective studies of the European Working Group of MDS in Childhood (EWOG-MDS) conducted in Germany over a period of 15 years. Germline GATA2 mutations accounted for 15% of advanced and 7% of all primary MDS cases, but were absent in children with MDS secondary to therapy or acquired aplastic anemia. Mutation carriers were older at diagnosis and more likely to present with monosomy 7 and advanced disease compared with wild-type cases. For stratified analysis according to karyotype, 108 additional primary MDS patients registered with EWOG-MDS were studied. Overall, we identified 57 MDS patients with germline GATA2 mutations. GATA2 mutations were highly prevalent among patients with monosomy 7 (37%, all ages) reaching its peak in adolescence (72% of adolescents with monosomy 7). Unexpectedly, monocytosis was more frequent in GATA2-mutated patients. However, when adjusted for the selection bias from monosomy 7, mutational status had no effect on the hematologic phenotype. Finally, overall survival and outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) were not influenced by mutational status. This study identifies GATA2 mutations as the most common germline defect predisposing to pediatric MDS with a very high prevalence in adolescents with monosomy 7. GATA2 mutations do not confer poor prognosis in childhood MDS. However, the high risk for progression to advanced disease must guide decision-making toward timely HSCT. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. Pleiotropic mechanisms of action of lenalidomide efficacy in del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Heise, Carla; Carter, Troy; Schafer, Peter; Chopra, Rajesh

    2010-10-01

    Lenalidomide has demonstrated clinical activity in myelodysplastic syndromes, particularly in patients with a deletion in the long arm of chromosome 5 (del[5q] abnormality). It has a direct effect on the del(5q) clone, which may contribute to its ability to induce cytogenetic responses. Lenalidomide also stimulates erythropoiesis, leading to erythroid responses in certain patients. Other effects include immunomodulation, anti-inflammatory effects and angiogenesis inhibition. New findings indicate that lenalidomide modulates key genes located within the del(5q) region, including tumor suppressor genes, and regulators of the actin cytoskeleton and cell membrane. Its effects on cytoskeleton regulation may explain its direct antitumor and immunomodulatory effects. This article provides an overview of the known effects of lenalidomide and new insights into its activity in del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes.

  5. Atypical cytogenetics in therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome secondary to indolent B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sinsabaugh, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) with unusual cytogenetics is presented. While therapy related myeloid neoplasms account for 10-20% of all myeloid neoplasms, 90% of therapy related myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) present with a del(7q) or a del(5q) and fewer than 1% present with a del(20q). In this case, the common cytogenetic pattern of either del(7q) or del(5q) is absent while presenting with an abnormal del(20q). Also demonstrated is the potently poor prognostic indicator of cytomegalovirus (CMV) seropositivity, even when seropositivity is matched between donor and recipient of hematopoietic stem-cell transplant. The patient also continues to demonstrate the inherent dangers of a stem-cell transplant, presenting with graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) while being a haploidentical 10 out of 10 HLA match to the allogeneic stem cell donor.

  6. Targeted re-sequencing analysis of 25 genes commonly mutated in myeloid disorders in del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Mercado, Marta; Burns, Adam; Pellagatti, Andrea; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Germing, Ulrich; Agirre, Xabier; Prosper, Felipe; Aul, Carlo; Killick, Sally; Wainscoat, James S.; Schuh, Anna; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of chromosome 5q is the most common chromosomal abnormality in myelodysplastic syndromes. The catalogue of genes involved in the molecular pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes is rapidly expanding and next-generation sequencing technology allows detection of these mutations at great depth. Here we describe the design, validation and application of a targeted next-generation sequencing approach to simultaneously screen 25 genes mutated in myeloid malignancies. We used this method alongside single nucleotide polymorphism-array technology to characterize the mutational and cytogenetic profile of 43 cases of early or advanced del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. A total of 29 mutations were detected in our cohort. Overall, 45% of early and 66.7% of advanced cases had at least one mutation. Genes with the highest mutation frequency among advanced cases were TP53 and ASXL1 (25% of patients each). These showed a lower mutation frequency in cases of 5q- syndrome (4.5% and 13.6%, respectively), suggesting a role in disease progression in del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. Fifty-two percent of mutations identified were in genes involved in epigenetic regulation (ASXL1, TET2, DNMT3A and JAK2). Six mutations had allele frequencies <20%, likely below the detection limit of traditional sequencing methods. Genomic array data showed that cases of advanced del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome had a complex background of cytogenetic aberrations, often encompassing genes involved in myeloid disorders. Our study is the first to investigate the molecular pathogenesis of early and advanced del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes using next-generation sequencing technology on a large panel of genes frequently mutated in myeloid malignancies, further illuminating the molecular landscape of del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:23831921

  7. Diagnostic utility of flow cytometry in low-grade myelodysplastic syndromes: a prospective validation study

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Kiyoyuki; Della Porta, Matteo G.; Malcovati, Luca; Picone, Cristina; Yokose, Norio; Matsuda, Akira; Yamashita, Taishi; Tamura, Hideto; Tsukada, Junichi; Dan, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes is not always straightforward when patients lack specific diagnostic markers, such as blast excess, karyotype abnormality, and ringed sideroblasts. Design and Methods We designed a flow cytometry protocol applicable in many laboratories and verified its diagnostic utility in patients without those diagnostic markers. The cardinal parameters, analyzable from one cell aliquot, were myeloblasts (%), B-cell progenitors (%), myeloblast CD45 expression, and channel number of side scatter where the maximum number of granulocytes occurs. The adjunctive parameters were CD11b, CD15, and CD56 expression (%) on myeloblasts. Marrow samples from 106 control patients with cytopenia and 134 low-grade myelodysplastic syndromes patients, including 81 lacking both ringed sideroblasts and cytogenetic aberrations, were prospectively analyzed in Japan and Italy. Results Data outside the predetermined reference range in 2 or more parameters (multiple abnormalities) were common in myelodysplastic syndromes patients. In those lacking ringed sideroblasts and cytogenetic aberrations, multiple abnormalities were observed in 8/26 Japanese (30.8%) and 37/55 Italians (67.3%) when the cardinal parameters alone were considered, and in 17/26 Japanese (65.4%) and 42/47 Italians (89.4%) when all parameters were taken into account. Multiple abnormalities were rare in controls. When data from all parameters were used, the diagnostic sensitivities were 65% and 89%, specificities were 98% and 90%, and likelihood ratios were 28.1 and 8.5 for the Japanese and Italian cohorts, respectively. Conclusions This protocol can be used in the diagnostic work-up of low-grade myelodysplastic syndromes patients who lack specific diagnostic markers, although further improvement in diagnostic power is desirable. PMID:19546439

  8. First report of anti-TIF1γ dermatomyositis in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palterer, B; Vitiello, G; Cammelli, D

    2017-08-03

    Inflammatory myopathies as para-neoplastic phenomena were first described by Sterz in 1916. Recently, myositis specific autoantibodies were described in cancer-associated myositis. Anti-transcription intermediary factor 1 gamma (anti-TIF1γ) antibodies have been found in both young adults affected by juvenile dermatomyositis and in elderly patients with cancer-associated myositis. In this regard, we report herein the first case of anti-TIF1γ dermatomyositis secondary to a myelodysplastic syndrome.

  9. Usefulness of spinal magnetic resonance imaging in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska-Pamuła, Anna; Ziółko, Ewa; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Podwińska, Ewa; Adamczyk, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background: Myelodysplastic syndrome is a rare, chronic hematological disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical presentations. Subtypes of myelodysplastic syndrome are characterized by different survival times and ability to transform into acute myeloid leukemia. Objectives: The objective of the study included the assessment of the relationship between the images obtained by magnetic resonance scans of lumbar spine and the clinical symptoms of the disease in patients diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome, as well as the assessment of the correlation of the images with the phase of transformation into acute myeloid leukemia. Material/Methods: The study-related tests were carried out in Specialist Hospital No. 1 in Bytom between 2006 and 2011 and involved 53 patients aged 55÷77, divided into groups according to the diagnosed subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome. The study also included the prognosis of overall survival and time to transformation into AML on the basis of valid classifications. The spinal magnetic resonance scans were obtained from medical documentation. The analysis included images obtained using T1- and T2-weighted sequences in sagittal, transverse and frontal planes in all patients, images obtained using the STIR sequence from 21 patients as well as 40 images obtained after contrast administration. The statistical analysis of the results was carried out using STATISTICA software. Conclusions: The obtained results demonstrated that the magnetic resonance scans revealed statistically significant changes in the images of bone marrow in vertebral body scans; with a decrease in the intensity of MRI signals correlated with the RAEB subtype, particularly with transformation into acute myeloid leukemia as well as with the high IPSS risk score with regard to the time of survival and transformation into acute myeloid leukemia. The research-related test results indicate the importance of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostics and the

  10. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 criteria for myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Senent, Leonor; Arenillas, Leonor; Luño, Elisa; Ruiz, Juan C.; Sanz, Guillermo; Florensa, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    The reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 classification for myelodysplastic syndromes is uncertain and its assessment was the major aim of this study. The different peripheral blood and bone marrow variables required for an adequate morphological classification were blindly evaluated by four cytomorphologists in samples from 50 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. The degree of agreement among observers was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient and the generalized kappa statistic for multiple raters. The degree of agreement for the percentages of blasts in bone marrow and peripheral blood, ring sideroblasts in bone marrow, and erythroid, granulocytic and megakaryocytic dysplastic cells was strong (P<0.001 in all instances). After stratifying the percentages according to the categories required for the assignment of World Health Organization subtypes, the degree of agreement was not statistically significant for cases with 5-9% blasts in bone marrow (P=0.07), 0.1-1% blasts in peripheral blood (P=0.47), or percentage of erythroid dysplastic cells (P=0.49). Finally, the interobserver concordance for World Health Organization-defined subtypes showed a moderate overall agreement (P<0.001), the reproducibility being lower for cases with refractory anemia with excess of blasts type 1 (P=0.05) and refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (P=0.09). In conclusion, the reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 classification for myelodysplastic syndromes is acceptable but the defining criteria for blast cells and features of erythroid dysplasia need to be refined. PMID:23065505

  12. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 criteria for myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Senent, Leonor; Arenillas, Leonor; Luño, Elisa; Ruiz, Juan C; Sanz, Guillermo; Florensa, Lourdes

    2013-04-01

    The reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 classification for myelodysplastic syndromes is uncertain and its assessment was the major aim of this study. The different peripheral blood and bone marrow variables required for an adequate morphological classification were blindly evaluated by four cytomorphologists in samples from 50 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. The degree of agreement among observers was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient and the generalized kappa statistic for multiple raters. The degree of agreement for the percentages of blasts in bone marrow and peripheral blood, ring sideroblasts in bone marrow, and erythroid, granulocytic and megakaryocytic dysplastic cells was strong (P<0.001 in all instances). After stratifying the percentages according to the categories required for the assignment of World Health Organization subtypes, the degree of agreement was not statistically significant for cases with 5-9% blasts in bone marrow (P=0.07), 0.1-1% blasts in peripheral blood (P=0.47), or percentage of erythroid dysplastic cells (P=0.49). Finally, the interobserver concordance for World Health Organization-defined subtypes showed a moderate overall agreement (P<0.001), the reproducibility being lower for cases with refractory anemia with excess of blasts type 1 (P=0.05) and refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (P=0.09). In conclusion, the reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 classification for myelodysplastic syndromes is acceptable but the defining criteria for blast cells and features of erythroid dysplasia need to be refined.

  14. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blasts Under 10 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Acute Cerebral Infarction as a Rare Thrombotic Event in Myelodysplastic Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by cytopenia that results in high risks of infection and bleeding. However, there are few reports of cerebral infarction in MDS. We reported a 72-year-old female with MDS who developed acute cerebral infarction. Clinical history of the patient revealed no definite risk factors for stroke except diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia that was well controlled. This case represented the rare occurrence of arterial thrombosis causing acute cerebral infarction in MDS, which may be due to complex chromosomal abnormality and inflammatory processes. PMID:28119848

  16. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. 211^At-BC8-B10 Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-13

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; CD45-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. A phase II study of amifostine in children with myelodysplastic syndrome: a report from the Children's Oncology Group study (AAML0121).

    PubMed

    Mathew, Prasad; Gerbing, Robert; Alonzo, Todd A; Wallas, Tanya; Gong, Jerald Z; Jasty, Rama; Jorstad, Dean T; Raimondi, Susana C; Chavez, Cathy M; Eisenberg, Nancy L; Hirsch, Betsy; Gamis, Alan; Smith, Franklin O; Arceci, Robert J

    2011-12-15

    Based on its potential role in adult myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), the Children's Oncology Group (COG) embarked on a phase II study using amifostine in pediatric MDS (WHO 2001 criteria) patients. Responses were evaluated after two cycles. Ten patients were enrolled; five were deemed ineligible, and four withdrew after the first course. Only one patient completed two courses, and was found to be in complete remission. The study was closed after being open for 2 years due to slow accrual. Studying a rare disease like MDS may pose insurmountable obstacles even in a large clinical trials group such as COG, in part because of the changing definitions of MDS and the rarity of adult type MDS in children. The role of amifostine in pediatric MDS was not known at the time of study. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Multicentric study underlining the interest of adding CD5, CD7 and CD56 expression assessment to the flow cytometric Ogata score in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Valérie; Wagner-Ballon, Orianne; Guy, Julien; Morvan, Céline; Debord, Camille; Trimoreau, Franck; Benayoun, Emmanuel; Chapuis, Nicolas; Freynet, Nicolas; Rossi, Cédric; Mathis, Stéphanie; Gourin, Marie-Pierre; Toma, Andréa; Béné, Marie C; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle

    2015-04-01

    Although numerous recent publications have demonstrated interest in multiparameter flow cytometry in the investigation of myelodysplastic disorders, it is perceived by many laboratory hematologists as difficult and expensive, requiring a high level of expertise. We report a multicentric open real-life study aimed at evaluating the added value of the technically simple flow cytometry score described by the Ogata group for the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes. A total of 652 patients were recruited prospectively in four different centers: 346 myelodysplastic syndromes, 53 myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms, and 253 controls. The Ogata score was assessed using CD45 and CD34 staining, with the addition of CD10 and CD19. Moreover, labeling of CD5, CD7 and CD56 for the evaluation of myeloid progenitors and monocytes was tested on a subset of 294 patients. On the whole series, the specificity of Ogata score reached 89%. Respective sensitivities were 54% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, 68% and 84% for type 1 and type 2 refractory anemia with excess of blasts, and 72% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. CD5 expression was poorly informative. When adding CD56 or CD7 labeling to the Ogata score, sensitivity rose to 66% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, to 89% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and to 97% for refractory anemia with excess of blasts. This large multicenter study confirms the feasibility of Ogata scoring in routine flow cytometry diagnosis but highlights its poor sensitivity in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes. The addition of CD7 and CD56 in flow cytometry panels improves the sensitivity but more sophisticated panels would be more informative.

  20. Multicentric study underlining the interest of adding CD5, CD7 and CD56 expression assessment to the flow cytometric Ogata score in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Bardet, Valérie; Wagner-Ballon, Orianne; Guy, Julien; Morvan, Céline; Debord, Camille; Trimoreau, Franck; Benayoun, Emmanuel; Chapuis, Nicolas; Freynet, Nicolas; Rossi, Cédric; Mathis, Stéphanie; Gourin, Marie-Pierre; Toma, Andréa; Béné, Marie C.; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous recent publications have demonstrated interest in multiparameter flow cytometry in the investigation of myelodysplastic disorders, it is perceived by many laboratory hematologists as difficult and expensive, requiring a high level of expertise. We report a multicentric open real-life study aimed at evaluating the added value of the technically simple flow cytometry score described by the Ogata group for the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes. A total of 652 patients were recruited prospectively in four different centers: 346 myelodysplastic syndromes, 53 myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms, and 253 controls. The Ogata score was assessed using CD45 and CD34 staining, with the addition of CD10 and CD19. Moreover, labeling of CD5, CD7 and CD56 for the evaluation of myeloid progenitors and monocytes was tested on a subset of 294 patients. On the whole series, the specificity of Ogata score reached 89%. Respective sensitivities were 54% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, 68% and 84% for type 1 and type 2 refractory anemia with excess of blasts, and 72% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. CD5 expression was poorly informative. When adding CD56 or CD7 labeling to the Ogata score, sensitivity rose to 66% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, to 89% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and to 97% for refractory anemia with excess of blasts. This large multicenter study confirms the feasibility of Ogata scoring in routine flow cytometry diagnosis but highlights its poor sensitivity in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes. The addition of CD7 and CD56 in flow cytometry panels improves the sensitivity but more sophisticated panels would be more informative. PMID:25637056

  1. Inversion of chromosome 7q22 and q36 as a sole abnormality presenting in myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Hiroto; Shimura, Kazuho; Kuwahara, Saeko; Ohshiro, Muneo; Tsutsumi, Yasuhiko; Iwai, Toshiki; Horiike, Shigeo; Yokota, Shouhei; Ohkawara, Yasuo; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2014-08-05

    Deletions of chromosome 7 are often detected in myelodysplastic syndrome. The most commonly deleted segments are clustered at band 7q22. A critical gene is therefore suggested to be located in this region. We report a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome whose marrow cells carried an inversion of 7q22 and q36 as a sole karyotypic abnormality. How this extremely rare chromosomal aberration contributes to the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndrome should be clarified by accumulating clinical data of such cases. A 74-year-old Japanese man presented with pancytopenia incidentally detected by routine medical check-up. His complete blood cell counts revealed that his white blood cells had decreased to 2100/mm3, neutrophils 940/mm3, red blood cells 320×104/mm3, hemoglobin 11.1g/dL, hematocrit 33.1%, and platelets 12.6×104/mm3. Bone marrow examination showed normal cellularity with nucleated cells of 9.4×104/mm3. The proportion of blasts was 4%. A morphological examination showed only basophilic stippling of erythroblasts which was seen as dysplasia. According to World Health Organization classification, the diagnosis was myelodysplastic syndrome-u. Karyotypic analysis showed 46,XY,inv(7)(q22q36) in all of 20 metaphases examined. Additional analysis revealed the karyotype of his lymphocytes was 46,XY. He is asymptomatic and cytopenia has slowly progressed. To the best of our knowledge, this karyotype from a clinical sample of de novo malignancies has never been documented although the identical karyotype from secondary myelodysplastic syndrome was reported. Despite the extremely low frequency, inversion of 7q22 appears to play a crucial role for myelodysplastic syndrome in this patient.

  2. [Transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to atypical chronic myeloid leukemia in a female patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Gritsaev, S V; Kostroma, I I; Zapreeva, I M; Shmidt, A V; Tiranova, S A; Balashova, V A; Martynkevich, I S; Chubukina, Zh V; Semenova, N Yu; Chechetkin, A V

    Secondary myeloid neoplasia may be a complication of intensive cytostatic therapy. The most common types of secondary neoplasias are acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The development of secondary atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) is an extremely rare phenomenon. The paper describes transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to aCML 6 months after its diagnosis. The development of aCML was accompanied by additional chromosomal aberration as monosomy of chromosome 17. No mutations in the JAK2, MPL, and CalR genes were detected. It is concluded that the clinical course of secondary myeloid neoplasias is variable.

  3. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndromes with bone marrow fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Nicolaus; Zabelina, Tatjana; van Biezen, Anja; Brand, Ronald; Niederwieser, Dietger; Martino, Rodrigo; Lim, Zi Yi; Onida, Francesco; Schmid, Christoph; Garderet, Laurent; Robin, Marie; van Gelder, Michael; Marks, Reinhard; Symeonidis, Argiris; Kobbe, Guido; de Witte, Theo

    2011-01-01

    Background Bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome is associated with a poor outcome, but whether the outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is related to the degree of bone marrow fibrosis is unknown. Design and Methods Patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and known bone marrow histology (n=721) who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were classified according to the degree of bone marrow fibrosis into those without fibrosis (n=483), those with mild or moderate fibrosis (n=199) and those with severe fibrosis (n=39) and analyzed regarding engraftment, treatment-related mortality, relapse and survival. Results The degree of fibrosis was not associated with disease status or abnormal cytogenetics. The cumulative incidence of engraftment achieved at day +30 in non-fibrotic patients was 93% and was significantly lower in those with mild or moderate fibrosis (89%) and severe fibrosis (75%) (P=0.009). Neutrophil engraftment occurred later in patients with mild or moderate fibrosis and severe fibrosis than in patients without fibrosis (median 17 versus 20 versus 16 days, respectively; P=0.002). The cumulative incidence of relapse at 3 years was significantly higher in patients with severe fibrosis than in those with a lesser degree of fibrosis or no fibrosis (47% versus 28% versus 27%, respectively; P=0.04), resulting in comparable 3-year disease-free survival rates in patients without fibrosis and in those with mild or moderate fibrosis (42% versus 38%, respectively) but a lower disease-free survival rate in those with severe fibrosis (18%; P=0.002). Severe fibrosis remained an independent factor for reduced survival (hazard ratio, 1.9; P=0.006). Conclusions Among patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, only severe fibrosis affects survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation while patients with mild or moderate fibrosis have an outcome comparable to that of patients without bone marrow fibrosis. PMID:20971823

  4. Autoimmune Syndromes Presenting as a Paraneoplastic Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Clinical Features, Course, Treatment and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Bradley T.; Foltz, Lynda; Leitch, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune manifestations (AIM) are reported in up to 10-30% of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients; this association is not well defined. We present herein a retrospective chart review of single center MDS patients for AIM, a case discussion and a literature review. Of 252 MDS patients examined, 11 (4.4%) had AIM around MDS diagnosis. International Prognostic Scoring System scores were: low or intermediate (int)-1 (n=7); int-2 or high (n=4). AIM were: culture negative sepsis (n=7); inflammatory arthritis (n=3); vasculitis (n=4); sweats; pericarditis; polymyalgia rheumatica (n=2 each); mouth ulcers; pulmonary infiltrates; suspicion for Behcet’s; polychondritis and undifferentiated (n=1 each). AIM treatment and outcome were: prednisone +/- steroid sparing agents, n=8, ongoing symptoms in 5; azacitidine (n=3), 2 resolved; and observation, n=1, ongoing symptoms. At a median follow up of 13 months, seven patients are alive. In summary, 4.4% of MDS patients presented with concomitant AIM. MDS should remain on the differential diagnosis of patients with inflammatory symptoms. PMID:27499837

  5. α-Thalassemia, Mental Retardation, and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes three rare syndromes in which the presence of α-thalassemia provided an important clue to the molecular basis of the underlying condition. It exemplifies how rare diseases allied with careful clinical observation can lead to important biological principles. Two of the syndromes, ATR-16 and ATR-X, are characterized by α-thalassemia in association with multiple developmental abnormalities including mental retardation. The third condition, ATMDS, is an acquired disorder in which α-thalassemia arises in the context of myelodysplasia. Intriguingly, mutations in the chromatin remodeling factor, ATRX, are common to both ATR-X syndrome and ATMDS. PMID:23028133

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis in two patients with myelodysplastic syndrome treated with azacitidine.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shiue-Wei; Huang, Tzu-Chuan; Ye, Ren-Hua; Wu, Yi-Ying

    2015-03-01

    Azacitidine is a novel agent for treating myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). It has a relatively safe toxicity profile with very few reported skin toxicities. Patients with MDS were prone to get severe infections, especially via respiratory tract, urinary system, and bloodstream. However, necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a relatively rare event in patients with MDS, and it is hard to diagnose early. Here, we report two MDS cases that developed NF in lower extremities while receiving azacitidine treatment. One of them survives after emergent fasciotomy along with the administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin.

  7. Efficacy of a single, weekly dose of recombinant erythropoietin in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Musto, Pellegrino; Falcone, Antonietta; Sanpaolo, Grazia; Bodenizza, Carlo; La Sala, Antonio; Perla, Gianni; Carella, Angelo Michele

    2003-07-01

    Thirteen patients with low-to-intermediate risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) received recombinant erythropoietin (r-EPO) at the single, weekly dose of 40.000 U for at least 8 weeks. Five patients (38.4%) achieved a major erythroid response (increased haemoglobin levels > 2 g/dl and/or transfusion independence), which is currently maintained after 3-11 months, without modification of r-EPO dose. This study suggests that 40.000 U r-EPO given once a week may be at least as effective as the more frequent (daily or three times a week) administrations of the drug usually employed in MDS patients.

  8. A simple method to predict response to immunosuppressive therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saunthararajah, Yogen; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Wesley, Robert; Wang, Qiong J; Barrett, A John

    2003-10-15

    Immunosuppression with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) or cyclosporine (CSA) can be used to treat the cytopenia associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Previously, we identified HLA-DR15, younger age, and shorter duration of red cell transfusion dependence as pretreatment variables that correlate significantly with a response. Using these pretreatment variables we have devised a simple method to prospectively identify patients with low or high probabilities of response to immunosuppression. The ability of this system to predict response was confirmed in a separate cohort of 23 patients with MDS treated with immunosuppression.

  9. Pulmonary Complications of Azanucleoside Therapy in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Manuel; Yellapragada, Sarvari; Mims, Martha; Rahman, Effie; Rivero, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Our primary aim was to identify potential risk factors and clinical outcome of azanucleoside induced pulmonary complications in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML). We present an 89-year-old female with MDS derived AML who developed fatigability, hypoxemia, and bilateral lung infiltrates indicating interstitial lung disease after 11 cycles of azanucleoside. In addition, we describe a cohort of six MDS patients with fever, cough, dyspnea, and pulmonary infiltrates at early time point during azanucleoside treatment. Early and late onset of pulmonary manifestations suggest different pathogenic mechanisms. Brief azanucleoside discontinuation and steroids led to rapid improvement in symptoms. PMID:26798526

  10. Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia with Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Corticosteroid Monotherapy Led to Successful Ventilator Weaning

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mari; Murata, Kengo; Kiriu, Takahiro; Kouzai, Yasuji; Takamori, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old man with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) presented to our hospital with a high fever. Although treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was initiated, his respiratory status worsened to the point that he required mechanical ventilation. However, he was successfully treated with a corticosteroid without immunosuppression. Sequential transbronchial lung biopsies revealed abundant fibrin exudate in the alveolar spaces, which was subsequently replaced by fibroblasts, showing that acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) gradually changes into organizing pneumonia. Our case demonstrated both the efficacy of corticosteroid-monotherapy and the histological course of AFOP. PMID:27803411

  11. Practical use of azacitidine in higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes: an expert panel opinion.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, Pierre; Bowen, David; Gattermann, Norbert; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Sanz, Guillermo; Santini, Valeria

    2010-11-01

    Azacitidine is currently the only drug to have shown a significant survival benefit over conventional care regimens in patients with International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) intermediate-2 (Int-2) and high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), establishing it as an important new treatment for these individuals. However, several aspects of the practical use of azacitidine remain uncertain. This manuscript outlines recommendations discussed by a panel of experts, providing a practical guide for physicians to ensure optimal management of Int-2 and high-risk patients receiving azacitidine.

  12. Improving clinical outcome in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and iron overload using iron chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Heather A

    2007-12-01

    Until recently, little information on the benefits of iron chelation therapy (ICT) in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and iron overload was known. A recent retrospective study showed improved survival in transfusion-dependent patients with MDS (Low or Intermediate-1 risk IPSS) receiving ICT, compared with those not receiving ICT; median overall survival was not reached at 160 months versus 40 months, respectively. Significantly more patients receiving ICT survived to 4 years (80% versus 44%; p < 0.03), suggesting that MDS patients with iron overload might benefit from ICT. Prospective studies to confirm the benefit of ICT in MDS are warranted.

  13. Atypical Porokeratosis Developing Following Bone Marrow Transplantation in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Sang Hee; Lee, Jun Young; Cho, Baik Kee

    2010-01-01

    Porokeratosis is an abnormal disease of keratinization of epidermis. It is clinically characterized by margins covered with keratin layer and it typically has an atrophied macule with a protruded, circular form. Histopathologically, it shows the findings of cornoid lamella. Risk factors for its development include organ transplantation, long-term use of corticosteroids, immunocompromised status, including AIDS, and exposure to ultraviolet light. We herein report a case of atypical porokeratosis in a 38-year-old man who developed porokeratosis involving multiple sites following bone marrow transplantation for myelodysplastic syndrome. PMID:20548916

  14. What Are the Risk Factors for Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... information about cancers caused by chemotherapy and radiation therapy can be found in Second Cancers in Adults . Genetic syndromes Some bone marrow problems are caused by abnormal (mutated) genes that have been passed on from one or ...

  15. Myelodysplastic syndrome complicated by central diabetes insipidus and cerebral salt wasting syndrome with peculiar change in magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Sano, Soichi; Yamagami, Keiko; Morikawa, Takashi; Yoshioka, Katsunobu

    2010-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) could occurs in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML), because of infiltration of leukemic cells into the neurohypophysis or some other reason and it is closely associated with abnormalities of chromosome 7. We report a case of MDS with abnormalities of chromosome 7, presenting as CDI followed by deterioration of polyuria and hyponatremia with a decreased extracellular fluid volume. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed symmetrically enhanced lesions in the hypothalamus. Fludrocortisone treatment normalized his serum sodium level and cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) was suspected.

  16. Cushing Syndrome in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin (ACTH)-releasing hormone (CRH) is synthesized in the hypothalamus and carried to the anterior pituitary in the portal system. CRH stimulates ACTH release from the anterior pituitary, which in turn stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete cortisol (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal or HPA axis).1–4 Cortisol inhibits the synthesis and secretion of both CRH and ACTH in a negative feedback regulation system. In Cushing syndrome, the HPA axis has lost its ability for self-regulation, due to excessive secretion of either ACTH or cortisol and the loss of the negative feedback function. Diagnostic tests, on the other hand, take advantage of the tight regulation of the HPA axis in the normal state and its disturbance in Cushing syndrome to guide therapy toward the primary cause of this disorder. PMID:23099271

  17. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia in children: correlation between chromosomal abnormalities and prior therapy.

    PubMed

    Rubin, C M; Arthur, D C; Woods, W G; Lange, B J; Nowell, P C; Rowley, J D; Nachman, J; Bostrom, B; Baum, E S; Suarez, C R

    1991-12-01

    We have studied 20 children with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who were 3 months to 16 years old at diagnosis of their primary neoplasm and 1 to 24 years old at diagnosis of their secondary neoplasm. The median interval from initial treatment for the first malignancy to diagnosis of therapy-related MDS or AML was 46 months (range, 12 to 116 months). Twelve patients had chromosomal abnormalities resulting in loss of material from the long arm of chromosomes 5 and/or 7, three patients had abnormalities of chromosome 11 band q23, one patient had both classes of abnormalities, three patients had other abnormalities, and one patient had a normal karyotype. Ten of 12 patients with chromosome 5 and/or 7 abnormalities had been exposed to an alkylating agent, and two of three patients with 11q23 abnormalities had been exposed to an epipodophyllotoxin. The patient with both classes of abnormalities had been exposed to both types of therapy. We conclude that abnormalities of chromosomes 5 and/or 7 are common in children with therapy-related MDS or AML. The proposed relationships between exposure to alkylating agents and abnormalities of chromosomes 5 and/or 7 and between exposure to epipodophyllotoxins and abnormalities of 11q23 are supported in this pediatric series.

  19. Burnout syndrome in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Al-Youbi, Reem A; Jan, Mohammed M

    2013-07-01

    Burnout is a common work-related syndrome consisting of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and diminished feelings of personal accomplishment. Burnout influences the performance and efficiency of the healthcare professionals and therefore the quality of the care provided. This study aims to assess the burnout rates and potential determinants in pediatrics. A cross-sectional, descriptive study involving physicians practicing pediatrics in the Jeddah area of Saudi Arabia was conducted utilizing the Maslach Burnout Inventory in addition to questions regarding work-related and lifestyle-related factors. One hundred and thirty pediatricians (55% females) were included with age ranging between 25 and 45 years (mean: 30). Most (46%) were consultants and 54% practiced in a university based setting. Burnout scores were abnormal in 107 (82%) and in 45 (34%) the syndrome was severe. Males were more likely to reach a severe burnout category compared to females (40% vs. 31%; p=0.012). Academic pediatricians working in a university setting were much more likely to experience severe burnout compared to their counterparts working in other hospitals (50% vs. 19%; p=0.0005). Consultants were also more likely to experience severe burnout compared to residents and assistants (46% vs. 27%; p=0.03). At least one third of practicing pediatricians suffer from burnout syndrome. Specific strategies should be developed and implemented to limit and prevent professional burnout.

  20. Changes in the Updated 2016: WHO Classification of the Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Related Myeloid Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bennett, John M

    2016-11-01

    In comparison with the 2008 World Health Organization "Blue Book" on hematopoietic neoplasms, a small number of changes have been made in the classification. In the lower-risk patients, Refractory Cytopenias with Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts (RCMD-RS) has been separated from RCMD to recognize the importance of the SF3B1 mutation. Often there has been confusion as to the degree of morphologic dysplasia and/or cytopenias to define some of the lower-risk subtypes. In addition, the type of dysplasia or cytopenias is not always concordant. Therefore, it seems prudent to apply the more general term "myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)" with single- or multiple-lineage dysplasia. Refractory neutropenia or thrombocytopenia has been deemphasized because most patients have multilineage dysplasia. In the higher-risk patients, the terms Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts (RAEB) 1 or 2 have been simplified to Myelodysplastic Syndrome-Excess Blasts (MDS-EB) 1 or 2 to emphasize the importance of the percentage of blasts that dictate therapy. Patients with Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) can be classified into 3 groups: CMML 0, 1, or 2, based on the percentage of blasts (< 5%, 5%-9%, 10%-19%). Cases with 50% or more erythroid precursors will not have the percentage of blasts based on the nonerythroid precursors. Previous cases of acute erythroid leukemia (myeloid:erythroid type) can be included in the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtype: AML with MDS-related features.

  1. [Research advances in value of flow cytometric immunophenotyping in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lu, Dan; Liu, Yan-Rong

    2013-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are myeloid neoplasms characterized by dysplasia in one or more linages of cells and increased risk of development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Along with the deeply understanding of myelodysplastic syndrome, the diagnosis standards of this disease experienced a leap in essence: from a single standard of morphological test in FAB to multiple detecting means in WHO standard of 2008, flow cytometry has been proposed as an adjunctive diagnostic test in the 2007 Vienna standards and the 2008 WHO standards. Recently, A heterogeneous spectrum of immunophenotypic abnormalities have been reported in MDS, and some of which are of great significance to the diagnosis, classification, prognosis assessment, and treatment of the disease. In the year of 2003, a flow cytometric scoring system (FCSS) was built to evaluate the prognosis of MDS patients, which was able to qualify the phenotypic aberrancies in the myelomonocytic, erythroid, and megakaryocytic lineage. It filled the gap of the international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) and the WHO classification-based prognostic scoring system (WPSS), and was of great value to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of MDS. In this article, the value of MDS immunophenotyping in diagnosis and prognosis evaluation of MDS is reviewed in term of MDS immunophenotypic abnormalities and flow cytometric scoring system.

  2. Myeloid sarcoma of the Gingiva with myelodysplastic syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seong-Ho; Park, Gyeongsin; Ko, Youngkyung; Park, Jun-Beom

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a case of myeloid sarcoma of the gingiva with myelodysplastic syndrome.A 52-year-old male diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome with skin lesions presented with gingival swelling and gingival redness involving the maxillary left second premolar and the maxillary left first molar. The patient was referred from the Department of Hematology for a biopsy of the lesion. Full-thickness flaps were elevated and inflamed, and neoplastic soft tissue was removed from a lesion and the samples sent for histopathologic analysis.Histopathologic results showed leukemic cell infiltration beneath the oral epithelium, and the specimen was positive for the leukocyte marker. The diagnosis was myeloid sarcoma. Uneventful healing was observed at 2-week follow-up, but relapse of the lesions with the hyperplastic and neoplastic tissue was noted at 4-week follow-up. Further follow-up or treatment could not be performed because the patient did not visit at the next follow-up.In conclusion, myeloid sarcoma should be a diagnosis option for gingival growth because it can involve intraoral lesion. In this report, a biopsy was performed due to referral considering the patient's medical history. Although myeloid sarcoma in the oral cavity is extremely rare, a small biopsy and consultation with a hematologist may be beneficial for patients and may provide a differential diagnosis.

  3. A Zebrafish Model of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Produced through tet2 Genomic Editing

    PubMed Central

    Gjini, Evisa; Mansour, Marc R.; Sander, Jeffry D.; Moritz, Nadine; Nguyen, Ashley T.; Kesarsing, Michiel; Gans, Emma; He, Shuning; Chen, Si; Ko, Myunggon; Kuang, You-Yi; Yang, Song; Zhou, Yi; Rodig, Scott; Zon, Leonard I.; Joung, J. Keith; Rao, Anjana

    2014-01-01

    The ten-eleven translocation 2 gene (TET2) encodes a member of the TET family of DNA methylcytosine oxidases that converts 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) to initiate the demethylation of DNA within genomic CpG islands. Somatic loss-of-function mutations of TET2 are frequently observed in human myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), which is a clonal malignancy characterized by dysplastic changes of developing blood cell progenitors, leading to ineffective hematopoiesis. We used genome-editing technology to disrupt the zebrafish Tet2 catalytic domain. tet2m/m (homozygous for the mutation) zebrafish exhibited normal embryonic and larval hematopoiesis but developed progressive clonal myelodysplasia as they aged, culminating in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) at 24 months of age, with dysplasia of myeloid progenitor cells and anemia with abnormal circulating erythrocytes. The resultant tet2m/m mutant zebrafish lines show decreased levels of 5hmC in hematopoietic cells of the kidney marrow but not in other cell types, most likely reflecting the ability of other Tet family members to provide this enzymatic activity in nonhematopoietic tissues but not in hematopoietic cells. tet2m/m zebrafish are viable and fertile, providing an ideal model to dissect altered pathways in hematopoietic cells and, for small-molecule screens in embryos, to identify compounds with specific activity against tet2 mutant cells. PMID:25512612

  4. Impaired cytotoxicity associated with defective natural killer cell differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Maryam; Manser, Angela R; Fröbel, Julia; Kündgen, Andrea; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Schönberg, Kathrin; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert; Uhrberg, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Natural killer cells are well known to mediate anti-leukemic responses in myeloid leukemia but their role in myelodysplastic syndromes is not well understood. Here, in a cohort of newly diagnosed patients (n=75), widespread structural and functional natural killer cell defects were identified. One subgroup of patients (13%) had a selective deficiency of peripheral natural killer cells (count <10/mm(3) blood) with normal frequencies of T and natural killer-like T cells. Natural killer cell-deficient patients were predominantly found in high-risk subgroups and deficiency of these cells was significantly associated with poor prognosis. In the second subgroup, comprising the majority of patients (76%), natural killer cells were present but exhibited poor cytotoxicity. The defect was strongly associated with reduced levels of perforin and granzyme B. Notably, natural killer cell function and arming of cytotoxic granules could be fully reconstituted by in vitro stimulation. Further phenotypic analysis of these patients revealed an immature natural killer cell compartment that was biased towards CD56(bright) cells. The residual CD56(dim) cells exhibited a significant increase of the unlicensed NKG2A(-)KIR(-) subset and a striking reduction in complexity of the repertoire of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that the widespread defects in natural killer cell function occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are mostly due to either unsuccessful or inefficient generation of mature, functionally competent natural killer cells, which might contribute to disease progression through impaired immune surveillance.

  5. SRSF2 Is Essential for Hematopoiesis, and Its Myelodysplastic Syndrome-Related Mutations Dysregulate Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Komeno, Yukiko; Huang, Yi-Jou; Qiu, Jinsong; Lin, Leo; Xu, YiJun; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Liang; Monterroza, Dora D.; Li, Hairi; DeKelver, Russell C.; Yan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of neoplasms characterized by ineffective myeloid hematopoiesis and various risks for leukemia. SRSF2, a member of the serine/arginine-rich (SR) family of splicing factors, is one of the mutation targets associated with poor survival in patients suffering from myelodysplastic syndromes. Here we report the biological function of SRSF2 in hematopoiesis by using conditional knockout mouse models. Ablation of SRSF2 in the hematopoietic lineage caused embryonic lethality, and Srsf2-deficient fetal liver cells showed significantly enhanced apoptosis and decreased levels of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Induced ablation of SRSF2 in adult Mx1-Cre Srsf2flox/flox mice upon poly(I):poly(C) injection demonstrated a significant decrease in lineage− Sca+ c-Kit+ cells in bone marrow. To reveal the functional impact of myelodysplastic syndromes-associated mutations in SRSF2, we analyzed splicing responses on the MSD-L cell line and found that the missense mutation of proline 95 to histidine (P95H) and a P95-to-R102 in-frame 8-amino-acid deletion caused significant changes in alternative splicing. The affected genes were enriched in cancer development and apoptosis. These findings suggest that intact SRSF2 is essential for the functional integrity of the hematopoietic system and that its mutations likely contribute to development of myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:26124281

  6. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia after treatment with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Jung; Park, Tae Sung; Lee, Seung Tae; Song, Jaewoo; Suh, Borum; Kim, Se Hoon; Jang, Seon Jung; Lee, Chang Hoon; Choi, Jong Rak

    2009-01-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia after treatment with temozolomide have rarely been described in the literature. Only 10 cases in association with temozolomide have been documented. The cases included anaplastic astrocytoma (4 cases), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (2 cases), low grade astrocytoma (2 cases), low grade oligodendroglioma (1 case), and one case of secondary Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Here we report a novel case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia associated with der(1;7)(q10;p10) in a glioblastoma multiforme patient treated with temozolomide. Results of bone marrow morphology, chromosome, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, as well as the clinical history, strongly suggest a treatment-related etiology in our case. In past reports, karyotypes in cases of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia mostly demonstrated abnormalities in chromosomes 5 and 7. However, we report a case of temozolomide-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with der(1;7)(q10;p10), possibly the first reported case, to the authors' knowledge.

  7. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-17

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  8. Repair of a recurrent pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta in an atomic bomb survivor with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Reiji; Nakao, Yoshihisa; Okada, Takayuki; Johno, Hiroyuki; Enoki, Chiharu; Sumida, Tomohiko; Imamura, Hiroji

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of infective aortic pseudoaneurysms tends to be intractable and difficult to treat. We experienced a very rare case of a recurrent infective pseudoaneurysm in the ascending aorta that occurred after cardiac surgery in an atomic bomb survivor with myelodysplastic syndrome. The pseudoaneurysm was successfully repaired using a femoral artery autograft with an omentopexy and the patient recovered well without any recurrence.

  9. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  11. SJG-136 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  12. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Sirolimus and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia That is Recurrent or Not Eligible for Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-17

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  15. Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome Is More Frequently Associated With Myelodysplastic Syndromes Than the Classical Neutrophilic Variant

    PubMed Central

    Ghoufi, Lisa; Ortonne, Nicolas; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Barhoumi, Walid; Begon, Edouard; Haioun, Corinne; Pautas, Cécile; Beckerich, Florence; Robin, Christine; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Cordonnier, Catherine; Chosidow, Olivier; Toma, Andréa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome (H-SS) is a histological variant of Sweet syndrome (SS) differing from classical neutrophilic SS (N-SS) by a dermal infiltrate mainly composed of lymphocytes and histiocytoid myeloperoxidase-positive cells. We aimed to report a large series of H-SS and compare the frequency and type of hematological malignancies associated to H-SS and N-SS. We included 62 patients with a coding histopathologic diagnosis of SS prospectively registered between 2005 and 2014 in the database of our Department of Pathology. Overall, 22 (35.5%) and 40 (64.5%) patients had a histological diagnosis of H-SS and N-SS, respectively. Median age, sex ratio, and cutaneous lesions were similar in the 2 groups. The frequency of extra-cutaneous manifestations was similar (50% vs 37.5%, P = 0.42). Recurrent forms were significantly more frequent in H-SS than in N-SS patients (21% vs 2.5%, P = 0.01). A hematological malignancy was diagnosed in 22 patients, 12 (55.5%) with H-SS and 10 (25%) with N-SS (P = 0.019). Hematological malignancy was of myeloid origin in 8/22 (36.3%) H-SS and 5/40 (12.5%) N-SS patients (P = 0.02), and of lymphoid origin without myeloid component in 4/22 (18.1%) H-SS and 4/40 (10%) N-SS patients (P = 0.35), respectively. One N-SS patient had a hematological malignancy of mixed (myeloid and lymphoid) phenotype. A myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) was diagnosed in 7/22 (31.8%) H-SS and 1/40 (2.5%) N-SS patients (P < 0.001). Hematological disease was diagnosed before (in 8 H-SS and 3 N-SS patients) or at the time of the occurrence of the cutaneous lesions (in 1 H-SS and 7 N-SS patients). However, in 3 H-SS patients, all with MDS, cutaneous lesions preceded the hematological disease by ≤6 months. In conclusion, H-SS was associated with MDS in one third of patients but also with lymphoid malignancies, and cutaneous lesions could precede the hematological diagnosis in patients with MDS. A complete hematological assessment is

  16. Bilateral lung 99mTc-MDP uptake on the bone scintigraphy in the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).

    PubMed

    Mogharrabi, Mehdi; Javadi, Hamid; Assadi, Majid

    2013-05-01

    We report a case of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with unusual abnormal 99mTc-MDP activity throughout both lungs on whole-body bone scan. To explain the pancytopenia, bone marrow examination was carried out which showed hypocellularity in addition to large abnormal megakaryocytes indicating myelodysplastic changes. His whole-body bone scan showed increased 99mTc-MDP activity in both lungs, kidneys, and also along the proximal two thirds of the femora. It was concluded that lung uptake in addition to skeletal uptake on scintigraphic bone scanning should be kept in mind in patients with MDS.

  17. Genetic predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Babushok, Daria V.; Bessler, Monica; Olson, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal blood disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, cytopenias, dysplasia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). With the growing availability of clinical genetic testing, there is an increasing appreciation that a number of genetic predisposition syndromes may underlie apparent de novo presentations of MDS/AML, particularly in children and young adults. Recent findings of clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia add another facet to our understanding of the mechanisms of MDS/AML predisposition. As more predisposition syndromes are recognized, it is becoming increasingly important for hematologists and oncologists to have familiarity with the common as well as emerging syndromes, and to have a systematic approach to diagnosis and screening of at risk patient populations. Here, we provide a practical algorithm for approaching a patient with a suspected MDS/AML predisposition, and provide an in-depth review of the established and emerging familial MDS/AML syndromes caused by mutations in the ANKRD26, CEBPA, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, RUNX1, SRP72 genes. Finally, we discuss recent data on the role of somatic mutations in malignant transformation in acquired aplastic anemia, and review the practical aspects of MDS/AML management in patients and families with predisposition syndromes. PMID:26693794

  18. [Lenalidomide treatment in myelodysplastic syndrome with 5q deletion--Czech MDS group experience].

    PubMed

    Jonášová, Anna; Červinek, Libor; Bělohlávková, Petra; Čermák, Jaroslav; Beličková, Monika; Rohoň, Petr; Černá, Olga; Hochová, Ivana; Šišková, Magda; Kačmářová, Karla; Janoušová, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a common hematological disease in patients over sixty. Despite intensive research, the therapy of this heterogeneous blood disease is complicated. In recent years, two new therapeutic approaches have been proposed: immunomodulation and demethylation therapy. Immunomodulation therapy with lenalidomide represents a meaningful advance in the treatment of anemic patients, specifically those with 5q- aberrations. As much as 60-70% of patients respond and achieve transfusion independence. We present the initial lenalidomide experience of the Czech MDS group. We analyze Czech MDS register data of 34 (31 female; 3 male; median age 69 years) chronically transfused low risk MDS patients with 5q- aberration treated by lenalidomide. Twenty-seven (79.4%) patients were diagnosed with 5q- syndrome, 5 patients with refractory anemia with multilineage dysplasia, 1 patient with refractory anemia with excess of blasts 1, and 1 patient with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative unclassified. Response, as represented by achieving complete transfusion independence, was achieved in 91% of patients. A true 5q- syndrome diagnosis in most our patients may be responsible for such a high response rate. Complete cytogenetic response was reached in 15% of patients and partial cytogenetic response in 67%, within a median time of 12 months. TP53 mutation was detected in 15% (3 from 18 tested) and 2 of these patients progressed to higher grade MDS. The majority of patients tolerated lenalidomide very well. Based on this albeit small study, we present our findings of high lenalidomide efficacy as well as the basic principles and problems of lenalidomide therapy.

