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Sample records for pediatric patients presenting

  1. Neurilemmoma presenting as a midline nasal mass in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Gary D; Patel, Sapna A; Duckworth, Laurie; Kress, Melissa; Goldstein, Jeffrey

    2010-05-01

    We report a case of a neurilemmoma presenting as a midline nasal mass in a 13-year-old girl. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a nasal neurilemmoma in a pediatric patient. Although this neoplasm is benign in nature, surgical resection is warranted to prevent recurrence, and it is the sole means of treatment. The overall prognosis is excellent, as was the case for our patient. We discuss the diagnosis and management of neurilemmomas and urge physicians not to exclude nasal neurilemmoma from the differential diagnosis in a pediatric patient who presents with a nasal mass.

  2. Respiratory Presentation of Pediatric Patients in the 2014 Enterovirus D68 Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Peter; Sauve, Laura; Tang, Patrick; Kapur, Akshat

    2016-01-01

    Background. In the fall of 2014, a North American outbreak of enterovirus D68 resulted in a significant number of pediatric hospital admissions for respiratory illness throughout North America. This study characterized the clinical presentation and risk factors for a severe clinical course in children admitted to British Columbia Children's Hospital during the 2014 outbreak. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients with confirmed EV-D68 infection admitted to BCCH with respiratory symptoms in the fall of 2014. Past medical history, clinical presentation, management, and course in hospital was collected and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Comparison was made between those that did and did not require ICU admission to identify risk factors. Results. Thirty-four patients were included (median age 7.5 years). Fifty-three percent of children had a prior history of wheeze, 32% had other preexisting medical comorbidities, and 15% were previously healthy. Ten children (29%) were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit. The presence of complex medical conditions (excluding wheezing) (P = 0.03) and copathogens was associated with PICU admission (P = 0.02). Conclusions. EV-D68 infection resulted in severe, prolonged presentations of asthma-like illness in the hospitalized pediatric population. Patients with a prior history of wheeze and preexisting medical comorbidities appear to be most severely affected, but the virus can also cause wheezing in previously well children. PMID:27610028

  3. An Unusual Presentation of Disseminated Histoplasmosis: Case Report and Review of Pediatric Immunocompetent Patients from India.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Poojan; Capoor, Malini R; Singh, Mukul; Gupta, Arpita; Chhakchhuak, Arini; Debatta, Pradeep

    2015-12-01

    Histoplasmosis is a progressive disease caused by dimorphic intracellular fungi and can prove fatal. Usually, it is present in immunocompromised individuals and immunocompetent individuals in the endemic zones. We report an unusual presentation of progressive disseminated histoplasmosis. The patient in the present case report was immunocompetent child and had fever, bone pains, gradual weight loss, lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. Disseminated histoplasmosis (DH) was diagnosed on microscopic examination and fungal culture of bone marrow, blood, skin biopsy and lymph node aspirate. The patient died on seventh day of amphotericin B. In the absence of predisposing factors and classical clinical presentation of febrile neutropenia, lung, adrenal and oropharyngeal lesions, the disease posed a diagnostic challenge. Progressive disseminated histoplasmosis in children can be fatal despite timely diagnosis and therapy. In India, disseminated histoplasmosis is seen in immunocompetent hosts. All the pediatrics immunocompetent cases from India are also reviewed.

  4. Disseminated Cytomegalovirus Infection and Protein Losing Enteropathy as Presenting Feature of Pediatric Patient with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ersoz, Safak; Akbulut, Ulas Emre

    2015-01-01

    We report a pediatric patient admitted with abdominal pain, diffuse lower extremity edema and watery diarrhea for two months. Laboratory findings including complete blood count, serum albumin, lipid and immunoglobulin levels were compatible with protein losing enteropathy. Colonoscopic examination revealed diffuse ulcers with smooth raised edge (like "punched out holes") in the colon and terminal ileum. Histopathological examination showed active colitis, ulcerations and inclusion bodies. Immunostaining for cytomegalovirus was positive. Despite supportive management, antiviral therapy, the clinical condition of the patient worsened and developed disseminated cytomegalovirus infection and the patient died. Protein losing enteropathy and disseminated cytomegalovirus infection a presenting of feature in steroid-naive patient with inflammatory bowel disease is very rare. Hypogammaglobulinemia associated with protein losing enteropathy in Crohn's disease may predispose the cytomegalovirus infection in previously healthy children. PMID:25866735

  5. Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) Polymorphisms in Pediatric Patients Presenting With Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tekgündüz, Sibel A; Yeşil, Şule; Ören, Ayşe C; Tanyildiz, Hikmet G; Çandir, Mehmet O; Bozkurt, Ceyhun; Şahin, Gürses

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms are found more commonly in some tumor types than in healthy individuals, suggesting that some polymorphisms (Cdx2, Fok1, Bsm1, Apa1, Taq1) contribute to tumor development. There is no previous report on VDR polymorphism in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients. VDR polymorphism patterns in 95 pediatric HL cases with 100 healthy controls were compared. No statistically significant difference was found between the patient group and control group in terms of Cdx2, Fok1, Bsm1, Apa1, and Taq1 polymorphisms (P>0.5). Our findings suggest that VDR polymorphisms may not play a role in HL development.

  6. The possible therapeutic benefits of utilizing motion gaming systems on pediatric patients presenting autism.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Stephen A; Merritte, Kristin

    2013-09-01

    Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder that affects a growing number of children in the United States each year. It is characterized by substantive differences in brain structure and function that lead to long-term cognitive and social deficits. These differences, combined with the increasing prevalence of autism in children, warrant the need for development of innovative, cost-effective and widely available alternative and complementary therapies. Motion gaming has the potential to be highly efficacious as a therapeutic technique to aid in developing memory, facial recognition, motor skills and social integration in the pediatric autistic population. This paper outlines the major deficits in the brains of individuals with autism and describes how the use of motion gaming could capitalize on the individual strengths of each patient, leading to improvements in a variety of deficits.

  7. Elevated Lipase during Initial Presentation of Ulcerative Colitis in a Pediatric Patient: Do We Check for It

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Piyali; Van Arsdall, Melissa R.

    2016-01-01

    There are very few reports of elevated lipase in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Symptoms of pancreatitis may be masked by abdominal pain in pediatric IBD. During the initial presentation of IBD in our patient, lipase was elevated to more than 3 times the upper limit of normal. Normalization of values coincided with remission of IBD. This may be due to extraintestinal involvement of the pancreas as part of the inflammatory process or due to leakage of pancreatic enzymes from an inflamed gut or mediated by inflammatory cytokines. Checking pancreatic enzymes during initial presentation of IBD may, therefore, be important to determine if pancreatic involvement has resulted from the inflammation in IBD or as an adverse effect of therapy. If unchecked, recurrent subclinical pancreatitis may be masked by IBD symptoms and missed prior to starting IBD therapy. This may result in chronic pancreatic insufficiency as reported in 50% of adults with IBD. Early detection of elevated pancreatic enzymes in IBD may help direct the management strategy, as treatment of the underlying inflammation in IBD may be the most important management for resolution of pancreatitis instead of cessation of therapy for fear of iatrogenic medication-induced pancreatitis. PMID:27920643

  8. Elevated Lipase during Initial Presentation of Ulcerative Colitis in a Pediatric Patient: Do We Check for It.

    PubMed

    Ray, Piyali; Van Arsdall, Melissa R

    2016-01-01

    There are very few reports of elevated lipase in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Symptoms of pancreatitis may be masked by abdominal pain in pediatric IBD. During the initial presentation of IBD in our patient, lipase was elevated to more than 3 times the upper limit of normal. Normalization of values coincided with remission of IBD. This may be due to extraintestinal involvement of the pancreas as part of the inflammatory process or due to leakage of pancreatic enzymes from an inflamed gut or mediated by inflammatory cytokines. Checking pancreatic enzymes during initial presentation of IBD may, therefore, be important to determine if pancreatic involvement has resulted from the inflammation in IBD or as an adverse effect of therapy. If unchecked, recurrent subclinical pancreatitis may be masked by IBD symptoms and missed prior to starting IBD therapy. This may result in chronic pancreatic insufficiency as reported in 50% of adults with IBD. Early detection of elevated pancreatic enzymes in IBD may help direct the management strategy, as treatment of the underlying inflammation in IBD may be the most important management for resolution of pancreatitis instead of cessation of therapy for fear of iatrogenic medication-induced pancreatitis.

  9. Epidermal Nevus Presenting in a Pediatric Patient With Pallister-Killian Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Garrett; Iyengar, Sanjana; Shenefelt, Philip

    2016-01-01

    A six-year-old boy with Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) presented to the clinic with extensive lesions on his body (Figure 1). The patient was not born with the lesions but began developing them on the head and neck, extending to his lower extremities, at 2 years of age. These lesions had been evaluated by his primary care physician and were previously treated with desonide and ketoconazole cream with little improvement.

  10. Postoperative Conversion Disorder Presenting as Inspiratory Stridor and Hemiparesis in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik J.; Wu, Jennifer Y.

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 13 Final Diagnosis: Postoperative conversion disorder Symptoms: Right-sided weakness and right-sided sensory loss • difficulty speaking Medication: — Clinical Procedure: EUS/EGD Specialty: Anesthesiology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Postoperative conversion disorder is rare and has been reported. The diagnosis is usually made after all major organic causes have been ruled out. Case Report: We describe a case of a 13-year-old female who presented in the post-anesthesia care unit with acute-onset inspiratory stridor and unresponsiveness to verbal or painful stimuli after receiving a general anesthetic for upper endoscopy. Later in the post-anesthesia care unit, she presented with acute-onset right hemiplegia and sensory loss. She was first evaluated for causes of her stridor and unresponsiveness. The evaluation revealed paradoxical vocal cord movement, and all laboratory test values were normal. For her hemiplegia and sensory loss, she was evaluated for stroke with head MRI and CT scans, which were normal. Conclusions: After extensive workup and consideration of multiple etiologies for her presenting signs and symptoms, the most likely diagnosis was conversion disorder. PMID:28093564

  11. Atypical case of oral lichen planus in a pediatric patient: clinical presentation and management.

    PubMed

    De Moraes, Paulo Camargo; Teixeira, Rubens Gonçalves; Tacchelli, Daniela Prata; Bönecker, Marcelo; Junqueira, José Luiz Cintra; Oliveira, Luciana Butini

    2011-01-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a mucocutaneous disease of unknown etiology that is relatively common in adults but rarely present in childhood. LP has been documented in dental and medical literature; however, there are few cases with oral involvement in children. The purpose of this paper was to report an unusual case of oral lichen planus involving the upper lip in a 7-year-old girl. A diagnosis was made based on clinical examination and histopathology features. The treatment consisted of topical corticosteroid and intralesional injection. After treatment with an intralesional corticosteroid, a complete re- mission of lesions involving the lip was observed. The 3-year follow-up, however, revealed asymptomatic lichenoid bilaterally affecting the buccal mucosa. The patient is currently under regular review.

  12. Pediatric dermatology: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Prindaville, Brea; Antaya, Richard J; Siegfried, Elaine C

    2015-01-01

    Up to 30% percent of pediatric primary care visits include a skin-related problem, and referrals are hampered by appointment wait times among the longest of any pediatric subspecialty. Despite the clear demand for pediatric dermatologists, there has been a long-standing shortage of providers, leaving dermatology as one of the most underserved pediatric subspecialties. Another consequence of the workforce shortage is the limited opportunity for pediatric dermatology training for residents and postgraduate general pediatricians and dermatologists. This review includes the evolution of the subspecialty from conception through the present, along with obstacles to workforce expansion and potential solutions to improve access to care for children with skin diseases.

  13. Cytogenetic Studies of Rwandan Pediatric Patients Presenting with Global Developmental Delay, Intellectual Disability and/or Multiple Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Uwineza, Annette; Hitayezu, Janvier; Jamar, Mauricette; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Murorunkwere, Seraphine; Janvier, Ndinkabandi; Bours, Vincent; Mutesa, Leon

    2016-02-01

    Global developmental delay (GDD) is defined as a significant delay in two or more developmental domains: gross or fine motor, speech/language, cognitive, social/personal and activities of daily living. Many of these children will go on to be diagnosed with intellectual disability (ID), which is most commonly defined as having an IQ <75 in addition to impairment in adaptive functioning. Cytogenetic studies have been performed in 664 Rwandan pediatric patients presenting GDD/ID and/or multiple congenital abnormalities (MCA). Karyotype analysis was performed in all patients and revealed 260 chromosomal abnormalities. The most frequent chromosomal abnormality was Down syndrome and then Edward syndrome and Patau syndrome. Other identified chromosomal abnormalities included 47,XX,+del(9)(q11), 46,XY,del(13)(q34) and 46,XX,der(22)t(10;22)(p10;p10)mat. In conclusion, our results highlight the high frequency of cytogenetically detectable abnormalities in this series, with implications for the burden on the healthcare. This study demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic analysis in patients with GDD/ID and MCA.

  14. Cytogenetic Studies of Rwandan Pediatric Patients Presenting with Global Developmental Delay, Intellectual Disability and/or Multiple Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Uwineza, Annette; Hitayezu, Janvier; Jamar, Mauricette; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Murorunkwere, Seraphine; Janvier, Ndinkabandi; Bours, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Global developmental delay (GDD) is defined as a significant delay in two or more developmental domains: gross or fine motor, speech/language, cognitive, social/personal and activities of daily living. Many of these children will go on to be diagnosed with intellectual disability (ID), which is most commonly defined as having an IQ <75 in addition to impairment in adaptive functioning. Cytogenetic studies have been performed in 664 Rwandan pediatric patients presenting GDD/ID and/or multiple congenital abnormalities (MCA). Karyotype analysis was performed in all patients and revealed 260 chromosomal abnormalities. The most frequent chromosomal abnormality was Down syndrome and then Edward syndrome and Patau syndrome. Other identified chromosomal abnormalities included 47,XX,+del(9)(q11), 46,XY,del(13)(q34) and 46,XX,der(22)t(10;22)(p10;p10)mat. In conclusion, our results highlight the high frequency of cytogenetically detectable abnormalities in this series, with implications for the burden on the healthcare. This study demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic analysis in patients with GDD/ID and MCA. PMID:26507407

  15. MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy.

    PubMed

    Gulko, Edwin; Collins, Lee K; Murphy, Robyn C; Thornhill, Beverly A; Taragin, Benjamin H

    2015-02-01

    In modern times scurvy is a rarely encountered disease caused by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) deficiency. However, sporadic cases of scurvy persist, particularly within the pediatric population. Recent individual case reports highlight an increased incidence of scurvy among patients with autism or developmental delay, with isolated case reports detailing the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of scurvy in these pediatric populations. We present the MRI findings of scurvy in four patients with autism or developmental delay, and review the literature on MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy. Despite its rarity, the radiologist must consider scurvy in a pediatric patient with a restricted diet presenting with arthralgia or myalgia.

  16. Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa in a Pediatric Patient With Initial Presentation of Refractory Acute Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Severe Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gurion, Reut; Siu, Anita; Weiss, Aaron R.; Masterson, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Severe bleeding in acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare but can cause significant complications to the patient. Here we report the case of a pediatric patient with acute ITP and hematuria refractory to anti-D immune globulin, high dose intravenous immunoglobulin G, and high dose steroids. Her hematuria was successfully treated with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa). While further investigation on the use of rFVIIa in ITP is warranted, this case report contributes to the pediatric literature for its use during the course of an initial presentation of ITP with hemorrhagic complications. PMID:23258971

  17. Postoperative Conversion Disorder Presenting as Inspiratory Stridor and Hemiparesis in a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik J; Wu, Jennifer Y

    2017-01-17

    BACKGROUND Postoperative conversion disorder is rare and has been reported. The diagnosis is usually made after all major organic causes have been ruled out. CASE REPORT We describe a case of a 13-year-old female who presented in the post-anesthesia care unit with acute-onset inspiratory stridor and unresponsiveness to verbal or painful stimuli after receiving a general anesthetic for upper endoscopy. Later in the post-anesthesia care unit, she presented with acute-onset right hemiplegia and sensory loss. She was first evaluated for causes of her stridor and unresponsiveness. The evaluation revealed paradoxical vocal cord movement, and all laboratory test values were normal. For her hemiplegia and sensory loss, she was evaluated for stroke with head MRI and CT scans, which were normal. CONCLUSIONS After extensive workup and consideration of multiple etiologies for her presenting signs and symptoms, the most likely diagnosis was conversion disorder.

  18. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy presenting with vertigo and muscle weakness in a male pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroe; Nishizato, Chizuru; Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Hiziri; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Kosuge, Hiroshi; Ozasa, Shiro; Nomura, Keiko; Kimura, Shigemi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an anti-thyroid antibody-positive autoimmune encephalopathy. We herein report the case of a 13-year-old male patient with subacute vertigo, muscle weakness in the extremities and gait disturbance who was diagnosed with Hashimoto's encephalopathy. He showed no severe impairment of consciousness and no seizures, and there were no abnormalities on the brain MRI. However, epileptic spike and wave complexes were observed on an electroencephalogram, and a decline in blood flow was diffusely observed on brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography). His thyroid function was normal, but he was positive for anti-thyroid antibodies, such as anti-TPO (thyroid peroxidase) antibodies. He was also positive for serum anti-NAE (NH2-terminal alpha-enolase) antibodies. Systemic corticosteroid therapy and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy were effective, greatly improving his quality of life.

  19. A novel 1050nm handheld OCT imaging system for pediatric retinoblastoma patients: technology development and clinical study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Moll, Annette C.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical coherence tomography system specifically developed and validated for clinical imaging of retinoblastoma tumors in pediatric patients. The existing treatment options for this malignant tumor of the retina aim at reduction of tumor (re)growth risks, and vision preservation. The choice of optimal treatment strongly depends on skilled and detailed clinical assessment. Due to the limitations of the existing real-time diagnostic tools the patients at risk are periodically monitored with retinal imaging to confirm the absence of new tumor seedings. Three-dimensional visualization of tissue layer and microvasculature at improved axial and lateral resolution of interference-based OCT imaging provides sensitivity for detection of vital tumor tissue concurrent with local treatment. Our METC-approved system accommodates for the range of optical parameters of infants' eyes, and uses the 1050nm wavelength to access the deeper choroid layers of retina. The prototype is designed for patients in supine position under general anesthesia, where ergonomic handheld module is connected to fiber-based optical setup via umbilical cord. The system conforms to clinical safety requirements, including fully isolated low-voltage electric circuit. Focusing is performed with a mechanically tunable lens, where resolution is 6 µm axially, and varies with focusing at 10-18µm laterally. We will present optical design, performance limitations, and results of the ongoing clinical study, including the increased OCT diagnostic sensitivity in three dimensions in comparison with the established clinical imaging modalities. We will discuss images of early, active, and treated tumors, as well as follow-up on patients after local and systemic treatments.

  20. Bladder pheochromocytoma: case presentation and the use of OctreoScan for localization of extra-adrenal tumor sites in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Fournier, José R; Baez-Trinidad, Luis; Acosta, Alex; Marrero, Miguel; Correa-Rivas, María; Rodríguez-Becerra, Javier; Nieves, Francisco

    2008-03-01

    An eleven year old boy presented with headaches and dizziness associated to micturition. On radiologic imaging, he was found with a bladder mass. The biochemical work up was suggestive of pheochromocytoma. An OctreoScan (111In-pentreotide) was used to rule out metastatic extension or other extra-adrenal locations of the pheochromocytoma. OctreoScan data correlated well with other radiologic studies, operative findings and with the final diagnosis, validating its use on pediatric patients.

  1. Internet Presentation of Departments of Pediatric Surgery in Germany and Their Compliance with Recommended Criteria for Promoting Services and Offering Professional Information for Patients.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Naim; Zoeller, Christoph; Petersen, Claus; Ure, Benno

    2016-08-01

    Introduction The presentation of health institutions in the internet is highly variable concerning marketing features and medical information. We aimed to investigate the structure and the kind of information provided on the Web sites of all departments of pediatric surgery in Germany. Furthermore, we aimed to identify the degree to which these Web sites comply with internet marketing recommendations for generating business. Method The Web sites of all pediatric surgery units referred to as departments on the official Web site of the German Society of Pediatric Surgery (GSPS) were assessed. The search engine Google was used by entering the terms "pediatric surgery" and the name of the city. Besides general data eight content characteristics focusing on ranking, accessibility, use of social media, multilingual sites, navigation options, selected images, contact details, and medical information were evaluated according to published recommendations. Results A total of 85 departments of pediatric surgery were included. On Google search results 44 (52%) ranked number one and 34 (40%) of the department's homepages were accessible directly through the homepage link of the GSPS. A link to own digital and/or social media was offered on 11 (13%) homepages. Nine sites were multilingual. The most common navigation bar item was clinical services on 74 (87%) homepages. Overall, 76 (89%) departments presented their doctors and 17 (20%) presented other staff members with images of doctors on 53 (62%) and contact data access from the homepage on 68 (80%) Web sites. On 25 (29%) Web sites information on the medical conditions treated were presented, on 17 (20%) details of treating concepts, and on 4 (5%) numbers of patients with specific conditions treated in the own department per year. Conclusion We conclude that numerous of the investigated online presentations do not comply with recommended criteria for offering professional information for patients and for promoting

  2. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Moss, S D; Rockswold, G L; Chou, S N; Yock, D; Berger, M S

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  3. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  4. The Acute Pediatric Scrotum: Presentation, Differential Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Vasdev, Nikhil; Chadwick, David; Thomas, David

    2012-01-01

    Both pediatric and adult urologists frequently evaluate pediatric patients with an acute scrotum. We present a detailed review on the acute pediatric scrotum highlighting the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis and management of this common clinical condition. It is important to highlight that a testicular torsion is the most important differential diagnosis and the main priority in each case is to diagnosis and treat a potential testicular torsion is of the essence. The aim of our extensive review is to update/review the appropriate evaluation and management of the acute scrotum and to guide the clinician in distinguishing testicular torsion from the other conditions that commonly mimic this surgical emergency. This review is useful for trainees in UK and Europe who plan to take the FRCS (Urol) examination. PMID:24917714

  5. DNA polymorphism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS33 gene among clinical isolates of pediatric TB patients and its associations with clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Huang, Yanfeng; Zhang, Aihua; Zhu, Chaomin; Yang, Zhenhua; Xu, Hongmei

    2011-07-01

    In vitro and in animal studies have suggested an important role for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS33 protein in the pathogenesis of TB. A significant level of PE_PGRS33 gene DNA polymorphism among clinical isolates from adult tuberculosis (TB) patients and its association with clinical and epidemiological phenotypes of the disease has been found. To better understand the role of PE_PGRS33 protein in the pathogenesis pediatric TB, we investigated DNA polymorphism of the PE_PGRS33 gene among 101 of pediatric TB patients' isolates and assessed the relationship between the PE_PGRS33 sequence variation and clinical characteristics of TB. Twelve different PE_PGRS33 sequence variations representing 12 different alleles were observed among the 101 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates investigated. Of these 101 isolates, 62(59.41%) had PE_PGRS33 alleles that would result in a change in the amino acid sequence of the PE_PGRS33 protein. The degree of DNA polymorphism within individual M. tuberculosis isolates from pediatric TB patients was remarkably lower than that previously found in M. tuberculosis isolates from adults TB patients. The frequency distribution of isolates having PE_PGRS33 gene sequence variations was similar between Beijing and non-Beijing families of the pathogen. Patients having TB meningitis and negative PPD skin test results appeared to be more likely to be infected by isolates having a mutant type of the PE_PGRS33 gene than patients who had no TB meningitis (OR 2.54, 95% CI [1.11-5.84]) and patients who had positive PPD-skin test results (OR 4.26, 95% CI [1.14-12.86]), respectively. This study provides new insight into the molecular pathogenesis of pediatric TB.

  6. Considerations in the Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Patients With Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor Who Present With Only Pulmonary Nodules.

    PubMed

    Green, Daniel M

    2016-04-01

    More than 70% of children with stage IV, favorable histology (FH) Wilms tumor will be relapse-free survivors 16 years after diagnosis. Successful treatment generally includes whole lung radiation therapy and doxorubicin. Such therapy is associated with adverse, long-term effects, including impaired pulmonary function, congestive heart failure, and second malignant neoplasms, especially breast cancer. Cooperative groups have adopted a risk-based approach to the treatment of these patients. It is important to recall the good overall prognosis for this group before recommendations for intensification are made based on preliminary data and in the absence of histological confirmation of persistent malignant disease.

  7. A novel 1050nm handheld OCT imaging system for pediatric retinoblastoma patients: translation from laboratory bench to clinical study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Moll, Annette C.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical coherence tomography system specifically developed and validated for clinical imaging of retinoblastoma tumors in pediatric patients. The existing treatment options for this malignant tumor of the retina aim at reduction of tumor (re)growth risks, and vision preservation. The choice of optimal treatment strongly depends on skilled and detailed clinical assessment. Currently, the patients at risk are periodically monitored with retinal imaging for possible morphological changes over time, and new tumor seedings, as the existing real-time diagnostic tools are limited. Three-dimensional visualization of tissue layer and microvasculature at improved axial and lateral resolution of interference-based OCT imaging provides sensitivity for detection of vital tumor tissue concurrent with local treatment. Our METC-approved system accommodates for the range of optical parameters of infants' eyes, and uses the 1050nm wavelength to access the deeper choroid layers of retina. The prototype is designed for patients in supine position under general anesthesia, where ergonomic handheld module is connected to fiber-based optical setup via umbilical cord. The system conforms to clinical safety requirements, including fully isolated low-voltage electric circuit. Focusing is performed with a mechanically tunable lens, where resolution is 6 µm axially, and varies with focusing at 10-18µm laterally. We will present optical design, performance limitations, and results of the ongoing clinical study, including the increased OCT diagnostic sensitivity in three dimensions in comparison with the established clinical imaging modalities. We will discuss images of early, active, and treated tumors, as well as follow-up on patients after local and systemic treatments.

  8. Pediatric trauma BIG score: Predicting mortality in polytraumatized pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Gamasy, Mohamed Abd El-Aziz; Elezz, Ahmed Abd El Basset Abo; Basuni, Ahmed Sobhy Mohamed; Elrazek, Mohamed El Sayed Ali Abd

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a worldwide health problem and the major cause of death and disability, particularly affecting the young population. It is important to remember that pediatric trauma care has made a significant improvement in the outcomes of these injured children. Aim of the Work: This study aimed at evaluation of pediatric trauma BIG score in comparison with New Injury Severity Score (NISS) and Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) in Tanta University Emergency Hospital. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Tanta University Emergency Hospital to all multiple trauma pediatric patients attended to the Emergency Department for 1 year. Pediatric trauma BIG score, PTS, and NISS scores were calculated and results compared to each other and to observed mortality. Results: BIG score ≥12.7 has sensitivity 86.7% and specificity 71.4%, whereas PTS at value ≤3.5 has sensitivity 63.3% and specificity 68.6% and NISS at value ≥39.5 has sensitivity 53.3% and specificity 54.3%. There was a significant positive correlation between BIG score value and mortality rate. Conclusion: The pediatric BIG score is a reliable mortality-prediction score for children with traumatic injuries; it uses international normalization ratio (INR), Base Excess (BE), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) values that can be measured within a few minutes of sampling, so it can be readily applied in the Pediatric Emergency Department, but it cannot be applied on patients with chronic diseases that affect INR, BE, or GCS. PMID:27994378

  9. Conversion disorder in a pediatric transgender patient.

    PubMed

    Orfanelli, Laura; Borkowski, Winslow J

    2006-04-01

    Somatoform disorders are difficult to diagnosis and often present as a neurological illness in pediatric populations. Conversion disorder is the somatoform disorder most commonly seen in children, particularly adolescents, who have anxiety related to sexual behaviors and orientation. In a transgender patient, the risk of conversion disorder is even higher. The patient described in this article presented with multiple neurological symptoms that disappeared after she began presenting herself as a male. There is a significant need for research into somatoform disorders as well as research into the transgender population.

  10. Medication Repurposing in Pediatric Patients: Teaching Old Drugs New Tricks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gaps in pediatric therapeutics often result in off-label use and specifically, novel uses for existing medications, termed “drug repurposing.” Drug Information (DI) queries to a Pediatric Medication Resource Center of a large metropolitan pediatric hospital in New York and inherent difficulties in retrieving evidence-based information prompted a review of current medication repurposing for pediatric patients. The objective included characterization of innovative off-label use of medications Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for 1 or more indications to treat a totally different disorder or indication in pediatric patients. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted to retrieve publications describing repurposed medications in pediatric patients. Excluded was FDA-approved indications used off-label in pediatric patients (e.g., different dose), preclinical data, adult use only, and experimental use. Evidence quality was classified using a modified American Academy of Neurology Level of Evidence. Results were analyzed using χ2 at p < 0.05. RESULTS: Over 2000 references were retrieved and reviewed. A total of 101 medications repurposed for novel off-label uses for pediatric patients were identified: 38 for neonates, 74 for children, and 52 for adolescents. Neonates and infants were least likely to receive a medication for a repurposed use. Strong or intermediate evidence existed in 80.2% of cases. The evidence was weak in 19.8%. No significant relationship was observed between the pediatric age group and strength of the literature. Most repurposed uses pertained to generic or widely used medications. Less than 5% of medications were first marketed after 2011. CONCLUSIONS: While not exhaustive, the present study represents the most comprehensive listing of novel uses exclusive to pediatric patients. Further research is needed to identify the frequency of repurposed uses. The valuable DI role of pharmacists in assessing repurposed

  11. An update on local anesthesia for pediatric dental patients

    PubMed Central

    Peedikayil, Faizal C.; Vijayan, Ajoy

    2013-01-01

    Pain control is an important part of dentistry, particularly in the management of children. Behavior guidance, and dose and technique of administration of the local anesthetic are important considerations in the successful treatment of a pediatric patient. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the relevant data on topics involved, and on the current methods available in the administration of local anesthesia used for pediatric dental patients. PMID:25885712

  12. Recurrent parotitis as a presentation of primary pediatric Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baszis, Kevin; Toib, Dana; Cooper, Megan; French, Anthony; White, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Parotitis is a common condition seen in the pediatric population, usually as an isolated occurrence associated with viral or bacterial infection. The differential diagnosis expands when recurrent parotitis is encountered. One etiology is primary pediatric Sjögren syndrome (SS), an autoimmune condition typically associated with dryness of the eyes and mouth in adults. Pediatric patients often present with isolated recurrent bilateral parotitis, however, and we describe 4 such cases in children aged 9 to 17 years at presentation. Despite lack of ocular complaints, 3 of these patients had ocular findings on ophthalmologic exam. Our patients also exhibited classic laboratory abnormalities, including positive antinuclear antibody, SS A, and SS B antibodies; presence of rheumatoid factor; and hypergammaglobulinemia. Consideration of SS in the child with recurrent parotitis is important for timely and appropriate referral and treatment. We review the differential diagnosis of parotitis in children as well as the salient features of pediatric SS.

  13. Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Malec, Lynn; Young, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Given the increased incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pediatric patients, which has been associated with increased survival of medically complex patients and increased use of invasive supportive measures, it is important to understand treatment options and unique aspects of anticoagulant use in children. The objective of this mini-review is to outline the goals of treatment, treatment options, and adverse events associated with the use of anticoagulants in pediatric patients with VTE. PMID:28293549

  14. International multicenter cohort study of pediatric brain arteriovenous malformations. Part 1: Predictors of hemorrhagic presentation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Kano, Hideyuki; Mathieu, David; Huang, Paul P; Feliciano, Caleb; Rodriguez-Mercado, Rafael; Almodovar, Luis; Grills, Inga S; Silva, Danilo; Abbassy, Mahmoud; Missios, Symeon; Kondziolka, Douglas; Barnett, Gene H; Dade Lunsford, L; Sheehan, Jason P

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are the most common cause of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage in pediatric patients (age < 18 years). Since the cumulative lifetime risk of AVM hemorrhage is considerable in children, an improved understanding of the risk factors influencing hemorrhagic presentation may aid in the management of pediatric AVMs. The aims of this first of a 2-part multicenter, retrospective cohort study are to evaluate the incidence and determine the predictors of hemorrhagic presentation in pediatric AVM patients. METHODS The authors analyzed pooled AVM radiosurgery data from 7 institutions participating in the International Gamma Knife Research Foundation (IGKRF). Patients younger than 18 years at the time of radiosurgery and who had at least 12 months of follow-up were included in the study cohort. Patient and AVM characteristics were compared between unruptured and ruptured pediatric AVMs. RESULTS A total of 357 pediatric patients were eligible for analysis, including 112 patients in the unruptured and 245 patients in the ruptured AVM cohorts (69% incidence of hemorrhagic presentation). The annual hemorrhage rate prior to radiosurgery was 6.3%. Hemorrhagic presentation was significantly more common in deep locations (basal ganglia, thalamus, and brainstem) than in cortical locations (frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes) (76% vs 62%, p = 0.006). Among the factors found to be significantly associated with hemorrhagic presentation in the multivariate logistic regression analysis, deep venous drainage (OR 3.2, p < 0.001) was the strongest independent predictor, followed by female sex (OR 1.7, p = 0.042) and smaller AVM volume (OR 1.1, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Unruptured and ruptured pediatric AVMs have significantly different patient and nidal features. Pediatric AVM patients who possess 1 or more of these high-risk features may be candidates for relatively more aggressive management strategies.

  15. Piperacillin pharmacokinetics in pediatric patients.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C B; Koup, J R; Opheim, K E; Adelman, L A; Levy, J; Stull, T L; Clausen, C; Smith, A L

    1982-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of piperacillin were studied in 15 pediatric patients (age range, 3.3 to 14.3 years). Piperacillin was administered in a dosage of 1.5 +/- 0.4 g/m2 (mean +/- standard deviation) every 4 to 6 h. Peak serum concentrations ranged from 69 to 354 micrograms/ml. The mean elimination half-life was 37.0 +/- 13.3 min, which is shorter than that observed in most adults with normal renal function. The mean elimination half-life in three patients with renal impairment was 60.1 +/- 12.4 min, and the mean ratio of renal clearance to total clearance was 0.57. These results suggest a significant nonrenal elimination of piperacillin. Based on these data, a dosage of 1.5 g/m2 given as a 30-min infusion every 4 h is suggested for children with normal renal function. For patients with renal impairment, the daily dosage could be calculated as follows: corrected dose = normal dose x (0.35 + [0.65 x (ClCr/0.06)]), where ClCr is the creatinine clearance expressed as liters per minute per square meter. PMID:6215893

  16. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Molina Moguel, J L; Ruiz Illezcas, R; Forsbach Sánchez, S; Carreño Alvarez, S; Picco Díaz, I

    1990-12-01

    The object of this study was to determine how many of the patients treated at the Pediatric Odontology Clinic, a branch of the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service at the Veinte de Noviembre Regional Hospital, ISSSTE, are VIH-positive of show serious manifestations of Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). For such purpose, 100 pediatric patients suffering from different systemic or local diseases were evaluated, the most common being hematological alterations. Results evidenced the presence of VIH in the blood of five of the pediatric subjects, all suffering from Hemophilia.

  17. Brown-McLean Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Tourkmani, Abdo Karim; Martinez, Jaime D; Berrones, David; Juárez-Domínguez, Brenda Y; Beltrán, Francisco; Galor, Anat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to report the case of a 12-year-old patient who presented for routine ophthalmic examination after congenital cataract surgery performed at 2 months of age. The patient was diagnosed with bilateral Brown-McLean syndrome by slit lamp examination. No treatment was required because the patient was asymptomatic and had a clear central cornea. This is the first described case of Brown-McLean syndrome in a pediatric patient, representing the importance of clinical examination in the pediatric age group after cataract surgery because of the risk for patients of developing peripheral edema.

  18. Brown-McLean Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tourkmani, Abdo Karim; Martinez, Jaime D.; Berrones, David; Juárez-Domínguez, Brenda Y.; Beltrán, Francisco; Galor, Anat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to report the case of a 12-year-old patient who presented for routine ophthalmic examination after congenital cataract surgery performed at 2 months of age. The patient was diagnosed with bilateral Brown-McLean syndrome by slit lamp examination. No treatment was required because the patient was asymptomatic and had a clear central cornea. This is the first described case of Brown-McLean syndrome in a pediatric patient, representing the importance of clinical examination in the pediatric age group after cataract surgery because of the risk for patients of developing peripheral edema. PMID:26034485

  19. Pediatric ocular trauma--a clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, S; Mukherjee, R; Ladi, D S; Gandhi, V H; Ladi, B S

    1990-01-01

    A year long study of ocular injuries in children below the age of 15 years was conducted in the Ophthalmology Department of a general hospital. Fortyfour cases were studied. Of these 45.45% were in the age group of 6-10 years. The male to female ratio was 5.28 : 1. Pointed objects viz. sticks, wires etc. were found to be the common causative agents; the recent trend being of bow and arrow injuries. Ocular perforation was observed in 28 cases. On follow up of all the cases with ocular trauma, only 12 patients were found to have a visual acuity better than 6/18; perception of light was absent in 7 patients. A need for increased parental awareness and supervision of children is stressed upon.

  20. Issues impacting therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Atin; Goindi, Shishu

    2014-01-01

    The quest for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients has evaded the healthcare professionals for long and often lack of child specific dosage forms and the associated events that follow with it have been considered to be major contributor towards suboptimal outcomes. Consequently, there have been sustained efforts over the years to address this issue with the enactment of legislations like Best Pharmaceutical for Children Act (BPCA), Pediatric Research Equity Act (PREA) and Pediatric Regulation by European Union (EU) to incentivise the participation of pharmaceutical industry towards development of child friendly dosage forms. Initiatives taken in past by organisations like World Health Organisation (WHO) and Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi) to spur the development of child friendly dosage forms has helped to address issues pertaining to management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and malaria in pediatric patients. Present efforts aimed at developing child friendly dosage forms include oro-dispersible platforms including thin films and mini-tablets. Despite these leaps and advancements in developing better dosage forms for children, lower therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients continue to remain an unresolved issue because of detrimental effects of additional factors such as parents understanding of label instructions and complexities involved in executing pediatric clinical studies thus requiring a concerted effort from pharmaceutical companies, academic researchers, parents and healthcare providers to work for better treatment outcomes in children.

  1. Upper gastrointestinal fiberoptic endoscopy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Prolla, J C; Diehl, A S; Bemvenuti, G A; Loguercio, S V; Magalhães, D S; Silveira, T R

    1983-11-01

    Upper gastrointestinal fiberendoscopy in pediatric patients is done safely and under local anesthesia in most instances. This study of 47 children confirmed the value of fiberendoscopy in establishing the etiology of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and the presence of esophageal varices. It also contributed significantly to the management of patients with disphagia, pyrosis, epigastric pain, and ingestion of foreign bodies. No significant morbidity was caused.

  2. Comorbidities in Chronic Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Report of the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Alicia M.; Sander, Anja; Borzych-Dużałka, Dagmara; Watson, Alan R.; Vallés, Patricia G.; Ha, Il Soo; Patel, Hiren; Askenazi, David; Balasz-Chmielewska, Irena; Lauronen, Jouni; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Feber, Janusz; Schaefer, Franz; Warady, Bradley A.

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background, Objectives, and Methods: Hospitalization and mortality rates in pediatric dialysis patients remain unacceptably high. Although studies have associated the presence of comorbidities with an increased risk for death in a relatively small number of pediatric dialysis patients, no large-scale study had set out to describe the comorbidities seen in pediatric dialysis patients or to evaluate the impact of those comorbidities on outcomes beyond the newborn period. In the present study, we evaluated the prevalence of comorbidities in a large international cohort of pediatric chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) patients from the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network registry and began to assess potential associations between those comorbidities and hospitalization rates and mortality. ♦ Results: Information on comorbidities was available for 1830 patients 0 - 19 years of age at dialysis initiation. Median age at dialysis initiation was 9.1 years [interquartile range (IQR): 10.9], median follow-up for calculation of hospitalization rates was 15.2 months (range: 0.2 - 80.9 months), and total follow-up time in the registry was 2095 patient-years. At least 1 comorbidity had been reported for 602 of the patients (32.9%), with 283 (15.5%) having cognitive impairment; 230 (12.6%), motor impairment; 167 (9.1%), cardiac abnormality; 76 (4.2%), pulmonary abnormality; 212 (11.6%), ocular abnormality; and 101 (5.5%), hearing impairment. Of the 150 patients (8.2%) that had a defined syndrome, 85% had at least 1 nonrenal comorbidity, and 64% had multiple comorbidities. The presence of at least 1 comorbidity was associated with a higher hospitalization rate [hospital days per 100 observation days: 1.7 (IQR: 5.8) vs 1.2 (IQR: 3.9), p = 0.001] and decreased patient survival (4-year survival rate: 73% vs 90%, p < 0.0001). ♦ Conclusions: Nearly one third of pediatric CPD patients in a large international cohort had at least 1 comorbidity, and multiple

  3. Irritability in Pediatric Patients: Normal or Not?

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Usman; Dellasega, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this article is to describe the concept of irritability in children and youth, which has been revisited in the DSM-5. Traditionally, this behavior has been more commonly associated with mood disorders, which may account for the rising incidence of bipolar disorder diagnosis and overuse of mood-stabilizing medications in pediatric patients. While not predictive of mania, persistent nonepisodic irritability, if undetected, may escalate to violent behavior with potentially serious outcomes. It is therefore important to educate clinicians about how to accurately assess irritability in pediatric patients. PMID:27486529

  4. Renal Presentation in Pediatric Acute Leukemia: Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Sherief, Laila M; Azab, Seham F; Zakaria, Marwa M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abd Elbasset Aly, Maha; Ali, Adel; Abd Alhady, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    Renal enlargement at time of diagnosis of acute leukemia is very unusual. We here in report 2 pediatric cases of acute leukemia who had their renal affection as the first presenting symptom with no evidences of blast cells in blood smear and none of classical presentation of acute leukemia. The first case is a 4-year-old girl who presented with pallor and abdominal enlargement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral symmetrical homogenous enlarged kidneys suggestive of infiltration. Complete blood picture (CBC) revealed white blood count 11 × 10⁹/L, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and platelet count 197 × 10⁹/L. Bone marrow aspiration was performed, and diagnosed precursor B-cell ALL was made. The child had an excellent response to modified CCG 1991 standard risk protocol of chemotherapy with sustained remission, but unfortunately relapsed 11 month after the end of therapy. The second child was 13-month old, presented with pallor, vomiting, abdominal enlargement, and oliguria 2 days before admission. Initial CBC showed bicytopenia, elevated blood urea, creatinine, and serum uric acid, while abdominal ultrasonography revealed bilateral renal enlargement. Bone marrow examination was done and showed 92% blast of biphenotypic nature. So, biphynotypic leukemia with bilateral renal enlargement and acute renal failure was subsequently diagnosed. The patients admitted to ICU and received supportive care and prednisolone. Renal function normalized and chemotherapy was started. The child achieved complete remission with marked reduction of kidney size but, unfortunately she died from sepsis in consolidation phase of therapy. This case demonstrates an unusual early renal enlargement in childhood acute leukemia. Renal involvement of acute leukemia should be considered in child presenting with unexplained bilateral renal enlargement with or without renal function abnormalities and bone marrow examination should be included in the workup.

  5. Enhancing the Imaging Experience for Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Baron, Molly; Joslin, Shannon; Kim, Jane S; Shet, Narendra S; Pocta, Brigitte; Olivi, Penny

    2016-01-01

    The University of Maryland Medical Center's goal was to improve the safety and comfort of pediatric imaging by enhancing the experience for children. Two pediatric radiologists and two child life specialists worked together to create a training program to help guide radiology technologists on how to approach and interact with children undergoing medical imaging. The results of surveys administered to technologists and parents or caregivers helped refine the strategy for both creating training sessions for technologists and reading materials for children and their parents to optimally prepare for the procedures. Training sessions included information on language choices, developmental considerations, comfort techniques, patient- and family-centered care practices, procedural support techniques, and coping styles. Through the implementation of learning sessions and distraction resources for technologists, and the development of preparation books, the imaging experience for pediatric patients at UMMC has improved.

  6. Stridor due to an innominate artery compression and posterior mediastinal mass in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Edwin; Parray, Tariq; Poteet-Schwartz, Kim

    2012-06-01

    There are many causes for stridor in a pediatric patient. We present an interesting case of a pediatric patient who had stridor due to an innominate artery compression and posterior mediastinal mass. We discuss the anesthetic complication and management of patients with stridor.

  7. Posttraumatic Growth in Parents and Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Picoraro, Joseph A.; Womer, James W.; Kazak, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pediatric medical experiences are potentially traumatic but may lead to psychological growth. Objective: The study objective was to synthesize the published literature regarding posttraumatic growth (PTG) in parents and patients with serious pediatric illness (SPI) into a conceptual model. Methods: We systematically searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsychInfo, and Sociological Abstracts in December 2012 to identify articles on stress or trauma caused by medical events with PTG as an outcome, reviewing articles pertaining to the pediatric population. We additionally reviewed articles outside pediatric medicine that described a model of PTG. Results: Of the 605 articles identified, 55 met inclusion criteria, 26 of which examined parents or pediatric patients. Parents and children may experience PTG following medical trauma through a combination of cognitive and affective processing of their subjective experience. Components of SPI-PTG are unclear, but may include greater appreciation of life, improved interpersonal relationships, greater personal strength, recognition of new possibilities in one's life course, spiritual or religious growth, and reconstruction of a positive body image. Individual characteristics, and the level of social support, may affect the likelihood that SPI-PTG will occur. SPI-PTG in siblings and other family members has not been well studied. Conclusions: SPI-PTG is an important but understudied and inadequately understood phenomenon affecting children with SPI and their family members. Research should focus on clarifying SPI-PTG domains, creating measurement instruments, assessing SPI-PTG across the pediatric age range and among family members, and improving our understanding of and ability to positively intervene regarding the cognitive processes of rumination, sense making, and benefit finding. PMID:24443768

  8. Neurocognitive functions in pediatric renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gulleroglu, K; Baskin, E; Bayrakci, U S; Aydogan, M; Alehan, F; Kantar, A; Karakayali, F; Moray, G; Haberal, M

    2013-01-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is one of the major complications of chronic renal failure (CRF). Uremic state during CRF encompasses a wide spectrum of neurobehavioral and neurological disturbances. Recent studies showed that the pathophysiology of neurocognitive dysfunction in CRF is related to plasma levels of uremic solutes. Successful renal transplantation improves renal, metabolic, and endocrine functions and the quality of life. The aim of our study was to determine the state of neurocognitive function in pediatric renal transplant recipients. We prospectively performed a neurological examination and neuropsychological test battery (Bender-Gestalt Test, Cancellation Test, and Visual and Auditory Number Assay Test) in 20 pediatric renal transplant recipients between 6 and 16 years of age. Twenty healthy children and 20 children with CRF were included in the study as the control groups. Mean age of the renal transplant recipients was 13.50 ± 3.40 years old. Mean evaluation time after transplantation was 2.0 ± 0.5 years. Bender-Gestalt Test result was abnormal in 40% of patients. The results of the Cancellation Test and the Visual and Auditory Number Assay Test showed significant decline in pediatric renal transplant patients when compared with the control. We found that neurocognitive dysfunction was frequent in pediatric renal transplantation patients. Awareness of this potential problem may be helpful for early recognition and treatment. Our findings suggest that periodic neurocognitive assessments may be indicated in transplant recipients.

  9. Drug shortages and implications for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lindsay; Cash, Jared; Pham, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Drug shortages in the United States continue to be a significant problem that negatively impacts pediatric patients of all ages. These shortages have been associated with a higher rate of relapse among children with cancer, substitution of less effective agents, and greater risk for short- and long-term toxicity. Effective prevention and management of any drug shortage must include considerations for issues specific to pediatric patients; hence, the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) strongly supports the effective management of shortages by institutions caring for pediatric patients. Recommendations published by groups such as the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition should be incorporated into drug shortage management policies. PPAG also supports the efforts of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to not only address but prevent drug shortages caused by manufacturing and quality problems, delays in production, and discontinuations. Prevention, mitigation, and effective management of drug shortages pose significant challenges that require effective communication; hence, PPAG encourages enhanced and early dialogue between the FDA, pharmaceutical manufacturers, professional organizations, and health care institutions.

  10. ECLS in Pediatric Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Nardo, Matteo; MacLaren, Graeme; Marano, Marco; Cecchetti, Corrado; Bernaschi, Paola; Amodeo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an important device in the management of children with severe refractory cardiac and or pulmonary failure. Actually, two forms of ECLS are available for neonates and children: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and use of a ventricular assist device (VAD). Both these techniques have their own advantages and disadvantages. The intra-aortic balloon pump is another ECLS device that has been successfully used in larger children, adolescents, and adults, but has found limited applicability in smaller children. In this review, we will present the “state of art” of ECMO in neonate and children with heart failure. ECMO is commonly used in a variety of settings to provide support to critically ill patients with cardiac disease. However, a strict selection of patients and timing of intervention should be performed to avoid the increase in mortality and morbidity of these patients. Therefore, every attempt should be done to start ECLS “urgently” rather than “emergently,” before the presence of dysfunction of end organs or circulatory collapse. Even though exciting progress is being made in the development of VADs for long-term mechanical support in children, ECMO remains the mainstay of mechanical circulatory support in children with complex anatomy, particularly those needing rapid resuscitation and those with a functionally univentricular circulation. With the increase in familiarity with ECMO, new indications have been added, such as extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR). The literature supporting ECPR is increasing in children. Reasonable survival rates have been achieved after initiation of support during active compressions of the chest following in-hospital cardiac arrest. Contraindications to ECLS have reduced in the last 5 years and many centers support patients with functionally univentricular circulations. Improved results have been recently achieved in this complex subset of patients. PMID

  11. [Disease-modifying drugs in pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Bykova, O V; Nankina, I A; Drozdova, I M; Kvasova, O V; Batysheva, T T; Boiko, A N

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of therapies are being evaluated and introduced for the treatment of adult multiple sclerosis (MS). A role of these drugs in the management of pediatric MS has yet to be defined both in Russia and in the whole world. Despite the fact that today the study of new drugs in the pediatric population have included in routine practices of the big pharmaceutical agencies, such as FDA and EMA, recommendations for the treatment of pediatric patients with MS are based not so much on a long period of systematic clinical research, but on professional consensus of international expert associations, in particular, the International pediatric multiple sclerosis study group (IPMSSG). The clinical trials include the small number of patients which is not comparable to those conducted in adults. Therefore, there is a need for study designs for assessment of efficacy and safety of the drugs for MS treatment in children and adolescents. The authors present the IPMSSG concept on the treatment of pediatric MS taking into account peculiarities of the Russian legislation and experience of national experts.

  12. Multilocular True Ulnar Artery Aneurysm in a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Stalder, Mark W; Sanders, Christopher; Lago, Mary; Hilaire, Hugo St

    2016-01-01

    Ulnar artery aneurysms are an exceedingly rare entity in the pediatric population and have no consistent etiologic mechanism. We present the case of a 15-year-old male with a multilocular ulnar artery aneurysm in the setting of no antecedent history of trauma, no identifiable connective tissue disorders, and no other apparent etiological factors. Furthermore, the patient's arterial palmar arch system was absent. The aneurysm was resected, and arterial reconstruction was successfully performed via open surgical approach with cephalic vein interposition graft. We believe this treatment modality should be considered as the primary approach in all of these pediatric cases in consideration of the possible pitfalls of less comprehensive measures.

  13. Pediatrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  14. Late-presenting complete heart block after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Bana Agha; Mesned, Abdu Rahman; Mohamad, Tagelden; Kabbani, Mohamad S.

    2015-01-01

    Late presenting complete heart block after pediatric cardiac surgery is a rare complication and its management is well defined once the initial diagnosis in made timely and appropriately. In this report we described a child who underwent atrioventricular septal defect repair with a normal sinus rhythm during the postoperative period, as well as during the first 2 years of follow up. She subsequently developed complete heart block with bradycardia that required insertion of a pacemaker. Here we discuss this unusual late-presenting complication, possible risk factors, and management. PMID:26778907

  15. Radiology of AIDS in the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, D; Harrison, L F; Singleton, E B

    1992-01-01

    The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has involved the pediatric age group and is especially prevalent in babies born of mothers who are intravenous drug abusers or prostitutes. Approximately 30% of children born to mothers who are seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) will develop HIV infection. There are several important differences in children and adults with AIDS. The incubation period of the disease is shorter, and initial clinical manifestations occur earlier in children. In addition, certain infections are more common in children, and the different types of malignancy, especially Kaposi's sarcoma, are unusual in the pediatric age group. The altered immune system involves both T cells and humoral immunity and increases susceptibility to a variety of infections, particularly opportunistic organisms. In this publication the complications of pediatric AIDS involving the lungs, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary system, and neurological system are described. The most common pulmonary complications in our experience are Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia. The spectrum of cardiovascular involvement in pediatric AIDS includes myocarditis, pericarditis, and infectious endocarditis. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is usually due to opportunistic organisms that produce esophagitis, gastritis, and colitis. Abdominal lymphadenopathy is a common finding either due to disseminating Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection or nonspecific lymphadenopathy. Although cholangitis is more commonly seen in adults, it may occur in children with AIDS and, in most cases, is due to related opportunistic infections. Genitourinary infections may be the first evidence of HIV disease. Cystitis, pyelonephritis, renal abscesses, and nephropathy with renal insufficiency are complications of pediatric AIDS. A variety of neurological abnormalities may occur in pediatric AIDS. The most common cause of

  16. Orocraniofacial findings of a Pediatric Patient with Joubert Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mridula; Verma, Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder, involving agenesis or dysgenesis of cerebellar vermis and brain stem. The neurological features of JS include hypotonia, ataxia, developmental delay, intellectual disability, abnormal eye movements, and neonatal breathing dysregulation. These may be associated with multiorgan involvement, mainly retinal dystrophy, nephronophthisis, hepatic fibrosis, and polydactyly. An obligatory hallmark feature associated with JS is the molar tooth sign (MTS), a complex midbrain-hindbrain malformation visible on brain imaging. This case report presents a pediatric case of JS in a 7-year-old girl. Joubert syndrome cases have been reported by various medical specialties in medical journals; however, this probably could be the first report of this rare developmental disorder in dental and oral health. How to cite this article Goswami M, Rajwar AS, Verma M. Orocraniofacial findings of a Pediatric Patient with Joubert Syndrome. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):379-383. PMID:28127172

  17. Treatment planning for the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    McWhorter, Alton G

    2010-12-01

    Treatment planning for pediatric dental patients is a multifactorial, complex process that requires careful consideration of three distinct areas: the patient's caries risk status, the available treatment options and the child's behavior. Components of a caries risk assessment include: a review of the child's medical and dental history in combination with the findings of the clinical and radiographic examination. All decisions regarding appropriate treatment options for the patient are guided by the outcome of the caries risk assessment. The child's behavior is another overriding consideration as it determines how the treatment can be rendered. Information obtained through careful evaluation of each area results in a treatment plan specifically designed for each child's circumstance.

  18. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Brazilian Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Mayra Isabel Correia; de Góes Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona; Honório, Rodrigo Schuler; de Alencar Moreno, Luís Hélder; Fortes, Mayara Carvalho; da Silva, Carlos Antônio Bruno

    2013-01-01

    We examined 11 pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis with a tardy diagnosis. The symptoms were initially thought to be related to other diseases, leading to the use of inadequate therapeutic approaches. The patients were between 3 and 17 years old (mean 7.8 ± 3.8 years), and 8 of the patients were male. Common symptoms included abdominal pain, regurgitation, difficulty in gaining weight, vomiting, dysphagia, and coughing. The mean age for the onset of symptoms was 4.3 ± 2.9 years. Endoscopic findings included normal mucosa in five (45%) patients, thickening of the mucosa with longitudinal grooves in three (27%), erosive esophagitis in two (18%), and a whitish stippling in one (9%) patient. Treatment included the use of a topical corticosteroid for 10 patients. In eight (73%) cases, the treatment made the symptoms disappear. Ten patients underwent histopathological management after treatment, with a decrease in the number of eosinophils. PMID:24106430

  19. Liver Replacement for Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Koep, Lawrence J.; Schröter, Gerhard P. J.; Halgrimson, Charles G.; Porter, Kendrick A.; Weil, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Between March 1963 and January 1978, 74 patients 18 years of age or younger have had liver replacements at the University of Colorado Medical Center, Denver. The most common cause of native liver failure was biliary atresia (48/74, 65%); the second most common cause was chronic aggressive hepatitis (12/74, 16%). Twenty-nine patients (39%) lived for at least one year, and 16 are still alive one to nine years after transplantation. Technical surgical problems, rejection, and infection were the main causes of death. Improved immunosuppression is needed; nevertheless, the quality of life in the long-term survivors has encouraged continuation of this difficult work. PMID:377201

  20. Rare Submandibular Presentation of Pediatric Castleman Disease: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jodi; Mandel, Louis

    2016-10-28

    Castleman disease (CD), a benign lymphoproliferative disorder that affects lymph nodes, is uncommon in children, with only approximately 100 cases published. Although 23% of pediatric CD cases are found in the neck, there is no substantial reported percentage found in the salivary glands, especially the submandibular salivary gland (SMSG). A pediatric case of CD involving the SMSG is reported because of its extreme rarity.

  1. Pure Cold-Induced Cholinergic Urticaria in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Tina; Frith, John; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Hostoffer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Cold urticaria and cholinergic urticaria are two distinct entities. The presentation of exclusive cold-induced cholinergic urticaria is very rare. The patient described herein had experienced urticaria in the exclusive setting of exercising in a cold environment. Urticarial testing including laboratory and in-office testing was all negative. The patient has prevented urticaria symptoms with oral antihistamine therapy. Pure cold-induced cholinergic urticaria is rarely described in literature. This form of urticaria has yet to be described in a pediatric patient. PMID:28025628

  2. Training and practice of pediatric surgery in Africa: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Elhalaby, Essam A; Uba, Francis A; Borgstein, Eric S; Rode, Heinz; Millar, Alastair J W

    2012-05-01

    The evolution and recognition of pediatric surgery as a specialty in Africa can be divided into 4 distinct phases, starting from early 1920s till the present. The pace of development has been quite variable in different parts of Africa. Despite all recent developments, the practice of pediatric surgery in Africa continues to face multiple challenges, including limited facilities, manpower shortages, the large number of sick children, disease patterns specific to the region, late presentation and advanced pathology, lack of pediatric surgeons outside the tertiary hospitals, and inadequate governmental support. Standardization of pediatric surgery training across the continent is advocated. Collaboration with well-established pediatric surgical training centers in Africa and other developed countries is necessary. The problems of delivery of pediatric surgical services need to be addressed urgently, if the African child is to have access to essential pediatric surgical services like his or her counterpart in the high-income parts of the world.

  3. Perioperative posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in 2 pediatric neurosurgery patients with brainstem ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Gephart, Melanie G Hayden; Taft, Bonnie P; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Guzman, Raphael; Edwards, Michael S B

    2011-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) has been described in pediatric neurooncology patients, although it has not been documented perioperatively in pediatric neurosurgery patients not actively receiving chemotherapy. Recently at the authors' facility, 2 cases of PRES were diagnosed perioperatively in children with brainstem ependymoma. Both patients had presented with hypertension, altered mental status, and seizures and demonstrated MR imaging features consistent with PRES. The patients were treated with antiseizure and antihypertension medications, leading to improvement in both clinical symptoms and neuroimaging findings. These cases are the first to document PRES in perioperative pediatric neurosurgery patients not actively receiving chemotherapy. Both patients had ependymoma involving the brainstem, which may have led to intra- and perioperative hemodynamic instability (including hypertension) and predisposed them to this syndrome. An awareness of PRES in similar scenarios will aid in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric neurosurgery patients with this syndrome.

  4. Three distinct cases of copper deficiency in hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Dembinski, Karolina; Gargasz, Anne Elizabeth; Dabrow, Sharon; Rodriguez, Lisa

    2012-08-01

    Although copper deficiency is a rare occurrence in the developed world, attention should be given to the proper supplementation of minerals to at-risk pediatric patients. This study presents 3 distinct cases of copper deficiency in hospitalized patients aged 14 months, 6 years, and 12 years. Two patients had short bowel syndrome, requiring prolonged parenteral nutrition or complex intravenous fluid supplementation. The third patient was severely malnourished. Copper deficiency manifested in all of our patients as either microcytic anemia or pancytopenia with myelodysplastic syndrome. Copper deficiency is an important diagnosis to be considered in patients with prematurity, parenteral nutrition dependency, malabsorption, and/or those with malnutrition. More studies are needed to establish appropriate amounts of copper supplementation to replenish copper stores in deficient patients.

  5. Oral and Dental Considerations in Pediatric Leukemic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Padmini, Chiyadu; Bai, K. Yellamma

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the world, there have been drastic decline in mortality rate in pediatric leukemic population due to early diagnosis and improvements in oncology treatment. The pediatric dentist plays an important role in the prevention, stabilization, and treatment of oral and dental problems that can compromise the child's health and quality of life during, and follow up of the cancer treatment. This manuscript discusses recommendations and promotes dental care of the pediatric leukemic patients. PMID:24724033

  6. Whole-body MRI in pediatric patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Noschang, Julia; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Tostes, Vivian; Kundra, Vikas; Oliveira, Alex Dias; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2017-02-10

    Cancer is the leading cause of natural death in the pediatric populations of developed countries, yet cure rates are greater than 70% when a cancer is diagnosed in its early stages. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging methods have markedly improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, while avoiding the risks of ionizing radiation that are associated with most conventional radiological methods, such as computed tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography. The advent of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in association with the development of metabolic- and function-based techniques has led to the use of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for the screening, diagnosis, staging, response assessment, and post-therapeutic follow-up of children with solid sporadic tumours or those with related genetic syndromes. Here, the advantages, techniques, indications, and limitations of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in the management of pediatric oncology patients are presented.

  7. Nuclear Medicine in Thyroid Diseases in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Volkan-Salancı, Bilge; Özgen Kıratlı, Pınar

    2015-01-01

    Both benign and malignant diseases of the thyroid are rare in the pediatric and adolescent population, except congenital hypothyroidism. Nuclear medicine plays a major role, both in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid pathologies. Use of radioactivity in pediatric population is strictly controlled due to possible side effects such as secondary cancers; therefore, management of pediatric patients requires detailed literature knowledge. This article aims to overview current algorithms in the management of thyroid diseases and use of radionuclide therapy in pediatric and adolescent population. PMID:26316469

  8. Pediatric Global Health Education: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Michael B; Gladding, Sophia P; Suchdev, Parminder S; Howard, Cynthia R

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of diseases erroneously thought by many to be contained by borders or eliminated by vaccines have highlighted the need for proper training of all residents in global health. Beyond infectious diseases, all pediatricians should know how to care for other conditions in global child health, ranging from malnutrition to the nuances of care for immigrant and refugee children. The call for broader education for pediatric residents in global health has been increasing over the last decade, with all major pediatric organizations underscoring its importance in statement and action. Herein, the current status of global child health education in pediatric residency training in the United States is summarized, highlighting where it has been, where it is now, and where it should go next.

  9. Gastrointestinal microbiome signatures of pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intestinal microbiomes of healthy children and pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are not well defined. Studies in adults have indicated that the gastrointestinal microbiota could be involved in IBS. We analyzed 71 samples from 22 children with IBS (pediatric Rome III criteri...

  10. Maxillary frenectomy using a carbon dioxide laser in a pediatric patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Kishore; Trajtenberg, Cynthia; Patel, Chandni; Streckfus, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Dental lasers contribute significantly to the field of cosmetic dentistry, providing an invaluable resource for clinicians who perform different types of esthetic procedures. An increasing number of general dentists are using the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser for surgical procedures. However, the literature about using a CO2 laser to perform oral soft tissue ablation in the pediatric patient is limited. This case report presents a successful case of a maxillary labial frenectomy in a pediatric patient using a CO2 laser.

  11. Interpretability of the PedsQL gastrointestinal symptoms scales and gastrointestinal worry scales in pediatric patients with functional and organic gastrointestinal diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigates the clinical interpretability of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventor (PedsQL) Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales and Worry Scales in pediatric patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic gastrointestinal diseases in comparison with healthy controls....

  12. Managing Acute Complications Of Sickle Cell Disease In Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sathyaseelan; Chao, Jennifer H

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic hematologic disease with a variety of acute, and often recurring, complications. Vaso-occlusive crisis, a unique but common presentation in sickle cell disease, can be challenging to manage. Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death in patients with sickle cell disease, occurring in more than half of patients who are hospitalized with a vaso-occlusive crisis. Uncommon diagnoses in children, such as stroke, priapism, and transient red cell aplasia, occur more frequently in patients with sickle cell disease and necessitate a degree of familiarity with the disease process and its management. Patients with sickle cell trait generally have a benign course, but are also subject to serious complications. This issue provides a current review of evidence-based management of the most common acute complications of sickle cell disease seen in pediatric patients in the emergency department.

  13. Early evaluation and resuscitation of the pediatric trauma patient.

    PubMed

    DeRoss, Anthony L; Vane, Dennis W

    2004-05-01

    Trauma is the leading case of death for children in the United States. Effective initial resuscitation of pediatric trauma patients can reduce mortality. Guidelines have been developed to facilitate patient care in a systematic and productive manner. Advances have been made in both diagnostic and therapeutic methods. The evaluation and treatment of trauma patients will continue to engage pediatric surgeons as efforts in trauma prevention become more successful.

  14. Acute, Severe Cryptosporidiosis in an Immunocompetent Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tallant, Caitlin; Huddleston, Patrick; Alshanberi, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Severe diarrheal illness in children can be attributed to a number of different microbiological agents. Without appropriate microbiological testing of stool samples, patients who present with multiple days of severe diarrhea might have a delay in proper diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report a case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient presenting with acute cryptosporidiosis. Humans and bovine species are known hosts of cryptosporidium and several studies have evaluated the zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidium from cattle to humans. Adding diagnostic tests for cryptosporidium like Ziehl-Neelsen staining of stool or fecal rapid antigen detection techniques should be considered in the workup of patients presenting with undifferentiated, severe diarrheal illness, especially in those who have close contact with livestock. PMID:27478580

  15. Recurrent Diplopia in a Pediatric Patient with Bickerstaff Brainstem Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Chapados, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute complete external ophthalmoplegia is a rare finding in clinical practice that is associated with diseases affecting the neuromuscular junction, the oculomotor nerves, or the brainstem. Ophthalmoplegia has been reported with acute ataxia in Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis (BBE). Up to 95% of these cases are associated with anti-GQ1b antibodies. Only a small number of cases of anti-GQ1b negative MFS have been documented in pediatric patients. This is the first case reporting a recurrence of ocular symptoms in an anti-GQ1b antibody negative patient with BBE. Case Presentation. An 8-year-old Caucasian boy presented with complete external ophthalmoplegia without ptosis, cerebellar ataxia, and a disturbance of consciousness. He had recently recovered from a confirmed Campylobacter jejuni infection. On subsequent laboratory testing he was anti-GQ1b antibody negative. He had a recurrence of diplopia at four-week follow-up. Conclusions. This patient's recurrence of diplopia was treated with a five-week course of oral corticosteroids which did not worsen his condition, and this may be a therapeutic option for similar patients. We will discuss the symptoms and treatment of reported pediatric cases of anti-GQ1b antibody negative cases of MFS and the variation between cases representing a spectrum of illness. PMID:27293928

  16. Prognosis and predictors of convulsion among pediatric lupus nephritis patients.

    PubMed

    Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Maddani, Abbas; Taheri, Saeed; Sharifi-Bonab, Mir Mohsen; Esfahani, Taher; Panahi, Yunes; Einollahi, Behzad

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to analyze features and outcome of convulsion in pediatric lupus nephritis patients. We retrospectively reviewed data of 14 Iranian children with lupus nephritis who developed seizures and compared them with a group of the same number of well matched pediatric lupus nephritis patients. Higher serum creatinine levels and higher frequencies of anemia and lymphopenia were observed in the convulsion group. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the only risk factor for development of convulsion in pediatric lupus patients with nephritis was lymphopenia. Survival analysis showed that convulsion had no impact on patient and renal function outcomes in our pediatric lupus nephritis subjects. In conclusion, we found that lymphopenia is a predictive factor for convulsion occurrence in our patients and special attention to neurological status assessment may be needed in this situation.

  17. Pharmacological management of narcolepsy and cataplexy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lecendreux, Michel

    2014-10-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder frequently occurring from childhood and persisting through adolescence and adulthood. Individuals suffering from narcolepsy exhibit excessive daytime somnolence, sleep attacks, cataplexy, dysomnia, metabolic perturbations including weight gain, and problems in social interaction and academic performance. The prevalence of narcolepsy in childhood is not known but can be estimated from adult studies to be greater than 20-60 per 100,000 in Western countries. The 2009 (A) H1N1 vaccination campaign led to an increase of narcoleptic cases both in children and in adults, supporting the autoimmune hypothesis of the disease. This article focuses on the epidemiology, etiology, and particularities of treatment in pediatric narcolepsy and details the effects of the drugs used to treat this condition, including recent trends in the field. Future therapeutic directions are also discussed. At present, medications used to treat children or adolescents have shown efficacy mostly based on clinical experience, given the lack of level 1 evidence-based studies in the pediatric population. Therefore, most compounds used in adult narcolepsy to target clinical symptoms such as wake-promoting or anticataplectic agents are prescribed off-label in pediatric patients. Published research shows the benefit of drug therapy for narcoleptic children, but these must be dispensed with caution in the absence of well conducted clinical trials.

  18. Emergent Complications in the Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Munchel, Ashley; Chen, Allen; Symons, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is the only potentially curative option for a variety of pediatric malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Despite advances in transplantation biology and immunology as well as in posttransplant management that have contributed to improved survival and decreased transplant-related mortality, hematopoietic cell transplantation does not come without significant risk of complications. When patients who have undergone hematopoietic cell transplantation present to the emergency department, it is important to consider a variety of therapy-related complications to optimize management and outcome. In this article, we use clinical cases to highlight some of the more common emergent complications after hematopoietic cell transplantation. PMID:25411564

  19. Management of orbital complications of sinusitis in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kinis, Vefa; Ozbay, Musa; Bakir, Salih; Yorgancilar, Ediz; Gun, Ramazan; Akdag, Mehmet; Sahin, Muhammed; Topcu, Ismail

    2013-09-01

    The most common reason of orbital infections is sinusitis. Orbital complications of sinusitis are mostly seen in children. Loss of vision and intracranial infections are among the complications of sinusitis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment is very important in the management of orbital complications. The orbital complication can be in the form of cellulitis or abscess. A retrospective review of 26 pediatric patients with orbital complications due to sinusitis was presented in this study. Of 26 patients, there were 13 cases of preseptal cellulitis, 2 cases of orbital cellulitis, and 11 cases of subperiosteal abscess. We grouped the preseptal and orbital cellulites in one category and the subperiosteal abscess in the other. All patients in the cellulitis group recovered by medical treatment. All the patients were treated by surgical drainage. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment method are vital for the treatment of orbital complications secondary to sinusitis.

  20. Splenorenal Manifestations of Bartonella henselae Infection in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Rising, Taylor; Fulton, Nicholas; Vasavada, Pauravi

    2016-01-01

    Bartonella henselae is a bacterium which can cause a wide range of clinical manifestations, ranging from fever of unknown origin to a potentially fatal endocarditis. We report a case of Bartonella henselae infection in a pediatric-aged patient following a scratch from a kitten. The patient initially presented with a prolonged fever of unknown origin which was unresponsive to antibiotic treatment. The patient was hospitalized with worsening fevers and night sweat. Subsequent ultrasound imaging demonstrated multiple hypoechoic foci within the spleen. A contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis was also obtained which showed hypoattenuating lesions in the spleen and bilateral kidneys. Bartonella henselae IgG and IgM titers were positive, consistent with an acute Bartonella henselae infection. The patient was discharged with a course of oral rifampin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and all symptoms had resolved following two weeks of therapy. PMID:27127672

  1. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, L. C.; Vano, E.; Gutierrez, F.; Rodriguez, C.; Gilarranz, R.; Manzanas, M. J.

    2007-08-01

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for <1 year; 52 for 1-<5 years; 25 for 5-<10 years and 13 for 10-<16 years. Median values of KAP were 1.9, 2.9, 4.5 and 15.4 Gy cm2 respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers.

  2. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Martinez, L C; Vano, E; Gutierrez, F; Rodriguez, C; Gilarranz, R; Manzanas, M J

    2007-08-21

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for <1 year; 52 for 1-<5 years; 25 for 5-<10 years and 13 for 10-<16 years. Median values of KAP were 1.9, 2.9, 4.5 and 15.4 Gy cm(2) respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers.

  3. [Understanding and reducing the risk of adverse drug reactions in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Gotta, Verena; van den Anker, Johannes; Pfister, Marc

    2015-12-01

    Developmental pharmacology influences the safety profile of drugs in pediatrics. Altered pharmacokinetics and/ or pharmacodynamics of drugs make pediatric patients susceptible to adverse drug reactions (ADRs), especially infants and newborns. Since the efficacy/ safety balance of most available drugs has not been formally evaluated in pediatric clinical trials, optimal dosing is rarely known in pediatrics. Suboptimal pediatric drug formulations make dose optimization even more difficult exposing pediatric patients to medication errors like overdosing and associated ADRs. We provide an overview of pediatric ADRs and discuss recent regulatory and pharmacological measures to understand and reduce risk of ADRs in pediatric patients.

  4. Differences in Presentation and Management of Pediatric Facial Lacerations by Type of Health Insurance

    PubMed Central

    Amanullah, Siraj; Linakis, James G.; Vivier, Patrick M.; Clarke-Pearson, Emily; Steele, Dale W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Limited data are available regarding differences in presentation and management of pediatric emergency department (PED) patients based on insurance status. The objective of the study was to assess the difference in management of pediatric facial lacerations based on medical insurance status. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study with universal sampling of patients with facial lacerations who were treated in an urban PED (45K visits/year) over a one-year period. Demographic features and injury characteristics for patients with commercial (private) insurance and those with Medicaid or Medicare (public) insurance were compared. Results Of 1235 children included in the study, 667 (54%) had private insurance and 485 (39%) had public insurance. The two groups did not differ in age or gender, arrival by ambulance, location of injury occurrence, mechanism of injury, part of face involved, length or depth of laceration, use of local anesthetic, or method of repair but differed in acuity assigned at triage. Patients with public insurance were found less likely to have subspecialty consultation in bivariable (OR=0.41, 95% CI [0.24–0.68]) and multivariable logistic regression analyses (OR=0.45, 95% CI [0.25–0.78]). Patients with public insurance received procedural sedation significantly less often than those with private insurance (OR=0.48, 95% CI [0.29–0.76]). This difference was not substantiated in multivariable models (OR=0.74, 95% CI [0.40–1.31]). Conclusion Patients with public insurance received less subspecialty consultation compared to privately insured patients despite a similarity in the presentation and characteristics of their facial lacerations. The reasons for these disparities require further investigation. PMID:26265964

  5. Diagnoses in Pediatric Patients With Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Lesions Suspicious for Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Michael L; Kukreja, Marcia; Horn, Paul S; Standridge, Shannon M

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the brain in pediatric patients frequently show abnormal white matter lesions, which may be concerning for demyelinating disease. This study aimed to determine the proportion of pediatric patients who have MRI lesions concerning for demyelinating disease at presentation and ultimately are diagnosed with a primary central nervous system demyelinating disease. A retrospective chart review was performed on MRI reports of patients who underwent imaging evaluation at a single tertiary pediatric hospital. Of 299 patients identified, 192 presented with acute neurologic complaints. In this group, ≥ 5 discrete lesions, African American race, and having brain stem, thalamic, cerebellar, or optic nerve lesions was associated with the patient being diagnosed with a disease that required further treatment. The other 107 patients underwent MRI for other indications. Among these subjects, having lesions within the corpus callosum or cerebellum was associated with being diagnosed with a disease requiring further treatment.

  6. A quantitative ethnopharmacological documentation of natural pharmacological agents used by pediatric patients in Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Mahomoodally, M Fawzi; Sreekeesoon, D Priyamka

    2014-01-01

    The pediatric population constitutes the most vulnerable patients due to a dearth of approved drugs. Consequently, there is a pressing need to probe novel natural pharmacological agents in an endeavour to develop new drugs to address pediatric illnesses. To date, no studies have explored the use of natural therapies for pediatric health care in Mauritius. Parents (n = 325) from different regions of the island were interviewed. Quantitative indexes such as fidelity level (FL), informant consensus factor (F IC), and use-value (UV) were calculated. Thirty-two plants were reported to be used by pediatric patients. Gastrointestinal disorders (F IC = 0.97) encompassing regurgitation, infantile colic, and stomach aches were the most common ailments managed with herbs. Matricaria chamomilla used for infantile colic and its pharmacological properties has previously been documented for pediatric patients. Product from A. mellifera (UV = 0.75) was the most utilized zootherapy for managing cough. Most plants and animal products reported in this study have bioactive constituents supported by existing scientific literature but their use for the pediatric population is scant. The present ethnopharmacological study has opened new perspectives for further research into their pharmacology, which can subsequently support and facilitate timely pediatric medicinal product development.

  7. A Quantitative Ethnopharmacological Documentation of Natural Pharmacological Agents Used by Pediatric Patients in Mauritius

    PubMed Central

    Mahomoodally, M. Fawzi; Sreekeesoon, D. Priyamka

    2014-01-01

    The pediatric population constitutes the most vulnerable patients due to a dearth of approved drugs. Consequently, there is a pressing need to probe novel natural pharmacological agents in an endeavour to develop new drugs to address pediatric illnesses. To date, no studies have explored the use of natural therapies for pediatric health care in Mauritius. Parents (n = 325) from different regions of the island were interviewed. Quantitative indexes such as fidelity level (FL), informant consensus factor (FIC), and use-value (UV) were calculated. Thirty-two plants were reported to be used by pediatric patients. Gastrointestinal disorders (FIC = 0.97) encompassing regurgitation, infantile colic, and stomach aches were the most common ailments managed with herbs. Matricaria chamomilla used for infantile colic and its pharmacological properties has previously been documented for pediatric patients. Product from A. mellifera (UV = 0.75) was the most utilized zootherapy for managing cough. Most plants and animal products reported in this study have bioactive constituents supported by existing scientific literature but their use for the pediatric population is scant. The present ethnopharmacological study has opened new perspectives for further research into their pharmacology, which can subsequently support and facilitate timely pediatric medicinal product development. PMID:24949418

  8. Vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in pediatric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Erika; Smith, Ellen M Lavoie; Donohoe, Clare; Hertz, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    Vincristine is a chemotherapeutic agent that is a component of many combination regimens for a variety of malignancies, including several common pediatric tumors. Vincristine treatment is limited by a progressive sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy. Vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy (VIPN) is particularly challenging to detect and monitor in pediatric patients, in whom the side effect can diminish long term quality of life. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding VIPN, focusing on its description, assessment, prediction, prevention, and treatment. Significant progress has been made in our knowledge about VIPN incidence and progression, and tools have been developed that enable clinicians to reliably measure VIPN in pediatric patients. Despite these successes, little progress has been made in identifying clinically useful predictors of VIPN or in developing effective approaches for VIPN prevention or treatment in either pediatric or adult patients. Further research is needed to predict, prevent, and treat VIPN to maximize therapeutic benefit and avoid unnecessary toxicity from vincristine treatment. PMID:27904761

  9. Buccal Dosage Forms: General Considerations for Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Montero-Padilla, Soledad; Velaga, Sitaram; Morales, Javier O

    2017-02-01

    The development of an appropriate dosage form for pediatric patients needs to take into account several aspects, since adult drug biodistribution differs from that of pediatrics. In recent years, buccal administration has become an attractive route, having different dosage forms under development including tablets, lozenges, films, and solutions among others. Furthermore, the buccal epithelium can allow quick access to systemic circulation, which could be used for a rapid onset of action. For pediatric patients, dosage forms to be placed in the oral cavity have higher requirements for palatability to increase acceptance and therapy compliance. Therefore, an understanding of the excipients required and their functions and properties needs to be particularly addressed. This review is focused on the differences and requirements relevant to buccal administration for pediatric patients (compared to adults) and how novel dosage forms can be less invasive and more acceptable alternatives.

  10. Restorative dentistry for the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Hackmyer, Steven P; Donly, Kevin J

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry sponsored the Pediatric Restorative Dentistry Consensus Conference in 2002. This paper will review the consensus statements that were issued as a result of the conference. Since the conference there have been advances in procedures, materials, and techniques that need to be considered in terms of some of the consensus statements. The introduction of the First Dental Home, interim therapeutic restoration and nanotechnology are examples of some of the materials and techniques that are now part of everyday pediatric dentistry. This paper will discuss the updates as it relates to each of the 2002 consensus statements.

  11. Acanthosis Nigricans Associated with an Adrenocortical Tumor in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadi, Filippina Filia; Barrows, Frank; Mostoufi-Moab, Sogol

    2013-01-01

    Malignant acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome seen primarily in adults with an underlying diagnosis of gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma. Malignant AN is characterized by hyperpigmentation and velvety hyperplasia of the epidermis. This condition is generally not associated with tumors in pediatric populations or in the adrenal gland. We present a case of malignant AN in a pediatric patient with a nonmalignant, functional adrenocortical tumor. PMID:23819073

  12. Acanthosis nigricans associated with an adrenocortical tumor in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Isaacoff, Elizabeth; Dimitriadi, Filippina Filia; Barrows, Frank; Pawel, Bruce; Mattei, Peter; Mostoufi-Moab, Sogol

    2013-01-01

    Malignant acanthosis nigricans (AN) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome seen primarily in adults with an underlying diagnosis of gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma. Malignant AN is characterized by hyperpigmentation and velvety hyperplasia of the epidermis. This condition is generally not associated with tumors in pediatric populations or in the adrenal gland. We present a case of malignant AN in a pediatric patient with a nonmalignant, functional adrenocortical tumor.

  13. Nutrition-focused physical examination in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Green Corkins, Kelly

    2015-04-01

    A complete nutrition assessment includes several components: medical record review, anthropometric measurements, diet/nutrition intake, interview, and physical examination. The nutrition-focused physical examination (NFPE) can identify or confirm muscle wasting, subcutaneous fat loss, and edema and clarify information gathered during the medical record review. The physical examination component of the nutrition assessment is more critical in pediatric patients because pediatric patients can become malnourished more quickly than adults and because prolonged malnutrition can negatively affect growth and development. In addition, case studies of micronutrient deficiencies, essential fatty acid deficiency, and protein-calorie malnutrition with skin manifestations have been reported in developed countries. The etiologies of the deficiencies are chronic disease, long-term tube feedings, or long-term parenteral nutrition. An NFPE involves an in-depth examination of the patient from head to toe by a trained nutrition professional. Nutrition professionals recognize the importance and value of an NFPE, yet it is seldom completed, particularly in pediatrics, most likely due to lack of training and lack of pediatric-specific information or training opportunities. Although there are similarities between NFPE in pediatric and adult patients such as the techniques used (inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation), there are important differences related to growth and development. This review provides an overview of nutrition assessment with focus on the NFPE and aspects unique to the pediatric patient.

  14. Nosocomial Infections among Pediatric Patients with Neoplastic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Pongwilairat, Natthida; Washington, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop nosocomial infections (NIs). NIs may prolong their hospital stay, and increase morbidity and mortality. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the incidence of NIs, (2) sites of NIs, (3) causal organisms, and (4) outcomes of NIs among pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases. Methods. This study was a prospective cohort study of pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases who were admitted to the Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand. Results. A total of 707 pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases were admitted. Forty-six episodes of NIs in 30 patients were reported (6.5 NIs/100 admission episodes and 7 NIs/1000 days of hospitalization). Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had the highest number of NIs (41.3%). The most common causal organisms were gram-negative bacteria (47.1%). Patients who had undergone invasive procedures were more likely to develop NIs than those who had not (P < .05). The mortality rate of patients with NIs was 19.6%. Conclusion. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop NIs after having undergone invasive procedures. Pediatricians should be aware of this and strictly follow infection control guidelines in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates related to NIs. PMID:20049342

  15. Nosocomial Infections among Pediatric Patients with Neoplastic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Pongwilairat, Natthida; Washington, Charles H

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop nosocomial infections (NIs). NIs may prolong their hospital stay, and increase morbidity and mortality. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the incidence of NIs, (2) sites of NIs, (3) causal organisms, and (4) outcomes of NIs among pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases. Methods. This study was a prospective cohort study of pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases who were admitted to the Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand. Results. A total of 707 pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases were admitted. Forty-six episodes of NIs in 30 patients were reported (6.5 NIs/100 admission episodes and 7 NIs/1000 days of hospitalization). Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had the highest number of NIs (41.3%). The most common causal organisms were gram-negative bacteria (47.1%). Patients who had undergone invasive procedures were more likely to develop NIs than those who had not (P < .05). The mortality rate of patients with NIs was 19.6%. Conclusion. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop NIs after having undergone invasive procedures. Pediatricians should be aware of this and strictly follow infection control guidelines in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates related to NIs.

  16. Fishbone ingestion: two cases of late presentation as pediatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Casadio, G; Chendi, D; Franchella, A

    2003-09-01

    The authors report 2 cases of pediatric emergencies caused by fishbone ingestion. In the first case, 2 fishbones within the sac of an inguinal hernia were detected during an emergency operation for suspected testicular torsion; in the second case, a big fishbone was found in the omentum covering an inflammed appendix during an emergency appendicectomy. In some cases this three foreign bodies can be detected with a simple abdominal X-ray; the relationship between the fish species involved and the diagnosis is discussed.

  17. Pediatric Coccidioidomycosis Patients: Perceptions, Quality of Life and Psychosocial Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gaab, Erin Mary; Naeem, Fouzia

    2015-01-01

    Research investigating the effects of coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) on children and the psychosocial implications of this disease in general is lacking. This study reviews what is known about pediatric coccidioidomycosis patients. It documents the psychological functioning, quality of life, and illness perceptions of a sample of coccidioidomycosis patient families. Primary caregivers of pediatric patients and patients from a major hospital in the San Joaquin Valley of California were interviewed regarding their perceptions of disease detection, access to care and the patient/family experience. PMID:27417796

  18. Sedation and Monitoring in the Pediatric Patient during Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun Kee; Lightdale, Jenifer R

    2016-07-01

    Sedation is a fundamental component of pediatric gastrointestinal procedures. The 2 main types of sedation for pediatric endoscopy remain general anesthesia and procedural sedation. Although anesthesiologist-administered sedation protocols are more common, there is no ideal regimen for endoscopy in children. This article discusses specific levels of sedation for endoscopy as well as various regimens that can be used to achieve each. Risks and considerations that may be specific to performing gastrointestinal procedures in children are reviewed. Finally, potential future directions for sedation and monitoring that may change the practice of pediatric gastroenterology and ultimately patient outcomes are examined.

  19. Prevalence, Clinical Presentation, and Differential Diagnosis of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Birmaher, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the past 20 years, the evidence regarding pediatric bipolar disorder (BP) has increased substantially. As a result, recent concerns have focused primarily on prevalence and differential diagnosis. Method Selective review of the literature. Results BP as defined by rigorously applying diagnostic criteria has been observed among children and especially adolescents in numerous countries. In contrast to increasing diagnoses in clinical settings, prevalence in epidemiologic studies has not recently changed. BP-spectrum conditions among youth are highly impairing and confer high risk for conversion to BP-I and BP-II. Compared to adults, youth with BP have more mixed symptoms, more changes in mood polarity, are more often symptomatic and seem to have worse prognosis. The course, clinical characteristics, and comorbidities of BP among children and adolescents are in many ways otherwise similar to those of adults with BP. Nonetheless, many youth with BP receive no treatment and most do not receive BP-specific treatment. Conclusion Despite increased evidence supporting the validity of pediatric BP, discrepancies between clinical and epidemiologic findings suggest that diagnostic misapplication may be common. Simultaneously, low rates of treatment of youth with BP suggest that withholding of BP diagnoses may also be common. Clinicians should apply diagnostic criteria rigorously in order to optimize diagnostic accuracy and ensure appropriate treatment. PMID:22652925

  20. Pediatric Polysomnography: The Patient and Family Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Das, Shubhadeep; Mindell, Jodi; Millet, Genevieve C.; Ofer, Dafna; Beck, Suzanne E.; Mason, Thornton B.A.; Brooks, Lee J.; Traylor, Joel; Marcus, Carole L.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: The gold-standard test used to diagnose childhood obstructive sleep apnea is polysomnography. However, this test requires an overnight stay at a sleep laboratory and the attachment of multiple sensors to the patient. The long-term impact of this testing on the child and family are not known. We hypothesized that polysomnography does not precipitate acute or chronic psychological effects in children. Methods: A consecutive cohort of children who had undergone sleep studies 2 to 4 months prior to the interview were administered a standardized questionnaire via telephone. Results: Of the 118 families that were eligible to participate, 67% could be contacted and agreed to participate; 87% of respondents reported the experience to have been satisfactory (mean Likert score of 8.6 ± 2.0 [SD] on a scale of 1-10). Similar levels of satisfaction were reported by parents of children with developmental delay or those who were younger than 3 years. The night's sleep was considered typical in 68% of cases. Sleep was less likely to be typical in children younger than 3 years (47%, p = 0.043). Eight percent of children experienced pain during the study. By caregiver report, of those children who remembered the sleep study, memories were positive in 84%. No child had evidence of serious long-term psychological issues. Conclusions: The vast majority of children and families found the polysomnography experience to be satisfactory, with no psychological sequelae. However, many children, especially those younger than 3 years, demonstrated sleep patterns different from their usual sleep. The clinical relevance of this finding merits further study. Further research evaluating the generalizability of this study is also needed. Citation: Das S; Mindell J; Millet GC; Ofer D; Beck SE; Mason TBA; Brooks LJ; Traylor J; Marcus CL. Pediatric polysomnography: the patient and family perspective. J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(1):81-87. PMID:21344042

  1. Pediatric oncologists' coping strategies for dealing with patient death.

    PubMed

    Granek, Leeat; Barrera, Maru; Scheinemann, Katrin; Bartels, Ute

    2016-01-01

    This research examined pediatric oncologists coping strategies when their patients died of cancer. Twenty-one pediatric oncologists at 2 Canadian pediatric academic hospitals were interviewed about their coping strategies when patients died or were in the process of dying. The grounded theory method of data collection and data analysis were used. Line-by-line coding was used to establish codes and themes and constant comparison was used to establish relations among emerging codes and themes. Pediatric oncologists used engagement coping strategies with primary and secondary responses including emotional regulation (social support and religion), problem solving (supporting families at end of life), cognitive restructuring (making a difference and research), and distraction (breaks, physical activity, hobbies and entertainment, spending time with own children). They also used disengagement coping strategies that included voluntary avoidance (compartmentalization and withdrawing from families at end of life). Given the chronic nature of patient death in pediatric oncology and the emotionally difficult nature of this work, medical institutions such as hospitals have a responsibility to assist pediatric oncologists in coping with this challenging aspect of their work. Future research is needed to evaluate how best to implement these changes on the institutional level to help oncologists cope with patient death and the effect of using these strategies on their quality of life.

  2. Prevalence of Symptomatic Lumbar Spondylolysis in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Akihiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Goda, Yuichiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakamaki, Tadanori; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis, a stress fracture of the pars interarticularis, is prevalent in adolescent athletes. Recent advances in diagnostic tools and techniques enable early diagnosis before these fractures progress to complete fractures through the pars. However, because patients often consult family physicians for primary care of low back pain and these physicians may not have access to diagnostic modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, stress fractures can be missed. This study surveyed the prevalence of symptomatic spondylolysis in pediatric patients who consulted an orthopedic clinic for primary care and investigated whether such acute stress fractures may be overlooked without MRI. The prospective study investigated 264 patients who were younger than 19 years and had low back pain. Of the 153 patients (58.0%) with low back pain persisting for longer than 2 weeks, 136 who agreed to undergo MRI were included in the study. This group included 11 elementary school students, 71 junior high school students, and 54 high school students. The overall prevalence of lumbar spondylolysis was 39.7% (54 of 136) and was 9.3% in elementary school students (5 of 11, 45.5%), 59.3% in junior high school students (32 of 71, 45.1%), and 31.5% in high school students (17 of 54, 31.5%). All 54 patients with spondylolysis had a history of athletic activity. Primary care physicians should recognize that approximately 40% of pediatric patients presenting with low back pain persisting for longer than 2 weeks may have spondylolysis and should consider MRI in those with a history of athletic activity. Because the spine is immature in this age group, almost half of affected elementary school and junior high school students may have lumbar spondylolysis. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e434-e437.].

  3. Use of cidofovir in pediatric patients with adenovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Lakshmi; Arnold, Alana; Jones, Sarah; Patterson, Al; Graham, Dionne; Harper, Marvin; Levy, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adenoviruses contribute to morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised pediatric patients including stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients. Cidofovir (CDV), an antiviral compound approved by the FDA in 1996, is used for treatment of adenoviral (ADV) infections in immunocompromised patients despite concern of potential nephrotoxicity.   Methods: We conducted a retrospective 5-year review at Boston Children’s Hospital of 16 patients (mean age = 6.5 years) receiving 19 courses of CDV. During therapy all pertinent data elements were reviewed to characterize potential response to therapy and incidence of renal dysfunction.   Results: Of the 19 CDV courses prescribed, 16 courses (84%) were in patients who had a positive blood ADV Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) alone or in combination with positive ADV PCR/ Direct Immunofluorescence Assay (DFA) at another site. Respiratory symptoms with or without pneumonia were the most common presentation (10/19, 53%). In the majority of blood positive courses (10/16, 63%), viral clearance was also accompanied by clinical response. This was not the case in four courses where patients expired despite viral clearance, including one in which death was directly attributable to adenovirus. There was reversible renal dysfunction observed during the use of CDV. Conclusions:  CDV appeared safe and reasonably tolerated for treatment of ADV in this pediatric population and was associated with viral response and clinical improvement in the majority of patients but reversible renal dysfunction was a side effect. Further studies of the efficacy of CDV for immunocompromised children with ADV infection are warranted. PMID:27239277

  4. [Adverse events in patients from a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Arriaga-Dávila, José de Jesús; Domínguez-Serrano, María Isabel; Guzmán-Bihouet, Beatriz Filomena; Navarrete-Navarro, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Background: detection of adverse events is part of the safety management in hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of adverse events that occurred in a pediatric hospital. Methods: cross-sectional study of the adverse events occurred in a pediatric hospital from 2007 to 2009. Factors associated with their developmental causes were identified. The statistical analysis was descriptive and bivariate, with contingency tables to estimate the relationship between those factors. A p value = 0.05 was considered significant. Results: a total of 177 adverse events were registered. When they began, human factor occurred in 23 cases (13 %, OR = 1.41, p = 0.001), organizational factor was present in 71 cases (40 %, OR = 1.91, p = 0.236) and technical factor in 46 cases (26 %, OR = 0.87, p = 0.01). Blows or bruises from falls as a result of adverse events occurred in 71 cases (40 %, 95 % CI = 64-78). Conclusions: we found 1.84 events per 100 hospital discharges during the study period. The fall of patients ranked first of the adverse events identified.