  19. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Early lymphocyte recovery predicts superior overall survival after unmanipulated haploidentical blood and marrow transplant for myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia evolving from myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Jun; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Xu, Lan-Ping; Liu, Dai-Hong; Liu, Kai-Yan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Han, Wei; Chen, Huan; Wang, Feng-Rong; Lv, Meng; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2013-12-01

    We investigated whether early lymphocyte recovery, after unmanipulated, haploidentical, blood and marrow transplant (HBMT), affected clinical outcomes in 78 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia evolving from MDS. Lymphocyte recovery was based on the absolute lymphocyte count on day 30 (ALC-30). Patients with high ALC-30 (≥ 300 cells/μL) had lower relapse rates (13.8% vs. 35.5%, p = 0.049) and lower incidence of bacterial infections (3.4% vs. 25.8%, p = 0.015) than those with low ALC-30 values. Multivariate analysis showed that a high ALC-30 was associated with improved overall survival (OS, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.099, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.029-0.337; p < 0.0001), improved leukemia-free survival (HR: 0.245, 95% CI: 0.112-0.539; p < 0.0001), lower relapse rate (HR: 0.096, 95% CI: 0.011-0.827; p = 0.033) and lower transplant-related mortality (TRM, HR: 0.073, 95% CI: 0.016-0.324; p = 0.001). Combinations of three mismatches in the human leukocyte antigen loci were associated with a higher TRM (HR: 5.026, 95% CI: 1.392-18.173; p = 0.014). Our results suggest that the ALC-30 can predict a favorable OS after unmanipulated HBMT.

  1. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome transformed in acute myeloid leukemia after androgens and cyclosporin. A treatment.

    PubMed

    Gologan, R; Ostroveanu, Daniela; Dobrea, Camelia; Gioadă, Liliana

    2003-01-01

    The apparent contradiction between clonal expansion and marrow failure encountered in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is more evident in hypocellular forms at presentation. Hypoplastic MDS (hMDS) appears to be a distinct clinicopathologic entity, accounting for about 15% from all MDS. The pathogeny is supposed to result from immunosupressive mechanisms and some observations on successful treatment with Cyclosporine A (CsA) are reported. The case of a young female patient diagnosed by bone marrow core biopsy with hMDS - refractory anemia (FAB and WHO classification) with normal karyotype and scarce CD34(+) cells by immunohistophenotyping is presented. She was treated with androgens followed by CsA for a few months and shortly after she developed an acute myeloid leukemia (M4) which responded to low-doses of daily oral melphalan. This is one of the first few reports on such an event during the immunosuppressive therapy in MDS and the possible explanations for this unusual evolution are discussed.

  3. Potential Relationship between Inadequate Response to DNA Damage and Development of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Chen, Peishuai; Gu, Jian; Bishop, Alexander J. R.; Scott, Linda M.; Hasty, Paul; Rebel, Vivienne I.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for the continuous regeneration of all types of blood cells, including themselves. To ensure the functional and genomic integrity of blood tissue, a network of regulatory pathways tightly controls the proliferative status of HSCs. Nevertheless, normal HSC aging is associated with a noticeable decline in regenerative potential and possible changes in other functions. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is an age-associated hematopoietic malignancy, characterized by abnormal blood cell maturation and a high propensity for leukemic transformation. It is furthermore thought to originate in a HSC and to be associated with the accrual of multiple genetic and epigenetic aberrations. This raises the question whether MDS is, in part, related to an inability to adequately cope with DNA damage. Here we discuss the various components of the cellular response to DNA damage. For each component, we evaluate related studies that may shed light on a potential relationship between MDS development and aberrant DNA damage response/repair. PMID:25569081

  4. Screening features to improve the class prediction of acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaishi; Yang, Meixue; Sablok, Gaurav; Fan, Jianping; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2013-01-10

    After more than three decades of intensive investigations, the underpinning mechanism of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis still remains largely uncharacterized, and their diagnosis relies heavily on the subjective factors. Recently gene expression profiling technique showed significant improvement in classifying some subtypes of AML, but the model's discriminating power of MDS from AML is still in its infancy. Feature selection plays an important role in the classification of the samples on the basis of the gene expression profiles. Our hypothesis explains that a better choice of features could improve the classification of the diseased and normal stage samples, and the potential application of feature screening to produce feature sets, with better accuracies and lowest number of embedded features. The observed results suggest that feature selection proves to be an essential and affirmative step in the biomedical data mining models based on gene expression profiles.

  5. Late effect of atomic bomb radiation on myeloid disorders: leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2012-03-01

    Leukemia was the first malignancy linked to radiation exposure in atomic bomb survivors. Clear evidence of the dose-dependent excess risk of three major types of leukemia (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia [AML], and chronic myeloid leukemia) was found, especially in people exposed at young ages. Such leukemia risks were at their highest in the late 1950s, and declined gradually thereafter over the past 50 years. Findings from recent risk analyses, however, suggest the persistence of AML risk even after 1990, and evidence of increased risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) due to atomic bomb radiation has recently been shown. High-risk MDS and forms involving complex chromosomal aberrations were found to be much more frequent in people exposed to higher radiation doses. These lines of epidemiological evidence suggest that the risk of radiation-induced hematological malignancies has persisted for six decades since the initial exposure.

  6. Impact of Nagasaki atomic bomb exposure on myelodysplastic syndrome patients who are treated with azacitidine.

    PubMed

    Jo, Tatsuro; Horio, Kensuke; Shigematsu, Kazuto

    2015-05-01

    High-dose radiation exposure greatly increases the risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), however the clinical characteristics of MDS among atomic bomb survivors have not been thoroughly investigated to date. We designed this study to identify these characteristics. We retrospectively evaluated data from 13 atomic bomb survivors with MDS and 15 elderly patients with de novo MDS who were diagnosed between April 2011 and April 2013 at the Nagasaki Genbaku Hospital. All patients were treated with azacitidine (AZA; a hypomethylating agent) and overall survival rates were estimated. No clear difference was observed in the clinical response to AZA between the two groups. However, atomic bomb survivors had a survival disadvantage, independent of their karyotype. Minute genetic alterations caused by exposure to atomic radiation can adversely affect the response to AZA, even 66 years after the exposure. Further studies are required to clarify the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Combining gene mutation with gene expression data improves outcome prediction in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gerstung, Moritz; Pellagatti, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Porta, Matteo G Della; Jädersten, Martin; Dolatshad, Hamid; Verma, Amit; Cross, Nicholas C. P.; Vyas, Paresh; Killick, Sally; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Cazzola, Mario; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J.; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease, but two patients rarely have identical genotypes. Similarly, patients differ in their clinicopathological parameters, but how genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity are interconnected is not well understood. Here we build statistical models to disentangle the effect of 12 recurrently mutated genes and 4 cytogenetic alterations on gene expression, diagnostic clinical variables and outcome in 124 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Overall, one or more genetic lesions correlate with expression levels of ~20% of all genes, explaining 20–65% of observed expression variability. Differential expression patterns vary between mutations and reflect the underlying biology, such as aberrant polycomb repression for ASXL1 and EZH2 mutations or perturbed gene dosage for copy-number changes. In predicting survival, genomic, transcriptomic and diagnostic clinical variables all have utility, with the largest contribution from the transcriptome. Similar observations are made on the TCGA acute myeloid leukaemia cohort, confirming the general trends reported here. PMID:25574665

  8. Comprehensive scanning of somatic mitochondrial DNA alterations in acute leukemia developing from myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Linnartz, Bjoern; Anglmayer, Roswitha; Zanssen, Stefanie

    2004-03-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis resulting in refractory cytopenias. Transformation resulting in acute myeloblastic leukemia is the final stage in the multistep process of MDS evolution. Functional relevant mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been related to sideroblastic anemia and MDS. To investigate the role of mtDNA in malignant transformation to acute leukemia, we used high-resolution techniques such as single-strand conformational polymorphism and fluorescence sequencing for investigation of the whole mitochondrial genome from blood cells of 10 patients with MDS. Functionally relevant point mutations in mitochondrial RNA and polypeptide-encoding genes were detected in 50% of patients with MDS. Their increasing mutation load connects MDS and the developing acute myeloid leukemias. Several point mutations of mtDNA, including secondary point mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, occur in one bone marrow and may synergically affect bone marrow stem cells by an apoptotic pathway.

  9. Autonomous proliferation and bcl-2 expression involving haematopoietic cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bincoletto, C.; Saad, S. T.; Soares da Silva, E.; Queiroz, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the autonomous proliferation, bcl-2 expression and number of apoptotic cells in the bone marrow of patients with confirmed diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Normal bone marrow cells obtained from donors of the Clinical Hospital of this university were used as a control. The autonomous proliferation, evaluated by clonal culture without exogenous growth factor, and the number of apoptotic cells in bone marrow kept for 10 days in liquid cultures at 37 degrees C and 5% carbon dioxide, were significantly greater in MDS patients than in control subjects (P = 0.001, Wilcoxon). However, bcl-2 expression, measured by immunocytochemistry, was significantly lower in MDS patients than in normal individuals (P = 0.002, Wilcoxon). These results suggest that the high proliferation activity in MDS patients may be counteracted by the high level of medullar cell death, which might be related to the lower bcl-2 expression. PMID:9744502

  10. Primary antifungal prophylaxis in acute myeloblastic leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome--still an open question?

    PubMed

    Rüping, Maria J G T; Vehreschild, Jörg J; Cornely, Oliver A

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we aim to compare different early treatment strategies of invasive fungal diseases in patients undergoing induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Three treatment approaches--prophylactic, empiric, and preemptive treatment--are subject to continuous discussion among physicians treating patients at risk. Considering the available clinical basis of evidence, we opt for antifungal prophylaxis with posaconazole 200 mg tid po as our primary prophylactic strategy, while the employment of preemptive treatment should be delayed until more accurate diagnostic tools become available. In addition to antifungal prophylaxis, empiric treatment with caspofungin or L-AmB may be administered to patients with fever resistant to broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and without radiographic findings typical of invasive fungal disease.

  11. Heritable GATA2 Mutations Associated with Familial Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Christopher N.; Chong, Chan-Eng; Carmichael, Catherine L.; Wilkins, Ella J.; Brautigan, Peter J.; Li, Xiao-Chun; Babic, Milena; Lin, Ming; Carmagnac, Amandine; Lee, Young K.; Kok, Chung H.; Gagliardi, Lucia; Friend, Kathryn L.; Ekert, Paul G.; Butcher, Carolyn M.; Brown, Anna L.; Lewis, Ian D.; To, L. Bik; Timms, Andrew E.; Storek, Jan; Moore, Sarah; Altree, Meryl; Escher, Robert; Bardy, Peter G.; Suthers, Graeme K.; D’Andrea, Richard J.; Horwitz, Marshall S.; Scott, Hamish S.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of the GATA2 gene as a new myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) predisposition gene. We found the same, novel heterozygous c.1061C>T (p.Thr354Met) missense mutation in the GATA2 transcription factor gene segregating with the multigenerational transmission of MDS/AML in three families, and a GATA2 c.1063_1065delACA (p.Thr355del) mutation at an adjacent codon in a fourth MDS/AML family. The mutations reside within the second zinc finger of GATA2 which mediates DNA-binding and protein-protein interactions. We show differential effects of the mutants on transactivation of target genes, cellular differentiation, apoptosis and global gene expression. Identification of such predisposing genes to familial forms of MDS and AML is critical for more effective diagnosis and prognosis, counselling, selection of related bone marrow transplant donors, and development of therapies. PMID:21892162

  12. The role of azacitidine in the management of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)

    PubMed Central

    Götze, KS; Müller-Thomas, C; Peschel, C

    2009-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of common bone marrow disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenias, and a propensity for transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). For many years, the main treatment option for MDS was best supportive care which alleviates symptoms but has no effect on the natural course of the disease. The recent approval of the demethylating agent azacitidine represents a significant advance in the treatment of MDS. The results of two randomized trials with azacitidine have shown an overall response rate between 40% and 60%, an improved quality of life, a reduced risk of transformation to AML and a definite survival advantage compared to best supportive care or low-dose chemotherapy. Current data on azacitidine and its place in the treatment of MDS are reviewed. PMID:21188130

  13. The DAC system and associations with acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bug, Gesine; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2010-12-01

    Imbalances of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and deacetylase activity (DAC) that result in deregulated gene expression are commonly observed in leukemias. These alterations provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches that target the epigenetic mechanisms implicated in leukemogenesis. As the acetylation status of histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation of genes involved particularly in differentiation and apoptosis, DAC inhibitors (DACi) have attracted considerable attention for treatment of hematologic malignancies. DACi encompass a structurally diverse family of compounds that are being explored as single agents as well as in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs, small molecule inhibitors of signaling pathways and hypomethylating agents. While DACi have shown clear evidence of activity in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes and lymphoid malignancies, their precise role in treatment of these different entities remain to be elucidated. Successful development of these compounds as elements of novel targeted treatment strategies for leukemia will require that clinical studies be performed in conjunction with translational research including efforts to identify predictive biomarkers.

  14. In-Silico Identification Of Micro-Loops In Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Dominik; Brandl, Miriam; Pham, Tuan D.; Chang, Chung-Che; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2011-06-01

    Micro-loops are regulatory network motifs that leverage transcriptional and posttranscriptional control to effectively regulate the transcriptome. In this paper a regulatory network for Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDSs) was constructed from the literature and publicly available data sources. The network was filtered using data from deep-sequencing of small RNAs, exon and microarrays. Motif discovery showed that micro-loops might exist in MDS. We further used the identified micro-loops and performed basic network analysis to identify the known disease gene RUNX1/AML, as well as miRNA family hsa-mir-181. This suggested that the concept of micro-loops can be applied to enhance disease gene identification and biomarker discovery.

  15. Hematologic improvements in a myelodysplastic syndromes with myelofibrosis (MDS-F) patient treated with azacitidine.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Daisuke; Matsuda, Akira; Ishikawa, Maho; Maeda, Tomoya; Tanae, Ken; Kohri, Mika; Takahashi, Naoki; Kawai, Nobutaka; Asou, Norio; Bessho, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes with myelofibrosis (MDS-F) is a poor prognostic hematopoietic disorder. Azacitidine was shown to prolong survival of high-risk MDS patients. However, the effects of azacitidine on MDS-F have yet to be elucidated. Azacitidine was administered to a 74-year-old man with MDS-F at a dose of 75 mg/m(2)/daily subcutaneously for 7 days every 28 days. Hematologic improvements were observed according to the International Working Group 2006 criteria after 8 cycles of the azacitidine treatment, and complete remission was achieved after 14 cycles. The grade of myelofibrosis was also improved. The therapeutic activity of azacitidine was confirmed in our MDS-F patient.

  16. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clinically Presenting with the “Classic TTP Pentad”

    PubMed Central

    Polanco Jácome, Evelyn Carolina; Guevara, Elizabeth; Mattoo, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    The clinical presentation of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is not specific. Many patients can be asymptomatic and can be detected only due to an abnormal complete blood cell count (CBC) on routine exam or for other reasons while others can be symptomatic as a consequence of underlying cytopenias. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) usually is suspected under the evidence of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) and thrombocytopenia and because it is a life-threatening condition (medical emergency) immediate initiation of plasmapheresis could be life-saving. The following case illustrates an unusual presentation of MDS in a patient who came in to the emergency room with the classic TTP “pentad” of fever, renal involvement, MAHA, mental status changes, and thrombocytopenia. We will focus our discussion in the clinical presentation of this case. PMID:28255478

  17. Review of azacitidine trials in Intermediate-2-and High-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, Pierre; Ades, Lionel

    2009-12-01

    The efficacy of azacitidine, a cytosine nucleoside analog, has been demonstrated in two large phase III trials in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients, primarily in higher-risk patients. In the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) study (lower-and higher-risk MDS patients; n = 191) azacitidine significantly prolonged median time-to-progression to acute myeloid leukemia or death (21 vs 13 months for supportive care; p = 0.007). The AZA-001 trial (Intermediate-2-and High-risk MDS patients; n = 358) showed azacitidine significantly prolonged median overall survival compared with conventional care regimens (24.5 vs 15.0 months; p = 0.0001). These results establish azacitidine as a reference first-line treatment in patients with Intermediate-2-and High-risk MDS who are not immediate candidates for allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

  18. Circulating myeloid and lymphoid precursor dendritic cells are clonally involved in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ma, L; Delforge, M; van Duppen, V; Verhoef, G; Emanuel, B; Boogaerts, M; Hagemeijer, A; Vandenberghe, P

    2004-09-01

    Circulating myeloid and lymphoid precursor dendritic cell (pDC) counts were determined in peripheral blood from 22 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) by a single-platform flow cytometric protocol. The absolute count of myeloid and lymphoid pDC, as well as their relative number (as proportion of mononuclear cells or total leukocytes) was significantly lower in MDS (n=22) than in healthy controls (n=41). In 11 patients with chromosomal aberrations, purified pDC were examined by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. This revealed clonal involvement of myeloid as well as lymphoid pDC in all of them. These data therefore strongly suggest that myeloid and lymphoid pDC share a common precursor. Whether reduced peripheral blood counts of pDC contribute to the immunological abnormalities observed in MDS remains to be investigated.

  19. The genetics of myelodysplastic syndrome: from clonal hematopoiesis to secondary leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Adam S.; Gibson, Christopher J.; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal disease that arises from the expansion of mutated hematopoietic stem cells. In a spectrum of myeloid disorders ranging from clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP) to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML), MDS is distinguished by the presence of peripheral blood cytopenias, dysplastic hematopoietic differentiation, and the absence of features that define acute leukemia. Over 50 recurrently mutated genes are involved in the pathogenesis of MDS, including genes that encode proteins involved in pre-mRNA splicing, epigenetic regulation, and transcription. In this review we discuss the molecular processes that lead to CHIP and further clonal evolution to MDS and sAML. We also highlight the ways in which these insights are shaping the clinical management of MDS, including classification schemata, prognostic scoring systems, and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27834397

  20. Recent advances in myelodysplastic syndromes: Molecular pathogenesis and its implications for targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Hironori; Harada, Yuka

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are defined as stem cell disorders caused by various gene abnormalities. Recent analysis using next-generation sequencing has provided great advances in identifying relationships between gene mutations and clinical phenotypes of MDS. Gene mutations affecting RNA splicing machinery, DNA methylation, histone modifications, transcription factors, signal transduction proteins and components of the cohesion complex participate in the pathogenesis and progression of MDS. Mutations in RNA splicing and DNA methylation occur early and are considered “founding mutations”, whereas others that occur later are regarded as “subclonal mutations”. RUNX1 mutations are more likely to subclonal; however, they apparently play a pivotal role in familial MDS. These genetic findings may lead to future therapies for MDS. PMID:25611784

  1. Diagnosis of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Among a Cohort of 119 Patients With Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Cioc, Adina M.; Wagner, John E.; MacMillan, Margaret L.; DeFor, Todd; Hirsch, Betsy

    2017-01-01

    Predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute leukemia is a hallmark of Fanconi anemia (FA). Morphologic criteria for MDS in FA are not well established, nor is the significance of clonal chromosomal abnormalities. We reviewed bone marrow samples of 119 FA patients: 23 had MDS, with the most common subtype refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia. The presence of MDS was highly correlated with the presence of clonal abnormalities. Neutrophil dysplasia and increased blasts were always associated with the presence of a clone, in contrast with dyserythropoiesis. The most frequent clones had gains of 1q and 3q and/or loss of 7. Karyotype complexity also correlated with MDS. One third of patients with 3q as a sole abnormality had no MDS; patients with 3q and an additional abnormality all had MDS. The data provide a rationale for integrating cytogenetic findings with independently evaluated morphologic findings for monitoring bone marrow status in FA. PMID:20023263

  2. RAS gene mutations in acute and chronic myelocytic leukemias, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, and myelodysplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, J.W.G.; Steenvoorden, A.C.M.; Lyons, J.; Anger, B.; Boehlke, J.U.; Bos, J.L.; Seliger, H.; Bartram, C.R.

    1987-12-01

    The authors report on investigations aimed at detecting mutated RAS genes in a variety of preleukemic disorders and leukemias of myeloid origin. DNA transfection analyses (tumorigenicity assay) and hybridization to mutation-specific oligonucleotide probes established NRAS mutations in codon 12 or 61 of 4/9 acute myelocytic leukemias (AML) and three AML lines. Leukemic cells of another AML patient showed HRAS gene activation. By using a rapid and sensitive dot-blot screening procedure based on the combination of in vitro amplification of RAS-specific sequences and oligonucleotide hybridization they additionally screened 15 myelodysplastic syndromes, 26 Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelocytic leukemias in chronic or acute phase, and 19 other chronic myeloproliferative disorders. A mutation within NRAS codon 12 could thus be demonstrated in a patient with idiopathic myelofibrosis and in another with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Moreover, mutated NRAS sequences were detected in lymphocytes, in granulocytes, as well as in monocytes/macrophages of the latter case.

  3. New ways to use DNA methyltransferase inhibitors for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gore, Steven D

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing analysis of the seminal AZA-001 study has taught many important lessons in the use of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors. The data emphasize the importance of patience in the use of these drugs, with several cycles required for the manifestations of hematologic responses. Improved survival in patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) treated with azacitidine extends to patients with any International Working Group-defined hematologic response; however, the benefit to patients with stable disease is less clear. A great deal remains to be learned about the optimal dosing and scheduling of the DNMT inhibitors, alone and in combination. New information on the impact of DNMT inhibitors on the immune system and on stem cells will likely lead to novel uses of these drugs in MDS and other hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies.

  4. [Myelodysplastic syndrome in the elderly: comprehensive geriatric assessment and therapeutic recommendations].

    PubMed

    López Arrieta, Jesús María; De Paz, Raquel; Altés, Albert; del Cañizo, Consuelo

    2012-02-18

    The onset of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is usually around the age of 70. Despite this, most clinical trials are restricted to younger subjects. Thus, the management of elderly patients with MDS is not always optimal. Physiologically, elderly patients show characteristics that differ from those of younger patients and that condition their pharmacological treatment. In this regard, the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) becomes particularly important. This document gathers conclusions from the 1(st) Meeting of Members of the Sociedad Española de Medicina Geriátrica and the Sociedad Española de Hematología y Hemoterapia, with the objective of proposing the establishment of CGA instruments to assist in the decision-making process of elderly patients with MDS. The results of this consensus document will focus on the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and management of adverse events in this age group.

  5. Splicing factor gene mutations in the myelodysplastic syndromes: impact on disease phenotype and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    Splicing factor gene mutations are the most frequent mutations found in patients with the myeloid malignancy myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), suggesting that spliceosomal dysfunction plays a major role in disease pathogenesis. The aberrantly spliced target genes and deregulated cellular pathways associated with the commonly mutated splicing factor genes in MDS (SF3B1, SRSF2 and U2AF1) are being identified, illuminating the molecular mechanisms underlying MDS. Emerging data from mouse modeling studies indicate that the presence of splicing factor gene mutations can lead to bone marrow hematopoietic stem/myeloid progenitor cell expansion, impaired hematopoiesis and dysplastic differentiation that are hallmarks of MDS. Importantly, recent evidence suggests that spliceosome inhibitors and splicing modulators may have therapeutic value in the treatment of splicing factor mutant myeloid malignancies.

  6. p53 mutations in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome after ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Debra G B; Travis, Lois B; Addya, Kathakali; Dores, Graca M; Holowaty, Eric J; Bergfeldt, Kjell; Malkin, David; Kohler, Betsy A; Lynch, Charles F; Wiklund, Tom; Stovall, Marilyn; Hall, Per; Pukkala, Eero; Slater, Diana J; Felix, Carolyn A

    2002-05-01

    Although p53 mutations occur in alkylating agent-related leukemias, their frequency and spectrum in leukemias after ovarian cancer have not been addressed. The purpose of this study was to examine p53 mutations in leukemias after ovarian cancer, for which treatment with platinum analogues was widely used. Adequate leukemic or dysplastic cells were available in 17 of 82 cases of leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that occurred in a multicenter, population-based cohort of 23,170 women with ovarian cancer. Eleven of the 17 received platinum compounds and other alkylating agents with or without DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors and/or radiation. Six received other alkylating agents, in one case, with radiation. Genomic DNA was extracted and p53 exons 5, 6, 7, and 8 were amplified by PCR. Mutations and loss of heterozygosity were analyzed on the WAVE instrument (Transgenomic) followed by selected analysis by sequencing. Eleven p53 mutations involving all four exons studied and one polymorphism were identified. Genomic DNA analyses were consistent with loss of heterozygosity for four of the mutations. The 11 mutations occurred in 9 cases, such that 6 of 11 leukemias after platinum-based regimens (55%) and 3 of 6 leukemias after other treatments (50%) contained p53 mutations. Two leukemias that occurred after treatment with platinum analogues contained two mutations. Among eight mutations in leukemias after treatment with platinum analogues, there were four G-to-A transitions and one G-to-C transversion. p53 mutations are common in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome after multiagent therapy for ovarian cancer. The propensity for G-to-A transitions may reflect specific DNA damage in leukemias after treatment with platinum analogues.

  7. Myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Koeffler, H P

    1996-04-01

    These two issues of the Seminars in Hematology will provide the physician the necessary knowledge to help make sense of this somewhat confusing array of diseases. The subdivisions of MDS reflect the precision of our techniques of dissection, with morphological and histochemical analyses forming the foundation to identify and subdivide MDS. Although steady refinement has occurred over the last half-century, the basic morphologic technique is unchanged. Cytogenetic analysis, which has been possible since the 1960s and 1970s, should be done at least at initial presentation in all patients to provide refinement of diagnosis and prognosis. FISH is not, at this time, useful as a screening technique. Although the 1990s is an era of rapidly growing knowledge and technical abilities in molecular biology, the use of these techniques in MDS is in its infancy. Very few genes have been identified which are altered in MDS, although many must exist. The molecular assays continue to be cumbersome and impractical to use in the clinical laboratory and remain the domain of the research scientist. Nevertheless, in the future, molecular biology will enable the internist to give each individual a clearer diagnosis and prognosis and may even provide targetted therapies of patients with MDS. At this time the center of management is good supportive care. Some patients, however, will benefit from special interventions, which include the use of growth factors, BMT, and in selected patients, aggressive chemotherapy. Induction of differentiation of the abnormal hematopoietic clone remains only a dream, although some of the differentiation agents may have applicability for their ability to induce apoptosis and prevent growth of the MDS clone of cells. Many of the major advances in our knowledge of cancer developed through the study of hematopoietic malignancy. A lot of these advances are due to the ease of obtaining the abnormal cells. MDS provides an excellent model for studying the progression of cells from their normal to preneoplastic and fully transformed states. A lucid understanding of this progression can form the paradigm for basic science to study neoplastic progression, and the molecular biology techniques used for these studies will be the basic tools used by hematologists and oncologists in the future.

  8. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... produces include: Medications that increase the number of blood cells your body makes. Called growth factors, these medications are artificial versions of substances found naturally in your bone ...

  9. Uncommon headache syndromes in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Marco A; Albuquerque, Regina C A P; Bigal, Marcelo E

    2011-08-01

    Headache is one of the most common symptoms in children and adolescents, and headache syndromes are an important reason for medical consulting. According to the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, there are 196 possible headache diagnoses, of which 113 have been described in pediatric population. Herein, we focus on unusual pediatric headache syndromes. We group them as headaches with migraine features, short-duration headaches with autonomic features, short-duration headaches without autonomic features, and potentially ominous forms of headaches. Although rare as single entities, providers focusing on pediatric headaches certainly will face some of these headaches and need to be comfortable on the diagnostic approach.

  10. Pediatric Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; Barker, Kristen; Brown, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Research on pediatric Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is reviewed in this article. Many recent articles in this area highlight the existence of key differences between the adult and pediatric forms of the illness. This review article provides an overview of pediatric ME/CFS, including epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, treatment, and prognosis. Challenges to the field are identified with the hope that in the future pediatric cases of ME/CFS can be more accurately diagnosed and successfully managed. PMID:24340168

  11. Coalesced Multicentric Analysis of 2,351 Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes Indicates an Underestimation of Poor-Risk Cytogenetics of Myelodysplastic Syndromes in the International Prognostic Scoring System

    PubMed Central

    Schanz, Julie; Steidl, Christian; Fonatsch, Christa; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Nösslinger, Thomas; Tuechler, Heinz; Valent, Peter; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Aul, Carlo; Lübbert, Michael; Stauder, Reinhard; Krieger, Otto; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop; Germing, Ulrich; Haase, Detlef; Estey, Elihu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) remains the most commonly used system for risk classification in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs). The IPSS gives more weight to blast count than to cytogenetics. However, previous publications suggested that cytogenetics are underweighted in the IPSS. Here we investigate the prognostic impact of cytogenetic subgroups compared with that of bone marrow blast count in a large, multicentric, international patient cohort. Patients and Methods In total, 2,351 patients with MDS who have records in the German-Austrian and the MD Anderson Cancer Center databases were included and analyzed in univariate and multivariate models regarding overall survival and risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The data were analyzed separately for patients treated with supportive care without specific therapy, with AML-like chemotherapy, or with other therapy regimens (low-dose chemotherapy, demethylating agents, immune modulating agents, valproic acid, and cyclosporine). Results The prognostic impact of poor-risk cytogenetic findings (as defined by the IPSS classification) on overall survival was as unfavorable as an increased (> 20%) blast count. The hazard ratio (compared with an abnormal karyotype or a bone marrow blast count < 5%) was 3.3 for poor-risk cytogenetics, 4.8 for complex abnormalities harboring chromosomes 5 and/or 7, and 3.1 for a blast count of 21% to 30% (P < .01 for all categories). The predictive power of the IPSS cytogenetic subgroups was unaffected by type of therapy given. Conclusion The independent prognostic impact of poor-risk cytogenetics on overall survival is equivalent to the impact of high blast counts. This finding should be considered in the upcoming revision of the IPSS. PMID:21519021

  12. Cellular immune profiling after sequential clofarabine and lenalidomide for high risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prachi; Klotz, Jeffrey; Dunavin, Neil; Lu, Kit; Koklanaris, Eleftheria; Draper, Debbie; Superata, Jeanine; Chinian, Fariba; Yu, Quan; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Wong, Susan; Muranski, Pawel; Barrett, A John; Ito, Sawa; Battiwalla, Minoo

    2017-01-01

    Patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are commonly older with multiple co-morbidities, rendering them unsuitable for intensive induction chemotherapy or transplantation. We report preliminary cellular immune profiling of four cases receiving sequential clofarabine and lenalidomide for high risk MDS and AML in a phase I study. Our results highlight the potential of immune profiling for monitoring immune-modifying agents in high risk MDS and AML.

  13. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  14. Relation between chelation and clinical outcomes in lower-risk patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: Registry analysis at 5 years.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Roger M; Marek, Billie J; Paley, Carole; Esposito, Jason; McNamara, Katie; Richards, Paul D; DiBella, Nicholas; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2017-05-01

    Prospective data are needed to ascertain the impact of iron chelation therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. The present 5-year prospective registry analysis was conducted to compare clinical outcomes between chelated and nonchelated patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and transfusional iron overload. In an interim analysis at 24 months, we previously reported that chelation therapy was associated with longer median overall survival and a tendency toward longer leukemia-free survival and fewer cardiac events. In the present report, we detail findings from the final analysis at 5 years. We confirm, at the conclusion of this 5-year, prospective, non-interventional study, that overall survival was significantly longer in patients who received iron chelation therapy vs those who did not. Causes of death in the overall population were predominantly myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia followed by cardiac disease. Time to progression to acute myeloid leukemia was also significantly longer in patients receiving chelation therapy, and significantly fewer patients progressed to leukemia vs those not receiving chelation therapy. Limitations of the study include a potential for clinical bias, as patients with longer predicted survival may have been chosen for chelation therapy, the differences present in concomitant conditions at baseline, and the possibility that some high-risk patients were not identified due to limited cytogenetic classification. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Klippel-Trenaunay-Servelle syndrome in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Papendieck, C M; Barbosa, M L; Pozo, P; Braun, D; Vannelli, C

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this report is to explain the historical differences between Klippel-Trenaunay (KT), Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber (KTW), and Klippel-Trenaunay-Servelle (KTS) syndromes. Furthermore, an attempt will be made to describe the different causes, symptoms, and consequences of the pathology, largely as a consequence of venous hypertension. The significance of these syndromes within the pediatric population is highlighted.

  16. A nationwide survey of hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome (a multicenter retrospective study).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Nannya, Yasuhito; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru; Tomita, Akihiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Shindo, Motohiro; Torimoto, Yoshihiro; Yonemura, Yuji; Hanaoka, Nobuyoshi; Nakakuma, Hideki; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Manabe, Atsushi; Fujishima, Naohito; Fujii, Nobuharu; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Morita, Yasuyoshi; Matsuda, Akira; Fujieda, Atsushi; Katayama, Naoyuki; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Nagai, Hirokazu; Terada, Yoshiki; Hino, Masayuki; Sato, Ken; Obara, Naoshi; Chiba, Shigeru; Usuki, Kensuke; Ohta, Masatsugu; Imataki, Osamu; Uemura, Makiko; Takaku, Tomoiku; Komatsu, Norio; Kitanaka, Akira; Shimoda, Kazuya; Watanabe, Kenichiro; Tohyama, Kaoru; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Harigae, Hideo; Arai, Shunya; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Ozawa, Keiya; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2017-09-11

    Hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome (hMDS) is a distinct entity with bone marrow (BM) hypocellularity and the risk of death from BM failure (BMF). To elucidate the characteristics of hMDS, the data of 129 patients diagnosed between April 2003 and March 2012 were collected from 20 institutions and the central review team of the National Research Group on Idiopathic Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes, and compared with 115 non-hMDS patients. More RA and fewer CMMoL and RAEB-t in French-American-British (FAB) and more RCUD and MDS-U and fewer RCMD in World Health Organization (WHO) classifications were found in hMDS than non-hMDS with significant differences. The overall survival (OS) and AML progression-free survival (AML-PFS) of hMDS were higher than those of non-hMDS, especially in patients at age ≥50 and of lower risk in Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). In competing risks analysis, hMDS exhibited decreased risk of AML-progression in lower IPSS or IPSS-R risk patients, and higher risk of death from BMF in patients at age ≥50. Poor performance status (PS ≥2) and high karyotype risks in IPSS-R (high and very high) were significant risk factors of death and AML-progression in Cox proportional hazards analysis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Allo-SCT conditioning for myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with clofarabine, cytarabine and ATG.

    PubMed

    Martin, M G; Uy, G L; Procknow, E; Stockerl-Goldstein, K; Cashen, A; Westervelt, P; Abboud, C N; Augustin, K; Luo, J; DiPersio, J F; Vij, R

    2009-07-01

    The application of myeloablative Allo-SCT is limited by its associated morbidity and mortality. Reduced-intensity conditioning regimens attempt to diminish these, but are associated with a higher risk of disease relapse. Given the evidence of activity of clofarabine and cytarabine in myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML), we explored a novel reduced-intensity conditioning regimen based on this backbone. Patients received clofarabine 40 mg/m(2) i.v. on days -6 to -2, cytarabine 1 g/m(2) i.v. on days -6 to -2 and anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) 1 mg/kg on day -4 and 2.5 mg/kg x 2 days on days -3 and -2. Seven patients were enrolled. Their median age was 54 years; three were with MDS and four with AML. The median duration of neutropenia was 14 days and that of thrombocytopenia was 22 days. Toxicities included hand-foot syndrome (57% grade 2), elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (57% grade 3), elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (86% grade 3) and hyperbilirubinemia (29% grade 3-5). No acute GVHD was observed. Enrollment to the trial was halted after three of the first seven patients expired on days +15, +26 and +32. Three of the four surviving patients have relapsed with a median TTP of 152 days. This regimen was not sufficiently immunosuppressive to ensure engraftment, and was associated with substantial morbidity and mortality.

  18. Molecular pathology of myelodysplastic syndromes: biology of medullary stromal and hematopoietic cells (review).

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Masanobu; Kurata, Morito; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Abe, Shinya; Suzuki, Shiho; Umeda, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have been defined as a disease entity based on clinical features and morphological findings. Despite similarities in clinical manifestations, genetic abnormalities occurring in hematopoietic cells are heterogeneous among the syndromes. However, recent investigations have revealed that there are common biological events in the bone marrow of MDS cases. Most notably, excessive apoptosis of hematopoietic cells was observed to be induced by the bone marrow microenvironment. The apoptosis was mediated by paracrine as well as autocrine factors, suggesting that medullary stromal and hematopoietic cells play a role in the pathology of disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα, in the bone marrow microenvironment are predominantly paracrine mediators of apoptosis. Regarding autocrine stimulation mechanisms, it has recently been shown that the deregulation of ribosomal protein is capable of initiating a stress response in the hematopoietic cell through a p53-mediated signaling pathway. Thus, both the stromal cells of the bone marrow microenvironment and hematopoietic cells themselves possess a common and characteristic biology in this heterogeneous disease entity.

  19. Chromothripsis: Basis of a Concurrent Unusual Association between Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, Wael

    2014-01-01

    A 20 year old male was initially diagnosed suffering from Primary ciliary dyskinesia with symptoms of bronchiectasis, severe frontal, maxillary and ethmoid sinus disease. At the age of 20, the patient was also diagnosed with Myelodysplastic syndrome requiring Bone marrow transplant due to the advanced stage at time of presentation. Primary ciliary dyskinesia and Myelodsyplastic syndrome are both rare clinical conditions found in the general population, especially in young adults. This rare combination of disorders has never been reported in literature to the best of the author's knowledge. The presence of an advanced cancer and a genetic abnormality due to two deletions occurring in two arms of the same chromosome can be explained on the base of chromothripsis. A number of evidences have been published in the literature, about multiple deletions in chromosome 5 and advanced stages of MDS being associated with chromothripsis however this is the first case report on two deletions in chromosome 7 giving rise to two different clinical entities requiring multiple modes of management. PMID:25254125

  20. Immune-mediated complications in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes--clinical and cytogenetic features.

    PubMed

    Billström, R; Johansson, H; Johansson, B; Mitelman, F

    1995-07-01

    It has been recognized in recent years that some patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) develop immune-mediated complications (IMC), but little is known about the correlations to MDS-specific disease features. In a retrospective study of 82 MDS patients, we identified 10 (12%) with IMC (group A) and compared them to the remaining 72 cases (group B). Group A consisted of 5 patients with biopsy-verified skin vasculitis and 1 case each with temporal arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica, necrotising panniculitis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, autoimmune thrombocytopenia, and Sweet's syndrome. Survival times, sex ratio and distribution of MDS subtypes were similar in the two groups. The patients in group A were younger than those in group B (median 66 vs. 76 years, p < 0.01). Four patients (40%) in group A had a history of previous genotoxic therapy for malignant disorders. The bone marrow karyotype was evaluated in 62 patients. Clonal chromosomal abnormalities were found more frequently in Group A than in group B (8/9 vs. 26/53, p = 0.03), and complex karyotypes, i.e., three or more aberrations, were also observed to be more common in group A (3/9 vs. 8/53). The results indicate that IMC preferentially develop in patients with secondary MDS, in younger MDS cases, and in patients with cytogenetic abnormalities.

  1. Myelodysplastic syndromes associated with 11q23 abnormalities. European 11q23 Workshop participants.

    PubMed

    Bain, B J; Moorman, A V; Johansson, B; Mehta, A B; Secker-Walker, L M

    1998-05-01

    Most hematological neoplasms associated with 11q23 chromosomal rearrangement have been cases of acute lymphoblastic or acute myeloid leukemia. Although cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are a minority, these syndromes should also be recognized as part of the spectrum of hematological disorders associated with 11q23 rearrangement. In this series of 550 patients with such rearrangement there were 28 (5.1%) who presented with MDS. A further five patients had a history of MDS but had evolved to AML by the time cytogenetic analysis was first undertaken. There were thus a total of 33 patients (6.0%) with an 11q23 abnormality whose initial presentation was as MDS. Of these 33 patients, a quarter (seven patients) were cases of secondary (therapy-related) MDS. Complex karyotypes and other poor prognosis chromosomal abnormalities such as -7 and 7q- were common and were not confined to secondary cases. The likelihood of presentation as MDS differed between different cytogenetic categories. The 28 patients in whom cytogenetic analysis was performed at presentation as MDS showed a wide age distribution, from 1 to 82 years; there were four children, two of 1 year of age. All FAB types of MDS were represented. Median survival was only 19.1 months. Leukemic transformation occurred in five patients including one case of transformation to a biphenotypic M5a/T-lineage acute leukemia.

  2. Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  3. Risk factors for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Nicolaus; Brand, Ronald; van Biezen, Anja; Zander, Axel; Dierlamm, Judith; Niederwieser, Dietger; Devergie, Agnès; Ruutu, Tapani; Cornish, Jackie; Ljungman, Per; Gratwohl, Alois; Cordonnier, Catherine; Beelen, Dietrich; Deconinck, Eric; Symeonidis, Argiris; de Witte, Theo

    2009-01-01

    Background After successful treatment of malignant diseases, therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia have emerged as significant problems. Design and Methods The aim of this study was to investigate outcome and risk factors in patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Between 1981 and 2006, 461 patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid, a median age of 40 years and a history of solid tumor (n=163), malignant lymphoma (n=133), or other hematologic diseases (n=57) underwent stem cell transplantation and their data were reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Results The cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality and relapse at 3 years was 37% and 31%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis significant factors for relapse were not being in complete remission at the time of transplantation (p=0.002), abnormal cytogenetics (p=0.005), higher patients’ age (p=0.03) and therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (p=0.04), while higher non-relapse mortality was influenced by higher patients’ age. Furthermore, there was a marked reduction in non-relapse mortality per calendar year during the study period (p<0.001). The 3-year relapse-free and overall survival rates were 33% and 35%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis significant higher overall survival rates were seen per calendar year (p<0.001), for younger age (<40 years) and normal cytogenetics (p=0.05). Using age (<40 years), abnormal cytogenetics and not being in complete remission at the time of transplantation as risk factors, three different risk groups with overall survival rates of 62%, 33% and 24% could be easily distinguished. Conclusions Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can cure patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia and has markedly improved over time. Non-complete remission

  4. Myeloablative Versus Reduced-Intensity Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Bart L; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Logan, Brent R; Wu, Juan; Devine, Steven M; Porter, David L; Maziarz, Richard T; Warlick, Erica D; Fernandez, Hugo F; Alyea, Edwin P; Hamadani, Mehdi; Bashey, Asad; Giralt, Sergio; Geller, Nancy L; Leifer, Eric; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Mendizabal, Adam M; Horowitz, Mary M; Deeg, H Joachim; Horwitz, Mitchell E

    2017-04-10

    Purpose The optimal regimen intensity before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is unknown. We hypothesized that lower treatment-related mortality (TRM) with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) would result in improved overall survival (OS) compared with myeloablative conditioning (MAC). To test this hypothesis, we performed a phase III randomized trial comparing MAC with RIC in patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes. Patients and Methods Patients age 18 to 65 years with HCT comorbidity index ≤ 4 and < 5% marrow myeloblasts pre-HCT were randomly assigned to receive MAC (n = 135) or RIC (n = 137) followed by HCT from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors. The primary end point was OS 18 months post-random assignment based on an intent-to-treat analysis. Secondary end points included relapse-free survival (RFS) and TRM. Results Planned enrollment was 356 patients; accrual ceased at 272 because of high relapse incidence with RIC versus MAC (48.3%; 95% CI, 39.6% to 56.4% and 13.5%; 95% CI, 8.3% to 19.8%, respectively; P < .001). At 18 months, OS for patients in the RIC arm was 67.7% (95% CI, 59.1% to 74.9%) versus 77.5% (95% CI, 69.4% to 83.7%) for those in the MAC arm (difference, 9.8%; 95% CI, -0.8% to 20.3%; P = .07). TRM with RIC was 4.4% (95% CI, 1.8% to 8.9%) versus 15.8% (95% CI, 10.2% to 22.5%) with MAC ( P = .002). RFS with RIC was 47.3% (95% CI, 38.7% to 55.4%) versus 67.8% (95% CI, 59.1% to 75%) with MAC ( P < .01). Conclusion OS was higher with MAC, but this was not statistically significant. RIC resulted in lower TRM but higher relapse rates compared with MAC, with a statistically significant advantage in RFS with MAC. These data support the use of MAC as the standard of care for fit patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes.

  5. Pediatric Metabolic Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Laboratory Assessment.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Victoria; Adeli, Khosrow

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric overweight and obesity is an emerging public health priority as rates have rapidly increased worldwide. Obesity is often clustered with other metabolic abnormalities including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, leading to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This cluster of risk factors, termed the metabolic syndrome, has traditionally been reported in adults. However, with the increased prevalence of pediatric obesity, the metabolic syndrome is now evident in children and adolescents. This complex cluster of risk factors is the result of the pathological interplay between several organs including adipose tissue, muscle, liver, and intestine with a common antecedent - insulin resistance. The association of the metabolic syndrome with several systemic alterations that involve numerous organs and tissues adds to the complexity and challenge of diagnosing the metabolic syndrome and identifying useful clinical indicators of the disease. The complex physiology of growing and developing children and adolescents further adds to the difficulties in standardizing laboratory assessment, diagnosis, and prognosis for the diverse pediatric population. However, establishing a consensus definition is critical to identifying and managing children and adolescents at high risk of developing the metabolic syndrome. As a result, the examination of novel metabolic syndrome biomarkers which can detect these metabolic abnormalities early with high specificity and sensitivity in the pediatric population has been of interest. Understanding this complex cluster of risk factors in the pediatric population is critical to ensure that this is not the first generation where children have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. This review will discuss the pathophysiology, consensus definitions and laboratory assessment of pediatric metabolic syndrome as well as potential novel biomarkers.

  6. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; CD45-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  7. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Molina Moguel, J L; Ruiz Illezcas, R; Forsbach Sánchez, S; Carreño Alvarez, S; Picco Díaz, I

    1990-12-01

    The object of this study was to determine how many of the patients treated at the Pediatric Odontology Clinic, a branch of the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service at the Veinte de Noviembre Regional Hospital, ISSSTE, are VIH-positive of show serious manifestations of Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). For such purpose, 100 pediatric patients suffering from different systemic or local diseases were evaluated, the most common being hematological alterations. Results evidenced the presence of VIH in the blood of five of the pediatric subjects, all suffering from Hemophilia.

  8. SNP array–based karyotyping: differences and similarities between aplastic anemia and hypocellular myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Afable, Manuel G.; Wlodarski, Marcin; Makishima, Hideki; Shaik, Mohammed; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Tiu, Ramon V.; Kalaycio, Matt; O'Keefe, Christine L.

    2011-01-01

    In aplastic anemia (AA), contraction of the stem cell pool may result in oligoclonality, while in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) a single hematopoietic clone often characterized by chromosomal aberrations expands and outcompetes normal stem cells. We analyzed patients with AA (N = 93) and hypocellular MDS (hMDS, N = 24) using single nucleotide polymorphism arrays (SNP-A) complementing routine cytogenetics. We hypothesized that clinically important cryptic clonal aberrations may exist in some patients with BM failure. Combined metaphase and SNP-A karyotyping improved detection of chromosomal lesions: 19% and 54% of AA and hMDS cases harbored clonal abnormalities including copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (UPD, 7%). Remarkably, lesions involving the HLA locus suggestive of clonal immune escape were found in 3 of 93 patients with AA. In hMDS, additional clonal lesions were detected in 5 (36%) of 14 patients with normal/noninformative routine cytogenetics. In a subset of AA patients studied at presentation, persistent chromosomal genomic lesions were found in 10 of 33, suggesting that the initial diagnosis may have been hMDS. Similarly, using SNP-A, earlier clonal evolution was found in 4 of 7 AA patients followed serially. In sum, our results indicate that SNP-A identify cryptic clonal genomic aberrations in AA and hMDS leading to improved distinction of these disease entities. PMID:21527527

  9. Gene Expression and Methylation Pattern in HRK Apoptotic Gene in Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zaker, Farhad; Amirizadeh, Naser; Nasiri, Nahid; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Mehrasa, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are a clonal bone marrow (BM) disease characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, dysplastic maturation and progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Methylation silencing of HRK has been found in several human malignancies. In this study, we explored the association of HRK methylation status with its expression, clinical parameters and MDS subtypes in MDS patients. To study the methylation status of HRK gene, we applied Methylation Sensitive-High Resolution Melting Curve Analysis (MS-HRM) in MDS patients, as well as healthy controls and EpiTect®PCR Control DNA. Real time RT-PCR was used for gene expression analysis. Methylation frequency in promoter region of HRK in patient samples was 20.37%. Methylation of HRK was significantly related to transcriptional downregulation (P=0.023). The difference in frequency of hypermethylated HRK gene was significant between good (10%) and poor (71.42%) cytogenetic risk groups (P= 0.001), advanced stage MDS patients (66.66%) in comparison with early stage MDS patients (2.56%) (P= 0.00), higher- risk MDS group (61.53%) and lower- risk MDS group (7.31%) (P= 0.00). HRK hypermethylation was associated with advanced- stage MDS and downregulation of HRK gene may play a role in the progression of MDS.