  5. Ultrasonographic imaging of inflammatory bowel disease in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Liliana; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Braden, Barbara; Cui, Xin-Wu; Buchhorn, Reiner; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal diseases in pediatric patients. Choosing the optimal imaging modality for the assessment of gastrointestinal disease in pediatric patients can be challenging. The invasiveness and patient acceptance, the radiation exposure and the quality performance of the diagnostic test need to be considered. By reviewing the literature regarding imaging in inflammatory bowel disease the value of ultrasound in the clinical management of pediatric patients is highlighted. Transabdominal ultrasound is a useful, noninvasive method for the initial diagnosis of IBD in children; it also provides guidance for therapeutic decisions and helps to characterize and predict the course of the disease in individual patients. Ultrasound techniques including color Doppler imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound are promising imaging tools to determine disease activity and complications. Comparative studies between different imaging methods are needed. PMID:25954096

  6. A nurse practitioner patient care team: implications for pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Golden, Julia Rose

    2014-01-01

    The role of the pediatric advanced practice registered nurse continues to evolve within the ever-changing field of health care. In response to increased demand for health care services and because of a variety of changes in the health care delivery system, nurse practitioner patient care teams are an emerging trend in acute care settings. Care provided by nurse practitioner teams has been shown to be effective, efficient, and comprehensive. In addition to shorter hospital stays and reduced costs, nurse practitioner teams offer increased quality and continuity of care, and improved patient satisfaction. Nurse practitioner patient care teams are well suited to the field of pediatric oncology, as patients would benefit from care provided by specialized clinicians with a holistic focus. This article provides health care professionals with information about the use of nurse practitioner patient care teams and implications for use in pediatric oncology.

  7. Metastatic esthesioneuroblastoma secreting adrenocorticotropic hormone in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Galioto, Silvestre; Di Petrillo, Alessandro; Pastori, Mauro; Arecchi, Alberto

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to report a pediatric case of secondary cervical esthesioneuroblastoma involving the parapharyngeal lymph nodes. A 3-year-old boy came to our clinical observation because of a right lymphonodal mass evidenced by nuclear magnetic resonance and a diagnosis of Cushing syndrome associated with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion, moon face, central obesity, asthenia, and hirsutism. At the age of 10 months, the patient underwent endoscopic surgery for asportation of the World Health Organization stage IV esthesioneuroblastoma. At 38 months of age, the patient underwent right parapharyngeal lymphadenectomy with surgical access by a double mandibulectomy. After surgery, serum ACTH, cortisolemia, and urinary excretion of cortisol were within the reference range. Blood pressure was recorded at 110/70 mm Hg. Moon face disappeared, as well as central obesity and hirsutism. Clinical report is presented together with brief review of literature.

  8. Intraoperative mechanical ventilation for the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Kneyber, Martin C J

    2015-09-01

    Invasive mechanical ventilation is required when children undergo general anesthesia for any procedure. It is remarkable that one of the most practiced interventions such as pediatric mechanical ventilation is hardly supported by any scientific evidence but rather based on personal experience and data from adults, especially as ventilation itself is increasingly recognized as a harmful intervention that causes ventilator-induced lung injury. The use of low tidal volume and higher levels of positive end-expiratory pressure became an integral part of lung-protective ventilation following the outcomes of clinical trials in critically ill adults. This approach has been readily adopted in pediatric ventilation. However, a clear association between tidal volume and mortality has not been ascertained in pediatrics. In fact, experimental studies have suggested that young children might be less susceptible to ventilator-induced lung injury. As such, no recommendations on optimal lung-protective ventilation strategy in children with or without lung injury can be made.

  9. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in pediatric patients: is computerized tomography a must?

    PubMed

    Gedik, Abdullah; Tutus, Ali; Kayan, Devrim; Yılmaz, Yakup; Bircan, Kamuran

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of pediatric percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) cases, and discuss the results and necessity of non-contrast computerized tomography (CT) in these cases. In all, 48 pediatric patients who underwent PNL were retrospectively evaluated. Before PNL, either intravenous urography or CT was performed. In all patients, we evaluated the PNL time, scopy time with stone burden, and complications. During the PNL procedure, we switched to open surgery in two cases: in one because of renal pelvis perforation and in the other because of transcolonic access. In one patient who was scheduled to undergo PNL, we performed open surgery, primarily because we detected a retrorenal colon with CT. The stone burden in 45 patients who underwent PNL was 445 ± 225 mm(2), the PNL time was 51 ± 23 min, and the scopy time was 6.1 ± 2.7 min. We removed nephrostomy tubes 1-4 days after the procedure. In two patients, 24 h after removal of nephrostomy tubes, we inserted double J stents because of prolonged urine extravasation from the tract. In all, 34 of the 45 patients were stone-free, 5 patients had clinically insignificant stone fragments, and 6 patients had residual stones. PNL is a safe and effective method in the treatment of pediatric patients with kidney stones. Clinical experience is the most important factor in obtaining stone-free results. CT should be performed in all pediatric patients in order to prevent colon perforation.

  10. Diagnostic Emergency Ultrasound: Assessment Techniques In The Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Joshua; Nelson, Bret P

    2016-01-01

    Emergency ultrasound is performed at the point of care to answer focused clinical questions in a rapid manner. Over the last 20 years, the use of this technique has grown rapidly, and it has become a core requirement in many emergency medicine residencies and in some pediatric emergency medicine fellowships. The use of emergency ultrasound in the pediatric setting is increasing due to the lack of ionizing radiation with these studies, as compared to computed tomography. Utilizing diagnostic ultrasound in the emergency department can allow clinicians to arrive at a diagnosis at the bedside rather than sending the patient out of the department for another study. This issue focuses on common indications for diagnostic ultrasound, as found in the pediatric literature or extrapolated from adult literature where pediatric evidence is scarce. Limitations, current trends, controversies, and future directions of diagnostic ultrasound in the emergency department are also discussed.

  11. How pediatric surgeons use social media to attract new patients.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ron; Baum, Neil

    2014-08-01

    Social media has changed the landscape of online interaction for all doctors including pediatric surgeons. Of course the public including our patients and potential new patients having immediate access to these sites through mobile devices and iPads has contributed immensely to this phenomenon. Nonetheless, it seems that we are all rushing to get in front of our target audience and to engage in a relationship with them in a cost-effective fashion. This article will discuss the role of the Internet and media and how you can use this technology to attract new pediatric patients to your practice.

  12. Trichoderma longibrachiatum infection in a pediatric patient with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, F M; Demmler, G J; Travis, W R; Ogden, A K; Rossmann, S N; Rinaldi, M G

    1997-01-01

    Trichoderma longibrachiatum infection of the skin in an 11-year-old child with severe aplastic anemia and prolonged neutropenia is reported. The patient received systemic antifungal therapy and underwent bone marrow transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first description of T. longibrachiatum infection in a pediatric patient. It also is the first case successfully treated with medical therapy. A review of the literature suggests that Trichoderma spp. are recognized as human pathogens with increasing frequency, particularly for immunocompromised patients, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fungal infections in the pediatric population. PMID:9003627

  13. Clinical features and biomarkers of concussion and mild traumatic brain injury in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Matthew T; Kosofsky, Barry E

    2015-05-01

    There has been increasing awareness of the incidence and potential long-term consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in children and young adults. While parents, school systems, and athletic programs are clamoring for evidence-based guidelines, the field remains primitive in understanding the factors resulting in a spectrum of individual outcomes, most of which are complete, but some of which are not. In this article, we discuss the definition, epidemiology, clinical presentation, course, and outcomes of mTBI, with a focus on the pediatric population as the context for reviewing the mechanisms and pathophysiology mediating, and biomarkers reflective of, more significant concussion-induced brain injury. Our goal is to present a general overview of the features of mTBI in the pediatric population in order to provide a conceptual model for pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists. This model emphasizes the importance of establishing actionable, noninvasive biomarkers that are reflective of brain injury and that may identify those pediatric patients who can benefit from earlier and more aggressive interventions. We will focus on the specific features of mTBI in pediatric patients; although given the relative lack of research in the pediatric population, we will also extrapolate from research on adults.

  14. Acquired and Heritable Thrombophilia in Indian Patients With Pediatric Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT).

    PubMed

    Pai, Navin; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2014-09-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in children is more often associated with underlying pathological conditions than with hereditary thrombophilia. The present study is a retrospective analysis of thrombophilia in 285 pediatric patients with venous thrombosis at different sites. Four common thrombophilia markers, that is protein C, protein S, antithrombin III, and factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation, were analyzed. Thrombosis in hepatic and portal veins was more common in pediatric patients (73%) when compared to other sites (27%). Overall, hereditary thrombophilia accounted for 15.5% of the patients with venous thrombosis. The FVL mutation, which was the major causative factor in Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis cases in the adult group, was not a major contributing factor in pediatric group, that is, 1.8% of the patients. In conclusion, the risk factors for venous thrombosis vary in different age groups.

  15. Commentary: The Diagnosis of Delirium in Pediatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martini, D. Richard

    2005-01-01

    Pediatric patients seem to be especially vulnerable to toxic, metabolic, or traumatic CNS insults and are at greater risk of delirium with fever regardless of the etiology. Developmental limitations, in the areas of communication and cognition, prevent a thorough evaluation of the young patient for delirium. Only the most severe cases are…

  16. Prevalence and nature of nail alterations in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, A; Tamayo, L; Sosa-de-Martínez, C; Durán-McKinster, C; Orozco-Covarrubias, L; Ruiz-Maldonado, R

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore the frequency and nature of ungual alterations in patients of a pediatric dermatology department at a third-level pediatric hospital. The first 20 patients with nail alterations seen each year during a 5-year period from 1992 through 1996 were included, totaling 100 patients. The rate of nail alterations was 11% (1/9) in pediatric dermatology patients. There were 5 infants, 19 preschoolers (2- to 5-year-olds), 38 school children (6- to 11-year-olds), and 38 adolescents (12- to 17-year-olds). The most frequent diagnoses were onychomycosis (23), nail alterations in a genodermatosis (23), nail alterations associated with dermatoses (16), onychocryptosis (11), and paronychia (10). Toenails were involved in 54 patients, fingernails in 25, and both in 21 patients. Twenty nails were involved in 21 patients. A high prevalence of nail alterations was found in pediatric dermatology patients, some of which were nonspecific, while others provided important diagnostic clues.

  17. Increased Prevalence of Anellovirus in Pediatric Patients with Fever

    PubMed Central

    McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Wylie, Kristine M.; Deych, Elena; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George; Storch, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    The Anelloviridae family consists of non-enveloped, circular, single-stranded DNA viruses. Three genera of anellovirus are known to infect humans, named TTV, TTMDV, and TTMV. Although anelloviruses were initially thought to cause non-A-G viral hepatitis, continued research has shown no definitive associations between anellovirus and human disease to date. Using high-throughput sequencing, we investigated the association between anelloviruses and fever in pediatric patients 2–36 months of age. We determined that although anelloviruses were present in a large number of specimens from both febrile and afebrile patients, they were more prevalent in the plasma and nasopharyngeal (NP) specimens of febrile patients compared to afebrile controls. Using PCR to detect each of the three species of anellovirus that infect humans, we found that anellovirus species TTV and TTMDV were more prevalent in the plasma and NP specimens of febrile patients compared to afebrile controls. This was not the case for species TTMV which was found in similar percentages of febrile and afebrile patient specimens. Analysis of patient age showed that the percentage of plasma and NP specimens containing anellovirus increased with age until patients were 19–24 months of age, after which the percentage of anellovirus positive patient specimens dropped. This trend was striking for TTV and TTMDV and very modest for TTMV in both plasma and NP specimens. Finally, as the temperature of febrile patients increased, so too did the frequency of TTV and TTMDV detection. Again, TTMV was equally present in both febrile and afebrile patient specimens. Taken together these data indicate that the human anellovirus species TTV and TTMDV are associated with fever in children, while the highly related human anellovirus TTMV has no association with fever. PMID:23226428

  18. Genotype and Phenotype Analysis in Pediatric Patients with Cystinuria

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Cystinuria is an inherited disorder characterized by defective renal reabsorption of cystine and dibasic amino acids leading to nephrolithiasis. This study was conducted to analyze the genotypes and phenotypes of pediatric patients with cystinuria. Eight children from Seoul National University Hospital and Asan Medical Center presenting with cystinuria from January 2003 to June 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. Mutational studies were performed by direct sequencing. Two of the 8 were male and 6 were female. The median ages at onset and diagnosis were 1.5 (range, 0.3–13.6) and 2.6 (range, 0.7–16.7) years, respectively. The median followed up was 7.7 (range, 3.4–14.0) years. Mutational analyses were performed in 7 patients and revealed biallelic SLC3A1 mutations (AA genotype) in 4 patients, a single heterozygous SLC3A1 mutation (A- genotype) in 1 patient, biallelic SLC7A9 mutations (BB genotype) in 1 patient, and a single heterozygous SLC7A9 mutation (B- genotype) in 1 patient. Two of the mutations were novel. No genotype-phenotype correlations were observed, except for earlier onset age in patients with non-AA genotypes than in patients with the AA genotype. All patients suffered from recurrent attacks of symptomatic nephrolithiasis, which lead to urologic interventions. At the last follow-up, 3 patients had a mild-to-moderate degree of renal dysfunction. This is the first study of genotypic and phenotypic analyses of patients with cystinuria in Korea. PMID:28049243

  19. Imaging of lumps and bumps in pediatric patients: an algorithm for appropriate imaging and pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Michael S; Oliveira, Amy M

    2014-08-01

    Superficial lumps and bumps are a common presenting complaint in the pediatric patient population. Although encountered frequently, the path to a definitive diagnosis is not always a straightforward one. Imaging offers a valuable tool to aid in this diagnostic challenge. Radiologists must be familiar with pediatric lumps and bumps, their imaging characteristics, and the best way to further evaluate challenging clinical presentations. This will not only allow the radiologist to serve as a valuable asset to the treating physician in choosing the most appropriate imaging modality but also help in accurate diagnosis, all while ensuring the "image gently" principle. An algorithm for imaging in the pediatric patient with lumps and bumps has been presented in this article and a few example entities along with their imaging findings have also been reviewed.

  20. Risk Factors for Inpatient Hospital Admission in Pediatric Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to determine the risk factors for inpatient admission of pediatric burn patients. Materials & methods This cross-sectional study uses data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (HCUP KID) for the years of 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012 to estimate the risk factors for inpatient admission for pediatric patients who sustained a burn injury. Patients who sustained a burn between the ages of 1 and 18 years were included. Results A total of 43,453 patients met inclusion criteria. Of those, 42.3% were Caucasian, 20.1% were African American, and 19.3% were Hispanic. Males comprised 63.5% of the studied population. The month of July was associated with a 31.8% increased chance (p=.011) of being admitted to hospital for a pediatric burn. It was found that patients being admitted had a 32.2% increased chance (p=.002) of a fluid and electrolyte abnormality and a 61.0% increased chance (p=.027) of drug abuse.  Conclusions Pediatric burn patients are more likely to be admitted to the hospital having a fluid and electrolyte abnormality, having a drug abuse status, and/or during the month of July. PMID:27335714

  1. Simultaneous acute appendicitis and pseudomembranous colitis in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Vidrine, Steven R; Cortina, Chandler; Black, Marissa; Vidrine, Steven B

    2012-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause for pediatric surgery, with an increasing incidence as this population ages. Pseudomembranous colitis (PMC) from Clostridum difficle is being seen more frequently in pediatric patients, especially after treatment with antibiotics and in those with Hirschsprung's disease. Only three prior cases of appendicitis associated with PMC have been described in the literature, and all of them occurred in adult patients. Here, we describe the first documented pediatric case: a 16-year-old female who developed acute appendicitis while concomitantly being treated for suspected pseudomembranous colitis. We concur with previous authors that there may be an association between these two pathologies; furthermore, this association may not always be clinically apparent and may be both under-diagnosed and under-reported.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Analysis of Caudal Regression Syndrome and Concomitant Anomalies in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boruah, Deb K; Dhingani, Dhaval D; Achar, Sashidhar; Prakash, Arjun; Augustine, Antony; Sanyal, Shantiranjan; Gogoi, Manoj; Mahanta, Kangkana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of caudal regression syndrome (CRS) and concomitant anomalies in pediatric patients. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted. The study group comprised 21 pediatric patients presenting to the Departments of Radiodiagnosis and Pediatric Surgery in a tertiary care hospital from May 2011 to April 2016. All patients were initially evaluated clinically followed by MRI. Results: In our study, 21 pediatric patients were diagnosed with sacral agenesis/dysgenesis related to CRS. According to the Pang's classification, 2 (9.5%) patients were Type I, 5 (23.8%) patients were Type III, 7 (33.3%) patients were Type IV, and 7 (33.3%) patients were of Type V CRS. Clinically, 17 (81%) patients presented with urinary incontinence, 6 (28.6%) with fecal incontinence, 9 patients (42.9%) had poor gluteal musculatures and shallow intergluteal cleft, 7 (33.3%) patients had associated subcutaneous mass over spine, and 6 (28.6%) patients presented with distal leg muscle atrophy. MRI showed wedge-shaped conus termination in 5 (23.8%) patients and bulbous conus termination in 3 (14.3%) patients above the L1 vertebral level falling into Group 1 CRS while 7 (33.3%) patients had tethered cord and 6 (28.6%) patients had stretched conus falling into Group 2 CRS. Conclusion: MRI is the ideal modality for detailed evaluation of the status of the vertebra, spinal cord, intra- and extra-dural lesions and helps in early diagnosis, detailed preoperative MRI evaluation and assessing concomitant anomalies and guiding further management with early institution of treatment to maximize recovery. PMID:27833778

  3. Validity and reliability of a pediatric patient classification instrument1

    PubMed Central

    Dini, Ariane Polidoro; Alves, Daniela Fernanda dos Santos; Oliveira, Henrique Ceretta; Guirardello, Edinêis de Brito

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to assess the construct validity and reliability of the Pediatric Patient Classification Instrument. METHODS: correlation study developed at a teaching hospital. The classification involved 227 patients, using the pediatric patient classification instrument. The construct validity was assessed through the factor analysis approach and reliability through internal consistency. RESULTS: the Exploratory Factor Analysis identified three constructs with 67.5% of variance explanation and, in the reliability assessment, the following Cronbach's alpha coefficients were found: 0.92 for the instrument as a whole; 0.88 for the Patient domain; 0.81 for the Family domain; 0.44 for the Therapeutic procedures domain. CONCLUSIONS: the instrument evidenced its construct validity and reliability, and these analyses indicate the feasibility of the instrument. The validation of the Pediatric Patient Classification Instrument still represents a challenge, due to its relevance for a closer look at pediatric nursing care and management. Further research should be considered to explore its dimensionality and content validity. PMID:25296143

  4. Pediatric catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome: descriptive analysis of 45 patients from the "CAPS Registry".

    PubMed

    Berman, Horacio; Rodríguez-Pintó, Ignasi; Cervera, Ricard; Gregory, Simone; de Meis, Ernesto; Rodrigues, Carlos Ewerton Maia; Aikawa, Nádia Emi; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Springer, Janusz; Niedzwiecki, Maciej; Espinosa, Gerard

    2014-02-01

    Given the lack of information about catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pediatric patients, the objective of the current study was to describe the clinical characteristics, laboratory features, treatment, and outcome of pediatric patients with catastrophic APS and compare them with the adult patients with catastrophic APS. We identified patients who were under 18years of age at time of catastrophic APS diagnosis included in the international registry of patients with catastrophic APS (CAPS Registry). Their main demographic and clinical characteristics, laboratory features, treatment, and outcome were described and compared with those of adult patients with catastrophic APS. From the 446 patients included in the CAPS Registry as of May 2013, 45 (10.3%) patients developed 46 catastrophic events before 18years of age (one patient presented two episodes). Overall, 32 (71.1%) patients were female and the mean age was 11.5±4.6years (range, 3months-18years). A total of 31 (68.9%) patients suffered from primary APS and 13 (28.9%) from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The main differences between the two groups of patients were the higher prevalence of infections as precipitating factor for catastrophic event in the pediatric population (60.9% versus 26.8% in the adult population, p<0.001) and of peripheral vessel thrombosis (52.2% versus 34.3%, p=0.017). In addition, catastrophic APS was the first manifestation of APS more frequently in pediatric patients (86.6% versus 45.2%, p<0.001). Interestingly, pediatric patients showed a trend of lower mortality, although the difference was not statistically significant (26.1% versus 40.2%; odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 0.96-3.79; p=0.063). No differences were found neither in the laboratory features nor in the isolated or combination treatments between groups. Catastrophic APS in pediatric patients is a rare disease. There are minimal differences in the clinical and laboratory features, treatment, and

  5. Patients presenting to an outpatient sport medicine clinic with concussion

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Jérôme; Boisvert, Leslie; Fischer, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe the characteristics of patients who presented to outpatient sport and exercise medicine clinics with concussion. Design Retrospective chart review of electronic medical records. Setting Three specialized sport and exercise medicine clinics in London, Ont. Participants A total of 283 patients presenting with concussion. Main outcome measures Data collected included demographic variables (age and sex), sport participation at the time of injury, previous medical history (including history of concussion), Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS) scores, and return-to-play (RTP) variables (delay and outcome). Results The mean age of patients presenting for care was 17.6 years; 70.9% of patients were younger than 18 years of age (considered pediatric patients); 58.8% of patients were male; and 31.7% of patients had a previous history of concussion. The main sports associated with injury were hockey (40.0%), soccer (12.6%), and football (11.7%). Return to play was granted to 50.9% of patients before the 3-week mark and 80.2% of patients before 8 weeks. Total PCSS scores (maximum score was 132) and neck scores (part of the PCSS, maximum score was 6) were significantly higher in adults compared with pediatric patients (36.2 vs 27.6, P = .02, and 1.8 vs 1.2, P = .02, respectively). A significant difference was seen in RTP, with pediatric patients returning earlier than adults did (P = .04). This difference was not seen when comparing males with females (P = .07). Longer duration of follow-up did not influence RTP outcomes. Previous history of concussion was associated with restriction from contact or collision sports (P < .001). Conclusion Given the age and sex variability found in this study, as well as in previous published reports, it is important to manage each patient individually using current best available practice strategies to optimize long-term outcomes.

  6. [Patient dose optimization in pediatric computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Verdun, F R; Schnyder, P; Gutièrrez, D; Gudinchet, F

    2006-07-12

    The development of CT applications might become a public health problem if no effort is made on the justification and the optimisation of the examinations. This paper presents some hints to assure that the risk-benefit compromise remains in favour of the patient, especially when one deals with the examinations of young patients. In this context a particular attention has to be made on the justification of the examination. When performing the acquisition one needs to optimise the extension of the volume investigated together with the number of acquisition sequences used. Finally, the use of automatic exposure systems, now available on all the units, and the use of the Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL) should allow help radiologists to control the exposure of their patients.

  7. Levetiracetam Clinical Pharmacokinetic Monitoring in Pediatric Patients with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jason; Paquette, Vanessa; Levine, Marc; Ensom, Mary H H

    2017-03-28

    Levetiracetam is a broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug (AED) with a unique mechanism of action. Older AEDs can cause serious short- and long-term adverse drug reactions and complications, rendering them undesirable to use in pediatric patients. Characteristics that make levetiracetam a near-ideal AED include its broad spectrum of activity, good tolerability profile, and minimal drug-drug interactions. Clinical pharmacokinetic monitoring (CPM) is often recommended in pediatric patients for certain AEDs due to large interindividual pharmacokinetic differences and unpredictable drug disposition. Our objective was to determine whether monitoring levetiracetam concentrations is warranted for pediatric patients with epilepsy, using a previously published 9-step decision-making algorithm. A literature search of the MEDLINE (1946-August 2016), EMBASE (1974-August 2016), CENTRAL, and Google Scholar databases was performed to identify relevant English-language articles and answer the questions posed in the algorithm for levetiracetam CPM in pediatric epilepsies. Additional articles were identified from a manual bibliographic review of the relevant literature. We found that levetiracetam CPM met some criteria of the algorithm: levetiracetam is an appropriate adjunctive or monotherapy for pediatric patients with either focal or generalized seizures; it is readily measurable in plasma, with an appropriate degree of sensitivity, accuracy, and precision; it exhibits interindividual variation in pharmacokinetics; often, its pharmacologic effect cannot be easily measured; and the duration of therapy is expected to be long-term. However, important criteria not met include the following: there is no clear evidence for a concentration-response relationship for efficacy or toxicity; the proposed therapeutic range of 12-46 μg/mL is not well-defined and is generally considered as wide. Thus, clinical decision making is unlikely to be affected as a result of routine levetiracetam CPM. In

  8. [Home ventilation of pediatric patients - description of a program

    PubMed

    Resener, T D; Martinez, F E; Reiter, K; Nicolai, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a German program for home ventilatory support, and to analyze the possibility of applying it in Brazil. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We assessed Dr. von Haunersches Kinderklinikacute;s Pediatric Intensive Care Unity - Ludwig-Maximilians - Universität - München (Munich, Germany) home ventilatory support program between April 1997 and June 1998. RESULTS: Patients aged between 1 and 21 years - 11 boys and 15 girls - participated in the study. Fifteen out of 26 children presented neuromuscular pathologies, 8 of them had ventilatory problems of central causes, and 3 children presented obstructive pulmonary diseases. Twelve (46.2%) were receiving noninvasive ventilatory assistance, and 19 (73.1%) only needed intermittent ventilatory support. CONCLUSION: The program relies on a permanent multidisciplinary staff to treat intercurrent diseases. Patients, at predetermined periods, are re-evaluated as to the evolution of respiratory insufficiency. The adequate system organization provides patients and their families with security, and accounts for the success of the home ventilatory support program. A great deal of organizational efforts should be consolidated before implementing similar programs in Brazil.

  9. Radionuclide bone imaging in the pediatric patient

    SciTech Connect

    Celinski, E.M.; Locko, R.C.

    1983-06-01

    This is the second of a four-part continuing education series on pediatric nuclear medicine. After reading and studying the article, the nuclear medicine technologist will be able to: (1) discuss the uptake mechanism of Tc-99m-labeled phosphate compounds used for bone imaging; (2) compare normal distribution of bone tracer in children and in adults; (3) discuss important technical considerations for performing bone scintigraphy in children; and (4) identify and discuss clinical applications of bone scintigraphy in children. Information about CEU(VOICE) credit appears immediately following this article.

  10. Is STEP the future for patients requiring proctocolectomy? A new therapeutic proposal from pediatric experience

    PubMed Central

    Mangray, Hansraj; Ghimenton, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present a pediatric case of medically unmanageable juvenile colonic polyposis, initially treated with subtotal colectomy and an ileostomy followed by a proctectomy, ileal-J-pouch and serial transverse enteroplasties (STEP) of the distal ileum. The STEP procedure in an adequate length was able to control stooling of our patient. PMID:26273442

  11. Is STEP the future for patients requiring proctocolectomy? A new therapeutic proposal from pediatric experience.

    PubMed

    Mangray, Hansraj; Ghimenton, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    We present a pediatric case of medically unmanageable juvenile colonic polyposis, initially treated with subtotal colectomy and an ileostomy followed by a proctectomy, ileal-J-pouch and serial transverse enteroplasties (STEP) of the distal ileum. The STEP procedure in an adequate length was able to control stooling of our patient.

  12. Medicines for Pediatric Patients-Biopharmaceutical, Developmental, and Regulatory Considerations.

    PubMed

    Elder, David P; Holm, René; Kuentz, Martin

    2016-12-29

    This commentary reflects current developments in pediatric medicine. The underpinning legislation in both Europe and the United States has led to the initiation of an increased number of clinical trials in the pediatric population, but there are still a number of outstanding issues within this field. These include the differences in the physiology between adults and the very heterogeneous nature of pediatric patients. There is an ongoing scientific debate on the applicability of a Pediatric Biopharmaceutical Classification System to define when waivers for bioequivalence studies can be supported by in vitro dissolution. However, a challenge is that in vitro models should adequately mimic the physiology of different pediatric age-groups and dose definition is another critical aspect. There is a tendency for off-label use of established adult medicines, resulting in increased adverse events and decreased efficacy in the target population. Recent advances in physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling may be used to provide valuable input into these discussions, but there are currently still many knowledge gaps. It is encouraging that there is a global recognition of these deficiencies and substantial funding in the field of basic research is being provided, for example, within Europe the Innovative Medicines Initiative consortium.

  13. Spontaneous perforation of common bile duct in a pediatric patient: application of hepatobiliary scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Joodi, Marjan; Norouzbeigi, Nasim; Rad, Mohammad Ali Ghodsi; Shojaeian, Reza; Kakhki, Vahid Reza Dabbagh; Sadeghi, Ramin

    2012-10-01

    We report a case of spontaneous biliary perforation in a 21-month old female pediatric patient with the presenting symptoms of abdominal distension, jaundice, and umbilical hernia. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed tracer accumulation in the peritoneal cavity. Preliminary diagnosis of spontaneous biliary perforation was confirmed during surgery. After surgical repair of the biliary leakage, the patient recovered fully. This case shows the importance of hepatobiliary scintigraphy in patients suspicious for this condition.

  14. [Implementation of the unified model of presenting cancer diagnosis in Polish pediatric onco-hematology centers].

    PubMed

    Samardakiewicz, Marzena; Kowalczyk, Jerzy R; Mazurowa, Mieczysława; Budziński, Waldemar; Antonowicz, Małgorzata; Borysławska, Anna; Szweda, Elzbieta; Groth, Anna; Pyka, Małgorzata; Figurska, Martyna; Chybicka, Alicja; Rokicka-Milewska, Roma; Matysiak, Michał; Balwierz, Walentyna; Sońta-Jakimczyk, Danuta; Balcerska, Anna; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of full information related to diagnosis of children with cancer should be one of principles in pediatric oncology. Multidisciplinary approach to each newly diagnosed child and its parents contributes to improving this standard. The Polish Pediatric Leukemia and Lymphoma Group is engaged in these activities since 1998 and it resulted in implementation of several SIOP recommendations in most of Polish pediatric oncohematology centers. The unified model of presentation of diagnosis for a child, parents and family was of an importance and the efforts to introduce it in all cooperating centers was undertaken. Proposed model of informing consists of several steps. Procedure should be individually tailored according to natural history of the disease and characteristics of the family. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the informing procedure in 60 children with newly diagnosed neoplasmatic disease.

  15. Management of the pediatric nuclear medicine patient (or children are not small adults)

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, C.T.; Suto, P.A.

    1983-03-01

    The first of a four-part continuing education series on pediatric nuclear medicine is presented. Included are: (1) clinical indications for performing nuclear medicine studies in children; (2) comparison of nuclear medicine procedures for adult and pedicatric patients; (3) appropriate radiopharmaceuticals for performing pediatric studies; (4) radiation protection techniques (5) the principles of pediatric radiopharmaceutical dose calculation and common calculation methods; (6) possible injection sites and administration methods (7) radiopharmaceutical clearance times and imaging times in adults and children; (8) the collimators of choice for most procedures performed in children; (9) certain behaviors exhibited by children according to their stage of emotional development and children's response to the hospital setting; and (10) patient immobilization techniques and advantages of physical restraint over sedation. (JMT)

  16. Compassionate deactivation of ventricular assist devices in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Seth A; Axelrod, David M; Bernstein, Daniel; Cohen, Harvey J; Sourkes, Barbara; Reddy, Sushma; Magnus, David; Rosenthal, David N; Kaufman, Beth D

    2016-05-01

    Despite greatly improved survival in pediatric patients with end-stage heart failure through the use of ventricular assist devices (VADs), heart failure ultimately remains a life-threatening disease with a significant symptom burden. With increased demand for donor organs, liberalizing the boundaries of case complexity, and the introduction of destination therapy in children, more children can be expected to die while on mechanical support. Despite this trend, guidelines on the ethical and pragmatic issues of compassionate deactivation of VAD support in children are strikingly absent. As VAD support for pediatric patients increases in frequency, the pediatric heart failure and palliative care communities must work toward establishing guidelines to clarify the complex issues surrounding compassionate deactivation. Patient, family and clinician attitudes must be ascertained and education regarding the psychological, legal and ethical issues should be provided. Furthermore, pediatric-specific planning documents for use before VAD implantation as well as deactivation checklists should be developed to assist with decision-making at critical points during the illness trajectory. Herein we review the relevant literature regarding compassionate deactivation with a specific focus on issues related to children.

  17. Intracerebral metastasis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Müge; Aytac, Selin; Altan, Ilhan; Unal, Sule; Tuncer, Murat; Gumruk, Fatma; Cetin, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system leukemia may present in different ways. However, intraparenchymal mass is extremely rare in childhood leukemia. Herein, we report a boy who presented with right hemiparesis and anisocoria 1 year after the cessation of the chemotherapy protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Cranial imaging demonstrated an extensive mass located in the anterior white matter of left frontal lobe, and cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed concomitant lymphoblasts. Immunohistochemical staining of the biopsy material showed neoplastic cells with positive CD10 and TdT. Complete remission was achieved with chemotherapy alone for a duration of 2 years. PMID:23560011

  18. Primary immunodeficiency investigation in patients during and after hospitalization in a pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Suavinho, Érica; de Nápolis, Ana Carolina R.; Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze whether the patients with severe infections, admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, underwent the active screening for primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Methods: Retrospective study that assessed the data records of patients with any severe infections admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, covering a period from January 2011 to January 2012, in order to confirm if they performed an initial investigation for PID with blood count and immunoglobulin dosage. Results: In the studied period, 53 children were hospitalized with severe infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, and only in seven (13.2%) the initial investigation of PID was performed. Among these patients, 3/7 (42.8%) showed quantitative alterations in immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels, 1/7 (14.3%) had the diagnosis of cyclic neutropenia, and 1/7 (14.3%) presented thrombocytopenia and a final diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Therefore, the PID diagnosis was confirmed in 5/7 (71.4%) of the patients. Conclusions: The investigation of PID in patients with severe infections has not been routinely performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Our findings suggest the necessity of performing PID investigation in this group of patients. PMID:24676187

  19. Thyroglossal Duct Cyst Carcinomas in Pediatric Patients: Report of Two Cases with a Comprehensive Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lester D R; Herrera, Hannah B; Lau, Sean K

    2017-03-14

    Thyroglossal duct cyst (TGDC) carcinomas are rarely encountered in the pediatric population. The clinical behavior of these tumors in the pediatric setting is unclear and management is not well defined. Two cases of pediatric thyroglossal duct cyst carcinoma were identified in a review of all thyroglossal duct cysts diagnosed over a ten year period. These two cases were analyzed along with 57 cases of thyroglossal duct cyst carcinoma affecting patients less than 21 years of age compiled from the English literature. Fifty-nine patients (36 females, 23 males) aged 6-20 years (mean 15.0 years) were identified. All presented with an anterior midline neck mass, which was typically mobile and non-tender. The average tumor size was 2.6 cm. Histologically, all tumors were papillary thyroid carcinomas arising in a background of a thyroglossal duct cyst. The tumors exhibited a papillary, follicular, or mixed architecture with classical papillary thyroid carcinoma nuclear features. Soft tissue extension was present in 16 cases. All patients were managed surgically with a Sistrunk procedure, with additional thyroidectomy performed in 29 patients, combined with a lymph node dissection (n = 15), or a Sistrunk and lymph node dissection (n = 5). All patients were stage I at presentation, with 11 showing lymph node metastases. Postoperative radioactive iodine was employed in 20 patients. A papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland was reported in four of the patients who had concurrent/subsequent thyroidectomies. Recurrences were reported in four patients, with distant metastases in one patient, who died of disease (13 months). Follow up data was available for 45 patients, with an overall mean follow-up of 54.5 months. All patients were alive, with the exception of one who died with disease. TGDC carcinomas in pediatric patients is associated with a good overall prognosis, best managed by Sistrunk procedure alone, with selected lymph node dissection if clinically

  20. Does pediatric patient-centeredness affect family trust?

    PubMed

    Aragon, Stephen J; McGuinn, Laura; Bavin, Stefoni A; Gesell, Sabina B

    2010-01-01

    Despite its recognition as a key dimension of healthcare quality, it is often unclear what exactly patient-centeredness means. A generally accepted measurement model of patient-centeredness is still nonexistent, current operational definitions lack sufficient specificity to inform providers how it relates to outcomes, and the influence of patient-centeredness on pediatric patients and families has not been quantified. This study demonstrates that patient-centeredness is a measurable ability of pediatricians that increases family trust. As an ability, it is teachable. The study offers an evidence-based model for future research with specific implications for quality measurement and improvement in the outpatient pediatrician's office.

  1. Postoperative conversion disorder in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Judge, Amy; Spielman, Fred

    2010-11-01

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM IV), conversion disorder is classified as a somatoform illness and defined as an alteration or loss of physical function because of the expression of an underlying psychological ailment. This condition, previously known as hysteria, hysterical neurosis, or conversion hysteria occurs rarely, with an incidence of 11-300 cases per 100,000 people (American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 4th edn. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Presentation after an anesthetic is exceptional. After thorough review of the literature, fewer than 20 cases have been documented, with only two instances in patients younger than 18 years of age after general anesthesia; both were mild in nature. We present a severe case of postoperative conversion disorder that developed upon emergence from anesthesia in a previously healthy 16-year-old girl following direct laryngoscopy with vocal fold injection.

  2. Longitudinally extensive optic neuritis in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Graves, Jennifer; Kraus, Verena; Soares, Bruno P; Hess, Christopher P; Waubant, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Extensive optic nerve demyelinating lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adults could indicate a diagnosis other than multiple sclerosis with worse prognosis such as neuromyelitis optica. We report the frequency of longitudinally extensive lesions in children with first events of optic neuritis. Subjects had brain or orbit MRI within 3 months of onset and were evaluated at the University of California, San Francisco, Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Center. Lesion length, determined by T2 hyperintensity or contrast enhancement, was blindly graded as absent, focal or longitudinally extensive (at least 2 contiguous segments of optic nerve). Of 25 subjects, 9 (36%) had longitudinally extensive optic neuritis. Extensive lesions were not associated with non-multiple sclerosis versus multiple sclerosis diagnosis (P = 1.00). No association between age and lesion extent was observed (P = .26). Prospective studies are needed to determine if longitudinally extensive optic neuritis can predict visual outcome.

  3. The UF series of tomographic computational phantoms of pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonik; Williams, Jonathan L.; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2005-12-15

    Two classes of anthropomorphic computational phantoms exist for use in Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations: tomographic voxel phantoms based upon three-dimensional (3D) medical images, and stylized mathematical phantoms based upon 3D surface equations for internal organ definition. Tomographic phantoms have shown distinct advantages over the stylized phantoms regarding their similarity to real human anatomy. However, while a number of adult tomographic phantoms have been developed since the early 1990s, very few pediatric tomographic phantoms are presently available to support dosimetry in pediatric diagnostic and therapy examinations. As part of a larger effort to construct a series of tomographic phantoms of pediatric patients, five phantoms of different ages (9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male, and 14-year male) have been constructed from computed tomography (CT) image data of live patients using an IDL-based image segmentation tool. Lungs, bones, and adipose tissue were automatically segmented through use of window leveling of the original CT numbers. Additional organs were segmented either semiautomatically or manually with the aid of both anatomical knowledge and available image-processing techniques. Layers of skin were created by adding voxels along the exterior contour of the bodies. The phantoms were created from fused images taken from head and chest-abdomen-pelvis CT exams of the same individuals (9-month and 4-year phantoms) or of two different individuals of the same sex and similar age (8-year, 11-year, and 14-year phantoms). For each model, the resolution and slice positions of the image sets were adjusted based upon their anatomical coverage and then fused to a single head-torso image set. The resolutions of the phantoms for the 9-month, 4-year, 8-year, 11-year, and 14-year are 0.43x0.43x3.0 mm, 0.45x0.45x5.0 mm, 0.58x0.58x6.0 mm, 0.47x0.47x6.00 mm, and 0.625x0.625x6.0 mm, respectively. While organ masses can be

  4. Malnutrition in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients: Assessment, Prevalence, and Association to Adverse Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Daskalou, Efstratia; Galli-Tsinopoulou, Assimina; Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Augoustides-Savvopoulou, Persefone

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent finding in pediatric health care settings in the form of undernutrition or excess body weight. Its increasing prevalence and impact on overall health status, which is reflected in the adverse outcomes, renders imperative the application of commonly accepted and evidence-based practices and tools by health care providers. Nutrition risk screening on admission and nutrition status evaluation are key points during clinical management of hospitalized pediatric patients, in order to prevent health deterioration that can lead to serious complications and growth consequences. In addition, anthropometric data based on commonly accepted universal growth standards can give accurate results for nutrition status. Both nutrition risk screening and nutrition status assessment are techniques that should be routinely implemented, based on commonly accepted growth standards and methodology, and linked to clinical outcomes. The aim of the present review was to address the issue of hospital malnutrition in pediatric settings in terms of prevalence, outline nutrition status evaluation and nutrition screening process using different criteria and available tools, and present its relationship with outcome measures. Key teaching points • Malnutrition-underweight or excess body weight-is a frequent imbalance in pediatric settings that affects physical growth and results in undesirable clinical outcomes. • Anthropometry interpretation through growth charts and nutrition screening are cornerstones for the assessment of malnutrition.To date no commonly accepted anthropometric criteria or nutrition screening tools are used in hospitalized pediatric patients. • Commonly accepted nutrition status and screening processes based on the World Health Organization's growth standards can contribute to the overall hospital nutrition care of pediatric patients.

  5. Avoiding Errors in the Management of Pediatric Polytrauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Chin, Kenneth; Abzug, Joshua; Bae, Donald S; Horn, Bernard D; Herman, Martin; Eberson, Craig P

    2016-01-01

    Management of pediatric polytrauma patients is one of the most difficult challenges for orthopaedic surgeons. Multisystem injuries frequently include complex orthopaedic surgical problems that require intervention. The physiology and anatomy of children and adolescent trauma patients differ from the physiology and anatomy of an adult trauma patient, which alters the types of injuries sustained and the ideal methods for management. Errors of pediatric polytrauma care are included in two broad categories: missed injuries and inadequate fracture treatment. Diagnoses may be missed most frequently because of a surgeon's inability to reliably assess patients who have traumatic brain injuries and painful distracting injuries. Cervical spine injuries are particularly difficult to identify in a child with polytrauma and may have devastating consequences. In children who have multiple injuries, the stabilization of long bone fractures with pediatric fixation techniques, such as elastic nails and other implants, allows for easier care and more rapid mobilization compared with cast treatments. Adolescent polytrauma patients who are approaching skeletal maturity, however, are ideally treated as adults to avoid complications, such as loss of fixation, and to speed rehabilitation.

  6. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for salivary calculi in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, F; Marchisio, P; Arisi, E; Capaccio, P

    2001-10-01

    Salivary gland lithiasis is uncommon in pediatric patients. Color Doppler ultrasonography (US) enables an accurate diagnosis of lithiasis to be made without exposure to the radiation of traditional imaging techniques. The development of minimally invasive techniques in the ENT field has made salivary lithotripsy a feasible alternative to traditional invasive surgery. The safety and efficacy of shock wave lithotripsy for salivary calculi were evaluated in pediatric patients. Seven children (5 males; age 4-15 years) with single calculi (mean diameter 4.4 mm) of the submandibular (n = 4) and parotid glands (n = 3) underwent extracorporeal electromagnetic shock wave lithotripsy (EESWL). In four cases the stone was intraductal (two submandibular and two parotideal) and in the remaining three cases it was intraparenchymal (two submandibular and one parotideal). In one case sedative anesthesia was performed. The mean number of therapeutic sessions was five. Patients were followed up clinically and with US for 6-72 months (mean 32 months). Complete disintegration of the calculi was achieved in five cases while in two cases a residual fragment < 2 mm in diameter was observed. None of the patients had recurrence of calculi in the treated gland. Mild self-limited adverse effects (pain, swelling of the gland, self-limiting bleeding from the duct, cutaneous petechiae) were observed in four cases. Our data suggest that EESWL is effective, safe and well tolerated; the minimal invasiveness of the technique suggests that EESWL should be used as the primary approach to salivary calculi in pediatric patients. The continuous US monitoring enables the efficacy of EESWL to be evaluated during both treatment and follow-up, with only slight discomfort for the pediatric patient.

  7. Alkaline Phosphatase: A Biomarker of Cardiac Function in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Makil, Elizabeth S; Tang, Xinyu; Frazier, Elizabeth A; Collins, R Thomas

    2017-02-09

    Myocardial dysfunction and heart failure are common in pediatric patients with congenital and acquired heart disease. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been suggested as a biomarker for myocardial dysfunction after Fontan operation. We hypothesized that pediatric patients with myocardial dysfunction requiring orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) have diminished AP compared to normal. A retrospective review was performed in all patients who underwent OHT at Arkansas Children's Hospital between January 2007 and October 2012. Anatomic diagnoses, therapeutic interventions, and ventricular ejection fraction (EF) were recorded. Z scores for AP levels in the study group were determined by comparing the observed AP levels to age- and gender-matched normative values. T tests were performed to compare the mean AP Z score prior to and after OHT. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. During the study period, 124 OHTs were performed. Complete study data were available and analyzed from 71/124 patients (mean age at OHT 3.9 years; 51% female). The mean AP Z score was significantly lower in the study group prior to OHT compared to normal (p < 0.0001). The initiation of ACE inhibitor therapy prior to OHT was associated with a significant increase in AP and the ventricular EF (p < 0.001 for both). Treatment with milrinone was associated with an increase in EF. AP is significantly lower in pediatric patients with myocardial dysfunction prior to OHT compared to normal. AP increases significantly after the initiation of therapies to improve myocardial function. Diminished AP is an indicator of myocardial dysfunction in pediatric patients.

  8. Malnutrition in pediatric hospital patients: current issues.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Koen F M; Hulst, Jessie M

    2011-02-01

    Malnutrition in hospitalized children is still very prevalent, especially in children with underlying disease and clinical conditions. The purpose of this review is to describe current issues that have to be taken into account when interpreting prevalence data. Weight-for-height and height-for-age standard deviation scores are used for classification for acute and chronic malnutrition, respectively. Body mass index for age can also be used for the definition of acute malnutrition but has a few advantages in the general pediatric population. The new World Health Organization child-growth charts can be used as reference but there is a risk of over- and underestimation of malnutrition rates compared with country-specific growth references. For children with specific medical conditions and syndromes, specific growth references should be used for appropriate interpretation of nutritional status. New screening tools are available to identify children at risk for developing malnutrition during admission. Because of the diversity of medical conditions and syndromes in hospitalized children, assessment of nutritional status and interpretation of anthropometric data need a tailored approach.

  9. Esophageal eosinophilia in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    de Nápolis, Ana Carolina Ramos; Alves, Flavia Araujo; Rezende, Erica Rodrigues Mariano de Almeida; Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues Silva

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the clinical picture, test results, and clinical evolution of patients with cerebral palsy associated with diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, monitored at tertiary centre. Methods: Cross-sectional, retrospective and descriptive study that evaluated the medical records data of pediatric patients with diagnosis of cerebral palsy and eosinophilic esophagitis in a tertiary center of pediatric gastroenterology between August 2005 and August 2013. Results: Seven out of 131 patients with cerebral palsy had the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis. The mean age at diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis was 52.3 months and the mean number of eosinophils in esophagus was 35 per high-power field. Symptoms more frequent were recurrent vomiting and disphagia. Endoscopic alterations found were mucosal thickening, vertical lines, mucosal opacificacion and white plaques. Conclusion: The frequency of eosinophilic esophagitis found was higher than in general pediatric population. The investigation of eosinophilic esophagitis should be done regularly in those patients, once this entity could overlap other gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:26154544

  10. Laparoscopic appendectomy in a pediatric patient with type 1 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Heller, Joshua A; Marn, Richard Y

    2015-12-01

    A pediatric patient with type 1 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-a disorder associated with a demyelinating polyneuropathy-presented for laparoscopic appendectomy in the setting of acute appendicitis. Induction and maintenance of anesthesia were successfully managed without the use of any depolarizing or nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents. The patient was successfully extubated at the completion of the procedure without any respiratory or neuromuscular sequelae, with excellent pain control and no postoperative nausea or vomiting.

  11. Ceftaroline Fosamil for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Pulmonary Exacerbation in a Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Ashley Hall; Srivastava, Ruma; Rybak, Michael J.; McGrath, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Ceftaroline, an advanced generation cephalosporin with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), may present a new therapeutic alternative for treating lung infections among patients with cystic fibrosis. We report a case of ceftaroline therapy in a pediatric patient with cystic fibrosis, whose dose was increased from 9.7 mg/kg/dose every 12 hours to 10.8 mg/kg/dose every 8 hours by using pharmacokinetic analyses. PMID:25024675

  12. Rapidly growing pigmented tumor on a scalp nevus sebaceous of a pediatric patient: Observation or excision.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Galvan-Linares, Aldo; Palafox-Vigil, Gloria; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2014-07-15

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a new, rapidly growing, pigmented tumor on a previously existing yellowish, verrucous plaque on the scalp. The patient received complete surgical excision. Routine histology ruled out basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and the histological diagnosis was pigmented trichoblastoma arising in nevus sebaceous (NS). It is important to define management for new lesions developing in pediatric patients with existing nevus sebaceus.

  13. Use of computed tomography (CT) for urolithiasis in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Angela; Castellan, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Numbers of annual CT examinations have been increasing incrementally each year during the last 10-20 years. Use of unenhanced CT has been increasingly used for evaluation of urolithiasis, and concerned had been raised about the risks of increased radiation exposure in pediatric patients. Sensitivities and specificity for ureteral stones on conventional CT have been reported up to 98-100%, respectively. Low dose protocols have been developed with the goal of reducing radiation dose with adequate image quality. Although the sensitivity and the specificity of CT is the highest, many can be diagnosed with combination of KUB and ultrasound. CT can be utilized in equivocal cases. Low-dose radiation CT protocols have been reported with high sensitivity and specificity and should be used in pediatric patients when a CT scan is needed.

  14. Use of computed tomography (CT) for urolithiasis in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Numbers of annual CT examinations have been increasing incrementally each year during the last 10-20 years. Use of unenhanced CT has been increasingly used for evaluation of urolithiasis, and concerned had been raised about the risks of increased radiation exposure in pediatric patients. Sensitivities and specificity for ureteral stones on conventional CT have been reported up to 98-100%, respectively. Low dose protocols have been developed with the goal of reducing radiation dose with adequate image quality. Although the sensitivity and the specificity of CT is the highest, many can be diagnosed with combination of KUB and ultrasound. CT can be utilized in equivocal cases. Low-dose radiation CT protocols have been reported with high sensitivity and specificity and should be used in pediatric patients when a CT scan is needed. PMID:26835357

  15. Practice guidelines for music interventions with hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Janice W; Shirk, Beverly J; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2007-12-01

    Music therapy is an effective complementary approach that can achieve specific therapeutic outcomes in the clinical management of pediatric patients. Growing research on music interventions has generated scientific knowledge about how this modality benefits patients and has formed the basis for effective protocols that can be used in practice. Although it can be challenging to translate research-based protocols into routine clinical care at the bedside, it is essential that music therapy interventions be aligned with evidence-based information and that accepted standards be established by the music therapy discipline to achieve the greatest benefit. The importance of partnerships between nurses and music therapists is emphasized to enhance the success of music-based treatments. This discussion synthesizes research findings that can be used to design pediatric practice guidelines in the application of music therapy.

  16. The Use of Home Spirometry in Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shakkottai, Aarti; Nasr, Samya Z.

    2017-01-01

    Medication adherence is poor among pediatric cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with adolescents having one of the lowest adherence rates. We wanted to identify an adherence intervention that would be acceptable to CF adolescents and assess its feasibility. We surveyed 40 adolescents with CF and asked about barriers to and motivators for their own adherence and to generate ideas for potential adherence interventions. Since most of the respondents chose frequent spirometry at home and medication reminders for interventions, we selected 5 subjects, 10 to 14 years of age, with CF to test the feasibility of home spirometry and medication reminders in pediatric CF patients. This article summarizes the results of both the survey and the feasibility pilot study. PMID:28229102

  17. Rapid Response Team Activations in Pediatric Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Acker, Shannon N; Wathen, Beth; Roosevelt, Genie E; Hill, Lauren R S; Schubert, Anna; Reese, Jenny; Bensard, Denis D; Kulungowski, Ann M

    2017-02-01

    Introduction The rapid response team (RRT) is a multidisciplinary team who evaluates hospitalized patients for concerns of nonemergent clinical deterioration. RRT evaluations are mandatory for children whose Pediatric Early Warning System (PEWS) score (assessment of child's behavior, cardiovascular and respiratory status) is ≥4. We aimed to determine if there were differences in characteristics of RRT calls between children who were admitted primarily to either medical or surgical services. We hypothesized that RRT activations would be called for less severely ill children with lower PEWS score on surgical services compared with children admitted to a medical service. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective review of all children with RRT activations between January 2008 and April 2015 at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. We evaluated the characteristics of RRT calls and made comparisons between RRT calls made for children admitted primarily to medical or surgical services. Results A total of 2,991 RRT activations were called, and 324 (11%) involved surgical patients. Surgical patients were older than medical patients (median: 7 vs. 4 years; p < 0.001). RRT evaluations were called for lower PEWS score in surgical patients compared with medical (median: 3 vs. 4, p < 0.001). Surgical patients were more likely to remain on the inpatient ward following the RRT (51 vs. 39%, p < 0.001) and were less likely to require an advanced airway than medical patients (0.9 vs. 2.1%; p = 0.412). RRT evaluations did not differ between day and night shifts (52% day vs. 48% night; p = 0.17). All surgical patients and all but one medical patient survived the event; surgical patients were more likely to survive to hospital discharge (97 vs. 91%, p < 0.001) Conclusions RRT activations are rare events among pediatric surgical patients. When compared with medical patients, RRT evaluation is requested for surgical patients with a lower PEWS

  18. Integrated care facilitation model reduces use of hospital resources by patients with pediatric asthma.

    PubMed

    Bird, Stephen R; Noronha, Michelle; Kurowski, William; Orkin, Carl; Sinnott, Helen

    2012-01-01

    This evaluation assessed a model of care for pediatric asthma patients that aimed to promote health and reduce their preventable and avoidable use of acute hospital services. Pediatric asthma patients (n=223) were allocated care facilitators who provided assistance in the promotion of carer/self-management, education and linkage to an integrated healthcare system, comprising of acute and community-based healthcare providers. Patients' use of acute hospital services (emergency department [ED] presentations, admissions, and bed-days) pre- and postrecruitment were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank tests. The pediatric asthma care givers quality of life questionnaire' was used to assess changes in health and quality of life. The patients displayed a 57% reduction in ED presentations, 74% in admissions, and a 71% reduction in bed-days. Whereas a comparator group displayed 27%, 32%, and 14% increases, respectively. Patients also reported significant improvements in quality of life domains of activity limitation (+5.6, p<.001) and emotional function (+9.1, p<.001). The reduction in the use of hospital services was attributed to the aversion of preventable presentations and admissions, via the enhancement of carer/self-management and access to community health services. These outcomes were supported by indicators of improved patient health and quality of life, and comments by the participant's carers.

  19. Current evidence of antifungal prophylaxis and therapy in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Giacchino, Mareva; Milano, Giuseppe Maria; Carraro, Francesca; Bezzio, Stefania; Pegoraro, Anna; Aversa, Franco; Cesaro, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFI) are an important complication in pediatric haematological and oncological patients who undergo intensive chemotherapy for leukemia, solid tumour at advanced stage or relapsed, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The incidence of IFI is lower than bacterial infection but mortality rate remains high. This review is designed to help paediatric oncologists in choosing the appropriate anti-fungal strategy and agents for prophylaxis, empirical, pre-emptive and specific therapy on the basis of published evidence. PMID:21647279

  20. Current evidence of antifungal prophylaxis and therapy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Giacchino, Mareva; Milano, Giuseppe Maria; Carraro, Francesca; Bezzio, Stefania; Pegoraro, Anna; Aversa, Franco; Cesaro, Simone

    2011-02-24

    Invasive fungal infections (IFI) are an important complication in pediatric haematological and oncological patients who undergo intensive chemotherapy for leukemia, solid tumour at advanced stage or relapsed, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The incidence of IFI is lower than bacterial infection but mortality rate remains high. This review is designed to help paediatric oncologists in choosing the appropriate anti-fungal strategy and agents for prophylaxis, empirical, pre-emptive and specific therapy on the basis of published evidence.

  1. Cluster Headache: Special Considerations for Treatment of Female Patients of Reproductive Age and Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    VanderPluym, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Cluster headache is a rare disorder that is more common in adult male patients. It has a unique phenotype of unilateral, severe, to very severe headaches lasting 15 to 180 min with ipsilateral autonomic symptoms. Time to correct diagnosis can be protracted. A number of treatment options exist for the standard cluster headache patient, but special considerations must be made for female patients of reproductive age and pediatric patients. The objective of this article is to explore the current literature pertaining to special considerations in cluster headache management, including treatment of pregnant or breastfeeding patients and pediatric patients.

  2. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  3. UTI: diagnosis and evaluation in symptomatic pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Heldrich, F J; Barone, M A; Spiegler, E

    2000-08-01

    We retrospectively reviewed data on 260 hospitalized pediatric patients with symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI). To ascertain the colony-forming units (CFU)/mL compatible with the diagnosis of UTI, a culture from a catheterized urine specimen containing >1,000 CFU/mL was considered diagnostic of UTI and resulted in imaging by renal ultrasound, voiding cystourethrography, and renal nuclear scan with Tc99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). A positive DMSA renal scan is indicative of pyelonephritis. We used logistic regression analysis to determine which patient characteristics were predictive of pyelonephritis. We determined that, in hospitalized pediatric patients, the colony count of the positive urine culture, the type of organism grown in culture, and the voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) result (positive or negative for vesicoureteral reflux) did not predict which patients had pyelonephritis. In females, advancing age of the patient and positive renal ultrasound results were predictive of which patients had pyelonephritis when we controlled for other factors. We feel this emphasizes the importance of a thorough evaluation of hospitalized symptomatic patients, including patients with colony counts of 1,000 to 50,000 CFU/mL, to locate the level of infection and plan appropriate therapy.

  4. Reanimation of facial palsy following tumor extirpation in pediatric patients: our experience with 16 patients.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Julia K; Konofaos, Petros

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to present our experience with reanimation of facial palsy (FP) following tumor extirpation in pediatric patients and to analyze the functional outcomes based on different types of procedures performed considering demographic and electrophysiological data of the patients. Sixteen patients with FP post-tumor extirpation who underwent facial reanimation were reviewed. Three independent assessors evaluated the preoperative and postoperative videos using the Terzis' grading scale for eye closure, smile, depressor and overall esthetic and functional outcomes. Preoperative and postoperative electromyographic interpretations and the effect of demographic variables were also evaluated. There was significant improvement in all the patients regarding overall esthetic and functional outcomes (p < 0.0001). Good and excellent overall esthetic and functional outcomes were observed in 62.50% of the patients (n = 10). The difference between preoperative and postoperative EMG results was of statistical significance (p < 0.0001 for each target re-innervated). Better results were observed in younger patients (≤10 years) (p = 0.014) and in early cases (denervation time ≤2 years) (p = 0.033). Functional results were significantly better if surgery was performed within 2 years and the patient was younger than 10 years. Augmentation of the paretic facial musculature in pediatric patients with post-tumor FP was feasible with the use of dynamic and/or static procedures. Advanced microsurgical techniques, such as the use of free muscle transfers, should be kept in mind in late cases (denervation time over 2 years).

  5. Caulobacter species as a cause of postneurosurgical bacterial meningitis in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    Bridger, Natalie; Walkty, Andrew; Crockett, Maryanne; Fanella, Sergio; Nichol, Kim; Karlowsky, James A

    2012-01-01

    Caulobacter species have been rarely found to be a cause of human infection. A case of probable Caulobacter species meningitis occurring postneurosurgery in a pediatric patient is reported in the present article. Gram stain and colony morphology of the isolate were not consistent with the identification provided by commercial phenotypic identification systems. The present case illustrates the need to reconcile conflicting phenotypic test results using 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing. PMID:23449318

  6. Retinal Injury Secondary to Laser Pointers in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kunyong; Chin, Eric K; Quiram, Polly A; Davies, John B; Parke, D Wilkin; Almeida, David R P

    2016-10-01

    This case report describes 4 male children (age, 9-16) who had laser-related retinal injury to the macula of 1 eye or both eyes due to the mishandling of the laser pointer devices at a single vitreoretinal clinical practice. The presenting symptoms associated with laser pointer injury include central vision loss, central scotoma, and metamorphopsia. Clinical findings of laser-related retinal injury include reduced visual acuity, disruption of the photoreceptor ellipsoid zone, retinal pigment epithelium atrophy, and choroidal neovascular membrane formation. Disruption of the foveal ellipsoid zone (photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment layer) is the most common finding on optical coherence tomography imaging. Three patients had potential irreversible vision loss. Laser pointers are readily available and appropriate use of laser pointers in the pediatric population must be emphasized due to the potential irreversible retinal injury. Health professionals, school teachers, and parents should raise public awareness of this emerging public health issue by educating children about the dangers of laser pointers. Laser pointer devices among children should be discouraged and limited due to the possibility of permanent harm to themselves and others. Legislation and laws may be required to better control the sale and use of these devices.

  7. Optimal study design for pioglitazone in septic pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, Catherine M T; Ding, Lili; Kaplan, Jennifer; Spigarelli, Michael G; Vinks, Alexander A

    2011-08-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the methodology and process of optimal sparse sampling pharmacokinetics (PK). This utilized a single daily dose of pioglitazone for pediatric patients with severe sepsis and septic shock based upon adult and minimal adolescent data. Pioglitazone pharmacokinetics were modeled using non-compartment analysis WinNonlin Pro (version 5.1) and population kinetics using NONMEM (version 7.1) with first order conditional estimation method (FOCE) with interaction. The initial model was generated from single- and multiple-dose pioglitazone PK data (15 mg, 30 mg, and 45 mg) in 36 adolescents with diabetes. PK models were simulated and overlaid upon original data to provide a comparison best described by a single compartment, first order model. The optimal design was based on the simulated oral administration of pioglitazone to three groups of pediatric patients, age 3.8 (2-6 years), weight 14.4 (7-28 kg); age 9.6 (6.1-11.9 years), weight 36.5 (28.1-48 kg) and age 15.5 (12-17 years,) weight 61.6 (48.1-80 kg). PFIM (version 3.2) was used to evaluate sample study size. Datasets were compiled using simulation for each dose (15, 30 and 45 mg) for the potential age/weight groups. A target dose of 15 mg daily in the youngest and middle groups was considered appropriate with area under the curve exposure levels (AUC) comparable to studies in adolescents. The final optimal design suggested time points of 0.5, 2, 6 and 21 h for 24 h dosing. This methodology provides a robust method of utilizing adult and limited adolescent data to simulate allometrically scaled, pediatric data sets that allow the optimal design of a pediatric trial. The pharmacokinetics of pioglitazone were described adequately and simulated data estimates were comparable to literature values. The optimal design provided clinically attainable sample times and windows.

  8. Active rehabilitation in a pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patient.

    PubMed

    Zebuhr, Carleen; Sinha, Amit; Skillman, Heather; Buckvold, Shannon

    2014-05-01

    Decreased intensive care unit (ICU) mortality has led to an increase in ICU morbidity. ICU-induced immobilization plays a major role in this morbidity. Recently, ICU mobility has been shown to be safe and effective in adolescent and adult patients. We report the successful rehabilitation of an 8-year-old boy with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A child who is critically ill may safely perform active rehabilitation while on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The gains achieved through active rehabilitation and optimal nutrition can facilitate recovery from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in select pediatric patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

  9. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2008-12-15

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ dose for

  10. Validation and Clinical Application of a Biopsychosocial Model of Pain Intensity and Functional Disability in Patients with a Pediatric Chronic Pain Condition Referred to a Subspecialty Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Thomas R.; McGwin, Gerald; Bridgewater, Cynthia L.; Madan-Swain, Avi; Ascherman, Lee I.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pediatric chronic pain is considered to be a multidimensional construct that includes biological, psychological, and social components. Methods. The 99 enrolled study patients (mean age 13.2 years, 71% female, 81% Caucasian) and an accompanying parent completed a series of health-related questionnaires at the time of their initial appointment in a pediatric chronic pain medicine clinic. Results. Significant correlations (r ≥ 0.30, P < 0.05) were observed between pediatric chronic pain intensity and patient anxiety, patient depression, patient pain coping, parent chronic pain intensity, and parent functional disability. Pediatric chronic pain intensity was significantly associated with patient anxiety (P = 0.002). Significant correlations (r ≥ 0.30, P < 0.05) were observed between pediatric functional disability and patient chronic pain intensity, patient anxiety, patient depression, patient pain coping, parent chronic pain intensity, parent functional disability, parent anxiety, parent depression, and parent stress. Pediatric functional disability was significantly associated with patient chronic pain intensity (P = 0.025), patient anxiety (P = 0.021), patient pain coping (P = 0.009), and parent functional disability (P = 0.027). Conclusions. These findings provide empirical support of a multidimensional Biobehavioral Model of Pediatric Pain. However, the practical clinical application of the present findings and much of the similar previously published data may be tenuous. PMID:24251035

  11. Psychosocial support for patients in pediatric oncology: the influences of parents, schools, peers, and technology.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Lalita K; Kato, Pamela M

    2003-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of pediatric cancer can be associated with profound psychosocial changes in the life of young patients. Although nurses, physicians, and other health care professionals are important sources of support, psychosocial support is also available through parents, schools, and peers. This article presents a review of the literature on how parents, schools, and peers affect the coping and adjustment of young patients with cancer and critically reviews interventions directed at improving functioning in these areas. Special attention is paid to recent interventions that exploit technology such as video games, CD-ROMs, and the Internet to provide creative new forms of support for patients in pediatric oncology. Existing research on both technological and interpersonal forms of intervention and support shows promising results, and suggestions for further study are provided.

  12. Management of pigmented gingiva in child patient: a new era to the pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Namdeoraoji Bahadure, Rakesh; Singh, Parul; Jain, Eesha; Khurana, Heena; Badole, Gautam

    2013-09-01

    Gingival health in the form of size, shape, consistency and appearance are essential components responsible for an attractive smile as well as may cause unpleasant appearance. Melanin pigmentation often occurs in the gingiva as a result of an abnormal deposition of melanin which can compromise the confidence level from the age of childhood. The present article describes and discusses the two cases of gingival melanin pigmentation in 12 and 13 years of female patient and their early surgical intervention with successful follow-up of 9 and 6 months. Patients were instructed to prevent sun exposure, intake of hot foods or beverages like cold drinks, tea, coffee and brushing immediately after surgery. How to cite this article: Bahadure RN, Singh P, Jain E, Khurana H, Badole G. Management of Pigmented Gingiva in Child Patient: A New Era to the Pediatric Dentistry. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):197-200.

  13. Management of Pigmented Gingiva in Child Patient: A New Era to the Pediatric Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Parul; Jain, Eesha; Khurana, Heena; Badole, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gingival health in the form of size, shape, consistency and appearance are essential components responsible for an attractive smile as well as may cause unpleasant appearance. Melanin pigmentation often occurs in the gingiva as a result of an abnormal deposition of melanin which can compromise the confidence level from the age of childhood. The present article describes and discusses the two cases of gingival melanin pigmentation in 12 and 13 years of female patient and their early surgical intervention with successful follow-up of 9 and 6 months. Patients were instructed to prevent sun exposure, intake of hot foods or beverages like cold drinks, tea, coffee and brushing immediately after surgery. How to cite this article: Bahadure RN, Singh P, Jain E, Khurana H, Badole G. Management of Pigmented Gingiva in Child Patient: A New Era to the Pediatric Dentistry. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):197-200. PMID:25206222

  14. Rapid ventricular pacing for a basilar artery pseudoaneurysm in a pediatric patient: case report.

    PubMed

    Nimjee, Shahid M; Smith, Tony P; Kanter, Ronald J; Ames, Warwick; Machovec, Kelly A; Grant, Gerald A; Zomorodi, Ali R

    2015-06-01

    Large cerebral aneurysms of the basilar apex are difficult to treat. Recently, endovascular treatment has mitigated much of the morbidity associated with treating these lesions. However, the morphology of aneurysms of the vertebrobasilar system can preclude endovascular treatment. Rapid ventricular pacing (RVP) facilitates open surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms. It can assist in reducing the pressure of the neck of the aneurysm, allowing safe application of a clip. The authors present a case of a pediatric patient who developed a basilar artery pseudoaneurysm that required surgery. Given the large size of the aneurysm, RVP was performed, allowing the surgeons to dissect the dome of the aneurysm from the surrounding tissue and pontine perforating branches away from the lesion to safely clip the lesion. The patient had an uneventful recovery. To the authors' knowledge, this represents the first known case of RVP to aid in basilar artery clip occlusion in a pediatric patient.

  15. Rejection criteria for endotracheal aspirates from pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, A K; Reller, L B

    1996-02-01

    Endotracheal aspirates (ETAs) from mechanically ventilated pediatric patients frequently are cultured as part of an evaluation for suspected sepsis. There are now well-defined criteria for rejecting low-yield ETAs from adults, but it is uncertain whether the same criteria can be applied to ETAs from children. Therefore, we compared the Gram stain and culture results for 361 consecutive ETA specimens collected from pediatric patients over a 1-year period. Results for patients for whom a blood culture was performed within 48 h of the time that a culture of ETA was performed were also reviewed. Gram stains were examined under x100 magnification to quantitate the number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and squamous epithelial cells (SECs) per low-power field and under x1,000 magnification for the presence of organisms. No organisms were seen by Gram staining in 225 (62%) of the ETAs. Culture of these specimens rarely yielded useful information: 52% were sterile, 32% grew rare to 1+ quantities of expected respiratory flora only, 12% grew rare to 1+ quantities of gram-negative rods mixed with expected respiratory flora, and only 10 (4%) yielded a pure or predominant growth of a potential respiratory pathogen. Unlike adult patients, we did not find the number of SECs to be a useful screening criterion. Only 17 (5%) of the ETAs had greater than 10 SECs per low-power field, and 5 (29%) of these yielded pure growth of a gram-negative rod. When blood culture results were positive, they correlated with ETA culture results in only 6 of 10 cases. On the basis of our findings, the absence of organisms on Gram staining is a useful criterion for rejecting ETAs from pediatric patients for culture and would have excluded 62% of the specimens from further processing.

  16. Vaginal and uterine anomalies in the pediatric and adolescent patient.

    PubMed

    Spence, J E

    1998-02-01

    Congenital malformations of the vagina, cervix, and uterus, although rare, may have profound implications for the young gynecological patient. These anomalies are often detected in the adolescent period. For proper management, the physician requires a thorough understanding of normal embryology and sexual differentiation. Although clinical experience helps the gynecologist appreciate the disturbed anatomic configurations, each and every individual who presents with a defect must be thoroughly evaluated because genital tract aberrations do not necessarily follow any defined and consistent pattern. Other anomalies often coexist, particularly related to the renal tract, so a thorough assessment is warranted. Genital malformations can be particularly disturbing to the patient and her family because they not only have reproductive implications but also significant psychological and sexual overtones that need to be addressed and dealt with in a sensitive and reassuring manner. This report is meant to provide an overview of the various abnormalities encountered and guide the clinician by providing an approach to management. A more indepth discussion is best found in the classic textbooks (Rock JA: Surgery for anomalies of the müllerian ducts. In: Te Linde's Operative Gynecology (8th ed). Edited by J Rock, J. Thompson. Philadelphia, Lippincott-Raven, 1997; Edmonds DK: Sexual development anomalies and their reconstruction: upper and lower tracts. In: Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Edited by J Sanfilippo, D Muram, P Lee, J Dewhurst. Philadelphia, W.B. Saunders, 1994; Jones HW Jr: Reconstruction of congenital uterovaginal anomalies. In: Female Reproductive Surgery. Edited by J Rock, A Murphy, HW Jones Jr. Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, 1992).

  17. [Desensitization to darunavir in a pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    Cambray-Gutiérrez, Julio César; López-Pérez, Patricia; Chávez-García, Aurora Alejandra; Del Rivero-Hernández, Leonel Gerardo; Segura-Méndez, Nora Hilda

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of HIV infection requires the combination of multiple antiretroviral drugs, known as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART); however, up to 84% of patients experience adverse drug effects that lead to discontinuation within first months of treatment. Skin manifestations are reported to 22% of patients. The severity of these is variable, such as erythema multiforme, rash, hives and severe skin reactions at less than 2%. Mild rashes, usually transient and self-limiting, while severe reactions require immediately remove the drug involved to prevent progression of the reaction. Only in those cases where the offending drug does not have another alternative and documented the reaction is mediated type I hypersensitivity mechanisms, can be performed desensitization protocol.

  18. Taurolidine in Pediatric Home Parenteral Nutrition Patients.

    PubMed

    Hulshof, Emma Claire; Hanff, Lidwien Marieke; Olieman, Joanne; de Vette, Susanna; Driessen, Gert-Jan; Meeussen, Conny; Escher, Johanna Caroline

    2017-02-01

    To reduce the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in home parenteral nutrition patients, the use of taurolidine was introduced in the Sophia Children's Hospital in 2011. This introduction led to a reduction in catheter-related bloodstream infections: 12.7/1000 catheter days before the use of taurolidine, compared with 4.3/1000 catheter days afterwards (n = 7) [relative risk = 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.20-0.65 (P = 0.018)].

  19. Neuroendocrine Disorders in Pediatric Craniopharyngioma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Daubenbüchel, Anna M. M.; Müller, Hermann L.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood-onset craniopharyngiomas are partly cystic embryonic malformations of the sellar/parasellar region. The therapy of choice in patients with favorable tumor localization is complete resection with a specific focus on maintaining optical and hypothalamic neuroendocrine functions. In patients with unfavorable tumor localization (i.e., hypothalamic involvement), a limited hypothalamus-sparing surgical strategy followed by local irradiation is recommended. Involvement and/or surgical lesions of posterior hypothalamic areas cause major neuroendocrine sequelae. The overall survival rates are high (92%) but neuroendocrine disorders such as obesity and metabolic syndrome due to involvement and/or treatment-related hypothalamic lesions have major negative impact on survival and quality of life. Recurrences and progressions are frequent post-surgical events. Because irradiation is efficient in preventing tumor progression, appropriate timing of post-surgical irradiation is currently under investigation in a randomized multinational trial (KRANIOPHARYNGEOM 2007). Childhood-onset craniopharyngioma should be recognized as a chronic disease requiring treatment and constant monitoring of the clinical and quality of life consequences, frequently impaired due to neuroendocrine disorders, by experienced multidisciplinary teams in order to provide optimal care of surviving patients. PMID:26239246

  20. Growth rates in pediatric dialysis patients and renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Turenne, M N; Port, F K; Strawderman, R L; Ettenger, R B; Alexander, S R; Lewy, J E; Jones, C A; Agodoa, L Y; Held, P J

    1997-08-01

    We compared growth rates by modality over a 6- to 14-month period in 1,302 US pediatric end-stage renal disese (ESRD) patients treated during 1990. Modality comparisons were adjusted for age, sex, race, ethnicity, and ESRD duration using linear regression models by age group (0.5 to 4 years, 5 to 9 years, 10 to 14 years, and 15 to 18 years). Growth rates were higher in young children receiving a transplant compared with those receiving dialysis (ages 0.5 to 4 years, delta = 3.1 cm/yr v continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis [CCPD], P < 0.01; ages 5 to 9 years, delta = 2.0 to 2.6 cm/yr v CCPD, chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), and hemodialysis, P < 0.01). In contrast, growth rates in older children were not statistically different when comparing transplantation with each dialysis modality. For most age groups of transplant recipients, we observed faster growth with alternate-day versus daily steroids that was not fully explained by differences in allograft function. Younger patients (<15 years) grew at comparable rates with each dialysis modality, while older CAPD patients grew faster compared with hemodialysis or CCPD patients (P < 0.02). There was no substantial pubertal growth spurt in transplant or dialysis patients. This national US study of pediatric growth rates with dialysis and transplantation shows differences in growth by modality that vary by age group.

  1. Hiatal hernia in pediatric patients: laparoscopic versus open approaches

    PubMed Central

    Namgoong, Jung-Man; Kim, Seong-Chul; Hwang, Ji-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of laparoscopic approach for hiatal hernia (HH) in pediatric patients. Methods This was a retrospective study of 33 patients younger than 18 years who underwent an operation for HH between January 1999 and December 2012. Results The HH symptoms were various and included regurgitation, vomiting, weight loss, cough, hoarseness, and cyanosis. Among the 33 patients, there were 25 sliding types, 1 paraesophageal type, and 7 mixed types. Open surgery (OS) and laparoscopic surgery (LS) were used in 16 and 17 patients, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in sex, age, or body weight between the groups. The median operating time was longer in the LS group (150 minutes; range, 90-250 minutes vs. 125 minutes; range, 66-194 minutes; P = 0.028). Time to oral intake was shorter in the LS group than in the OS group (1 day; range, 1-3 days vs. 2 days; range, 1-7 days; P = 0.001) and time to full feeding was shorter in the LS group than in the OS group (6 days; range, 3-16 days vs. 10 days; range, 3-33 days; P = 0.048). There were no differences in length of hospital stay and complications between the two groups. There was no perioperative mortality or recurrence of HH. Conclusion A good surgical outcome for laparoscopic correction of HH was seen in pediatric patients. PMID:24851228

  2. Present state and future challenges in pediatric abdominal pain therapeutics research: Looking beyond the forest

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Craig A; Schurman, Jennifer V; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    At the present time, it is nearly impossible to treat pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with pain in an evidence based fashion. This is due to the overall lack of controlled studies and, even more importantly, the complexity of the contributors to disease phenotype which are not controlled or accounted for in most therapeutic trials. In this manuscript, we review the challenges of defining entry criteria, controlling for the large number of biopsychosocial factors which may effect outcomes, and understanding pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors when designing therapeutic trials for abdominal pain in children. We also review the current state of pediatric abdominal pain therapeutics and discuss trial design considerations as we move forward. PMID:26558142

  3. The Role and Impact of Animals with Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Anna Tielsch; Gilmer, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    Animal-facilitated therapy (AFT), more specifically known as animal-assisted therapy (AAT) or "pet therapy," has had an increased presence in the literature with a surge of recent research methodologies exploring this complementary alternative medicine (CAM) intervention. However, limited studies have been conducted in the pediatric population, with many articles anecdotal in nature. A literature review included primary data sources PubMed, PsychINFO, Medline, and CINAHL, and yielded positive and beneficial outcomes to be gained through AAT in the pediatric population. Primary outcome variables of decreased anxiety and pain are the most commonly reported results. Further research studies are indicated to include the effects of AFT with children with different diseases and diagnoses. Exploration of other psychosocial and physical variables, such as self-esteem, would be useful. Interdisciplinary strategies are needed to develop interventions to help reduce patient symptoms and treatment-associated stress, as well as to facilitate healing and wellness beyond traditional medical treatment plans. Complementary therapies are of continued interest to the health care community, especially for pediatric nurses. Effective use of animals to facilitate conversation, lead discussion, or break communication barriers has been demonstrated through both research and anecdotal reports.

  4. Anthropometric and Biochemical Assessment of Nutritional Status in Pediatric Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    İlhan, İnci Ergürhan; Sarı, Neriman; Yeşil, Şule; Eren, Tuba; Taçyıldız, Nurdan

    2015-01-01

    Children are at greater risk for malnutrition due to increased needs of nutrients to obtain appropriate growth, and they exhibit elevated substrate needs due to cancer and its treatment. This study aimed to report anthropometric and biochemical evaluation of nutritional status in children with cancer at initial presentation and during treatment. A prospective, controlled study was performed in the pediatric oncology department of a tertiary care center. Control group consisted of the siblings of patients. Weight, height, body mass index, triceps skinfold thickness, and serum levels of total protein, albumin, prealbumin, serum lipids, trace minerals, C-reactive protein (CRP), and vitamins were compared in patients and controls at initial presentation and at 6th month after the onset of treatment. According to weight for height, the frequency of malnutrition was 16% at initial presentation and 22% at 6th month. Triceps skinfold thickness was significantly thinner in patients than controls at both measurements. Patients had lower levels of prealbumin, albumin, iron, folate, zinc, and vitamin C and higher levels of ferritin, vitamin B12, and copper. Serum CRP levels were significantly higher in cancer patients at initial presentation and seemed to be correlated with copper levels. Compared with other patients, malnourished patients had significantly higher levels of vitamin B12 at 6th month. Results of the current study demonstrate that trace minerals, vitamins, and anthropometric measures may yield important clues for nutritional status and disease activity in pediatric oncology patients. However, validation and updating these potential markers warrant further trials on larger series.

  5. A Review on Vitamin D Deficiency Treatment in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yeon; So, Tsz-Yin; Thackray, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and for maintaining bone health in the pediatric population. Vitamin D deficiency may develop from nutritional deficiencies, malabsorption, enzyme-inducing medications, and many other etiologies. It may present as hypocalcemia before bone demineralization at periods of increased growth velocity (infancy and adolescence) because the increased calcium demand of the body cannot be met. In children, inadequate concentrations of vitamin D may cause rickets and/or symptomatic hypocalcemia, such as seizures or tetany. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacology behind vitamin D supplementation, laboratory assessments of vitamin D status, current literature concerning vitamin D supplementation, and various supplementation options for the treatment of vitamin D deficiency in the pediatric population. PMID:24719588

  6. A review on vitamin d deficiency treatment in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; So, Tsz-Yin; Thackray, Jennifer

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption and for maintaining bone health in the pediatric population. Vitamin D deficiency may develop from nutritional deficiencies, malabsorption, enzyme-inducing medications, and many other etiologies. It may present as hypocalcemia before bone demineralization at periods of increased growth velocity (infancy and adolescence) because the increased calcium demand of the body cannot be met. In children, inadequate concentrations of vitamin D may cause rickets and/or symptomatic hypocalcemia, such as seizures or tetany. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacology behind vitamin D supplementation, laboratory assessments of vitamin D status, current literature concerning vitamin D supplementation, and various supplementation options for the treatment of vitamin D deficiency in the pediatric population.

  7. A case of pediatric multiple sclerosis presenting with a tumefactive demyelinating lesion.

    PubMed

    Majima, Hisakazu; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Koyama, Norihisa

    2017-02-25

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis accompanied by a tumefactive demyelinating lesion (TDL) is extremely rare. Because it is very difficult to distinguish TDLs from neoplasms, invasive brain biopsies are required for a definitive diagnosis. MR spectroscopy (MRS) without brain biopsy was recently shown diagnostic in some patients with TDLs, based on the elevation of glutamate/glutamine peaks. This report describes the clinical course of a 9-year-old girl with multiple sclerosis following a TDL and discusses the usefulness of MRS and brain biopsies to diagnose TDLs.

  8. Scrub typhus associated with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: A report of six pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yingkang; Huang, Li; Fan, Huifeng; Lu, Gen; Xu, Yi; Wu, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening immune disorder that may be inherited or secondary to infection, malignancy or rheumatological disease. The aim of the present study was to highlight the clinical features of scrub typhus-associated HLH in children. A retrospective study was performed on 6 pediatric patients with scrub typhus-associated HLH. For each patient, medical records were reviewed and analyzed, and demographic, clinical and laboratory data and outcomes were collected. The duration of fever prior to admission ranged between 4 and 12 days. All patients exhibited persistent or intermittent fever, eschar, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy at the time of diagnosis. Five patients experienced acute respiratory distress syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) during hospitalization. Thrombocytopenia was detected in all patients with cytopenia involving two or three cell types, simultaneously. Coagulopathy with prolonged prothrombin time and/or activated partial thromboplastin time were noted in all patients. Markedly elevated serum ferritin levels (>1,500 µg/ml) were identified in all patients. Elevated lactate dehydrogenase (>1,000 U/l) was detected in 4 (66.7%) patients and elevated alanine aminotransferase was exhibited by 5 (83/3%) patients. Lung infiltrates and consolidation were the most common imaging findings. Only 1 patient succumbed, with DIC and multi-organ failure. Of the survivors, 1 patient was lost to follow-up, and the remaining patients are in remission with excellent general health, to date. In conclusion, HLH should be considered in severe pediatric cases of scrub typhus. Upon the early recognition of this syndrome, prompt and supportive treatment in the pediatric intensive care unit are vital. PMID:27698778

  9. Evaluating the Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) System for Admitted Patients in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Delia L.; Mihalov, Leslie K.; Cohen, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) systems were developed to provide a reproducible assessment of a child’s clinical status while hospitalized. Most studies investigating the PEWS evaluate its usefulness in the inpatient setting. Limited studies evaluate the effectiveness and integration of PEWS in the pediatric emergency department (ED). The goal of this study was to explore the test characteristics of an ED-assigned PEWS score for intensive care unit (ICU) admission or clinical deterioration in admitted patients. Methods This was a prospective 12-month observational study of patients, aged 0 to 21 years, admitted from the ED of an urban, tertiary care children’s hospital. ED nurses were instructed in PEWS assignment and electronic medical record (EMR) documentation. Interrater reliability between nurses was evaluated. PEWS scores were measured at initial assessment (P0) and time of admission (P1). Patients were stratified into outcome groups: those admitted to the ICU either from the ED or as transfers from the floor and those admitted to the floor only. Clinical deterioration was defined as transfer to the ICU within 6 hours or within 6 to 24 hours of admission. PEWS scores and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were compared for patients admitted to the floor, ICU, and with clinical deterioration. Results The authors evaluated 12,306 consecutively admitted patients, with 99% having a PEWS documented in the EMR. Interrater reliability was excellent (intraclass coefficient 0.91). A total of 1,300 (10.6%) patients were admitted to the ICU and 11,066 (89.4%) were admitted to the floor. PEWS scores were higher for patients in the ICU group (P0 = 2.8, SD ± 2.4; P1 = 3.2, SD ± 2.4; p < 0.0001) versus floor patients (P0 = 0.7, SD ± 1.2; P1 = 0.5, SD ± 0.9; p < 0.0001). To predict the need for ICU admission, the optimal cutoff points on the ROC are P0 = 1 and P1 = 2, with areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of 0.79 and 0

  10. Utilization of pressure-volume curves in the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Bone, R C; Jantzen, D; Heithold, R

    1978-04-01

    Seven patients treated with continuous mechanical ventialtion were monitored with static and dynamic pressure-volume curves. Three patients developed no pulmonary complications, and mechanical ventilation was discontinued within 96 hr. In four patients, pressure-volume curves were used as a diagnostic aid in the detection of the physiologic defect resulting from bronchoconstriction, atelectasis, loculated pleural fluid, pulmonary edema, and mucous plugging. These measurements were also utilized to evaluate the effectivess of therapeutic modalities such as treatment of bronchoconstriction with bronchodilators, mucous plugging with adequate suctioning, and drainage of loculated pleural effusion. Pressure-v-lume measurements are simple, noninvasive, and require the smae equipment used in continuous mechanical ventilation. Pressure-volume monitoring of pediatric patients with curves warrants further investigation to evaluate its value.

  11. Transoral robotic-assisted tongue base resection in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: case presentation, clinical and technical consideration.

    PubMed

    Montevecchi, Filippo; Bellini, Chiara; Meccariello, Giuseppe; Hoff, Paul T; Dinelli, Elisa; Dallan, Iacopo; Corso, Ruggero M; Vicini, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is primarily caused by adenotonsillar hypertrophy. However, tongue base hypertrophy is increasingly being recognized as a cause, even after adenotonsillectomy. We report three cases of pediatric OSAS successfully treated by transoral robotic reduction of the tongue base. In all children, we were able to achieve improved retrolingual patency while avoiding significant procedure-related morbidity. In conclusion, tongue base reduction by transoral robotic surgery appears to be a feasible solution for the base of tongue obstruction due to lingual tonsil hypertrophy in pediatric patients.

  12. Rare variant mutations identified in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rampersaud, Evadnie; Siegfried, Jill D; Norton, Nadine; Li, Duanxiang; Martin, Eden; Hershberger, Ray E

    2010-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in infants and children can be partially explained by genetic cause but the catalogue of known genes is limited. We reviewed our database of 41 cases diagnosed with DCM before 18 years of age who underwent detailed clinical and genetic evaluation, and summarize here the evidence for mutations causing DCM in these cases from 15 genes (PSEN1, PSEN2, CSRP3, LBD3, MYH7, SCN5A, TCAP, TNNT2, LMNA, MYBPC3, MYH6, TNNC1, TNNI3, TPM1, and RBM20). Thirty-five of the 41 pediatric cases had relatives with adult-onset DCM. More males (66%) were found among children diagnosed after 1 year of age with DCM. Nineteen mutations in 9 genes were identified among 15 out of 41 patients; 3 patients (diagnosed at ages 2 weeks, 9 and 13 years) had multiple mutations. Of the 19 mutations identified in 12 families, mutations in TPM1 (32%) and TNNT2 (21%) were the most commonly found. Of the 6 patients diagnosed before 1 year of age, 3 had mutations in TPM1 (including a set of identical twins), 1 in TNNT2, 1 in MYH7, and 1 with multiple mutations (MYH7 and TNNC1). Most DCM was accompanied by advanced heart failure and need for cardiac transplantation. We conclude that in some cases pediatric DCM has a genetic basis, which is complicated by allelic and locus heterogeneity as seen in adult-onset DCM. We suggest that future prospective comprehensive family-based genetic studies of pediatric DCM are indicated to further define mutation frequencies in known genes and to discover novel genetic cause. PMID:21483645

  13. Pediatric Glioblastoma Therapies Based on Patient-Derived Stem Cell Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0756 TITLE: Pediatric Glioblastoma Therapies Based on Patient-Derived Stem Cell Resources PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pediatric Glioblastoma Therapies Based on Patient-Derived Stem Cell Resources 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11...TERMS Glioblastoma multiforme , glioma stem cell, brain tumor-initiating cell, pediatric brain tumor, RNAi, functional genetics 16. SECURITY

  14. Daily Bathing with Chlorhexidine and Its Effects on Nosocomial Infection Rates in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Raulji, Chittalsinh M; Clay, Kristin; Velasco, Cruz; Yu, Lolie C

    2015-01-01

    Infections remain a serious complication in pediatric oncology patients. To determine if daily bathing with Chlorhexidine gluconate can decrease the rate of nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients, we reviewed rates of infections in pediatric oncology patients over a 14-month span. Intervention group received daily bath with Chlorhexidine, while the control group did not receive daily bath. The results showed that daily bath with antiseptic chlorhexidine as daily prophylactic antiseptic topical wash leads to decreased infection density amongst the pediatric oncology patients, especially in patients older than 12 years of age. Furthermore, daily chlorhexidine bathing significantly reduced the rate of hospital acquired infection in patients older than 12 years of age. The findings of this study suggest that daily bathing with chlorhexidine may be an effective measure of reducing nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients.

  15. Clinically Profiling Pediatric Patients with Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Pothapregada, Sriram; Kamalakannan, Banupriya; Thulasingham, Mahalaskhmy; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical profile and outcome of dengue fever in children at a tertiary care hospital in Puducherry. Materials and Methods: All children (0-12 years of age) diagnosed and confirmed as dengue fever from August 2012 to January 2015 were reviewed retrospectively from hospital case records as per the revised World Health Organization guidelines for dengue fever. The diagnosis was confirmed by NS1 antigen-based ELISA test or dengue serology for IgM and IgG antibodies, and the data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software. After collecting the data, all the variables were summarized by descriptive statistics. Results: Among the 261 confirmed cases of dengue fever non-severe and severe dengue infection was seen in 60.9% and 39.1%, respectively. The mean age (standard deviation) of the presentation was 6.9 + 3.3 years and male: female ratio was 1.2:1. The most common clinical manifestations were fever (94.6%), conjunctival congestion (89.6%), myalgia (81.9%), coryza (79.7%), headache (75.1%), palmar erythema (62.8%), and retro-orbital pain (51.3%). The common early warning signs at the time of admission were persistent vomiting (75.1%), liver enlargement (59.8%), cold and clammy extremities (45.2%), pain abdomen (31.0%), hypotension (29.5%), restlessness (26.4%), giddiness (23.0%), bleeding (19.9%), and oliguria (18.4%). The common manifestation of severe dengue infection was shock (39.1%), bleeding (19.9%), and multi-organ dysfunction (2.3%). The most common complications were liver dysfunction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, encephalopathy, pleural effusion, ascites, myocarditis, myositis, acute kidney injury, and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Platelet count did not always correlate well with the severity of bleeding. There were six deaths (2.3%) and out of them four presented with impaired consciousness (66.6%). The common causes for poor outcome were multiorgan failure, encephalopathy, and fluid refractory shock

  16. Overview of pediatric peripheral facial nerve paralysis: analysis of 40 patients.

    PubMed

    Özkale, Yasemin; Erol, İlknur; Saygı, Semra; Yılmaz, İsmail

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral facial nerve paralysis in children might be an alarming sign of serious disease such as malignancy, systemic disease, congenital anomalies, trauma, infection, middle ear surgery, and hypertension. The cases of 40 consecutive children and adolescents who were diagnosed with peripheral facial nerve paralysis at Baskent University Adana Hospital Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology Unit between January 2010 and January 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. We determined that the most common cause was Bell palsy, followed by infection, tumor lesion, and suspected chemotherapy toxicity. We noted that younger patients had generally poorer outcome than older patients regardless of disease etiology. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis has been reported in many countries in America and Europe; however, knowledge about its clinical features, microbiology, neuroimaging, and treatment in Turkey is incomplete. The present study demonstrated that Bell palsy and infection were the most common etiologies of peripheral facial nerve paralysis.

  17. Primary liver tumors in pediatric patients: proper imaging technique for diagnosis and staging.

    PubMed

    Rozell, Joseph M; Catanzano, Tara; Polansky, Stanley M; Rakita, Dmitry; Fox, Lindsay

    2014-08-01

    Liver tumors in children are rare and comprise a diverse set of both benign and malignant lesions, most of which are not clinically detected until they are large and often difficult to resect. Technological advances in diagnostic imaging have greatly influenced the surgical planning of these lesions and ultimately the clinical outcome. The intent of this article is to present an imaging algorithm for the effective and efficient workup of liver tumors in pediatric patients. This includes the appropriate timing and use of various imaging modalities, such as conventional radiographs, ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. This article also addresses the use of sedation, intravenous contrast agents, and the benefits and limitations of specific imaging modalities. An overview of the radiologic and pathologic findings in common liver lesions in pediatric patients, as well as individual case examples demonstrating the use of the proposed workup algorithm, is provided.

  18. Antibacterial honey (Medihoney®) for wound care of immunocompromised pediatric oncology patients

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arne; Sofka, Kai; Wieszniewsky, Gertrud; Blaser, Gisela

    2006-01-01

    The physiologic process of wound healing is impaired and prolonged in paediatic patients receiving chemotherapy. Due to profound immunosuppression, wound infection can easily spread and act as the source of sepsis. Referring to in vitro studies, which confirmed the antibacterial potency of special honey preparations against typical isolates of nosocomially acquired wound infections (including MRSA and VRE) and considering the encouraging reports from other groups, Medihoney™ has now been used in wound care at the Department of Pediatric Oncology, Children's Hospital, University of Bonn for three years. Supplemented with exemplary clinical data from pediatric oncology patients, this presentation reviews the scientific background and our promising experience with Medihoney™ in wound care issues at our institution. PMID:20204081

  19. Antibacterial honey (Medihoney) for wound care of immunocompromised pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Simon, Arne; Sofka, Kai; Wieszniewsky, Gertrud; Blaser, Gisela

    2006-08-30

    The physiologic process of wound healing is impaired and prolonged in paediatic patients receiving chemotherapy. Due to profound immunosuppression, wound infection can easily spread and act as the source of sepsis. Referring to in vitro studies, which confirmed the antibacterial potency of special honey preparations against typical isolates of nosocomially acquired wound infections (including MRSA and VRE) and considering the encouraging reports from other groups, Medihoney has now been used in wound care at the Department of Pediatric Oncology, Children's Hospital, University of Bonn for three years. Supplemented with exemplary clinical data from pediatric oncology patients, this presentation reviews the scientific background and our promising experience with Medihoney in wound care issues at our institution.