  10. Gene Expression and Methylation Pattern in HRK Apoptotic Gene in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zaker, Farhad; Amirizadeh, Naser; Nasiri, Nahid; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Mehrasa, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are a clonal bone marrow (BM) disease characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, dysplastic maturation and progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Methylation silencing of HRK has been found in several human malignancies. In this study, we explored the association of HRK methylation status with its expression, clinical parameters and MDS subtypes in MDS patients. To study the methylation status of HRK gene, we applied Methylation Sensitive-High Resolution Melting Curve Analysis (MS-HRM) in MDS patients, as well as healthy controls and EpiTect®PCR Control DNA. Real time RT-PCR was used for gene expression analysis. Methylation frequency in promoter region of HRK in patient samples was 20.37%. Methylation of HRK was significantly related to transcriptional downregulation (P=0.023). The difference in frequency of hypermethylated HRK gene was significant between good (10%) and poor (71.42%) cytogenetic risk groups (P= 0.001), advanced stage MDS patients (66.66%) in comparison with early stage MDS patients (2.56%) (P= 0.00), higher- risk MDS group (61.53%) and lower- risk MDS group (7.31%) (P= 0.00). HRK hypermethylation was associated with advanced- stage MDS and downregulation of HRK gene may play a role in the progression of MDS. PMID:27478805

  11. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome in a case of cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Naofumi; Shinohara, Kenji; Ota, Ituro; Muraki, Kazuhiko; Shimohakamada, Yoko

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) in adult T-cell lymphoma. A 69-year-old man suffered from cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma, which was treated with radiation to the skin and combination chemotherapy of CHOP-V-MMV and VEPA-B. After 14 months of these therapies, anemia and thrombocytopenia appeared, and bone marrow aspiration smears showed immature myeloblasts, dysplastic erythroblasts, and micromegakaryocytes. Therapy-related MDS of refractory anemia with an excess of blasts was diagnosed. Cytogenetic study of the bone marrow cells showed 5q- and additional abnormalities. Rearrangement of the MLL gene was observed in the bone marrow cells. Mutations of N-ras codons at 12,13, and 61, p53 tumor suppressor gene, and monoclonal integration of human T-lymphotrophic virus -1 provirus DNA were not observed in the bone marrow cells. The patient died of pneumonia 21 months after diagnosis of cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma.

  12. Lenalidomide for treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Komrokji, Rami S; List, Alan F

    2010-04-01

    Lenalidomide was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of transfusion-dependent lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients with deletion (del) (5q) alone or with additional karyotype abnormalities. The approval was based on high rates of prolonged transfusion independence and complete cytogenetic response in this subset. In lower-risk non-del(5q) patients, meaningful erythroid responses also were reported with a low frequency of cytogenetic improvement, although inferior to that observed in the del(5q) patients. There is now a better understanding of the mechanism of the karyotype-dependent drug action, explaining the disparate response rates and frequency of myelosuppression. In del(5q) patients, lenalidomide suppresses the clone by inhibiting the nuclear sequestration of the haplodeficient cell cycle regulatory protein cdc25c, thereby promoting selective G2 arrest and apoptosis. In non-del(5q) patients, lenalidomide enhances erythropoietin receptor signaling. Future directions include use of biologic and molecular markers as predictive tools to select patients and use of combination strategies to overcome resistance to lenalidomide in del(5q) patients or enhance erythropoiesis in non-del 5 patients. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Trisomy 8, a Cytogenetic Abnormality in Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Is Constitutional or Not?

    PubMed

    Saumell, Sílvia; Solé, Francesc; Arenillas, Leonor; Montoro, Julia; Valcárcel, David; Pedro, Carme; Sanzo, Carmen; Luño, Elisa; Giménez, Teresa; Arnan, Montserrat; Pomares, Helena; De Paz, Raquel; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Jerez, Andrés; Martínez, Ana B; Sánchez-Castro, Judith; Rodríguez-Gambarte, Juan D; Raya, José M; Ríos, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Rivera, María; Espinet, Blanca; Florensa, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Isolated trisomy 8 is not considered presumptive evidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in cases without minimal morphological criteria. One reason given is that trisomy 8 (+8) can be found as a constitutional mosaicism (cT8M). We tried to clarify the incidence of cT8M in myeloid neoplasms, specifically in MDS, and the diagnostic value of isolated +8 in MDS. Twenty-two MDS and 10 other myeloid neoplasms carrying +8 were studied. Trisomy 8 was determined in peripheral blood by conventional cytogenetics (CC) and on granulocytes, CD3+ lymphocytes and oral mucosa cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In peripheral blood CC, +8 was seen in 4/32 patients. By FISH, only one patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia showed +8 in all cell samples and was interpreted as a cT8M. In our series +8 was acquired in all MDS. Probably, once discarded cT8M by FISH from CD3+ lymphocytes and non-hematological cells, +8 should be considered with enough evidence to MDS.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of primary myelodysplastic syndromes in adults: recommendations from the European LeukemiaNet

    PubMed Central

    Malcovati, Luca; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Bowen, David; Adès, Lionel; Cermak, Jaroslav; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Della Porta, Matteo G.; Fenaux, Pierre; Gattermann, Norbert; Germing, Ulrich; Jansen, Joop H.; Mittelman, Moshe; Mufti, Ghulam; Platzbecker, Uwe; Sanz, Guillermo F.; Selleslag, Dominik; Skov-Holm, Mette; Stauder, Reinhard; Symeonidis, Argiris; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2013-01-01

    Within the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) work package of the European LeukemiaNet, an Expert Panel was selected according to the framework elements of the National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Program. A systematic review of the literature was performed that included indexed original papers, indexed reviews and educational papers, and abstracts of conference proceedings. Guidelines were developed on the basis of a list of patient- and therapy-oriented questions, and recommendations were formulated and ranked according to the supporting level of evidence. MDSs should be classified according to the 2008 World Health Organization criteria. An accurate risk assessment requires the evaluation of not only disease-related factors but also of those related to extrahematologic comorbidity. The assessment of individual risk enables the identification of fit patients with a poor prognosis who are candidates for up-front intensive treatments, primarily allogeneic stem cell transplantation. A high proportion of MDS patients are not eligible for potentially curative treatment because of advanced age and/or clinically relevant comorbidities and poor performance status. In these patients, the therapeutic intervention is aimed at preventing cytopenia-related morbidity and preserving quality of life. A number of new agents are being developed for which the available evidence is not sufficient to recommend routine use. The inclusion of patients into prospective clinical trials is strongly recommended. PMID:23980065

  15. Some aspects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: advances and controversy.

    PubMed

    Blau, Olga; Blau, Igor Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous group of myeloid disorders. MDS remains a disease of elderly patients; moreover, the incidence of high risk MDS is proportionally greater in elderly patients, with increased frequency of secondary acute myeloid leukemia, as well as adverse cytogenetic abnormalities. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a therapeutic approach with known curative potential for patients with MDS that allows the achievement of long-term disease control. Numerous controversies still exist regarding transplantation in MDS: timing of transplantation, disease status at transplantation and comorbidity, conditioning intensity, pretransplant therapy, and stem cell source. Various transplant modalities of different intensities and alternative donor sources are now in use. Current advances in transplant technology are allowing the consideration of older patients. This should result in a greater number of older patients benefiting from this potentially curative treatment modality. Despite advances in transplantation technology, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality associated with this approach. Nevertheless, with the introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning and thereby reduced early mortality, transplant numbers in MDS patients have significantly increased. Moreover, recent new developments with innovative drugs, including hypomethylating agents, have extended the therapeutic alternatives for MDS patients. Hypomethylating agents allow the delay of allogeneic stem cell transplantation by serving as an effective and well-tolerated means to reduce disease burden.

  16. SLC7A5 act as a potential leukemic transformation target gene in myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Song, Jing; Chen, Bobin; Xu, Xiaoping; Lin, Guowei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogenous group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by increased risk of leukemic transformation. This study identifies microRNAs(miRNA) and miRNA targets that might represent leukemic transformation markers for MDS. Methods Based on our previously established nested case-control study cohort of MDS patients, we chose paired patients to undergo Angilent 8 × 15K human miRNA microarrays. Target prediction analysis was administrated using targetscan 5.1 software. We further investigated the function of target gene in MDS cell line using siRNA method, including cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, cell cycle and electron microscope. Results Finally we screened a subset of 7 miRNAs to be significantly differentially expressed between the case (at the end of follow up with leukemic transformation) and control group (at the end of follow up without leukemic transformation). Target prediction analysis revealed SLC7A5 was the common target gene of these 7 miRNAs. Further study on the function of SLC7A5 gene in SKM-1 cell line showed that downregulation of SLC7A5 inhibited SKM-1 cells proliferation, increased apoptosis and caused cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 stage. Conclusion Our data indicate that SLC7A5 gene may act as a potential leukemic transformation target gene in MDS. PMID:26657287

  17. [Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicated with relapsed myelodysplastic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hiroshi; Nakane, Takahiko; Fujino, Keizo; Koh, Shiro; Yoshimura, Takuro; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Hino, Masayuki

    2015-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is known to often be complicated by a range of autoimmune diseases. We herein present a case with MDS complicated by cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia (cold AIHA). The patient was a 51-year-old woman. She was diagnosed with MDS (refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia) in May 2009. In January 2010, she underwent unrelated allogeneic bone marrow transplantation but was re-admitted in October 2010 for treatment of relapsed MDS. Despite daily transfusions of red blood cells, her anemia failed to improve. Her laboratory examinations showed a low haptoglobin level and elevation of indirect bilirubin and LDH. The direct Coombs test was positive at a low and at room temperature and cold agglutinin was negative. After confirming the diagnosis of cold AIHA, all transfusion fluids were warmed but her anemia still failed to improve. In addition to the warmed transfusion fluids, we administered corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. This management strategy ameliorated the patient's hemolytic anemia. To our knowledge, MDS cases complicated by cold AIHA are rare. Our patient thus provides a valuable contribution to medical knowledge.

  18. Hepcidin levels and their determinants in different types of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria; Girelli, Domenico; Sanna, Alessandro; Martinelli, Nicola; Duca, Lorena; Campostrini, Natascia; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Corbella, Michela; Bosi, Alberto; Reda, Gianluigi; Olivieri, Oliviero; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2011-01-01

    Iron overload may represent an additional clinical problem in patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS), with recent data suggesting prognostic implications. Beyond red blood cells transfusions, dysregulation of hepcidin, the key iron hormone, may play a role, but studies until now have been hampered by technical problems. Using a recently validated assay, we measured serum hepcidin in 113 patients with different MDS subtypes. Mean hepcidin levels were consistently heterogeneous across different MDS subtypes, with the lowest levels in refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS, 1.43 nM) and the highest in refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB, 11.3 nM) or in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML, 10.04 nM) (P = 0.003 by ANOVA). MDS subtypes remained significant predictors of hepcidin in multivariate analyses adjusted for ferritin and transfusion history. Consistently with current knowledge on hepcidin action/regulation, RARS patients had the highest levels of toxic non-transferrin-bound-iron, while RAEB and CMML patients had substantial elevation of C-Reactive Protein as compared to other MDS subtypes, and showed lost of homeostatic regulation by iron. Growth differentiation factor 15 did not appear as a primary hepcidin regulator in this series. If confirmed, these results may help to calibrate future treatments with chelating agents and/or hepcidin modulators in MDS patients.

  19. Analyzing transformation of myelodysplastic syndrome to secondary acute myeloid leukemia using a large patient database.

    PubMed

    Shukron, Ofir; Vainstein, Vladimir; Kündgen, Andrea; Germing, Ulrich; Agur, Zvia

    2012-09-01

    One-third of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) progress to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML), with its concomitant poor prognosis. Recently, multiple mutations have been identified in association with MDS-to-sAMLtransition, but it is still unclear whether all these mutations are necessary for transformation. If multiple independent mutations are required for the transformation, sAML risk should increase with time from MDS diagnosis. In contrast, if a single critical biological event determines sAML transformation; its risk should be constant in time elapsing from MDS diagnosis. To elucidate this question, we studied a database of 1079 patients with MDS. We classified patients according to the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), using either the French-American-British (FAB) or the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, and statistically analyzed the resulting transformation risk curves of each group. The risk of transformation after MDS diagnosis remained constant in time within three out of four risk groups, and in all four risk groups, when patients were classified according to FAB or to the WHO-determined criteria, respectively. Further subdivision by blast percentage or cytogenetics had no influence on this result. Our analysis suggests that a single random biological event leads to transformation to sAML, thus calling for the exclusion of time since MDS diagnosis from the clinical decision-making process.

  20. Abrupt evolution of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Akiko; Sakoda, Hiroto; Iwamoto, Yoshihiro; Inano, Shojiro; Sueki, Yuki; Yanagida, Soshi; Arima, Nobuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal disorder arising from an alteration in multipotent stem cells, which lose the ability of normal proliferation and differentiation. Disease progression occurs in approximately 30% MDS cases. Specific chromosomal alterations seem responsible for each step in the evolution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Multiple genetic aberrations occur during the clonal evolution of MDS; however, few studies report the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. We report a rare case of Ph-positive AML, which evolved during the course of low-risk MDS. The patient, a 76-year-old man with mild leukocytopenia, was diagnosed with MDS, refractory neutropenia (RN). After 1.5 yr, his peripheral blood and bone marrow were suddenly occupied by immature basophils and myeloblasts, indicating the onset of AML. A bone marrow smear showed multilineage dysplasia, consistent with MDS evolution. Chromosomal analysis showed an additional t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation. Because progression occurred concurrently with emergence of the Ph chromosome, we diagnosed this case as Ph-positive AML with basophilia arising from the clonal evolution of MDS. The patient was initially treated with nilotinib. A hematological response was soon achieved with disappearance of the Ph chromosome in the bone marrow. Emergence of Ph-positive AML in the course of low-risk MDS has rarely been reported. We report this case as a rare clinical course of MDS.

  1. ST-elevation myocardial infarction and myelodysplastic syndrome with acute myeloid leukemia transformation.

    PubMed

    Jao, Geoffrey T; Knovich, Mary Ann; Savage, Rodney W; Sane, David C

    2014-04-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syndrome, and newly recognized acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Standard antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy were contraindicated by the patient's thrombocytopenia and by his reported ecchymosis and gingival bleeding upon admission. He declined cardiac catheterization, was provided palliative care, and died 2 hours after hospital admission. We searched the English-language medical literature, found 8 relevant reports, and determined that the prognosis for patients with concomitant STEMI and acute myeloid leukemia is clearly worse than that for either individual condition. No guidelines exist to direct the management of STEMI and concomitant acute myeloid leukemia. In 2 reports, dual antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, and drug-eluting stent implantation were used without an increased risk of bleeding in the short term, even in the presence of thrombocytopenia. However, we think that a more conservative approach--balloon angioplasty with the provisional use of bare-metal stents--might be safer. Simultaneous chemotherapy for the acute myeloid leukemia is crucial. Older age seems to be a major risk factor: patients too frail for emergent treatment can die within hours or days.

  2. Decitabine treatment sensitizes tumor cells to T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; He, Qi; Tao, Ying; Guo, Juan; Xu, Feng; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhao, You-Shan; Wu, Dong; Zhou, Li-Yu; Su, Ji-Ying; Song, Lu-Xi; Xiao, Chao; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chun-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Decitabine treatment improves immunological recognition that increases expression of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) against solid tumors. The mechanisms of decitabine enhancement of immunogenicity when used for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) remain unclear. In the present study, we found relatively low baseline expression of MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3, and SP17 in MDS-derived cell lines. Decitabine treatment significantly improved MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3, and SP17 expression in these cell lines and in MDS patients. Decitabine-treated K562 and SKM-1 target cells with incrementally induced MAGE-A1, MAGE-A3, or SP17 levels up-regulated T lymphocyte function. Decitabine treatment improved CTA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) recognition of MDS cells via the up-regulation of CTAs. This response was accompanied by enhanced T lymphocyte function and HLA class antigen expression, and increased ICAM-1. These findings suggested that decitabine may have a broad range of therapeutic applications when it is used in association with active adaptive immunity responses against up-regulated CTAs. PMID:28337274

  3. Hypocellular myelodysplastic syndrome with myelofibrosis in acute myeloid leukemia transformation: A case report.

    PubMed

    Song, Kui; Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Min

    2015-07-01

    Primary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with myelofibrosis is a rare hematological disorder that should be classified as a distinct subgroup of MDS. Treatment of MDS with myelofibrosis remains problematic and the prognosis is poor in these patients, particularly following transformation into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The current study presents the case of a 28-year-old male diagnosed with MDS associated with myelofibrosis, together with hypocellular bone marrow features. Following induction chemotherapy consisting of mitoxantrone and cytarabine, the patient achieved complete remission, but developed severe myelofibrosis. The patient relapsed and the disease transformed into AML 12 months later. However, the extent of the myelofibrosis was markedly alleviated upon administration of a FLAG regimen that consisted of fludarabine, cytarabine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during the AML transformation. After one course of the FLAG regimen, the patient achieved a second complete remission. As there was no suitable donor for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the patient relapsed and succumbed shortly after. In conclusion, MDS with fibrosis is an aggressive disease, but the degree of myelofibrosis may not be associated with the progression of hypocellular MDS, and allogeneic HSCT remains a potentially curative option for affected patients.

  4. Up-front allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia arising from the myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yunsuk; Kim, Sung-Doo; Park, Young-Hoon; Lee, Jae Seok; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Seol, Miee; Lee, Young-Shin; Kang, Young-Ah; Jeon, Mijin; Jung, Ah Rang; Lee, Je-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    In patients with secondary acute myeloid leukemia (s-AML) arising from the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), treatment outcome is unsatisfactory. We compared up-front allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to induction chemotherapy (IC) as an initial treatment in patients with s-AML arising from MDS. This retrospective study included 85 patients who were diagnosed with s-AML arising from MDS; 11 patients proceeded to up-front HCT without IC (HCT group) and 74 received IC (IC group) as an initial treatment for s-AML, 28 of whom subsequently underwent HCT. In the IC group, 41.9% achieved complete remission (CR) compared to 81.8% in the HCT group (p = 0.013). The HCT group showed a significantly longer event-free survival (EFS) than the IC group (median 29.2 vs. 5.2 months, p = 0.042). Overall survival of the HCT group was higher than that of the IC group, but the difference was not statistically significant (median 34.6 vs. 7.6 months, p = 0.149). After adjustment for other clinical factors, outcome in the HCT group was significantly better than in the IC group in terms of CR rate (hazard ratio, HR, 11.195; p = 0.007) and EFS (HR, 0.384; p = 0.029). Up-front HCT is a viable option in s-AML arising from MDS if an appropriate donor is available.

  5. Incidence, etiology and timing of infections following azacitidine therapy for myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Trubiano, Jason A; Dickinson, Michael; Thursky, Karin A; Spelman, Timothy; Seymour, John F; Slavin, Monica A; Worth, Leon J

    2017-02-28

    We examine the infective complications occurring during azacitidine (AZA) therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A retrospective review of patients receiving ≥1 cycle of AZA for MDS or AML was performed. Patient demographics, infection prophylaxis/episodes and outcomes were evaluated. Sixty eight patients received 884 AZA cycles. Bacterial infections occurred in 25% of cycle-1 and 27% of cycle-2 AZA therapy. Febrile neutropenia complicated 5.3% of AZA cycles, bacteremia 2% and invasive Aspergillosis 0.3%. Using Poisson modeling, a very high IPSS-R (RR 10.26, 95% CI 1.20, 87.41, p= .033) was identified as an independent risk factor for infection. Infection-related attributable mortality was 23%. The burden of infection is high in AZA-treated patients, associated with high attributable mortality. Over 25% of AZA cycles 1 and 2 were complicated by infection, predominantly bacterial, rates dropping to <10% after cycle-5.

  6. TP53 mutations predict decitabine-induced complete responses in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Kang; Zhao, You-Shan; Xu, Feng; Guo, Juan; Zhang, Zheng; He, Qi; Wu, Dong; Wu, Ling-Yun; Su, Ji-Ying; Song, Lu-Xi; Xiao, Chao; Li, Xiao

    2017-02-01

    To identify the molecular signatures that predict responses to decitabine (DAC), we examined baseline gene mutations (28 target genes) in 109 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients at diagnosis. We determined that TP53 mutations predicted complete response (CR), as 10 of 15 patients (66·7%) who possessed TP53 mutations achieved a CR. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that TP53 mutations are the only molecular signatures predictive of a CR to DAC in MDS. Among the ten patients with TP53 mutations who achieved a CR, nine presented with complex karyotypes due to abnormalities involving chromosome 5 and/or chromosome 7, and eight possessed monosomies. Although TP53 mutations were associated with a higher frequency of CRs, they were not associated with improved survival. Poor outcomes were attributed to early relapses and transformation to acute myeloid leukaemia after CR. Post-DAC therapy patient gene mutation profiles showed that most CR patients exhibited fewer gene mutations after achieving a CR. It seems that suppression of these gene mutations was facilitated by DAC, resulting in a CR. In summary, TP53 mutations might predict decitabine-induced complete responses in patients with MDS. DAC-induced responses may result from partial suppression of malignant clones containing mutated TP53 genes.

  7. Effectiveness of azacitidine in unselected high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes: results from the Spanish registry.

    PubMed

    Bernal, T; Martínez-Camblor, P; Sánchez-García, J; de Paz, R; Luño, E; Nomdedeu, B; Ardanaz, M T; Pedro, C; Amigo, M L; Xicoy, B; del Cañizo, C; Tormo, M; Bargay, J; Valcárcel, D; Brunet, S; Benlloch, L; Sanz, G

    2015-09-01

    The benefit of azacitidine treatment in survival of high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients compared with conventional care treatment (CCT) has not been established outside clinical trials. To assess its effectiveness, we compared overall survival (OS) between azacitidine and conventional treatment (CCT) in high-risk MDS patients, excluding those undergoing stem cell transplantation, submitted to the Spanish MDS registry from 2000 to 2013. Several Cox regression and competing risk models, considering azacitidine as a time-dependent covariate, were used to assess survival and acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) progression. Among 821 patients included, 251 received azacitidine. Median survival was 13.4 (11.8-16) months for azacitidine-treated patients and 12.2 (11-14.1) for patients under CCT (P=0.41). In a multivariate model, age, International prognostic scoring system and lactate dehydrogenase were predictors of OS whereas azacitidine was not (adjusted odds ratio 1.08, 95% confidence interval 0.86-1.35, P=0.49). However, in patients with chromosome 7 abnormalities, a trend toward a better survival was observed in azacitidine-treated patients (median survival 13.3 (11-18) months) compared with CCT (median survival 8.6 (5-10.4) months, P=0.08). In conclusion, our data show that, in spite of a widespread use of azacitidine, there is a lack of improvement in survival over the years. Identification of predicting factors of response and survival is mandatory.

  8. Trisomy 8, a Cytogenetic Abnormality in Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Is Constitutional or Not?

    PubMed Central

    Saumell, Sílvia; Solé, Francesc; Arenillas, Leonor; Montoro, Julia; Valcárcel, David; Pedro, Carme; Sanzo, Carmen; Luño, Elisa; Giménez, Teresa; Arnan, Montserrat; Pomares, Helena; De Paz, Raquel; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Jerez, Andrés; Martínez, Ana B.; Sánchez-Castro, Judith; Rodríguez-Gambarte, Juan D.; Raya, José M.; Ríos, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Rivera, María; Espinet, Blanca; Florensa, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Isolated trisomy 8 is not considered presumptive evidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in cases without minimal morphological criteria. One reason given is that trisomy 8 (+8) can be found as a constitutional mosaicism (cT8M). We tried to clarify the incidence of cT8M in myeloid neoplasms, specifically in MDS, and the diagnostic value of isolated +8 in MDS. Twenty-two MDS and 10 other myeloid neoplasms carrying +8 were studied. Trisomy 8 was determined in peripheral blood by conventional cytogenetics (CC) and on granulocytes, CD3+ lymphocytes and oral mucosa cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In peripheral blood CC, +8 was seen in 4/32 patients. By FISH, only one patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia showed +8 in all cell samples and was interpreted as a cT8M. In our series +8 was acquired in all MDS. Probably, once discarded cT8M by FISH from CD3+ lymphocytes and non-hematological cells, +8 should be considered with enough evidence to MDS. PMID:26066831

  9. [Research Progress on Gene Expression Abnormality of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells in Myelodysplastic Syndromes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Ma, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal disease involving one or more series of hematopoietic cells. Its pathogenesis is still unclear. No effective targeted drug is available to prevent this disease progression. MDS originates in hematopoietic stem cells. Recent researches found that the complex abnormal gene expression occurred in bone marrow CD34⁺ cells plays a key role in development of MDS. Some of these genes are closely related with the patient's prognosis and survival, such as DLK1, ribosomal transcripts gene, Toll-like receptors gene, EPA-1 and interferon-stimulated genes. Due to heterogeneity of this disease, abnormal gene expression profiles in bone marrow CD34⁺ cells are closely associated with particular FAB or cytogenetic subtypes. To elucidate the pathogenesis of MDS and investigate its therapeutic target, this article reviews progress of researches on abnormal gene expression profiles of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in low-risk, high-risk patients and MDS patients who carry common cytogenetic abnormalities.

  10. Safety and efficacy of azacitidine in elderly patients with intermediate to high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Navada, Shyamala C.; Silverman, Lewis R.

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by morphologic features of dyspoiesis, a hyperproliferative bone marrow, and one or more peripheral blood cytopenias. In patients classified according to the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (R-IPSS) with intermediate or higher-risk disease, there is an increased risk of death due to progressive bone marrow failure or transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Azacitidine was the first DNA hypomethylating agent approved by the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of MDS and the only therapy that has demonstrated a significant survival benefit over conventional care regimens (CCRs) in patients with intermediate or higher-risk disease. Prolonged survival is independent of achieving a complete remission. Azacitidine has been used in older patients with both clinical and hematological improvement as well as an acceptable side effect profile. The most common adverse effect is myelosuppression. These findings support the use of azacitidine as an effective treatment in older patients with higher-risk MDS. PMID:28042456

  11. Oral clofarabine in the treatment of patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faderl, Stefan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Estrov, Zeev; Ravandi, Farhad; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge E; O'Brien, Susan; Gandhi, Varsha; Plunkett, William; Byrd, Anna; Kwari, Monica; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2010-06-01

    Efficacy and toxicity profile of orally administered clofarabine were evaluated in patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Thirty-two patients were treated, of whom 22 had intermediate-2 or high-risk disease (International Prognostic Scoring System). Median age was 70 years (range, 53 to 86), nine patients had secondary MDS, and 20 patients experienced prior therapy failure with hypomethylating agents. Three doses of clofarabine were evaluated: 40 mg/m(2), 30 mg/m(2), and 20 mg/m(2) daily for 5 days. Courses were repeated every 4 to 8 weeks. Eight patients (25%) achieved complete remission (CR), three had (9%) hematologic improvement (HI), and three had (9%) clinical benefit (CB; overall response rate, 43%). Responses in patients who experience treatment failure with hypomethylating agents included CR in two (10%), HI in two (10%), and CB in two patients (10%). No patients died within 6 weeks of induction. Renal failure occurred in four patients in the context of myelosuppression-associated infectious complications. Common adverse events were gastrointestinal and hepatic. Myelosuppression was common, but prolonged myelosuppression (> 42 days) was rare. The toxicity profile was better with lower doses of clofarabine, whereas response rates did not differ significantly. Oral clofarabine has achieved a response rate of 43% in patients with higher-risk MDS. The optimal dose and schedule and the appropriate patient population for such therapy remain to be further defined.

  12. Donor lymphocyte infusion to treat relapse after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Depil, S; Deconinck, E; Milpied, N; Sutton, L; Witz, F; Jouet, J P; Damaj, G; Yakoub-Agha, I

    2004-03-01

    Donor lymphocyte infusion has become established as a salvage therapy for patients with hematological disorders relapsing after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The role of donor lymphocyte infusion for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) remains to be established. Between July 1993 and October 2001, 14 patients with MDS relapsing after allogeneic BMT received DLI as salvage therapy. At the time of BMT, one patient had RA, nine had RAEB, of whom three were in CR after induction-type chemotherapy, two had RAEB-T, one had CMML and one had AML. Donors were HLA-matched siblings (n=12), HLA-matched other relative (n=1) and unrelated (n=1). At the time of relapse, the median marrow blast count was 9%. The median CD3+ cell dose administered was 6.3 x 10(7)/kg. With a median follow-up of 49 months, six patients were alive, of whom two were in CR after DLI alone and remained disease-free, two were in CR after a second BMT and two had active disease. Eight patients died of disease progression. Although DLI alone seems to be effective in a small number of patients with MDS, other treatment strategies, including prior debulking chemotherapy, deserve investigation.

  13. The role of epigenetics in the regulation of apoptosis in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karlic, Heidrun; Herrmann, Harald; Varga, Franz; Thaler, Roman; Reitermaier, Rene; Spitzer, Silvia; Ghanim, Viviane; Blatt, Katharina; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter; Pfeilstöcker, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Disordered stem cell epigenetics and apoptosis-regulating mechanisms contribute essentially to the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and may trigger disease-progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Expression of apoptosis-mediators FAS (CD95) and DAPK1 the latter being also known for its association with autophagy are upregulated in neoplastic cells in patients with low-risk MDS and epigenetically silenced and downregulated in high-risk MDS and AML as confirmed by a study 50 MDS and 30 AMLs complementing this review. 5-Azacytidine (AZA) and 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine (DAC), promoted FAS and DAPK1 gene demethylation and their (re)expression as well as apoptosis in leukemic cell lines (HL-60, KG1) which can be reversed by siRNA against FAS. Thus, promoter-demethylation of FAS and DAPK1 represents a critical mechanism of drug-induced apoptosis in neoplastic cells in MDS and AML which underscores the clinical implication of epigenetically active therapies.

  14. Mutational hierarchies in myelodysplastic syndromes dynamically adapt and evolve upon therapy response and failure.

    PubMed

    Mossner, Maximilian; Jann, Johann-Christoph; Wittig, Janina; Nolte, Florian; Fey, Stephanie; Nowak, Verena; Obländer, Julia; Pressler, Jovita; Palme, Iris; Xanthopoulos, Christina; Boch, Tobias; Metzgeroth, Georgia; Röhl, Henning; Witt, Stephanie H; Dukal, Helene; Klein, Corinna; Schmitt, Steffen; Gelß, Patrick; Platzbecker, Uwe; Balaian, Ekaterina; Fabarius, Alice; Blum, Helmut; Schulze, Torsten J; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Trumpp, Andreas; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Medyouf, Hind; Nowak, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Clonal evolution is believed to be a main driver for progression of various types of cancer and implicated in facilitating resistance to drugs. However, the hierarchical organization of malignant clones in the hematopoiesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and its impact on response to drug therapy remain poorly understood. Using high-throughput sequencing of patient and xenografted cells, we evaluated the intratumoral heterogeneity (n= 54) and reconstructed mutational trajectories (n = 39) in patients suffering from MDS (n = 52) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia-1 (n = 2). We identified linear and also branching evolution paths and confirmed on a patient-specific level that somatic mutations in epigenetic regulators and RNA splicing genes frequently constitute isolated disease-initiating events. Using high-throughput exome- and/or deep-sequencing, we analyzed 103 chronologically acquired samples from 22 patients covering a cumulative observation time of 75 years MDS disease progression. Our data revealed highly dynamic shaping of complex oligoclonal architectures, specifically upon treatment with lenalidomide and other drugs. Despite initial clinical response to treatment, patients' marrow persistently remained clonal with rapid outgrowth of founder-, sub-, or even fully independent clones, indicating an increased dynamic rate of clonal turnover. The emergence and disappearance of specific clones frequently correlated with changes of clinical parameters, highlighting their distinct and far-reaching functional properties. Intriguingly, increasingly complex mutational trajectories are frequently accompanied by clinical progression during the course of disease. These data substantiate a need for regular broad molecular monitoring to guide clinical treatment decisions in MDS.

  15. The incorporation of comorbidities in the prognostication of patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Falantes, Jose F; Márquez-Malaver, Francisco J; Knight, Teresa; Calderón-Cabrera, Cristina; Martino, María L; González, Jose; Montero, Isabel; Espigado, Ildefonso; Pérez-Simón, Jose A

    2017-08-01

    Chronic medical diseases, evaluated by several comorbidities indexes have been reported to influence on overall survival in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). However, these studies included patients with lower and higher-risk disease by IPSS. This study retrospectively evaluates the role of comorbidities (evaluated by the MDS comorbidity index; MDS-CI) together with clinical parameters in a series of 232 patients with LR-MDS (defined as either an IPSS score of low/intermediate-1 and favorable cytogenetic categories by IPSS-R). In multivariate analysis, together with age >75 years, diabetes requiring therapy and hemoglobin <10 g/dL; the incorporation of comorbidities by the MDS-CI (HR = 2.5; p< 0.0001) were independently associated to the probability of nonleukemic death (NLD). The combination of these variables allowed development of a model, which categorizes patients in three different groups with significantly different probability of NLD overtime (p< 0.001). This integrated score confirms the importance of comorbidities at diagnosis of patients with LR-MDS.

  16. Functional evidence implicating chromosome 7q22 haploinsufficiency in myelodysplastic syndrome pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jasmine C; Weinfurtner, Kelley M; Alzamora, Maria del pilar; Kogan, Scott C; Burgess, Michael R; Zhang, Yan; Nakitandwe, Joy; Ma, Jing; Cheng, Jinjun; Chen, Shann-Ching; Ho, Theodore T; Flach, Johanna; Reynaud, Damien; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Downing, James R; Shannon, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 7 deletions are highly prevalent in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and likely contribute to aberrant growth through haploinsufficiency. We generated mice with a heterozygous germ line deletion of a 2-Mb interval of chromosome band 5A3 syntenic to a commonly deleted segment of human 7q22 and show that mutant hematopoietic cells exhibit cardinal features of MDS. Specifically, the long-term hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment is expanded in 5A3+/del mice, and the distribution of myeloid progenitors is altered. 5A3+/del HSCs are defective for lymphoid repopulating potential and show a myeloid lineage output bias. These cell autonomous abnormalities are exacerbated by physiologic aging and upon serial transplantation. The 5A3 deletion partially rescues defective repopulation in Gata2 mutant mice. 5A3+/del hematopoietic cells exhibit decreased expression of oxidative phosphorylation genes, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, and perturbed oxygen consumption. These studies provide the first functional data linking 7q22 deletions to MDS pathogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07839.001 PMID:26193121

  17. The DAC system and associations with acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bug, Gesine

    2010-01-01

    Summary Imbalances of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and deacetylase activity (DAC) that result in deregulated gene expression are commonly observed in leukemias. These alterations provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches that target the epigenetic mechanisms implicated in leukemogenesis. As the acetylation status of histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation of genes involved particularly in differentiation and apoptosis, DAC inhibitors (DACi) have attracted considerable attention for treatment of hematologic malignancies. DACi encompass a structurally diverse family of compounds that are being explored as single agents as well as in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs, small molecule inhibitors of signaling pathways and hypomethylating agents. While DACi have shown clear evidence of activity in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes and lymphoid malignancies, their precise role in treatment of these different entities remain to be elucidated. Successful development of these compounds as elements of novel targeted treatment strategies for leukemia will require that clinical studies be performed in conjunction with translational research including efforts to identify predictive biomarkers. PMID:21153858

  18. Lenalidomide: a brief review of its therapeutic potential in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Giagounidis, Aristoteles A N; Germing, Ulrich; Haase, Sabine; Aul, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Lenalidomide is a novel thalidomide analogue with enhanced immunomodulatory and antiangiogenic action lacking most of the typical thalidomide-associated adverse events. In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), it has been used primarily in the IPSS low- and intermediate-1 risk setting. Several trials have demonstrated its potential to lead to both erythroid and cytogenetic responses in these disease groups. In a clinical trial of patients with a del(5q) chromosomal abnormality, lenalidomide treatment resulted in red blood cell (RBC) transfusion independence in 67% of patients. Moreover, 45% of patients achieved a complete cytogenetic remission, and 28% achieved a minor cytogenetic remission. This result was independent of karyotype complexity. Lenalidomide might also induce long-term remissions in del(5q) patients with an elevated medullary blast count. In non-del(5q) patients, 43% of patients with confirmed low- and intermediate-1 risk achieved transfusion independence or a reduction of at least 50% of pre-treatment RBC transfusion levels. Adverse events are common but manageable and include neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, pruritus, rash, diarrhea, and others. Lenalidomide will prove an essential part in the armamentarium of MDS therapeutics. Combination therapies with cytokines, demethylating agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, or chemotherapy are being investigated and may show additional benefit in both low- and high risk MDS. PMID:18472976

  19. The Interactions Between Diabetes Mellitus and Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Current State of Evidence and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Hamoudeh, Eyad; Zeidan, Amer M; Barbarotta, Lisa; Rosano, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer are disorders of global importance. Multiple epidemiologic studies show that diabetic patients have an increased risk of developing cancer of different types. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are among the most common hematologic malignancies and include a heterogeneous group of hematopoietic neoplasms characterized by dysplastic changes, low blood counts, and an increased risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Potential epigenetic and metabolic interferences between DM and MDS have been reported but are poorly understood. DM and MDS share some predisposing risk factors such as obesity. Patients with MDS and DM can experience worsening of diabetic control due to multiple factors that exacerbate hyperglycemia and insulin resistance such as stress, infections, adjunct drugs (e.g. steroids to control nausea), and others. In addition, accurate assessment of glucose control in diabetic patients who have MDS can be complicated. Alternatively, DM when associated with end-organ damage can complicate management of MDS, increase risks of complications, and limit the applicability of intensive therapeutic interventions. Here we review the current knowledge of the interactions between DM and MDS at the pathogenetic, clinical and epidemiologic levels, discuss how this knowledge could be used therapeutically to improve the outcome of patients affected by both conditions, and delineate important unmet needs that should be addressed in future research.

  20. 5-azacitidine efficacy and safety in patients aged >65 years with myelodysplastic syndromes outside clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Salaroli, Adriano; Serrao, Alessandra; Petrucci, Luigi; Mancini, Marco; Alimena, Giuliana

    2012-08-01

    The efficacy and safety of azacitidine in elderly patients (aged >65 years) with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) treated outside clinical trials are reported. Thirty-eight patients with MDS received azacitidine (75 mg/m(2), schedule 5+2 +2): seven patients were classified as having refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD), nine patients with refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) type 1, 18 patients with RAEB type 2 and four patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia type 2 (CMML-2). According to International Working Group (IWG) 2006 criteria, after the first four cycles we detected complete remission in seven patients (CR, 18%), improvement of bone marrow dysplasia and reduction of blast percentage in seven patients (partial response, 18%), stable disease in 20 patients (53%) and progression to acute leukemia in four patients (10%). Median overall survival for all patients treated was 16.4 months. Only mild non-hematologic toxicity was detected (grade 1-2 nausea and pruritus), whereas 55% of patients experienced hematologic side effects (25% grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia and 30% grade 3-4 neutropenia). Our results suggest that advanced age should not preclude effective treatment with azacitidine in non-selected elderly patients wih MDS.

  1. Massive hyperdiploidy and tetraploidy in acute myelocytic leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Renuka V; Sait, Sheila N J; Matsui, Sei-Ichi; Block, AnneMarie W; Barcos, Maurice; Slack, James L; Wetzler, Meir; Baer, Maria R

    2004-01-01

    Massive hyperdiploidy (>50 chromosomes) and tetraploidy (4n) are rare cytogenetic abnormalities in myelocytic malignancies, and their significance is unknown. We report on 11 patients with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and two patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with massive hyperdiploidy (10 patients) or tetraploidy (3 patients) seen at our institution over a 12-year period. Eleven patients were male and two were female. Age range was 44-84 years (median, 70 years). Only one AML patient had a previous MDS, and no patient had therapy-related disease. One or more copies of chromosomes 8 and 19 were gained in eight patients each; other frequently gained chromosomes included 13, 15, and 21. Eight patients had structural abnormalities in addition to chromosome gain; del(5q) was most common (five patients). Eleven patients received induction chemotherapy, but only four achieved complete remission. Survival ranged from 1 to 22 months, with a median of 6 months. We conclude that massive hyperdiploidy and tetraploidy are infrequent abnormalities in AML and MDS, are seen primarily in de novo disease in older male patients and are associated with a low remission rate and short survival. Massive hyperdiploidy and tetraploidy define a prognostically unfavorable cytogenetic group in de novo AML.

  2. An update on the safety and efficacy of decitabine in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Jacqueline S; Jain, Nitin; Godley, Lucy A

    2010-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal bone marrow malignancies characterized by peripheral cytopenias and dysplastic changes in the bone marrow with various clinical features. Patients with MDS, in particular those with intermediate-2 (Int-2) and high-risk disease, have a poor prognosis. The mainstay of treatment includes cytoxic chemotherapy and supportive care. Over the last decade, promising results from studies focusing on hypomethylating agents, such as decitabine (5-aza-deoxycytidine) and 5-azacitidine, have led to the expansion of the therapeutic arsenal for MDS. This review presents the current data available on the clinical efficacy and safety profile for decitabine as a treatment for MDS. Although not fully understood, decitabine’s antitumor activity may involve its ability to induce hypomethylation and reactivation of genes responsible for cellular differentiation, stimulate an immune response, induce DNA damage/apoptotic response pathways, and/or augment stem cell renewal. Future studies that use epigenetic therapies that combine hypomethylating agents with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and head-to-head comparison studies of decitabine and 5-azacitidine will provide valuable pre-clinical and clinical data, enhancing our understanding of these drugs. PMID:20616953

  3. Management of patients receiving antithymocyte globulin for aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bevans, Margaret F; Shalabi, Reem A

    2004-08-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used commonly in patients with severe aplastic anemia and those undergoing renal transplant. Its utility also is being explored in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome, conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and prophylaxis of graft-versus-host disease. As indications for ATG expand, knowledge regarding its administration and management of associated toxicities is needed. These toxicities range from life-threatening anaphylaxis associated with the infusion to flu-like symptoms that occur one to two weeks after the infusion. Adverse effects are classified according to the severity and system impacted. Mild toxicities respond to comfort measures and include fever, chills, urticarial rash, and vomiting. Moderate toxicities require acute interventions and include fluid-responsive hypotension, nonischemic chest pain, and reversible oxygen desaturation. Severe toxicities require intensive support and include those refractory to earlier intervention. Management of these toxicities usually is limited to fluid resuscitation and noninvasive monitoring. Occurrence of infusion-related toxicities may require premature discontinuation of therapy. Therefore, an educated healthcare team and interdisciplinary clinical management guidelines are important to ensure the safe administration and complete course of ATG.

  4. Gene expression profiling in myelodysplastic syndrome after SPARC overexpression associated with Ara-C.

    PubMed

    Nian, Qing; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wei, Chunmei; Kuang, Xingyi; Wang, Xingyong; Wang, Li

    2015-10-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is involved in many biological processes, including erythropoiesis and cell proliferation. However, the role of SPARC in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) remains to be elucidated. Pyrimidine analogue cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) is among the most effective agents used in the treatment of acute leukemia. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the chemotherapeutic activity of Ara-C was enhanced by the overexpression of SPARC. DNA microarray technology and RNA sequencing were employed to examine differential gene expression in the apoptosis signaling pathway after gene change occurred in cells following drug treatment. The results showed that upregulation of the expression of SPARC induced SKM-1 cell death and inhibited proliferation. Additionally, the apoptotic rate of SPARC overexpression combined with Ara-C increased significantly. Transcription factors CPBP and ZNF333 regulated the 69 genes and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression of apoptosis-related genes in the DNA microarray results were increased. These results suggest that SPARC expression changes with Ara-C, revealing a possible application in the treatment of MDS.

  5. [Point mutations of genes encoding proteins involvedin RNA splicing in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Barańska, Marta; Czerwińska-Rybak, Joanna; Gil, Lidia; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2015-01-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) constitute heterogeneous group of clonal disorders, characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenia and increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia development. Molecular mechanisms behind MDS have not been fully explained, however recent studies based on new technologies confirmed that epigenetic abnormalities and somatic mutation in the spliceasome machinery are crucial in pathogenesis of these diseases. Abnormal mRNA splicing (excision of intronic sequences from mRNA) has been found in over half of all MDS patients and resulted in accumulation of cytogenetical and molecular changes. The biological impact of splicing factor genes mutations has been evaluated only in a limited extend and current studies concentrate on analysis of MDS transcriptome. Molecular characteristic of classical and alternative splicing is presented in the paper, according to current knowledge. We review the most prominent findings from recent years concerning mutation in the spliceasome machinery with respect to MDS phenotype and disease prognosis. Perspectives in applying of novel diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities for myelodysplasia, based on spliceosome mutations identification are also presented.

  6. Therapeutic Advances in Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Over the Past 40 Years

    PubMed Central

    Kantarjian, Hagop; O'Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Wierda, William; Faderl, Stefan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Estey, Elihu; Keating, Michael; Freireich, Emil J.

    2015-01-01

    Major therapeutic progress has been accomplished in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) over the past 40 years, which may not be fully appreciated by the larger medical community. The objective of this review was to briefly highlight the treatment breakthroughs in leukemia and MDS. Therapeutic progress happened through better understanding of disease pathophysiologies and rational development of targeted agents, like imatinib mesylate in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and through astute, empirical discoveries in the clinic, like all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and chlorodeoxyadenosine in hairy cell leukemia (HCL). Today, the 5- to 10-year survival rates in patients with APL and HCL exceed 80%. In patients with CML, imatinib therapy has been associated with estimated 5- to 7-year survival rates from 85% to 90%. In patients with adult acute lymphocytic leukemia, modern intensive regimens have improved the 5-year survival rates from 20% up to 40%. In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chemoimmunotherapy recently produced high rates of quality responses and improved long-term outcome. In younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the 5-year survival rates range from 40% to 50%, although elderly AML remains a therapeutic challenge. In patients with MDS, it was recently demonstrated that epigenetic therapy with hypomethylating agents improved survival. Much therapeutic progress has been witnessed in leukemia and MDS, and much more is expected to occur soon. PMID:18798533

  7. Reclassifying myelodysplastic syndromes: what's where in the new WHO and why.

    PubMed

    Arber, Daniel A; Hasserjian, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    A revision to the 4th edition of the WHO Classification of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs), originally published in 2008, is expected in mid-2016. Based on recommendations of a Clinical Advisory Committee, the revision will aim to incorporate new discoveries in MDS that impact existing disease categories. Although the basic diagnostic principles of the WHO classification remain unchanged, several changes to the classification are proposed. All revisions are considered preliminary until the actual publication of the monograph and online document. Proposals for change include abandoning the routine use of "refractory anemia/cytopenia" in the various disease names, including the prognostic significance of gene mutations in MDS, revising the diagnostic criteria for MDS entities with ring sideroblasts based on the detection of SF3B1 mutations, modifying the cytogenetic criteria for MDS with isolated del(5q), reclassifying most cases of the erythroid/myeloid type of acute erythroleukemia, and recognizing the familial link in some cases of MDS. This review will provide details of the major proposed changes as well as rationale for the revisions. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  8. Prognostic impact of SNP array karyotyping in myelodysplastic syndromes and related myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tiu, Ramon V.; Gondek, Lukasz P.; O'Keefe, Christine L.; Elson, Paul; Huh, Jungwon; Mohamedali, Azim; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Advani, Anjali S.; Paquette, Ronald; List, Alan F.; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; McDevitt, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism arrays (SNP-As) have emerged as an important tool in the identification of chromosomal defects undetected by metaphase cytogenetics (MC) in hematologic cancers, offering superior resolution of unbalanced chromosomal defects and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and related cancers share recurrent chromosomal defects and molecular lesions that predict outcomes. We hypothesized that combining SNP-A and MC could improve diagnosis/prognosis and further the molecular characterization of myeloid malignancies. We analyzed MC/SNP-A results from 430 patients (MDS = 250, MDS/myeloproliferative overlap neoplasm = 95, acute myeloid leukemia from MDS = 85). The frequency and clinical significance of genomic aberrations was compared between MC and MC plus SNP-A. Combined MC/SNP-A karyotyping lead to higher diagnostic yield of chromosomal defects (74% vs 44%, P < .0001), compared with MC alone, often through detection of novel lesions in patients with normal/noninformative (54%) and abnormal (62%) MC results. Newly detected SNP-A defects contributed to poorer prognosis for patients stratified by current morphologic and clinical risk schemes. The presence and number of new SNP-A detected lesions are independent predictors of overall and event-free survival. The significant diagnostic and prognostic contributions of SNP-A–detected defects in MDS and related diseases underscore the utility of SNP-A when combined with MC in hematologic malignancies. PMID:21285439

  9. Case Report: Myelodysplastic syndrome- associated myeloid sarcoma: an unusual clinical presentation of a rare disease

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Emoke; Demian, Smaranda; Nagy, Elod

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma results from the extramedullary homing and proliferation of immature myeloid precursors. We present the timeline, events and diagnostic pitfalls related to a 66 year-old male patient’s case, admitted to the Hematology Clinic for pancytopenia, fever, weight loss and fatigue. The severe cytopenia and the few blasts observed in his blood smear indicated a bone marrow biopsy. The bone marrow showed hypercellularity and multilineage dysplasia with the presence of 15% myeloblasts. After the biopsy, he promptly developed paraplegia and nuclear magnetic resonance revealed an epidural tumour which was then resected.In the epidural tumour mass blast-like, round cells were observed with a complex immunophenotype, characterized by myeloperoxidase, CD117, CD15, CD99, leucocyte common antigen positivity and a high Ki-67 proliferation index. Considering the main differential diagnostic issues, the final diagnosis was stated as myelodysplastic syndrome-associated myeloid sarcoma. The prognosis was unfavourable, the bone marrow was quickly invaded by proliferating blast cells, and despite chemotherapy attempts, the patient died. PMID:27019694

  10. Case Report: Myelodysplastic syndrome- associated myeloid sarcoma: an unusual clinical presentation of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Emoke; Demian, Smaranda; Nagy, Elod

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma results from the extramedullary homing and proliferation of immature myeloid precursors. We present the timeline, events and diagnostic pitfalls related to a 66 year-old male patient's case, admitted to the Hematology Clinic for pancytopenia, fever, weight loss and fatigue. The severe cytopenia and the few blasts observed in his blood smear indicated a bone marrow biopsy. The bone marrow showed hypercellularity and multilineage dysplasia with the presence of 15% myeloblasts. After the biopsy, he promptly developed paraplegia and nuclear magnetic resonance revealed an epidural tumour which was then resected.In the epidural tumour mass blast-like, round cells were observed with a complex immunophenotype, characterized by myeloperoxidase, CD117, CD15, CD99, leucocyte common antigen positivity and a high Ki-67 proliferation index. Considering the main differential diagnostic issues, the final diagnosis was stated as myelodysplastic syndrome-associated myeloid sarcoma. The prognosis was unfavourable, the bone marrow was quickly invaded by proliferating blast cells, and despite chemotherapy attempts, the patient died.

  11. A rare case of acquired hemophilia A associated with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Mihir; Kallamadi, Rekha; Bande, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    84 year old male with past medical history of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) presented with progressive subcutaneous and muscle bleed in the right forearm and arm. Workup revealed elevated activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) - 71.8 seconds (normal 23 - 32 seconds) which was persistently elevated after mixing study (37.1 seconds immediately and 51.1 seconds after 1 hour). Further laboratory work up revealed low factor VIII level (3%) and elevated factor VIII inhibitor by Bethesda assay (3 units/ml of blood). Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) diagnosis was established and patient was treated with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVlla) to control the bleeding and also prednisone for immunosuppression. Subsequent monitoring suggested reduction of factor VIII inhibitor - antibody levels to undetectable level in 3 days and increase of factor VIII level from 3% to 50% in 5 days. Despite of improvement in the laboratory values he continued to have progression of his bleeding which involved posterior chest wall and also left arm. Due to the progression of the condition and prior expressed wish family decided to stop the aggressive treatment and patient died nine days after the diagnosis. The case report describes a rare presentation of AHA in MDS (With bone marrow cytogenetics abnormality) patient with fatal outcome. PMID:22837802

  12. Functional evidence implicating chromosome 7q22 haploinsufficiency in myelodysplastic syndrome pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jasmine C; Weinfurtner, Kelley M; Alzamora, Maria Del Pilar; Kogan, Scott C; Burgess, Michael R; Zhang, Yan; Nakitandwe, Joy; Ma, Jing; Cheng, Jinjun; Chen, Shann-Ching; Ho, Theodore T; Flach, Johanna; Reynaud, Damien; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Downing, James R; Shannon, Kevin

    2015-07-20

    Chromosome 7 deletions are highly prevalent in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and likely contribute to aberrant growth through haploinsufficiency. We generated mice with a heterozygous germ line deletion of a 2-Mb interval of chromosome band 5A3 syntenic to a commonly deleted segment of human 7q22 and show that mutant hematopoietic cells exhibit cardinal features of MDS. Specifically, the long-term hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment is expanded in 5A3(+/del) mice, and the distribution of myeloid progenitors is altered. 5A3(+/del) HSCs are defective for lymphoid repopulating potential and show a myeloid lineage output bias. These cell autonomous abnormalities are exacerbated by physiologic aging and upon serial transplantation. The 5A3 deletion partially rescues defective repopulation in Gata2 mutant mice. 5A3(+/del) hematopoietic cells exhibit decreased expression of oxidative phosphorylation genes, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, and perturbed oxygen consumption. These studies provide the first functional data linking 7q22 deletions to MDS pathogenesis.

  13. Paediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and juvenile chronic myelogenous leukaemia (JCML) detected by cytogenetic and FISH techniques.

    PubMed

    Acar, H; Caliskan, U; Cora, T

    1999-12-01

    This report presents two rare cases, one of paediatric myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and the other juvenile chronic myeloid leukaemia (jCML). In the first case, there were clinical and biological features of MDS-refractory anaemia with excess blasts (RAEB). The bone marrow (BM) karyotype demonstrated a monosomy 7 which was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In addition, FISH analysis showed that an alpha-satellite DNA sequence had been transferred from chromosomes 13/21 to one homologue of chromosomes 22. The BCR-ABL rearrangement was negative. In the second case, at diagnosis, the karyotype was 46,XX. FISH analysis with the simultaneous and individual application of abl and bcr probes for chromosome 9 and 22, respectively, revealed the presence of the BCR-ABL rearrangement in addition to an extra ABL sequence locating chromosome 20. A clone that was BCR-ABL gene rearrangement negative but with an extra ABL DNA sequence on chromsome 20, and another clone that was BCR-ABL gene rearrangement negative were detected by DC-FISH and uni-colour (UC-) FISH analysis. No monosomy 7 was detected by conventional cytogenetic or FISH analyses.

  14. YKL-40 in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Wang, Tao; Lee, Stephanie J.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Zhu, Xiaochun; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Müller, Carlheinz; Verneris, Michael R.; Müller, Klaus; Johansen, Julia S.; Vindelov, Lars; Garred, Peter

    2016-01-01

    YKL-40, also called chitinase3-like-1 protein, is an inflammatory biomarker which has been associated with disease severity in inflammatory and malignant diseases, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), multiple myeloma and lymphomas. The objective of the current study was to assess the prognostic value of pre-transplant recipient and donor plasma YKL-40 concentrations in patients with AML (n=624) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n=157) treated with allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In recipients, the plasma YKL-40 concentrations were increased when the HCT-comorbidity index was ≥5 (p=0.028). There were no significant associations between plasma YKL-40 concentrations in recipients and any outcome measures. In donors with YKL-40 plasma concentrations above the age adjusted 95th percentile a trend towards increased grade II-IV acute graft versus host disease in recipients was observed (adjusted hazard ratio 1.39 (95% confidence interval 1.00–1.94), P=0.050), with no significant associations with overall survival, treatment-related mortality or relapse. In conclusion, our study shows that YKL-40 does not aid risk stratification of patients undergoing allogeneic HCT, but suggests that YKL-40 may aid donor selection when multiple, otherwise equal, donors are available. PMID:27427920

  15. Survival benefits with transplantation in secondary AML evolving from myelodysplastic syndrome with hypomethylating treatment failure.

    PubMed

    Shin, S-H; Yahng, S-A; Yoon, J-H; Lee, S-E; Cho, B-S; Eom, K-S; Lee, S; Min, C-K; Kim, H-J; Cho, S-G; Kim, D-W; Lee, J-W; Min, W-S; Park, C-W; Kim, Y-J

    2013-05-01

    The prognosis for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome with hypomethylating treatment failure (MDS-HTF) has been known to be poor. However, the clinical outcomes and optimal treatment options for secondary AML evolving from MDS-HTF (sAML/MDS-HTF) are not well known. This retrospective analysis was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes and influences of treatment options on survival in 46 consecutive patients with sAML/MDS-HTF. The median OS rates were 1.4 months in the best supportive care group (n=15) and 9.4 months in the active treatment group (n=31). One-year OS rates were 13.3% and 36.8%, respectively (P=0.001). Active treatment (P<0.001), lower BM blast (<33%) at sAML (P=0.007), non-poor NCCN (National Cancer Comprehensive Network) cytogenetics (P=0.001) and good performance status (ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group) 1) (P=0.024) were significant predictors affecting favorable OS in a multivariate analysis. Of the active treatment options, allo-SCT with prior chemotherapy (CTx) showed better OS compared with CTx only or SCT without CTx (P=0.019). Our analyses suggest that active treatment, particularly SCT following CTx, should be considered in patients with sAML/MDS-HTF if the patient is medically fit.

  16. Predictors of Neuropsychological Change in Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Mary-Ellen; Chang, Grace; Jones, Jennifer A.; Antin, Joseph R.; Orav, E. John

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the course of neuropsychological functioning in patients with chronic myelogeous leukemia (n = 91) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 15) who underwent standard treatment for their disease or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at baseline, 12 months, and 18 months post-treatment. At baseline, 23% of the participants (n = 75) in the longitudinal sample had Z-scores on at least one of the neuropsychological tests that were <1.4. Participants in the study showed improvement over baseline at the 12 and 18 months assessments. The average Z-scores for the six cognitive domains in the longitudinal data set over the course of the study ranged from −0.89 to 0.59. Significant predictors of change in neuropsychological test scores included age, with older participants showing less improvement over time. Other predictors included baseline cognitive domains (language, memory, and attention), previous cocaine use, disease status, intelligence quotient, and quality of life measures. Findings support previous studies in patients with hematological malignancies who showed cognitive impairments at baseline prior to HSCT. However, there was little evidence for further cognitive decline over the course of 18 months. PMID:23391504

  17. Impact of iron overload and potential benefit from iron chelation in low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Niraj; Vallumsetla, Nishanth; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer; Verma, Amit; Ginzburg, Yelena

    2014-08-07

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are a group of heterogeneous clonal bone marrow disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral blood cytopenias, and potential for malignant transformation. Lower/intermediate-risk MDSs are associated with longer survival and high red blood cell (RBC) transfusion requirements resulting in secondary iron overload. Recent data suggest that markers of iron overload portend a relatively poor prognosis, and retrospective analysis demonstrates that iron chelation therapy is associated with prolonged survival in transfusion-dependent MDS patients. New data provide concrete evidence of iron's adverse effects on erythroid precursors in vitro and in vivo. Renewed interest in the iron field was heralded by the discovery of hepcidin, the main serum peptide hormone negative regulator of body iron. Evidence from β-thalassemia suggests that regulation of hepcidin by erythropoiesis dominates regulation by iron. Because iron overload develops in some MDS patients who do not require RBC transfusions, the suppressive effect of ineffective erythropoiesis on hepcidin may also play a role in iron overload. We anticipate that additional novel tools for measuring iron overload and a molecular-mechanism-driven description of MDS subtypes will provide a deeper understanding of how iron metabolism and erythropoiesis intersect in MDSs and improve clinical management of this patient population.

  18. [Study of deferoxamine in subcutaneous profusion treatment of iron overload in myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    González, Fernando Ataúlfo; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Villegas, Ana; Alonso, Dora; Castro, Mercedes; Remacha, Angel; del Arco, Aurora; Martín Núñez, Guillermo

    2005-05-07

    The progressive accumulation of iron in the organism contribute to one of the most important problems of morbidity and mortality in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We present an observational protocol, multicentre, open and non-aleatheorised, in patients diagnosed with MDS on transfusional regime with iron overload. The study was meant to prove the effectiveness of the parenteral treatment with desferrioxamine using continuous devices of subcutaneous profusion and evaluate the evolution of iron overload as well as transfusional requirements. There were 28 patients (12 men and 16 women), 12 AR, 15 AS and 1 unknown. Average monitoring lasted 13.5 months and there was a gradual loss of patients. 11 of them had gone during the first year. After 12 months the average of ferritin decreased by 258.51 ng/dl (DE 1208.04; p = 9.4) and after 24 months, it decreased by 979.6 ng/dl (DE 810.31; p = 0.1). After 12 months the average of requirements increased by 60.57 gHb/month (DE 183.7; p = 0.029) and after 24 months, it increased by 167.3 g/Hb/month (DE 406.5; p = 0.36). Desferroxiamine treatment is effective at least to prevent an iron overload in these patients, and therefore should be incorporated in the clinical practice.

  19. Lenalidomide for myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q): how long should it last?

    PubMed

    Vozella, Federico; Latagliata, Roberto; Carmosino, Ida; Volpicelli, Paola; Montagna, Chiara; Romano, Angela; Roberto, Amanda; Finsinger, Paola; Mancini, Marco; Breccia, Massimo; Oliva, Esther; Oliva, Esther

    2015-03-01

    Lenalidomide induces in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and del(5q) erythroid and cytogenetic response rates as high as 75% and 50%, respectively. It is still unclear, however, how long lenalidomide treatment should be continued and whether or not the drug could be interrupted. To assess the feasibility of lenalidomide discontinuation, we revised a cohort of 16 low-risk MDS patients with del(5q) treated at our institute in a phase II multicentric Italian study. Among the 12 responding patients, four discontinued lenalidomide while in complete response. All four patients needed during treatment a permanent lenalidomide reduction from 10 to 5 mg/day because of haematological toxicity (three patients) or grade 3 muscular and bone pain (one patient). At lenalidomide discontinuation after 16, 20, 27 and 20 months from the start, respectively, all four patients were in complete hematologic response and three forth in complete cytogenetic response. Three patients are still in response after 36, 30 and 20 months from lenalidomide discontinuation, respectively: The remaining patient relapsed after 20 months, and she is now receiving a new course of lenalidomide. In conclusion, long-lasting remissions are achievable in MDS patients with del(5q) in complete response after lenalidomide discontinuation.

  20. [Chromosome 1 abnormalities at band 1p32 in two atomic bomb survivors with myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Hata, T; Tagawa, M; Atogami, S; Tomonaga, M; Sadamori, N; Hayashi, Y

    2000-02-01

    We reported on 2 atomic bomb survivors(a 60-year-old man and 63-year-old woman)suffering myelodysplastic syndrome(MDS) associated with 1p32 chromosomal abnormalities. They were exposed to atomic bomb radiation at distances of 1.2 and 1.1 km, respectively, and were given a diagnosis of MDS 44 and 46 years after the bombing, respectively. The male patient had refractory anemia(RA) and a bone marrow cell karyotype of 46, XY, del(1)(p22p32), t(8;11)(p11;p15). The female patient had RA with excess of blasts (RAEB) and a karyotype of 45, X, -X, t(1;11)(p32;q23), +del(1)(p32), inv(3) (p21q27), del(5)(q15), -6, -9, -19, +mar 1, +mar 2. Multi-separated nuclear megakaryocytes were observed in both patients. These findings suggested that they had been exposed to radiation near the atomic explosion despite the fact that their symptoms of MDS developed more than 40 years after the bombing. 1p32 is known to be the locus of the TAL1 gene. However, Southern blot analysis did not reveal rearrangement of the TAL1 gene in the male patient.

  1. Awareness of acute myeloid leukaemia risk induced by diagnosis of a myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ousseine, Youssoufa M; Butow, Phyllis N; Julian-Reynier, Claire; Dring, Rebecca; Festy, Patrick; Fenaux, Pierre; Vey, Norbert; Mancini, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) can evolve to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in approximately 30% of cases. Knowing their AML risk is important for patients because it might impact adherence to care and psychological health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the awareness of AML risk among MDS patients and to study the factors associated with this awareness. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to all members of French and Australian patients' national MDS associations. Data of 301 patients were analysed. Patients were satisfied with the information they had received, but 33.2% did not know that they had an increased risk of developing AML. Younger age, higher-risk MDS treatment, preferences for health-related information and satisfaction with information provided about treatment were the factors independently associated with awareness of AML risk. Compared to unaware patients, patients knowing their risk were more likely to participate in a hypothetical clinical trial (83.0% vs 72.4%, p=0.043). More efforts are needed to provide more systematic information about AML risk to patients wishing to know it. More research is needed to study if increasing awareness can lead to more active engagement of MDS patients in their care and can increase the rate of clinical trial participation. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelodysplastic syndromes: a prospective evaluation including mutational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Fernando; Robledo, Cristina; Izquierdo-García, Francisco Miguel; Suárez-Vilela, Dimas; Benito, Rocío; Fuertes, Marta; Insunza, Andrés; Barragán, Eva; del Rey, Mónica; de Morales, José María García-Ruiz; Tormo, Mar; Salido, Eduardo; Zamora, Lurdes; Pedro, Carmen; Sánchez-del-Real, Javier; Díez-Campelo, María; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Sanz, Guillermo F.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús María

    2016-01-01

    The biological and molecular events that underlie bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are poorly understood, and its prognostic role in the era of the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) is not yet fully determined. We have evaluated the clinical and biological events that underlie bone marrow fibrotic changes, as well as its prognostic role, in a well-characterized prospective patient cohort (n=77) of primary MDS patients. The degree of marrow fibrosis was linked to parameters of erythropoietic failure, marrow cellularity, p53 protein accumulation, WT1 gene expression, and serum levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10, but not to other covariates including the IPSS-R score. The presence of bone marrow fibrosis grade 2 or higher was associated with the presence of mutations in cohesin complex genes (31.5% vs. 5.4%, p=0.006). By contrast, mutations in CALR, JAK2, PDGFRA, PDGFRB, and TP53 were very rare. Survival analysis showed that marrow fibrosis grade 2 or higher was a relevant significant predictor for of overall survival, and independent of age, performance status, and IPSS-R score in multivariate analysis. PMID:27127180

  3. [The myelodysplastic syndrome I. Pathogenesis, clinical symptoms, diagnosis and differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Juhl, Birgitte Ravn; Hansen, Per Boye

    2002-01-21

    The myelodysplastic (MDS) syndrome is characterized by variable cytopenia, owing to bone marrow insufficiency. Known provoking factors for the disease are chemicals (benzene), previous treatment with alkylating agents, and radioactive irradiation. The pathogenesis involves an acquired lesion of the pluripotent haematopoietic stem cell with the evolution of a (pre-)malignant cell clone with an increased proliferation potential, but, in addition, severe dysplasia with ineffective haematopoiesis. An increased intramedullary production of various cytokines that inhibit haematopoiesis, including tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), may be responsible for the accelerated cell death (apoptosis). An increasing genetic instability during the course of the disease causes progression of the cytopenia with anaemia, infections, and bleeding. Autoimmune diseases may be seen. The disease often progresses to acute myeloid leukaemia. A chromosomal analysis is important, as 40-50% of the patients have chromosomal changes at the time of diagnosis. Differential diagnostic considerations include temporary dysplasia provoked by medical or toxic agents, B12 or folate deficiency, infectious bone marrow involvement (HIV, CMV infection), chronic alcoholism, aplastic anaemia, and myelofibrosis.

  4. Optimal timing of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Porta, Matteo G Della; Malcovati, Luca; Jackson, Christopher H; Pascutto, Cristiana; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Teresa van Lint, Maria; Falda, Michele; Bernardi, Massimo; Onida, Francesco; Guidi, Stefano; Iori, Anna Paola; Cerretti, Raffaella; Marenco, Paola; Pioltelli, Pietro; Angelucci, Emanuele; Oneto, Rosi; Ripamonti, Francesco; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bosi, Alberto; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents the only curative treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but involves non-negligible morbidity and mortality. Registry studies have shown that advanced disease stage at transplantation is associated with inferior overall survival. To define the optimal timing of allogeneic HSCT, we carried out a decision analysis by studying 660 patients who received best supportive care and 449 subjects who underwent transplantation. Risk assessment was based on both the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the World Health Organization classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS). We used a continuous-time multistate Markov model to describe the natural history of disease and evaluate the effect of allogeneic HSCT on survival. This model estimated life expectancy from diagnosis according to treatment policy at different risk stages. Relative to supportive care, estimated life expectancy increased when transplantation was delayed from the initial stages until progression to intermediate-1 IPSS-risk or to intermediate WPSS-risk stage, and then decreased for higher risks. Modeling decision analysis on WPSS versus IPSS allowed better estimation of the optimal timing of transplantation. These observations indicate that allogeneic HSCT offers optimal survival benefits when the procedure is performed before MDS patients progress to advanced disease stages. Am. J. Hematol. 88:581–588, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23606215

  5. T-cell large granular lymphocyte proliferation in myelodysplastic syndromes: Clinicopathological features and prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Sokol, Lubomir; Bennett, John M; Moscinski, Lynn C; List, Alan; Zhang, Ling

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory and immune dysregulation are crucial in the initiation and development of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). It is noted that clonal T-cell large granular lymphocyte (T-LGL) proliferation associated with MDS is not uncommon. However, clinicopathological features, and prognostic and predictive value of presence of T-LGL proliferation in MDS patients is not very clear. This study compared 35 MDS patients with T-LGL proliferation with 36 MDS patients without T-LGL proliferation and summarized clinicopathologic features, including peripheral blood LGL cell counts, immunophenotype, T cell receptor gene rearrangement, bone marrow hematopoietic status, and adjuvant immunosuppressive therapy. The peripheral blood CD3+/CD57+ cell counts were significantly different (p<0.01) between the two groups. Notably, on examination of the bone marrow, MDS patients with T-LGL proliferation showed more frequent hypocellularity and/or lineage hypoplasia, particularly erythroid hypoplasia. On survival analysis, no overall difference was noted between MDS patients with T-LGL proliferation and those without T-LGL proliferation, and between the patients who received therapy for LGL and those who did not receive adjuvant therapy for LGL in the same risk group. In conclusion, T-LGL proliferation present in MDS patients can be associated with bone marrow hypocellularity and lineage hypoplasia. Although immunosuppressive therapy to eliminate T-LGL cells is potentially beneficial to the MDS patients with associated T-LGL proliferation, there is no overall survival benefit to the patients who received such treatment.

  6. Phenotypic and Cytogenetic Characterization of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Goonasekera, H. W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are vital in hematopoiesis. Whether BM-MSCs alter their characteristics in Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) is still controversial. We characterized MSCs of de novo MDS patients in Sri Lanka who have not been reported previously in the literature. We also analyzed MSCs derived from different MDS subtypes. MSCs were culture-expanded, characterized by flow cytometry, and induced towards osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Growth properties were determined using growth curves and population doubling times. Karyotyping and FISH were performed on MSCs. Cell morphology, differentiation potential, and CD marker expression of MDS-MSCs of all subtypes were comparable to those of control-MSCs. No significant growth differences were observed between control MSCs and MDS-MSCs of all subtypes (p > 0.05). 31% of MDS-MSCs had chromosomal aberrations (der(3),del(6q),del(7p), loss of chromosomes) whose BM karyotypes were normal. Highest percentage of karyotypic abnormalities was observed in RCMD-MSCs. Patients with abnormal BM karyotypes had no aberrant MSC clones. Results show that in spite of presence of genetically abnormal clones in MDS-MSC populations, in vitro phenotypic and growth characteristics of MSCs in MDS remain unchanged. Further, the occurrence of genetic abnormalities in BM-MSCs in MDS could be considered as an autonomous event from that of their hematopoietic counterparts. PMID:27660743

  7. Pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes: an overview of molecular and non-molecular aspects of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Visconte, Valeria; Tiu, Ramon V.

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of clonal disorders arising from hematopoietic stem cells generally characterized by inefficient hematopoiesis, dysplasia in one or more myeloid cell lineages, and variable degrees of cytopenias. Most MDS patients are diagnosed in their late 60s to early 70s. The estimated incidence of MDS in the United States and in Europe are 4.3 and 1.8 per 100,000 individuals per year, respectively with lower rates reported in some Asian countries and less well estimated in other parts of the world. Evolution to acute myeloid leukemia can occur in 10-15% of MDS patients. Three drugs are currently approved for the treatment of patients with MDS: immunomodulatory agents (lenalidomide), and hypomethylating therapy [HMT (decitabine and 5-azacytidine)]. All patients will eventually lose their response to therapy, and the survival outcome of MDS patients is poor (median survival of 4.5 months) especially for patients who fail (refractory/relapsed) HMT. The only potential curative treatment for MDS is hematopoietic cell transplantation. Genomic/chromosomal instability and various mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis and prognosis of the disease. High throughput genetic technologies like single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis and next generation sequencing technologies have uncovered novel genetic alterations and increased our knowledge of MDS pathogenesis. We will review various genetic and non-genetic causes that are involved in the pathogenesis of MDS. PMID:25548754

  8. Revisiting the case for genetically engineered mouse models in human myelodysplastic syndrome research

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Kinney, Marsha C.; Scott, Linda M.; Zinkel, Sandra S.

    2015-01-01

    Much-needed attention has been given of late to diseases specifically associated with an expanding elderly population. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a hematopoietic stem cell-based blood disease, is one of these. The lack of clear understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this disease has hampered the development of efficacious therapies, especially in the presence of comorbidities. Mouse models could potentially provide new insights into this disease, although primary human MDS cells grow poorly in xenografted mice. This makes genetically engineered murine models a more attractive proposition, although this approach is not without complications. In particular, it is unclear if or how myelodysplasia (abnormal blood cell morphology), a key MDS feature in humans, presents in murine cells. Here, we evaluate the histopathologic features of wild-type mice and 23 mouse models with verified myelodysplasia. We find that certain features indicative of myelodysplasia in humans, such as Howell-Jolly bodies and low neutrophilic granularity, are commonplace in healthy mice, whereas other features are similarly abnormal in humans and mice. Quantitative hematopoietic parameters, such as blood cell counts, are required to distinguish between MDS and related diseases. We provide data that mouse models of MDS can be genetically engineered and faithfully recapitulate human disease. PMID:26077396

  9. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y. H.; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  10. Future Directions in Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Newer Agents and the Role of Combination Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Steven D.; Hermes-DeSantis, Evelyn R.

    2009-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is not a single disease, but a collection of hematopoietic disorders that require newer strategies. Currently, azacitidine, decitabine, and lenalidomide are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of MDS. A recent study demonstrated an improved overall survival (24.4 months vs 15 months) in high-risk MDS patients receiving azacitidine plus best supportive care vs conventional care which has resulted in an updated label for this product. Conventional care consisted of supportive care alone or either low-dose ara-C or standard chemotherapy plus best supportive care. While these data are encouraging, newer agents such as vorinostat, MGCD0103, MS-275, and tipifarnib are currently being studied as monotherapy or in combinations with approved treatments for MDS. The goal of combining pharmacotherapy, such as the combination of DNA methylation inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors, in the management of MDS is to increase the response rates and decrease the toxicities associated with treatment. Clinical experience in the use of combination products has given practitioners the empirical knowledge necessary to better treat patients with MDS. Utilizing convergent or complementary molecular mechanisms with in vitro or in vivo evidence of synergy is a fresher and maybe a more efficacious approach to combination therapy. PMID:18813208

  11. [Hematologic response predictor factors in adults with myelodysplastic syndromes (SMD) treated with cyclosporin A (CSA)].

    PubMed

    Zamora-Pérez, Elia; López-Karpovitch, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal diseases of hematopoietic cells. The International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) is the risk scale most employed in MDS. Cyclosporin A (CsA) has been used in the treatment of cytopenias in MDS. To evaluate hematologic response and identify response predictive factors in adults with MDS treated with CsA. Patients with MDS diagnosed according World Health Organization (WHO) classification were recruited from January 1997 to June 2012. All patients were classified with IPSS, IPSS revised (IPSS-R),WHO Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS), and WPSS revised (WPSS-R) risk scales. Cyclosporin A was administered orally at a dose of 5 mg/kg/day. Hematologic response was evaluated following the International Working Group for MDS (2006 version) criteria. Inclusion criteria were met by 32 patients. Median age was 56.5 years, with a median follow-up of 3.1 years. Hematologic response was 56.2% and erythrocyte independence transfusion was found in 42.9% of patients. Age,hemoglobin level, and WPSS at diagnosis were independent predictive factors for CsA response. Survival was longer in responder than in nonresponder CsA patients (p=0.06). Cyclosporin A induced hematologic response in >50% of patients with MDS aged <57 years, with Hb<8 g/dl and low WPSS at diagnosis.

  12. A nationwide non-interventional epidemiological data registry on myelodysplastic syndromes in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Otrock, Zaher K; Chamseddine, Nabil; Salem, Ziad M; Wehbe, Tarek; Al-Ayoubi, Mouna; Dhaini, Moussa; Kattan, Joseph; Mokaddem, Walid; Nasr, Therese Abi; Jradi, Oussama; Farhat, Fadi S; Wehbe, Mahmoud; Haidar, Mohammad H; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Bitar, Nizar; Hajj, Mirna El; Kadri, Adel M; Kamar, Francois G; Yassine, Hanan; Khodr, Hassan; Taher, Ali T; Hakime, Noha; Mahfouz, Rami AR; Serhal, Wassim; Bazarbachi, Ali; Farhat, Hussein Z

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias, blood cells dysplasia, and increased risk for progression to acute leukemia.Physicians should be vigilant in diagnosing MDS and should be aware of the contemporary therapies that are always in progress. Most of the data on MDS epidemiology and management comes from developed countries. The incidence and features of MDS in the Arab countries, among them Lebanon, are not known. We undertook a nationwide epidemiological registry study of all newly diagnosed MDS cases through 2010-2011. Patients were referred by 21 hematologists/oncologists practicing in 17 hospitals and medical centers distributed across the entire country. 58 patients (29 males and 29 females) with confirmed MDS were included. The calculated incidence rate of MDS was 0.71 per 100,000 people. The median age at diagnosis was 73 years (range 16-86). The most common complaints on presentation were fatigue (70.7%), weakness (60.3%) and pallor (43.1%). Most patients were diagnosed as refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB; 36.2%) and refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD; 32.8%). This paper constitutes the first epidemiological report on the incidence and specific subtypes of MDS in Lebanon. PMID:27069756

  13. Use of azacitidine for myelodysplastic syndromes: controversial issues and practical recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Jin; Jang, Jun Ho; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Lee, Je-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Azacitidine is recommended for patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) who are not eligible for intensive therapy or for patients with lower-risk MDS who have thrombocytopenia or neutropenia or have anemia that is unresponsive to other therapies. However, standard treatment with azacitidine has not been optimized and many issues about the use of azacitidine remain unresolved. The use of azacitidine is expanding rapidly, but limited comparative clinical trial data are available to (i) define the optimal use of azacitidine in patients with higher-risk MDS or around the time of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, (ii) identify those patients with lower-risk MDS who may benefit from treatment, and (iii) guide physicians on alternative therapies after treatment failure. Increasing evidence suggests that the clinical features, prognostic factors, and cytogenetic profiles of patients with MDS in Asia differ significantly from those of patients in Western countries, so the aim of this review is to summarize the evidence and provide practical recommendations on the use of azacitidine in patients with MDS in the Republic of Korea. Evidence considered in this review is based on published clinical data and on the clinical experience of an expert panel from the acute myeloid leukemia/MDS Working Party of the Korean Society of Hematology. PMID:23826577

  14. Genetics and Epigenetics of Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Response to Drug Therapy: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Shahrabi, Saeid; Khosravi, Abbas; Shahjahani, Mohammad; Rahim, Fakher; Saki, Najmaldin

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hematologic neoplasms ocurring mostly in the elderly. The clinical outcome of MDS patients is still poor despite progress in treatment approaches. About 90% of patients harbor at least one somatic mutation. This review aimed to assess the potential of molecular abnormalities in understanding pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis and in guiding choice of proper therapy in MDS patients. Papers related to this topic from 2000 to 2016 in PubMed and Scopus databases were searched and studied. The most common molecular abnormalities were TET2, ASXL1 as well as molecules involved in spliceosome machinery (U2AF1, SRSF2 and SF3B1). Patients with defects in TET2 molecule show better response to treatment with azacitidine. IDH and DNMT3A mutations are associated with a good response to decitabine therapy. In addition, patients with del5q subtype harboring TP53 mutation do not show a good response to lenalidomide therapy. In general, the results of this study show that molecular abnormalities can be associated with the occurrence of a specific morphological phenotype in patients. Therefore, considering the morphology of patients, different gene profiling methods can be selected to choice the most appropriate therapeutic measure in these patients in addition to faster and more cost-effective diagnosis of molecular abnormalities. PMID:28058097

  15. Outcomes for Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tambaro, Francesco Paolo; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; O’Brien, Susan M.; Faderl, Stefan H.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Burger, Jan A.; Pierce, Sherry; Wang, Xuemei; Do, Kim-Anh; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Keating, Michael J.; Wierda, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia (AL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are uncommon in CLL. We retrospectively identified 95 patients with CLL also diagnosed with AL (n=38) or MDS (n=57), either concurrently (n=5) or subsequent (n=90) to CLL diagnosis and report their outcomes. Median number of CLL treatments prior to AL and MDS was 2(0–9) and 1(0–8), respectively; the most common regimen was purine analogue combined with alkylating agent±CD20 mAb. Twelve had no prior CLL treatment. Among 38 with AL, 33 had AML, 3 had ALL (1Ph+), 1 had biphenotypic, and 1 had extramedullary (bladder) AML. Unfavorable AML karyotype was noted in 26, intermediate-risk in 7. There was no association between survival from AL and number of prior CLL regimens or karyotype. Expression of CD7 on blasts was associated with shorter survival. Among MDS cases, all IPSS were represented; karyotype was unfavorable in 36, intermediate in 6, and favorable in 12 patients; 10 experienced transformation to AML. Shorter survival from MDS correlated with higher-risk IPSS, poor-risk karyotype, and increased number of prior CLL treatments. Overall, outcomes for patients with CLL subsequently diagnosed with AL or MDS were poor; AL/MDS occurred without prior CLL treatment. Effective therapies for these patients are desperately needed. PMID:26290497

  16. Cardiac iron overload in chronically transfused patients with thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Montalembert, Mariane; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Brousse, Valentine; Guerci-Bresler, Agnes; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Dumesnil, Cécile; Lahary, Agnès; Touati, Mohamed; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Cavazzana, Marina; Chauzit, Emmanuelle; Baptiste, Amandine; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Puy, Hervé; Elie, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    The risk and clinical significance of cardiac iron overload due to chronic transfusion varies with the underlying disease. Cardiac iron overload shortens the life expectancy of patients with thalassemia, whereas its effect is unclear in those with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA), iron does not seem to deposit quickly in the heart. Our primary objective was to assess through a multicentric study the prevalence of cardiac iron overload, defined as a cardiovascular magnetic resonance T2*<20 ms, in patients with thalassemia, SCA, or MDS. Patient inclusion criteria were an accurate record of erythrocyte concentrates (ECs) received, a transfusion history >8 ECs in the past year, and age older than 6 years. We included from 9 centers 20 patients with thalassemia, 41 with SCA, and 25 with MDS in 2012-2014. Erythrocytapharesis did not consistently prevent iron overload in patients with SCA. Cardiac iron overload was found in 3 (15%) patients with thalassemia, none with SCA, and 4 (16%) with MDS. The liver iron content (LIC) ranged from 10.4 to 15.2 mg/g dry weight, with no significant differences across groups (P = 0.29). Abnormal T2* was not significantly associated with any of the measures of transfusion or chelation. Ferritin levels showed a strong association with LIC. Non-transferrin-bound iron was high in the thalassemia and MDS groups but low in the SCA group (P<0.001). Hepcidin was low in thalassemia, normal in SCA, and markedly elevated in MDS (P<0.001). Two mechanisms may explain that iron deposition largely spares the heart in SCA: the high level of erythropoiesis recycles the iron and the chronic inflammation retains iron within the macrophages. Thalassemia, in contrast, is characterized by inefficient erythropoiesis, unable to handle free iron. Iron accumulation varies widely in MDS syndromes due to the competing influences of abnormal erythropoiesis, excess iron supply, and inflammation. PMID:28257476

  17. Myelodysplastic syndromes: a study of 101 cases according to the FAB classification.

    PubMed

    Vallespi, T; Torrabadella, M; Julia, A; Irriguible, D; Jaen, A; Acebedo, G; Triginer, J

    1985-09-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of closely related disorders characterized by chronic cytopenias with cellular marrow, poor prognosis and refractoriness to treatment. We studied 101 consecutive cases of MDS diagnosed over a 7-year period. Peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) samples were reviewed and classified according to the proposals of the French-American-British (FAB) cooperative group for MDS. The combined analysis of the initial laboratory features and qualitative haematological abnormalities readily allowed the distinction between the different subgroups. Thirty-two of 79 cases (40.5%) evolved towards other diseases, frequently acute leukaemia (24/79, 30%), or transformed into other MDS (7/79, 9%). In five cases, initially classified as refractory anaemia (RA) or refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts (RAS), a transitory change to another type of MDS--two chronic myelomonocytic leukaemias (CMML), two refractory anaemias with excess of blasts (RAEB) and one refractory anaemia with excess of blasts 'in transformation' (RAEB-t)--was observed before the evolution towards acute leukaemia. This provides a new link between all these syndromes and increases the number of transitions to other MDS. Overall prognosis was very poor, with differences between subgroups. RA had the best prognosis whereas RAEB-t had the worst one. This study shows that the FAB classification is readily usable and defines well-characterized subgroups of MDS, although there are frequent transitional forms, and as the natural history of the MDS unfolds they may convert into another. The actual poor prognosis and the frequent evolution towards acute leukaemia makes necessary to investigate new methods of treatment for these disorders.

  18. Cardiac iron overload in chronically transfused patients with thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Montalembert, Mariane; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Brousse, Valentine; Guerci-Bresler, Agnes; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Dumesnil, Cécile; Lahary, Agnès; Touati, Mohamed; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Cavazzana, Marina; Chauzit, Emmanuelle; Baptiste, Amandine; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Puy, Hervé; Elie, Caroline; Karim, Zoubida; Ernst, Olivier; Rose, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The risk and clinical significance of cardiac iron overload due to chronic transfusion varies with the underlying disease. Cardiac iron overload shortens the life expectancy of patients with thalassemia, whereas its effect is unclear in those with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA), iron does not seem to deposit quickly in the heart. Our primary objective was to assess through a multicentric study the prevalence of cardiac iron overload, defined as a cardiovascular magnetic resonance T2*<20 ms, in patients with thalassemia, SCA, or MDS. Patient inclusion criteria were an accurate record of erythrocyte concentrates (ECs) received, a transfusion history >8 ECs in the past year, and age older than 6 years. We included from 9 centers 20 patients with thalassemia, 41 with SCA, and 25 with MDS in 2012-2014. Erythrocytapharesis did not consistently prevent iron overload in patients with SCA. Cardiac iron overload was found in 3 (15%) patients with thalassemia, none with SCA, and 4 (16%) with MDS. The liver iron content (LIC) ranged from 10.4 to 15.2 mg/g dry weight, with no significant differences across groups (P = 0.29). Abnormal T2* was not significantly associated with any of the measures of transfusion or chelation. Ferritin levels showed a strong association with LIC. Non-transferrin-bound iron was high in the thalassemia and MDS groups but low in the SCA group (P<0.001). Hepcidin was low in thalassemia, normal in SCA, and markedly elevated in MDS (P<0.001). Two mechanisms may explain that iron deposition largely spares the heart in SCA: the high level of erythropoiesis recycles the iron and the chronic inflammation retains iron within the macrophages. Thalassemia, in contrast, is characterized by inefficient erythropoiesis, unable to handle free iron. Iron accumulation varies widely in MDS syndromes due to the competing influences of abnormal erythropoiesis, excess iron supply, and inflammation.

  19. Certain Autoimmune Manifestations Are Associated With Distinctive Karyotypes and Outcomes in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jin; Park, Jin Kyun; Lee, Eun Young; Joo, Sang Hyun; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Lee, Eun Bong; Song, Yeong Wook; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune manifestations (AIMs) are common in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). This study aimed to investigate whether AIMs are associated with a specific cytogenetic abnormalities and worse survival in patients with MDS. A total of 67 MDS patients with AIMs and 134 age- and sex-matched MDS patients without AIMs, all of whom received medical care at Seoul National University Hospital from January 2000 through July 2014, were enrolled. The clinical features, chromosomal abnormalities, and outcomes were examined. The effect of AIMs on mortality was estimated after adjusting for age, sex, and the International Prognostic Scoring System. The mean age (±SD) at the time of MDS diagnosis was 54.5 ± 17.1 years, and 44.8% of patients were male. Neutrophilic dermatosis (ND; Sweet syndrome and pyoderma gangrenosum) was the most prevalent AIM (n = 24 36%]), followed by Behcet disease (10 [15%]), rheumatoid arthritis (9 [13%]), vasculitis (8 [12%]), myositis (3 [4%]), spondyloarthropathy (3 [4%]), and systemic lupus erythematous (2 [3%]). ND and vasculitis occurred at the time of MDS diagnosis, whereas other AIMs occurred years after MDS diagnosis. Deletion of 5q was associated with ND (P = 0.001), whereas trisomy 8 was associated with Behcet disease (P = 0.015). Strikingly, ND was associated with a 1.8-fold increase in mortality (95% CI 1.033–3.093; P = 0.038). Certain AIMs in MDS patients are associated with distinctive karyotypes and worse survival. A larger study is needed to confirm whether the presence of AIMs influences disease outcome in MDS. PMID:27043672

  20. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant in adult patients with myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN) overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prashant; Shinde, Shivani S; Damlaj, Moussab; Hefazi Rorghabeh, Mehrdad; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Litzow, Mark R; Hogan, William J; Gangat, Naseema; Elliott, Michelle A; Al-Kali, Aref; Tefferi, Ayalew; Patnaik, Mrinal M

    2017-04-01

    MDS/MPN (myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm) overlap syndromes are myeloid malignancies for which allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) is potentially curative. We describe transplant outcomes of 43 patients - 35 with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, CMML (of which 17 had blast transformation, BT) and eight with MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN,U). At median follow-up of 21 months, overall survival (OS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) and non-relapse mortality (NRM) were 55%, 29%, and 25% respectively in CMML without BT and 47%, 40%, and 34% respectively in CMML with BT. Higher HSCT-comorbidity index (HSCT-CI >3 versus ≤3; p = 0.015) and splenomegaly (p = 0.006) predicted worse OS in CMML without BT. In CMML with BT, engraftment failure (p = 0.006) and higher HSCT-CI (p = 0.03) were associated with inferior OS, while HSCT within 1-year of diagnosis was associated with improved OS (p = 0.045). In MDS/MPN,U, at median follow-up of 15 months, OS, CIR, and NRM were 62%, 30%, and 14%, respectively.

  1. [Review of evidence of thalidomide and lenalidomide in different hematological diseases: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, primary amyloidosis, myelofibrosis and syndrome myelodysplastic].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Lozano, I; Juárez Jiménez, J C

    2013-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug approved by the AEMPS and the EMA, in combination with dexamethasone, for the treatment of multiple myeloma in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy. Moreover, it has recently been approved for the treatment of patients with transfusion-dependent anaemia due to low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndromes associated with an isolated deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality when other therapeutic options are insufficient or inadequate. It has also shown to be active in other hematologic and no hematologic diseases. Growing evidence of its use entails a challenge when situating the drug in a cost-effective way to treat these diseases. On this article we review the available evidence on the use of lenalidomide in the second line treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, primary amyloidosis and primary myelofibrosis, and in the first line treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, and also the evidence of other immunomodulators. Different clinical practice guidelines and scientific evidence portals consider lenalidomide a valid alternative in the first-line treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, specially those with the deletion of 5q, and in second line for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, the available evidence of lenalidomide in the treatment of patients with primary amyloidosis and primary myelofibrosis is limited, ant thus is not considered as the first choice treatment. In any case, the treatment of choice should consider the safety profile in each patient, the previous treatments that has received and the own therapeutic protocols of each center.

  2. p53 protein expression independently predicts outcome in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q)

    PubMed Central

    Saft, Leonie; Karimi, Mohsen; Ghaderi, Mehran; Matolcsy, András; Mufti, Ghulam J.; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Göhring, Gudrun; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Muus, Petra; Sanz, Guillermo; Mittelman, Moshe; Bowen, David; Porwit, Anna; Fu, Tommy; Backstrom, Jay; Fenaux, Pierre; MacBeth, Kyle J.; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System as low- or intermediate-1-risk (lower-risk) are considered to have an indolent course; however, recent data have identified a subgroup of these patients with more aggressive disease and poorer outcomes. Using deep sequencing technology, we previously demonstrated that 18% of patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes carry TP53 mutated subclones rendering them at higher risk of progression. In this study, bone marrow biopsies from 85 patients treated with lenalidomide in the MDS-004 clinical trial were retrospectively assessed for p53 expression by immunohistochemistry in association with outcome. Strong p53 expression in ≥1% of bone marrow progenitor cells, observed in 35% (30 of 85) of patients, was significantly associated with higher acute myeloid leukemia risk (P=0.0006), shorter overall survival (P=0.0175), and a lower cytogenetic response rate (P=0.009), but not with achievement or duration of 26-week transfusion independence response. In a multivariate analysis, p53-positive immunohistochemistry was the strongest independent predictor of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.0035). Pyrosequencing analysis of laser-microdissected cells with strong p53 expression confirmed the TP53 mutation, whereas cells with moderate expression predominantly had wild-type p53. This study validates p53 immunohistochemistry as a strong and clinically useful predictive tool in patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. This study was based on data from the MDS 004 trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00179621). PMID:24682512

  3. Vatalanib population pharmacokinetics in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: CALGB 10105 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Owzar, Kouros; Gupta, Pankaj; Larson, Richard A; Mulkey, Flora; Miller, Antonius A; Lewis, Lionel D; Hurd, David; Vij, Ravi; Ratain, Mark J; Murry, Daryl J

    2014-01-01

    Aims Vatalanib is an oral anti-angiogenesis agent that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, which in patients showed auto induction of metabolism and variability in pharmacokinetic (PK) disposition. The objective was to characterize the population PK and time-dependent change in vatalanib clearance and assess exposure–toxicity relationship in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Methods This was an open-label phase II study of vatalanib in MDS patients receiving 750–1250 mg once daily in 28-day cycles. Serial blood samples were obtained and plasma vatalanib concentrations measured by HPLC. Population PK analysis was performed using nonmem 7.2 with FO estimation since FOCE failed. The final model was evaluated using goodness-of-fit plots, bootstrap analysis, and visual predictive check. Results Pharmacokinetic data were complete for 137 patients (86 M, 51 F), of median age 70 years (range 20–91). A one-compartment model with lagged first-order absorption and time-dependent change in oral clearance was fitted to the vatalanib plasma concentration versus time data. The population means for pre-induction and post-induction oral clearance were 24.1 l h–1 (range: 9.6–45.5) and 54.9 l h–1 (range: 39.8–75.6), respectively. The apparent oral clearance increased 2.3-fold, (range: 1.7–4.1-fold) from first dose to steady state. Our data did not identify a significant relationship of the predefined covariates with vatalanib pharmacokinetics, although power to detect such a relationship was limited. Conclusions Vatalanib pharmacokinetics were highly variable and the extent of auto induction was not determined to correlate with any of the pre-defined covariates. PMID:24838014

  4. Cost-effectiveness in Canada of azacitidine for the treatment of higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Levy, A R; Zou, D; Risebrough, N; Buckstein, R; Kim, T; Brereton, N

    2014-02-01

    Our goal was to determine the economic value of azacitidine in Canada compared with conventional care regimens (ccrs), including best supportive care (bsc) and low- or standard-dose chemotherapy plus bsc in the treatment of higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (mdss) and acute myeloid leukemia (aml) with 20%-30% blasts. The cost-utility model is a lifetime probabilistic Markov model with a 35-day cycle length consisting of 3 health states: mds; transformation to aml with more than 30% blasts; and death. A third-party public payer perspective was adopted. Overall survival was extrapolated beyond the time horizon of the aza-001 trial comparing azacitidine with ccr. Resource use was determined through a questionnaire completed by Canadian hematologists. Utility values were obtained from two studies in which EQ-5D health questionnaire values were mapped from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer qlq-C30 survey, and SF-6D scores were mapped from the Short Form 12, elicited from 191 and 43 patients in two different trials. In the base case, azacitidine had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (icer) of $86,182 (95% confidence limits: $69,920, $107,157) per quality-adjusted life year (qaly) gained relative to ccr. Comparing azacitidine with bsc, low-dose chemotherapy plus bsc, and standard-dose chemotherapy plus bsc, the icers were, respectively, $86,973, $84,829, and $2,152 per qaly gained. Results were most sensitive to the utility for azacitidine after 6 months of treatment and to overall survival. The prolonged 9-month median overall survival with azacitidine relative to ccr fills a gap w hen treating patients with higher-risk mds and aml with 20%-30% blasts. The economic value of azacitidine is within the threshold of willingness-to-pay for third-party public payers for oncology treatments in Canada.