  20. Large osteoclasts in pediatric osteogenesis imperfecta patients receiving intravenous pamidronate.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Moira S; Glorieux, Francis H; Rauch, Frank

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous pamidronate is widely used to treat children with moderate to severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Changes in the appearance of osteoclasts have previously been noted in children receiving pamidronate and have been interpreted as signs of toxicity. In this study, we analyzed osteoclast parameters in paired iliac bone specimens before and after 2-4 yr of cyclical intravenous pamidronate therapy in 44 pediatric OI patients (age range: 1.4-17.5 yr; 21 girls). During pamidronate treatment, average osteoclast diameter and the mean number of nuclei present per osteoclast increased by 18% (p = 0.02) and 43% (p < 0.001), respectively. The number of samples containing large osteoclasts (LOcs, diameter > 50 mum) increased from 6 (14%) before treatment to 23 (52%) after pamidronate therapy (p < 0.001 by chi(2) test). Post-treatment samples containing LOcs had a greater core width (p = 0.04) and a higher cancellous bone volume per tissue volume (p < 0.001), because cancellous bone volume had increased more during pamidronate treatment (p < 0.001). Osteoclast number and surface were higher in samples with LOcs, but there was no difference in cancellous bone formation parameters. The presence of LOcs was independent of OI type, type of collagen type I mutation, lumbar spine BMD, and other clinical or biochemical measures. In conclusion, this study did not show any indication that LOcs during pamidronate treatment are indicative of toxicity. It seems more likely that the observed abnormalities in osteoclast morphology are part of the mechanism of action of this drug.

  1. [Pharmacokinetics and clinical effects of aspoxicillin in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Fujii, R; Meguro, H; Kim, B; Yonezawa, H; Kawaoi, T; Tajima, T; Mashiko, J; Nakazawa, S; Niino, K; Sato, H

    1987-09-01

    Since the efficacy and the safety of aspoxicillin (ASPC, TA-058) have been established on adult patients and the need of ASPC use on pediatric patients was anticipated, we performed a 16 center study on the clinical utility of ASPC in pediatric patients. 1. Pharmacokinetics ASPC was intravenously administered to 45 patients at a dose of 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg by one shot. Serum concentrations of ASPC were dependent of dose levels, and maximum levels of 58.4-230.8 micrograms/ml and half-lives (beta) of 1.08-1.16 hours were observed. Urinary recovery rates were 62.7-67.2% in 6 hours. Results obtained upon drip infusions (0.5-1 hour) were similar to one shot injections. 2. Clinical results (1) Clinical effectiveness Of 318 evaluable patients including 175 boys and 143 girls, 18.2% were nurslings and 61% were young children under 4 years of age. One hundred eighty six patients from whom causative organisms were isolated were classified as A group. Among them were 5 patients suffered with sepsis, but the ASPC treatment eradicated all the bacteria but Salmonella java in 1 case. All of 4 patients with meningitis were cured and all causative organisms (3 cases with Haemophilus influenzae and 1 case with Gram-positive coccus) were eradicated. Cure rates were 90% for 130 patients with respiratory tract infection, 88.6% for 35 with urinary tract infection, 85.7% for 7 with skin soft tissue infection and 89.8% for all the A group patients. Meanwhile, no causative organisms were isolated from 132 patients (B group patients) but cure rate of 91.7% was obtained for this group. No statistical difference was observed between A and B groups. For all the patients (318), the cure rate was 90.6%. (2) Bacteriological effects Of 63 Gram-positive bacteria isolated as pathogens, 58 strains were eradicated. Of 117 Gram-negative bacterial, 101 were eradicated. The eradication rate on all 180 strains was 88.3%. Overall, ASPC showed excellent effects against Streptococcus. Among strains of

  2. Study of inhaler technique in asthma patients: differences between pediatric and adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Manríquez, Pablo; Acuña, Ana María; Muñoz, Luis; Reyes, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Inhaler technique comprises a set of procedures for drug delivery to the respiratory system. The oral inhalation of medications is the first-line treatment for lung diseases. Using the proper inhaler technique ensures sufficient drug deposition in the distal airways, optimizing therapeutic effects and reducing side effects. The purposes of this study were to assess inhaler technique in pediatric and adult patients with asthma; to determine the most common errors in each group of patients; and to compare the results between the two groups. Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Using a ten-step protocol, we assessed inhaler technique in 135 pediatric asthma patients and 128 adult asthma patients. Results: The most common error among the pediatric patients was failing to execute a 10-s breath-hold after inhalation, whereas the most common error among the adult patients was failing to exhale fully before using the inhaler. Conclusions: Pediatric asthma patients appear to perform most of the inhaler technique steps correctly. However, the same does not seem to be true for adult patients. PMID:26578130

  3. Population Pharmacokinetics of Pyronaridine in Pediatric Malaria Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ayyoub, Amal; Methaneethorn, Janthima; Ramharter, Michael; Djimde, Abdoulaye A.; Tekete, Mamadou; Duparc, Stephan; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Shin, Jang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Pyramax is a pyronaridine (PYR)-artesunate (PA) combination for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in adult and pediatric patients. A granule formulation of this combination is being developed for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum and P. vivax malaria in pediatric patients. The aims of this study were to describe the pharmacokinetics of PYR using a total of 1,085 blood PYR concentrations available from 349 malaria patients younger than 16 years of age with mild to moderate uncomplicated malaria and to confirm the dosing regimen for the pediatric granule formulation. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling using NONMEM software was used to obtain the pharmacokinetic and inter- and intraindividual variability parameter estimates. The population pharmacokinetics of PYR were described by a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Allometric scaling was implemented to address the effect of body weight on clearance and volume parameters. The final parameter estimates of PYR apparent clearance (CL/F), central volume of distribution (V2/F), peripheral volume of distribution (V3/F), intercompartmental clearance (Q/F), and absorption rate constant (Ka) were 377 liters/day, 2,230 liters, 3,230 liters, 804 liters/day and 17.9 day−1, respectively. Covariate model building conducted using forward addition (P < 0.05) followed by backward elimination (P < 0.001) yielded two significant covariate-parameter relationships, i.e., age on V2/F and formulation on Ka. Evaluation of bootstrapping, visual predictive check, and condition number indicated that the final model displayed satisfactory robustness, predictive power, and stability. Simulations of PYR concentration-time profiles generated from the final model show similar exposures across pediatric weight ranges, supporting the proposed labeling for weight-based dosing of Pyramax granules. (These studies have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00331136 [phase II study] and

  4. Development of a radiopharmaceutical dose calculator for pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine studies

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Priyanka; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Objective: It is important to ensure that as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept during the radiopharmaceutical (RPH) dose administration in pediatric patients. Several methods have been suggested over the years for the calculation of individualized RPH dose, sometimes requiring complex calculations and large variability exists for administered dose in children. The aim of the present study was to develop a software application that can calculate and store RPH dose along with patient record. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the literature to select the dose formula and used Microsoft Access (a software package) to develop this application. We used the Microsoft Excel to verify the accurate execution of the dose formula. The manual and computer time using this program required for calculating the RPH dose were compared. Results: The developed application calculates RPH dose for pediatric patients based on European Association of Nuclear Medicine dose card, weight based, body surface area based, Clark, Solomon Fried, Young and Webster's formula. It is password protected to prevent the accidental damage and stores the complete record of patients that can be exported to Excel sheet for further analysis. It reduces the burden of calculation and saves considerable time i.e., 2 min computer time as compared with 102 min (manual calculation with the calculator for all seven formulas for 25 patients). Conclusion: The software detailed above appears to be an easy and useful method for calculation of pediatric RPH dose in routine clinical practice. This software application will help in helping the user to routinely applied ALARA principle while pediatric dose administration. PMID:24163510

  5. Low-molecular-weight heparin in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Sutor, Anton Heinz; Chan, Anthony K C; Massicotte, Patricia

    2004-02-01

    The incidence of thromboembolic events (TEs) in childhood is greatly underestimated. Two age groups account for approximately 70% of TEs in childhood: infants and teenagers. There are several predisposing risk factors for newborns such as small vessels, high hematocrit, and a unique neonatal hemostatic system. Central venous lines contribute to 80% of deep vein thrombosis in newborns. Other risk factors for all children are shock syndromes, trauma, surgery, heart and kidney disease, and acquired or hereditary thrombophilias. The best prophylaxis is to recognize, avoid, and remove risk factors if possible. This is particularly relevant in childhood, where risk factors can be found in the majority of TEs. The serious sequelae of TEs (mortality, and short- and long-term morbidity) require therapeutic intervention. Unfractionated heparin (UFH) has the following disadvantages: age-dependent unpredictable pharmacokinetics, the need for intravenous access for therapy and monitoring, delays in achieving therapeutic ranges, bleeding risk, the risk of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, and osteoporosis with long-term use. Oral anticoagulants, in addition to some of these disadvantages, show considerable variation by diet (especially if there is a change from breast to bottle feeding), medication, and intercurrent illness. Review of case reports and cohort studies on 728 children treated with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) indicate the following advantages over UFH: minimal monitoring, ease of administration (subcutaneous), and possibly equivalent efficacy and safety. Dose recommendations for pediatric patients cannot be directly extrapolated from those for adult patients. If dosages are calculated according to body weight, infants < 3 months (or < 5 kg) need approximately 50% more LMWH than older children or adults to reach prophylactic or therapeutic anti-factor Xa levels. Further studies are necessary to address the following: the importance of risk factors, the

  6. A multiplex cytokine score for the prediction of disease severity in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Yong-Min; Song, Hua; Yang, Shi-Long; Xu, Wei-Qun; Shi, Shu-Wen; Zhao, Ning; Liao, Chan

    2013-11-01

    Although many inflammatory cytokines are prognostic in sepsis, the utility of cytokines in evaluating disease severity in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock was rarely studied. On the other hand, a single particular cytokine is far from ideal in guiding therapeutic intervention, but combination of multiple biomarkers improves the accuracy. In this prospective observational study, 111 episodes of septic shock in pediatric hematology/oncology patients were enrolled from 2006 through 2012. Blood samples were taken for inflammatory cytokine measurement by cytometric bead array (CBA) technology at the initial onset of septic shock. Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 were significantly elevated in majority of patients, while tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were markedly increased in patients with high pediatric index of mortality 2 (PIM2) score and non-survivors. All the four cytokines paralleled the PIM2 score and differentially correlated with hemodynamic disorder and fatal outcomes. The pediatric multiplex cytokine score (PMCS), which integrated the four cytokines into one score system, was related to hemodynamic disorder and mortality as well, but showed more powerful prediction ability than each of the four cytokines. PMCS was an independent predictive factor for fatal outcome, presenting similar discriminative power with PIM2, with accuracy of 0.83 (95% CI, 0.71-0.94). In conclusion, this study develops a cytokine scoring system based on CBA technique, which performs well in disease severity and fatality prediction in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock.

  7. Resource Utilization and Costs of Care prior to ART Initiation for Pediatric Patients in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Hari S.; Scott, Callie A.; Lembela Bwalya, Deophine; Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Moyo, Crispin; Bolton Moore, Carolyn; Larson, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We estimated time to initiation, outpatient resource use, and costs of outpatient care during the 6 months prior to ART initiation for HIV-infected pediatric patients in Zambia. Methods. We enrolled 1,102 children who initiated ART at <15 years of age between 2006 and 2011 at 5 study sites. Of these, 832 initiated ART ≤6 months after first presenting to care at the study sites. Data on time in care and resources utilized during the 6 months prior to ART initiation were extracted from patient medical records. Costs were estimated from the provider's perspective and are reported in 2011 USD. Results. For the patients who initiated ART ≤6 months after presenting to care, median age at presentation to care was 3.9 years; median CD4 percentage was 13%. Median time to ART initiation was 26 days. Patients made, on average, 2.38 clinic visits prior to ART initiation and received 0.81 CD4 tests, 0.74 full blood count tests, and 0.49 blood chemistry tests. The mean cost of pre-ART care was $20 per patient. Conclusions. Zambian pediatric patients initiating ART ≤6 months after presenting to care do so quickly, utilize fewer resources than mandated by national guidelines, and accrue low costs. PMID:24711925

  8. Resource Utilization and Costs of Care prior to ART Initiation for Pediatric Patients in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Hari S; Scott, Callie A; Lembela Bwalya, Deophine; Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Moyo, Crispin; Bolton Moore, Carolyn; Larson, Bruce A; Rosen, Sydney

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We estimated time to initiation, outpatient resource use, and costs of outpatient care during the 6 months prior to ART initiation for HIV-infected pediatric patients in Zambia. Methods. We enrolled 1,102 children who initiated ART at <15 years of age between 2006 and 2011 at 5 study sites. Of these, 832 initiated ART ≤6 months after first presenting to care at the study sites. Data on time in care and resources utilized during the 6 months prior to ART initiation were extracted from patient medical records. Costs were estimated from the provider's perspective and are reported in 2011 USD. Results. For the patients who initiated ART ≤6 months after presenting to care, median age at presentation to care was 3.9 years; median CD4 percentage was 13%. Median time to ART initiation was 26 days. Patients made, on average, 2.38 clinic visits prior to ART initiation and received 0.81 CD4 tests, 0.74 full blood count tests, and 0.49 blood chemistry tests. The mean cost of pre-ART care was $20 per patient. Conclusions. Zambian pediatric patients initiating ART ≤6 months after presenting to care do so quickly, utilize fewer resources than mandated by national guidelines, and accrue low costs.

  9. Overview of veterinary chiropractic and its use in pediatric exotic patients.

    PubMed

    Maler, Marilyn M

    2012-05-01

    The scope of this article will be an introduction to veterinary chiropractic and its use in treating pediatric exotic patients. After discussing the general principles of human and veterinary chiropractic, the special considerations of adjusting exotic pediatric patients will be explored.

  10. Home intravenous antibiotic treatment for febrile episodes in immune-compromised pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, E; Yaniv, I; Drucker, M; Hadad, S; Goshen, Y; Stein, J; Ash, S; Fisher, S; Zaizov, R

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of home intravenous antibiotic treatment (HIAT) for febrile episodes in immune-compromised (neutropenic, splenectomized), low-risk pediatric patients. Thirty hematology-oncology patients who presented to our emergency room from January 1993 to January 1995 and who suffered from a febrile episode and were considered at low risk for septic complications were immediately discharged on HIAT. Patients were followed for at least 3 weeks after recovery. Patients and parents were retrospectively questioned about adverse effects and about their degree of satisfaction with home treatment. Patients who required hospitalization during this period were considered unresponsive to HIAT and were analyzed for causes and adverse effects. Thirteen out of 60 (22%) febrile episodes, or eight out of 42 (19%) episodes of fever and neutropenia eventually led to hospitalization. Pseudomonas species infections were associated with the highest rate of unresponsiveness (88%). A central venous catheter infection developed in two cases following HIAT (two cases out of 640 days of therapy). No other complications were identified. No infection-related morbidity was observed. Patients and parents were highly satisfied with HIAT and wanted to use it again, if necessary. Immediate discharge on HIAT for low-risk pediatric immune-compromised patients suffering from a febrile episode is feasible, safe, and well accepted by patients and families. Patients who are found to have Pseudomonas infections should probably be hospitalized. Our results are preliminary and must be confirmed by a prospective, randomized trial before definite recommendations can be made.

  11. Zirconia-Prefabricated Crowns for Pediatric Patients With Primary Dentition: Technique and Cementation for Esthetic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Carla

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, many clinicians tend to forego esthetic considerations when full-coverage restorations are indicated for pediatric patients with primary dentitions. However, the availability of new zirconia pediatric crowns and reliable techniques for cementation makes esthetic outcomes practical and consistent when restoring primary dentition. Two cases are described: a 3-year-old boy who presented with severe early childhood caries affecting both anterior and posterior teeth, and a 6-year-old boy who presented with extensive caries of his primary posterior dentition, including a molar requiring full coverage. The parents of both boys were concerned about esthetics, and the extent of decay indicated the need for full-coverage restorations. This led to the boys receiving treatment using a restorative procedure in which the carious teeth were prepared for and restored with esthetic tooth-colored zirconia crowns. In both cases, comfortable function and pleasing esthetics were achieved.

  12. [HCV and HBV prevalence in hemodialyzed pediatric patients. Multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Cañero-Velasco, M C; Mutti, J E; Gonzalez, J E; Alonso, A; Otegui, L; Adragna, M; Antonuccio, M; Laso, M; Montenegro, M; Repetto, L; Brandi, M; Canepa, J; Baimberg, E

    1998-01-01

    Hemodialized pediatric patients are a risk population for the hepatitis B and C virus infection. The aim of this paper was to study the serum prevalence of HBV and HCV infection in hemodialized children. We study 61 pediatric patients at hemodialisis, 12 on renal transplant, range between 2 and 20 years old (mean: 12.9 years), 23 male and 38 female. The specific anti-HCV IgC were measured by enzyme immunoassay (ELISA Abbott) and confirmed by LIA-TEK (Organon). The anti-HBV were measured by ELISA Abbott and transaminases by cinetic method (ASAT: 29 UI/L and ALT: 33 UI/L). The 19.7% of studied children were HCV (+) and 29.5% were HBV (+), 38.9% of them were HbsAg (+) and 50% anti-HBs (+). The HCV and HBV infection was more elevated in relation to the transfusion number and the hemodilisis time. The elevation of ALT/ASAT activity isn't a right infection index for HCV and HBV in this children.

  13. Caregivers' perception of drug administration safety for pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Harris, Nariman; Badr, Lina Kurdahi; Saab, Raya; Khalidi, Aziza

    2014-01-01

    Medication errors (MEs) are reported to be between 1.5% and 90% depending on many factors, such as type of the institution where data were collected and the method to identify the errors. More significantly, the risk for errors with potential for harm is 3 times higher for children, especially those receiving chemotherapy. Few studies have been published on averting such errors with children and none on how caregivers perceive their role in preventing such errors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pediatric oncology patient's caregivers' perception of drug administration safety and their willingness to be involved in averting such errors. A cross-sectional design was used to study a nonrandomized sample of 100 caregivers of pediatric oncology patients. Ninety-six of the caregivers surveyed were well informed about the medications their children receive and were ready to participate in error prevention strategies. However, an underestimation of potential errors uncovered a high level of "trust" for the staff. Caregivers echoed their apprehension for being responsible for potential errors. Caregivers are a valuable resource to intercept medication errors. However, caregivers may be hesitant to actively communicate their fears with health professionals. Interventions that aim at encouraging caregivers to engage in the safety of their children are recommended.

  14. Risk factors and interventions for ventilator-associated pneumonia in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Morinec, Jill; Iacaboni, Jacalyn; McNett, Molly

    2012-10-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a leading nosocomial infection in pediatrics. Little research has investigated the risk factors or effectiveness of interventions for pediatric VAP prevention. The purposes of this study were to identify the risk factors associated with VAP in pediatric patients and describe current VAP prevention practices. Data were gathered retrospectively on ventilated patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit over 12 months. No variables were found to be predictive of VAP. Review of practices indicates that better documentation is needed of all interventions. Findings provide information to guide the implementation of VAP bundles. Implementation should focus on adequate documentation of VAP prevention efforts.

  15. Screening Autoimmune Anti-neuronal Antibodies in Pediatric Patients with Suspected Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Yeon; Choi, Sun Ah; Ryu, Hye Won; Kim, Hunmin; Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify and describe the pediatric autoimmune encephalitis cases positive for anti-neuronal antibody tests. Methods: Screening of six anti-neuronal antibodies in 23 children with suspected autoimmune encephalitis was performed by cell-based indirect immunofluorescence test with patients’ serum or cerebrospinal fluid. Results: Among the 23 cases enrolled here, eight patients (35%) were positive for the anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antibody and one patient (4%) was positive for the anti-contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2) antibody. In the anti-NMDA receptor antibody-positive group, seizure and movement disorders were the most prominent features and were present in all patients. A tumor was present in only one patient. Three patients with infant- and toddler-onset disease did not exhibit a classic multistage illness. In addition to seizure and dyskinesia, aphasia or mutism without severe consciousness impairment was present in all three patients. These atypical clinical presentations may suggest different pathomechanism of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis among these age groups. The patient who was positive for the anti-CASPR2 antibody was an 8-year-old girl who presented with fever, encephalopathy, and seizure. Neuromyotonia or other dyskinesia was not present. Conclusions: Eight anti-NMDA receptor antibody positive patients and one CASPR2 positive patient were identified from the screening of six anti-neuronal antibodies in pediatric patients suspected with autoimmune encephalitis. Developmental regression specifically for language skills was suggested as one of the atypical clinical features in infants and toddler onset anti-NMDA receptor antibody positive patients. PMID:25625089

  16. Cervical fixation in the pediatric patient: our experience.

    PubMed

    Crostelli, Marco; Mariani, Massimo; Mazza, Osvaldo; Ascani, Elio

    2009-06-01

    The surgical management of cervical instability in children is a challenging issue. Although the indications for internal fixation are similar to those for adults, accurate pre-surgery study and sharp surgical techniques are necessary because of the size of such patients' anatomy, their peculiar tissue biology and the wide spectrum of diseases requiring cervical fusion. Our case study is made up of 31 patients, 15 male and 16 female, with an average age of 7 years and 6 months (2 years and 6 months to 18 years) who underwent cervical fusion for instability. Their physical condition presented various different pathologies ranging from congenital deformity, systemic skeletal disease, tumors, trauma, post-surgery instability. We performed occipito-cervical fusion in 11 cases, 5 of which involved stabilization at the cranium-vertebral junction. We used instrumentation in 13 cases (3 sublaminar wiring, 10 rigid adult instrumentation). We used rigid adult instrumentation in three patients under 10 years of age, treated by rod, occipital screws and sublaminar hook instrumentation in steel C0-C2 (9-year-old male, affected by os odontoideum in Down's syndrome; male of 7 years and 10 months, affected by os odontoideum in Down's syndrome; female of 4 years and 6 months with occipito-cervical stenosis and C0-C2 instability in Hurler's syndrome). We operated on two patients under 3 years of age, using sublaminar wiring with bone precursors and allograft at level C0-C2 (one of these was a 30-month-old male with post-traumatic instability C0-C2, while the other was a 17-month-old male with C0-C2 instability in Larsen's syndrome). The average follow-up age was 7 years and 1 month (between 1 and 18 years). Cervical fusion was assessed by X-ray examinations at 4th and 12th weeks and at 6th and 12th months after surgery. Where implants could allow, RMN examination was performed at 1st month after surgery. In the other cases, in which implants do not allow RMN to be performed, CT scan

  17. Low density lipoprotein apheresis in pediatric patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Coker, Mahmut; Ucar, Sema Kalkan; Simsek, Damla Goksen; Darcan, Sukran; Bak, Mustafa; Can, Sule

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to clarify the low density lipoprotein apheresis procedure for pediatric patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in terms of efficacy, adverse effects and difficulties. The follow-up was carried out using an open, prospective uncontrolled clinical design. Data were collected from 10 patients (with an average age of 8.4 +/- 4.7 years) with FH treated with double filtration plasmapheresis. The total time span of follow-up covered five years (30.2 +/- 17.8 months [range 9-60 months]) and more than 600 sessions (62.1 +/- 35.5 sessions per patient [range 18-120 sessions]) were evaluated. The mean low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) pre-treatment value was 375.5 +/- 127.5 mg/dL, and the post-treatment value was 147.5 +/- 73.9 mg/dL. This corresponded to a 62.8 +/- 10.3% (43-73%) acute reduction of LDL-C, while the mean high density lipoprotein cholesterol losses amounted to 41%. The chronic reduction in LDL-C ranged from 18 to 52%, with a mean level of 36.4 +/- 11.7%. The most frequently occurring technical problems were related to blood lines: puncture difficulties (4.5%), insufficient blood flow (3.5%), and obturation of the blood lines (2.4%). The main clinical adverse effects were hypotension (0.2%), chills/feeling cold (0.1%), and nausea and vomiting (0.2%). We observed that the low pediatric patient tolerance is the main problem in compliance with treatment. In conclusion, LDL apheresis, started under the age of eight years, combined with lipid-lowering drugs, provides a safe and effective lowering of the mean LDL-C levels in pediatric homozygous FH; and there are more problems with compliance for pediatric LDL apheresis than in the adult population.

  18. Complications of chlorine inhalation in a pediatric chemical burn patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mangat, Harshdeep Singh; Stewart, Tara Lynn; Dibden, Lionel; Tredget, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    The majority of burn injuries in the pediatric population occur at home, and a significant proportion are the result of exposure to household cleaning products. A common injury-causing agent is bleach, which has the potential to release chlorine gas, a potent respiratory irritant that leads to the added risk of inhalation injury. The survival of pediatric patients with chemical burns is extremely high, and the 3 strongest predictors of mortality are large burn size, age <48 months, and the presence of inhalation injury. The authors present a rare case of a pediatric fatality from a chemical bleach burn that resulted in acute respiratory distress syndrome as well as hemodynamic and pulmonary instability that required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The authors critically appraised the management of this patient to determine the possible effect certain events had on the unexpected and poor outcome of this patient, including fluid resuscitation, the effect of the chemical inhalation injury, sedation, and the need for invasive extracorporeal membrane oxygenation life support.

  19. Fasciola hepatica infection: clinical and radiological findings in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Karadağ-Öncel, Eda; Ozsürekçi, Yasemin; Ozkaya-Parlakay, Aslınur; Celik, Melda; Cengiz, Ali Bülent; Haliloğlu, Mithat; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Kara, Ateş

    2012-01-01

    Fascioliasis, an uncommon liver disease in children, is caused by the trematode Fasciola hepatica. Its clinical and laboratory findings may mimic several disorders of the liver, including malignancies. Diagnosis is usually made by demonstrating the presence of the parasite in liver tissue or the stool, or by serology, but many children are diagnosed incidentally. Described here are the clinical, laboratory and radiological features of five pediatric fascioliasis cases with different clinical pictures presenting over a period of five years, all of whom were successfully cured with oral triclabendazole.

  20. Status epilepticus in a pediatric patient with amantadine overdose.

    PubMed

    Claudet, Isabelle; Maréchal, Céline

    2009-02-01

    A 2-year-old boy who ingested 0.8-1.5 g of amantadine developed status epilepticus. One hour later, the child presented with agitation, diaphoresis, and vomiting. He was admitted to the pediatric emergency department 2 hours later. Generalized seizures evolved to status epilepticus, with alternating generalized tonic-clonic and partial seizures, over a period of 7 hours. Other initial clinical signs were sinusal tachycardia and reactive bilateral mydriasis. All symptoms resolved within 20 hours, with a good recovery; the child was released from the hospital on day 3.

  1. [Special features of febrile neutropenia in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Olivé-Oliveras, M Teresa; Ruiz-Camps, Isabel

    2005-12-01

    Febrile neutropenia is a common complication in pediatric oncohematological patients. It is defined by fever > or = 38.3 degrees C or > or = 38 for more than one hour together with a neutrophil count of < or = 500/microl(3). These children are usually admitted to hospital and receive empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Recent studies support the possibility of early discharge or outpatient management in selected cases of febrile neutropenia. This translates into a lower risk of nosocomial infections and a reduction in the discriminate use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, with a consequent reduction in resistance, toxicity and costs. All of these factors would improve the patient's quality of life. The estimated incidence of bacteremia in children with febrile neutropenia is 10-36%. However, the experience of multiple centers suggests that not all children have the same risk of complications or death due to infection and that the risk is much lower than that in adults.

  2. Combined surgical and endovascular management of a giant fusiform PCA aneurysm in a pediatric patient. A case report.

    PubMed

    Shin, S H; Choi, I S; Thomas, K; David, C A

    2013-06-01

    Treatment of intracranial giant aneurysms presents is challenging. In the case of pediatric giant aneurysm, more challenges arise. We describe our experience with a 17-year-old pediatric patient who presented with severe headache. She was diagnosed as having a giant fusiform aneurysm at the right P1-P2-Pcom junction. The aneurysm was treated with superficial temporal artery-posterior cerebral artery bypass and subsequent coil embolization of the aneurysm with parent artery occlusion. The patient had an excellent outcome at one-year follow-up. Our case suggests a combined approach of surgical and endovascular management may yield a better outcome than surgery or endovascular management alone in the treatment of pediatric giant aneurysm.

  3. Pediatric martial arts injuries presenting to Emergency Departments, United States 1990-2003.

    PubMed

    Yard, Ellen E; Knox, Christy L; Smith, Gary A; Comstock, R Dawn

    2007-08-01

    Although an estimated 6.5 million United States (US) children aged 6-17 practiced a martial art in 2004, there have been no nationally representative studies comparing pediatric injuries among the three most popular disciplines, karate, taekwondo, and judo. Describe pediatric martial arts injuries presenting to a representative sample of US Emergency Departments (EDs) from 1990 to 2003. We reviewed all martial arts injuries captured by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC), National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). An estimated 128,400 children Pediatric martial arts injuries differ by discipline. Understanding these injury patterns can assist with the development of discipline-specific preventive interventions.

  4. Fecal microbiota transplantation via nasogastric tube for recurrent clostridium difficile infection in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kronman, Matthew P; Nielson, Heather J; Adler, Amanda L; Giefer, Matthew J; Wahbeh, Ghassan; Singh, Namita; Zerr, Danielle M; Suskind, David L

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a safe and effective therapy for adults with recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis, but data regarding FMT in children are limited and focus on colonoscopic administration of FMT. We present 10 consecutive children who received FMT via nasogastric tube for treatment of recurrent C difficile infection. Median age was 5.4 years, and 30% were receiving simultaneous immunosuppression. Median follow-up was 44 days, and 90% of patients resolved their C difficile infection; one patient relapsed 2 months later after receiving antibiotics. FMT via nasogastric tube appears safe, well tolerated, and effective in treating pediatric recurrent C difficile colitis.

  5. Recurrent TMJ Dislocation Managed with Botulinum Toxin Type A Injections in a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Stark, Thomas R; Perez, Cristina V; Okeson, Jeffrey P

    2015-01-01

    Chronic recurrent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon condition that is painful and distressing to patients and uniquely challenging for clinicians. Sustained TMJ dislocation is not amenable to manual reduction alone when the etiology is muscular in nature. The purpose of this report was to describe the case of a child presenting with recurring temporomandibular joint dislocation secondary to muscle hyperactivity of unknown etiology that was managed with injections of botulinum toxin type A into the inferior lateral pterygoid muscles. The use of this peripheral antispasmoic neurotoxin is a reasonable, safe, and conservative, palliative treatment option for pediatric patients suffering from chronic recurring TMJ dislocation.

  6. Preventing Medicine mistakes in pediatric and neonatal patients

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanah, F; Haddad Kashani, H; Sharif, MR

    2015-01-01

    Medicine mistakes are significant issues that happen in clinic environments. Several portions make the pediatric community extra sensitive to medicine faults, and possible complexities are rising from medicine board. These involve the various dosage forms of the identical medication availability, inaccurate dosing, absence of regulated dosing regimen, and process development. Electric information like EMBASE, MEDLINE, Global Pharmaceutical Abstracts, ASSIA, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, were sleeked among 1985 and December 2014. Study choice Inclusion and exclusion standard are used to specify the eligible publications though title investigation followed by abstract and then full text investigation. Medicine mistakes were most often reported in pediatric and neonatal patients. This was in consensus with literature information about the occurrences in other specialties. Fatal or life-threatening harm because of medicine mistakes was not often reported. However, most studies reported that the possible for the cases impairment as an outcome of a mistake is a significant problem. Investigation of types and level of medicine faults might results in steps towards the prevention of these faults and the improvement in the neonatal care quality and safety. PMID:28316659

  7. Pediatric Patients' Malnutrition and Its Relation to Hospitalization Times and Causes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimarey, Luis M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Relates the nutritional status of 1,378 hospitalized pediatric patients to length of hospitalization and definitive hospitalization diagnosis. Findings indicated the length of hospitalization time increased markedly with malnutrition, especially for patients with diarrhea. (BJD)

  8. Clinical and molecular study of a pediatric patient with sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mei; Mao, Man; Guo, Li; Chen, Feng-Ping; Wen, Wang-Rong; Song, Yuan-Zong

    2016-01-01

    The human solute carrier family 10 member 1 (SLC10A1) gene encodes sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), the principal transporter of conjugated bile salts from the plasma into hepatocytes. Although the function of NTCP has been studied extensively and a number of SLC10A1 variations have been identified in humans, information regarding NTCP deficiency is limited. To date, only one patient with NTCP deficiency has been described; however, in the present study a pediatric patient who experienced intractable and striking hypercholanemia is presented. Analysis of the SLC10A1 gene in the patient revealed a homozygous p.Ser267Phe (c.800C>T) variation, which proved to be a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the allele frequency of 4.7% of healthy controls. This variation involved a conserved amino acid residue on the orthologous alignment that was predicted to be ‘disease-causing’ by functional analysis using a number of bioinformatic tools. Next generation sequencing was performed; however, no other genetic causes were identified that would affect the bile acid homeostasis in the patient. Moreover, an adult, with the same genotype as the pediatric patient, was identified for the first time as experiencing mild hypercholanemia. The molecular and clinical findings in the present study suggest, for the first time, that there is an association between p.Ser267Phe SNP and hypercholanemia, and this information may be used to clinically identify NTCP deficiency worldwide. PMID:27882152

  9. Microbial Dysbiosis in Pediatric Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Day, Andrew S.; Huinao, Karina D.; Leach, Steven T.; Lemberg, Daniel A.; Dowd, Scot E.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial dysbiosis has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD); however, many studies of gut microbial communities have been confounded by environmental and patient-related factors. In this study, the microbial flora of fecal samples from 19 children newly diagnosed with CD and 21 age-matched controls were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing to determine differences in the microbial composition between CD patients and controls. Analysis of the microbial composition of specific bacterial groups revealed that Firmicutes percentages were significantly lower in CD patients than in controls and that this was due largely to changes in the class Clostridia. Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria percentages were higher and significantly higher in CD patients than in controls, respectively. Both the detection frequencies of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with the calculated pediatric Crohn's disease activity index scores of patients. Upon further analysis, differences in the microbial compositions of patients with mild disease and moderate to severe disease were identified. Our findings indicate that a combination of different bacterial species or a dynamic interplay between individual species is important for disease and is consistent with the dysbiosis hypothesis of CD. PMID:22837318

  10. Cardiopulmonary Bypass Using Argatroban as an Anticoagulant for a 6.0-kg Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Mejak, Brian; Giacomuzzi, Carmen; Shen, Irving; Boshkov, Lynn; Ungerleider, Ross

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: A patient was born with transposition of the great arteries, double-outlet right ventricle, interrupted aortic arch, and a ventricular septal defect and underwent a Damus–Kaye–Stansel procedure with a modified Blalock–Taussig shunt at 14 days old. Three months later, this patient presented with hypoxia and bradycardia was found to have a thrombus present in the main pulmonary artery extending to right pulmonary artery. After initiation of thrombolytic therapy, the patient became severely hypoxic and required the institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. As the result of unknown heparin resistance independent of adequate antithrombin III levels, argatroban therapy was used to achieve desired anticoagulation. The patient was taken to the operating room and converted to conventional cardiopulmonary bypass once adequate activated clotting times were achieved using argatroban. This case report summarizes the use of argatroban as an anticoagulant for a 6.0-kg pediatric patient undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:16350385

  11. Nystagmus in pediatric patients: interventions and patient-focused perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Penix, Kimberly; Swanson, Mark W; DeCarlo, Dawn K

    2015-01-01

    Nystagmus refers to involuntary, typically conjugate, often rhythmic oscillations of the eyes. The most common cause of nystagmus in children is infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS). INS presents within the first few months of life and is sometimes accompanied by an ocular condition associated with sensory impairment. Because this condition affects a person throughout life, it is important to understand the options available to manage it. This review focuses on the underlying nystagmus etiology, psychosocial and functional effects of nystagmus, as well as current principles of management, including optical, pharmacological, surgical, and rehabilitative options. Currently, the neural mechanisms underlying INS are not fully understood. Treatment options are designed to increase foveation duration or correct anomalous head postures; however, evidence is limited to mainly pre- and post-study designs with few objective comparisons of treatment strategies. Management of INS should be individualized. The decision on which treatment is best suited for a particular patient lies with the patient and his/her physician. PMID:26345377

  12. Kilovoltage Imaging Doses in the Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jun; Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Nath, Ravinder

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate doses induced by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) to pediatric cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, as well as strategies for dose reduction. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose deposition due to kVCBCT on 4 pediatric cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were analyzed for both half-fan and full-fan modes. Clinical conditions, such as distance from organ at risk (OAR) to CBCT field border, kV peak energy, and testicular shielding, were studied. Results: The mean doses induced by one CBCT scan operated at 125 kV in half-fan mode to testes, liver, kidneys, femoral heads, spinal cord, brain, eyes, lens, and optical nerves were 2.9, 4.7, 7.7, 10.5, 8.8, 7.6, 7.7, 7.8, and 7.2 cGy, respectively. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduced the doses to OARs, ranging from 33% reduction for spinal cord to 2300% reduction for testes. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, the dose increase due to kVCBCT ranged from 170% for lens to 460% for brain and spinal cord. A testicular shielding made of 1-cm cerrobend could reduce CBCT doses down to 31%, 51%, 68%, and 82%, respectively, for 60, 80, 100, and 125 kV when the testes lay within the CBCT field. Conclusions: Generally speaking, kVCBCT deposits much larger doses to critical structures in children than in adults, usually by a factor of 2 to 3. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduces doses to OARs. Depending on OARs, kVCBCT-induced doses increase linearly or exponentially with photon beam energy. Testicular shielding works more efficiently at lower kV energies. On the basis of our study, it is essential to choose an appropriate scanning protocol when kVCBCT is applied to pediatric cancer patients routinely.

  13. Three-in-one parenteral nutrition in neonates and pediatric patients: risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Blackmer, Allison Beck; Partipilo, M Luisa

    2015-06-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a life-sustaining therapy designed to deliver essential nutrients to patients unable to meet nutrition needs via the enteral route. PN may be delivered via a 2-in-1 system (one solution containing amino acids, dextrose, electrolytes, vitamins, minerals, and fluids and one solution containing intravenous fat emulsions [IVFEs]) or via a 3-in-1 system (all nutrients mixed in one container). Although the use of 3-in-1 PN solutions is not necessarily therapeutically advantageous, certain benefits may exist such as the potential to reduce the risk of contamination due to decreased manipulations; ease of administration, particularly in the home care setting; possible cost savings; and reduced IVFE wastage. However, the incorporation of IVFE in 3-in-1 solutions also presents unique risks for the neonatal and pediatric population such as decreased stability, increased lipid globule size, decreased sterility and the potential for increased microbial growth/infectious complications, the need to use a larger filter size, precipitation and compatibility risks, and an increased chance of catheter occlusion. This review outlines the unique issues and challenges to be considered when formulating neonatal and pediatric 3-in-1 PN admixtures. While 3-in-1 PN solutions may be advantageous for certain pediatric populations, specifically those dependent on home PN, the risks do not outweigh the benefits in neonatal patients, and use should be avoided in this population.

  14. Wernicke encephalopathy in pediatric neuro-oncology: presentation of 2 cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Cefalo, Maria Giuseppina; De Ioris, Maria Antonietta; Cacchione, Antonella; Longo, Daniela; Staccioli, Susanna; Arcioni, Francesco; Bernardi, Bruno; Mastronuzzi, Angela

    2014-12-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy represents a well-known entity characterized by a set of cognitive and neurologic alterations. Wernicke encephalopathy is rare and under-recognized in childhood and may be fatal. Few cases have been documented in pediatric oncology. We report on 2 Wernicke encephalopathy cases that occurred in children having a brain tumor. The diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy was suggested by clinical manifestations associated with the typical radiologic findings and a laboratory evidence of thiamine deficiency. No large series have been published to support the evidence that pediatric malignancies represent a demonstrated factor of increased risk to develop a Wernicke encephalopathy. Moreover, the diagnosis may be even more difficult in brain tumors, considering the overlapping symptoms and the risk of encephalopathy related to both the disease and the treatment. Wernicke encephalopathy should be considered in all children with cancer presenting a neurologic deterioration, mainly in brain tumors. An early diagnosis is imperative for a prompt therapy that might prevent or minimize the irreversible brain damage related to this condition.

  15. Palliative care in pediatric patients with hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Lisa; Kang, Tammy I

    2015-01-01

    Children with advanced cancer, including those with hematologic malignancies, can benefit from interdisciplinary palliative care services. Palliative care includes management of distressing symptoms, attention to psychosocial and spiritual needs, and assistance with navigating complex medical decisions with the ultimate goal of maximizing the quality-of-life of the child and family. Palliative care is distinct from hospice care and can assist with the care of patients throughout the cancer continuum, irrespective of prognosis. While key healthcare organizations, including the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Society of Clinical Oncology among many others endorse palliative care for children with advanced illness, barriers to integration of palliative care into cancer care still exist. Providing assistance with advance care planning, guiding patients and families through prognostic uncertainty, and managing transitions of care are also included in goals of palliative care involvement. For patients with advanced malignancy, legislation, included in the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act allows patients and families more options as they make the difficult transition from disease directed therapy to care focused on comfort and quality-of-life.

  16. Diabetes Screening, Diagnosis, and Therapy in Pediatric Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rodbard, Helena W.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract and Introduction Abstract The dramatic rise in the incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the pediatric and adolescent populations has been associated with the ongoing epidemic of overweight, obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome seen in these age groups. Although the majority of pediatric patients diagnosed with diabetes are still classified as having type 1 diabetes, almost 50% of patients with diabetes in the pediatric age range (under 18 years) may have type 2 diabetes. Screening of high-risk patients for diabetes and prediabetes is important. Prompt diagnosis and accurate diabetes classification facilitate appropriate and timely treatment and may reduce the risk for complications. This is especially important in children because lifestyle interventions may be successful and the lifelong risk for complications is greatest. Treatment usually begins with dietary modification, weight loss, and a structured program of physical exercise. Oral antidiabetic agents are added when lifestyle intervention alone fails to maintain glycemic control. Given the natural history of type 2 diabetes, most if not all patients will eventually require insulin therapy. In those requiring insulin, improved glycemic control and reduced frequency of hypoglycemia can be achieved with insulin analogs. It is common to add insulin therapy to existing oral therapy only when oral agents no longer provide adequate glycemic control. Introduction The incidence of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has reached epidemic proportions in the United States.[1] Recent reports indicate that as many as 45% of pediatric patients diagnosed with diabetes in the United States have type 2 diabetes.[1] Furthermore, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes may be underestimated due to misclassification of the disease.[2] Prior to the late 1990s, only 1% to 2% of children diagnosed with diabetes mellitus in the United States had type 2 diabetes. Since then, owing to a

  17. Characterization of Candida isolates from pediatric burn patients.

    PubMed Central

    Neely, A N; Odds, F C; Basatia, B K; Holder, I A

    1988-01-01

    To provide more detailed information about Candida epidemiology and pathogenesis in pediatric burn patients, Candida isolates from 113 patients collected over 3 years were identified at the species level and the serotypes and biotypes of the C. albicans isolates were determined. A total of 85% of the patients were colonized or infected by C. albicans, 18% by C. tropicalis, and 11% by C. parapsilosis. Although colonization or infection often was found at multiple sites and times, 87% of the patients were colonized or infected by only one Candida species or strain; the other 13% showed multiple colonizations or infections, some of which occurred simultaneously at the same site. C. albicans biotyping determined the tolerance of the isolates to pH (pH 1.4) and salt; flucytosine, borate, and safranine resistance; and ability to produce proteinase and assimilate urea, sorbose, and citrate; results are expressed as three-digit numbers. For isolates from three different anatomical sites, the distribution of the nine biotype characteristics was similar in all cases but one. Significantly more fecal than wound or throat isolates were resistant to safranine. Sixty-four different serotype-biotype combinations were found in the 96 patients with C. albicans infections or colonizations. Twenty-nine percent of all C. albicans isolates had the partial biotype -57, while 20 of the 96 patients had specifically serotype B, biotype 557 colonizations or infections. Eleven patients had the B557 infection when admitted; nine patients acquired the yeast in-house. Thirty percent of the C. albicans isolated from 23 adult patients at a nearby hospital also showed the -57 biotype pattern, suggesting that C. albicans isolates expressing this biotype are either extremely prevalent in nature or are more virulent than other C. albicans isolates. PMID:3053771

  18. Ascending and plunging ranula in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Clyburn, Virginia L; Smith, Jacob E; Rumboldt, Tihana; Matheus, Maria G; Day, Terry A

    2009-06-01

    A plunging ranula is a rare phenomenon that represents mucous extravasation extending through or behind the mylohyoid. The mucous dissects the tissue planes inferiorly and usually manifests as a swelling in the submental or submandibular regions. Some plunging ranulas are believed to result from disruption of excretory ducts that originate from the sublingual gland. The currently accepted definitive treatment of a plunging ranula is resection of the ipsilateral sublingual gland and evacuation of the cyst with removal of the pseudocapsule. There have been no reported cases of "ascending" ranulas into the parapharyngeal or pterygomaxillary space. The following represents the first known case that involved an extensive ascending and plunging ranula in a pediatric patient, which recurred despite complete excision of the ranula and sublingual gland. IRB approval was not required per institutional policy on retrospective case reports.

  19. The camp experience for siblings of pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Siblings of pediatric cancer patients experience difficulties coping and adapting to the experience of a cancer diagnosis. A variety of emotional and behavioral changes as well as somatic complaints have been reported. Children describe many negative changes after their sibling is diagnosed with cancer. Many social supports and therapeutic interventions have been proposed for siblings, one of which is a camp experience. The literature has demonstrated that camps have a positive impact and offer siblings of children with cancer a supportive peer environment. Camp encourages discussion with peers and health care providers and facilitates participation in activities that improve knowledge, social confidence, and self-esteem. Nurses can help siblings by recommending camp experiences, volunteering at camps, and adding a camp experiences to existing sibling support programs.

  20. Sedation and analgesia for the pediatric trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Grabinsky, Andreas; Bhananker, Sanjay M

    2012-01-01

    The number of children requiring sedation and analgesia for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures has increased substantially in the last decade. Both anesthesiologist and non-anesthesiologists are involved in varying settings outside the operating room to provide safe and effective sedation and analgesia. Procedural sedation has become standard of care and its primary aim is managing acute anxiety, pain, and control of movement during painful or unpleasant procedures. There is enough evidence to suggest that poorly controlled acute pain causes suffering, worse outcome, as well as debilitating chronic pain syndromes that are often refractory to available treatment options. This article will provide strategies to provide safe and effective sedation and analgesia for pediatric trauma patients. PMID:23181210

  1. Predictors of direct cost of diabetes care in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examines factors that predict elevated direct costs of pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods: A cohort of 784 children with type 1 diabetes at least 6 months postdiagnosis and managed by pediatric endocrinologists at Texas Children's Hospital were included in this study. Actual...

  2. Persistent Infections with Diverse Co-Circulating Astroviruses in Pediatric Oncology Patients, Memphis, Tennessee, USA

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Valerie; Freiden, Pamela; Gu, Zhengming; Adderson, Elisabeth; Hayden, Randall

    2017-01-01

    Human astroviruses are a major cause of pediatric gastroenteritis, especially in immunocompromised children. We conducted a retrospective study to demonstrate that diverse astrovirus genotypes can co-circulate in pediatric oncology patients. A subset of cases is associated with long-term virus shedding (range 17–183 days). PMID:28098537

  3. Recommendations for meeting the pediatric patient's need for a clinical pharmacist: a joint opinion of the Pediatrics Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group.