  5. Cost-effectiveness in Canada of azacitidine for the treatment of higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Levy, A.R.; Zou, D.; Risebrough, N.; Buckstein, R.; Kim, T.; Brereton, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to determine the economic value of azacitidine in Canada compared with conventional care regimens (ccrs), including best supportive care (bsc) and low- or standard-dose chemotherapy plus bsc in the treatment of higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (mdss) and acute myeloid leukemia (aml) with 20%–30% blasts. Methods The cost–utility model is a lifetime probabilistic Markov model with a 35-day cycle length consisting of 3 health states: mds; transformation to aml with more than 30% blasts; and death. A third-party public payer perspective was adopted. Overall survival was extrapolated beyond the time horizon of the aza-001 trial comparing azacitidine with ccr. Resource use was determined through a questionnaire completed by Canadian hematologists. Utility values were obtained from two studies in which EQ-5D health questionnaire values were mapped from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer qlq-C30 survey, and SF-6D scores were mapped from the Short Form 12, elicited from 191 and 43 patients in two different trials. Results In the base case, azacitidine had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (icer) of $86,182 (95% confidence limits: $69,920, $107,157) per quality-adjusted life year (qaly) gained relative to ccr. Comparing azacitidine with bsc, low-dose chemotherapy plus bsc, and standard-dose chemotherapy plus bsc, the icers were, respectively, $86,973, $84,829, and $2,152 per qaly gained. Results were most sensitive to the utility for azacitidine after 6 months of treatment and to overall survival. Conclusions The prolonged 9-month median overall survival with azacitidine relative to ccr fills a gap w hen treating patients with higher-risk mds and aml with 20%–30% blasts. The economic value of azacitidine is within the threshold of willingness-to-pay for third-party public payers for oncology treatments in Canada. PMID:24523619

  6. [Clinical analysis in a cohort of 102 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome characterized by erythroid hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Sun, A N; Chen, S N; Wang, Q R; Zhang, T T; Wu, D P

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and laboratorial characteristics of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and erythroid hyperplasia. Methods: MDS patients whose bone marrow was hypercellular with erythroid lineage more than 50% and blasts account for less than 20% of non-erythroid cells were enrolled in this study. The ratio of mature erythrocytes to nucleated erythrocytes was no more than 20, namely MDS patients with erythroid hyperplasia(MDS-E). The retrospective analysis comprised 102 patients with MDS-E from the First Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University. Clinical characteristics, karyotype, and the prognostic significance of erythroid hyperplasia were evaluated. Results: A total of 48 MDS-E patients (47.1%) presented a variety of cytogenetic abnormalities. The most frequently involved chromosomes were chromosome 8 (39.5% of all abnormal karyotypes), chromosome 7 (22.9%), followed by chromosome 5 (18.8%), chromosome 1 (16.7%) and chromosome 20 (16.7%). Hemoglobin (Hb) level affected the prognosis by survival analysis. The overall survival (OS) of MDS-E patients with Hb equal or more than 70 g/L was longer than that of patients less than 70 g/L (P<0.001). Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) significantly improved the OS compared with best supportive care (P<0.001) and chemotherapy (P<0.001). The extent of erythroid hyperplasia in bone marrow did not impact on prognosis (P=0.187). Conclusions: Compared with previous reports of MDS patients, MDS-E patients have higher level of erythroid hyperplasia, more common erythroid dyshematopoiesis, more frequent 8 and 1 chromosome abnormalities. The degree of erythroid hyperplasia is not correlated with prognosis. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation improves the prognosis.

  7. Incidence of myelodysplastic syndromes in patients receiving concurrent myelosuppressive chemotherapy and pegfilgrastim.

    PubMed

    Covert, Wendy M; Murillo, Jose R; Cox, James E

    2011-12-01

    The World Health Organization classifies myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) as a group of hematologic malignancies where at least one myeloid lineage contains ≥10% cells with myelodysplasia. Therapy-related MDS (t-MDS) may result from treatment with myelosuppressive chemotherapy and/or radiation. Myeloid growth factors, such as pegfilgrastim, have also been investigated as a possible risk factor for development of t-MDS. National guidelines and myeloid growth factor prescribing information recommend administering myeloid growth factors after a minimum of 24 h following myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Some evidence suggests that administering myeloid growth factors and myelosuppressive chemotherapy concurrently may increase the risk of developing t-MDS. To evaluate the incidence of t-MDS in patients who received pegfilgrastim and chemotherapy on the same day compared to patients receiving pegfilgrastim at least 1 day following completion of their chemotherapy. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify all patients who received myelosuppressive chemotherapy and pegfilgrastim on the same day between January 2003 and December 2007. Any initial diagnosis of t-MDS was clinically confirmed. A total of 227 patients received myelosuppressive chemotherapy and pegfilgrastim on the same day. Median time to follow-up was 3.47 years (IQR 1.15). Two patients had a confirmed diagnosis of t-MDS. The incidence of t-MDS in patients receiving concurrent myelosuppressive chemotherapy and pegfilgrastim in our study population is 0.88%. Administering pegfilgrastim at least 1 day after myelosuppressive chemotherapy may help reduce the risk of t-MDS, but more studies with longer follow-up are needed to confirm this finding.

  8. Novel therapeutic strategies using hypomethylating agents in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takayuki

    2014-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic neoplasm with high rates of leukemic transformation. MDS had been an intractable disease for which the mainstream of therapeutic approach was best supportive care. Recently, however, treatment of hematological malignancies has benefited from advances in molecular targeted drug discovery such as the revolutionary drug imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, and from the reappraisal of forgotten drugs such as thalidomide for multiple myeloma. Two azanucleotide drugs, azacitidine (AZA) and decitabine, were created as anti-neoplastic drugs in the 1960s with little success. In the 1980s, they were reassessed as hypomethylating agents (HMAs), and the introduction of low-dose schedules of them has shown dramatic effects in the delay of leukemic evolution for high-risk MDS. AZA was approved in Japan in March 2011 and has become a standard drug of choice in the treatment of high-risk MDS. Its position as a treatment for low-risk MDS remains to be established. Only half of patients with high-risk MDS can gain benefit from AZA. For example, those with complex karyotypes experience only a limited extension in survival. In addition, AZA resistance develops sooner or later. To achieve a more sustained disease control of high-risk MDS, the combined use of HMAs with other therapeutic approaches will be inevitable. Clinical trials of histone deacetylase inhibitors, lenalidomide, thrombopoietin agonists, or anticancer drugs in combination with HMAs are ongoing. In addition, HMAs are being used as a bridging therapy prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) and the salvage therapy of relapsed disease after AHSCT. Thus, HMAs will continue to be key drugs for the management of MDS.

  9. Telomere stability is frequently impaired in high-risk groups of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ohyashiki, J H; Iwama, H; Yahata, N; Ando, K; Hayashi, S; Shay, J W; Ohyashiki, K

    1999-05-01

    Genomic instability induces an accumulation of genetic changes and may play a role in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). To clarify the possible association between genomic instability and clinical outcome in MDS patients, we compared telomere dynamics to the recently established International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) risk groups for MDS. We measured the terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) of 93 patients with MDS at the time of diagnosis, and telomerase activity was analyzed in 62 patients with MDS using the PCR-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. A total of 53 of 93 MDS patients had TRFs within the age-matched normal range, and the remaining patients showed shortened TRFs (35 patients) or elongated TRFs (5 patients). MDS patients with shortened TRFs had a significantly low hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.04), a high percentage of marrow blasts (P = 0.02), and a high incidence of cytogenetic abnormalities (P < 0.05). The incidence of leukemic transformation was significantly high in patients with shortened TRF length (P < 0.05). In addition, patients with shortened TRF length were frequently seen in the IPSS high-risk group (P < 0.01). Most of the MDS patients had normal-to-low levels of telomerase activity, suggesting that changes in TRF length rather than telomerase activity may more accurately reflect the pathophysiology of MDS. MDS patients with shortened TRF length had a very poor prognosis (P < 0.01), suggesting that telomere dynamics may be linked to clinical outcome in MDS patients. Thus, an abnormal mechanism of telomere maintenance in subgroups of MDS patients may be an early indication of genomic instability. This study demonstrates that telomere stability is frequently impaired in a high-risk group of MDS patients and suggests that, in combination with the IPSS classification system, measurement of TRFs may be useful in the future to stratify MDS patients according to risk and manage the care of MDS

  10. Maintenance Therapy with Decitabine after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Iskra; Choi, Jaebok; Fiala, Mark A; Gao, Feng; Holt, Matthew; Cashen, Amanda F; Vij, Ravi; Abboud, Camille N; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E; Jacoby, Meghan A; Uy, Geoffrey L; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2015-10-01

    Decitabine is a hypomethylating agent that irreversibly inhibits DNA methyltransferase I, inducing leukemic differentiation and re-expression of epigenetically silenced putative tumor antigens. We assessed safety and efficacy of decitabine maintenance after allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Decitabine maintenance may help eradicate minimal residual disease, decrease the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and facilitate a graft-versus-leukemia effect by enhancing the effect of T regulatory lymphocytes. Patients with AML/MDS in complete remission (CR) after allotransplantation started decitabine between day +50 and +100. We investigated 4 decitabine doses in cohorts of 4 patients: 5, 7.5, 10, and 15 mg/m(2)/day × 5 days every 6 weeks, for a maximum 8 cycles. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the maximum dose at which ≤ 25% of people experience dose-limiting toxicities during the first cycle of treatment. Twenty-four patients were enrolled and 22 were evaluable. All 4 dose levels were completed and no MTD was reached. Overall, decitabine maintenance was well tolerated. Grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicities were experienced by 75% of patients, including all patients treated at the highest dose level. Nine patients completed all 8 cycles and 8 of them remain in CR. Nine patients died from relapse (n = 4), infectious complications (n = 3), and GVHD (n = 2). Most occurrences of acute GVHD were mild and resolved without interruption of treatment; 1 patient died of acute gut GVHD. Decitabine maintenance did not clearly impact the rate of chronic GVHD. Although there was a trend of increased FOXP3 expression, results were not statistically significant. In conclusion, decitabine maintenance is associated with acceptable toxicities when given in the post-allotransplantation setting. Although the MTD was not reached, the dose of 10 mg/m(2) for 5 days every 6 weeks appeared to be the

  11. Considering Bone Marrow Blasts From Nonerythroid Cellularity Improves the Prognostic Evaluation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Arenillas, Leonor; Calvo, Xavier; Luño, Elisa; Senent, Leonor; Alonso, Esther; Ramos, Fernando; Ardanaz, María Teresa; Pedro, Carme; Tormo, Mar; Marco, Víctor; Montoro, Julia; Díez-Campelo, María; Brunet, Salut; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Xicoy, Blanca; Andreu, Rafael; Bonanad, Santiago; Jerez, Andrés; Nomdedeu, Benet; Ferrer, Ana; Sanz, Guillermo F; Florensa, Lourdes

    2016-09-20

    WHO classification of myeloid malignancies is based mainly on the percentage of bone marrow (BM) blasts. This is considered from total nucleated cells (TNCs), unless there is erythroid-hyperplasia (erythroblasts ≥ 50%), calculated from nonerythroid cells (NECs). In these instances, when BM blasts are ≥ 20%, the disorder is classified as erythroleukemia, and when BM blasts are < 20%, as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In the latter, the percentage of blasts is considered from TNCs. We assessed the percentage of BM blasts from TNCs and NECs in 3,692 patients with MDS from the Grupo Español de Síndromes Mielodisplásicos, 465 patients with erythroid hyperplasia (MDS-E) and 3,227 patients without erythroid hyperplasia. We evaluated the relevance of both quantifications on classification and prognostication. By enumerating blasts systematically from NECs, 22% of patients with MDS-E and 12% with MDS from the whole series diagnosed within WHO categories with < 5% BM blasts, were reclassified into higher-risk categories and showed a poorer overall survival than did those who remained in initial categories (P = .006 and P = .001, respectively). Following WHO recommendations, refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB)-2 diagnosis is not possible in MDS-E, as patients with 10% to < 20% BM blasts from TNCs fulfill erythroleukemia criteria; however, by considering blasts from NECs, 72 patients were recoded as RAEB-2 and showed an inferior overall survival than did patients with RAEB-1 without erythroid hyperplasia. Recalculating the International Prognostic Scoring System by enumerating blasts from NECs in MDS-E and in the overall MDS population reclassified approximately 9% of lower-risk patients into higher-risk categories, which indicated the survival expected for higher-risk patients. Regardless of the presence of erythroid hyperplasia, calculating the percentage of BM blasts from NECs improves prognostic assessment of MDS. This fact should be considered in future

  12. Chromothripsis Is a Recurrent Genomic Abnormality in High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Abáigar, María; Robledo, Cristina; Benito, Rocío; Ramos, Fernando; Díez-Campelo, María; Hermosín, Lourdes; Sánchez-del-Real, Javier; Alonso, Jose M.; Cuello, Rebeca; Megido, Marta; Rodríguez, Juan N.; Martín-Núñez, Guillermo; Aguilar, Carlos; Vargas, Manuel; Martín, Ana A.; García, Juan L.; Kohlmann, Alexander; del Cañizo, M. Consuelo; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    To explore novel genetic abnormalities occurring in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) through an integrative study combining array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a series of MDS and MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) patients. 301 patients diagnosed with MDS (n = 240) or MDS/MPN (n = 61) were studied at the time of diagnosis. A genome-wide analysis of DNA copy number abnormalities was performed. In addition, a mutational analysis of DNMT3A, TET2, RUNX1, TP53 and BCOR genes was performed by NGS in selected cases. 285 abnormalities were identified in 71 patients (23.6%). Three high-risk MDS cases (1.2%) displayed chromothripsis involving exclusively chromosome 13 and affecting some cancer genes: FLT3, BRCA2 and RB1. All three cases carried TP53 mutations as revealed by NGS. Moreover, in the whole series, the integrative analysis of aCGH and NGS enabled the identification of cryptic recurrent deletions in 2p23.3 (DNMT3A; n = 2.8%), 4q24 (TET2; n = 10%) 17p13 (TP53; n = 8.5%), 21q22 (RUNX1; n = 7%), and Xp11.4 (BCOR; n = 2.8%), while mutations in the non-deleted allele where found only in DNMT3A (n = 1), TET2 (n = 3), and TP53 (n = 4). These cryptic abnormalities were detected mainly in patients with normal (45%) or non-informative (15%) karyotype by conventional cytogenetics, except for those with TP53 deletion and mutation (15%), which had a complex karyotype. In addition to well-known copy number defects, the presence of chromothripsis involving chromosome 13 was a novel recurrent change in high-risk MDS patients. Array CGH analysis revealed the presence of cryptic abnormalities in genomic regions where MDS-related genes, such as TET2, DNMT3A, RUNX1 and BCOR, are located. PMID:27741277

  13. Effect of lenalidomide treatment on clonal architecture of myelodysplastic syndromes without 5q deletion

    PubMed Central

    Chesnais, Virginie; Renneville, Aline; Toma, Andrea; Lambert, Jérôme; Passet, Marie; Dumont, Florent; Chevret, Sylvie; Lejeune, Julie; Raimbault, Anna; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Rose, Christian; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Delaunay, Jacques; Solary, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Preudhomme, Claude; Kosmider, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Non-del(5q) transfusion-dependent low/intermediate-1 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients achieve an erythroid response with lenalidomide in 25% of cases. Addition of an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent could improve response rate. The impact of recurrent somatic mutations identified in the diseased clone in response to lenalidomide and the drug’s effects on clonal evolution remain unknown. We investigated recurrent mutations by next-generation sequencing in 94 non-del(5q) MDS patients randomized in the GFM-Len-Epo-08 clinical trial to lenalidomide or lenalidomide plus epoetin β. Clonal evolution was analyzed after 4 cycles of treatment in 42 cases and reanalyzed at later time points in 18 cases. The fate of clonal architecture of single CD34+CD38− hematopoietic stem cells was also determined in 5 cases. Mutation frequency was >10%: SF3B1 (74.5%), TET2 (45.7%), DNMT3A (20.2%), and ASXL1 (19.1%). Analysis of variant allele frequencies indicated a decrease of major mutations in 15 of 20 responders compared with 10 of 22 nonresponders after 4 cycles. The decrease in the variant allele frequency of major mutations was more significant in responders than in nonresponders (P < .001). Genotyping of single CD34+CD38− cell–derived colonies showed that the decrease in the size of dominant subclones could be associated with the rise of founding clones or of hematopoietic stem cells devoid of recurrent mutations. These effects remained transient, and disease escape was associated with the re-emergence of the dominant subclones. In conclusion, we show that, although the drug initially modulates the distribution of subclones, loss of treatment efficacy coincides with the re-expansion of the dominant subclone. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01718379. PMID:26626993

  14. Association of loss of heterozygosity with cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, R F; Serio, F M; Silva, M R R; Briones, M R S; Chauffaille, M L L F

    2008-07-01

    Deletions on chromosomes 5 and 7 are frequently seen in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It is assumed that these deletions indicate loss of tumor suppressor genes on these chromosomes and until these tumor suppressor genes are identified, the functional consequences of these deletions and the molecular basis of these myeloid disorders cannot be completely understood. We evaluated loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 44 patients (18 MDS and 26 AML, diagnosed according to WHO classification criteria) at diagnosis, using a four-microsatellite marker panel: an intragenic marker on the 7th intron of gene IRF-1 of the 5q31.1 region and three markers located inside the 7q31.1 region and correlated the LOH with karyotype abnormalities. The microsatellites chosen corresponded to chromosome regions frequently deleted in MDS/AML. The samples with Q (peak area) less than or equal to 0.50 were indicative of LOH. The percent of informative samples (i.e., heterozygous) for the intragenic microsatellite in gene IRF-1 and in loci D7S486, D7S515 and D7S522 were 66.6, 73.7, 75.5, and 48.8%, respectively. Cytogenetic abnormalities by G-banding were found in 36% (16/44) of the patients (2 of 18 MDS and 14 of 26 AML patients). We found a significantly positive association of the occurrence of LOH with abnormal karyotype (P < 0.05; chi-square test) and there were cases with LOH but the karyotype was normal (by G-banding). These data indicate that LOH in different microsatellite markers is possibly an event previous to chromosomal abnormalities in these myeloid neoplasias.

  15. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Zeidan, Amer M; Yu, James B; Soulos, Pamela R; Davidoff, Amy J; Gore, Steven D; Huntington, Scott F; Gross, Cary P; Ma, Xiaomei

    2017-04-01

    To understand the impact of radiotherapy on the development of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) among elderly prostate cancer patients. We performed a retrospective cohort study of elderly prostate cancer patients diagnosed during 1999-2011 by using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare linked database. Competing risk analyses adjusting for patient characteristics were conducted to assess the impact of radiotherapy on the development of subsequent MDS/AML, compared with surgery. Of 32,112 prostate cancer patients, 14,672 underwent radiotherapy, and 17,440 received surgery only. The median follow-up was 4.68 years. A total of 157 (0.47%) prostate cancer patients developed subsequent MDS or AML, and the median time to develop MDS/AML was 3.30 (range: 0.16-9.48) years. Compared with prostate cancer patients who received surgery only, patients who underwent radiotherapy had a significantly increased risk of developing MDS/AML (hazard ratio [HR] =1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07-2.13). When radiotherapy was further categorized by modalities (brachytherapy, conventional conformal radiotherapy, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]), increased risk of second MDS/AML was only observed in the IMRT group (HR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.09-2.54). Our findings suggest that radiotherapy for prostate cancer increases the risk of MDS/AML, and the impact may differ by modality. Additional studies with longer follow-up are needed to further clarify the role of radiotherapy in the development of subsequent myeloid malignancies. A better understanding may help patients, physicians, and other stakeholders make more informed treatment decisions. Prostate 77:437-445, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Somatic Mutations Predict Poor Outcome in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome After Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bejar, Rafael; Stevenson, Kristen E.; Caughey, Bennett; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Mar, Brenton G.; Stojanov, Petar; Getz, Gad; Steensma, David P.; Ritz, Jerome; Soiffer, Robert; Antin, Joseph H.; Alyea, Edwin; Armand, Philippe; Ho, Vincent; Koreth, John; Neuberg, Donna; Cutler, Corey S.; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recurrently mutated genes in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are pathogenic drivers and powerfully associated with clinical phenotype and prognosis. Whether these types of mutations predict outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients with MDS is not known. Patients and Methods We used massively parallel sequencing to examine tumor samples collected from 87 patients with MDS before HSCT for coding mutations in 40 recurrently mutated MDS genes. Results Mutations were identified in 92% of patients, most frequently in the ASXL1 (29%), TP53 (21%), DNMT3A (18%), and RUNX1 (16%) genes. In univariable analyses, only TP53 mutations were associated with shorter overall (OS; hazard ratio [HR], 3.74; P < .001) and progression-free survival (HR, 3.97; P < .001). After adjustment for clinical variables associated with these end points, mutations in TP53 (HR, 2.30; P = .027), TET2 (HR, 2.40; P = .033), and DNMT3A (HR, 2.08; P = .049) were associated with decreased OS. In multivariable analysis including clinical variables, complex karyotype status, and candidate genes, mutations in TP53 (HR, 4.22; P ≤ .001) and TET2 (HR, 1.68; P = .037) were each independently associated with shorter OS. Nearly one half of patients (46%) carried a mutation in TP53, DNMT3A, or TET2 and accounted for 64% of deaths. Three-year OS in patients without these mutations was 59% (95% CI, 43% to 72%), versus 19% (95% CI, 9% to 33%) in patients with these mutations. Conclusion Mutations in TP53, TET2, or DNMT3A identify patients with MDS with shorter OS after HSCT. PMID:25092778

  17. An exploratory clinical trial of bortezomib in patients with lower risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Daher, May; Hidalgo Lopez, Juliana Elisa; Randhawa, Jasleen K; Jabbar, Kausar Jabeen; Wei, Yue; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Borthakur, Gautam; Kadia, Tapan; Konopleva, Marina; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Hearn, Katherine; Estrov, Zeev; Reyes, Steven; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2017-03-31

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and an increased risk of transformation. Few effective therapies are available for lower risk MDS patients, especially after the failure of hypomethylating agents. MDS progenitor cells are dependent on the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) for survival, which makes it an attractive therapeutic target. As a proteosomal inhibitor, bortezomib is thought to have inhibitory activity against NF-κB. We designed a proof-of-principle study of subcutaneous (SC) bortezomib in lower risk MDS patients with evidence of NF-κB activation in their bone marrow. Fifteen patients were treated, their median age was 71 (range 56-87), 33% were low and 67% int-1 by IPSS, median number of prior therapies was 2, all patients were transfusion dependent. Baseline median pp65 percentage was 31% and 11 patients had evidence of ring sideroblasts. SC bortezomib was safe, well tolerated with no excess toxicity. Three patients out of the 15 (20%) had evidence of response with hematologic improvement (HI-E). Bortezomib caused a decrease in pp65 levels in 7 out of 13 evaluable patients (54%, p=0.025). Of interest, unexpectedly, we observed a significant decrease in ring sideroblasts in 7 out of 10 (70%) evaluable patients during treatment. In conclusion, this study suggests that NF-κB activation, measured by pp65 levels, may be a useful biomarker in MDS. Bortezomib is safe in this patient population but has modest clinical activity. The role of the proteasome in the genesis of ring sideroblasts needs further study. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. [Correlation of chromosome karyotype with dyshaematopoiesis and reticulin in myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yan-Chao; Sun, Hui; Gan, Si-Lin; Liu, Yan-Fang; Xie, Xin-Sheng; Zhang, Qiu-Tang; Li, Tao; Gao, Juan

    2013-04-01

    This study was purposed to explore the correlation of chromosome karyotype with dyshaematopoiesis and reticulin in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The data of 202 MDS patients diagnosed and treated in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University were retrospectively analyzed in term of chromosome karyotype, dyshaematopoiesis and reticulin detection results. The chromosome karyotypes were categorized according to the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS). The results showed that there was a positive correlation between chromosome karyotype grading and number of lineages with dyshaematopoiesis (r = 0.443, P < 0.05). The detected rates of multilineage dyshaematopoiesis in patients with good, intermediate and poor chromosome karyotypes were 44.4%, 71.4% and 96.3% respectively. There was a positive correlation between chromosome karyotype grading and reticulin grading (r = 0.451, P < 0.05). The positive rates of reticulin in patients with good grading, intermediate and poor chromosome karyotypes were 36.8%, 64.3% and 92.6% respectively. The detected rate of multilineage dyshaematopoiesis, number of lineages with dyshaematopoiesis, the positive rate of reticulin and reticulin grade in patients with poor karyotypes were higher than those in patients with intermediate or good chromosome karyotypes (separately P < 0.01). The above data in patients with intermediate chromosome karyotypes were higher than those in patients with good chromosome karyotypes (separately P < 0.01). It is concluded that the chromosome karyotype grading positively correlates with the number of lineages with dyshaematopoiesis and reticulin grading. When the chromosome karyotype changed from good to poor, the detected rate of multilineage dyshaematopoiesis, number of lineages with dyshaematopoiesis, positive rate of reticulin and reticulin grading became higher and higher.

  19. Are myelodysplastic syndromes underdiagnosed in Poland? A report by the Polish Adult Leukaemia Group.

    PubMed

    Drozd-Sokołowska, Joanna E; Mądry, Krzysztof; Waszczuk-Gajda, Anna; Żółtak, Tomasz; Sikorska, Anna; Mital, Andrzej; Wajs, Jarosław; Semeńczuk, Grażyna; Szmigielska-Kapłon, Anna; Szczepańska, Magdalena; Wasilewska, Ewa; Szwedyk, Paweł; Hołojda, Jadwiga; Wątek, Marzena; Stella-Hołowiecka, Beata; Soroka-Wojtaszko, Maria; Homenda, Wojciech; Polak, Mirosław; Guzicka-Kazimierska, Renata; Porowska, Agnieszka; Wiktor-Jędrzejczak, Wiesław; Dwilewicz-Trojaczek, Jadwiga

    2017-02-01

    The epidemiology of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) differs among countries. Here, we present the first epidemiological indices determined for Poland. Twenty-one haematological centres participated in the study. Patients diagnosed with MDS and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) with 20-29% blasts were enrolled. Data collection was conducted for strictly predefined period. The overall crude incidence rate for all MDS subtypes was 1.95 (95% CI, 1.81-2.09) per 100 000 person-years: 2.46 (95% CI, 2.24-2.69) for males and 1.47 (95% CI, 1.31-1.65) for females; after excluding AML cases, the indices were as follows: 2.35 (95% CI, 2.08-2.66) for males and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08-1.5) for females. Prevalence rate was 6.2 per 100 000 persons (95% CI, 5.96-6.45), that is 6.86 (95% CI, 6.49-7.24) for males and 5.58 (95% CI, 5.26-5.92) for females. Both incidence and prevalence increased with increasing age. The most frequently diagnosed MDS subtype was refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD), responsible for 30.3% of all newly diagnosed MDSs. RCMD is the most frequent MDS subtype in Poland. Incidence and prevalence indices are lower than those reported for other populations, which probably results from inadequate diagnosis of potential cases of this disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Impairment of FOS mRNA stabilization following translation arrest in granulocytes from myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaomin; Shikama, Yayoi; Shichishima, Tsutomu; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Kazuei; Kimura, Hideo; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kimura, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Although quantitative and qualitative granulocyte defects have been described in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the underlying molecular basis of granulocyte dysfunction in MDS is largely unknown. We recently found that FOS mRNA elevation under translation-inhibiting stimuli was significantly smaller in granulocytes from MDS patients than in healthy individuals. The aim of this study is to clarify the cause of the impaired FOS induction in MDS. We first examined the mechanisms of FOS mRNA elevation using granulocytes from healthy donors cultured with the translation inhibitor emetine. Emetine increased both transcription and mRNA stability of FOS. p38 MAPK inhibition abolished the emetine-induced increase of FOS transcription but did not affect FOS mRNA stabilization. The binding of an AU-rich element (ARE)-binding protein HuR to FOS mRNA containing an ARE in 3'UTR was increased by emetine, and the knockdown of HuR reduced the FOS mRNA stabilizing effect of emetine. We next compared the emetine-induced transcription and mRNA stabilization of FOS between MDS patients and healthy controls. Increased rates of FOS transcription by emetine were similar in MDS and controls. In the absence of emetine, FOS mRNA decayed to nearly 17% of initial levels in 45 min in both groups. In the presence of emetine, however, 76.7±19.8% of FOS mRNA remained after 45 min in healthy controls, versus 37.9±25.5% in MDS (P<0.01). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating attenuation of stress-induced FOS mRNA stabilization in MDS granulocytes.

  1. Effect of IL-7 and IL-15 on T cell phenotype in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen; Ding, Tingting; Wu, Lei; Ren, Xiubao; Epling-Burnette, P K; Yang, Lili

    2016-05-10

    Aberrant T cell phenotype is one of the characteristics of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In this study, we detected an increased concentration of IL-15 in the plasma of MDS patients (n = 20) compared with that in the plasma of healthy controls (n = 20). In MDS patients, reduced naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells [16.11 ± 6.56 vs. 24.11 ± 7.18 for CD4+ T cells (p < 0.001) and 13.15 ± 5.67 vs. 23.51 ± 6.25 for CD8+ T cells (p < 0.001)] were observed. The reduced naïve and increased effector memory T cells were significantly correlated with IL-15 plasma level. Then, the effect of IL-15 and IL-7 was tested in vitro. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from MDS were treated for 15 days with IL-15. This treatment significantly decreased naïve CD4+ (p < 0.001) and CD8+ (p < 0.001) T cells and correspondingly increased terminal memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (p < 0.001). Treatment with IL-7 increased naïve CD4+ (p < 0.05) and CD8+ (p < 0.001) T cells. Our results indicated that exposure to high levels of IL-15 may be involved in the T cell phenotype conversion observed in MDS. IL-7 may be one of the promising therapeutic candidates for recovering the effector immune compartment in MDS patients.

  2. Risk for developing myelodysplastic syndromes in prostate cancer patients definitively treated with radiation.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sudipto; Reddy, Chandana A; Ciezki, Jay P; Abdel-Wahab, May; Tiu, Ramon V; Copelan, Edward; Advani, Anjali A; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Paulic, Katarina; Hobson, Sean; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Bolwell, Brian J; Kalaycio, Matt; Dreicer, Robert; Klein, Eric A; Sekeres, Mikkael A

    2014-03-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation has been linked to myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS); it is not clear whether therapeutic radiation doses used for prostate cancer pose an increased MDS risk. We performed a retrospective cohort study of prostate cancer patients diagnosed between 1986 and 2011 at Cleveland Clinic, comparing those who underwent definitive treatment with radical prostatectomy (RP) to radiotherapy either external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) or prostate interstitial brachytherapy (PI) and to population-based registries. Competing risk regression analyses were used to determine the cumulative risk of developing MDS. All statistical tests were two-sided. Of 10924 patients, 5119 (47%) received radiation (n = 2183 [43%] in EBRT group and n = 2936 [57%] in PI group) and 5805 (53%) were treated with RP. Overall, 31 cases of MDS were observed, with age-adjusted incidence rates no higher than in population-based registries. In univariate analyses, advancing age (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09 to 1.20; P < .001) and radiotherapy exposure (HR = 3.44; 95% CI = 1.41 to 8.37; P = .007) were statistically significantly associated with development of MDS. In multivariable analyses, although advanced age (HR = 1.13; 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.19; P < .001) remained statistically associated with MDS, radiation did not, although a small non-statistically significant trend existed for PI-treated patients. MDS rates were no higher than in population-based registries. With relatively short follow-up, prostate cancer patients definitively treated with radiation did not appear to have a statistically increased risk of subsequent MDS.

  3. A calcium- and calpain-dependent pathway determines the response to lenalidomide in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing; Liu, Xiaona; Bolanos, Lyndsey; Barker, Brenden; Rigolino, Carmela; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Oliva, Esther N; Cuzzola, Maria; Grimes, H Leighton; Fontanillo, Celia; Komurov, Kakajan; MacBeth, Kyle; Starczynowski, Daniel T

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high response rates of individuals with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with deletion of chromosome 5q (del(5q)) to treatment with lenalidomide (LEN) and the recent identification of cereblon (CRBN) as the molecular target of LEN, the cellular mechanism by which LEN eliminates MDS clones remains elusive. Here we performed an RNA interference screen to delineate gene regulatory networks that mediate LEN responsiveness in an MDS cell line, MDSL. We identified GPR68, which encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor that has been implicated in calcium metabolism, as the top candidate gene for modulating sensitivity to LEN. LEN induced GPR68 expression via IKAROS family zinc finger 1 (IKZF1), resulting in increased cytosolic calcium levels and activation of a calcium-dependent calpain, CAPN1, which were requisite steps for induction of apoptosis in MDS cells and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. In contrast, deletion of GPR68 or inhibition of calcium and calpain activation suppressed LEN-induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, expression of calpastatin (CAST), an endogenous CAPN1 inhibitor that is encoded by a gene (CAST) deleted in del(5q) MDS, correlated with LEN responsiveness in patients with del(5q) MDS. Depletion of CAST restored responsiveness of LEN-resistant non-del(5q) MDS cells and AML cells, providing an explanation for the superior responses of patients with del(5q) MDS to LEN treatment. Our study describes a cellular mechanism by which LEN, acting through CRBN and IKZF1, has cytotoxic effects in MDS and AML that depend on a calcium- and calpain-dependent pathway.

  4. Distinct mutation profile and prognostic relevance in patients with hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndromes (h-MDS).

    PubMed

    Yao, Chi-Yuan; Hou, Hsin-An; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Lin, Chien-Chin; Chou, Wen-Chien; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Wu, Shang-Ju; Liao, Xiu-Wen; Lin, Chien-Ting; Ko, Bor-Shen; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Li, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shang-Yi; Yao, Ming; Tang, Jih-Luh; Tsay, Woei; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2016-09-27

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies. Although most MDS patients have normal or increased BM cellularity (NH-MDS), some have hypocellular BM (h-MDS). The reports concerning the differences in genetic alterations between h-MDS and NH-MDS patients are limited. In this study, 369 MDS patients diagnosed according to the WHO 2008 criteria were recruited. h-MDS patients had lower PB white blood cell and blast counts, and lower BM blast percentages, than those with NH-MDS. h-MDS was closely associated with lower-risk MDS, defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and revised IPSS (IPSS-R). IPSS-R could properly predict the prognosis in h-MDS (P<0.001) as in NH-MDS patients. The h-MDS patients had lower incidences of RUNX1, ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2 and TP53 mutations than NH-MDS patients. The cumulated incidence of acute leukemic transformation at 5 years was 19.3% for h-MDS and 40.4% for NH-MDS patients (P= 0.001). Further, the patients with h-MDS had longer overall survival (OS) than those with NH-MDS (P= 0.001), and BM hypocellularity remains an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS irrespective of age, IPSS-R, and gene mutations. Our findings provide evidence that h-MDS indeed represent a distinct clinico-biological subgroup of MDS and can predict better leukemia-free survival and OS.

  5. Inter-observer variance with the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) following the 2008 WHO classification.

    PubMed

    Font, P; Loscertales, J; Benavente, C; Bermejo, A; Callejas, M; Garcia-Alonso, L; Garcia-Marcilla, A; Gil, S; Lopez-Rubio, M; Martin, E; Muñoz, C; Ricard, P; Soto, C; Balsalobre, P; Villegas, A

    2013-01-01

    Morphology is the basis of the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The WHO classification offers prognostic information and helps with the treatment decisions. However, morphological changes are subject to potential inter-observer variance. The aim of our study was to explore the reliability of the 2008 WHO classification of MDS, reviewing 100 samples previously diagnosed with MDS using the 2001 WHO criteria. Specimens were collected from 10 hospitals and were evaluated by 10 morphologists, working in five pairs. Each observer evaluated 20 samples, and each sample was analyzed independently by two morphologists. The second observer was blinded to the clinical and laboratory data, except for the peripheral blood (PB) counts. Nineteen cases were considered as unclassified MDS (MDS-U) by the 2001 WHO classification, but only three remained as MDS-U by the 2008 WHO proposal. Discordance was observed in 26 of the 95 samples considered suitable (27 %). Although there were a high number of observers taking part, the rate of discordance was quite similar among the five pairs. The inter-observer concordance was very good regarding refractory anemia with excess blasts type 1 (RAEB-1) (10 of 12 cases, 84 %), RAEB-2 (nine of 10 cases, 90 %), and also good regarding refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (37 of 50 cases, 74 %). However, the categories with unilineage dysplasia were not reproducible in most of the cases. The rate of concordance with refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia was 40 % (two of five cases) and 25 % with RA with ring sideroblasts (two of eight). Our results show that the 2008 WHO classification gives a more accurate stratification of MDS but also illustrates the difficulty in diagnosing MDS with unilineage dysplasia.

  6. SF3B1 haploinsufficiency leads to formation of ring sideroblasts in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Visconte, Valeria; Rogers, Heesun J.; Singh, Jarnail; Barnard, John; Bupathi, Manoj; Traina, Fabiola; McMahon, James; Makishima, Hideki; Szpurka, Hadrian; Jankowska, Anna; Jerez, Andres; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Advani, Anjali S.; Copelan, Edward; Koseki, Haruhiko; Isono, Kyoichi; Padgett, Richard A.; Osman, Sami; Koide, Kazunori; O'Keefe, Christine; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2012-01-01

    Whole exome/genome sequencing has been fundamental in the identification of somatic mutations in the spliceosome machinery in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and other hematologic disorders. SF3B1, splicing factor 3b subunit 1 is mutated in 60%-80% of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) and RARS associated with thrombocytosis (RARS-T), 2 distinct subtypes of MDS and MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDSs/MPNs). An idiosyncratic feature of RARS/RARS-T is the presence of abnormal sideroblasts characterized by iron overload in the mitochondria, called RS. Based on the high frequency of mutations of SF3B1 in RARS/RARS-T, we investigated the consequences of SF3B1 alterations. Ultrastructurally, SF3B1 mutants showed altered iron distribution characterized by coarse iron deposits compared with wild-type RARS patients by transmission electron microscopy. SF3B1 knockdown experiments in K562 cells resulted in down-regulation of U2-type intron-splicing by RT-PCR. RNA-sequencing analysis of SF3B1 mutants showed differentially used genes relevant in MDS pathogenesis, such as ASXL1, CBL, EZH, and RUNX families. A SF3B pharmacologic inhibitor, meayamycin, induced the formation of RS in healthy BM cells. Further, BM aspirates of Sf3b1 heterozygous knockout mice showed RS by Prussian blue. In conclusion, we report the first experimental evidence of the association between SF3B1 and RS phenotype. Our data suggest that SF3B1 haploinsufficiency leads to RS formation. PMID:22826563

  7. Decitabine can be safely reduced after achievement of best objective response in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Hady; Cornelison, A Megan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop; Ravandi, Farhad; Kadia, Tapan; Cortes, Jorge; O'Brien, Susan; Brandt, Mark; Borthakur, Gautam; Jabbour, Elias

    2013-09-01

    Decitabine is standard therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Current recommendations suggest a dose of 20 mg/m(2) intravenously (IV) daily for 5 days every 4 weeks. However, this therapy is associated with frequent grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity, requiring dose delays and/or dose reductions (DD/DR). We investigated the outcomes of 122 patients with MDS who had DD/DR of frontline decitabine therapy. Sixty-five patients (53%) had DR by at least 25% or DD (defined as a delay beyond 5 weeks between cycles). Thirty-five patients (29%) underwent DD/DR after achieving best objective response, 30 patients (25%) underwent DD/DR before best objective response, and 57 (54%) patients had no DD/DR. There was a trend for more durable responses in favor of patients requiring DD/DR after the achievement of best objective response (median not reached) (P = .161). Overall survival rates were significantly higher for patients who had DD/DR after best objective response compared with those who had DD/DR before best objective response or those with no DD/DR (30 vs. 22 vs. 11 months, respectively; P < .001). Progression-free survival (PFS) rates also trended higher for those with DD/DR after best objective response (median not reached) compared with those who required DD/DR before best objective response (median of 15 months) (P = .285). DD/DR may be safely accomplished once the patient has achieved best objective response (preferably complete remission [CR]) without impacting outcome. Prospective evaluation of an approach conceived of a loading dose for induction of a best objective response followed by a maintenance schedule is to be considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular matching for Rh and K reduces red blood cell alloimmunisation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guelsin, Gláucia A.S.; Rodrigues, Camila; Visentainer, Jeane E.L.; de Melo Campos, Paula; Traina, Fabíola; Gilli, Simone C.O.; Saad, Sara T.O.; Castilho, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Background Matching for Rh and K antigens has been used in an attempt to reduce antibody formation in patients receiving chronic transfusions but an extended phenotype matching including Fya and Jka antigens has also been recommended. The aim of this study was to identify an efficient transfusion protocol of genotype matching for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. We also examined a possible association of HLA class II alleles with red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunisation. Materials and methods We evaluated 43 patients with MDS undergoing transfusion therapy with and without antibody formation. We investigated antigen-matched RBC units for ABO, D, C, c, E, e, K, Fya, Fyb, Jka, Jkb, S, s, Doa, Dob and Dia on the patients’ samples and on the donor units serologically matched for them based on their ABO, Rh and K phenotypes and presence of antibodies. We also determined the frequencies of HLA-DRB1 alleles in the alloimmunised and non-alloimmunised patients. Results Seventeen of the 43 patients had discrepancies or mismatches for multiple antigens between their genotype-predicted profile and the antigen profile of the units of blood serologically matched for them. We verified that 36.8% of patients had more than one RBC alloantibody and 10.5% of patients had autoantibodies. Although we were able to find a better match for the patients in our extended genotyped/phenotyped units, we verified that matching for Rh and K would be sufficient for most of the patients. We also observed an over-representation of the HLA-DRB1*13 allele in the non-alloimmunised group of patients with MDS. Discussion In our population molecular matching for C, c, E, e, K was able to reduce RBC alloimmunisation in MDS patients. An association of HLA-DRB1*13 and protection from RBC alloimmunisation should be confirmed. PMID:24960644

  9. [Predict response to decitabine in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and related neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y S; Guo, J; Xu, F; Wu, D; Wu, L Y; Song, L L; Xiao, C; Li, X; Chang, C K

    2017-02-14

    Objective: To identify clinical and molecular signatures for predicting response to decitabine (DAC) in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and related neoplasms. Methods: The clinical characteristics of 109 patients with MDS and related neoplasms who were treated with DAC were analyzed retrospectively and the next target sequencing was performed to define recurrently mutated genes in these disease samples, to examine the association of the clinical and molecular signatures with response to DAC treatment. Results: Of 109 MDS and related neoplasms patients, there were 70 males and 39 females, the median age was 61 years old (ranges: 17-85 years old) . According to the international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) , 46 cases were included in the relatively low risk group (low risk and intermediate-1 risk) , 63 in the relative high risk group (intermediate-2 and high risk) . There were 21 cases with complex karyotype, 17 chromosome 7 abnormality and 17 monosomal karyotype. The median courses of DAC treatment was 4 (2-11) . A total of 74 patients achieved response (67.9%) and 30 (27.5%) achieved complete response (CR) . Univariate analysis found that CR was higher in patients with high risk of IPSS, complex karyotypes, monosomal karyotypes, chromosome 7 abnormality, and platelet doubling after one cycle of DAC treatment. Patients with TP53 gene mutation were more likely to receive CR, 10 of 15 patients with TP53 mutations achieved CR. (66.7%) , which was significantly higher than that of the patients without TP53 gene mutation (21.3%) (P=0.001) . Multivariate analysis showed that TP53 gene mutation, platelet doubling after one cycle of DAC treatment and the complex karyotype were independent prognostic factors for CR. Of them, TP53 gene mutation is the strongest predictor (OR=4.39, 95%CI, 1.20-16.06, P=0.026) . Conclusion: TP53 mutation, platelet doubling after one cycle of DAC treatment and complex karyotypes could predict CR to DAC.

  10. Feedback signals in myelodysplastic syndromes: increased self-renewal of the malignant clone suppresses normal hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Walenda, Thomas; Stiehl, Thomas; Braun, Hanna; Fröbel, Julia; Ho, Anthony D; Schroeder, Thomas; Goecke, Tamme W; Rath, Björn; Germing, Ulrich; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are triggered by an aberrant hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). It is, however, unclear how this clone interferes with physiologic blood formation. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that the MDS clone impinges on feedback signals for self-renewal and differentiation and thereby suppresses normal hematopoiesis. Based on the theory that the MDS clone affects feedback signals for self-renewal and differentiation and hence suppresses normal hematopoiesis, we have developed a mathematical model to simulate different modifications in MDS-initiating cells and systemic feedback signals during disease development. These simulations revealed that the disease initiating cells must have higher self-renewal rates than normal HSCs to outcompete normal hematopoiesis. We assumed that self-renewal is the default pathway of stem and progenitor cells which is down-regulated by an increasing number of primitive cells in the bone marrow niche--including the premature MDS cells. Furthermore, the proliferative signal is up-regulated by cytopenia. Overall, our model is compatible with clinically observed MDS development, even though a single mutation scenario is unlikely for real disease progression which is usually associated with complex clonal hierarchy. For experimental validation of systemic feedback signals, we analyzed the impact of MDS patient derived serum on hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro: in fact, MDS serum slightly increased proliferation, whereas maintenance of primitive phenotype was reduced. However, MDS serum did not significantly affect colony forming unit (CFU) frequencies indicating that regulation of self-renewal may involve local signals from the niche. Taken together, we suggest that initial mutations in MDS particularly favor aberrant high self-renewal rates. Accumulation of primitive MDS cells in the bone marrow then interferes with feedback signals for normal hematopoiesis--which then results in cytopenia.

  11. Assessing karyotype precision by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization in the myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide microarray-based research investigations have revealed a high frequency of submicroscopic copy number alterations (CNAs) in the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), suggesting microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has the potential to detect new clinically relevant genomic markers in a diagnostic laboratory. Results We performed an exploratory study on 30 cases of MDS, myeloproliferative neoplasia (MPN) or evolving acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (% bone marrow blasts ≤ 30%, range 0-30%, median, 8%) by aCGH, using a genome-wide bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) microarray. The sample data were compared to corresponding cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and clinical-pathological findings. Previously unidentified imbalances, in particular those considered submicroscopic aberrations (< 10 Mb), were confirmed by FISH analysis. CNAs identified by aCGH were concordant with the cytogenetic/FISH results in 25/30 (83%) of the samples tested. aCGH revealed new CNAs in 14/30 (47%) patients, including 28 submicroscopic or hidden aberrations verified by FISH studies. Cryptic 344-kb RUNX1 deletions were found in three patients at time of AML transformation. Other hidden CNAs involved 3q26.2/EVI1, 5q22/APC, 5q32/TCERG1,12p13.1/EMP1, 12q21.3/KITLG, and 17q11.2/NF1. Gains of CCND2/12p13.32 were detected in two patients. aCGH failed to detect a balanced translocation (n = 1) and low-level clonality (n = 4) in five karyotypically aberrant samples, revealing clinically important assay limitations. Conclusions The detection of previously known and unknown genomic alterations suggests that aCGH has considerable promise for identification of both recurring microscopic and submicroscopic genomic imbalances that contribute to myeloid disease pathogenesis and progression. These findings suggest that development of higher-resolution microarray platforms could improve karyotyping in clinical practice. PMID:21078186

  12. Cost of transfusion-dependent myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) from a German payer's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kühne, Felicitas; Mittendorf, Thomas; Germing, Ulrich; Tesch, Hans; Weinberg, Reiner; Grabenhorst, Ulrich; Mohr, Andreas; Lipp, Rainer; von der Schulenburg, Johann Matthias

    2010-12-01

    No curative treatment exists for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) besides allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Hence, palliative treatment is provided for a life time accruing high health care cost. As no study in cost of MDS exists in Germany, the objective of this study was to assess and analyze costs of transfusion-dependent low/intermediate-1-risk MDS in Germany from a payers' perspective. From seven centers, 116 low/intermediate-1-risk transfusion-dependent MDS patients with and without isolated 5q-deletion were identified. Claims data and patient records of the previous 5 years were used to collect health care utilization data retrospectively. Publicly available tariff books and remuneration schemes were applied to evaluate mean costs per year in Euro with 2007 as base year. The annual cost of MDS patients was estimated at 14,883. Subgroup analyses showed differences in patient's characteristics and outcomes among patients treated at a hospital-based vs. an office-based setting. Patients treated at the hospital-based registry show higher cost, whereas the reasons for that still need to be detected. Overall, per annum direct costs range from 12,543 (SD 12,967) to 24,957 (SD 36,399) in different subgroups of patients. In both groups, patients with 5q-deletion use more medication than those without deletion. Mean costs for medication in the office-based setting are 5,902 for patients with isolated 5q-deletion vs. 3,932 for patients with no deletion, respectively. MDS leads to a high health care utilization and resulting costs for the health care system which requires a detailed analysis of underlying services.

  13. Tumor suppressor microRNAs are downregulated in myelodysplastic syndrome with spliceosome mutations

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Derya; Garde, Christian; Nygaard, Mette Katrine; Helbo, Alexandra Søgaard; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Hansen, Jakob Werner; Severinsen, Marianne Tang; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Sjø, Lene Dissing; Grønbæk, Kirsten; Kristensen, Lasse Sommer

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosome mutations are frequently observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, it is largely unknown how these mutations contribute to the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs, which have been implicated in most human cancers due to their role in post transcriptional gene regulation. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of spliceosome mutations on the expression of miRNAs in a cohort of 34 MDS patients. In total, the expression of 76 miRNAs, including mirtrons and splice site overlapping miRNAs, was accurately quantified using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR. The majority of the studied miRNAs have previously been implicated in MDS. Stably expressed miRNA genes for normalization of the data were identified using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. High-resolution melting assays covering all mutational hotspots within SF3B1, SRSF2, and U2AF1 (U2AF35) were developed, and all detected mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Overall, canonical miRNAs were downregulated in spliceosome mutated samples compared to wild-type (P = 0.002), and samples from spliceosome mutated patients clustered together in hierarchical cluster analyses. Among the most downregulated miRNAs were several tumor-suppressor miRNAs, including several let-7 family members, miR-423, and miR-103a. Finally, we observed that the predicted targets of the most downregulated miRNAs were involved in apoptosis, hematopoiesis, and acute myeloid leukemia among other cancer- and metabolic pathways. Our data indicate that spliceosome mutations may play an important role in MDS pathophysiology by affecting the expression of tumor suppressor miRNA genes involved in the development and progression of MDS. PMID:26848861

  14. TP53 overexpression is an independent adverse prognostic factor in de novo myelodysplastic syndromes with fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Loghavi, Sanam; Al-Ibraheemi, Alyaa; Zuo, Zhuang; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Yabe, Mariko; Wang, Sa A; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Yin, Cameron C; Miranda, Roberto N; Luthra, Raja; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Khoury, Joseph D

    2015-10-01

    Bone marrow (BM) fibrosis is associated with poor prognosis in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). TP53 mutations and TP53 (p53) overexpression in MDS are also associated with poor patient outcomes. The prevalence and significance of TP53 mutations and TP53 overexpression in MDS with fibrosis are unknown. We studied 67 patients with de novo MDS demonstrating moderate to severe reticulin fibrosis (MDS-F). Expression of TP53 was evaluated in BM core biopsy specimens using dual-colour CD34/TP53 immunohistochemistry with computer-assisted image analysis. Mutation analysis was performed using next-generation sequencing, or Sanger sequencing methods. TP53 mutations were present in 47·1% of cases. TP53 mutation was significantly associated with TP53 expression (P = 0·0294). High levels of TP53 expression (3 +  in ≥10% cells) were associated with higher BM blast counts (P = 0·0149); alterations of chromosomes 5 (P = 0·0009) or 7 (P = 0·0141); complex karyotype (P = 0·0002); high- and very-high risk IPSS-R groups (P = 0·009); and TP53 mutations (P = 0·0003). High TP53 expression independently predicted shorter overall survival (OS) by multivariate analysis (P = <0·001). Expression of TP53 by CD34-positive cells was associated with shorter OS and leukaemia-free survival (P = 0·0428). TP53 overexpression is a predictor of poor outcome in patients with MDS-F.

  15. Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome after hematopoietic cell transplantation for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, S; Suzuki, R; Hatano, K; Fukushima, K; Iida, H; Morishima, S; Suehiro, Y; Fukuda, T; Uchida, N; Uchiyama, H; Ikeda, H; Yokota, A; Tsukasaki, K; Yamaguchi, H; Kuroda, J; Nakamae, H; Adachi, Y; Matsuoka, K-I; Nakamura, Y; Atsuta, Y; Suzumiya, J

    2017-04-03

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (t-AML/MDS) represent severe late effects in patients receiving hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for lymphoma. The choice between high-dose therapy with autologous HCT and allogeneic HCT with reduced-intensity conditioning remains controversial in patients with relapsed lymphoma. We retrospectively analyzed incidence and risk factors for the development of t-AML/MDS in lymphoma patients treated with autologous or allogeneic HCT. A total of 13 810 lymphoma patients who received autologous (n=9963) or allogeneic (n=3847) HCT between 1985 and 2012 were considered. At a median overall survival (OS) of 52 and 46 months in autologous and allogeneic HCT groups, respectively, lymphoma patients receiving autologous HCT (1.38% at 3 years after autologous HCT) had a significant risk for developing t-AML/MDS compared to allogeneic HCT (0.37% at 3 years after allogeneic HCT, P<0.001). Significant risk factors for the development of t-AML/MDS after autologous and allogeneic HCT were high-stage risk at HCT (P=0.04) or secondary malignancies (P<0.001) and receiving cord blood stem cell (P=0.03) or involved field radiotherapy (P=0.002), respectively. Strategies that carefully select lymphoma patients for autologous HCT, by excluding lymphoma patients with high-stage risk at HCT, may allow the identification of individual lymphoma patients at particular high risk for t-AML/MDS.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 3 April 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.52.

  16. Genomic Array as Compared to Karyotyping in Myelodysplastic Syndromes in a Prospective Clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian J; Olde Weghuis, Daniel; ElIdrissi-Zaynoun, Najat; van der Reijden, Bert; Cremers, Eline M P; Alhan, Canan; Westers, Theresia M; Visser-Wisselaar, Heleen A; Chitu, Dana A; Cunha, Sonia M; Vellenga, Edo; Klein, Saskia K; Wijermans, Pierre; de Greef, Georgine E; Schaafsma, M R; Muus, Petra; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Jansen, Joop H

    2017-02-25

    Karyotyping is considered as the gold standard in the genetic subclassification of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Oligo/SNP-based genomic array profiling is a high-resolution tool that also enables genome wide analysis. We compared karyotyping with oligo/SNP-based array profiling in 104 MDS patients from the HOVON-89 study. Oligo/SNP-array identified all cytogenetically defined genomic lesions, except for subclones in two cases and balanced translocations in three cases. On the other hand oligo/SNP-based genomic array profiling had a higher success rate, showing 55 abnormal cases, while an abnormal karyotype was found in only 35 patients. In 9 patients whose karyotyping was unsuccessful because of insufficient metaphases or failure, oligo/SNP-based array analysis was successful. Based on cytogenetic visible abnormalities as identified by oligo/SNP-based genomic array prognostic scores based on IPSS/-R were assigned. These prognostic scores were identical to the IPSS/-R scores as obtained with karyotyping in 95-96% of the patients. In addition to the detection of cytogenetically defined lesions, oligo/SNP-based genomic profiling identified focal copy number abnormalities or regions of copy neutral loss of heterozygosity that were out of the scope of karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of interest, in 26 patients we demonstrated such cytogenetic invisible abnormalities. These abnormalities often involved regions that are recurrently affected in hematological malignancies, and may therefore be of clinical relevance. Our findings indicate that oligo/SNP-based genomic array can be used to identify the vast majority of recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities in MDS. Furthermore, oligo/SNP-based array profiling yields additional genetic abnormalities that may be of clinical importance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Validation of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System in treated patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Asmita; Corrales-Yepez, Maria; Ali, Najla Al; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K.; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Lancet, Jeffrey E.; List, Alan F.; Komrokji, Rami S.

    2015-01-01

    The International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) was recently revised (IPSS-R) under the auspices of the MDS Foundation as a collaborative international effort to refine its prognostic power. Our purpose was to externally validate this new risk model using a large single-institution cohort, determine its prognostic power in patients receiving active treatment, and explore its utility in guiding therapeutic decisions. Data were collected retrospectively from our myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) database and verified by chart review. Of the data available for 1,088 patients, 152 (14%), 353 (32%), 237 (22%), 190 (18%), and 156 (14%) patients were classified as very low, low, intermediate, high, and very high risk, respectively, with median overall survival (OS) of 90 (95%CI 71–109), 54 (95%CI 50–59), 34 (95%CI 26–43), 21 (95%CI 17–25), and 13 months (95%CI 11– 15), respectively (P < 0.005). We found that the IPSS-R further refined prognostic discrimination in all IPSS risk categories, particularly in the intermediate 1 and 2 groups. Among high and very high IPSS-R patients receiving azacitidine, OS was significantly improved versus patients not receiving azacitidine, with corresponding median OS of 25 versus 18 months (P = 0.028) and 15 versus 9 months (P = 0.005), respectively. Similarly, patients with IPSS-R high- and very high-risk disease who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had significantly improved OS versus nontransplant approaches (P < 0.005). High and very high IPSS-R patients derived a survival advantage from disease-modifying therapies. Our data validate the prognostic value of the proposed IPSS-R and show that its refined IPSS prognostic discrimination can be applied to actively treated patients. PMID:23605934

  18. Distinct mutation profile and prognostic relevance in patients with hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndromes (h-MDS)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzung-Yi; Lin, Chien-Chin; Chou, Wen-Chien; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Wu, Shang-Ju; Liao, Xiu-Wen; Lin, Chien-Ting; Ko, Bor-Shen; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Li, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shang-Yi; Yao, Ming; Tang, Jih-Luh; Tsay, Woei; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies. Although most MDS patients have normal or increased BM cellularity (NH-MDS), some have hypocellular BM (h-MDS). The reports concerning the differences in genetic alterations between h-MDS and NH-MDS patients are limited. In this study, 369 MDS patients diagnosed according to the WHO 2008 criteria were recruited. h-MDS patients had lower PB white blood cell and blast counts, and lower BM blast percentages, than those with NH-MDS. h-MDS was closely associated with lower-risk MDS, defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and revised IPSS (IPSS-R). IPSS-R could properly predict the prognosis in h-MDS (P<0.001) as in NH-MDS patients. The h-MDS patients had lower incidences of RUNX1, ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2 and TP53 mutations than NH-MDS patients. The cumulated incidence of acute leukemic transformation at 5 years was 19.3% for h-MDS and 40.4% for NH-MDS patients (P= 0.001). Further, the patients with h-MDS had longer overall survival (OS) than those with NH-MDS (P= 0.001), and BM hypocellularity remains an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS irrespective of age, IPSS-R, and gene mutations. Our findings provide evidence that h-MDS indeed represent a distinct clinico-biological subgroup of MDS and can predict better leukemia-free survival and OS. PMID:27527853

  19. Review of stem-cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndromes in older patients in the context of the Decision Memo for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndrome emanating from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

    PubMed

    Giralt, Sergio A; Horowitz, Mary; Weisdorf, Daniel; Cutler, Corey

    2011-02-10

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic stem-cell disorders that result in varying degrees of cytopenia and risk of transformation into acute leukemia. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (SCT) is the only known cure for this disease. The treatment is routinely used for younger patients, but only a minority of patients older than the age of 60 undergo this procedure. The overall MDS incidence is 3.3 per 100,000, but the incidence in patients older than age 70 is between 15 and 50 per 100,000. The median age at presentation is 76 years. Medicare-age patients 65 or older represent 80% of the total population receiving an MDS diagnosis. In the United States, one of the obstacles to SCT for older patients with MDS has been lack of third party reimbursement. On August 4, 2010, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released their Decision Memo for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Myelodysplastic Syndrome. This memo states: "Allogeneic HSCT for MDS is covered by Medicare only for beneficiaries with MDS participating in an approved clinical study that meets the criteria below…. " In this review, we will summarize what is known regarding the role of allogeneic SCT in older patients as well as other elements that should be included within clinical trials that can provide the evidence necessary to demonstrate that allogeneic SCT should be a covered benefit for Medicare beneficiaries.

  20. A pediatric case of idiopathic Harlequin syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Moon Souk; Kim, Seung Yeon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Soo Jin; You, Chur Woo; Kim, Jon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Harlequin syndrome, which is a rare disorder caused by dysfunction of the autonomic system, manifests as asymmetric facial flushing and sweating in response to heat, exercise, or emotional factors. The syndrome may be primary (idiopathic) with a benign course, or can occur secondary to structural abnormalities or iatrogenic factors. The precise mechanism underlying idiopathic harlequin syndrome remains unclear. Here, we describe a case of a 6-year-old boy who reported left hemifacial flushing and sweating after exercise. He had an unremarkable birth history and no significant medical history. Complete ophthalmological and neurological examinations were performed, and no other abnormalities were identified. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to exclude lesions of the cerebrum and cervicothoracic spinal cord, and no abnormalities were noted. His final diagnosis was classic idiopathic harlequin syndrome. Herein, we report the first pediatric case of idiopathic harlequin syndrome in Korea. PMID:28018464

  1. Antiretroviral activity of 5-azacytidine during treatment of a HTLV-1 positive myelodysplastic syndrome with autoimmune manifestations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are often accompanied by autoimmune phenomena. The underlying mechanisms for these associations remain uncertain, although T cell activation seems to be important. Human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) has been detected in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, mostly in regions of the world which are endemic for the virus, and where association of HTLV-1 with rheumatological manifestation is not rare. We present here the case of a 58 year old man who presented with cytopenias, leukocytoclastic vasculitis of the skin and glomerulopathy, and was diagnosed as MDS (refractory anemia with excess blasts - RAEB 1). The patient also tested positive for HTLV-1 by PCR. After 8 monthly cycles of 5-azacytidine he achieved a complete hematologic remission. Following treatment, a second PCR for HTLV-1 was carried out and found to be negative. This is the first report in the literature of a HTLV-1-positive MDS with severe autoimmune manifestations, which was treated with the hypomethylating factor 5-azacitidine, achieving cytogenetic remission with concomitant resolution of the autoimmune manifestations, as well as HTLV-1-PCR negativity. HTLV-1-PCR negativity may be due to either immune mediated clearance of the virus, or a potential antiretroviral effect of 5-azacytidine. 5-azacytidine is known for its antiretroviral effects, although there is no proof of its activity against HTLV-1 infection in vivo. PMID:22214262

  2. Development of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia 15 years after hydroxyurea use in a patient with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Baz, Walid; Najfeld, Vesna; Yotsuya, Matthew; Talwar, Jotica; Terjanian, Terenig; Forte, Frank

    2012-01-01

    We report a 41 year old male with sickle cell disease who developed a myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with complex karyotype involving chromosomes 5, 7 and 17 after 15 years of hydroxyurea treatment. He responded poorly to induction chemotherapy with cytarabine/idarubicin followed by high dose cytarabine and succumbed to neutropenic sepsis. Multiple systematic reviews, observational studies and clinical trials were conducted to identify the toxicity profile of hydroxurea. Only six cases of leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome were identified in patients with sickle cell anemia treated with hydroxyurea. Subsequently, it was concluded that hydroxyurea is not leukemogenic. However, it was noted that most of the published studies had only up to 9 years of follow-up. Our patient was started on hydroxyurea in 1990, before the widespread use of the drug and took hydroxyurea for 15 years. His presentation may reflect an outcome otherwise not yet observed because of the short follow-up of prior studies. We believe that the leukemogenic risk of hydroxyurea should be discussed with the patients and their families. Studies evaluating the adverse effects of hydroxyurea should have longer follow-up before definitive conclusions are drawn.

  3. Fatal Relapse of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in a Patient with HIV/Hepatitis C Coinfection Treated with Simeprevir/Sofosbuvir.

    PubMed

    Diejomaoh, Efemena Michael; Gathe, Joseph Clayton; Mayberry, Carl Craig; Clemmons, John Benjamin; Miguel, Bernie; Glombicki, Alan; Daquioag, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Registrational studies and observational cohorts clearly suggest sustained virologic response (SVR) rates in HIV-/hepatitis C-coinfected patients are similar to monoinfected patients when utilizing interferon-free regimens, and this can be accomplished with agents that are well tolerated with minimal adverse events. These randomized trials that led to the approval of several of our new direct-acting antiviral agents, however, specifically excluded patients who had significant comorbidities and none to our knowledge accepted patients with a history of cancer. Therefore, the effect of treatment of active hepatitis C in such patients and the effect on preexisting neoplasia are relatively unknown. We prospectively followed a 62-year-old male coinfected with HIV/hepatitis C who had a history of anal squamous cell carcinoma, prostate carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma all clinically cured and a myelodysplastic syndrome that was in remission. The patient achieved an SVR of hepatitis C with simeprevir/sofosbuvir without ribavirin and died shortly thereafter of a fatal relapse of his previously clinically controlled myelodysplastic syndrome.

  4. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total Body Irradiation Followed by a Donor Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-01

    Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Polycythemia Vera; Polycythemia Vera, Post-Polycythemic Myelofibrosis Phase; Primary Myelofibrosis; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  5. Recurrent unbalanced whole-arm t(1;10)(q10;p10) in myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Odish, Omar Ferkad Faraj; Gotoh, Akihiko; Liu, Yi-Chang; Shoji, Nohoko; Kimura, Yukihiko; Kodama, Atsushi; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2007-01-15

    We report a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome (refractory anemia) showing the karyotype 46,XY,+1,der(1;10)(q10;p10), resulting in trisomy 1q and monosomy 10q abnormality. This finding suggests that either trisomy of 1q or centromeric connection between chromosomes 1 and 10, rather than the absence of 10q, might be essential toward neoplastic transformation.

  6. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  7. Pediatric phantom vision (Charles Bonnet) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mewasingh, Leena D; Kornreich, Charles; Christiaens, Florence; Christophe, Catherine; Dan, Bernard

    2002-02-01

    Visual symptomatology in childhood often presents diagnostic difficulties. Recurrent paroxysmal visual complaints, although typically associated with migraine, may also signal other disorders. We describe a 9-year-old partially sighted male with paroxysmal zoopsias resulting from Charles Bonnet syndrome. This condition is characterized by paroxysmal visual hallucinations occurring in patients with chronic visual impairment, akin to the phantom-limb phenomenon. This pediatric case is the fourth report of this condition. We have reviewed the other cases.

  8. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation is Underutilized in Older Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Getta, Bartlomiej M; Kishtagari, Ashwin; Hilden, Patrick; Tallman, Martin S; Maloy, Molly; Gonzales, Patrick; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Giralt, Sergio; Tamari, Roni; Klimek, Virginia

    2017-03-20

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is the only curative treatment for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The proportion of MDS patients referred for transplant evaluation, those undergoing transplantation and the reasons for not undergoing transplant are unknown. In this retrospective analysis, pre-defined HCT eligibility and indications criteria were applied to 362 unselected patients with newly diagnosed MDS seen by Leukemia faculty between 2008 and 2015 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Two hundred ninety four patients (81%) were deemed eligible for transplant and among these, transplant was considered indicated in 244 (83%). Of these, 158/244 (65%) were referred for transplant evaluation at a median of 3.9 months from diagnosis. Overall 120/362 (33%) underwent transplant at a median of 7.7 months from diagnosis. Metastatic solid organ malignancy was the major reason for transplant ineligibility (54%), and death due to MDS, which occurred in 41% of candidates who were not transplanted, was the major reason for not undergoing transplant. Factors associated with a lower likelihood of referral for transplant evaluation included age ≥65 (p<0.001), ≥2 co-morbidities (p=0.008), intermediate-1/low risk MDS (p<0.001), <5% blasts at diagnosis (overall p<0.001), having medicare/medicaid health insurance (p<0.001), not being married (p=0.017) and diagnosis between 2008-2011 (p=0.035). On multivariate analysis adjusting for all of the previous, diagnosis between 2008-2011 (p<0.001), age ≥65 (p=0.001) and <5% blasts at diagnosis (overall p=0.031) were associated with a lower likelihood of referral for transplant evaluation. Factors associated with a lower likelihood of undergoing transplant included age ≥65 (p<0.001), ≥2 co-morbidities (p=0.003), intermediate-1/low risk MDS (p<0.001), <5% blasts (overall p<0.001), very low/low/intermediate risk IPSS-R karyotype (p=0.018) and having medicare/medicaid health insurance (p<0.001). In

  10. Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Benzene Exposure Among Petroleum Workers: An International Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Benzene at high concentrations is known to cause acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but its relationship with other lymphohematopoietic (LH) cancers remains uncertain, particularly at low concentrations. In this pooled analysis, we examined the risk of five LH cancers relative to lower levels of benzene exposure in petroleum workers. Methods We updated three nested case–control studies from Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom with new incident LH cancers among petroleum distribution workers through December 31, 2006, and pooled 370 potential case subjects and 1587 matched LH cancer-free control subjects. Quantitative benzene exposure in parts per million (ppm) was blindly reconstructed using historical monitoring data, and exposure certainty was scored as high, medium, or low. Two hematopathologists assigned diagnoses and scored the certainty of diagnosis as high, medium, or low. Dose–response relationships were examined for five LH cancers, including the three most common leukemia cell-types (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia [CML], and chronic lymphoid leukemia [CLL]) and two myeloid tumors (myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS] and myeloproliferative disease [MPD]). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, and time period. Results Cumulative benzene exposure showed a monotonic dose–response relationship with MDS (highest vs lowest tertile, >2.93 vs ≤0.348 ppm-years, OR = 4.33, 95% CI = 1.31 to 14.3). For peak benezene exposures (>3 ppm), the risk of MDS was increased in high and medium certainty diagnoses (peak exposure vs no peak exposure, OR = 6.32, 95% CI = 1.32 to 30.2) and in workers having the highest exposure certainty (peak exposure vs no peak exposure, OR = 5.74, 95% CI = 1.05 to 31.2). There was little evidence of dose–response relationships for AML, CLL, CML, or MPD. Conclusions Relatively low-level exposure to benzene experienced by petroleum

  11. The evaluation of iron overload through hepcidin level and its related factors in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shucheng; Song, Xiaoli; Zhao, Youshan; Guo, Juan; Fei, Chengming; Xu, Feng; Wu, Lingyun; Zhang, Xi; Zhao, Jungong; Chang, Chunkang; Li, Xiao

    2013-09-01

    We chose hepcidin and its related factors as evaluating indicators to determine the degrees of iron overload in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients. A total of 73 patients and 28 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. We performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure both bone marrow and peripheral blood serum hepcidin. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the gene expression of growth differentiation factor 15 and twisted gastrulation 1. Serum ferritin (SF), C-reactive protein (CRP), and erythropoietin were measured by routine standard laboratory assays. CD4(+) and CD19(+) lymphocytes and Th polarization were detected by flow cytometry. Twenty-four MDS patients were measured their cardiac and liver iron deposition levels through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2* examination. No significant difference was found between the bone marrow hepcidin levels and peripheral blood hepcidin levels (P = 0.134). Stratified according to different World Health Organization subtypes, refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts patients had the lowest hepcidin levels (105.40 ± 5.13 ng/ml), while refractory anemia with excess blasts-1 had the highest levels (335.71 ± 25.16 ng/ml). Stratified according to International Prognostic Scoring System and WHO Classification-based Prognostic Scoring System, there was a significant difference of hepcidin levels between low-risk group and high-risk group in two systems, respectively (P = 0.033 and 0.009). The hepcidin levels of CD4(+) high-expression group were demonstrated higher than the normal expression groups (P = 0.02), but the CD19(+) high-expression group did not show the same result (P = 0.206). Meanwhile, patients with a Th1 polarization trend had a high level of hepcidin versus normal group (P < 0.001). Liver iron concentration (LIC) measured by MRI T2* had a closer correlation (r = 0.582, P < 0.001) to hepcidin than serum ferritin, by stepwise regression. C

  12. [Clinical observation of decitabine-treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Wang, Quan-Shun; Han, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Wen-Rong; Jing, Yu; Wang, Shu-Hong; Zhang, Song-Song; Mei, Jun-Hui; Yu, Li

    2013-02-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the clinical efficiencies and adverse reactions of treating the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by using decitabine. The clinical data of 12 MDS and AML patients treated with decitabine were analyzed retrospectively. Among 12 patients there were 1 case of MDS-RA, 2 cases of MDS-RAEB-I, 3 cases of MDS-RAEB-II, 2 cases of AML-M4, 2 cases of AML-M5, 1 case of AML-M6 and 1 case of AML-M0. In decitabine chemotherapy program for 5 days (n = 8), decitabine 20 mg/(m(2)·d) × 5 days was applied, 4 weeks for 1 cycle; in program for 3 days (n = 2), decitabine 15 mg/m(2), once 8 h for 3 days, 6 weeks for 1 cycle; another program (n = 2), decitabine 20 mg/(m(2)·d) every other day for 5 times. For 1 patient achieved complete remission (CR) after treatment with decitabine, ID4 gene methylated level was detected by MS-PCR and ML-PCR before and after treatment. The results showed that 2 cases achieved CR, 1 case partial remission, 5 cases stable disease, 1 case progress of disease and 3 cases died. Disease control rate was 66.67% (8/12), the effective rate 25% (3/12). The average survival time was (11.5 ± 2.1) months. 1-year OS rate was 40%, 2-year OS rate was 16.7%. MS-PCR detection showed that the decitabine could significantly reduce the ID4 gene methylation level. It is concluded that decitabine can stabilize disease status of MDS patients, reduce blood transfusion dependence and improve the life quality of patients, and even some patients who transformed from MDS to leukemia achieved CR after treatment with decitabine. Decitabine can reduce the ID4 gene methylation level. The main adverse reaction of decitabine was myelosuppression, infection and so on. So the blood transfusions, antibiotics and other supportive treatments for these patients are needed. Most of patients well tolerate the adverse effects of decitabine after active symptomatic and supportive treatment. The efficacy and survival rate of

  13. Suppression of the DNA damage response in acute myeloid leukemia versus myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boehrer, S; Adès, L; Tajeddine, N; Hofmann, W K; Kriener, S; Bug, G; Ottmann, O G; Ruthardt, M; Galluzzi, L; Fouassier, C; Tailler, M; Olaussen, K A; Gardin, C; Eclache, V; de Botton, S; Thepot, S; Fenaux, P; Kroemer, G

    2009-06-04

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the evolution from the preleukemic entities of low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) to the less favorable forms of high-risk MDS, as well as those enabling transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML), are still incompletely understood. Abundant evidence from solid tumors demonstrates that preneoplastic lesions activate signaling pathways of a DNA damage response (DDR), which functions as an 'anticancer barrier' hindering tumorigenesis. Testing the hypothesis that subgroups of MDS and AML differ with respect to DDR, we first assessed markers of DDR (phosphorylation of ATM, Chk-1, Chk-2 and H2AX) in cell lines representing different entities of MDS (P39, MOLM-13) and AML (MV4-11, KG-1) before and after gamma-irradiation. Although gamma-irradiation induced apoptosis and G(2)/M arrest and a concomitant increase in the phosphorylation of ATM, Chk-1 and H2AX in MDS-derived cell lines, this radiation response was attenuated in the AML-derived cell lines. It is noteworthy that KG-1, but not P39 cells exhibit signs of an endogenous activation of the DDR. Similarly, we found that the frequency of P-ATM(+) cells detectable in bone marrow (BM) biopsies increased in samples from patients with AML as compared with high-risk MDS samples and significantly correlated with the percentage of BM blasts. In contrast, the frequency of gamma-H2AX(+) cells was heterogeneous in all subgroups of AML and MDS. Whereas intermediate-1 MDS samples contained as little P-Chk-1 and P-Chk-2 as healthy controls, staining for both checkpoint kinases increased in intermediate-2 and high-risk MDS, yet declined to near-to-background levels in AML samples. Thus the activation of Chk-1 and Chk-2 behaves in accord with the paradigm established for solid tumors, whereas ATM is activated during and beyond transformation. In conclusion, we demonstrate the heterogeneity of the DDR response in MDS and AML and provide evidence for its selective suppression in AML

  14. Mechanisms of Impaired Neutrophil Migration by MicroRNAs in Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Meiwan; Shikama, Yayoi; Kimura, Hideo; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ono, Tomoyuki; Ogawa, Kazuei; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kimura, Junko

    2017-03-01

    In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), functional defects of neutrophils result in high mortality because of infections; however, the molecular basis remains unclear. We recently found that miR-34a and miR-155 were significantly increased in MDS neutrophils. To clarify the effects of the aberrant microRNA expression on neutrophil functions, we introduced miR-34a, miR-155, or control microRNA into neutrophil-like differentiated HL60 cells. Ectopically introduced miR-34a and miR-155 significantly attenuated migration toward chemoattractants fMLF and IL-8, but enhanced degranulation. To clarify the mechanisms for inhibition of migration, we studied the effects of miR-34a and miR-155 on the migration-regulating Rho family members, Cdc42 and Rac1. The introduced miR-34a and miR-155 decreased the fMLF-induced active form of Cdc42 to 29.0 ± 15.9 and 39.7 ± 4.8% of that in the control cells, respectively, although Cdc42 protein levels were not altered. miR-34a decreased a Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) 8, whereas miR-155 reduced another Cdc42-specific GEF, FYVE, RhoGEF, and PH domain-containing (FGD) 4. The knockdown of DOCK8 and FGD4 by small interfering RNA suppressed Cdc42 activation and fMLF/IL-8-induced migration. miR-155, but not miR-34a, decreased Rac1 protein, and introduction of Rac1 small interfering RNA attenuated Rac1 activation and migration. Neutrophils from patients showed significant attenuation in migration compared with healthy cells, and protein levels of DOCK8, FGD4, and Rac1 were well correlated with migration toward fMLF (r = 0.642, 0.686, and 0.436, respectively) and IL-8 (r = 0.778, 0.659, and 0.606, respectively). Our results indicated that reduction of DOCK8, FGD4, and Rac1 contributes to impaired neutrophil migration in MDS. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Fluorescence in situ hybridization improves the detection of monosomy 7 in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Flactif, M; Lai, J L; Preudhomme, C; Fenaux, P

    1994-06-01

    We performed conventional cytogenetic (CC) and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with an alpha satellite chromosome 7 specific DNA centromeric probe (p alpha 7t1) on bone marrow material prepared for CC in 11 controls and 80 cases of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In controls, a mean of 4.3 +/- 1% of the 700 cells examined showed only one FISH signal for chromosome 7, and the finding of > 6.3% (mean +2 standard deviations) of cells with one FISH signal was considered to indicate the presence of a clone with -7. By CC, clonal -7 was found in 11 patients, whereas two patients had -7 in only one mitose (non-clonal -7). In eight of the 11 cases of clonal -7 by CC, interphase FISH confirmed -7. In the remaining three patients, 5.1%, 6.3% and 18.4% respectively of the cells had one signal. Those three patients had, in addition to -7 by CC, a marker chromosome which was shown to be constituted of chromosome 7 pericentromeric material by FISH analysis on metaphase spreads (metaphase FISH). Of the two patients with non-clonal -7 by CC, one had a -7 clone by interphase FISH whereas the other patient had normal FISH results. Five of the 67 patients with no -7 mitose by CC had clonal -7 by interphase FISH, with one chromosome 7 signal in 14.4 to 39% of the cells examined. At least three mitoses with -7 were found in two of them by metaphase FISH. Three of the five patients were reexamined 12 to 17 months later: CC and metaphase FISH found no -7, whereas interphase FISH still showed a -7 clone. Three of the patients with clonal -7 by CC and by FISH were reexamined in complete hematological remission after intensive therapy. CC found no -7 and interphase FISH was normal in all three patients. Our findings suggest that interphase FISH may improve the detection of -7 in MDS. Conventional cytogenetics should still be performed in parallel to FISH, however, because of possible false negative FISH results when a pericentromeric chromosome 7 marker is

  16. Myelodysplastic syndrome after autologous bone marrow transplantation: an additional late complication of curative cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Miller, J S; Arthur, D C; Litz, C E; Neglia, J P; Miller, W J; Weisdorf, D J

    1994-06-15

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a complication of conventional antineoplastic therapy but has rarely been reported after autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). We reviewed records of 206 patients who underwent ABMT for lymphoma at the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN) between 1974 and 1993. Of 206 patients who underwent ABMT for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) or Hodgkin's disease (HD), 9 patients developed an MDS or secondary acute leukemia between 5 and 60 months (median 34 months) post-BMT. Two patients had relapsed after transplant and received additional therapy before the diagnosis of MDS. They were censored from the statistical analysis, resulting in a cumulative incidence of 14.5% +/- 11.6% (95% confidence interval) at 5 years. Three patients (15.2% +/- 18.0%) had HD, and four (14.0% +/- 14.7%) had NHL. In vitro BM purging had no affect on the incidence of MDS, although patients receiving peripheral blood stem cells had a projected MDS incidence of 31% +/- 33% versus 10.5% +/- 12% if BM cells were used (p = .0035). The patients had received a median of 14 cycles (range, 6 to 40) of chemotherapy before autologous transplantation; Five of nine patients received radiation therapy before BMT conditioning, and all patients received radiation before the diagnosis of MDS. No BM cytogenetic abnormalities were evident pretransplant in three of three patients studied, and all nine had normal pretransplant BM morphology. All patients had morphologic BM findings typical of MDS, and six of six studied had clonal cytogenetic abnormalities. At the diagnosis of MDS, all nine patients were without clinical, radiographic, or autopsy evidence of recurrent lymphoma; Three of the nine patients have died from complications of cytopenias at 23, 36, and 45 months after transplant (3 to 10 months after the diagnosis of MDS), whereas 6 survive 8 to 63 months after transplantation (1 to 34 months post-MDS). These data emphasize the cumulative leukemogenic potential of

  17. TP53 and Decitabine in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher A.; Fronick, Catrina C.; O'Laughlin, Michelle; Fulton, Robert S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Baty, Jack D.; Duncavage, Eric J.; Tandon, Bevan; Lee, Yi-Shan; Wartman, Lukas D.; Uy, Geoffrey L.; Ghobadi, Armin; Tomasson, Michael H.; Pusic, Iskra; Romee, Rizwan; Fehniger, Todd A.; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E.; Vij, Ravi; Oh, Stephen T.; Abboud, Camille N.; Cashen, Amanda F.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Jacoby, Meagan A.; Heath, Sharon E.; Luber, Kierstin; Janke, Megan R.; Hantel, Andrew; Khan, Niloufer; Sukhanova, Madina J.; Knoebel, Randall W.; Stock, Wendy; Graubert, Timothy A.; Walter, Matthew J.; Westervelt, Peter; Link, Daniel C.; DiPersio, John F.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The molecular determinants of clinical responses to decitabine therapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are unclear. METHODS We enrolled 84 adult patients with AML or MDS in a single-institution trial of decitabine to identify somatic mutations and their relationships to clinical responses. Decitabine was administered at a dose of 20 mg per square meter of body-surface area per day for 10 consecutive days in monthly cycles. We performed enhanced exome or gene-panel sequencing in 67 of these patients and serial sequencing at multiple time points to evaluate patterns of mutation clearance in 54 patients. An extension cohort included 32 additional patients who received decitabine in different protocols. RESULTS Of the 116 patients, 53 (46%) had bone marrow blast clearance (<5% blasts). Response rates were higher among patients with an unfavorable-risk cytogenetic profile than among patients with an intermediate-risk or favorable-risk cytogenetic profile (29 of 43 patients [67%] vs. 24 of 71 patients [34%], P<0.001) and among patients with TP53 mutations than among patients with wild-type TP53 (21 of 21 [100%] vs. 32 of 78 [41%], P<0.001). Previous studies have consistently shown that patients with an unfavorable-risk cytogenetic profile and TP53 mutations who receive conventional chemotherapy have poor outcomes. However, in this study of 10-day courses of decitabine, neither of these risk factors was associated with a lower rate of overall survival than the rate of survival among study patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetic profiles. CONCLUSIONS Patients with AML and MDS who had cytogenetic abnormalities associated with unfavorable risk, TP53 mutations, or both had favorable clinical responses and robust (but incomplete) mutation clearance after receiving serial 10-day courses of decitabine. Although these responses were not durable, they resulted in rates of overall survival that were similar to those

  18. Molecular Testing in Myelodysplastic Syndromes for the Practicing Oncologist: Will the Progress Fulfill the Promise?

    PubMed Central

    Nazha, Aziz; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Gore, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are heterogeneous hematopoietic neoplasms that are driven by somatically acquired genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations. Accurate risk stratification is essential for delivery of risk-adaptive therapeutic interventions. The current prognostic tools sum the impact of clinical, pathologic, and laboratory parameters. Newer technologies with next-generation targeted deep sequencing and whole-genome and -exome sequencing have identified several recurrent mutations that play a vital role in the pathophysiology of MDS and the impact of these genetic changes on disease phenotype. Equally important, well-annotated databases of MDS patients with paired clinicopathologic and genetic data have enabled better understanding of the independent prognostic impact of several molecular mutations on important clinical endpoints such as overall survival and probability of leukemic progression. Cumulative evidence suggests that genomic data can also be used clinically to aid with the diagnosis, prognosis, prediction of response to specific therapies, and the development of novel and rationally targeted therapies. However, the optimal use of this mutational profiling remains a work in progress and currently there is no standard set of genes or techniques that are recommended for routine use in the clinic. In this review, we discuss the genomic revolution and its impact on our understanding of MDS biology and risk stratification. We also discuss the current role and the challenges of the application of genetic mutational data into daily clinical practice and how future research could help improve the prognostication precision and specific therapy selection for patients with MDS. Implications for Practice: Heterogeneity in clinical outcomes of MDS is partly related to interpatient variability of recurrent somatic mutations that drive disease phenotype and progression. Although clinical risk stratification tools have functioned well in prognostication

  19. [Mutation of mitochondria cytochrome oxidase gene in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hou, Li; Liu, Ting; Meng, Wen-Tong

    2008-08-01

    The relationship between mitochondria gene mutation and hematological malignancies has been focusing on as a key point in recent studies. This study was aimed to investigate whether in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) exists mitochoudria cytochrome oxidase COI and COII gene mutations different from normal tissues and to analyze whether these mutations are "hot spot" mutations. Eighteen MDS patients aged from 20 to 70 years old were brought into this study, including 2 of RA, 3 of RCMD, 7 of RAEB, 5 of AML (transformation from MDS), and 1 of MDS/MPD. The total DNA was extracted both from bone marrow cells and buccal cells of the same patients. A pair of primers was designed to amplify a fragment with 528 base pair (7181 - 7709) by PCR technique, which contained high frequency mutation area of cytochrome oxidase COI and COII gene based on the literature reports. The PCR products were purified and sequenced as bidirection to confirm if there is any mutation. The results of sequence of COI and COII gene from MDS patient bone marrow cells were compared with both the standard sequence from GenBank and the sequence from MDS patient buccal cells. The results showed that 3 single nucleotide changes in 528 bp cytochrome oxidase gene fragment from 18 MDS patients were confirmed. They were 7674 T-->C, 7353 A-->G, and an insert mutation of G at 7702. The former two mutations caused isoleucine-->methionine, and methionine-->viline. The 7702G ins was only confirmed with marrow cells in a patient, and caused a frame shift, which suggested that the mutation might be related to MDS cells. It is concluded that some of "hot spots" of mtDNA mutation in cytochrome oxidase (COI, COII) gene from our MDS patients are failed to be confirmed, but 3 new mutations on this gene are found, which suggested that mitochondria DNA mutations in MDS patients still have much complexity and heterogeneity, mtDNA mutation may be a prophase or an accompany phenomenon of this disease.

  20. Scoring System Prognostic of Outcome in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kwang Woo; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Malone, Adriana K.; Valcárcel, David; Grunwald, Michael R.; Bacher, Ulrike; Hamilton, Betty; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Saad, Ayman; Cutler, Corey; Warlick, Erica; Reshef, Ran; Wirk, Baldeep Mona; Sabloff, Mitchell; Fasan, Omotayo; Gerds, Aaron; Marks, David; Olsson, Richard; Wood, William Allen; Costa, Luciano J.; Miller, Alan M.; Cortes, Jorge; Daly, Andrew; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila L.; Kamble, Rammurti; Rizzieri, David A.; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Gale, Robert Peter; William, Basem; Litzow, Mark; Wiernik, Peter H.; Liesveld, Jane; Savani, Bipin N.; Vij, Ravi; Ustun, Celalettin; Copelan, Edward; Popat, Uday; Kalaycio, Matt; Maziarz, Richard; Alyea, Edwin; Sobecks, Ron; Pavletic, Steven; Tallman, Martin; Saber, Wael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a system prognostic of outcome in those undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo HCT) for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients and Methods We examined 2,133 patients with MDS undergoing HLA-matched (n = 1,728) or -mismatched (n = 405) allo HCT from 2000 to 2012. We used a Cox multivariable model to identify factors prognostic of mortality in a training subset (n = 1,151) of the HLA-matched cohort. A weighted score using these factors was assigned to the remaining patients undergoing HLA-matched allo HCT (validation cohort; n = 577) as well as to patients undergoing HLA-mismatched allo HCT. Results Blood blasts greater than 3% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.41; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.85), platelets 50 × 109/L or less at transplantation (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.61), Karnofsky performance status less than 90% (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.28), comprehensive cytogenetic risk score of poor or very poor (HR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.80), and age 30 to 49 years (HR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.09 to 2.35) were associated with increased hazard of death and assigned 1 point in the scoring system. Monosomal karyotype (HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.65 to 2.45) and age 50 years or older (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.36 to 2.83) were assigned 2 points. The 3-year overall survival after transplantation in patients with low (0 to 1 points), intermediate (2 to 3), high (4 to 5) and very high (≥ 6) scores was 71% (95% CI, 58% to 85%), 49% (95% CI, 42% to 56%), 41% (95% CI, 31% to 51%), and 25% (95% CI, 4% to 46%), respectively (P < .001). Increasing score was predictive of increased relapse (P < .001) and treatment-related mortality (P < .001) in the HLA-matched set and relapse (P < .001) in the HLA-mismatched cohort. Conclusion The proposed system is prognostic of outcome in patients undergoing HLA-matched and -mismatched allo HCT for MDS. PMID:27044940

  1. Clinical, hematological, and cytogenetic profile of adult myelodysplastic syndrome in a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Santhosh

    2017-01-01

    Background Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a disorder of clonal hematopoiesis, is an important clinical entity, but most of the studies available are conducted among the Western population. Its etiological factors and clinicohematological profile in the Indian population are quite diverse. The information regarding its prognostic factors and cytogenetics is very scarce. Objectives (1) To assess the clinicohematological profile, cytogenetics, prognostic factors, and outcome of MDS and (2) to study its progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the selected patients over the study period. Methods A prospective observational study was performed with patients from Department of Medicine and Hematology, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, who were diagnosed with MDS within the study period (from 1 January 2014 to 31 July 2015). Secondary causes of dysplasia were excluded. In possible cases, the international prognostic scoring system was followed. These patients were followed up for an additional 6 months to assess the progression of MDS to AML based on symptoms, signs, hemogram, or repeat peripheral smear/bone marrow studies. Results Of the 60 patients, 73% were aged >60 years. Disease was common in males, with a male:female ratio of 7:3. Thirty-five percent of the patients were working in agricultural and allied fields and had pesticide exposure. Patients with prior radiation exposure had significant association with adverse outcome. Fatigue was the prominent symptom and was reported by 90% of the patients. Blasts were >5% in peripheral smear; bone marrow cytopenia and dysplasia at the time of diagnosis had significant association with risk of transforming to AML. Refractory anemia (RA), observed in 22 patients, was the most common type of MDS. Most of the patients with RA with excess blasts type-1 and RA with excess blasts type-2 transformed to AML, and the association was statistically significant. Deletion of short arm of fifth chromosome (5q deletion) was

  2. Scoring System Prognostic of Outcome in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Brian C; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Malone, Adriana K; Valcárcel, David; Grunwald, Michael R; Bacher, Ulrike; Hamilton, Betty; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Saad, Ayman; Cutler, Corey; Warlick, Erica; Reshef, Ran; Wirk, Baldeep Mona; Sabloff, Mitchell; Fasan, Omotayo; Gerds, Aaron; Marks, David; Olsson, Richard; Wood, William Allen; Costa, Luciano J; Miller, Alan M; Cortes, Jorge; Daly, Andrew; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila L; Kamble, Rammurti; Rizzieri, David A; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Gale, Robert Peter; William, Basem; Litzow, Mark; Wiernik, Peter H; Liesveld, Jane; Savani, Bipin N; Vij, Ravi; Ustun, Celalettin; Copelan, Edward; Popat, Uday; Kalaycio, Matt; Maziarz, Richard; Alyea, Edwin; Sobecks, Ron; Pavletic, Steven; Tallman, Martin; Saber, Wael

    2016-06-01

    To develop a system prognostic of outcome in those undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo HCT) for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We examined 2,133 patients with MDS undergoing HLA-matched (n = 1,728) or -mismatched (n = 405) allo HCT from 2000 to 2012. We used a Cox multivariable model to identify factors prognostic of mortality in a training subset (n = 1,151) of the HLA-matched cohort. A weighted score using these factors was assigned to the remaining patients undergoing HLA-matched allo HCT (validation cohort; n = 577) as well as to patients undergoing HLA-mismatched allo HCT. Blood blasts greater than 3% (hazard ratio [HR], 1.41; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.85), platelets 50 × 10(9)/L or less at transplantation (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.61), Karnofsky performance status less than 90% (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.28), comprehensive cytogenetic risk score of poor or very poor (HR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.80), and age 30 to 49 years (HR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.09 to 2.35) were associated with increased hazard of death and assigned 1 point in the scoring system. Monosomal karyotype (HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.65 to 2.45) and age 50 years or older (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.36 to 2.83) were assigned 2 points. The 3-year overall survival after transplantation in patients with low (0 to 1 points), intermediate (2 to 3), high (4 to 5) and very high (≥ 6) scores was 71% (95% CI, 58% to 85%), 49% (95% CI, 42% to 56%), 41% (95% CI, 31% to 51%), and 25% (95% CI, 4% to 46%), respectively (P < .001). Increasing score was predictive of increased relapse (P < .001) and treatment-related mortality (P < .001) in the HLA-matched set and relapse (P < .001) in the HLA-mismatched cohort. The proposed system is prognostic of outcome in patients undergoing HLA-matched and -mismatched allo HCT for MDS. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Somatic mutations predict outcomes of hypomethylating therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Seon-Hee; Kim, Hye-Jung; Kwon, Yong-Rim; Hur, Eun-Hye; Goo, Bon-Kwan; Choi, Yun-Suk; Lee, Sug Hyung; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Je-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Although hypomethylating therapy (HMT) is the first line therapy in higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), predicting response to HMT remains an unresolved issue. We aimed to identify mutations associated with response to HMT and survival in MDS. A total of 107 Korean patients with MDS who underwent HMT (57 responders and 50 non-responders) were enrolled. Targeted deep sequencing (median depth of coverage 1,623X) was performed for 26 candidate MDS genes. In multivariate analysis, no mutation was significantly associated with response to HMT, but a lower hemoglobin level (<10g/dL, OR 3.56, 95% CI 1.22-10.33) and low platelet count (<50,000/μL, OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.05-5.93) were independent markers of poor response to HMT. In the subgroup analysis by type of HMT agents, U2AF1 mutation was significantly associated with non-response to azacitidine, which was consistent in multivariate analysis (OR 14.96, 95% CI 1.67-134.18). Regarding overall survival, mutations in DNMT1 (P=0.031), DNMT3A (P=0.006), RAS (P=0.043), and TP53 (P=0.008), and two clinical variables (male-gender, P=0.002; IPSS-R H/VH, P=0.026) were independent predicting factors of poor prognosis. For AML-free survival, mutations in DNMT3A (P<0.001), RAS (P=0.001), and TP53 (P=0.047), and two clinical variables (male-gender, P=0.024; IPSS-R H/VH, P=0.005) were independent predicting factors of poor prognosis. By combining these mutations and clinical predictors, we developed a quantitative scoring model for response to azacitidine, overall- and AML-free survival. Response to azacitidine and survival rates became worse significantly with increasing risk-scores. This scoring model can make prognosis prediction more reliable and clinically applicable. PMID:27419369

  4. Analysis of the erythropoietin receptor gene in patients with myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mittelman, M; Gardyn, J; Carmel, M; Malovani, H; Barak, Y; Nir, U

    1996-06-01

    The human erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) gene has been cloned and characterized. Very few EpoR genetic abnormalities have been reported so far. Polycythemia vera (PV) is characterized by low/normal serum erythropoietin (Epo) levels with proposed Epo hypersensitivity. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by refractory anemia with variable serum Epo levels. Several reports have suggested EpoR abnormalities in both types of stem cell disorders. We analyzed DNA obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of seven healthy controls, 20 patients with myeloproliferative disorders (MPD, 11 patients with PV, five agnogenic myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis, four essential thrombocytosis) and eight patients with refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS), an MDS variant. The DNA was digested with four restriction enzymes (BamHI, Bgl II, Sacl and HindIII), followed by Southern blot, using a 32P radiolabeled probe, containing 1.5 kb of the human EpoR cDNA. All 20 MPD patients and seven out of the eight MDS patients demonstrated a restriction pattern which was identical to the seven normal controls, as well as to the erythroid cell line K562, and also consistent with the expected restriction map, for all four enzymes tested. One RARS patient had a normal pattern with three enzymes but a different one with HindIII. The HindIII 12 kb large band was replaced by a faint 12 kb band and a new (about 9 kb) band appeared. The EpoR restriction map and the normal pattern obtained with the other three enzymes suggest that this patient has a 3 kb upstream deletion in one allelic EpoR gene. The same molecular pattern was detected in the patient's sister, who suffers from anemia with mild bone marrow (BM) dyserythropoiesis and plasmacytosis. Northern blot analysis showed that the patient's BM RNA carried normal EpoR message. This familial pattern may represent polymorphism. However, the patient's very high serum Epo level, her resistance to treatment with

  5. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  6. MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. The Synergistic Effects of Decitabine Combined with Arsenic Trioxide (ATO) in the Human Myelodysplastic Syndrome Cell Line SKM-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Long; Weng, Jianyu; Geng, Suxia; Deng, Chengxin; Lu, Zesheng; Luo, Chengwei; Du, Xin

    2016-12-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), single-agent clinical effects remain unsatisfactory, and decitabine monotherapy is also associated with a relatively low rate of complete remission. To study the combined effects and mechanism of decitabine (DAC) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) on the human myelodysplastic cell line SKM-1,we used the MTS assay and CalcuSyn software to determine the cytotoxicity and potential synergistic effects, respectively. Furthermore, we determined apoptosis and measured the mRNA expression level of two genes that are considered main regulators of the apoptosis process. The results showed that DAC and/or ATO can inhibit the proliferation of SKM-1 cells and demonstrated significant synergy between the two agents (CI < 1). Additionally, combination of 2.5 μmol/L DAC and 5 μmol/L ATO led to a significantly higher apoptosis rate and more significantly decreased the Bcl2/Bax ratio than either compound alone (P < 0.001). Based on the observations of this study, we suggest that combined administration of these two drugs might be considered a novel therapeutic regimen for treating MDS.