    PubMed

    Bhatt-Mehta, Varsha; Buck, Marcia L; Chung, Allison M; Farrington, Elizabeth A; Hagemann, Tracy M; Hoff, David S; LaRochelle, Joseph M; Pettit, Rebecca S; Phan, Hanna; Potts, Amy L; Smith, Katherine P; Parrish, Richard H

    2013-02-01

    Children warrant access to care from clinical pharmacists trained in pediatrics. The American College of Clinical Pharmacy Pediatrics Practice and Research Network (ACCP Pediatrics PRN) released an opinion paper in 2005 with recommendations for improving the quality and quantity of pediatric pharmacy education in colleges of pharmacy, residency programs, and fellowships. Although progress has been made in increasing the availability of pediatric residencies, there is still much to be done to meet the direct care needs of pediatric patients. The purpose of this joint opinion paper is to outline strategies and recommendations for expanding the quality and capacity of pediatric clinical pharmacy practitioners by elevating the minimum expectations for pharmacists entering pediatric practice, standardizing pediatric pharmacy education, expanding the current number of pediatric clinical pharmacists, and creating an infrastructure for development of pediatric clinical pharmacists and clinical scientists. These recommendations may be used to provide both a conceptual framework and action items for schools of pharmacy, health care systems, and policymakers to work together to increase the quality and quantity of pediatric training, practice, and research initiatives.

  4. Multiple-dose amikacin kinetics in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Kramer, W G; Cleary, T; Frankel, L S; Kohl, S; Pickering, L K

    1979-11-01

    Amikacin kinetics was studied in 8 pediatric oncology patients who received the drug by intravenous infusion over 30 or 60 min at a dose of 5 mg/kg every 6 or 8 hr. This regimen is recommended but, due to patient variability, patients should be monitored. Dosing intervals during 1 or 2 and 3 or 4 days of therapy were studied with serum samples collected before and at the end of the infusion and serially to the end of the dosing interval. The data appeared consistent with and were analyzed according to 1-compartment model. An equation describing serum concentration with time for the multiple-dose case was fit to each patient's multiple-interval data with nonlinear regression. Half-life averaged 1.2 hr. volume of distribution 0.24 l/kg, and total body clearance 109 ml/min/1.73 m2 or 2.51 ml/min/kg. The volume of distribution and the clearance are greater than reported for adults and probably account for the larger dose needed to achieve and maintain therapeutic levels. Although the total daily dose was greater than previously reported, there were no signs of toxicity, although therapuetic concentrations were maintained.

  5. Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices for Pediatric Patients With Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Chopski, Steven G; Moskowitz, William B; Stevens, Randy M; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2017-01-01

    The use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices is a viable therapeutic treatment option for patients with congestive heart failure. Ventricular assist devices, cavopulmonary assist devices, and total artificial heart pumps continue to gain acceptance as viable treatment strategies for both adults and pediatric patients as bridge-to-transplant, bridge-to-recovery, and longer-term circulatory support alternatives. We present a review of the current and future MCS devices for patients having congenital heart disease (CHD) with biventricular or univentricular circulations. Several devices that are specifically designed for patients with complex CHD are in the development pipeline undergoing rigorous animal testing as readiness experiments in preparation for future clinical trials. These advances in the development of new blood pumps for patients with CHD will address a significant unmet clinical need, as well as generally improve innovation of the current state of the art in MCS technology.

  6. Appropriateness of hospitalization for CAP-affected pediatric patients: report from a Southern Italy General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Fabio; De Brasi, Daniele; Siani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease, responsible for significant healthcare expenditures, mostly because of hospitalization. Many practice guidelines on CAP have been developed, including admission criteria, but a few on appropriate hospitalization in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate appropriate hospital admission for CAP in a pediatric population. Methods We evaluated appropriate admission to a Pediatric Unit performing a retrospective analysis on CAP admitted pediatric patients from a Southern Italy area. Diagnosis was made based on clinical and radiological signs. Appropriate hospital admission was evaluated following clinical and non-clinical international criteria. Family ability to care children was assessed by evaluating social deprivation status. Results In 2 winter seasons 120 pediatric patients aged 1-129 months were admitted because of CAP. Median age was 28.7 months. Raised body temperature was scored in 68.3% of patients, cough was present in 100% of cases, and abdominal pain was rarely evidenced. Inflammatory indices (ESR and CRP) were found elevated in 33.3% of cases. Anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibodies were found positive in 20.4%. Trans-cutaneous (TC) SaO2 was found lower than 92% in 14.6%. Dyspnoea was present in 43.3%. Dehydration requiring i.v. fluid supplementation was scored in 13.3%. Evaluation of familial ability to care their children revealed that 76% of families (derived from socially depressed areas) were "at social risk", thus not able to appropriately care their children. Furthermore, analysis of CAP patients revealed that "at social risk" people accessed E.D. and were hospitalized more frequently than "not at risk" patients (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% CI: 1,15 to 11,12; p = 0.01), and that admitted "at social risk" people presented without clinical signs of severity (namely dyspnoea, and/or SaO2 ≤ 92%, and/or dehydration) more frequently than "not at risk" population (p = 0.005). Conclusion

  7. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values

    SciTech Connect

    Ubeda, Carlos; Miranda, Patricia; Vano, Eliseo

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Methods: Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Results: Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for <1 yr; 213 for 1 to <5 yr; 82 for 5 to <10 yr; and 102 for 10 to <16 yr. The third quartile values obtained for DAP by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and age range were 1.17 and 1.11 Gy cm{sup 2} for <1 yr; 1.74 and 1.90 Gy cm{sup 2} for 1 to <5 yr; 2.83 and 3.22 Gy cm{sup 2} for 5 to <10 yr; and 7.34 and 8.68 Gy cm{sup 2} for 10 to <16 yr, respectively. The third quartile value obtained for the DAP/body weight ratio for the full sample of procedures was 0.17 (Gy cm{sup 2}/kg) for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions: The data presented in this paper are an initial attempt at establishing local DRLs in pediatric interventional cardiology, from a large sample of procedures for the standard age bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there

  8. Health-related quality of life among children presenting to a pediatric sleep disorders clinic.

    PubMed

    Hart, Chantelle N; Palermo, Tonya M; Rosen, Carol L

    2005-01-01

    The present study is a retrospective review of a clinical database that assessed the association between childhood sleep disturbances and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The sample consists of 80 caretakers of children ages 5 to 18 years referred to a pediatric sleep disorders clinic. Caretakers completed the Child Health Questionnaire-Parent Form (CHQ-PF50) and the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ). Compared to a normative sample, caretakers of children with a sleep disorder reported poorer scores on the CHQ-PF50. Caretaker reports of HRQOL did not differ across sleep diagnostic groups, and scores on the CSHQ were not associated with scores on the CHQ-PF50. Results suggest that children with sleep disturbances experience a variety of HRQOL decrements that may benefit from intervention.

  9. Safety and efficacy of two dose levels of taliglucerase alfa in pediatric patients with Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Zimran, Ari; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Derlis Emilio; Abrahamov, Aya; Elstein, Deborah; Paz, Alona; Brill-Almon, Einat; Chertkoff, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Taliglucerase alfa is a plant cell-expressed beta-glucocerebrosidase approved in the United States, Israel, Australia, Canada, and other countries for enzyme replacement therapy in adults with Type 1 Gaucher disease (GD), for treatment of pediatric patients in the United States, Australia, and Canada, and for the hematologic manifestations of Type 3 GD in pediatric patients in Canada. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-dose, 12-month study assessed efficacy and safety of taliglucerase alfa in pediatric patients with GD. Eleven children were randomized to taliglucerase alfa 30U/kg (n=6) or 60U/kg (n=5) per infusion every other week. From baseline to month 12, the following changes were noted in the taliglucerase alfa 30-U/kg and 60-U/kg dose groups, respectively: median hemoglobin concentrations increased by 12.2% and 14.2%; the interquartile ranges of median percent change in hemoglobin levels from baseline were 20.6 and 10.4, respectively; mean spleen volume decreased from 22.2 to 14.0 multiples of normal (MN) and from 29.4 to 12.9 MN; mean liver volume decreased from 1.8 to 1.5 MN and from 2.2 to 1.7 MN; platelet counts increased by 30.9% and 73.7%; and chitotriosidase activity was reduced by 58.5% and 66.1%. Nearly all adverse events were mild/moderate, unrelated to treatment, and transient. One patient presented with treatment-related gastroenteritis reported as a serious adverse event due to the need for hospitalization for rehydration. No patient discontinued. These data suggest that taliglucerase alfa has the potential to be a therapeutic treatment option for children with GD. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01132690.

  10. Intravesical Botulinum Toxin for Persistent Autonomic Dysreflexia in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Durkee, Charles; Groth, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We present a novel case of persistent autonomic dysreflexia in a pediatric spinal cord injury patient treated successfully with intravesical botulinum toxin. Study Design. A retrospective chart review of one patient seen at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin from 2006 to 2012 was performed. Results. A pediatric spinal cord injury patient with known neurogenic bladder presented with severe hypertension consistent with autonomic dysreflexia. His symptoms and hypertension did not improve with conservative measures, and he necessitated ICU admission and antihypertensive drips. He was taken to the operating room for intravesical botulinum toxin for refractory bladder spasms. Following this, his symptoms abated, and he was weaned off IV antihypertensives and returned to his baseline state. His symptoms were improved for greater than six months. Conclusions. There are few treatment options for the management of refractory autonomic dysreflexia. Intravesical botulinum toxin has never been reported for this use. Dedicated research is warranted to assess its efficacy, as it was used successfully to abort autonomic dysreflexia in this patient. PMID:27006855

  11. The respiratory presentation of severe combined immunodeficiency in two Mennonite children at a tertiary centre highlighting the importance of recognizing this pediatric emergency

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Simon; Kavadas, Fotini D; Haider, Seemab; Noseworthy, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is considered to be a pediatric emergency, with respiratory distress being the most common presenting symptom. The authors present two cases of SCID in children <4 months of age with respiratory distress at a tertiary care centre due to a recently described homozygous CD3 delta mutation found only in the Mexican Mennonite population. Failure to respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics prompted investigation for possible SCID. Bronchial alveolar lavage fluid from both patients grew Pneumocystis jiroveci, and flow cytometry revealed absent T cells. The CD3 delta gene is believed to be important in T cell differentiation and maturation. The present article reminds pediatricians and pediatric respirologists that the key to diagnosing SCID is to have a high index of suspicion if there is poor response to conventional therapies. PMID:24288697

  12. The respiratory presentation of severe combined immunodeficiency in two Mennonite children at a tertiary centre highlighting the importance of recognizing this pediatric emergency.

    PubMed

    Lam, Simon; Kavadas, Fotini Dimitriou; Haider, Seemab; Noseworthy, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is considered to be a pediatric emergency, with respiratory distress being the most common presenting symptom. The authors present two cases of SCID in children <4 months of age with respiratory distress at a tertiary care centre due to a recently described homozygous CD3 delta mutation found only in the Mexican Mennonite population. Failure to respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics prompted investigation for possible SCID. Bronchial alveolar lavage fluid from both patients grew Pneumocystis jiroveci, and flow cytometry revealed absent T cells. The CD3 delta gene is believed to be important in T cell differentiation and maturation. The present article reminds pediatricians and pediatric respirologists that the key to diagnosing SCID is to have a high index of suspicion if there is poor response to conventional therapies.

  13. Incidental GIST after appendectomy in a pediatric patient: a first instance and review of pediatric patients with CD117 confirmed GISTs.

    PubMed

    Tran, Sifrance; Dingeldein, Michael; Mengshol, Sarah C; Kay, Saundra; Chin, Anthony C

    2014-04-01

    A 7-year-old boy underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy for acute appendicitis. Incidentally, he was found to have a spindle cell tumor with CD117 immunopositivity, consistent with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the appendix. Although commonly reported in adults, pediatric GISTs are rare gastrointestinal malignancies that occur in only 1.4-2.7% of children and adolescents. Due to the paucity of reports, data are insufficient to adequately characterize tumor behavior, recurrence, and survival. We present the first case of pediatric GIST in the appendix. In addition, a review of the literature for CD117 confirmed pediatric GISTs was conducted to summarize its clinical features and current treatment options.

  14. Adoption of Secure Messaging in a Patient Portal across Pediatric Specialties

    PubMed Central

    Masterman, Mary; Cronin, Robert M.; Davis, Sharon E.; Shenson, Jared A.; Jackson, Gretchen P.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have explored adoption of patient portals for pediatric patients outside primary care or disease-specific applications. We examined use of patient-provider messaging in a patient portal across pediatric specialties during the three years after implementation of pediatric portal accounts at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. We determined the number of patient-initiated message threads and clinic visits for pediatric specialties and percentage of these outpatient interactions (i.e., message threads + clinic visits) done through messaging. Generalized estimating equations measured the likelihood of message-based interaction. During the study period, pediatric families initiated 33,503 messages and participated in 318,386 clinic visits. The number of messages sent (and messaging percentage of outpatient interaction) increased each year from 2,860 (2.7%) to 18,772 (17%). Primary care received 4,368 messages (3.4% of outpatient interactions); pediatric subspecialties, 29,135 (13.0%). Rapid growth in messaging volume over time was seen in primary care and most pediatric specialties (OR>1.0; p<0.05). PMID:28269952

  15. Reconstruction of lower extremity with perforator free flaps by free style approach in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin Woo; Ben-Nakhi, Muneera; Hong, Joon Pio

    2012-11-01

    Pediatric reconstruction using microsurgery is accepted normal practice, and the use of perforator flaps is slowly increasing. This study presents clinical work using various perforator free flaps by free style approach to reconstruct lower extremity soft tissue defects in pediatric patients and evaluates its efficacy. Between June 2002 and February 2011, 32 cases (mean age: 10.1 years) were reconstructed with free style perforator free flaps. Retrospective evaluations for flap survival, growth character, and other associated morbidities were performed. Flaps used in this series are anterolateral thigh (ALT) perforator, superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator (SCIP), upper medial thigh perforator, and posterior interosseous perforator free flaps. The free style approach for pedicle dissection was successful in all cases. Early postoperative complications were 15.6% from hematoma collection to partial loss of flap. Although there was no total loss in this series, one case needed additional flap coverage to cover the partial loss of the flap. The long-term follow-up showed contracture along the margin, with 16% needing a releasing procedure. Bone growth was not affected by flap contracture. The overall results show perforator flaps using the free style approach to be a reliable and feasible approach for lower extremity reconstruction in the pediatric population.

  16. Dietary supplements and pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Present and the future

    PubMed Central

    Rahimlou, Mehran; Ahmadnia, Hoda; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in children. High prevalence of pediatric obesity and sedentary lifestyle has augmented the incidence of NAFLD in children. Obesity is associated with an increased risk of NAFLD through various mechanisms such as intensification of insulin resistance and increased levels of inflammatory markers. There is no approved medical intervention for treatment of pediatric NAFLD; the only proven strategy in management of pediatric NAFLD is lifestyle modification. Recently, the effects of nutritional supplements have been examined in the management of pediatric NAFLD. The purpose of this review is to summarize the studies evaluating the effects of nutritional supplements on pediatric NAFLD and explain the future direction in this field. PMID:26557952

  17. Bezoar in a Pediatric Oncology Patient Treated with Coca-Cola

    PubMed Central

    Naramore, Sara; Virojanapa, Amy; Bell, Moshe; Jhaveri, Punit N.

    2015-01-01

    A bezoar is a mass of indigestible material. Bezoars can present with a gradual onset of non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. However, bezoars can result in more serious conditions such as intestinal bleeding or obstruction. Without quick recognition, particularly in susceptible individuals, the diagnosis and treatment can be delayed. Currently resolution is achieved with enzymatic dissolution, endoscopic fragmentation or surgery. We describe, to our knowledge, the first pediatric patient with lymphoma to have had a bezoar treated with Coca-Cola. PMID:26269699

  18. Bezoar in a Pediatric Oncology Patient Treated with Coca-Cola.

    PubMed

    Naramore, Sara; Virojanapa, Amy; Bell, Moshe; Jhaveri, Punit N

    2015-01-01

    A bezoar is a mass of indigestible material. Bezoars can present with a gradual onset of non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. However, bezoars can result in more serious conditions such as intestinal bleeding or obstruction. Without quick recognition, particularly in susceptible individuals, the diagnosis and treatment can be delayed. Currently resolution is achieved with enzymatic dissolution, endoscopic fragmentation or surgery. We describe, to our knowledge, the first pediatric patient with lymphoma to have had a bezoar treated with Coca-Cola.

  19. Sciatica caused by pyomyositis of the piriformis muscle in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Toda, Taihei; Koda, Masao; Rokkaku, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Arata; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Murakami, Ken-ichi; Nakajima, Hideyuki; Murakami, Masazumi

    2013-02-01

    Because the sciatic nerve leaves the pelvis through the greater sciatic notch underneath the piriformis muscle, any pathology of the piriformis muscle could result in entrapment of the sciatic nerve; this is widely known as piriformis muscle syndrome. Pyomyositis of the piriformis muscle may be a cause of piriformis muscle syndrome. Piriformis muscle syndrome caused by pyomyositis of the piriformis muscle in pediatric patients is rare. This article describes a case of sciatica caused by pyomyositis of the piriformis muscle in a pediatric patient. A 6-year-old boy presented with right buttock and thigh pain following a mild fever and sore throat. The pain worsened, and he became unable to walk. On admission, his temperature was 38.4°C. He reported severe right-sided buttock and lateral thigh pain. Positive Freiberg sign was observed. Laboratory examination revealed elevated white blood cell count and C-reactive protein level. T2-weighted magnetic resonance images of the pelvis revealed high-intensity changes of the piriformis muscle and iliosacral joint. Thus, piriformis syndrome caused by pyomyositis of the piriformis muscle was diagnosed. Oral antibiotics (10 mg/kg per day of cefdinir) were administered. Pain gradually decreased, and the patient was able to walk. Final follow-up examination at 6 months after symptom onset revealed no sciatic pain. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed normalized intensities of the piriformis muscle. The endopelvic fascia provides a route for infection from the pelvis to the piriformis. The pyomyositis of the piriformis muscle in the current case may have occurred secondary to the pyoarthritis of the sacroiliac joint. Endopelvic infections involving the piriformis muscle may mimic hip diseases in pediatric patients.

  20. Successful emergency department interventions that reduce time to antibiotics in febrile pediatric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Sandra; Nypaver, MIchele; Hebert, Katherine; Benner, Christopher; Stanley, Rachel; Cohen, Daniel; Rogers, Alexander; Goldstick, Jason; Mahajan, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    Children with cancer and fever are at high risk for sepsis related death. Rapid antibiotic delivery (< 60 minutes) has been shown to reduce mortality. We compared patient outcomes and describe interventions from three separate quality improvement (QI) projects conducted in three United States (US) tertiary care pediatric emergency departments (EDs) with the shared aim to reduce time to antibiotic (TTA) to < 60 minutes in febrile pediatric oncology patients (Temperature > 38.0 C). A secondary objective was to identify interventions amenable to translation to other centers. We conducted a post project analysis of prospectively collected observational data from children < 18 years visiting these EDs during independently conducted QI projects. Comparisons were made pre to post intervention periods within each institution. All interventions were derived independently using QI methods by each institution. Successful as well as unsuccessful interventions were described and common interventions adopted by all sites identified. A total of 1032 ED patient visits were identified from the three projects. Improvement in median TTA delivery (min) pre to post intervention(s) was 118.5–57.0 at site 1, 163.0–97.5 at site 2, and 188.0–111.5 at site 3 (p<.001 all sites). The eight common interventions were 1) Triage application of topical anesthetic 2) Rapid room placement & triage 3) Resuscitation room placement of ill appearing children 4) Close proximity to central line equipment 5) Antibiotic administration before laboratory analyses 6) Consensus clinical practice guideline establishment 7) Family pre-ED education for fever and 8) Staff project updates. This core set of eight low cost, high yield QI interventions were developed independently by the three ED's which led to substantial reduction in time to antibiotic delivery in children with cancer presenting with fever. These interventions may inform future QI initiatives in other settings caring for febrile pediatric

  1. Pediatric sedation.

    PubMed

    Daud, Yasmeen N; Carlson, Douglas W

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric sedation is an evolving field performed by an extensive list of specialties. Well-defined sedation systems within pediatric facilities are paramount to providing consistent, safe sedation. Pediatric sedation providers should be trained in the principles and practice of sedation, which include patient selection, pre-sedation assessment to determine risks during sedation, selection of optimal sedation medication, monitoring requirements, and post-sedation care. Training, credentialing, and continuing sedation education must be incorporated into sedation systems to verify and monitor the practice of safe sedation. Pediatric hospitalists represent a group of providers with extensive pediatric knowledge and skills who can safely provide pediatric sedation.

  2. The Prevalence of Malnutrition and Effectiveness of STRONGkids Tool in the Identification of Malnutrition Risks among Pediatric Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Durakbaşa, Çiğdem Ulukaya; Fettahoğlu, Selma; Bayar, Ahu; Mutus, Murat; Okur, Hamit

    2014-01-01

    of hospitalised pediatric surgical patients, the data acquired in the present study emphasise the need to raise clinician’s awareness about the importance of nutritional status assessment among hospitalised pediatric patients and the benefits of identifying patients at the risk of nutritional depletion before malnutrition occurs. Our findings support the use of the STRONGkids tool among pediatric surgical patients to identify patients at risk for malnutrition and to increase the physician’s awareness of nutritional assessment among hospitalised patients upon admission. PMID:25667785

  3. Percutaneous endoscopic treatment for urinary stones in pediatric patients: where we are now

    PubMed Central

    Collura, Giuseppe; Innocenzi, Michele; De Dominicis, Mauro; Gerocarni Nappo, Simona; Capozza, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Background Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been adopted for pyelo-calyceal stones treatment in pediatric patients, starting from the 90’s. Very recently, miniaturization of endoscopic instruments allowed less invasive procedures with low complication rate. We reviewed our experience on upper tract stone treatment utilizing two different percutaneous accesses, focusing on the recent new miniaturized devices offered for pediatric renal stones. Methods Patients presenting upper tract urinary stones observed from January 2011 to December 2015 and treated by percutaneous renal access were prospectively evaluated: age, sex, metabolic issues, associated abnormalities, treatment modalities, hospital stay and complication rate were recorded in a specific database. Two different endourological percutaneous modalities were adopted, depending to the stone size and position. PCNL was performed through a direct calyceal puncture under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance and Amplatz access dilatation till 24 Fr. Ballistic energy was used for fragmentation. Micropercutaneous (Microperc) procedure was recently offered utilizing a 4.85 Fr metallic needle and Holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy under direct vision through a 0.9 mm high resolution optic flexible wire connected with a telescope. Results Thirty-eight percutaneous access to pyelo-calyceal renal stones were performed on a total of 108 children treated for upper tract stones, aged 4 to 18 years (mean age 7.5 years). The overall number of procedures was 144 (36 repeated procedures). Cystinuria was diagnosed in 5 patients. PCNL was adopted in 28 patients, Microperc was utilized in 8 patients. Hemoglobin dropdown was limited to 1.20±0.80 mg% in PCNL and was not significant in Microperc. No blood transfusion was needed. No significant complications were observed. Stone free rate or minimal not significant residuals were achieved in 82% of PCNL and in 87.5% of Microperc, after a single procedure. Conclusions

  4. Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Combined Immunodeficiency Pediatric Patients on the Basis of Cellular Radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Woodbine, Lisa; Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Choo, Sharon; Fraser, Chris; Gray, Paul; Smith, Jai; Best, Nickala; Munforte, Laura; Korneeva, Elena; Martin, Roger F.; Jeggo, Penny A.; Martin, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients with severe or nonsevere combined immunodeficiency have increased susceptibility to severe, life-threatening infections and, without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, may fail to thrive. A subset of these patients have the radiosensitive (RS) phenotype, which may necessitate conditioning before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and this conditioning includes radiomimetic drugs, which may significantly affect treatment response. To provide statistical criteria for classifying cellular response to ionizing radiation as the measure of functional RS screening, we analyzed the repair capacity and survival of ex vivo irradiated primary skin fibroblasts from five dysmorphic and/or developmentally delayed pediatric patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and combined immunodeficiency. We developed a mathematical framework for the analysis of γ histone 2A isoform X foci kinetics to quantitate DNA-repair capacity, thus establishing crucial criteria for identifying RS. The results, presented in a diagram showing each patient as a point in a 2D RS map, were in agreement with findings from the assessment of cellular RS by clonogenic survival and from the genetic analysis of factors involved in the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway. We provide recommendations for incorporating into clinical practice the functional assays and genetic analysis used for establishing RS status before conditioning. This knowledge would enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen, reducing the risk for severe therapy-related adverse effects. PMID:26151233

  5. Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Combined Immunodeficiency Pediatric Patients on the Basis of Cellular Radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Woodbine, Lisa; Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Choo, Sharon; Fraser, Chris; Gray, Paul; Smith, Jai; Best, Nickala; Munforte, Laura; Korneeva, Elena; Martin, Roger F; Jeggo, Penny A; Martin, Olga A

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric patients with severe or nonsevere combined immunodeficiency have increased susceptibility to severe, life-threatening infections and, without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, may fail to thrive. A subset of these patients have the radiosensitive (RS) phenotype, which may necessitate conditioning before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and this conditioning includes radiomimetic drugs, which may significantly affect treatment response. To provide statistical criteria for classifying cellular response to ionizing radiation as the measure of functional RS screening, we analyzed the repair capacity and survival of ex vivo irradiated primary skin fibroblasts from five dysmorphic and/or developmentally delayed pediatric patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and combined immunodeficiency. We developed a mathematical framework for the analysis of γ histone 2A isoform X foci kinetics to quantitate DNA-repair capacity, thus establishing crucial criteria for identifying RS. The results, presented in a diagram showing each patient as a point in a 2D RS map, were in agreement with findings from the assessment of cellular RS by clonogenic survival and from the genetic analysis of factors involved in the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway. We provide recommendations for incorporating into clinical practice the functional assays and genetic analysis used for establishing RS status before conditioning. This knowledge would enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen, reducing the risk for severe therapy-related adverse effects.

  6. A pediatric civil war burn victim: the patient's and caregivers' stress and coping.

    PubMed

    Fette, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    A patient's and the caregivers' threats and reliefs during nursing of a pediatric civil war burn victim, treated through a charity grant in a Western hospital, are discussed and supported by a literature review.

  7. Quality Improvement Initiative Reduces Serious Safety Events in Pediatric Hospital Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Annual Conferences Newsletter AHRQ News Now Search News & Events Topics Search ahrq.gov About About AHRQ Profile ... May 2013 Quality improvement initiative reduces serious safety events in pediatric hospital patients Previous Page Next Page ...

  8. Systematic review of surgical treatment techniques for adult and pediatric patients with pectus excavatum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This compares outcome measures of current pectus excavatum (PEx) treatments, namely the Nuss and Ravitch procedures, in pediatric and adult patients. Original investigations that stratified PEx patients based on current treatment and age (pediatric = 0–21; adult 17–99) were considered for inclusion. Outcome measures were: operation duration, analgesia duration, blood loss, length of stay (LOS), outcome ratings, complications, and percentage requiring reoperations. Adult implant patients (18.8%) had higher reoperation rates than adult Nuss or Ravitch patients (5.3% and 3.3% respectively). Adult Nuss patients had longer LOS (7.3 days), more strut/bar displacement (6.1%), and more epidural analgesia (3 days) than adult Ravitch patients (2.9 days, 0%, 0 days). Excluding pectus bar and strut displacements, pediatric and adult Nuss patients tended to have higher complication rates (pediatric - 38%; adult - 21%) compared to pediatric and adult Ravitch patients (12.5%; 8%). Pediatric Ravitch patients clearly had more strut displacements than adult Ravitch patients (0% and 6.4% respectively). These results suggest significantly better results in common PEx surgical repair techniques (i.e. Nuss and Ravitch) than uncommon techniques (i.e. Implants and Robicsek). The results suggest slightly better outcomes in pediatric Nuss procedure patients as compared with all other groups. We recommend that symptomatic pediatric patients with uncomplicated PEx receive the Nuss procedure. We suggest that adult patients receive the Nuss or Ravitch procedure, even though the long-term complication rates of the adult Nuss procedure require more investigation. PMID:24506826

  9. Modified functional obturator for the consideration of facial growth in the mucoepidermoid carcinoma pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Min; Park, Min Woo; Cho, Young Ah; Myoung, Hoon; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Suk Keun

    2015-10-01

    Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) is a common salivary gland tumor in a adults but is very rare in pediatric patients. The standard treatment of MEC is en bloc resection with wide safety margins and subsequent reconstruction of the jaw, but few surgeons or pediatric specialists have experience with this procedure. An 11-year-old boy received a hemi-maxillectomy with subsequent application of the modified functional obturator (MFO) by the functional matrix concept of Moss. And the patient's face showed normal growth pattern. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate the novel concept of pediatric maxillary reconstruction using MFO for the consideration of facial growth.

  10. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Daniela Migliarese; Wu, Jessica; Mager, Diana R; Turner, Justine M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD) is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician) in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD.

  11. Managing the pediatric patient with celiac disease: a multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Daniela Migliarese; Wu, Jessica; Mager, Diana R; Turner, Justine M

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune reaction to gluten, leading to intestinal inflammation, villous atrophy, and malabsorption. It is the most common autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder, with an increasing prevalence. A life-long gluten-free diet (GFD) is an effective treatment to alleviate symptoms, normalize autoantibodies, and heal the intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Poorly controlled CD poses a significant concern for ongoing malabsorption, growth restriction, and the long-term concern of intestinal lymphoma. Achieving GFD compliance and long-term disease control poses a challenge, with adolescents at particular risk for high rates of noncompliance. Attention has turned toward innovative management strategies to improve adherence and achieve better disease control. One such strategy is the development of multidisciplinary clinic approach, and CD is a complex life-long disease state that would benefit from a multifaceted team approach as recognized by multiple national and international bodies, including the National Institutes of Health. Utilizing the combined efforts of the pediatric gastroenterologist, registered dietitian, registered nurse, and primary care provider (general practitioner or general pediatrician) in a CD multidisciplinary clinic model will be of benefit for patients and families in optimizing diagnosis, provision of GFD teaching, and long-term adherence to a GFD. This paper discusses the benefits and proposed structure for multidisciplinary care in improving management of CD. PMID:27785047

  12. Concurrent robotic partial adrenalectomy and extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma resection in a pediatric patient with von Hippel-Lindau disease.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Craig G; Blatt, Adam M; Miles, George E; Linehan, W Marston; Pinto, Peter A

    2008-07-01

    Laparoscopic partial adrenalectomy is a surgical option for select patients with hereditary pheochromocytoma. We present a case of a pediatric patient with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) and both an adrenal pheochromocytoma and an extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma, who underwent concurrent partial adrenalectomy and extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma resection utilizing robotic assistance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of partial adrenalectomy with concurrent extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma resection.

  13. Bacterial Respiratory Tract Infections are Promoted by Systemic Hyperglycemia after Severe Burn Injury in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Cox, Robert A; Williams, Felicia N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn injuries are associated with hyperglycemia leading to increased incidence of infections with pneumonia being one of the most prominent and adverse complication. Recently, various studies in critically ill patients indicated that increased pulmonary glucose levels with airway/blood glucose threshold over 150 mg/dl lead to an overwhelming growth of bacteria in the broncho-pulmonary system, subsequently resulting in an increased risk of pulmonary infections. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a similar cutoff value exists for severely burned pediatric patients. Methods One-hundred six severely burned pediatric patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided in two groups: high (H) defined as daily average glucose levels >75% of LOS >150 mg/dl), and low (L) with daily average glucose levels >75% of the LOS <150 mg/dl). Incidences of pneumonia, atelectasis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were assessed. Incidence of infections, sepsis, and respiratory parameters were recorded. Blood was analyzed for glucose and insulin levels. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test and chi-square test. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results Patient groups were similar in demographics and injury characteristics. Pneumonia in patients on the mechanical ventilation (L: 21% H: 32%) and off mechanical ventilation (L: 5% H: 15%), as well as ARDS were significantly higher in the high group (L: 3% H: 19%), p<0.05, while atelectasis was not different. Patients in the high group required significantly longer ventilation compared to low patients (p<0.05). Furthermore, incidence of infection and sepsis were significantly higher in the high group, p<0.05. Conclusion Our results indicate that systemic glucose levels over 150 mg/dl are associated with a higher incidence of pneumonia confirming the previous studies in critically ill patients. PMID:24074819

  14. STRESS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS--THE EFFECT OF PROLONGED HOSPITALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Mîndru, Dana Elena; Stănescu, Ralnca Stefania; Mioara, Calipsoana Matei; Duceac, Letiţia Doina; Rugina, Aurica; Temneanu, Oana Raluca; Ungureanu, Monica; Florescu, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Long-term hospitalization emotionally impacts any patient, especially children, and is defined as a long period of time during which the patient is hospitalized and experiences isolation from his or her family, friends and home. Stressful situations trigger a nonspecific response that involves multiple physiological mechanisms. Currently, because of the complexity of these mechanisms, there are no laboratory markers that allow the quantification of the stress intensity felt by the patient. Laboratory determinations currently used in evaluating the response to stress are neuroendocrine, immunological and metabolic. The neuroendocrine system is the first to respond to stressful events. Stress stimulates the hypothalamus, leading to the release of CRH, which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce ACTH. Chronic stress directs the synthesis towards cortisol, which may lead to hypo secretion of the other adrenal steroid hormones. The hospital and the disease are stressors for children and caregivers, since stress can interfere with the normal development of young patients, affecting them in the long term. Admitting a child to hospital means interrupting his or her normal daily life and changing the environment that is familiar to him or her. Therefore, the involvement of the family doctor is very important, as many conditions can be solved by visiting his or her office and thus eliminating the need for hospitalization in a pediatric hospital. If, however, the nature of the condition requires that the child should be seen by a pediatrician, the period of hospitalization should not be much extended so as to prevent the appearance of other possible problems that might influence the child's state.

  15. Genomic imbalances in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Verbitsky, Miguel; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Fasel, David A.; Levy, Brynn; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Wuttke, Matthias; Abraham, Alison G.; Kaskel, Frederick; Köttgen, Anna; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.; Wong, Craig S.; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. There is frequent uncertainty in the identification of specific etiologies of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. Recent studies indicate that chromosomal microarrays can identify rare genomic imbalances that can clarify the etiology of neurodevelopmental and cardiac disorders in children; however, the contribution of unsuspected genomic imbalance to the incidence of pediatric CKD is unknown. METHODS. We performed chromosomal microarrays to detect genomic imbalances in children enrolled in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) prospective cohort study, a longitudinal prospective multiethnic observational study of North American children with mild to moderate CKD. Patients with clinically detectable syndromic disease were excluded from evaluation. We compared 419 unrelated children enrolled in CKiD to multiethnic cohorts of 21,575 children and adults that had undergone microarray genotyping for studies unrelated to CKD. RESULTS. We identified diagnostic copy number disorders in 31 children with CKD (7.4% of the cohort). We detected 10 known pathogenic genomic disorders, including the 17q12 deletion HNF1 homeobox B (HNF1B) and triple X syndromes in 19 of 419 unrelated CKiD cases as compared with 98 of 21,575 control individuals (OR 10.8, P = 6.1 × 10–20). In an additional 12 CKiD cases, we identified 12 likely pathogenic genomic imbalances that would be considered reportable in a clinical setting. These genomic imbalances were evenly distributed among patients diagnosed with congenital and noncongenital forms of CKD. In the vast majority of these cases, the genomic lesion was unsuspected based on the clinical assessment and either reclassified the disease or provided information that might have triggered additional clinical care, such as evaluation for metabolic or neuropsychiatric disease. CONCLUSION. A substantial proportion of children with CKD have an unsuspected genomic imbalance, suggesting genomic disorders as a risk factor for

  16. Annular pancreas concurrent with pancreaticobiliary maljunction presented with symptoms until adult age: case report with comparative data on pediatric cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Annular pancreas (AP) concurrent with pancreaticobiliary maljunction (PBMJ), an unusual coexisted congenital anomaly, often presented symptoms and subjected surgical treatment at the early age of life. We reported the first adult case of concurrent AP with PBMJ presented with symptoms until his twenties, and performed a literature review to analyze the clinicopathological features of such cases comparing with its pediatric counterpart. Case presentation The main clinical features of this case were abdominal pain and increased levels of plasma amylase as well as liver function test. A complete type of annular pancreas with duodenal stenosis was found, and dilated common bile duct with high confluence of pancreaticobiliary ducts was also observed. Meanwhile, extremely high levels of bile amylase were detected both in common bile duct and gallbladder. The patient received duodenojejunostomy (side-to-side anastomosis) as well as choledochojejunostomy (Roux-en-Y anastomosis), adnd was discharged in a good condition. Conclusion AP concurrent with PBMJ usually presents as duodenal obstruction in infancy, while manifests as pancreatitis in adulthood. Careful long-term follow-up is required for children with AP considering its association with PBMJ which would induce various intractable pathologic conditions in the biliary tract and pancreas. PMID:24156788

  17. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Continuous Infusion Doripenem in a Pediatric Patient on Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Wayne S.; Conley, Susan B.; Shea, Paul; Enache, Adela; Chopra, Arun

    2017-01-01

    An 11-year-old African American male with severe combined immunodeficiency variant, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, pancreatic insufficiency, chronic mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection, chronic sinusitis, and malnutrition presented with a 1-week history of fevers. He subsequently developed respiratory decompensation and cefepime was discontinued and doripenem was initiated. Doripenem was the carbapenem used due to a national shortage of meropenem. By day 7 the patient (24.7 kg) had a positive fluid balance of 6925 mL (28% FO), and on days 7 into 8 developed acute kidney injury evidenced by an elevated serum creatinine of 0.68 mg/dL, an increase from the baseline of 0.28 mg/dL. On day 9, the patient was initiated on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and the doripenem dosing was changed to a continuous infusion of 2.5 mg/kg/hr (60 mg/kg/day). Approximately 12.5 hours after the start of the doripenem a serum concentration was obtained, which was 4.01 mg/L corresponding to a clearance of 10.5 mL/min/kg. The pediatric dosing and pharmacokinetic data available for doripenem suggest a clearance estimate of 4.4 to 4.8 mL/min/kg, and the adult clearance estimate is 2.4 to 3.78 mL/min/kg. The calculated clearance in our patient of 10.5 mL/min/kg is over double the highest clearance estimate in the pediatric literature. This case demonstrates that doripenem clearance is significantly increased with CRRT in comparison with the published pediatric and adult data. An appropriate pharmacodynamic outcome (time that free drug concentration > minimum inhibitory concentration) can be achieved by continuous infusion doripenem with concurrent therapeutic drug monitoring.

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency in Pediatric Fracture Patients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Vitamin D Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Gorter, Erwin A.; Oostdijk, Wilma; Felius, Abraham; Krijnen, Pieta; Schipper, Inger B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although vitamin D levels are not routinely monitored in pediatric fracture patients, identification of children with a vitamin D deficiency may be clinically relevant because of the potential role of vitamin D in fracture healing. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a pediatric fracture population and to identify risk factors for deficiency. Methods: All pediatric patients (<18 years) who were treated for a fracture of the upper or lower extremity from September 2012 to October 2013 in the outpatient setting of a level one trauma center were included in this cross-sectional study. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as a serum calcidiol <50 nmol/L. Potential risk factors for vitamin D deficiency were analysed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 108 boys (58%) and 79 girls, of a mean age 11.1 years (standard deviation 3.9), who had undergone 189 fractures were included in the study. Sixty-four children (34%) were vitamin D deficient. Of those with follow-up measurements, 74% were no longer deficient after supplementation. Vitamin D status did not influence the occurrence of complications during fracture treatment. Independent risk factors for vitamin D deficiency were older age, season (spring), and a non-Caucasian skin type. Conclusion: Clinicians who treat children with a fracture should inform patients and parents on vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D measurement and supplementation may be needed for children with a non-Caucasian skin type or for those who present with a fracture during spring months. PMID:27550850

  19. Activation of less affected corticospinal tract and poor motor outcome in hemiplegic pediatric patients: a diffusion tensor tractography imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Son, Su Min

    2015-01-01

    The less affected hemisphere is important in motor recovery in mature brains. However, in terms of motor outcome in immature brains, no study has been reported on the less affected corticospinal tract in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the condition of the less affected corticospinal tract and motor function in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Forty patients with hemiplegia due to perinatal or prenatal injury (13.7 ± 3.0 months) and 40 age-matched typically developing controls were recruited. These patients were divided into two age-matched groups, the high functioning group (20 patients) and the low functioning group (20 patients) using functional level of hemiplegia scale. Diffusion tensor tractography images showed that compared with the control group, the patient group of the less affected corticospinal tract showed significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value. Significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value in the low functioning group were observed than in the high functioning group. These findings suggest that activation of the less affected hemisphere presenting as increased fiber number and decreased fractional anisotropy value is related to poor motor function in pediatric hemiplegic patients. PMID:26889198

  20. Pediatric Craniospinal Axis Irradiation With Helical Tomotherapy: Patient Outcome and Lack of Acute Pulmonary Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Penagaricano, Jose; Moros, Eduardo; Corry, Peter; Saylors, Robert; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To present the patient outcomes and risk of symptomatic acute radiation pneumonitis (ARP) in 18 pediatric patients treated with helical tomotherapy to their craniospinal axis for a variety of neoplasms. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 patients received craniospinal axis irradiation with helical tomotherapy. The median age was 12 years (range, 2.5-21). The follow-up range was 3-48 months (median, 16.5). Of the 18 patients, 15 received chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or concomitant setting. Chemotherapy was tailored to the particular histologic diagnosis; 10 of 18 patients underwent surgical removal of the gross primary tumor. The patients were followed and evaluated for ARP starting at 3-6 months after completion of craniospinal axis irradiation. ARP was graded using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3. Results: At the last follow-up visit, 14, 2, and 2 patients were alive without disease, alive with disease, and dead of disease, respectively. The cause-specific survival rate was 89% (16 of 18), disease-free survival rate was 78% (14 of 18), and overall survival rate was 89% (16 of 18). No patient had treatment failure at the cribriform plate. No patient developed symptoms of ARP. Conclusion: Craniospinal axis irradiation using helical tomotherapy yielded encouraging patient outcomes and acute toxicity profiles. Although large volumes of the lung received low radiation doses, no patient developed symptoms of ARP during the follow-up period.

  1. Procedural ultrasound in pediatric patients: techniques and tips for accuracy and safety.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sophia

    2016-06-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound is becoming more prevalent in pediatric emergency departments as a critical adjunct to both diagnosis and procedure guidance. It is cost-effective, safe for unstable patients, and easily repeatable as a patient's clinical status changes. Point-of-care ultrasound does not expose the patient to ionizing radiation and may care ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine is relatively new, the body of literature evaluating its utility is small, but growing. Data from adult emergency medicine, radiology, critical care, and anesthesia evaluating the utility of ultrasound guidance must be extrapolated to pediatric emergency medicine. This issue will review the adult literature and the available pediatric literature comparing ultrasound guidance to more traditional approaches. Methods for using ultrasound guidance to perform various procedures, and the pitfalls associated with each procedure, will also be described.

  2. Single-dose pharmacokinetics of intravenous sulbactam in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Schaad, U B; Guenin, K; Straehl, P

    1986-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered sulbactam were studied in 17 pediatric patients two to 14 years of age. Single doses of 12.5 or 25 mg/kg were infused over 3 min, and in previously healthy children, mean peak plasma concentrations 5 min after dosing were 71 and 163 micrograms/ml, respectively. Noncompartmental and compartmental calculations resulted in similar pharmacokinetic parameters. Linear pharmacokinetics were found in the concentration range studied. The mean terminal-phase half-life was 1.75 hr, the mean total plasma clearance was 180 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and the mean apparent volume of distribution was 340 ml/kg. Approximately 70%-80% of an intravenous dose was excreted unchanged in the urine. In children with cystic fibrosis, both total plasma clearance and apparent volume of distribution were significantly increased. The data support the intravenous administration of 12.5-25 mg of sulbactam/kg every 6 to 8 hr for assessing the adequacy of this drug as an adjunct to beta-lactam therapy for various bacterial infections in children.

  3. Second malignancies in pediatric patients: imaging findings and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Elida; Castellote, Amparo; Piqueras, Joaquim; Ortuno, Pedro; Sánchez-Toledo, José; Nogués, Pere; Lucaya, Javier

    2003-01-01

    Therapeutic advances in the treatment of pediatric neoplasms have improved the prognosis but have also increased the risk of developing rare second malignant neoplasms (SMNs). Primary neoplasms that are often associated with SMNs include lymphoma, retinoblastoma, medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma, and leukemia. The most common SMNs are central nervous system (CNS) tumors, sarcomas, thyroid and parotid gland carcinomas, and leukemia, particularly acute myeloblastic leukemia. Genetic predisposition, chemotherapy, and especially radiation therapy are implicated as pathogenic factors in SMN. All survivors of childhood cancer should have lifelong follow-up, preferably with magnetic resonance imaging, which does not require ionizing radiation and provides greater anatomic detail and resolution in the head and neck region and the CNS. A new or progressive lesion may represent recurrence of the primitive neoplastic process, late radiation injury, or, more infrequently, an SMN. Differential diagnosis can be very difficult, and outcome is often fatal. Treatment protocols should be modified to reduce the risk for SMN without compromising the effectiveness of initial therapy. Clinicians should individualize treatment for patients who are genetically predisposed to SMN. In addition, radiologists should be familiar with the long-term consequences of antineoplastic therapy to facilitate diagnosis and anticipate adverse outcomes.

  4. Dental treatment under general anesthesia in a group of patients with cerebral palsy and a group of healthy pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Escanilla-Casal, Alejandro; Aznar-Gómez, Mirella; Viaño, José M.; Rivera-Baró, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    This is a comparative study between two groups, one of healthy children and the other of children with cerebral palsy, which underwent dental treatment under general anesthesia at Hospital Sant Joan de Déu Barcelona. The purpose of the study was to compare and determine oral pathology, frequency, severity and postoperative complications in pediatric patients with and without an underlying disease which undergo a dental treatment under general anesthesia. Key words:General anesthesia, cerebral palsy, pediatric patients. PMID:24608223

  5. Successful Endovascular Treatment of Iliac Vein Compression (May-Thurner) Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Oguzkurt, Levent Tercan, Fahri; Sener, Mesut

    2006-06-15

    A 10-year-old boy presented to our clinic with left lower extremity swelling present for 1 year with deterioration of symptoms during the prior month. Laboratory investigation for deep vein thrombosis was negative. Venography and computed tomography scan of the pelvis showed compression of the left common iliac vein by the right common iliac artery. A diagnosis of iliac vein compression syndrome was made. After venography, endovascular treatment was planned. The stenosis did not respond to balloon dilatation and a 12 mm Wallstent was placed with successful outcome. The patient's symptoms improved but did not resolve completely, probably due to a chronically occluded left superficial femoral vein that did not respond to endovascular recanalization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of successful endovascular treatment of iliac vein compression syndrome with stent placement in a pediatric patient.

  6. Organ doses for reference pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-04-15

    differences up to several-fold when organs were partially included in the scan coverage. Second, selected organ doses from our calculations agreed to within 20% of values derived from empirical formulae based upon measured patient abdominal circumference. Third, the existing DLP-to-effective dose conversion coefficients tended to be smaller than values given in the present study for all examinations except head scans. Conclusions: A comprehensive organ/effective dose database was established to readily calculate doses for given patients undergoing different CT examinations. The comparisons of our results with the existing studies highlight that use of hybrid phantoms with realistic anatomy is important to improve the accuracy of CT organ dosimetry. The comprehensive pediatric dose data developed here are the first organ-specific pediatric CT scan database based on the realistic pediatric hybrid phantoms which are compliant with the reference data from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The organ dose database is being coupled with an adult organ dose database recently published as part of the development of a user-friendly computer program enabling rapid estimates of organ and effective dose doses for patients of any age, gender, examination types, and CT scanner model.

  7. A distinctive 'microbial signature' in celiac pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Celiac Disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine in which dietary gluten ingestion leads to a chronic enteropathy. Recently, scientific evidence suggested a potential role of gut microbiota in CD. To have a snapshot of dominant duodenal microbiota we analyzed the mucosa-associated microbiota of 20 children with CD, before and after a gluten-free diet (GFD) regimen, and of 10 controls. Total DNA was extracted from duodenal biopsies and amplification products of 16S ribosomal DNA were compared by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE). TTGE profiles were analyzed by statistical multivariate analysis. Results The average number of bands in TTGE profiles was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in active (n.b. 16.7 ± 0.7) and inactive states (n.b. 13.2 ± 0.8) than in controls (n.b. 3.7 ± 1.3). Mean interindividual similarity index was 54.9% ± 14.9% for active disease, 55.6% ± 15.7% for remission state and 21.8% ± 30.16% for controls. Similarity index between celiac children before and after GFD treatment was 63.9% ± 15.8%. Differences in microbiota biodiversity were among active and remission state (P = 0.000224) and amid active CD and controls (P < 0.001). Bacteroides vulgatus and Escherichia coli were detected more often in CD patients than in controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Overall, the results highlighted a peculiar microbial TTGE profile and a significant higher biodiversity in CD pediatric patients' duodenal mucosa. The possible pathophysiological role of these microbial differences needs further characterization. PMID:20565734

  8. Three unique presentations of atraumatic spinal cord infarction in the pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Sandra P; Brock, Timothy D; Matthews, Rebecca R; Stevens, Wendy K

    2014-05-01

    Nontraumatic spinal cord infarction is especially rare in children. Although diagnosis is easily made with magnetic resonance imaging, the typical presenting signs and symptoms and etiology remain elusive. Evidence-based treatment courses are not available. We assess a series of 3 unique patients with nontraumatic spinal cord infarction who presented to our emergency department over the course of 2 years. We consider their presentation, etiology, and treatment course to provide other emergency department physicians with the ability to better identify and evaluate these patients. We also note the need for further research on nontraumatic spinal cord infarction because these patients' outcomes can be quite devastating.

  9. [Giant retropharyngeal abscess in pediatric patient: case report].

    PubMed

    Demir, Ali Oğuz; Doğan, Ersoy; Ecevit, Mustafa Cenk

    2016-01-01

    A two-year-old girl patient, who presented to another center with three months of sore throat and one month of neck swelling with pain, was initiated antibiotherapy but no healing was achieved. Afterwards, the patient was directed to our clinic and an abscess was detected in magnetic resonance imaging extending in both lateral spaces of the neck. The patient was performed surgical drainage urgently. The wound was dressed with rifampicin and the patient was started parenteral antibiotherapy. A dramatic recovery was observed and no complication occurred in the patient.

  10. Fungemia and interstitial lung compromise caused by Malassezia sympodialis in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Clarisa; Euliarte, Cristina; Finquelievich, Jorge; Sosa, María de los Ángeles; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    A case of fungemia with interstitial lung compromise caused by Malassezia sympodialis is reported in an obese pediatric patient on long-term treatment with inhaled corticosteroids for asthma. The patient was hospitalized due to a post-surgical complication of appendicitis. The patient was treated with amphotericin B for 3 weeks, with good clinical evolution and subsequent negative cultures.

  11. [Health professionals and hand hygiene: a question of pediatric patient safety].

    PubMed

    Botene, Daisy Zanchi de Abreu; Pedro, Eva Neri Rubim

    2014-09-01

    This paper is a qualitative descriptive study, which aims to analyze how the academic education concerning hand hygiene contributes to the pediatric patient safety. This research was developed in an university hospital in Southern Brazil, in the pediatric unit, during the period of August to December, 2012. Sixteen healthcare professionals participated (doctors, nurses and physical therapists). A semi-structured interview was used to gather information. Data was organized by the software QSR Nvivo and analyzed using the content analysis technique. The results allowed us to list two thematic categories:"Hand hygiene and healthcare professionals' academic education"; and "Hand hygiene and professional life". The first thematic category will be presented in this paper. It was identified that the academic education contributes in an ineffective way to the creation of a patient safety culture. According to the professionals, there are gaps during the educational process regarding hand hygiene. The topic is treated in an ineffective and not very significant way to the learning and adhesion of hand hygiene in the professional life. It is recommended that, for the internalization of the practice by future professionals, a transversal, continuous and systematical approach is adopted during the professional's training, evaluations concerning the hand hygiene are done throughout the academic life as well as healthcare professors bethink the topic.

  12. Management of pediatric head and neck rhabdomyosarcoma: A case-series of 36 patients

    PubMed Central

    Radzikowska, Joanna; Kukwa, Wojciech; Kukwa, Andrzej; Czarnecka, Anna M.; Kawecki, Maciej; Lian, Fei; Szczylik, Cezary; Krzeski, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in the pediatric population. In 35% of cases, RMS develops in the head and neck (H&N) region, and only combined therapy is recognized as a curative treatment. However, recent advances in skull base and reconstructive surgery, along with microsurgery and endoscopic surgery, have strengthened the role of surgery as an important part of RMS treatment. In the present study, 36 pediatric RMS cases (24 males and 12 females) were analyzed after surgical treatment. The average age at diagnosis was 7 years. In total, 67% of tumors were localized in the parameningeal region. Alveolar RMS was the most common histopathological type. A total of 16 patients were treated due to disease recurrence or a previous non-radical surgical procedure, while 19 cases had inductive chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy preceding surgical treatment due to locally advanced disease. In 1 case, only diagnostic biopsy was performed. It is recommended that the management of H&N RMS is interdisciplinary from the beginning. Extensive surgical dissection in the H&N region for RMS may result in severe cosmetic defects and functional impairment; thus, these risks should be considered during treatment planning, and the surgical approach should be based on the individual characteristics of each patient. PMID:27900036

  13. Prosthodontic management of worn dentition in pediatric patient with complete overlay dentures: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Jyoti; Jain, Chandni; Singh, Harkanwal Preet

    2012-01-01

    Overlay complete dentures are simple, reversible and economical treatment modality for patients with congenital or acquired disorders that severely affect the tooth development. It satisfies both the esthetic and functional demands where the extraction of teeth is not generally indicated. In pediatric patients, the overlay dentures establish a relatively stable occlusion that improves patient's tolerance to the future treatment procedures for worn dentition. This clinical report highlights the imperative need of appropriate treatment strategy and application of maxillary and mandibular overlay dentures in a pediatric patient who suffered from congenitally mutilated and worn dentition. PMID:23236577

  14. Intravenous pentamidine for Pneumocystis carinii/jiroveci pneumonia prophylaxis in pediatric transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Clark, Abigail; Hemmelgarn, Trina; Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Teusink, Ashley

    2015-05-01

    SMX/TMP is the current gold standard for prophylaxis against PCP in immunocompromised pediatric patients. Currently, there are several second-line options for prophylaxis but many, including intravenous (IV) pentamidine, have not been reported to be as effective or as safe as SMX/TMP in the pediatric transplant population. This study is to determine the efficacy and safety of IV pentamidine in preventing PCP in pediatric transplant patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted to evaluate all transplant patients that received at least one dose of IV pentamidine from January 2010 to July 2013. The primary outcome, IV pentamidine efficacy, was evaluated by the incidence of PCP diagnosis for 28 days after the last dose of IV pentamidine if patient was transitioned to another agent for PCP prophylaxis. Patients on IV pentamidine for entire course of PCP prophylaxis were followed at least six months after discontinuation of IV pentamidine. The safety of IV pentamidine was assessed by the incidence of adverse events leading to pentamidine discontinuation. All data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. All transplant patients at CCHMC who had received IV pentamidine were reviewed, and 333 patients met inclusion criteria. The overall incidence of PCP was found to be 0.3% for pediatric transplant patients on pentamidine. Pentamidine was found to be safe, and the incidence of adverse events leading to discontinuation was 6% with the most common reason being tachycardia 2.1%. IV pentamidine is safe and effective as PCP prophylaxis in pediatric transplant patients with a PCP breakthrough rate of 0.3% (1 of 333 patients), and only 20 adverse events led to discontinuation. We recommend that IV pentamidine be considered as a second-line option in pediatric transplant patients who cannot tolerate SMX/TMP.

  15. Varicella-Zoster Virus Infections in Pediatric Malignancy Patients: A Seven-Year Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Düzgöl, Mine; Özek, Gülcihan; Bayram, Nuri; Oymak, Yeşim; Kara, Ahu; Demirağ, Bengü; Karapınar, Tuba Hilkay; Ay, Yılmaz; Vergin, Canan; Devrim, İlker

    2016-01-01

    Primary varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection is a benign self-limited disease. In this study, we review our experience in focusing on the outcome and treatment of VZV infection in pediatric malignancy patients. During the study period, a total of 41 patients with pediatric malignancy had been hospitalized with the diagnosis of VZV infection. All the patients were treated with intravenous acyclovir for a median of 7 days (ranging from 5 to 21 days). The calculated attributable delay of chemotherapy due to VZV infections was 8 days (ranging from 2 to 60 days). VZV-related complications were observed in 3 of 41 patients (7%) who suffered from acute respiratory distress syndrome, and one of them with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis died due to respiratory failure despite acyclovir and broad-spectrum antimicrobial treatment plus supportive treatment. VZV infections are still important contagious diseases in pediatric cancer patients, because they cause not only significant mortality but also a delay in chemotherapy. PMID:27751970

  16. Distress among hospitalized pediatric cancer patients modified by pet-therapy intervention to improve quality of life.

    PubMed

    Urbanski, Beth L; Lazenby, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This state of the science, integrative literature review focuses on animal-facilitated therapy (AFT) and the benefits provided to quality of life in hospitalized pediatric oncology patients. Results showed physiological and psychological benefits in pediatric inpatients settings. AFT has been shown to decrease pain, change vital signs, provide distraction, decrease fear, increase socialization, increase pleasure and decrease emotional distress in hospitalized pediatric patients. AFT needs to be implemented with appropriate medical discretion, but for the appropriate high-risk patients, AFT can improve quality of life. Pain, adjustment difficulties, mood changes and symptom management can be improved in inpatient pediatric cancer patients receiving AFT, thus improving overall quality of life.

  17. Neurometabolic Diagnosis in Children who referred as Neurodevelopmental Delay (A Practical Criteria, in Iranian Pediatric Patients)

    PubMed Central

    KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; JAFARI, Narjes; NEJAD BIGLARI, Habibeh; JABBEHDARI, Sayena; KHAYAT ZADEH, Simin; AHMAD ABADI, Farzad; LOTFI, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate the clinical and para clinical manifestations of neuro metabolic disorders, in patients who presented by neuro developmental delay in their neuro developmental milestones. Materials & Methods The patients diagnosed as neuro developmental delay and regression with or without seizure at the Neurology Department of Mofid Children Hospital in Tehran, Iran between 2004 and 2014 were included in our study. These patients diagnosed as neuro developmental delay by pediatric neurologists in view of diagnostic /screening neuro developmental assessment tests. The patients who completed our inclusion criteria as neuro metabolic disorders were evaluated in terms of metabolic and genetic study in referral lab. Results Overall, 213 patients with neurometabolic disorders were diagnosed. 54.3% of patients were male. The average age of patients was 41 +-46.1 months. 71.4% of parent’s patients had consanguinity of marriages. Eighty seven percent of patients had developmental delay (or/and) regression. 55.5% of them had different type of seizures. Overall, 213 patients with 34 different neurometabolic disorders were diagnosed and classified in the 7 sub classes, consisting of: 1- organic acidemia and aminoacidopathy (122 patients), 2-storage disease (37 patients) 3- eukodystrophy (27 patients), other classes consisted: lipid oxidation disorders, urea cycle disorders, progressive myoclonic epilepsy; and peroxizomal disorders (27 patients). Conclusion In patients with developmental delay or regression, with or without seizure, abnormal neurologic exam along with positive family history of similar disorder or relative parents, abnormal brain imaging with specific patterns, neurometabolic disorders should be considered as one of the important treatable diseases PMID:27375759

  18. Clinical recovery of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction with cisapride in a complex pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jean-Christy F; Vaillancourt, Régis; Major-Cook, Nathalie; Boland, Margaret; Zucker, Marc; Lariviere, Doris

    2013-06-01

    Cisapride is a gastrointestinal prokinetic that facilitates or restores motility along the entire gastrointestinal tract. It has been used successfully to treat acute and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstructions (CIPs) in adults, but there is a paucity of literature surrounding the treatment of CIP in pediatric patients and therapies for CIP are limited and their impact is often unsatisfactory. This case report presents the use of cisapride in the management of pseudo-obstruction. Treatment with cisapride substantially improved the patient's symptoms and improved feeding tolerance. It improved his prognosis remarkably and prevented the need for end-of-life care. He experienced no adverse effects throughout the course of therapy. The treatment regimen is discussed in this case report.

  19. Tigecycline treatment of infection caused by KPC-producing Escherichia coli in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tigecycline shows great antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and has been considered to be an appropriate choice in controlling infection caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens, such as carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). Although many clinical trials evaluate the efficacy and safety of tigecycline on adults, rare reports recommend tigecycline to treat pediatric patient. In this study, we presented a clinical case with tigecycline as an anti-infectious agent on a 14-year-old child who was suffering from infection of intraperitoneal abscess caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPC)-producing Escherichia coli with extreme drug resistant profile. By accessing the clinical outcome and efficacy of the patient, and the side effects of tigecycline, our research explored the documented experience of tigecycline on controlling infection caused by CPE isolate in children. PMID:23941473

  20. Cytokines and Metabolic Patterns in Pediatric Patients with Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Briassoulis, George; Venkataraman, Shekhar; Thompson, Ann

    2010-01-01

    It is not known if cytokines, which are cell-derived mediators released during the host immune response to stress, affect metabolic response to stress during critical illness. The aim of this prospective study was to determine whether the metabolic response to stress is related to the inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6), 10 (IL-10), and other stress mediators' responses and to assess their relationships with different feeding patterns, nutritional markers, the severity of illness as assessed by the Multiple Organ System Failure (MOSF), the Pediatric Risk of Mortality Score (PRISM), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and mortality in critically ill children. Patients were classified as hypermetabolic, normometabolic, and hypometabolic when the measured resting energy expenditures (REE) were >110%, 90–110% and, <90% of the predicted basal metabolic rate, respectively. The initial predominance of the hypometabolic pattern (48.6%) declined within 1 week of acute stress (20%), and the hypermetabolic patterns dominated only after 2 weeks (60%). Only oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) (P < .0001) but none of the cytokines and nutritional markers, were independently associated with a hypometabolic pattern. REE correlated with the IL-10 but not PRISM. In the presence of SIRS or sepsis, CRP, IL-6, IL-10, Prognostic Inflammatory and Nutritional Index (NI), and triglycerides—but not glucose, VO2, or VCO2 increased significantly. High IL-10 levels (P = .0000) and low measured REE (P = .0000) were independently associated with mortality (11.7%), which was higher in the hypometabolic compared to other metabolic patterns (P < .005). Our results showed that only VO2 and VCO2, but not IL-6 or IL-10, were associated with a hypometabolic pattern which predominated the acute phase of stress, and was associated with increased mortality. Although in SIRS or sepsis, the cytokine response was reliably reflected by increases in NI and

  1. Laparoscopic approach for gonadectomy in pediatric patients with intersex disorders

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Andres; Settimi, Alessandro; Roberti, Agnese; Caprio, Maria Grazia; Esposito, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    The birth of a child with a disorder of sex development (DSD) prompts a long-term management strategy that involves a myriad of professionals working with the family. There has been progress in diagnosis, surgical techniques and in understanding psychosocial issues related to this condition. However, since these kinds of disorders are rare and have many anatomical variations, individual care is necessary, especially regarding surgical management. Gonadectomy is indicated in a number of intersex disorders with a Y chromosome to reduce the associated risk of cancer. Recently, laparoscopy has gained wide acceptance in pediatric urology. Laparoscopy is also reported to be a useful tool for diagnosing and treating DSD because of its minimal invasiveness and favorable cosmetic outcome. However, reports of evaluation and management using laparoscopy for large numbers of DSD patients are limited and debate is still open about indications and timing of gonadectomy. In this study, we reviewed the literature of the last 10 years about the role of laparoscopic gonadectomy in patients with DSD. In the analyzed papers, all the procedures were accomplished successfully using laparoscopy. No conversions to open surgery neither intra-operative complications were reported in all series. Post-operative complications were reported only in one series and included 1 umbilical port infection [2% (1/50)] and 1 pelvic abscess [2% (1/50)], both treated with antibiotic therapy (grade I Clavien-Dindo). Of the analyzed series, 7/10 reported postoperative diagnosis of gonadal tumors. The histopathologic examinations revealed 15 cases of gonadoblastoma, 7 cases of dysgerminoma and 2 cases of seminoma. Analyzing the single series, the incidence of these tumors varied between 10% and 33%. The results of our review confirmed the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic gonadectomy in DSD patients. In our mind, laparoscopic gonadectomy should be accepted as the treatment of choice in children and

  2. Ketoprofen pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and tolerability in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kokki, Hannu

    2010-10-01

    in pediatric patients. Most of the adverse events reported are mild and transient, and are similar to those observed with other NSAIDs. Long-term tolerability has not yet been fully established in children, but data from three studies in >900 children indicate that oral ketoprofen is well tolerated when administered for up to 3 weeks after surgery. In conclusion, ketoprofen is effective and well tolerated in children for the control of post-surgical pain and for the control of pain and fever in inflammatory conditions.

  3. Amygdala volume reductions in pediatric patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder treated with paroxetine: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Szeszko, Philip R; MacMillan, Shauna; McMeniman, Marjorie; Lorch, Elisa; Madden, Rachel; Ivey, Jennifer; Banerjee, S Preeya; Moore, Gregory J; Rosenberg, David R

    2004-04-01

    The amygdala is believed to be highly relevant to the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) given its prominent role in fear conditioning and because it is an important target of the serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs), the pharmacotherapy of choice for OCD. In the present study, we measured in vivo volumetric changes in the amygdala in pediatric patients with OCD following 16 weeks of monotherapy with the selective SRI, paroxetine hydrochloride. Amygdala volumes were computed from contiguous 1.5 mm magnetic resonance (MR) images in 11 psychotropic drug-naive patients with OCD prior to and then following treatment. Eleven healthy pediatric comparison subjects also had baseline and follow-up scans, but none of these subjects received medication. Patients demonstrated significant asymmetry of the amygdala (L>R) prior to pharmacologic intervention in contrast to healthy comparison subjects who showed no asymmetry at the time of their baseline scan. Mixed model analyses using age and total brain volume as time varying covariates indicated that left amygdala volume decreased significantly in patients following treatment. The reduction in left amygdala volume in patients correlated significantly with higher paroxetine dosage at the time of the follow-up scan and total cumulative paroxetine exposure between the scans. No significant changes in either right or left amygdala volume were evident among healthy comparison subjects from the baseline to the follow-up scan. These preliminary findings suggest that abnormal asymmetry of the amygdala may play a role in the pathogenesis of OCD and that paroxetine treatment may be associated with a reduction in amygdala volume.

  4. Clinical Features, Prothrombotic Risk Factors, and Long-Term Follow-Up of Eight Pediatric Moyamoya Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tatlı, Burak; Sencer, Altay; Sencer, Serra; Aydın, Kubilay; Aydınlı, Nur; Çalışkan, Mine; Özmen, Meral; Kırış, Talat

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinical features, prothrombotic risk factors, and outcome of pediatric Moyamoya patients. Methods Patients diagnosed with Moyamoya disease at a tertiary center between January 2000 and December 2006 were enrolled in this study. The clinical presentations, underlying diseases, prothrombotic risk factors, family history of thrombosis, radiological findings, treatment, and outcome of the patients were reviewed retrospectively. Results Eight patients with angiographically proven Moyamoya disease were identified, one of whom had neurofibromatosis type I and one had Down syndrome. The age at diagnosis varied between 19 months and 11 years (73.4±41.8 months, mean±SD). The follow-up period after diagnosis was 52.5±14.8 months. In six patients, the initial clinical presentation was hemiparesis. None of the patients had any identifiable prothrombotic factors. Despite medical and surgical treatment, three patients had recurrences and one died. Only two patients recovered without sequelae. Conclusions The value of prothrombotic risk factor evaluation appears to be limited in Moyamoya patients; the outcome for pediatric patients remains dismal. PMID:22787492

  5. No Cases of PANDAS on Follow-Up of Patients Referred to a Pediatric Movement Disorders Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Kilbertus, Sarah; Brannan, Renee; Sell, Erick; Doja, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS) remains a controversial diagnosis and it is unclear how frequently it is encountered in clinical practice. Our study aimed to determine how many children with acute-onset tics and/or Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder (OCD) met criteria for PANDAS. Materials and methods: A retrospective review was performed on 39 children who presented to a movement disorders clinic with acute-onset tics or OCD from 2005 to 2012. Results: Out of 284 patients seen over the course of 7 years, only 39 had acute-onset tics and/or OCD symptoms. None of the 39 children who presented to us acutely met full criteria for PANDAS. Thirty-eight percent had no association between their symptoms and group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection, while 54% had prior inconclusive laboratory testing done and no exacerbations during the course of the study. Only 8% of patients had an acute exacerbation after their initial visit; however, testing for GAHBS in these patients was negative Discussion: Our results support the notion that PANDAS, if it exists, is an exceedingly rare diagnosis encountered in a pediatric movement disorder clinic. While none of our patients met criteria for PANDAS, two with acute-onset OCD would have met criteria for pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) indicating that PANS may be a more appropriate diagnosis. PMID:25309889

  6. Can Latent Class Analysis Be Used to Improve the Diagnostic Process in Pediatric Patients with Chronic Ataxia?

    PubMed

    Klassen, Samantha; Dufault, Brenden; Salman, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    Chronic ataxia is a relatively common symptom in children. There are numerous causes of chronic ataxia, making it difficult to derive a diagnosis in a timely manner. We hypothesized that the efficiency of the diagnostic process can be improved with systematic analysis of clinical features in pediatric patients with chronic ataxia. Our aim was to improve the efficiency of the diagnostic process in pediatric patients with chronic ataxia. A cohort of 184 patients, aged 0-16 years with chronic ataxia who received medical care at Winnipeg Children's Hospital during 1991-2008, was ascertained retrospectively from several hospital databases. Clinical details were extracted from hospital charts. The data were compared among the more common diseases using univariate analysis to identify pertinent clinical features that could potentially improve the efficiency of the diagnostic process. Latent class analysis was then conducted to detect unique patterns of clinical features and to determine whether these patterns could be associated with chronic ataxia diagnoses. Two models each with three classes were chosen based on statistical criteria and clinical knowledge for best fit. Each class represented a specific pattern of presenting symptoms or other clinical features. The three classes corresponded to a plausible and shorter list of possible diagnoses. For example, developmental delay and hypotonia correlated best with Angelman syndrome. Specific patterns of presenting symptoms or other clinical features can potentially aid in the initial assessment and diagnosis of pediatric patients with chronic ataxia. This will likely improve the efficiency of the diagnostic process.

  7. Antifungal prophylaxis with posaconazole vs. fluconazole or itraconazole in pediatric patients with neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Döring, M; Eikemeier, M; Cabanillas Stanchi, K M; Hartmann, U; Ebinger, M; Schwarze, C-P; Schulz, A; Handgretinger, R; Müller, I

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric patients with hemato-oncological malignancies and neutropenia resulting from chemotherapy have a high risk of acquiring invasive fungal infections. Oral antifungal prophylaxis with azoles, such as fluconazole or itraconazole, is preferentially used in pediatric patients after chemotherapy. During this retrospective analysis, posaconazole was administered based on favorable results from studies in adult patients with neutropenia and after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Retrospectively, safety, feasibility, and initial data on the efficacy of posaconazole were compared to fluconazole and itraconazole in pediatric and adolescent patients during neutropenia. Ninety-three pediatric patients with hemato-oncological malignancies with a median age of 12 years (range 9 months to 17.7 years) that had prolonged neutropenia (>5 days) after chemotherapy or due to their underlying disease, and who received fluconazole, itraconazole, or posaconazole as antifungal prophylaxis, were analyzed in this retrospective single-center survey. The incidence of invasive fungal infections in pediatric patients was low under each of the azoles. One case of proven aspergillosis occurred in each group. In addition, there were a few cases of possible invasive fungal infection under fluconazole (n = 1) and itraconazole (n = 2). However, no such cases were observed under posaconazole. The rates of potentially clinical drug-related adverse events were higher in the fluconazole (n = 4) and itraconazole (n = 5) groups compared to patients receiving posaconazole (n = 3). Posaconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole are comparably effective in preventing invasive fungal infections in pediatric patients. Defining dose recommendations in these patients requires larger studies.

  8. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and recombinant factor VIIa treatment in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening pulmonary complication in patients with hematologic malignancies or autoimmune disorders. The current treatment options, which include corticosteroids, transfusions, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and immunosuppressants, have been limited and largely unsuccessful. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) has been successfully administered, either systemically or bronchoscopically, to adults for the treatment of DAH, but there are few data on its use in pediatric patients. The current literature in the PubMed database was reviewed to evaluate the efficacy and risk of rFVIIa treatment for DAH in pediatric patients. This review discusses the diagnosis and treatment of DAH, as well as a new treatment paradigm that includes rFVIIa. Additionally, the risks and benefits of off-label use of rFVIIa in pediatric patients are discussed. PMID:27186216

  9. A novel drainage technique during micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy in pediatric patients: double angiocath.

    PubMed

    Penbegul, Necmettin; Utangac, Mehmet Mazhar; Daggulli, Mansur; Dede, Onur; Bozkurt, Yasar; Bodakci, Mehmet Nuri; Atar, Murat

    2016-06-01

    Micropercutaneous nephrolithotomy (microperc) is a recently introduced percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) technique that has the smallest tract size. The absence of an amplatz sheath during the microperc technique is a fundamental difference that distinguishes it from all other types of PNL (standard, mini, ultramini). Increasing of the intrarenal pelvic pressure (IPP) was demonstrated by the authors in adult patients but this problem may be even more serious in pediatric patients. Previously, the authors defined the use of a 14 gauge angiocath needle and sheath (microsheath) during microperc surgery for pediatric patient to reduce the IPP. In this novel technique, a second angiocath is used to access the renal collecting system to drain fluid during surgery. This technique is more effective in reducing IPP during microperc, especially in pediatric patients.

  10. Surgical results of cranioplasty with a polymethylmethacrylate customized cranial implant in pediatric patients: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi, Pietro; Pavanello, Marco; Imperato, Alessia; Dallolio, Villiam; Accogli, Andrea; Capra, Valeria; Consales, Alessandro; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Cranioplasty is a reconstructive procedure used to restore skull anatomy and repair skull defects. Optimal skull reconstruction is a challenge for neurosurgeons, and the strategy used to achieve the best result remains a topic of debate, especially in pediatric patients for whom the continuing skull growth makes the choice of material more difficult. When the native bone flap, which is universally accepted as the preferred option in pediatric patients, is unavailable, the authors' choice of prosthetic material is a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) implant designed using a custom-made technique. In this paper the authors present the results of their clinical series of 12 custom-made PMMA implants in pediatric patients. METHODS A retrospective study of the patients who had undergone cranioplasty at Gaslini Children's Hospital between 2006 and 2013 was conducted. A total of 12 consecutive cranioplasties in 12 patients was reviewed, in which a patient-specific PMMA implant was manufactured using a virtual 3D model and then transformed into a physical model using selective laser sintering or 3D printing. All patients or parents were administered a questionnaire to assess how the patient/parent judged the aesthetic result. RESULTS Patient age at craniectomy ranged from 5 months to 12.5 years, with a mean age of 84.33 months at cranioplasty. The mean extension of the custom-made plastic was 56.83 cm(2). The mean time between craniectomy and cranioplasty was 9.25 months. The mean follow-up duration was 55.7 months. No major complications were recorded; 3 patients experienced minor/moderate complications (prosthesis dislocation, granuloma formation, and fluid collection). CONCLUSIONS In this patient series, PMMA resulted in an extremely low complication rate and the custom-made technique was associated with an excellent grade of patient or parent satisfaction on long-term follow up.

  11. Integrative Therapy Use for Management of Side Effects and Toxicities Experienced by Pediatric Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Shana S

    2014-01-01

    Integrative Therapies (IT), otherwise known as Complementary and Alternative Medicine, are widely used among pediatric oncology patients, despite a paucity of available evidence. This review summarizes surveys that describe the prevalence of IT use by pediatric oncology patients, both during therapy and in survivorship, as well as the modalities being used. Additionally, the evidence that exists for specific treatments that appear to be efficacious in controlling specific symptoms is described. Finally, there are recommendations for practitioners on how to best counsel patients about IT use. PMID:27417488

  12. Camouflage therapy workshop for pediatric dermatology patients: a review of 6 cases.

    PubMed

    Padilla-España, L; del Boz, J; Ramírez-López, M B; Fernández-Sánchez, M E

    2014-06-01

    Certain skin conditions, such as vitiligo, acne, vascular malformations, and surgical scars, can impair the quality of life of pediatric patients, especially adolescents-even to the point of hindering psychosocial development. We review the cases of 6 patients with discoloration or scarring, predominantly of the face, who attended our cosmetic camouflage workshops from January through December 2012. The quality-of-life impact of their skin disorder was assessed before and after workshop attendance. Cosmetic camouflage is an easily replicated, cheap, and noninvasive adjunctive treatment of great potential value in managing skin conditions that impair the physical and emotional well-being of pediatric patients.

  13. Liver transplantation for urea cycle disorders in pediatric patients: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Kim, Irene K; Niemi, Anna-Kaisa; Krueger, Casey; Bonham, Clark A; Concepcion, Waldo; Cowan, Tina M; Enns, Gregory M; Esquivel, Carlos O

    2013-03-01

    LT has emerged as a surgical treatment for UCDs. We hypothesize that LT can be safely and broadly utilized in the pediatric population to effectively prevent hyperammonemic crises and potentially improve neurocognitive outcomes. To determine the long-term outcomes of LT for UCDs, charts of children with UCD who underwent LT were retrospectively reviewed at an academic institution between July 2001 and May 2012. A total of 23 patients with UCD underwent LT at a mean age of 3.4 yr. Fifteen (65%) patients received a whole-liver graft, seven patients (30%) received a reduced-size graft, and one patient received a living donor graft. Mean five-yr patient survival was 100%, and allograft survival was 96%. Mean peak blood ammonia (NH(3) ) at presentation was 772 μmol/L (median 500, range 178-2969, normal <30-50). After transplantation, there were no episodes of hyperammonemia. Eleven patients were diagnosed with some degree of developmental delay before transplantation, which remained stable or improved after transplantation. Patients without developmental delay before transplantation maintained their cognitive abilities at long-term follow-up. LT was associated with the eradication of hyperammonemia, removal of dietary restrictions, and potentially improved neurocognitive development. Long-term follow-up is underway to evaluate whether LT at an early age (<1 yr) will attain improved neurodevelopmental outcomes.

  14. Development of Clostridium septicum gas gangrene as an adverse effect of clindamycin-induced Clostridium difficile infection in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Kiser, Casey J; Urish, Kenneth L; Boateng, Henry A

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium myonecrosis or gas gangrene is a life-threatening infection characterized by either traumatic or atraumatic etiology. It has been widely described in patients with traumatic open wounds and in immunocompromised patients, including malignancy. A third source can result from natural flora in the gastrointestinal tract after bowel ischemia. This is a rare occurrence and is even less commonly described in the pediatric population. We present a pediatric patient who developed Clostridium septicum myonecrosis as an iatrogenic complication from clindamycin-induced Clostridium difficile ischemic colitis.

  15. ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT IN A PEDIATRIC PATIENT: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Duby, Cherie

    2012-01-01

    The management of the skeletally immature athlete sustaining injury to the anterior cruciate ligament and other knee structures provides multiple challenges for both the treating clinicians and parents of the injured child. The diagnostic process and subsequent decision making present additional complexities because of the developmental anatomy and the potential for disturbance of normal growth patterns by some surgical interventions. In the following case report, the course to appropriate management of a young athlete is detailed, including the contributions of imaging results. The reconstructive options available to orthopedic surgeons and the patient's post‐operative progression are also briefly discussed. Rehabilitation practitioners require an understanding of the unique issues present when providing care for pediatric and adolescent athletes with knee injuries in order to assist in optimal decision making in the phases during which they are involved. Level of Evidence: 5 (Single Case Report) PMID:23316431

  16. Myxoid Chondrosarcoma of Maxilla in a Pediatric Patient: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nimonkar, Pranali; Bhola, Nitin; Jadhav, Anendd; Jain, Anuj; Borle, Rajiv; Ranka, Rajul; Chaudhary, Minal

    2016-01-01

    Myxoid variant of chondrosarcoma is an uncommon potentially lethal malignant tumor which is even rare in pediatric age group. In the present paper, we report one such case of intermediate grade myxoid chondrosarcoma of left side of maxilla in a 12-year-old girl. The present case had a firm, painless, and lobulated growth in premolar-molar region which was associated with bicortical expansion. Maxillofacial imaging showed ill-defined radiolucency with displaced maxillary molars. Osteolytic changes were evident with the alveolus and walls of maxillary sinus. Owing to the age of the patient, surgical excision was selected as the modality of management followed by postoperative radiotherapy. This report encompasses the entire gamut of clinicopathological, radiological, and treatment modalities employed for chondrosarcoma. PMID:26904332

  17. Incidence, clinical features, and treatment of familial moyamoya in pediatric patients: a single-institution series.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Jonathan; Klein, Jennifer; Duran, Daniel; Storey, Armide; Scott, R Michael; Kahle, Kristopher; Smith, Edward R

    2017-03-10

    OBJECTIVE Limited data exist on familial moyamoya in children. The purpose of this study was to characterize presentation and outcomes of pediatric moyamoya patients who have relatives diagnosed with moyamoya. METHODS The authors performed a single-institution retrospective analysis of a case series including all surgically treated children with moyamoya with first- or second-degree relatives with moyamoya. Clinical and radiographic characteristics were analyzed, along with surgical outcomes. RESULTS A total of 537 patients underwent surgery for moyamoya during the study period. Eighteen of those patients (3.4% of the total series) had moyamoya and a family history of moyamoya and were included in this study. Of these 18 patients, 14 were non-twin siblings, and the remaining 4 represented 2 pairs of identical (affected) twins. The presentation was predominantly ischemic (72%), but 4 patients (33%) were asymptomatic when they were found to have moyamoya. Bilateral disease was present in 13 patients (72%). Radiographic stroke prevalence (67%), Suzuki grade (3.3), and angiographic findings were comparable to findings in nonfamilial moyamoya patients. Thirty revascularization procedures were performed, with a 3.3% operative stroke rate per hemisphere and no new strokes in an average follow-up period of 4.5 years. CONCLUSIONS In a North American surgical series, familial moyamoya existed in 3.4% of cases, and was distinguished by manifesting in a broad range of ethnic groups, with a higher proportion of male patients and increased rates of asymptomatic and unilateral disease in comparison to nonfamilial moyamoya. Screening indications remain controversial and the current data are used to suggest guidelines. Surgical therapy is warranted, effective, and durable in these patients, but patients should be carefully selected.

  18. Urologic issues in the pediatric and adolescent gynecology patient.

    PubMed

    Yerkes, Elizabeth B

    2009-03-01

    This article lends the urologist's perspective on complaints commonly seen in a pediatric and adolescent gynecology practice, such as perineal pain, repetitive posturing, vulvovaginitis and interlabial masses. Evaluation and management of urinary tract infections and daytime incontinence is discussed. The role of constipation and pelvic floor dysfunction in many of these complaints is emphasized.

  19. Association of Atlanto-Occipital Dislocation, Retroclival Hematoma, and Hydrocephalus: Management and Survival in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Isaac L.; Vasquez, Luis F.; Tyroch, Alan H.; Trier, Todd T.

    2017-01-01

    Atlanto-occipital dislocation (AOD) is an injury with high morbidity and mortality. We present a case of survival of a pediatric patient with the diagnoses of AOD, retroclival hematoma, and resulting hydrocephalus. The patient's cervical spine was stabilized until occipital-cervical fusion provided definitive treatment, and the hydrocephalus was treated with a ventriculostomy. The patient survived with no neurological deficits. A better understanding and awareness of the radiologic criteria of AOD will lead to earlier recognition of AOD and improved outcomes, even in the presence of complications from AOD. Surgical fixation should be used for definitive treatment of injuries with AOD. PMID:28321388

  20. Ventilator-associated pneumonia in neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Foglia, Elizabeth; Meier, Mary Dawn; Elward, Alexis

    2007-07-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the second most common hospital-acquired infection among pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Empiric therapy for VAP accounts for approximately 50% of antibiotic use in pediatric ICUs. VAP is associated with an excess of 3 days of mechanical ventilation among pediatric cardiothoracic surgery patients. The attributable mortality and excess length of ICU stay for patients with VAP have not been defined in matched case control studies. VAP is associated with an estimated $30,000 in attributable cost. Surveillance for VAP is complex and usually performed using clinical definitions established by the CDC. Invasive testing via bronchoalveolar lavage increases the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis. The pathogenesis in children is poorly understood, but several prospective cohort studies suggest that aspiration and immunodeficiency are risk factors. Educational interventions and efforts to improve adherence to hand hygiene for children have been associated with decreased VAP rates. Studies of antibiotic cycling in pediatric patients have not consistently shown this measure to prevent colonization with multidrug-resistant gram-negative rods. More consistent and precise approaches to the diagnosis of pediatric VAP are needed to better define the attributable morbidity and mortality, pathophysiology, and appropriate interventions to prevent this disease.

  1. Outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia complex among ventilated pediatric patients linked to hospital sinks.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Cynthia A; Cohen, Adam L; Trevino, Ingrid; Rupp, Angela Hammer; Harris, Michelle; Forkan-Kelly, Sinead; Noble-Wang, Judith; Jensen, Bette; Shams, Alicia; Arduino, Matthew J; LiPuma, John J; Gerber, Susan I; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2011-11-01

    We investigated a cluster of Burkholderia cepacia complex colonization in ventilated pediatric patients. Isolates from 15 patients, 2 sink drains, and several ventilator components were found to belong to a single B cenocepacia clone. Hospital tap water used during oral and tracheostomy care was identified as the most likely mechanism for transmission.

  2. Cognitive Dysfunction Is Worse among Pediatric Patients with Bipolar Disorder Type I than Type II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenkel, Lindsay S.; West, Amy E.; Jacobs, Rachel; Sweeney, John A.; Pavuluri, Mani N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Impaired profiles of neurocognitive function have been consistently demonstrated among pediatric patients with bipolar disorder (BD), and may aid in the identification of endophenotypes across subtypes of the disorder. This study aims to determine phenotypic cognitive profiles of patients with BD Type I and II. Methods: Subjects (N =…

  3. The Effect of Hemoglobin Levels on Mortality in Pediatric Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Yee, Kevin F; Walker, Andrew M; Gilfoyle, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is increasing evidence of adverse outcomes associated with blood transfusions for adult traumatic brain injury patients. However, current evidence suggests that pediatric traumatic brain injury patients may respond to blood transfusions differently on a vascular level. This study examined the influence of blood transfusions and anemia on the outcome of pediatric traumatic brain injury patients. Design. A retrospective cohort analysis of severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients was undertaken to investigate the association between blood transfusions and anemia on patient outcomes. Measurements and Main Results. One hundred and twenty patients with severe traumatic brain injury were identified and included in the analysis. The median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 6 and the mean hemoglobin (Hgb) on admission was 115.8 g/L. Forty-three percent of patients (43%) received at least one blood transfusion and the mean hemoglobin before transfusion was 80.1 g/L. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that anemia and the administration of packed red blood cells were not associated with adverse outcomes. Factors that were significantly associated with mortality were presence of abusive head trauma, increasing PRISM score, and low GCS after admission. Conclusion. In this single centre retrospective cohort study, there was no association found between anemia, blood transfusions, and hospital mortality in a pediatric traumatic brain injury patient population.

  4. Orthodontic and Orthognathic Surgical Treatment of a Pediatric OSA Patient

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A case report is presented which demonstrates the effectiveness of comprehensive orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery in the correction of malocclusion and reduction in the sequelae of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The patient's severe OSA was improved to very mild as evaluated by full overnight polysomnogram. The orthodontic treatment included the expansion of both dental arches and mandibular advancement surgery. There was significant improvement in the patient's sleep continuity and architecture with the elimination of obstructive apneas. PMID:27668098

  5. Effect of Revascularization on Headache Associated with Moyamoya Disease in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Bohara, Manoj; Sugata, Sei; Nishimuta, Yosuke; Karki, Prasanna; Nagayama, Tetsuya; Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Tokimura, Hiroshi; Arita, Kazunori

    2015-09-01

    Episodic headache is common in childhood moyamoya disease (MMD). The onset, mechanism, cause of headache and the effect of revascularization surgery on headache are not yet clear. We studied 10 cases of children (7 boys and 3 girls) younger than 18 years who underwent revascularization for MMD between 2009 and 2013. We evaluated frequency of headache and cerebral blood flow changes by single photon emission computed tomography brain imaging with [I123]-labeled iofetamine (IMP-SPECT) before and after surgery. Patients' ages ranged from 0 to 15 years at onset and 2 to 17 years at the time of surgery, mean age being 6.7 and 8.0 years respectively. 9 of 10 patients presented with ischemic symptoms and 8 had headache. 5 patients underwent indirect bypass and 5 underwent combined direct and indirect bypass. Cerebral blood flow improvement was obtained in 14 of the 15 cerebral hemispheres revascularized. The mean follow-up duration was 32.9 months. All the patients had good outcomes with improvement of ischemic neurological deficits. Headache improved in 7 (87.5%) of 8 patients. Headache in pediatric moyamoya disease is associated with change in cerebral hemodynamics. Revascularization including combined direct bypass and indirect techniques may be required to reduce headache in patients with MMD.

  6. Zygomycetes infections in pediatric hematology oncology patients: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dehority, Walter; Willert, Jennifer; Pong, Alice

    2009-12-01

    Fungi from the Zygomycetes class are increasingly recognized causes of infection in immunosuppressed children, but no comprehensive literature review and few case series have been published on the topic. A case series of 6 pediatric oncology patients with Zygomycetes infections cared for at our institution was constructed, and a concurrent search of the English language literature for Zygomycetes infections in children with oncologic disorders was undertaken. Our case series described 6 patients (5 male) between the ages of 2.5 and 19.5 years. One patient was diagnosed with rhinocerebral disease, 2 with rhinosinusitis, 2 with pulmonary involvement, and 1 with a gastrointestinal presentation. Five patients survived. Our literature review identified 82 cases from 61 studies. The mean subject age was 10.8 years (1.4 to 21.0 y). About 92.7% of all patients suffered from some form of leukemia, with 70.7% suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Overall, 58.5% of reported patients survived, with individuals with disseminated disease showing the worst prognosis (68.2% mortality) and those with cutaneous disease the best (14.3% mortality). Survival is increasingly reported in the literature, perhaps as a result of improved diagnostic capabilities, increased physician awareness and increased reliance on adjunctive surgical therapy.

  7. Banding cytogenetic analysis in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cytogenetic studies in Brazilian population about childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood malignancy, are scarce. Moreover, Brazilian race is very heterogeneous and is made by the confluence of people of several different origins, from the original Native Brazilians, with the influx of Portuguese colonizers, Black African slaves, and recent European, Arab and Japanese immigration. The purpose of this prospective, multicentric study was to assess the sociodemographic, clinic and cytogenetic characteristics of the children treated for ALL in the Northeast region of Brazil. Results This study includes thirty patients between 4 months and 17 years old treated for ALL from January 1st, 2009 to November 30th, 2010. Cytogenetic analysis showed that in nineteen out of thirty patients (64%) presented some chromosome abnormalities, in which 53% corresponds to numerical abnormalities, 21% structural and numerical abnormalities, and 26% only structural changes. Moreover, seven patients presented complexes karyotype not yet described in the literature. Taken together these results show the importance of the cytogenetic analysis in ALL pediatric patients and illustrates that the studied population presented unexpected complexes karyotypes which were correlated to poor outcome. Conclusion The results demonstrate the importance of banding cytogenetics for ALL diagnosis despite the use of most modern techniques such as FISH and aCGH, and provide reliable insight into the ALL in Brazil. PMID:24025689

  8. [Robotics in pediatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Camps, J I

    2011-10-01

    Despite the extensive use of robotics in the adult population, the use of robotics in pediatrics has not been well accepted. There is still a lack of awareness from pediatric surgeons on how to use the robotic equipment, its advantages and indications. Benefit is still controversial. Dexterity and better visualization of the surgical field are one of the strong values. Conversely, cost and a lack of small instruments prevent the use of robotics in the smaller patients. The aim of this manuscript is to present the controversies about the use of robotics in pediatric surgery.

  9. Intraoperative handheld probe for 3D imaging of pediatric benign vocal fold lesions using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benboujja, Fouzi; Garcia, Jordan; Beaudette, Kathy; Strupler, Mathias; Hartnick, Christopher J.; Boudoux, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    Excessive and repetitive force applied on vocal fold tissue can induce benign vocal fold lesions. Children affected suffer from chronic hoarseness. In this instance, the vibratory ability of the folds, a complex layered microanatomy, becomes impaired. Histological findings have shown that lesions produce a remodeling of sup-epithelial vocal fold layers. However, our understanding of lesion features and development is still limited. Indeed, conventional imaging techniques do not allow a non-invasive assessment of sub-epithelial integrity of the vocal fold. Furthermore, it remains challenging to differentiate these sub-epithelial lesions (such as bilateral nodules, polyps and cysts) from a clinical perspective, as their outer surfaces are relatively similar. As treatment strategy differs for each lesion type, it is critical to efficiently differentiate sub-epithelial alterations involved in benign lesions. In this study, we developed an optical coherence tomography (OCT) based handheld probe suitable for pediatric laryngological imaging. The probe allows for rapid three-dimensional imaging of vocal fold lesions. The system is adapted to allow for high-resolution intra-operative imaging. We imaged 20 patients undergoing direct laryngoscopy during which we looked at different benign pediatric pathologies such as bilateral nodules, cysts and laryngeal papillomatosis and compared them to healthy tissue. We qualitatively and quantitatively characterized laryngeal pathologies and demonstrated the added advantage of using 3D OCT imaging for lesion discrimination and margin assessment. OCT evaluation of the integrity of the vocal cord could yield to a better pediatric management of laryngeal diseases.

  10. Neglected Alkaptonuric Patient Presenting with Steppage Gait

    PubMed Central

    Mirzashahi, Babak; Tafakhori, Abbas; Najafi, Arvin; Farzan, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Even though intervertebral disc degeneration can be found in the natural course of alkaptonuria, detection of the disease by black disc color change in a patient without any other presentation of alkaptonuria is an exceptionally rare condition. We have reported a very rare case of alkaptonuria presented with low back pain and steppage gait in a 51-year-old male with a complaint of chronic low-back pain and steppage gait who was operated on for prolapsed lumbar disc herniation. Intraoperatively his lumbar disk was discovered to be black. The alkaptonuria diagnosis was considered after histopathological examination of the black disc material and elevated urinary concentration of homogentisic acid confirmed the diagnosis. To our knowledge, this presentation has not been reported previously in literature. PMID:27200402

  11. Unusual Structural Autonomic Disorders Presenting in Pediatrics: Disorders Associated with Hypoventilation and Autonomic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Chelimsky, Gisela; Chelimsky, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Structural autonomic disorders (producing structural damage to the autonomic nervous system or autonomic centers) are far less common than functional autonomic disorders (reflected in abnormal function of a fundamentally normal autonomic nervous system) in children and teenagers. This article focuses on this uncommon first group in the pediatric clinic. These disorders are grouped into 2 main categories: those characterized by hypoventilation and those that feature an autonomic neuropathy.