  8. Aortic Involvement in Pediatric Marfan syndrome: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ekhomu, Omonigho; Naheed, Zahra J

    2015-06-01

    Outlining specific protocols for the management of pediatric patients with Marfan syndrome has been challenging. This is mostly due to a dearth of clinical studies performed in pediatric patients. In Marfan syndrome, the major sources of morbidity and mortality relate to the cardiovascular system. In this review, we focus on aortic involvement seen in pediatric patients with Marfan syndrome, ranging from aortic dilatation to aortic rupture and heart failure. We discuss the histological, morphological, and pathogenetic basis of the cardiac manifestations seen in pediatric Marfan syndrome and use a specific case to depict our experienced range of cardiovascular manifestations. The survival for patients with Marfan syndrome may approach the expected survival for non-affected patients, with optimal management. With this potentiality in mind, we explore possible and actual management considerations for pediatric Marfan syndrome, examining both medical and surgical therapy modalities that can make the possibility of improved survival a reality.

  9. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-25

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in the Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common disorder characterized by hyperandrogenism and disordered gonadotropin secretion, often associated with insulin resistance. The syndrome, which modulates both hormonal and metabolic processes, is the most common endocrinopathy in reproductive-age women and increases a woman's risk of infertility, endometrial pathology, and cardiometabolic disease. As it is currently defined, PCOS most likely encompasses several distinct diseases with similar clinical phenotypes but different underlying pathophysiological processes. However, hyperandrogenism remains the syndrome's clinical hallmark. The clinical manifestations of PCOS often emerge during childhood or in the peripubertal years, suggesting that the syndrome is influenced by fetal programming and/or early postnatal events. However, given that the full clinical spectrum of PCOS does not typically appear until puberty, a “two-hit” hypothesis has been proposed: (1) a girl develops hyperandrogenism via one or more of many different potential mechanisms; (2) the preexisting hyperandrogenism subsequently disturbs the hypothalamic–pituitary–ovarian axis, resulting in ovulatory dysfunction and sustained hyperandrogenism. No consensus guidelines exist regarding the diagnosis and management of PCOS in the pediatric population; however, because the syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, the clinical evaluation of girls suspected of having PCOS is aimed at excluding other causes of androgen excess and menstrual dysfunction. For the syndrome's management, emphasis is placed on lifestyle and symptom-directed treatment. PMID:20939704

  11. Safety and tolerability of guadecitabine (SGI-110) in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia: a multicentre, randomised, dose-escalation phase 1 study.

    PubMed

    Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Roboz, Gail; Rizzieri, David; Jabbour, Elias; Stock, Wendy; O'Connell, Casey; Yee, Karen; Tibes, Raoul; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Walsh, Katherine; Daver, Naval; Chung, Woonbok; Naim, Sue; Taverna, Pietro; Oganesian, Aram; Hao, Yong; Lowder, James N; Azab, Mohammad; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-09-01

    Hypomethylating agents are used to treat cancers driven by aberrant DNA methylation, but their short half-life might limit their activity, particularly in patients with less proliferative diseases. Guadecitabine (SGI-110) is a novel hypomethylating dinucleotide of decitabine and deoxyguanosine resistant to degradation by cytidine deaminase. We aimed to assess the safety and clinical activity of subcutaneously given guadecitabine in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. In this multicentre, open-label, phase 1 study, patients from nine North American medical centres with myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukaemia that was refractory to or had relapsed after standard treatment were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive subcutaneous guadecitabine, either once-daily for 5 consecutive days (daily × 5), or once-weekly for 3 weeks, in a 28-day treatment cycle. Patients were stratified by disease. A 3 + 3 dose-escalation design was used in which we treated patients with guadecitabine doses of 3-125 mg/m(2) in separate dose-escalation cohorts. A twice-weekly treatment schedule was added to the study after a protocol amendment. The primary objective was to assess safety and tolerability of guadecitabine, determine the maximum tolerated and biologically effective dose, and identify the recommended phase 2 dose of guadecitabine. Safety analyses included all patients who received at least one dose of guadecitabine. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses to determine the biologically effective dose included all patients for whom samples were available. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01261312. Between Jan 4, 2011, and April 11, 2014, we enrolled and treated 93 patients: 35 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and nine patients with myelodysplastic syndrome in the daily × 5 dose-escalation cohorts, 28 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and six patients with myelodysplastic syndrome in the once-weekly dose

  12. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute leukemia after multiple myeloma in the era of novel agents.

    PubMed

    Gertz, Morie A; Terpos, Evangelos; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kumar, Shaji; Shah, Rupin A; Orlowski, Robert; Kastritis, Efstathios; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Shah, Jatin

    2015-06-01

    Survival for patients with multiple myeloma has increased. Both melphalan and lenalidomide are associated with subsequent development of myelodysplasia. We reviewed the cases of all patients with multiple myeloma who had subsequent development of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) during a 12-year period in three centers. Of 55 patients identified, two received only lenalidomide before myelodysplasia developed. The median time between the diagnoses of multiple myeloma and MDS/ANLL was 52.7 months. Median survival after the diagnosis of MDS or ANLL was 6.7 months. Treatment of MDS comprised allogeneic stem cell transplant in eight patients (median survival, 219 days; one patient alive at 624 days) and a hypomethylating agent in 21 patients (response of stable or better in five patients). Myelodysplasia remains a devastating complication of therapy for multiple myeloma, with short survival and poor response rates to available modalities.

  13. Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Treated by Thrombectomy in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Severe Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Onder, Halil; Murat Arsava, E.; Arat, Anıl; Akif Topcuoglu, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Experience on thrombolysis and/or thrombectomy for acute major ischemic strokes in the setting of deep (less than 40,000/mm3) thrombocytopenia is limited. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results A 63-year-old female with myelodysplastic syndrome presented with left middle cerebral artery stroke within 2 hours of symptom onset. Severe thrombocytopenia (10.000/mm3) precluded systemic thrombolysis. However, endovascular thrombectomy provided successful recanalization and dramatic clinical recovery with NIHSS score decreasing from 20 to 2 soon after the procedure. Her modified Rankin scale was 1 at the end of the third month. Conclusion This exceptional case highlights that neurothrombectomy could be feasible and of justifiable merit even in the setting of critically low thrombocytopenia if a meticulous procedure is followed in subjects with severe acute stroke. PMID:26576212

  14. Stathmin 1 is involved in the highly proliferative phenotype of high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; de Melo Campos, Paula; Favaro, Patricia; Lazarini, Mariana; Lorand-Metze, Irene; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Olalla Saad, Sara Teresinha; Traina, Fabiola

    2014-02-01

    Stathmin 1 is an important cytoplasmic microtubule-destabilizing protein that plays critical roles in proliferation and accurate chromosome segregation through regulation of microtubule dynamics. High levels of Stathmin 1 expression have been reported in leukemia and solid tumors. However, Stathmin 1 has not been studied in myelodysplastic syndrome cells. We, herein, report that significantly higher Stathmin 1 levels were observed in proliferating hematopoietic cells, in high-risk MDS and acute leukemia cells. In addition, Stathmin 1 silencing in U937 and Namalwa leukemia cells reduced cell proliferation and clonogenicity. Our data suggest that Stathmin 1 expression may be related to the highly proliferative phenotype of hematopoietic cells and add new insights into the participation of Stathmin 1 in hematological malignancies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Simultaneous Elevation of Oxidative Stress Markers and Wilms' Tumor 1 Gene during the Progression of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Naomi; Hasunuma, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Matsuzawa, Yasuo; Iwashita, Youichi; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Yokota, Hiromitsu

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is closely related to iron overload in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and induces DNA damage. We evaluated the oxidative stress markers derivatives of reactive oxidative metabolites (dROM) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) during azacitidine treatment in an MDS patient. Simultaneous with an increase in the expression of Wilms' Tumor 1 (WT1) gene in the peripheral blood, the serum dROM level was elevated, and this increase was observed earlier than the increases in ferritin and 8-OHdG. Throughout the clinical course, dROM and 8-OHdG correlated significantly with WT1 and with ferritin, suggesting that changes in the oxidative stress marker levels reflect not only iron overload but also disease progression of MDS. PMID:27980269

  16. Meeting report: Vienna 2008 Workshop of the German-Austrian Working Group for Studying Prognostic Factors in Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Büsche, Guntram; Sotlar, Karl; Horny, Hans-Peter; Haase, Detlef; Haferlach, Torsten; Kern, Wolfgang; Bettelheim, Peter; Baumgartner, Christian; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Nösslinger, Thomas; Wimazal, Friedrich; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A; Lübbert, Michael; Krieger, Otto; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Stauder, Reinhard; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Gattermann, Norbert; Fonatsch, Christa; Aul, Carlo; Germing, Ulrich

    2009-07-01

    Criteria, scoring systems, and treatment algorithms for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have been updated repeatedly in recent years. This apparently results from increased awareness and early recognition of the disease, an increasing number of new diagnostic and prognostic markers and tools, and new therapeutic options that may change the course and thus prognosis in MDS. To address these challenges and to create useful new diagnostic and prognostic parameters and scores, the German-Austrian Working Group for Studying Prognostic Factors in MDS was established in 2003 and later was extended to centers in Switzerland (D-A-CH group). In addition, the group cooperates with the European LeukemiaNet, the MDS Foundation, and other national and international working groups in order to improve diagnosis and prognostication. The current article represents a meeting report from the latest workshop organized by the group in Vienna in October 2008.

  17. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Reduced-intensity bone marrow transplantation from an alternative unrelated donor for myelodysplastic syndrome of first-donor origin.

    PubMed

    Komeno, Yukiko; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Kandabashi, Koji; Kawazu, Masahito; Goyama, Susumu; Takeshita, Masataka; Nannya, Yasuhito; Niino, Miyuki; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Kurokawa, Mineo; Tsujino, Shiho; Ogawa, Seishi; Aoki, Katsunori; Chiba, Shigeru; Motokura, Toru; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-03-01

    A male patient had a relapse of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) 2 years after BMT from a female matched unrelated donor. Conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and short-tandem repeat chimerism analysis proved a relapse of donor origin. He underwent reduced-intensity BMT after a conditioning with fludarabine and busulfan, since he had impaired renal, liver, and pulmonary functions. Chimerism analysis on day 28 after the second BMT showed mixed chimerism of the first and the second donors, which later turned to full second-donor chimerism on day 60. He developed grade II acute GVHD of the skin and cytomegalovirus reactivation, but both were improved with methylprednisolone and ganciclovir, respectively. He remains in complete remission 6 months after the second BMT. Reduced-intensity second BMT from an alternative donor appeared to be a tolerable treatment option for donor-derived leukemia/MDS after the first conventional transplantation.

  19. Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  20. Minimally invasive colopexy for pediatric Chilaiditi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Wayne A; Cafasso, Danielle E; Fernandez, Minela; Edwards, Mary J

    2011-03-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by abdominal pain, respiratory distress, constipation, and vomiting in association with Chilaiditi's sign. Chilaiditi's sign is the finding on plain roentgenogram of colonic interposition between the liver and diaphragm and is usually asymptomatic. Surgery is typically reserved for cases of catastrophic colonic volvulus or perforation because of the syndrome. We present a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with Chilaiditi syndrome and resulting failure to thrive because of severe abdominal pain and vomiting, which did not improve with laxatives and dietary changes. He underwent a laparoscopic gastrostomy tube placement and laparoscopic colopexy of the transverse colon to the falciform ligament and anterior abdominal wall. Postoperatively, his symptoms resolved completely, as did his failure to thrive. His gastrostomy tube was removed 3 months after surgery and never required use. This is the first case of Chilaiditi syndrome in the pediatric literature we are aware of that was treated with an elective, minimally invasive colopexy. In cases of severe Chilaiditi syndrome refractory to medical treatment, a minimally invasive colopexy should be considered as a possible treatment option and potentially offered before development of life-threatening complications such as volvulus or perforation.

  1. Optimizing therapy for iron overload in the myelodysplastic syndromes: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Heather A

    2011-01-22

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by cytopenias and risk of progression to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Most MDS patients eventually require transfusion of red blood cells for anaemia, placing them at risk of transfusional iron overload. In β-thalassaemia major, transfusional iron overload leads to organ dysfunction and death; however, with iron chelation therapy, organ function is improved, and survival improved to near normal and correlated with the degree of compliance with chelation. In lower-risk MDS, several nonrandomized studies suggest an adverse effect of iron overload on survival and that lowering iron with chelation may minimize this impact. Emerging data indicate that chelation may improve organ function, particularly hepatic function, and a minority of patients may have improvement in cell counts and decreased transfusion requirements. While guidelines for MDS generally recommend chelation in selected lower-risk patients, data from nonrandomized trials suggest iron overload may impact adversely on the outcome of higher-risk MDS and stem cell transplantation (SCT). This effect may be due to increased transplant-related mortality, infection and AML progression, and preliminary data suggest that lowering iron may be beneficial in this patient group. Other areas of active and future investigation include optimizing the monitoring of iron overload using imaging such as T2* MRI and measures of labile iron and oxidative stress; correlating new methods of measuring iron to clinical outcomes; clarifying the contribution of different cellular and extracellular iron pools to iron toxicity; optimizing chelation by using agents that access the appropriate iron pools to minimize the relevant clinical consequences in individual patients; and incorporating measures of quality of life and co-morbidities into clinical trials of chelation in MDS. It should be noted that chelation is costly and potentially toxic, and in MDS should be initiated after

  2. Cytogenetic analogy between myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia of elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Rossi, G; Pelizzari, A M; Bellotti, D; Tonelli, M; Barlati, S

    2000-04-01

    The biological and clinical importance of cytogenetic analysis in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is being increasingly recognized. Recently, cytogenetic similarities were noted between elderly de novo AML and secondary AML, suggesting common etiopathogenetic mechanisms. In the present study we analyzed the cytogenetic similarities between patients with AML of different age and patients with MDS consecutively diagnosed during a 5-year period at a single, primary referral, hematologic center. Of 246 patients aged <86 years, 195 (80%) had a cytogenetic study at diagnosis. Informative metaphases were obtained in 182 cases (93%), including 17 (9.3%) with secondary MDS/AML. Patients were classified according to FAB criteria and were subdivided into four groups: (1) 'early MDS': 42 patients with MDS of FAB subtypes other than refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) or RAEB in transformation (RAEB-T); (2) 'late MDS': 35 patients with RAEB and RAEB-T; (3) 'old AML': 48 patients with AML aged 65 to 85 years; (4) 'young AML': 57 patients with AML aged <65 years. Results showed that 'late MDS' and 'old AML' had striking cytogenetic similarities both in the frequency of normal karyotypes (31% and 27%), single abnormalities (14% and 13%), double abnormalities (17% and 14%), complex karyotypes (37% and 46%), and numerical abnormalities (89% and 93%), as well as in the frequency of rearrangements involving chromosome 5 (20% and 31%) and 7 (27% and 27%). The only difference between the two groups was found in the median number of chromosomes involved in complex karyotypes (5 vs 8; P=0.03). 'Early MDS' had significantly less complex karyotypes (21%; P<0.05), but its cytogenetic features resembled otherwise those of 'late MDS' and 'old AML', and any significant difference disappeared when patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) were excluded. CMML markedly differed from other MDS subtypes in the frequency of normal (57%) and of

  3. [Decitabine treatment in myelodysplastic syndromes--results of a compassionate patient program in Israel].

    PubMed

    Klepfish, Abraham; Silbershatz, Itay; Lugassy, Gilles; Shimoni, Avichai; Mittelman, Moshe

    2013-10-01

    Hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSG) has been recognized as an important factor in the pathogenesis of malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Decitabine (trade name Dacogen; 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine) is a cytosine analog which inhibits the enzyme DNA methyltransferase (DNMT), inducing hypomethylation and activates TSG, leading to tumor cell growth inhibition. In clinical trials with hypomethylating agents in advanced MDS, a total response rate of 30-73% has been observed, with a complete response (CR) of 9-37%, partial response (PR] of similar rate and a hematologic improvement (HI] in 20-48% of the patients. We report the results of a national Israeli compassionate program of decitabine administration to patients with advanced MDS. From July 2007 through August 2008, under the joint sponsorship of The Israel Society of Hematology and Blood Transfusions and Janssen, Israel, a compassionate program was conducted. Decitabine was administered to patients with advanced MDS who were not candidates for any other anti-MDS treatment, except for supportive care. The selected regimen was a 5-day intravenous administration of 20 mg/m/d, every 28 days. After the program had been completed, an approval of the institutional Helsinki committees was obtained, and the data were collected in an attempt to evaluate the results of this novel treatment. The standard response criteria, i.e. total response, CR, PR and HI were applied. Toxicity, survival and leukemic transformation rate were also analyzed. Twenty-four patients with advanced MDS participated in the program but evaluable information could be collected only on 17 patients. The median number of therapeutic cycles was two per patient. Twelve patients were transfusion-dependent at program onset, of whom 7 either benefited from reduced transfusion requirements or became transfusion-free. The overall response rate was 26%, with 23% PR and 13% HI. Two patients (13%) demonstrated leukemic transformation

  4. Pediatric adenomatous polyposis syndromes: an update.

    PubMed

    Erdman, Steven H

    2007-06-01

    Juvenile polyps are a common finding in the pediatric population. In contrast, colon adenomas, which are viewed as dysplastic precancerous lesions, are found sporadically in late adulthood. Adenomas in children and young adults are highly unusual and suggest one of several forms of inherited colorectal cancer. These disorders show a predilection to early adenoma formation and can present in childhood. Familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome are autosomal dominant, often with involvement of multiple family members, or can be seen in an individual arising from a de novo mutation. The most recently described adenomatous polyposis syndrome, MutYH-associated polyposis, is autosomal recessive, requiring an inherited mutation from each parent. All three adenomatous polyposis disorders can display tremendous variation in expression, even within the same family, and can have a common overlapping phenotype. These disorders require regular medical care to minimize cancer risk in the digestive tract and in other organ systems.

  5. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome: a clinical and morphologic study of 65 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Michels, S.D.; McKenna, R.W.; Arthur, D.C.; Brunning, R.D.

    1985-06-01

    This study consists of 65 patients (pts) who developed a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (39 pts) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (26 pts) following chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy; the interval from the onset of therapy to bone marrow abnormality ranged from 11 to 192 months (median, 58). Thirty-three patients had been previously treated for lymphoproliferative diseases, 29 for carcinoma, and three for a nonneoplastic disorder. Approximately 30% of the cases presenting in the MDS phase evolved to AML in one to 12 months (median, 3.5). The AML in 49% of the cases was not readily classified according to French-American-British (FAB) criteria; the primary difficulty in classification related to the involvement of multiple cell lines. Among the cases that could be classified, all FAB types were represented except for M1; M2 was the most frequent type. Clonal chromosome abnormalities were found in marrow specimens from 22 of 24 (92%) patients studied with G banding; 11 had abnormalities of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. The median survival for all patients was four months with no significant difference between those treated and not treated with antileukemic therapy. The median survival was three months for the patients presenting with AML, six months for the patients with AML following an MDS, and four months for the patients with an MDS that did not evolve to AML. The findings in the present study suggest that there are three stages of therapy-related panmyelosis: (1) pancytopenia with associated myelodysplastic changes, (2) a frank MDS, and (3) overt AML. Many patients will present in the stage of overt AML that differs from de novo AML primarily by the high incidence of trilineage involvement, difficulty in classification, frequent cytogenetic abnormalities, and poor response to antileukemic therapy.

  7. Down-regulation of Dicer1 promotes cellular senescence and decreases the differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youshan; Wu, Dong; Fei, Chengming; Guo, Juan; Gu, Shuncheng; Zhu, Yang; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Lingyun; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang

    2015-02-01

    Although it has been reported that mesenchymal stromal cells are unable to provide sufficient hematopoietic support in myelodysplastic syndrome, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we found that mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome displayed a significant increase in senescence, as evidenced by their decreased proliferative capacity, flattened morphology and increased expression of SA-β-gal and p21. Senescent mesenchymal stromal cells from patients had decreased differentiation potential and decreased stem cell support capacity. Gene knockdown of Dicer1, which was down-regulated in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients, induced senescence. The differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities were significantly inhibited by Dicer1 knockdown. Overexpression of Dicer1 in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients reversed cellular senescence and enhanced stem cell properties. Furthermore, we identified reduced expression in the microRNA-17 family (miR-17-5p, miR-20a/b, miR-106a/b and miR-93) as a potential factor responsible for increased p21 expression, a key senescence mediator, in Dicer1 knockdown cells. Moreover, we found that miR-93 and miR-20a expression levels were significantly reduced in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients and miR-93/miR-20a gain of function resulted in a decrease of cellular senescence. Collectively, the results of our study show that mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome are prone to senescence and that Dicer1 down-regulation promotes cellular senescence and decreases the differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells. Dicer1 down-regulation seems to contribute to the insufficient hematopoietic support capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  8. Pediatric obesity, metabolic syndrome, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Mary A

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the pediatric population has dramatically increased in the last 30 years. While the adverse health effects of obesity have long been recognized in adults, many of these complications are now understood to begin in early childhood. Obese children and adolescents are significantly more likely than their peers of healthy weight to suffer from obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome. In turn, affected individuals may experience myriad serious clinical sequelae; neuro-cognitive, psychiatric, cardiovascular, and endocrinologic complications have each been extensively documented. Thus, the spectrum of obesity-related disease represents a serious but preventable threat to personal and family wellness; additionally, it is a source of considerable health care expenditure and represents a national and international health crisis. The optimal care of these patients will be best achieved through the pediatric health care provider's timely recognition of these clinical problems and knowledge of appropriate intervention strategies.

  9. Metabolic syndrome in pediatrics: old concepts revised, new concepts discussed.

    PubMed

    D'Adamo, Ebe; Santoro, Nicola; Caprio, Sonia

    2011-10-01

    The worldwide epidemic of childhood obesity in the last decades is responsible for the occurrence in pediatrics of disorders once mainly found in adults, such as the metabolic syndrome. A key factor in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome is insulin resistance, a phenomenon occurring mainly in obese subjects with a general resistance to the insulin effect only on carbohydrates metabolism. Given that the metabolic syndrome is driven by obesity, the prevalence of the latter will strongly influence the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. This article addresses the causes of metabolic syndrome and the relevance of obesity in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  11. Azacitidine for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Edlin, R; Connock, M; Tubeuf, S; Round, J; Fry-Smith, A; Hyde, C; Greenheld, W

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of azacitidine (aza) compared with conventional care regimes (CCR) for higher risk patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), based on the evidence submission from the manufacturer to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) as part of the single technology appraisal process. The patient outcomes governing relative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness were defined as overall survival, time to progression (TTP) to AML, adverse events and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The clinical evidence was derived from an open-label randomised controlled trial referred to as study AZA-001. It compared aza with CCR in 358 patients with higher risk MDS, CMML and AML 20-30% blasts. The outcomes reported in AZA-001 included overall survival, TTP to AML and adverse events. No HRQoL results were reported; however, outcomes likely to impact on HRQoL were provided. The results showed that: the median overall survival was 24.5 months on aza, compared with 15.0 months in the CCR group (p = 0.0001); the response rates were low (complete remission 17% aza versus 8% CCR); the median time to transformation to AML was greater in the aza group (17.8 versus 11.5 months; p < 0.0001); and of patients who were red blood cell (RBC) transfusion-dependent at baseline, 45% of those on aza became RBC transfusion-independent during the treatment period, compared with 11.8% in the CCR group (p < 0.0001). The ERG reran the submission's search strategies after some modifications incorporating minor improvements. The ERG analysed the submitted economic model (model 1) and identified a number of inconsistencies and errors within the model. The manufacturer submitted a revised model for analysis by the ERG. Using the issues identified in the earlier analysis, the ERG conducted

  12. The proliferation index of specific bone marrow cell compartments from myelodysplastic syndromes is associated with the diagnostic and patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Matarraz, Sergio; Teodosio, Cristina; Fernandez, Carlos; Albors, Manuel; Jara-Acevedo, María; López, Antonio; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, María; Gutierrez, María Laura; Flores-Montero, Juan; Cerveró, Carlos; Pizarro-Perea, Marlies; Paz Garrastazul, María; Caballero, Gonzalo; Gutierrez, Oliver; Mendez, Guy Daniel; González-Silva, Manuel; Laranjeira, Paula; Orfao, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal stem cell disorders which frequently show a hypercellular dysplastic bone marrow (BM) associated with inefficient hematopoiesis and peripheral cytopenias due to increased apoptosis and maturation blockades. Currently, little is known about the role of cell proliferation in compensating for the BM failure syndrome and in determining patient outcome. Here, we analyzed the proliferation index (PI) of different compartments of BM hematopoietic cells in 106 MDS patients compared to both normal/reactive BM (n = 94) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 30 cases) using multiparameter flow cytometry. Our results show abnormally increased overall BM proliferation profiles in MDS which significantly differ between early/low-risk and advanced/high-risk cases. Early/low-risk patients showed increased proliferation of non-lymphoid CD34(+) precursors, maturing neutrophils and nucleated red blood cells (NRBC), while the PI of these compartments of BM precursors progressively fell below normal values towards AML levels in advanced/high-risk MDS. Decreased proliferation of non-lymphoid CD34(+) and NRBC precursors was significantly associated with adverse disease features, shorter overall survival (OS) and transformation to AML, both in the whole series and when low- and high-risk MDS patients were separately considered, the PI of NRBC emerging as the most powerful independent predictor for OS and progression to AML. In conclusion, assessment of the PI of NRBC, and potentially also of other compartments of BM precursors (e.g.: myeloid CD34(+) HPC), could significantly contribute to a better management of MDS.

  13. Lenalidomide Promotes p53 Degradation by Inhibiting MDM2 Auto-ubiquitination in Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Chromosome 5q Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Sheng; Chen, Xianghong; McGraw, Kathy; Zhang, Ling; Komrokji, Rami; Clark, Justine; Caceres, Gisela; Billingsley, Debbie; Sokol, Lubomir; Lancet, Jeffrey; Fortenbery, Nicole; Zhou, Junmin; Eksioglu, Erika A.; Sallman, David; Wang, Huaquan; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K.; Djeu, Julie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Sekeres, Mikkael; List, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Allelic deletion of the RPS14 gene is a key effector of the hypoplastic anemia in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and chromosome 5q deletion [del(5q)]. Disruption of ribosome integrity liberates free ribosomal proteins to bind to and trigger degradation of MDM2, with consequent p53 transactivation. Herein we show that p53 is overexpressed in erythroid precursors of primary bone marrow del(5q) MDS specimens accompanied by reduced cellular MDM2. More importantly, we show that lenalidomide acts to stabilize MDM2, thereby accelerating p53 degradation. Biochemical and molecular analyses showed that lenalidomide inhibits the haplodeficient PP2Acα phosphatase resulting in hyperphosphorylation of inhibitory serine-166 and serine-186 residues on MDM2, and displaces binding of RPS-14 to suppress MDM2 auto-ubiquitination; whereas PP2Acα over expression promotes drug resistance. Bone marrow specimens from del(5q) MDS patients resistant to lenalidomide over-expressed PP2Acα accompanied by restored accumulation of p53 in erythroid precursors. Our findings indicate that lenalidomide restores MDM2 functionality in the 5q- syndrome to overcome p53 activation in response to nucleolar stress, and therefore may warrant investigation in other disorders of ribosomal biogenesis. PMID:22525275

  14. Use of newer prognostic indices for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes in the low and intermediate-1 risk categories: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, David; Sanz, Guillermo; Ortega, Margarita; Nomdedeu, Benet; Luño, Elisa; Diez-Campelo, María; Ardanaz, María Teresa; Pedro, Carmen; Montoro, Julía; Collado, Rosa; Andreu, Rafa; Marco, Victor; Cedena, María Teresa; de Paz, Raquel; Tormo, Mar; Xicoy, Blanca; Ramos, Fernando; Bargay, Joan; Gonzalez, Bernardo; Brunet, Salut; Muñoz, Juan Antonio; Gomez, Valle; Bailén, Alicia; Sanchez, Joaquin; Merchán, Brayan; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Vallespí, Teresa

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to compare the ability of recently developed prognostic indices for myelodysplastic syndromes to identify patients with poor prognoses within the lower-risk (low and intermediate-1) categories defined by the International Prognosis Scoring System (IPSS). We included patients with de-novo myelodysplastic syndromes diagnosed between Nov 29, 1972, and Dec 15, 2011, who had low or intermediate-1 IPSS scores and were in the Spanish Registry of Myelodysplastic Syndromes. We reclassified these patients with the new prognostic indices (revised IPSS [IPSS-R], revised WHO-based Prognostic Scoring System [WPSS-R], Lower Risk Scoring System [LRSS], and the Grupo Español de Síndromes Mielodisplásicos [Spanish Group of Myelodysplastic Syndromes; GESMD]) and calculated the overall survival of the different risk groups within each prognostic index to identify the groups of patients with overall poor prognoses (defined as an expected overall survival <30 months). We calculated overall survival with the Kaplan-Meier method. We identified 2373 patients. None of the prognostic indices could be used to identify a population with poor prognoses (median overall survival <30 months) for the patients with low IPSS scores (1290 individuals). In the group with intermediate-1 scores (1083 individuals), between 17% and 47% of patients were identified as having poor prognoses with the new prognostic indices. The LRSS had the best model fit with the lowest value in the Akaike information criteria test, whereas the IPSS-R identified the largest proportion of patients with poor prognoses (47%). Patients with intermediate-1 scores who were classified as having poor prognoses by one or more prognostic index (646 [60%] individuals) had worse median overall survival (33·1 months, 95% CI 28·4-37·9) than did patients who were classified as having low risk by all prognostic indices (63·7 months, 49·5-78·0], HR 1·9, 95% CI 1·6-2·3, p<0·0001) INTERPRETATION: Recently proposed

  15. Prognostic impact of pre-transplantation transfusion history and secondary iron overload in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a GITMO study

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Porta, Matteo Giovanni Della; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Angelucci, Emanuele; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Falda, Michele; Onida, Francesco; Bernardi, Massimo; Guidi, Stefano; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Cerretti, Raffaella; Marenco, Paola; Pioltelli, Pietro; Pascutto, Cristiana; Oneto, Rosi; Pirolini, Laura; Fanin, Renato; Bosi, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Background Transfusion-dependency affects the natural history of myelodysplastic syndromes. Secondary iron overload may concur to this effect. The relative impact of these factors on the outcome of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome receiving allogeneic stem-cell transplantation remains to be clarified. Design and Methods We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic effect of transfusion history and iron overload on the post-transplantation outcome of 357 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome reported to the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo (GITMO) registry between 1997 and 2007. Results Transfusion-dependency was independently associated with reduced overall survival (hazard ratio=1.48, P=0.017) and increased non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio=1.68, P=0.024). The impact of transfusion-dependency was noted only in patients receiving myeloablative conditioning (overall survival: hazard ratio=1.76, P=0.003; non-relapse mortality: hazard ratio=1.70, P=0.02). There was an inverse relationship between transfusion burden and overall survival after transplantation (P=0.022); the outcome was significantly worse in subjects receiving more than 20 red cell units. In multivariate analysis, transfusion-dependency was found to be a risk factor for acute graft-versus-host disease (P=0.04). Among transfusion-dependent patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation, pre-transplantation serum ferritin level had a significant effect on overall survival (P=0.01) and non-relapse mortality (P=0.03). This effect was maintained after adjusting for transfusion burden and duration, suggesting that the negative effect of transfusion history on outcome might be determined at least in part by iron overload. Conclusions Pre-transplantation transfusion history and serum ferritin have significant prognostic value in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation, inducing a significant increase of non

  16. Gastrointestinal microbiome signatures of pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The intestinal microbiomes of healthy children and pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are not well defined. Studies in adults have indicated that the gastrointestinal microbiota could be involved in IBS. We analyzed 71 samples from 22 children with IBS (pediatric Rome III criteri...

  17. Insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Rachel A; Bremer, Andrew A

    2010-02-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a constellation of specific anthropometric, physiological, and biochemical abnormalities predisposing affected individuals to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The syndrome is well described in the adult literature. However, its description in the pediatric literature is more limited. Due in large part to the normal physiological changes that occur in children and adolescents with respect to growth and puberty, investigators have also struggled to establish a standard definition of the syndrome in the pediatric age group, hindering coordinated research efforts. However, whatever definition of the syndrome is used, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in the pediatric age group has increased worldwide. Insulin resistance is the principal metabolic abnormality that is common to the development of the metabolic syndrome in both children and adults. This review summarizes current research regarding the pathophysiology of insulin resistance and how this may contribute to specific abnormalities seen in children and adolescents with the metabolic syndrome. Specifically, insulin resistance in pediatric patients is correlated with cardiovascular risk factors such as elevated blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, all of which are significant risk factors for adult disease. In addition, current treatment and prevention strategies, including lifestyle modifications, pharmacologic agents, and certain surgical therapies, are highlighted. The need for collaborative changes at the family, school, city, state, and national levels to address the growing prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in the pediatric age group is also reviewed.

  18. Hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia arising from myelodysplastic syndrome: similar outcomes in patients with de novo disease and disease following prior therapy or antecedent hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chunkang; Storer, Barry E; Scott, Bart L; Bryant, Eileen M; Shulman, Howard M; Flowers, Mary E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Witherspoon, Robert P; Nash, Richard A; Sanders, Jean E; Bedalov, Antonio; Hansen, John A; Clurman, Bruce E; Storb, Rainer; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Deeg, H Joachim

    2007-08-15

    We analyzed outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in 257 patients, 3 to 72.7 years old (median, 43 y), with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) including those with transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (tAML). Conditioning regimens included high-dose total-body irradiation (TBI)/chemotherapy (n = 83); busulfan (BU)/cyclophosphamide (CY) (BUCY, n = 122; with BU targeting [tBUCY], n = 93); fludarabine (Flu) with tBU (FLUtBU; n = 12); Flu plus 200 cGy TBI (n = 26); and miscellaneous regimens (n = 14). Donors were HLA-identical or partially mismatched family members in 135 and unrelated individuals in 122 patients. Five-year relapse-free survival was highest (43%) and nonrelapse mortality lowest (28%) among tBUCY-conditioned patients. Outcomes were compared with results in 339 patients who received transplants for de novo MDS/tAML, and a multivariate analysis failed to show significant differences in outcome between the 2 cohorts. Relapse probability and relapse-free survival correlated significantly with disease stage (P < .001) and karyotype (P < .001). Relapse incidence was lower (P = .003) and relapse-free survival superior (P = .02) with unrelated donor transplants. The data suggest that overall inferior outcome in patients with secondary MDS/tAML was related to the frequency of high-risk cytogenetics. For both cohorts, transplantation outcomes improved over the time interval studied.

  19. Hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia arising from myelodysplastic syndrome: similar outcomes in patients with de novo disease and disease following prior therapy or antecedent hematologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chang, ChunKang; Storer, Barry E.; Scott, Bart L.; Bryant, Eileen M.; Shulman, Howard M.; Flowers, Mary E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Witherspoon, Robert P.; Nash, Richard A.; Sanders, Jean E.; Bedalov, Antonio; Hansen, John A.; Clurman, Bruce E.; Storb, Rainer; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in 257 patients, 3 to 72.7 years old (median, 43 y), with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) including those with transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (tAML). Conditioning regimens included high-dose total-body irradiation (TBI)/chemotherapy (n = 83); busulfan (BU)/cyclophosphamide (CY) (BUCY, n = 122; with BU targeting [tBUCY], n = 93); fludarabine (Flu) with tBU (FLUtBU; n = 12); Flu plus 200 cGy TBI (n = 26); and miscellaneous regimens (n = 14). Donors were HLA-identical or partially mismatched family members in 135 and unrelated individuals in 122 patients. Five-year relapse-free survival was highest (43%) and nonrelapse mortality lowest (28%) among tBUCY-conditioned patients. Outcomes were compared with results in 339 patients who received transplants for de novo MDS/tAML, and a multivariate analysis failed to show significant differences in outcome between the 2 cohorts. Relapse probability and relapse-free survival correlated significantly with disease stage (P < .001) and karyotype (P < .001). Relapse incidence was lower (P = .003) and relapse-free survival superior (P = .02) with unrelated donor transplants. The data suggest that overall inferior outcome in patients with secondary MDS/tAML was related to the frequency of high-risk cytogenetics. For both cohorts, transplantation outcomes improved over the time interval studied. PMID:17488876

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphism array karyotyping: a diagnostic and prognostic tool in myelodysplastic syndromes with unsuccessful conventional cytogenetic testing.

    PubMed

    Arenillas, Leonor; Mallo, Mar; Ramos, Fernando; Guinta, Kathryn; Barragán, Eva; Lumbreras, Eva; Larráyoz, María-José; De Paz, Raquel; Tormo, Mar; Abáigar, María; Pedro, Carme; Cervera, José; Such, Esperanza; José Calasanz, María; Díez-Campelo, María; Sanz, Guillermo F; Hernández, Jesús María; Luño, Elisa; Saumell, Sílvia; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Florensa, Lourdes; Solé, Francesc

    2013-12-01

    Cytogenetic aberrations identified by metaphase cytogenetics (MC) have diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, in some MDS patients MC study is unsuccesful. Single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A) based karyotyping could be helpful in these cases. We performed SNP-A in 62 samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood of primary MDS with an unsuccessful MC study. SNP-A analysis enabled the detection of aberrations in 31 (50%) patients. We used the copy number alteration information to apply the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and we observed differences in survival between the low/intermediate-1 and intermediate-2/high risk patients. We also saw differences in survival between very low/low/intermediate and the high/very high patients when we applied the revised IPSS (IPSS-R). In conclusion, SNP-A can be used successfully in PB samples and the identification of CNA by SNP-A improve the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of this group of MDS patients. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. T-replete haploidentical allogeneic transplantation using post-transplantation cyclophosphamide in advanced AML and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Devillier, R; Bramanti, S; Fürst, S; Sarina, B; El-Cheikh, J; Crocchiolo, R; Granata, A; Chabannon, C; Morabito, L; Harbi, S; Faucher, C; Santoro, A; Weiller, P-J; Vey, N; Carlo-Stella, C; Castagna, L; Blaise, D

    2016-02-01

    Unmanipulated haploidentical transplantation (Haplo-SCT) using post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy) represents an alternative for patients with high-risk diseases lacking HLA-identical donor. Although it provides low incidences of GVHD, the efficacy of Haplo-SCT is still questioned, especially for patients with myeloid malignancies. Thus, we analyzed 60 consecutive patients with refractory (n=30) or high-risk CR (n=30) AML or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) who underwent PT-Cy Haplo-SCT. The median age was 57 years (22-73 years), hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index was ⩾3 in 38 patients (63%) and Haplo-SCT was the second allogeneic transplantation for 10 patients (17%). Although most of patients received PBSC as graft source (n=48, 80%), we found low incidences of grade 3-4 acute (2%) and severe chronic GVHD (4%). Among patients with high-risk CR diseases, 1-year non-relapse mortality, cumulative incidence of relapse, progression-free and overall survivals were 20%, 32%, 47% and 62%, respectively. In patients with refractory disease, corresponding results were 34%, 35%, 32% and 37%, respectively. We conclude that PT-Cy Haplo-SCT could provide promising anti-leukemic effect even in the setting of very advanced diseases. Thus, it represents a viable alternative for high-risk AML/MDS patients without HLA-identical donor.

  2. Cost effectiveness of lenalidomide in the treatment of transfusion-dependent myelodysplastic syndromes in the United States.

    PubMed

    Goss, Thomas F; Szende, Agota; Schaefer, Caroline; Totten, P Jane; Knight, Robert; Jädersten, Martin; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; List, Alan F

    2006-12-01

    Lenalidomide has been approved for the treatment of transfusion-dependent low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) associated with a chromosome 5q deletion with or without additional cytogenetic abnormalities. We evaluated the cost effectiveness of lenalidomide versus best supportive care (BSC) in these patients. We developed a decision analytic model to compare costs and outcomes of lenalidomide with BSC without recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) versus BSC with EPO over 1 year. Outcome measures were transfusion independence and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. The model incorporated costs of medications, transfusions, chelation, laboratory tests, office visits, and other resources associated with each therapy. Lenalidomide therapy was associated with an estimated incremental 0.53 transfusion-free and 0.25 QALY gain compared to BSC at 1 year. The costs of lenalidomide therapy were substantially offset by reduced blood transfusion and EPO costs. One-year total treatment costs were estimated at $63,385 for lenalidomide and $54,940 for BSC. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for lenalidomide vs BSC was estimated at $16,066 per transfusion-free year and $35,050 per QALY gained, values within the acceptable cost-effectiveness ranges for a new therapy. Results suggest that oral lenalidomide is cost effective in the United States in the treatment of transfusion-dependent, low- or intermediate-1-risk MDS associated with a deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality. Confirmation of these findings awaits results of an ongoing randomized phase III trial (MDS-004 study).

  3. Clinical and genetic characteristics of congenital sideroblastic anemia: comparison with myelodysplastic syndrome with ring sideroblast (MDS-RS).

    PubMed

    Ohba, Rie; Furuyama, Kazumichi; Yoshida, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Manabe, Atsushi; Ito, Etsuro; Ozawa, Keiya; Kojima, Seiji; Ogawa, Seishi; Harigae, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is characterized by anemia with the emergence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. There are two forms of sideroblastic anemia, i.e., congenital sideroblastic anemia (CSA) and acquired sideroblastic anemia. In order to clarify the pathophysiology of sideroblastic anemia, a nationwide survey consisting of clinical and molecular genetic analysis was performed in Japan. As of January 31, 2012, data of 137 cases of sideroblastic anemia, including 72 cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD), 47 cases of MDS-refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS), and 18 cases of CSA, have been collected. Hemoglobin and MCV level in CSA are significantly lower than those of MDS, whereas serum iron level in CSA is significantly higher than those of MDS. Of 14 CSA for which DNA was available for genetic analysis, 10 cases were diagnosed as X-linked sideroblastic anemia due to ALAS2 gene mutation. The mutation of SF3B1 gene, which was frequently mutated in MDS-RS, was not detected in CSA patients. Together with the difference of clinical data, it is suggested that genetic background, which is responsible for the development of CSA, is different from that of MDS-RS.

  4. Increased PD-1/STAT1 ratio may account for the survival benefit in decitabine therapy for lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Guo, Juan; Tao, Ying; Wu, Ling-Yun; Xu, Feng; Wu, Dong; Zhou, Li-Yu; Su, Ji-Ying; Song, Lu-Xi; Xiao, Chao; Li, Xiao

    2017-04-01

    Decitabine is an effective therapy for patients with lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). However, the mechanisms of decitabine's therapeutic effect are not well established. Forty-four lower risk MDS patients received decitabine therapy. 59.1% patients achieved treatment response, and 53.8% patients who were RBC/platelet-dependent cast off the transfusion burden. The median overall survival (OS) was 19.0 months after decitabine treatment. Moreover, polarization toward type 1 in the CD8 + subset was enhanced, and a significantly increased expression of the PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-1/STAT1 ratio was observed in these lower risk MDS. The patients with amplification of PD-1/STAT1 ratio (2-4) achieved longer OS. Thus, our results suggest that the effect mechanism of decitabine toward lower risk MDS may be the moderate increase of PD-1/STAT1, which contributes to hematopoietic improvement. These findings suggest that a different PD-1-related strategy from those used to treat higher risk patients could be used for lower risk MDS patients.

  5. Efficacy and safety of extended dosing schedules of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manero, G; Gore, S D; Kambhampati, S; Scott, B; Tefferi, A; Cogle, C R; Edenfield, W J; Hetzer, J; Kumar, K; Laille, E; Shi, T; MacBeth, K J; Skikne, B

    2016-04-01

    CC-486, the oral formulation of azacitidine (AZA), is an epigenetic modifier and DNA methyltransferase inhibitor in clinical development for treatment of hematologic malignancies. CC-486 administered for 7 days per 28-day treatment cycle was evaluated in a phase 1 dose-finding study. AZA has a short plasma half-life and DNA incorporation is S-phase-restricted; extending CC-486 exposure may increase the number of AZA-affected diseased target cells and maximize therapeutic effects. Patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) received 300 mg CC-486 once daily for 14 days (n=28) or 21 days (n=27) of repeated 28-day cycles. Median patient age was 72 years (range 31-87) and 75% of patients had International Prognostic Scoring System Intermediate-1 risk MDS. Median number of CC-486 treatment cycles was 7 (range 2-24) for the 14-day dosing schedule and 6 (1-24) for the 21-day schedule. Overall response (complete or partial remission, red blood cell (RBC) or platelet transfusion independence (TI), or hematologic improvement) (International Working Group 2006) was attained by 36% of patients receiving 14-day dosing and 41% receiving 21-day dosing. RBC TI rates were similar with both dosing schedules (31% and 38%, respectively). CC-486 was generally well-tolerated. Extended dosing schedules of oral CC-486 may provide effective long-term treatment for patients with lower-risk MDS.

  6. WT1 as a universal marker for minimal residual disease detection and quantification in myeloid leukemias and in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cilloni, Daniela; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Monitoring of acute leukemia patients during and after treatment for the presence of remaining leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) has been shown to give major insight into the effectiveness of treatment. However, so far the applicability of this strategy has been limited to those leukemia subsets characterized by genetic markers amenable to sensitive detection by PCR. Although PCR for immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene rearrangement represents the gold standard for MRD detection in most cases of ALL without any fusion gene transcripts as molecular markers available, the situation in AML is more complicated because, at present, more than 50% of them lack any sort of clonality markers suitable for MRD monitoring. Thus, a number of studies have been performed in an attempt to identify cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities associated with leukemic transformation. In this paper we describe the effectiveness of the quantitative assessment of the Wilms tumor gene (WT1) transcript as a molecular marker for the detection of the leukemic clone useful for monitoring the presence of MRD in all the patients affected by acute and chronic leukemias as well as myelodysplastic syndromes. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Successful use of rituximab in platelet transfusion refractoriness in a multi-transfused patient with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing-Hong; Shen, Yi-Ping; Ye, Bao-Dong; Zhou, Yu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with newly diagnosed INT-1 risk myelodysplastic syndrome--refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (MDS-RCMD) was not responsive to treatment, such as androgen, thalidomide, granulocyte--colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) combined with erythropoietin (EPO), interleukin-11 (IL-11) and thrombopoietin (TPO), and became transfusion dependent. Due to repeated blood transfusions, he developed platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR) to platelets from cross-matched donors as well as random donors. Anti-HLA class I antibodies were positive with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; however, HLA-compatible platelet products were unavailable. PTR was unresponsive to high-dose immunoglobulin and plasma exchange. The patient was then treated with rituximab 375 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8, and 100 mg total dose on days 15 and 22. Already after the first dose of rituximab, the patient was able to received successful platelet transfusion from all donors. Therefore rituximab may be considered as a potential therapy for PTR.

  8. Prognostic value of trisomy 8 as a single anomaly and the influence of additional cytogenetic aberrations in primary myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Saumell, Sílvia; Florensa, Lourdes; Luño, Elisa; Sanzo, Carmen; Cañizo, Consuelo; Hernández, Jesus M; Cervera, José; Gallart, Miguel A; Carbonell, Félix; Collado, Rosa; Arenillas, Leonor; Pedro, Carme; Bargay, Joan; Nomdedeu, Benet; Xicoy, Blanca; Vallespí, Teresa; Raya, José M; Belloch, Luis; Sanz, Guillermo F; Solé, Francesc

    2012-11-01

    Trisomy 8 is the most common chromosomal gain in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), however, little is known about the features of MDS with isolated trisomy 8 and the influence of additional cytogenetic aberrations. We determined the characteristics and prognostic factors of 72 patients with trisomy 8 as a single anomaly and analysed also the impact of other aberrations added to trisomy 8 in another 62 patients. According to our study, MDS with isolated trisomy 8 was more frequent in men, with more than one cytopenia in most patients (62%) and having about 4% bone marrow blasts. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that platelet count and percentage bone marrow blasts had the strongest impact on overall survival (OS). The median OS for isolated trisomy 8, trisomy 8 plus one aberration (tr8 + 1), plus two (tr8 + 2) and plus three or more aberrations (tr8 + ≥3) was 34·3, 40, 23·4 and 5·8 months, respectively (P < 0·001). Trisomy 8 confers a poorer prognosis than a normal karyotype in MDS patients with ≥5% bone marrow blasts. This study supports the view that MDS with isolated trisomy 8 should be included in the intermediate cytogenetic risk group. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Assessment of Drug Sensitivity in Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells From Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Katherine L B; Finn, Laura E; Smith, B Douglas; Hess, Allan D; Foran, James M; Karp, Judith E; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2016-11-07

    : Current understanding suggests that malignant stem and progenitor cells must be reduced or eliminated for prolonged remissions in myeloid neoplasms such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Multicolor flow cytometry has been widely used to distinguish stem and myeloid progenitor cells from other populations in normal and malignant bone marrow. In this study, we present a method for assessing drug sensitivity in MDS and AML patient hematopoietic stem and myeloid progenitor cell populations ex vivo using the investigational Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 and standard-of-care agent cytarabine as examples. Utilizing a multicolor flow cytometry antibody panel for identification of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors, common myeloid progenitors, granulocyte-monocyte progenitors, and megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors present in mononuclear cell fractions isolated from bone marrow aspirates, we compare stem and progenitor cell counts after treatment for 24 hours with drug versus diluent. We demonstrate that MLN4924 exerts a cytotoxic effect on MDS and AML stem and progenitor cell populations, whereas cytarabine has more limited effects. Further application of this method for evaluating drug effects on these populations ex vivo and in vivo may inform rational design and selection of therapies in the clinical setting.

  10. Immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, and mutational characterization of cell lines derived from myelodysplastic syndrome patients after progression to acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Palau, Anna; Mallo, Mar; Palomo, Laura; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ines; Diesch, Jeannine; Campos, Diana; Granada, Isabel; Juncà, Jordi; Drexler, Hans G; Solé, Francesc; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2017-03-01

    Leukemia cell lines have been widely used in the hematology field to unravel mechanistic insights and to test new therapeutic strategies. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and frequent progress to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A few cell lines have been established from MDS patients after progression to AML but their characterization is incomplete. Here we provide a detailed description of the immunophenotypic profile of the MDS-derived cell lines SKK-1, SKM-1, F-36P; and MOLM-13. Specifically, we analyzed a comprehensive panel of markers that are currently applied in the diagnostic routine for myeloid disorders. To provide high-resolution genetic data comprising copy number alterations and losses of heterozygosity we performed whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism-based arrays and included the cell line OHN-GM that harbors the frequent chromosome arm 5q deletion. Furthermore, we assessed the mutational status of 83 disease-relevant genes. Our results provide a resource to the MDS and AML field that allows researchers to choose the best-matching cell line for their functional studies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Assessment of Drug Sensitivity in Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells from Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Katherine L B; Finn, Laura E; Smith, B Douglas; Hess, Allan D; Foran, James M; Karp, Judith E; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2017-03-01

    Current understanding suggests that malignant stem and progenitor cells must be reduced or eliminated for prolonged remissions in myeloid neoplasms such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Multicolor flow cytometry has been widely used to distinguish stem and myeloid progenitor cells from other populations in normal and malignant bone marrow. In this study, we present a method for assessing drug sensitivity in MDS and AML patient hematopoietic stem and myeloid progenitor cell populations ex vivo using the investigational Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 and standard-of-care agent cytarabine as examples. Utilizing a multicolor flow cytometry antibody panel for identification of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors, common myeloid progenitors, granulocyte-monocyte progenitors, and megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors present in mononuclear cell fractions isolated from bone marrow aspirates, we compare stem and progenitor cell counts after treatment for 24 hours with drug versus diluent. We demonstrate that MLN4924 exerts a cytotoxic effect on MDS and AML stem and progenitor cell populations, whereas cytarabine has more limited effects. Further application of this method for evaluating drug effects on these populations ex vivo and in vivo may inform rational design and selection of therapies in the clinical setting. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:840-850.

  12. A phase I/II trial of Erlotinib in higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia after azacitidine failure.

    PubMed

    Thepot, Sylvain; Boehrer, Simone; Seegers, Valérie; Prebet, Thomas; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Wattel, Eric; Delaunay, Jacques; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Hunault, Mathilde; Jourdan, Eric; Chermat, Fatiha; Sebert, Marie; Kroemer, Guido; Fenaux, Pierre; Adès, Lionel

    2014-12-01

    Survival after azacitidine (AZA) failure in higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is poor and new treatment options are needed. Erlotinib, an oral inhibitor of the epidermal-growth-factor-receptor (EGFR), has shown in preclinical models some efficacy in higher risk MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this phase I/II trial, 30 patients received 100mg/day (n=5) or 150mg/day (n=25) of Erlotinib orally after primary or secondary resistance to AZA treatment. Eighteen MDS and 12 AML patients were treated. This outpatient treatment was well tolerated with limited grade III-IV extra hematological toxicities (skin (n=1), and diarrhea (n=3). Response was observed in 6 patients (20%) including 1 complete remission (CR), 1 marrow CR and 4 hematological improvement (2 erythroid and 2 on platelets). Median duration of response was 5 months. Erlotinib appears to induce a significant number of responses in higher risk MDS/AML having failed AZA treatment. Given the good safety profile of Erlotinib, its combination with other drugs could be tested in the future in MDS and AML.

  13. Prognostic significance of SETBP1 mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and chronic neutrophilic leukemia: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Li-Hong; Cao, Dan; Dong, Xiao-Hui; Fang, Qiu; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Yan; Fei, Ju-Ping; Xu, Bao-Lian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This meta-analysis investigates the prognostic effect of SET binding protein 1 (SETBP1) mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), or chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL). Methods Eligible studies from Pubmed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched from database inception through April 2016. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of overall survival (OS) were pooled to calculate the prognostic significance of SETBP1 mutation in patients. Results A total of 12 studies with 2321 patients were included in this meta-analysis; 4 studies for MDS, 5 studies for CMML, and 3 studies for CNL. Pooled results suggested that MDS and CMML patients with SETBP1 mutations had a significantly poorer prognosis when compared with patients with wild-type SETBP1 (MDS: HR = 1.808, 95% CI (1.218–2.685), P = 0.001; CMML: HR = 2.223, 95% CI (1.493–3.308), P<0.001). SETBP1 mutations in CNL patients however, showed no significant effect on the overall survival (HR = 1.773, 95% CI (0.877–3.582), P = 0.111). The Begg’s and Egger’s tests did not show significant publication bias in any groups. Conclusions Current evidence shows that SETBP1 mutation is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with MDS and CMML, but not in patients with CNL. PMID:28158286

  14. Acute myeloid leukemia after myelodysplastic syndrome and failure of therapy with hypomethylating agents: an emerging entity with a poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias; Ghanem, Hady; Huang, Xuelin; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stephan; Pierce, Sherry; Choi, Sangbum; Verstovsek, Srdan; Brandt, Mark; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-04-01

    We assessed the outcomes of 63 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) arising from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) after hypomethylating agent failure. Their median age was 63 years. All 63 patients had received ≥ 1 salvage regimens for AML, and 35 patients (55%) had received ≥ 2. Of the 31 patients (49%) who had received high-dose cytarabine (HDAC) at first relapse, 2 (6%) achieved complete remission (CR) and 4 (13%) CR with incomplete platelet recovery (overall response rate, 19%). Of the 32 patients (51%) who had received other treatments, including investigational agents, 4 (12%) achieved CR and 4 (12%) CR with incomplete platelet recovery (overall response rate, 24%). The median response duration was 20 weeks. With a median follow-up of 42 months from the AML diagnosis, the median survival (21 weeks) was similar between the 2 groups. The 1- and 2-year survival rate was 19% and 8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified low albumin, HDAC treatment, and platelet count < 50 × 10(9)/L as independent adverse factors for CR and a platelet count < 50 × 10(9)/L and age > 65 years as independent adverse factors for survival. Thus, the outcome of AML evolving from MDS after hypomethylating agent failure is poor and not improved with HDAC. Novel therapies directed toward this emerging entity are urgently needed.

  15. Significance of genome-wide analysis of copy number alterations and UPD in myelodysplastic syndromes using combined CGH - SNP arrays.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ausaf; Iqbal, M Anwar

    2012-01-01

    Genetic information is an extremely valuable data source in characterizing the personal nature of cancer. Chromosome instability is a hallmark of most cancer cells. Chromosomal abnormalities are correlated with poor prognosis, disease classification, risk stratification, and treatment selection. Copy number alterations (CNAs) are an important molecular signature in cancer initiation, development, and progression. Recent application of whole-genome tools to characterize normal and cancer genomes provides the powerful molecular cytogenetic means to enumerate the multiple somatic, genetic and epigenetic alterations that occur in cancer. Combined array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array is a useful technique allowing detection of CNAs and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) or uni-parental disomy (UPD) together in a single experiment. It also provides allelic information on deletions, duplications, and amplifications. UPD can result in an abnormal phenotype when the chromosomes involved are imprinted. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are the most common clonal stem cell hematologic malignancy characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, which leads to rapid progression into acute myeloid leukemia. UPD that occurs without concurrent changes in the gene copy number is a common chromosomal defect in hematologic malignancies, especially in MDS. Approximately 40-50% of MDS patients do not have karyotypic abnormalities that are detectable using classical metaphase cytogenetic techniques (MC) because of inherent limitations of MC, low resolution and the requirement of having dividing cells. In this review, we highlight advances in the clinical application of microarray technology in MDS and discuss the clinical potential of microarray.

  16. Genomic loss of EZH2 leads to epigenetic modifications and overexpression of the HOX gene clusters in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Li; Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Shi, Wen-Hui; Guo, Juan; Zhu, Yang; Zhao, You-Shan; Gu, Shu-Cheng; Fei, Cheng-Ming; Li, Xiao

    2016-02-16

    The role of EZH2 in cancer is complex and may vary depending on cancer type or stage. We examined the effect of altered EZH2 levels on H3K27 methylation, HOX gene expression, and malignant phenotype in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cell lines and an in vivo xenograft model. We also studied links between EZH2 expression and prognosis in MDS patients. Patients with high-grade MDS exhibited lower levels of EZH2 expression than those with low-grade MDS. Low EZH2 expression was associated with high percentages of blasts, shorter survival, and increased transformation of MDS into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MDS patients frequently had reductions in EZH2 copy number. EZH2 knockdown increased tumor growth capacity and reduced H3K27me3 levels in both MDS-derived leukemia cells and in a xenograft model. H3K27me3 levels were reduced and HOX gene cluster expression was increased in MDS patients. EZH2 knockdown also increased HOX gene cluster expression by reducing H3K27me3, and H3K27 demethylating agents increased HOX gene cluster expression in MDS-derived cell lines. These findings suggest genomic loss of EZH2 contributes to overexpression of the HOX gene clusters in MDS through epigenetic modifications.

  17. Prognostic features of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes aged < 50 years: update of a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Finsinger, Paola; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Santopietro, Michelina; Salaroli, Adriano; Serrao, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Volpicelli, Paola; Petrucci, Luigi; Nanni, Mauro; Alimena, Giuliana

    2012-12-01

    Fewer than 10% of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are younger than 50 years. A series of 91 younger patients (median age 44 years with female prevalence) are reported and compared with elderly patients. Frequent karyotypic changes were trisomy 8 (9.8%) and monosomy 7 (5%). Twenty-three patients had occupational exposure to potential mutagens (benzene and solvents), with a male predominance, higher frequency of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD) (52%) and higher frequency of monosomy 7 (21.7%). At a median follow-up of 72 months, 22 patients (24%) evolved to acute leukemia, with higher frequency being observed among the exposed cohort (39% vs. 19% non-exposed). Unfavorable factors for overall survival were: age > 40 years, > 5% of blasts, trilinear bone marrow involvement and intermediate-high World Health Organization Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) risk. The present results suggest that younger MDS could be identified as a distinct subset. For patients belonging to the low/intermediate-I risk group, due to a low transformation rate, aggressive approaches should rarely be recommended.

  18. Efficacy and safety of extended dosing schedules of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manero, G; Gore, S D; Kambhampati, S; Scott, B; Tefferi, A; Cogle, C R; Edenfield, W J; Hetzer, J; Kumar, K; Laille, E; Shi, T; MacBeth, K J; Skikne, B

    2016-01-01

    CC-486, the oral formulation of azacitidine (AZA), is an epigenetic modifier and DNA methyltransferase inhibitor in clinical development for treatment of hematologic malignancies. CC-486 administered for 7 days per 28-day treatment cycle was evaluated in a phase 1 dose-finding study. AZA has a short plasma half-life and DNA incorporation is S-phase-restricted; extending CC-486 exposure may increase the number of AZA-affected diseased target cells and maximize therapeutic effects. Patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) received 300 mg CC-486 once daily for 14 days (n=28) or 21 days (n=27) of repeated 28-day cycles. Median patient age was 72 years (range 31–87) and 75% of patients had International Prognostic Scoring System Intermediate-1 risk MDS. Median number of CC-486 treatment cycles was 7 (range 2–24) for the 14-day dosing schedule and 6 (1–24) for the 21-day schedule. Overall response (complete or partial remission, red blood cell (RBC) or platelet transfusion independence (TI), or hematologic improvement) (International Working Group 2006) was attained by 36% of patients receiving 14-day dosing and 41% receiving 21-day dosing. RBC TI rates were similar with both dosing schedules (31% and 38%, respectively). CC-486 was generally well-tolerated. Extended dosing schedules of oral CC-486 may provide effective long-term treatment for patients with lower-risk MDS. PMID:26442612

  19. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome patients undergoing induction chemotherapy with idarubicin and cytarabine.

    PubMed

    Heisel, Ronald W; Sutton, Robert R; Mascara, Gerard P; Winger, Daniel G; Weber, David R; Lim, Seah H; Oleksiuk, Louise-Marie

    2017-11-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to determine the risk factors associated with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) acquisition/infection in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome patients undergoing chemotherapy with the 7 + 3 regimen of cytarabine and idarubicin. Although only 2.5% (6/235) patients were colonized with VRE on admission, 59% (134/229) of patients acquired VRE during their hospitalization. Multivariable analysis identified the use of intravenous vancomycin (p = .024; HR: 1.548) and cephalosporin (p = .009; HR: 1.596) as the risk factors for VRE acquisition. VRE infection developed in 14% (33/229) of patients, with bloodstream infections accounting for 82% (27/33) of cases. VRE infection occurred in 25/126 (20%) of the VRE-colonized patients, but only 8/103 (8%) of those who were not (p = .01). Our study provides the evidence for the role of intravenous cephalosporin and vancomycin in VRE acquisition and highlights the clinical significance of VRE colonization in these patients.

  20. Recent advances in the treatment of lower-risk non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).

    PubMed

    Almeida, Antonio; Fenaux, Pierre; List, Alan F; Raza, Azra; Platzbecker, Uwe; Santini, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are affected primarily by symptoms of chronic anemia and fatigue rather than progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Severe thrombocytopenia, although less common in lower-risk MDS, is associated with increased risk of bleeding. For anemic patients, the principal aim of treatment is to improve anemia and decrease red blood cell transfusions. For transfusion-dependent patients with lower-risk MDS without chromosome 5q deletion [non-del(5q) MDS], there are limited effective treatments. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are generally first-line therapy, yielding frequent responses with a median duration of 18-24 months. Immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic stem cell transplantation are restricted to select patients. New strategies for ESA-refractory or relapsed patients include lenalidomide, alone or in combination with ESAs; oral azacitidine; and new molecules such as the activin receptor type II ligand traps luspatercept and sotatercept. In thrombocytopenic patients, thrombopoietin receptor agonists are under evaluation. While trials to evaluate these treatment strategies are underway, efforts are needed to optimize therapies through better patient selection and response prediction as well as integrating molecular and genetic data into clinical practice. We provide an overview of current treatment approaches for lower-risk non-del(5q) MDS and explore promising directions for future research.

  1. Deletion 5q is frequent in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients diagnosed with interstitial lung diseases (ILD): Mayo Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Nanah, Rama; Zblewski, Darci; Patnaik, Mrinal S; Begna, Kebede; Ketterling, Rhett; Iyer, Vivek N; Hogan, William J; Litzow, Mark R; Al-Kali, Aref

    2016-11-01

    A variety of interstitial Lung Diseases (ILD) have been described in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with possible etiologies including autoimmunity, drug related toxicity, and recurrent infections. A comprehensive study of ILD in MDS patients has not been previously performed. Out of 827 consecutive biopsy proven MDS patients seen at our institution from June 1970-May 2010, 18 (2%) were found to have ILD. There was no statistical significance in baseline characteristics between patients with ILD (ILD +) vs those without ILD (ILD-). Cytogenetic studies were reported in 14 ILD+patients out of whom 43% had 5q- abnormalities (21% isolated and 22% part of complex karyotype). Prevalence of high risk MDS was similar between both groups (22% vs 29% in ILD-) with similar overall survival. ILD was diagnosed prior to MDS in the majority of cases (72%) with a median time to MDS diagnosis of 22.3 months. Our study suggests that ILD are present in a higher percentage than anticipated in the MDS population. Deletion 5q was frequent in ILD+ cases and this requires further study. Prior MDS treatment and autoimmunity seemed to play no significant role in ILD development.

  2. Clinical and cytogenetic features of 508 Chinese patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and comparison with those in Western countries.

    PubMed

    Chen, B; Zhao, W-L; Jin, J; Xue, Y-Q; Cheng, X; Chen, X-T; Cui, J; Chen, Z-M; Cao, Q; Yang, G; Yao, Y; Xia, H-L; Tong, J-H; Li, J-M; Chen, J; Xiong, S-M; Shen, Z-X; Waxman, S; Chen, Z; Chen, S-J

    2005-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and leukemia progression. Racial differences may exist on clinical pictures and the molecular events leading to MDS, which are heterogeneous. To better define the clinical and cytogenetic features in Chinese patients, a retrospective multicentric study was performed in 508 MDS cases. Compared with Western countries, Chinese patients showed younger age (median: 49 vs 65-73 years), lower percentages of RARS (2.8 vs 6.6-15.3%), and CMML (5.2 vs 11.7-30.6%). Cytogenetically, among 367 cases with evaluable data, abnormal karyotypes were found in 136 cases, including 56 numerical and 80 structural changes. Incidences of single chromosome 5 and 7 abnormalities were lower than those in Western countries (2.2 vs 17.8-42.5%). However, complex cytogenetic aberrations and chromosome translocations were frequently observed and related to poor prognosis. Both multiple chromosome deletions and translocations were detected in advanced subtypes (RAEB and RAEB-T). Analysis of 200 cases revealed a higher incidence of hepatitis-B-virus infection than that in non-MDS population (21.00 vs 9.75%). This study further confirmed: (1) different genetic/environmental backgrounds between Asian and Western MDS populations; (2) a strong predictive value of cytogenetic abnormalities on disease outcome and involvement of genomic instability in leukemia clone development.

  3. Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction in Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Possible Contribution of a Defective Vascular Niche to Myelodysplasia12

    PubMed Central

    Teofili, Luciana; Martini, Maurizio; Nuzzolo, Eugenia Rosa; Capodimonti, Sara; Iachininoto, Maria Grazia; Cocomazzi, Alessandra; Fabiani, Emiliano; Voso, Maria Teresa; Larocca, Luigi M.

    2015-01-01

    We set a model to replicate the vascular bone marrow niche by using endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs), and we used it to explore the vascular niche function in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Overall, we investigated 56 patients and we observed higher levels of ECFCs in MDS than in healthy controls; moreover, MDS ECFCs were found variably hypermethylated for p15INK4b DAPK1, CDH1, or SOCS1. MDS ECFCs exhibited a marked adhesive capacity to normal mononuclear cells. When normal CD34 + cells were co-cultured with MDS ECFCs, they generated significant lower amounts of CD11b + and CD41 + cells than in co-culture with normal ECFCs. At gene expression profile, several genes involved in cell adhesion were upregulated in MDS ECFCs, while several members of the Wingless and int (Wnt) pathways were underexpressed. Furthermore, at miRNA expression profile, MDS ECFCs hypo-expressed various miRNAs involved in Wnt pathway regulation. The addition of Wnt3A reduced the expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 on MDS ECFCs and restored the defective expression of markers of differentiation. Overall, our data demonstrate that in low-risk MDS, ECFCs exhibit various primary abnormalities, including putative MDS signatures, and suggest the possible contribution of the vascular niche dysfunction to myelodysplasia. PMID:26025663

  4. Deferasirox Decreases Liver Iron Concentration in Iron-Overloaded Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Aplastic Anemia and Other Rare Anemias.

    PubMed

    Kohgo, Yutaka; Urabe, Akio; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Agaoglu, Leyla; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Miyamura, Koichi; Lim, Lay Cheng; Glaser, Sabine; Wang, Candace; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw

    2015-01-01

    Iron overload in transfusion-dependent patients with rare anemias can be managed with chelation therapy. This study evaluated deferasirox efficacy and safety in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), aplastic anemia (AA) or other rare anemias. A 1-year, open-label, multicenter, single-arm, phase II trial was performed with deferasirox (10–40 mg/kg/day, based on transfusion frequency and therapeutic goals), including an optional 1-year extension. The primary end point was a change in liver iron concentration (LIC) after 1 year. Secondary end points included changes in efficacy and safety parameters (including ophthalmologic assessments) overall as well as in a Japanese subpopulation. Overall, 102 patients (42 with MDS, 29 with AA and 31 with other rare anemias) were enrolled; 57 continued into the extension. Mean absolute change in LIC was –10.9 mg Fe/g dry weight (d.w.) after 1 year (baseline: 24.5 mg Fe/g d.w.) and –13.5 mg Fe/g d.w. after 2 years. The most common drug-related adverse event was increased serum creatinine (23.5%), predominantly in MDS patients. Four patients had suspected drug-related ophthalmologic abnormalities. Outcomes in Japanese patients were generally consistent with the overall population. Results confirm deferasirox efficacy in patients with rare anemias, including a Japanese subpopulation. The safety profile was consistent with previous studies and ophthalmologic parameters generally agreed with baseline values (EUDRACT 2006-003337-32).

  5. Absence of aberrant myeloid progenitors by flow cytometry is associated with favorable response to azacitidine in higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Alhan, Canan; Westers, Theresia M; van der Helm, Lieke H; Eeltink, Corien; Huls, Gerwin; Witte, Birgit I; Buchi, Francesca; Santini, Valeria; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A

    2014-01-15

    Background: In intermediate-2 and high risk patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), treatment with azacitidine is associated with hematological responses and prolonged overall survival in patients who respond to therapy. However, only half of the patients that are treated will benefit from this treatment. It is a major challenge to predict which patients are likely to respond to treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of immunophenotyping for response to treatment with azacitidine of Int-2 and high risk MDS patients. Methods: Bone marrow aspirates were analyzed by flow cytometry in 42 patients with Int-2 and high risk MDS, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia or low blast count acute myeloid leukemia before treatment and after every third cycle of azacitidine. A flow score was calculated using the flow cytometric scoring system (FCSS). Results: The presence of myeloid progenitors with an aberrant immunophenotype was significantly associated with lack of response (p=0.02). A low pretreatment FCSS was associated with significantly better overall survival compared with a high pretreatment FCSS (p=0.03). A significant decrease in FCSS was observed in patients with complete response after three cycles azacitidine compared to patients with progressive disease (p=0.006). Conclusions: Absence of aberrant myeloid progenitor cells at baseline and/or a decrease in the FCSS during treatment identified Int-2 and high risk MDS patients who are likely to respond to treatment with azacitidine. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  6. Analysis of the efficacy of lenalidomide in patients with intermediate-1 risk myelodysplastic syndrome without 5q deletion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Gao, Sujun; Fan, Hongqiong; Lin, Hai; Li, Wei; Wang, Juan

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of lenalidomide in the treatment of intermediate-1 risk non-5q deletion [non-del (5q)] myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). A total of 30 patients with MDS were classified through G-banding chromosome karyotype analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). According to the International Prognostic Scoring System scores, among the 30 patients, 23 and seven cases had scores of 0.5 and 1.0, respectively. Lenalidomide (Revlimid(®)), 10 mg/day) was administered for 21 days every 28 days. All 30 cases were treated with lenalidomide for at least three cycles, including 20 cases with four cycles. The patients did not require erythropoietin, cyclosporine or iron chelation treatments. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS statistical software version 13.0, and comparisons among groups were conducted using a t-test. The efficacy of lenalidomide was demonstrated in patients with intermediate-1 risk non-del (5q) MDS. Peripheral blood cell counts were improved following treatment, and absolute neutrophil, haemoglobin and platelet counts increased following 2-4 cycles of treatment. All patients became stable having undergone three cycles of treatment; however, 17 patients with chromosomal abnormalities had no cytogenetic response to the treatment, as confirmed through the FISH test. Patients with intermediate-1 risk non-del (5q) MDS treated with lenalidomide did not achieve complete haematological remission, although they demonstrated haematological improvement.

  7. Serum proteome profiling detects myelodysplastic syndromes and identifies CXC chemokine ligands 4 and 7 as markers for advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Aivado, Manuel; Spentzos, Dimitrios; Germing, Ulrich; Alterovitz, Gil; Meng, Xiao-Ying; Grall, Franck; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A. N.; Klement, Giannoula; Steidl, Ulrich; Otu, Hasan H.; Czibere, Akos; Prall, Wolf C.; Iking-Konert, Christof; Shayne, Michelle; Ramoni, Marco F.; Gattermann, Norbert; Haas, Rainer; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Fung, Eric T.; Libermann, Towia A.

    2007-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are among the most frequent hematologic malignancies. Patients have a short survival and often progress to acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis of MDS can be difficult; there is a paucity of molecular markers, and the pathophysiology is largely unknown. Therefore, we conducted a multicenter study investigating whether serum proteome profiling may serve as a noninvasive platform to discover novel molecular markers for MDS. We generated serum proteome profiles from 218 individuals by MS and identified a profile that distinguishes MDS from non-MDS cytopenias in a learning sample set. This profile was validated by testing its ability to predict MDS in a first independent validation set and a second, prospectively collected, independent validation set run 5 months apart. Accuracy was 80.5% in the first and 79.0% in the second validation set. Peptide mass fingerprinting and quadrupole TOF MS identified two differential proteins: CXC chemokine ligands 4 (CXCL4) and 7 (CXCL7), both of which had significantly decreased serum levels in MDS, as confirmed with independent antibody assays. Western blot analyses of platelet lysates for these two platelet-derived molecules revealed a lack of CXCL4 and CXCL7 in MDS. Subtype analyses revealed that these two proteins have decreased serum levels in advanced MDS, suggesting the possibility of a concerted disturbance of transcription or translation of these chemokines in advanced MDS. PMID:17220270

  8. Prognostic Impact of IPSS-R and Chromosomal Translocations in 751 Korean Patients with Primary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Inho; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Shin, Dong-Yeop; Koh, Youngil; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Min, Yoo Hong; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Lee, Yun-Gyoo; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Bang, Soo-Mee; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Seong, Chu-Myoung; Park, Yong; Kim, Byung-Soo; Hong, Junshik; Park, Jinny; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Sung-Yong; Lee, Hong Ghi

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are rare in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and their impact on overall survival (OS) and response to hypomethylating agents (HMA) is unknown. The prognostic impact of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) and for chromosomal translocations was assessed in 751 patients from the Korea MDS Registry. IPSS-R effectively discriminated patients according to leukaemia evolution risk and OS. We identified 40 patients (5.3%) carrying translocations, 30 (75%) of whom also fulfilled complex karyotype criteria. Translocation presence was associated with a shorter OS (median, 12.0 versus 79.7 months, P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that translocations (hazard ratio [HR] 1.64 [1.06–2.63]; P = 0.03) as well as age, sex, IPSS-R, and CK were independent predictors of OS. In the IPSS-R high and very high risk subgroup (n = 260), translocations remained independently associated with OS (HR 1.68 [1.06–2.69], P = 0.03) whereas HMA treatment was not associated with improved survival (median OS, 20.9 versus 21.2 months, P = 0.43). However, translocation carriers exhibited enhanced survival following HMA treatment (median 2.1 versus 12.4 months, P = 0.03). Our data suggest that chromosomal translocation is an independent predictor of adverse outcome and has an additional prognostic value in discriminating patients with MDS having higher risk IPSS-R who could benefit from HMA treatment. PMID:27824923

  9. TP53 and MDM2 single nucleotide polymorphisms influence survival in non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sallman, David A.; Basiorka, Ashley A.; Irvine, Brittany A.; Zhang, Ling; Epling-Burnette, P.K.; Rollison, Dana E.; Mallo, Mar; Sokol, Lubomir; Solé, Francesc; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; List, Alan F.

    2015-01-01

    P53 is a key regulator of many cellular processes and is negatively regulated by the human homolog of murine double minute-2 (MDM2) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of either gene alone, and in combination, are linked to cancer susceptibility, disease progression, and therapy response. We analyzed the interaction of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 SNPs in relationship to outcome in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Sanger sequencing was performed on DNA isolated from 208 MDS cases. Utilizing a novel functional SNP scoring system ranging from +2 to −2 based on predicted p53 activity, we found statistically significant differences in overall survival (OS) (p = 0.02) and progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.02) in non-del(5q) MDS patients with low functional scores. In univariate analysis, only IPSS and the functional SNP score predicted OS and PFS in non-del(5q) patients. In multivariate analysis, the functional SNP score was independent of IPSS for OS and PFS. These data underscore the importance of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 SNPs in MDS, and provide a novel scoring system independent of IPSS that is predictive for disease outcome. PMID:26416416

  10. A phase II Open-label Study of the Intravenous Administration of Homoharringtonine in the treatment of Myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Daver, Naval; Vega-Ruiz, Arturo; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Estrov, Zeev; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Kornblau, Steve; Verstovsek, Srdan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge E.

    2013-01-01

    Homoharringtonine is an alkaloid inhibitor of protein synthesis with activity in myeloid malignancies. We report a phase II pilot study of homoharringtonine in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Induction consisted of homoharringtonine at 2.5 mg/m2 via continuous infusion for seven days. Maintenance was given every 4 weeks. Nine patients were enrolled: five with refractory anaemia with excess blasts, two with refractory anaemia with excess blasts in transformation, one each with refractory anaemia and chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia, respectively. Median age was 70 years (55–84) and 6 (66%) were male. Per International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) two patients were intermediate-1, five intermediate-2 and two high-risk. Median chemotherapy courses were one (1–3). One patient (11%) responded with complete hematologic and cytogenetic remission after one course. Eight patients did not respond (four had stable disease, two progressed to acute leukaemia and two died during induction - from aspergillus pneumonia and intracerebral haemorrhage, respectively). Grade 3/4 myelosuppression seen in 56% (5/9). Serious non-hematologic toxicities included one case of grade 4 left bundle branch heart block and one grade 3 nephrotoxicity. Median time between courses was 42 days (35–72 days). In conclusion homoharringtonine might have clinical activity in some patients with MDS. PMID:23701251

  11. Development and validation of a model to predict platelet response to romiplostim in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sekeres, Mikkael A; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Kantarjian, Hagop; Mufti, Ghulam J; Fenaux, Pierre; Jia, Catherine; Yang, Allen S; Platzbecker, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    Low endogenous erythropoietin levels and limited red blood cell transfusion history can predict response to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in anaemic patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The relationship between endogenous thrombopoietin (THPO) levels and platelet response to romiplostim is unknown. Variables including baseline endogenous THPO levels, transfusion needs, and platelet response were analysed in a randomized trial of 250 thrombocytopenic, lower-risk MDS patients (International Prognostic Scoring System low/intermediate-1). A predictive scoring system was developed based on log-likelihood ratios and logistic coefficients. Patients with HI-P (haematological improvement - platelets) responses had lower mean baseline THPO levels (P = 0·0497) and were more likely to have <6 platelet units transfused in the past year (P = 0·0027), as did patients with platelet responses ≥50% of weeks on romiplostim (P = 0·001 and P = 0·0037, respectively). A model for predicting response to romiplostim was developed and validated in a separate MDS cohort (N = 72). Patients in low-, intermediate-, and high-response groups had response rates of 17·4%, 29·6%, and 50·7%, respectively, for HI-P, and 17·4%, 33·8%, and 65·2%, respectively, for ≥50% response. For thrombocytopenic patients with lower-risk MDS, lower baseline THPO levels (<500 pg/ml) and limited platelet transfusion history predicted a greater likelihood of a subsequent platelet response to romiplostim. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Role of chromosome 1 pericentric heterochromatin (1q) in pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes: report of 2 new cases.

    PubMed

    Millington, Karmaine; Hudnall, S David; Northup, Jill; Panova, Neli; Velagaleti, Gopalrao

    2008-04-01

    Chromosome 1 pericentromeric heterochromatin (1q) has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) results from marrow failure in two or more cell lineages. Although trisomy 1q has been reported in MDS, it is usually present with additional common abnormalities such as trisomy 8, monosomy 5 or monosomy 7, leading to speculation that 1q abnormalities are mostly secondary events representing clonal evolution. We report two cases of MDS in which consistent involvement of 1q heterochromatin is seen as the primary clonal abnormality. Both patients presented with fatigue and pancytopenia. Based on the published reports and our cases, we propose that the 1q heterochromatin plays a vital role in the pathophysiology of MDS. Abnormalities involving 1q result in aberrant heterochromatin/euchromatin junctions, leading to gene dosage abnormalities. Further studies of 1q abnormalities in MDS might provide specific insights as to the exact role of the excess 1q heterochromatin in the etiology of MDS.

  13. Sonic Hedgehog Produced by Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Supports Cell Survival in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jixue; Hong, Yan; Tong, Yin; Wei, Ju; Qin, Youwen; Shao, Shan; Wang, Chun; Zhou, Kun

    2015-01-01

    The role of marrow microenvironment in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) remains controversial. Therefore, we studied the influence of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) from patients with different risk types of MDS on the survival of the MDS cell lines SKM-1 and MUTZ-1. We first demonstrated that the expression of Sonic hedgehog (Shh), smoothened (Smo), and glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (Gli1) was increased in MDS patients (n = 23); the increase in expression was positively correlated with the presence of high-risk factors. The Shh signaling inhibitor, cyclopamine, inhibited high-risk MDS BMSC-induced survival of SKM-1 and MUTZ-1 cells, suggesting a role for Shh signaling in MDS cell survival. Furthermore, cyclopamine-mediated inhibition of Shh signaling in SKM-1 and MUTZ-1 cells resulted in decreased DNMT1 expression and cell survival; however, exogenous Shh peptide had the opposite effect, suggesting that Shh signaling could regulate the expression of DNMT1, thereby modulating cell survival in MDS. In addition, the apoptosis of SKM-1 and MUTZ-1 cell increased significantly when cultured with cyclopamine and a demethylation agent, 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine. These findings suggest that Shh signaling from BMSCs is important in the pathogenesis of MDS and could play a role in disease progression by modulating methylation. PMID:25861282

  14. Stem and progenitor cells in myelodysplastic syndromes show aberrant stage-specific expansion and harbor genetic and epigenetic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Will, Britta; Zhou, Li; Vogler, Thomas O.; Ben-Neriah, Susanna; Schinke, Carolina; Tamari, Roni; Yu, Yiting; Bhagat, Tushar D.; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Barreyro, Laura; Heuck, Christoph; Mo, Yonkai; Parekh, Samir; McMahon, Christine; Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Montagna, Cristina; Silverman, Lewis; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Greally, John M.; Ye, B. Hilda; List, Alan F.; Steidl, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Even though hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) dysfunction is presumed in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), the exact nature of quantitative and qualitative alterations is unknown. We conducted a study of phenotypic and molecular alterations in highly fractionated stem and progenitor populations in a variety of MDS subtypes. We observed an expansion of the phenotypically primitive long-term HSCs (lineage−/CD34+/CD38−/CD90+) in MDS, which was most pronounced in higher-risk cases. These MDS HSCs demonstrated dysplastic clonogenic activity. Examination of progenitors revealed that lower-risk MDS is characterized by expansion of phenotypic common myeloid progenitors, whereas higher-risk cases revealed expansion of granulocyte-monocyte progenitors. Genome-wide analysis of sorted MDS HSCs revealed widespread methylomic and transcriptomic alterations. STAT3 was an aberrantly hypomethylated and overexpressed target that was validated in an independent cohort and found to be functionally relevant in MDS HSCs. FISH analysis demonstrated that a very high percentage of MDS HSC (92% ± 4%) carry cytogenetic abnormalities. Longitudinal analysis in a patient treated with 5-azacytidine revealed that karyotypically abnormal HSCs persist even during complete morphologic remission and that expansion of clonotypic HSCs precedes clinical relapse. This study demonstrates that stem and progenitor cells in MDS are characterized by stage-specific expansions and contain epigenetic and genetic alterations. PMID:22753872

  15. Mesenchymal stromal cells of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia patients have distinct genetic abnormalities compared with leukemic blasts

    PubMed Central

    Baldus, Claudia Dorothea; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Thiel, Gundula; Nolte, Florian; Burmeister, Thomas; Türkmen, Seval; Benlasfer, Ouidad; Schümann, Elke; Sindram, Annette; Molkentin, Mara; Mundlos, Stefan; Keilholz, Ulrich; Thiel, Eckhard; Blau, Igor Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are an essential cell type of the hematopoietic microenvironment. Concerns have been raised about the possibility that MSCs undergo malignant transformation. Several studies, including one from our own group, have shown the presence of cytogenetic abnormalities in MSCs from leukemia patients. The aim of the present study was to compare genetic aberrations in hematopoietic cells (HCs) and MSCs of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Cytogenetic aberrations were detected in HCs from 25 of 51 AML patients (49%) and 16 of 43 MDS patients (37%). Mutations of the FLT3 and NPM1 genes were detected in leukemic blasts in 12 (23%) and 8 (16%) AML patients, respectively. Chromosomal aberrations in MSCs were detected in 15 of 94 MDS/AML patients (16%). No chromosomal abnormalities were identified in MSCs of 36 healthy subjects. We demonstrate herein that MSCs have distinct genetic abnormalities compared with leukemic blasts. We also analyzed the main characteristics of patients with MSCs carrying chromosomal aberrations. In view of these data, the genetic alterations in MSCs may constitute a particular mechanism of leukemogenesis. PMID:21948175

  16. Early treatment initiation in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes produces an earlier and higher rate of transfusion independence.

    PubMed

    Cogle, Christopher R; Reddy, Sheila R; Chang, Eunice; Papoyan, Elya; Broder, Michael S; McGuire, Michael; Binder, Gary

    2017-09-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis resulting in refractory cytopenias. Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions can improve anemia; however, prolonged transfusion dependence (TD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Disease-modifying therapy (DMT) for MDS can reduce transfusion requirements, although the optimum timing of DMT initiation is unclear. This retrospective study analyzed linked SEER registry and Medicare claims (2006-2012) to estimate the impact of DMT-initiation (azacitidine, decitabine, or lenalidomide) timing (≤ 3 vs.>3months from start of TD) on the likelihood of achieving transfusion independence (TI) among 508 TD patients with MDS. Mean time to DMT was 28days for early initiators (n=351) and 187days for late initiators (n=157). Fewer early initiators used erythropoiesis-stimulating agents before achieving TI versus late initiators (61.5% vs. 73.9%; P=0.007). In multivariate analyses, early DMT initiation predicted TI achievement (HR, 1.69; P<0.001); patients who met minimum active therapy-exposure requirements were more likely to achieve TI (HR, 2.12; P<0.001). Higher rates of TI were associated with reduced time between onset of TD and DMT initiation. Similarly, patients meeting the minimum treatment-exposure threshold had higher TI rates. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Pre-transplant weight loss predicts inferior outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Becker, Natalia; Benner, Axel; Penack, Olaf; Platzbecker, Uwe; Stölzel, Friedrich; Bornhäuser, Martin; Hegenbart, Ute; Ho, Anthony D; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2015-10-27

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) represents a curative therapeutic option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM) limit treatment efficacy. Based on our previous observation in acute myeloid leukemia we investigated the impact of pre-transplant weight loss on post-transplant outcome in MDS patients. A total of 111 patients diagnosed with MDS according to WHO criteria transplanted between 2000 and 2012 in three different transplant centers were included into the analysis. Data on weight loss were collected from medical records prior to conditioning therapy and 3-6 months earlier. Patient, disease and transplant characteristics did not differ between patients with weight loss (2-5%, n = 17; > 5%, n = 17) and those without (n = 77). In a mixed effect model, weight loss was associated with higher risk MDS (p = 0.046). In multivariable analyses, pre-transplant weight loss exceeding 5% was associated with a higher incidence of relapse (p < 0.001) and NRM (p = 0.007). Pre-transplant weight loss of 2-5% and > 5% were independent predictors of worse disease-free (p = 0.023 and p < 0.001, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.043 and p < 0.001, respectively). Our retrospective study suggests that MDS patients losing weight prior to alloSCT have an inferior outcome after transplantation. Prospective studies addressing pre-transplant nutritional interventions are highly warranted.

  18. Proteome Changes in the Plasma of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients with Refractory Anemia with Excess Blasts Subtype 2

    PubMed Central

    Majek, Pavel; Riedelova-Reicheltova, Zuzana; Pecankova, Klara; Cermak, Jaroslav; Dyr, Jan E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the plasma proteome of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts subtype 2 (RAEB-2) in comparison to healthy controls. 20 plasma samples were separated with 2D electrophoresis and statistically processed with Progenesis SameSpots software. 47 significantly differing (P < 0.05) spots were observed, and 27 different proteins were identified by nano-LC-MS/MS. Mass spectrometry-based relative label-free quantification showed a 2-fold increase of the leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRAG) peptide levels in the RAEB-2 group. Changes in the fragments of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4) protein were observed. Western blot analysis showed no differences in albumin and ITIH4 levels, while increased expression was observed for LRAG in the RAEB-2 group. Quantification using ELISA showed decreased plasma level of alpha-2-HS glycoprotein in the RAEB-2 group. In conclusion, this is the first time that alpha-2-HS glycoprotein and LRAG were proposed as new biomarkers of RAEB-2 and advanced MDS, respectively. Alpha-2-HS glycoprotein, a protein involved in the bone marrow development and previously proposed as a MDS biomarker candidate, was significantly decreased in RAEB-2. Increased expression and changes in modification(s) were observed for LRAG, a protein involved in granulocytic and neutrophil differentiation, and angiogenesis. PMID:24958999

  19. Oral Ezatiostat HCl (TLK199) and Myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report of sustained hematologic response following an abbreviated exposure.

    PubMed

    Quddus, Fahd; Clima, Jessica; Seedham, Helen; Sajjad, Ghulam; Galili, Naomi; Raza, Azra

    2010-04-23

    Treatment options for patients with lower risk non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) who fail erythroid stimulating agents are restricted to one of the hypomethylating drugs with an expected response rate of approximately 50%. Ezatiostat HCl, an agent with the potential for producing multi-lineage responses in this population is currently in clinical investigation phase. This case report describes a 77 year old male who received less than two cycles of therapy with ezatiostat HCl which had to be aborted due to intolerable side effects, but which produced a sustained normalization of all three blood counts. This trilineage response has now lasted for more than a year. Interestingly, the patient began with a del(5q) abnormality and responded briefly to lenalidomide. Upon relapse of the anemia, a bone marrow showed the disappearance of the del(5q) but the appearance of a new clonal abnormality t(2;3). Given that the patient had a complete cytogenetic response to a truncated exposure to lenalidomide followed by a trilineage response to an even briefer course of ezatiostat HCl suggests a potential role for ezatiostat HCl in del(5q) patients who relapse following lenalidomide.

  20. Oral Ezatiostat HCl (TLK199) and Myelodysplastic syndrome: A case report of sustained hematologic response following an abbreviated exposure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with lower risk non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) who fail erythroid stimulating agents are restricted to one of the hypomethylating drugs with an expected response rate of ~50%. Eza