  12. Response to pazopanib in two pediatric patients with pretreated relapsing synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Michela; Basso, Eleonora; Magni, Chiara; Bergamaschi, Luca; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Carta, Roberto; Tirtei, Elisa; Massimino, Maura; Fagioli, Franca; Ferrari, Andrea

    2017-01-21

    Pazopanib is an oral multikinase inhibitor that has proved effective in adults treated for relapsing soft tissue sarcoma and synovial sarcoma in particular. Two cases are reported here of pediatric patients with pretreated relapsing synovial sarcoma whose tumors showed a prolonged response to pazopanib given on compassionate grounds. These results suggest that new agents found effective in adult patients might achieve similar results in adolescents with the same disease. Facilitating the availability of new drugs for children and adolescents is a major challenge for pediatric oncologists.

  13. Assessing pediatric patient's risk of distress during health-care encounters: The psychometric properties of the Psychosocial Risk Assessment in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Staab, Jennifer H; Klayman, Gail Jean; Lin, Li

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Psychosocial Risk Assessment in Pediatrics (PRAP). PRAP is a screening tool designed to assess pediatric patients who are at risk of experiencing elevated distress during health-care encounters. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted with 200 pediatric patients. Patient's distress levels were observed during their health-care encounter using the Children's Emotional Manifestation Scale (CEMS). Health-care staff and parents were asked to rate the patient's level of cooperation and stress. Exploratory factor analysis supported a single latent factor structure of the PRAP tool. Cronbach's α for internal reliability was .83. PRAP score was strongly correlated with CEMS score with r = .82 (p < .0001). The PRAP is a standardized, reliable, and valid method for health-care providers to assess a patient's risk of experiencing significant distress during treatment or testing.

  14. Management of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) in pediatric heart failure patients receiving continuous inotropic support.

    PubMed

    Giangregorio, Maeve; Mott, Sandra; Tong, Elizabeth; Handa, Sonia; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Connor, Jean Anne

    2014-01-01

    The study aim was to evaluate present practice of maintaining PICC line patency in pediatric heart failure patients receiving continuous inotropes by comparing one cohort receiving low dose continuous heparin with one receiving no heparin. A case control retrospective chart review compared the two cohorts on duration of patency (measured in days) and need for thrombolytic agents. Median duration of patency for the heparin group was 24 days versus 16 days for the no heparin group (p=0.07). Use of thrombolytic agents was 28% in the heparin group compared to 50% in the no heparin group (p=0.08). Although not statistically significant, findings were clinically significant and supportive of current practice.

  15. Calyceal Diverticulum of the Kidney – Diagnostic Imaging Dilemma in Pediatric Patients – Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bombiński, Przemysław; Warchoł, Stanisław; Brzewski, Michał; Biejat, Agnieszka; Dudek-Warchoł, Teresa; Krzemień, Grażyna; Szmigielska, Agnieszka; Toth, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Calyceal diverticula are rarely diagnosed in children. They can mimic other renal cystic lesions and correct diagnosis can be difficult to establish. Connection between fluid collection and collecting system confirmed by imaging studies is the key diagnostic finding. Case Report In this report we present a case of pediatric patient with calyceal diverticulum, with initial ultrasonographic diagnosis of simple renal cyst. Final diagnosis was established after extended diagnostics following infection of a fluid collection. Conclusions 1. Differential diagnosis of well-circumscribed solitary renal fluid collections in children should include particularly: simple cyst, calyceal diverticulum and the first demonstration of ADPKD. 2. Diagnosis of calyceal diverticulum should be confirmed by contrast studies. 3. Standard management of calyceal diverticula in children includes ultrasonographic follow-up and conservative treatment and rarely requires surgical intervention. PMID:25610511

  16. [Management of the pediatric dental patient with seizure disorder: prevention and treatment of emergencies].

    PubMed

    Shapira, Y; Sapir, S; Amir, E

    2003-09-01

    Seizures are not infrequent in childhood and may occur during dental treatment. Generalized seizures and particularly the Tonic-clonic (grand-mal) are the most hazardous and may induce self-injury, aspiration, and medical emergency as status epilepticus. The differential diagnosis of isolated seizure attack should consider hyperventilation, hyperglycemia, local anesthetic toxicity, and anoxia. The pediatric dentist should be aware of predisposing factors that may induce seizure attack in their patients. Proper precautionary measures could prevent the attack from occurring or at least reduce its consequences. The diagnosis as to the cause of the seizure, as well as providing proper management, could prevent further complications. This article presents the medical and dental history relevant for prevention of seizure attack in the dental chair, antiepileptic drugs with possible interactions with the dental treatment and management of such attack, should they occurs.

  17. Comparison of human growth hormone products' cost in pediatric and adult patients. A budgetary impact model.

    PubMed

    Bazalo, Gary R; Joshi, Ashish V; Germak, John

    2007-09-01

    We assessed the economic impact to the United States payer of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) utilization, comparing the relative dosage efficiency of marketed pen-based and vial-based products in a pediatric and in an adult population. A budgetary impact model calculated drug costs based on product waste and cost. Waste was the difference between prescribed dose, based on patient weight, and actual delivered dose, based on dosing increments and maximum deliverable dose for pens and a fixed-percent waste as derived from the literature for vials. Annual wholesale acquisition costs were calculated based upon total milligrams delivered, using a daily dose of 0.03 mg/kg for pediatric patients and 0.016 mg/kg for adults. Total annual drug costs were compared for two scenarios: 1) a product mix based on national market share and 2) restricting use to the product with lowest waste. Based on the literature, waste for each vial product was 23 percent. Among individual pens, waste was highest for Humatrope 24 mg (19.5 percent pediatric, 14.3 percent adult) and lowest for Norditropin Nordi-Flex 5 mg (1.1 percent pediatric, 1 percent adult). Restricting use to the brand with least waste (Norditropin), compared to national product share mix, resulted in a 10.2 percent reduction in annual pediatric patient cost from $19,026 to $17,089 and an 8 percent reduction in annual adult patient cost from $24,099 to $22,161. We concluded that pen delivery systems result in less waste than vial and syringe. Considering all approved delivery systems, Norditropin resulted in the least product waste and lower annual patient cost for both pediatric and adult populations.

  18. Tuberculous iliac artery aneurysm in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sharon Gail; Naidoo, Nadraj G; Wood, Richard John; Clark, Lizelle; Kilborn, Tracy

    2013-03-01

    Vascular complications of tuberculous infections are rare and occur even less frequently in the pediatric population. Tuberculous pseudoaneurysms can occur either as a result of contiguous spread from a neighboring focus-invariably infected lymph nodes-or by hematogenous spread and seeding of acid-fast bacilli that lodge in the adventitia or media via the vasa vasorum. We report a case of turberculous right common iliac artery pseudoaneurysm in a 12-year-old and review the relevant literature.

  19. D-penicillamine-induced ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis in pediatric patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonhee; Lee, Sang Taek; Cho, Heeyeon

    2016-05-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are associated with systemic vasculitis. The pathophysiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) has not been clearly proven, and drug-induced ANCA-associated vasculitis has been reported. Wilson's disease is an inborn error of copper metabolism caused by a mutation in the copper transporting gene ATP7B, and traditional treatment is based on copper chelation with agents such as D-penicillamine. There have been rare reports that prolonged D-penicillamine therapy might cause adverse renal events such as membranous nephropathy and minimal change disease, but it is questionable if D-penicillamine induces ANCA-associated vasculitis. We describe 2 patients with Wilson's disease treated with D-penicillamine who presented with ANCA (+) vasculitis and renal involvement. The 2 patients also showed positive results for antinuclear antibody (ANA). Their kidney biopsy findings were compatible with crescentic/necrotizing glomerulonephritis, pauci-immune type. After diagnosis of AAV, D-penicillamine was stopped. Patients were then treated with plasmapheresis and immunosuppressants, including methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide. One patient progressed to end-stage renal disease and the other showed persistent proteinuria. These cases suggest that D-penicillamine may induce ANA (+) ANCA (+) vasculitis with severe renal involvement in pediatric patients, and plasmapheresis combined with immunosuppressant should be considered.

  20. Etiology and management of alimentary tract ulcers in pediatric intestinal transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Selvaggi, G; Sarkar, S; Mittal, N; Acar, B C; Weppler, D; Kato, T; Tryphonopoulos, P; Tzakis, A; Ruiz, P

    2006-01-01

    Patients who undergo intestinal transplantation encounter several complications in the posttransplant period, one of them being ulcer formation in the alimentary tract. During postoperative endoscopic monitoring of 112 pediatric intestinal transplantation patients at our institution, we identified chronic ulcer formation in 11 patients. There were no common or defining demographic or clinical variables that were found in the patients with ulcers. The ulcers could be located within the allograft or in native tissue. Biopsies were obtained from the ulcer edge and the intervening mucosa as well as an evaluation of possible infectious agents. The most common changes in the ulcers were compatible with Epstein-Barr virus-associated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD; seven cases), acute rejection (six cases), and less commonly, infectious causes (one case). These changes could occur concomitantly and retrospective analysis after therapy showed that the ulcers could have multiple etiologies. Directed biopsies of ulcer edges often displayed morphological changes compatible with acute rejection of the graft, although some biopsies of the intervening mucosa did not show similar changes. Some patients treated based on the changes within the intervening mucosa responded well and led to resolution of the ulcers. Our findings demonstrate that PTLD and acute rejection are the most common causes of chronic ulcer formation and that biopsy samples should be collected simultaneously from both the ulcer edge and intervening mucosa since pathological changes can vary depending on the underlying cause(s). Infectious agents were rarely present but could be seen superimposed with the underlying cause.

  1. Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    Mau, Elke E.; Leonard, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder in children and adolescents is rare. The World Health Organization database has recorded approximately 80 patients under age 16 that have been diagnosed with papillary bladder tumour since 1968.1 We are reporting on our case of urothelial carcinoma diagnosed in a 14-year-old male who presented with painless gross hematuria. PMID:28255421

  2. Therapeutic effects of exercise training in patients with pediatric rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gualano, Bruno; Pinto, Ana Lúcia de Sá; Perondi, Maria Beatriz; Roschel, Hamilton; Sallum, Adriana Maluf Elias; Hayashi, Ana Paula Tanaka; Solis, Marina Yazigi; Silva, Clóvis Artur

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decades, the role of exercise training in rheumatic diseases has been largely explored. Currently, physical activity is well known to benefit patients with osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, idiopathic inflammatory myopathy, fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, exercise training has been considered a valuable tool for treating rheumatic patients. The therapeutic effects of exercise training have also been investigated in pediatric rheumatic diseases. Collectively, studies have revealed the therapeutic potential of exercise in juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile fibromyalgia and other causes of chronic pain. The aim of this review is to familiarize the pediatric rheumatologist with the exercise science field; discuss the potential benefits of exercise training in pediatric rheumatic diseases, emphasize both research and clinical perspectives of this promising field; and propose practical models of pre-participation examinations and contraindications to exercise.

  3. Erythromelalgia in the pediatric patient: role of computed-tomography-guided lumbar sympathetic blockade

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Anjana; Rafiq, Mahmood; Warren, Patrick S; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-01-01

    Erythromelalgia (EM) is an uncommon condition characterized by erythema, increased skin temperature, and burning pain, most frequently occurring in the lower extremities. The pain is generally very severe and treatment can be extremely challenging, especially in the pediatric and adolescent population. We report a series of three cases of primary EM in pediatric patients involving the lower extremities, refractory to medical treatment that responded favorably to computed-tomography-guided lumbar sympathetic blockade. There was a significant improvement in pain scores, quality of life, and overall function as well as decreased analgesic requirements. Lumbar sympathetic blockade should be considered as a therapeutic modality in pediatric and adolescent patients with EM who are refractory to other treatments. PMID:27799815

  4. Multiple chronic conditions among outpatient pediatric patients, southeastern Michigan, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Michael E; Pollock, Martha

    2015-02-12

    Studies investigating the prevalence of multiple chronic conditions (MCCs) and their associated health care cost and use among pediatric populations have been limited. Among 14,404 pediatric patients receiving outpatient care in southeastern Michigan from 2008 through 2013, 82.1% had 0 chronic conditions, 16.2% had 1 chronic condition, and 1.6% had 2 or more chronic conditions. Greater numbers of chronic conditions significantly predicted outpatient cost (β = 581.7, P < .001), visit frequency (β = 9.1, P < .001), and days between appointments (β = -33.9, P < .001). Further study of MCCs among pediatric patients is needed given their increasing prevalence and their associated health care cost and use.

  5. Benefits of and Untoward Events during Intrahospital Transport of Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Harish, M. M.; Siddiqui, Suhail Sarwar; Prabu, Natesh R; Chaudhari, Harish K.; Divatia, Jigeeshu V.; Kulkarni, Atul Prabhakar

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: The transport of critically ill patients for procedures or imaging outside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is potentially hazardous; hence, the transport process must be organized and efficient. The literature about benefits of and untoward events (UEs) during intrahospital transport of pediatric critically ill patient is scarce. We, therefore, audited the UEs during and benefits of intrahospital transport of critically ill pediatric patients in our ICU. Subjects and Methods: Eighty critically ill pediatric (<18 years) cancer patients, transported from the ICU for either diagnostic or therapeutic procedure over a period of 6 months, were included in the study. The data collected included the destination (computed tomography scan, intervention radiology, magnetic resonance imaging scan, and operation theater), accompanying medical personnel, UEs, and benefits obtained during transport. Results: Among eighty pediatric patients, the median age was 8 years (range 2–17 years). During the transport, four (5%) patients required endotracheal intubation, three (3.75%) patients required intercostal drain placement, and six (7.5%) patients required cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Accidental removal of central venous catheter was reported in three (3.75%) patients, drain came out in four (5%) patients, and three (3.75%) patients had accidental extubation. Transport indirectly led to a change in antibiotic therapy in 24 (30%) patients and directly helped in change of therapy in the form of interventions in 20 (25%) patients. Conclusion: Critically ill children can be transported safely with adequate pretransport preparations, which may help in avoiding major UEs and benefit the patient by change in the therapy. PMID:28197051

  6. A Pediatric Tumor Found Frequently in the Adult Population: A Case of Anaplastic Astroblastoma in an Elderly Patient and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Batouli, Ali; Stabingas, Kristen; Alcindor, Dunbar; Abdel Aziz, Khaled; Pu, Cunfeng; Williams, Robert; Yu, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Astroblastomas are rare, potentially curable primary brain tumors which can be difficult to diagnose. We present the case of astroblastoma in a 73-year-old male, an atypical age for this tumor, more classically found in pediatric and young adult populations. Through our case and review of the literature, we note that this tumor is frequently reported in adult populations and the presentation of this tumor in the elderly is well described. This tumor is an important consideration in the differential diagnosis when managing both pediatric and adult patients of any age who present with the imaging findings characteristic of this rare tumor. PMID:28239500

  7. Use of the Pasero Opioid-induced Sedation Scale (POSS) in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Quinlan-Colwell, Ann; Thear, Gayle; Miller-Baldwin, Emily; Smith, Andrea

    2017-02-10

    The Pasero Opioid-induced Sedation Scale (POSS) is a valid, reliable tool used to assess sedation when administering opioid medications to manage pain. The POSS is endorsed by The Joint Commission and the American Society for Pain Management Nursing to help prevent adverse opioid-related respiratory events. Although the POSS is used to assess sedation in pediatric patients at some hospitals, prior to this study, it was not formally evaluated in the pediatric population. This study used a quasi-experimental design with a convenience sample of pediatric patients admitted to a large regional medical center in southeastern North Carolina. The POSS was evaluated from three perspectives. First, the study was designed to compare the documentation of sedation when opioids were administered before (n=25) and after (n=27) implementation of the POSS to assess sedation. Second, the occurrence of respiratory adverse events before and after implementation of the POSS was compared. Third, the appropriateness of using the POSS in the pediatric population was evaluated. When the POSS was used, there was an increase in both the clarity and frequency of documentation when sedation was assessed. There was no incidence of opioid-related adverse respiratory events after implementation of the POSS. Finally, the POSS was found to be appropriate and safe to use in the pediatric population. Through a survey, the majority of registered nurses who cared for the research subjects evaluated the POSS as easy, appropriate and safe to use with pediatric patients. The nurses also noted using the POSS provided standardized communication among staff regarding patients' levels of sedation. No adverse effects, concerns, or objections were reported. Coincidentally, while it was not part of the study, frequency of documentation of assessment of pain also improved with implementation of the POSS.

  8. A Comprehensive Survey of Institutional Patient/Family Educational Practices for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Withycombe, Janice S; Andam-Mejia, Rachel; Dwyer, Annie; Slaven, Abigail; Windt, Katherine; Landier, Wendy

    Patient/family education is an important component of nursing practice and is essential to the care of children newly diagnosed with cancer. Practices regarding patient/family education in Children's Oncology Group (COG) treatment centers have not been well described. We used an Internet-based survey to determine current patient/family educational practices at COG institutions; participation rate was 90.5% (201/222). Patient/family education was delivered primarily by an individual (rather than a team) at 43% of institutions. Advanced practice nurses had primary responsibility for providing education at 32% of institutions. "Fever" was the most frequently reported topic considered mandatory for inclusion in education for newly diagnosed patients. More than half of institutions reported using checklists and/or end-of-shift reports to facilitate health care team communication regarding patient/family education, and 77% reported using the "teach-back" method of assessing readiness for discharge. Thirty-seven percent of institutions reported delays in hospital discharge secondary to the need for additional teaching. An understanding of current practices related to patient/family education is the first step in establishing effective interventions to improve and standardize educational practices in pediatric oncology.

  9. Pediatric vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-04-01

    Vitiligo is a disease of pigment loss. Most investigators currently consider vitiligo to be a disorder that occurs as a result of autoimmune destruction of melanocytes, supported by identification of antimelanocyte antibodies in many patients, and the presence of comorbid autoimmune disease in patients with and family members of individuals with vitiligo. One-half of vitiligo cases are of childhood onset. This article presents a current overview of pediatric vitiligo including comorbidities of general health, psychological factors, therapeutic options, and long-term health considerations.

  10. Pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of caspofungin in Japanese pediatric patients with invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masaaki; Imaizumi, Masue; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Kaneko, Takashi; Goto, Hiroaki; Kato, Koji; Hara, Junichi; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Koike, Kazutoshi; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Maeda, Naoko; Yoshinari, Tomoko; Kishino, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kenichi; Kawahara, Shizuko; Kartsonis, Nicholas A; Komada, Yoshihiro

    2015-06-01

    The antifungal agents approved in Japan for pediatric use are limited and many unapproved drugs are actually used without clear instruction for dosage. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of caspofungin for the treatment of invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis in 20 Japanese pediatric patients using a pediatric-specific dosage based on body surface area. Caspofungin was administered intravenously over 60 min as 70 mg/m(2) on Day 1, followed by 50 mg/m(2) per day. Five or 4 point blood sampling were done in 15 patients on Day 4-5 to calculate AUC0-24 h. The geometric means (95% confidence interval) of C24 h and AUC0-24 h in the pediatric patients were 3.3(2.5, 4.4) μg/mL and 175.1 (139.3, 220.1) μg hr/mL, respectively, which were comparable to those in Japanese adult patients [3.2 (2.8, 3.5) μg/mL and 144.9 (131.7, 159.3) μg hr/mL, respectively]. Among the 20 patients, 10 (50%) had at least 1 drug-related adverse event which was considered related to caspofungin therapy. No drug-related serious adverse event and no death occurred. The most common drug-related adverse events were events relating to hepatic function (mainly increases in ALT and AST). The overall success in efficacy was observed in 13 of 20 patients. In conclusion, once daily administration of caspofungin (70 mg/m(2) on Day 1, followed by 50 mg/m(2) [maximum daily dose not to exceed 70 mg]), which is the same dosage being used in overseas, achieved sufficient drug exposure and a favorable efficacy and acceptable safety profile in Japanese pediatric patients with invasive fungal infections.

  11. Making strides and meeting challenges in pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation clinical trials in the United States: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Satwani, Prakash; Kahn, Justine; Jin, Zhezhen

    2015-11-01

    Over the past 20years, the field of pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation has made ground-breaking strides in the successful treatment of patients with both malignant and non-malignant diseases. As the field advances, so does the need for high-quality studies including randomized controlled trials, aimed at answering clinically important questions about optimizing care and outcomes of children undergoing alloHCT. In an effort to actively address emerging clinical questions, three main cooperative groups in the U.S. have joined forces to develop and implement multiple clinical trials for pediatric alloHCT patients. These groups include the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, the Children's Oncology Group and the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium. Though the field of stem cell transplantation continues to advance, conducting clinical trials in the pediatric population is a unique challenge and as a result, optimal outcomes have yet to be reached in this population. Because of the limited number of pediatric transplant patients at each institution in the U.S., trials aimed at answering important clinical questions still struggle to accrue acceptable numbers of patients in an appropriate amount of time and thus gathering statistically useful data has posed a challenge for the field. In an effort to mitigate some of the challenges associated with obtaining statistically and clinically meaningful information about pediatric alloHCT, the implementation of new cooperative group trials is active and ongoing.

  12. Preventing Long-Term Cardiac Damage in Pediatric Patients With Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kelly

    Kawasaki disease is currently the leading cause of long-term cardiac damage in pediatric patients in the United States. Kawasaki disease is diagnosed based on symptomatology and by ruling out other etiology. There is a significant need for an improved, standardized treatment protocol for patients diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and a more rapid initiation of treatment for these patients. Decreasing the cardiac damage caused by Kawasaki disease with timely diagnosis and treatment needs be a principal goal.

  13. Simultaneous hand-held contact color fundus and SD-OCT imaging for pediatric retinal diseases (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Marco; Hernandez, Victor; De Freitas, Carolina; Relhan, Nidhi; Silgado, Juan; Manns, Fabrice; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Hand-held wide-field contact color fundus photography is currently the standard method to acquire diagnostic images of children during examination under anesthesia and in the neonatal intensive care unit. The recent development of portable non-contact hand-held OCT retinal imaging systems has proved that OCT is of tremendous help to complement fundus photography in the management of pediatric patients. Currently, there is no commercial or research system that combines color wide-field digital fundus and OCT imaging in a contact-fashion. The contact of the probe with the cornea has the advantages of reducing motion experienced by the photographer during the imaging and providing fundus and OCT images with wider field of view that includes the periphery of the retina. In this study we produce proof of concept for a contact-type hand-held unit for simultaneous color fundus and OCT live view of the retina of pediatric patients. The front piece of the hand-held unit consists of a contact ophthalmoscopy lens integrating a circular light guide that was recovered from a digital fundus camera for pediatric imaging. The custom-made rear piece consists of the optics to: 1) fold the visible aerial image of the fundus generated by the ophthalmoscopy lens on a miniaturized level board digital color camera; 2) conjugate the eye pupil to the galvanometric scanning mirrors of an OCT delivery system. Wide-field color fundus and OCT images were simultaneously obtained in an eye model and sequentially obtained on the eye of a conscious 25 year-old human subject with healthy retina.

  14. PRESENT; PREScription of Enteral Nutrition in pediaTric Crohn's disease in Spain.

    PubMed

    Navas-López, Victor Manuel; Martín-de-Carpi, Javier; Segarra, Oscar; García-Burriel, José Ignacio; Díaz-Martín, Juan José; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Medina, Enrique; Juste, Mercedes

    2014-03-01

    Objetivos: La nutrición enteral exclusiva (NEE) es una de las estrategias terapéuticas empleadas para inducir la remisión en niños con enfermedad de Crohn (EC). Pese a que la NEE se recomienda en las guías de práctica clínica y en los documentos de consenso, la frecuencia real de su empleo en España es desconocida. Métodos: Encuesta compuesta por 70-items (PRESENT: PREScription of Enteral Nutrition in pediaTric Crohn’s disease in Spain) que se distribuyó a través de la lista de distribución de Sociedad Española de Gastroenterología, Hepatología y Nutrición Pediátrica (SEGHNP). Resultados: Se recibieron los datos de 51 unidades de Gastroenterología Pediátrica del territorio español. De los 287 pacientes recién diagnosticados de EC durante los años 2011-12 en esos centros (139 en 2011 y 148 en 20212), 182 (63%) recibieron NEE (58% en 2011 y 68% en 2012). El 26% de los pacientes que recibieron NEE estaban en recaída. Todos los facultativos que respondieron pensaban que la NEE es efectiva para inducir la remisión clínica en los brotes leves-moderados. El 24,5% no emplean la NEE durante las recaídas. Las formulas enterales empleadas más frecuentemente fueron las específicas para EC (70,6%), la vía oral fue la más utilizada, el 60,8% utilizaron saborizantes y el 9,8% de las unidades permitían un porcentaje variable de calorías en forma de otros alimentos durante el periodo de NEE. El 65% emplearon 5-ASA junto con la NEE, el 69% antibióticos y hasta un 95% inmunomoduladores. La duración de la NEE fue de 8 semanas en el 47,1% de los casos, la transición hacia una dieta normal se realizó de forma secuencial. En relación a las barreras y factores limitantes encontrados por los respondedores para instaurar la NEE destacaban la falta de aceptación por el paciente y/o la familia (71%), falta de tiempo o de personal auxiliar (69%) y la dificultad para convencer al paciente o su familia de la idoneidad del tratamiento (43%). Conclusiones

  15. Bacterial isolates from neutropenic febrile pediatric patients and their sensitivity patterns to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, F N; Burney, I A; Moid, M I; Siddiqui, T

    1998-09-01

    Patients on cytotoxic therapy often develop neutropenia and fever. Our interest was to identify the common pathogens isolated from such patients and to study the sensitivity patterns of these organisms to the antibiotics used in their treatment. Thus, guidelines can be established by hospitals to identify which antibiotics can be used in the treatment of these patients when the results of cultures and sensitivities are not available. We conducted a retrospective study of neutropenic pediatrics presenting to AKUH from July, 1990 to June, 1996. A total of 153 isolates in 35 different patients were studied. Samples for culture were taken from the sites at risk. The majority of samples consisted of blood, stool, pus and urine. Twenty stool samples were also sent for microscopy. Malignancies were both hematological and non-hematological. Gram negatives were isolated in 52.9%, gram positives in 33.9% and parasites in 13.2%. Salmonella paratyphi B was the most commonly isolated organism, followed by Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Giardia lamblia was the most common parasite. Sensitivity patterns of these organisms to antibiotics studied showed that Escheria coli had the lowest sensitivity rate being only 40% sensitive to Aztreonam and 64% sensitive to Ofloxacillin. A comparison was made between our findings and those reported in literature, as well as the risk factors for developing neutropenia. A guide to management is also discussed.

  16. Two-dimensional analysis of glycated hemoglobin heterogeneity in pediatric type 1 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Hempe, James M; McGehee, Amanda M; Chalew, Stuart A

    2013-11-15

    Interindividual and ethnic variation in glycated hemoglobin levels, unrelated to blood glucose variation, complicates the clinical use of glycated hemoglobin assays for the diagnosis and management of diabetes. Assessing the types and amounts of glycated hemoglobins present in erythrocytes could provide insight into the mechanism. Blood samples and self-monitored mean blood glucose (MBG) levels were obtained from 85 pediatric type 1 diabetes patients. Glycated hemoglobin levels were measured using three primary assays (boronate-affinity chromatography, capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF), and standardized DCA2000+ immunoassay) and a two-dimensional (2D) analytical system consisting of boronate-affinity chromatography followed by CIEF. The 2D system separated hemoglobin into five subfractions, four of which contained glycated hemoglobins. Glycated hemoglobin measurements were compared in patients with low, moderate, or high hemoglobin glycation index (HGI), a measure of glycated hemoglobin controlled for blood glucose variation. MBG was not significantly different between HGI groups. Glycated hemoglobin levels measured by all three primary assays and in all four glycated 2D subfractions were significantly different between HGI groups and highest in high HGI patients. These results show that interindividual variation in glycated hemoglobin levels was evident in diabetes patients with similar blood glucose levels regardless of which glycated hemoglobins were measured.

  17. Pediatric Crohn disease patients exhibit specific ileal transcriptome and microbiome signature.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Yael; Tickle, Timothy L; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Kim, Mi-Ok; Tang, Dora; Karns, Rebekah; Baldassano, Robert N; Noe, Joshua D; Rosh, Joel; Markowitz, James; Heyman, Melvin B; Griffiths, Anne M; Crandall, Wallace V; Mack, David R; Baker, Susan S; Huttenhower, Curtis; Keljo, David J; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Kugathasan, Subra; Walters, Thomas D; Aronow, Bruce; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gevers, Dirk; Denson, Lee A

    2014-08-01

    Interactions between the host and gut microbial community likely contribute to Crohn disease (CD) pathogenesis; however, direct evidence for these interactions at the onset of disease is lacking. Here, we characterized the global pattern of ileal gene expression and the ileal microbial community in 359 treatment-naive pediatric patients with CD, patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), and control individuals. We identified core gene expression profiles and microbial communities in the affected CD ilea that are preserved in the unaffected ilea of patients with colon-only CD but not present in those with UC or control individuals; therefore, this signature is specific to CD and independent of clinical inflammation. An abnormal increase of antimicrobial dual oxidase (DUOX2) expression was detected in association with an expansion of Proteobacteria in both UC and CD, while expression of lipoprotein APOA1 gene was downregulated and associated with CD-specific alterations in Firmicutes. The increased DUOX2 and decreased APOA1 gene expression signature favored oxidative stress and Th1 polarization and was maximally altered in patients with more severe mucosal injury. A regression model that included APOA1 gene expression and microbial abundance more accurately predicted month 6 steroid-free remission than a model using clinical factors alone. These CD-specific host and microbe profiles identify the ileum as the primary inductive site for all forms of CD and may direct prognostic and therapeutic approaches.

  18. Similarities and differences between pediatric and adult patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Tarr, T; Dérfalvi, B; Győri, N; Szántó, A; Siminszky, Z; Malik, A; Szabó, A J; Szegedi, G; Zeher, M

    2015-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease with highest prevalence among women of childbearing age. However, children younger than 16 years also can develop SLE (childhood-onset lupus/juvenile-type SLE). The aim of our study was to compare the clinical course of adult and pediatric-onset SLE. Data from 342 adult patients followed at the University of Debrecen, Hungary, and 79 children documented in the Hungarian National Pediatric SLE registry were analyzed using hospital medical records. Organ manifestations, laboratory parameters, and immunoserological characteristics were reviewed and the results were evaluated using SPSS for Windows software.Gender distribution was not significantly different between groups with disease starting in childhood vs adulthood. The prevalence of the following manifestations was significantly higher for pediatric than for adult-onset disease including: lupus nephritis (43% pediatric vs 26.4% for adult-onset), hematological disorders (57% vs 36.4%), photosensitivity (20% vs 9%), butterfly rash (61% vs 35.5%) and mucosal ulceration (11.4% vs 4%). For adult-onset SLE, neurological symptoms (30% vs 6%) and polyarthritis (86% vs 68%) occurred significantly more frequently than in children. Anti-SSA, anti-SSB and antiphospholipid antibodies were detected at significantly higher levels in adult-onset patients compared to those in pediatrics. Children were more commonly given high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin treatment (6.3% vs 0.6%) and mycophenolate mofetil (15.2% vs 5.3%) than adults.These results suggest that pediatric and adult-onset SLE differ in multiple aspects, and it is important to recognize these differences for optimal treatment and prognosis of these patients.

  19. Pediatric patient and staff dose measurements in barium meal fluoroscopic procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipov, D.; Schelin, H. R.; Denyak, V.; Paschuk, S. A.; Porto, L. E.; Ledesma, J. A.; Nascimento, E. X.; Legnani, A.; Andrade, M. E. A.; Khoury, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates patient and staff dose measurements in pediatric barium meal series fluoroscopic procedures. It aims to analyze radiographic techniques, measure the air kerma-area product (PKA), and estimate the staff's eye lens, thyroid and hands equivalent doses. The procedures of 41 patients were studied, and PKA values were calculated using LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) positioned at the center of the patient's upper chest. Furthermore, LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs were used to estimate the equivalent doses. The results showed a discrepancy in the radiographic techniques when compared to the European Commission recommendations. Half of the results of the analyzed literature presented lower PKA and dose reference level values than the present study. The staff's equivalent doses strongly depends on the distance from the beam. A 55-cm distance can be considered satisfactory. However, a distance decrease of ~20% leads to, at least, two times higher equivalent doses. For eye lenses this dose is significantly greater than the annual limit set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. In addition, the occupational doses were found to be much higher than in the literature. Changing the used radiographic techniques to the ones recommended by the European Communities, it is expected to achieve lower PKA values ​​and occupational doses.

  20. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient.

  1. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Karen A; Breuer, Christopher K

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents. The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies, and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed, the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population. Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy. Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented. The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16718840

  2. Pediatric Dental Patients are Part of a Larger Picture: Detailing Population Realities.

    PubMed

    Waldman, H B; Perlman, S P

    2015-01-01

    The traditional setting of a dental practice may offer pediatric dentists a potentially isolated picture of the general health and use of health services by youngsters in their community. Results from the latest National Health Interview Survey are reviewed to provide broad dimensions to supplement and reinforce the general and specific information usually developed regarding individual patients.

  3. Health-related quality of life in pediatric patients with functional and organic gastrointestinal diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of our study was to compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in pediatric patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and organic gastrointestinal (GI) diseases with an age-, sex-, and race/ethnicity-matched healthy sample across GI diagnostic groups and with one ...

  4. The Mutual Prospective Influence of Child and Parental Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Pediatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landolt, Markus A.; Ystrom, Eivind; Sennhauser, Felix H.; Gnehm, Hanspeter E.; Vollrath, Margarete E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous studies found notable rates of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in pediatric patients and their parents and suggest a significant association between child and parent PTSS. However, little is known about mutual influences between child and parental PTSS over time. This study…

  5. Creating Mandalas for the Management of Acute Pain Symptoms in Pediatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinley, Nora E.; Norris, Deborah O.; Hinds, Pamela S.

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled clinical trial explored the feasibility of implementing a fast-acting mandala intervention to reduce physical pain and psychological anxiety experienced during needle sticks. Forty pediatric patients participated in this two-group study: 20 participants created a mandala on an iPad (Treatment Group) and 20 participants…

  6. The Depths from Skin to the Major Organs at Chest Acupoints of Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi-Chun; Peng, Ching-Tien; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Lin, Hung-Yi; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2015-01-01

    Background. Acupuncture is applied to treat numerous diseases in pediatric patients. Few reports have been published on the depth to which it is safe to insert needle acupoints in pediatric patients. We evaluated the depths to which acupuncture needles can be inserted safely in chest acupoints in pediatric patients and the variations in safe depth according to sex, age, body weight, and body mass index (BMI). Methods. We retrospectively studied computed tomography (CT) images of pediatric patients aged 4 to 18 years who had undergone chest CT at China Medical University Hospital from December 2004 to May 2013. The safe depth of chest acupoints was directly measured from the CT images. The relationships between the safe depth of these acupoints and sex, age, body weight, and BMI were analyzed. Results. The results demonstrated significant differences in depth among boys and girls at KI25 (kidney meridian), ST16 (stomach meridian), ST18, SP17 (spleen meridian), SP19, SP20, PC1 (pericardium meridian), LU2 (lung meridian), and GB22 (gallbladder meridian). Safe depth significantly differed among the age groups (P < 0.001), weight groups (P < 0.05), and BMI groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Physicians should focus on large variations in needle depth during acupuncture for achieving optimal therapeutic effect and preventing complications. PMID:26457105

  7. Cognitive/Attentional Distraction in the Control of Conditioned Nausea in Pediatric Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redd, William H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigated use of cognitive/attentional distraction (via commercially available video games) to control conditioned nausea in pediatric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Video game-playing resulted in significantly less nausea. The introduction and withdrawal of the opportunity to play video games produced significant changes (reduction…

  8. Human bocavirus and KI/WU polyomaviruses in pediatric intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    van de Pol, Alma C; Wolfs, Tom F W; Jansen, Nicolaas J G; Kimpen, Jan L L; van Loon, Anton M; Rossen, John W A

    2009-03-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of human bocavirus and KI and WU polyomaviruses in pediatric intensive care patients with and without lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). The prevalence of these viruses was 5.1%, 0%, and 2.6%, respectively, in children with LRTI and 4.8%, 4.8%, and 2.4%, respectively, in those without LRTI.

  9. An Innovative Educational Program for International Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    MacWilliams, MariaEugenia Álvarez; Lunar, Estela Cabrera; Denzen, Ellen M

    2016-02-03

    Pediatric patients and their families confront a difficult journey with hematopoietic cell transplantation. Understanding complex information, navigation, and coping with emotional, physical, and social changes in the patient, parents and family nucleus life could be quite challenging for all. In Spanish-speaking countries where transplant is emerging as an available treatment option, healthcare professionals encounter the lack or limited quality resources to educate pediatric patients and their families on a complex treatment process. Also, the level of literacy of each family varies widely, making transplant education very difficult to address in a simple and engaging way that could benefit all levels of literacy and foster well-being in the family as a whole, so they are prepared to make better informed decisions and decrease stress in all members. Super Sam versus the Marrow Monsters is a DVD resource made by the National Marrow Donor Program® (NMDP)/Be The Match® intended as an educational tool, to be shared with our U.S. network transplant centers to use when educating their pediatric patients. Hospital Angeles Lomas in the State of Mexico-member of the NMDP international network-has adopted the DVD with their pediatric audience, with very successful results, and demonstrates the benefits of expanding the initial intended use.

  10. Benign liver tumors in pediatric patients - Review with emphasis on imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Liliana; Cui, Xin-Wu; Tannapfel, Andrea; Franke, Doris; Stenzel, Martin; Kosiak, Wojciech; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jüngert, Jörg; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Benign hepatic tumors are commonly observed in adults, but rarely reported in children. The reasons for this remain speculative and the exact data concerning the incidence of these lesions are lacking. Benign hepatic tumors represent a diverse group of epithelial and mesenchymal tumors. In pediatric patients, most benign focal liver lesions are inborn and may grow like the rest of the body. Knowledge of pediatric liver diseases and their imaging appearances is essential in order to make an appropriate differential diagnosis. Selection of the appropriate imaging test is challenging, since it depends on a number of age-related factors. This paper will discuss the most frequently encountered benign liver tumors in children (infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma, mesenchymal hamartoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, and hepatocellular adenoma), as well as a comparison to the current knowledge regarding such tumors in adult patients. The current emphasis is on imaging features, which are helpful not only for the initial diagnosis, but also for pre- and post-treatment evaluation and follow-up. In addition, future perspectives of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in pediatric patients are highlighted, with descriptions of enhancement patterns for each lesion being discussed. The role of advanced imaging tests such as CEUS and magnetic resonance imaging, which allow for non-invasive assessment of liver tumors, is of utmost importance in pediatric patients, especially when repeated imaging tests are needed and radiation exposure should be avoided. PMID:26229397

  11. Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Prusakowski, Melanie K; Chen, Audrey P

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric sepsis is distinct from adult sepsis in its definitions, clinical presentations, and management. Recognition of pediatric sepsis is complicated by the various pediatric-specific comorbidities that contribute to its mortality and the age- and development-specific vital sign and clinical parameters that obscure its recognition. This article outlines the clinical presentation and management of sepsis in neonates, infants, and children, and highlights some key populations who require specialized care.

  12. On SHiPs and safety: a journey of safe patient handling in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Gayla M; Crumrine, Jean; Thompson, Brenda; Mobley, Venise; Roth, Katie; Roberts, Cristine

    2014-01-01

    Nursing personnel have consistently been ranked among the top ten professions impacted by musculoskeletal injuries. Inpatient pediatric nurses witnessed an increase in injuries and upon discovering limited evidence applicable to pediatrics, conducted a research study to evaluate the effectiveness of a safe patient handling program. Surveys were distributed to assess risk and workplace safety perceptions. Post-implementation, surveys revealed a statistically significant (p>0.0001) increase in staff perception of workplace safety, reduction in risk perception for several nursing tasks, and reduction in injury related costs. As a result of this program, workplace safety was improved through education and equipment provision.

  13. Patient-focused measures of functional health status and health-related quality of life in pediatric orthopedics: A case study in measurement selection

    PubMed Central

    Furlong, William; Barr, Ronald D; Feeny, David; Yandow, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this report are to review the assessment of patient-focused outcomes in pediatric orthopedic surgery, to describe a framework for identifying appropriate sets of measures, and to illustrate an application of the framework to a challenging orthopedic problem. A detailed framework of study design and measurement factors is described. The factors are important for selecting appropriate instruments to measure health status and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in a particular context. A study to evaluate treatment alternatives for patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 and congenital tibial dysplasia (NF1-CTD) provides a rich illustration of the application of the framework. The application involves great variability in the instrument selection factors. Furthermore, these patients and their supportive caregivers face numerous complex health challenges with long-term implications for HRQL. Detailed summaries of important generic preference-based multi-attribute measurement systems, pediatric health profile instruments, and pediatric orthopedic-specific instruments are presented. Age-appropriate generic and specific measures are identified for study of NF1-CTD patients. Selected measures include the Activities Scale for Children, Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire Walking Scale, Health Utilities Index, and Pediatric Inventory of Quality of Life. Reliable and valid measures for application to pediatric orthopedics are available. There are important differences among measures. The selected measures complement each other. The framework in this report provides a guide for selecting appropriate measures. Application of appropriate sets of measures will enhance the ability to describe the morbidity of pediatric orthopedic patients and to assess the effectiveness of alternative clinical interventions. The framework for measurement of health status and HRQL from a patient perspective has relevance to many other areas of orthopedic practice. PMID

  14. Pediatric facial transplantation: Ethical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jennifer; Shaul, Randi Zlotnik; Hanson, Mark D; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Facial transplantation is becoming increasingly accepted as a method of reconstructing otherwise unreconstructable adult faces. As this modality is made more available, we must turn our attention to pediatric patients who may benefit from facial transplantation. In the current article, the authors present and briefly examine the most pressing ethical challenges posed by the possibility of performing facial transplantation on pediatric patients. Furthermore, they issue a call for a policy statement on pediatric facial transplantation. The present article may serve as a first step in that direction, highlighting ethical issues that would need to be considered in the creation of such a statement. PMID:25114614

  15. Sleep disorders in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Stabouli, Stella; Papadimitriou, Eleni; Printza, Nikoleta; Dotis, John; Papachristou, Fotios

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of sleep disorders during childhood has been estimated to range from 25 to 43 %. The aim of this review is to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders and possible associations with chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related factors and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children with CKD. An electronic systematic literature search for sleep disorders in children with CKD in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library Databases identified seven relevant articles for review, all of which reported an increased prevalence of sleep disorders in children with CKD. Five studies included children with CKD undergoing dialysis, and two studies included only non-dialysis patients. In all studies the presence of sleep disturbances was assessed by questionnaires; only one study compared the results of a validated questionnaire with laboratory-based polysomnography. The prevalence of any sleep disorder ranged from 77 to 85 % in dialysis patients, to 32-50 % in transplanted patients and 40-50 % in non-dialysis patients. The most commonly studied disorder was restless legs syndrome, which presented at a prevalence of 10-35 %. Three studies showed significant associations between presence of sleep disorders and HRQOL. We found consistent evidence of an increased prevalence of sleep disturbances in children with CKD, and these seemed to play a critical role in HRQOL.

  16. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  17. Emergency department management of seizures in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Santillanes, Genevieve; Luc, Quyen

    2015-03-01

    Seizures account for 1% of all emergency department visits for children, and the etiologies range from benign to life-threatening. The challenge for emergency clinicians is to diagnose and treat the life-threatening causes of seizures while avoiding unnecessary radiation exposure and painful procedures in patients who are unlikely to have an emergent pathology. When treating patients in status epilepticus, emergency clinicians are also faced with the challenge of choosing anticonvulsant medications that will be efficacious while minimizing harmful side effects. Unfortunately, evidence to guide the evaluation and management of children presenting with new and breakthrough seizures and status epilepticus is limited. This review summarizes available evidence and guidelines on the diagnostic evaluation of first-time, breakthrough, and simple and complex febrile seizures. Management of seizures in neonates and seizures due to toxic ingestions is also reviewed.

  18. Genetics and Therapeutics in Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis: the Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Sifuentes-Dominguez, Luis; Patel, Ashish S.

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a relapsing and remitting disease with significant phenotypic and genotypic variability. Though more common in adults, UC is being increasingly diagnosed in childhood. The subsequent lifelong course of disease results in challenges for the patient and physician. Currently, there is no medical cure for UC. Even though surgical removal of the colon can be curative, complications including infertility in females make colectomy an option often considered only when the disease presents with life-threatening complications or when medical management fails. One of the greatest challenges the clinician faces in the care of patients with UC is the inability to predict at diagnosis which patient is going to respond to a specific therapy or will eventually require surgery. This therapeutic conundrum frames the discussion to follow, specifically the concept of individualized or personalized treatment strategies based on genetic risk factors. As we move to therapeutics, we will elucidate traditional approaches and discuss known and novel agents. As we look to the future, we can expect increasing integrated approaches using several scientific disciplines to inform how genetic interactions shape and mold the pathogenesis and therapeutics of UC. PMID:26973787

  19. The Rehabilitation of Oncological Patients Presenting Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MICU, ELENA CLAUDIA; IRSAY, LASZLO

    2014-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP 2011) defines neuropathic pain as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the somatosensory portion of the nervous system”. The central neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the central somatosensory central nervous system”, whereas the peripheral neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the peripheral somatosensory nervous system” [1]. The peripheral neuropathy describes any affection of the peripheral nervous system. The etiology is vast, there being a number of over 100 possible causes, which causes the global morbidity rate to reach approximately 2.4%. The chronic nature of the pain superposes the everyday routine and leads to the high intake of medication for pain alleviation. The number of cases of neuroplasia has always increased today. This disturbing diagnosis which can potentiate the signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy as well as reduce and limit the treatment options associated with neuropathies. The treatment presupposes a multidisciplinary approach, while the solution to prevent complications involves the control of risk factors and pathophysiological treatment. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CPIN) is a significant disabling symptom that is tightly connected to the administration of neurotoxic cytostatic agents used for the treatment of neoplasia. CPIN compromises the quality of life and produces pain or discomfort [2]. I have sought to produce a presentation of the medicated and physical-kinetic treatment options that have proved their effectiveness during clinical studies or random trials and can be applied to cancer patients presenting with symptoms associated with peripheral neuropathy, namely with neuropathic pain, and support it with arguments. PMID:26528000

  20. Clinical and Neurobiological Perspectives of Empowering Pediatric Cancer Patients Using Videogames

    PubMed Central

    Govender, Meveshni; Bowen, Randy C.; German, Massiell L.; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pediatric oncology patients often experience fatigue and physical and mental deconditioning during and following chemotherapy treatments, contributing to diminished quality of life. Patient empowerment is a core principle of patient-centered care and reflects one's ability to positively affect his or her own health behavior and health status. Empowerment interventions may enhance patients' internal locus of control, resilience, coping skills, and self-management of symptoms related to disease and therapy. Clinical and technological advancements in therapeutic videogames and mobile medical applications (mobile health) can facilitate delivery of the empowerment interventions for medical purposes. This review summarizes clinical strategies for empowering pediatric cancer patients, as well as their relationship with developing a “fighting spirit” in physical and mental health. To better understand physiological aspects of empowerment and to elucidate videogame-based intervention strategies, brain neuronal circuits and neurotransmitters during stress, fear, and resilience are also discussed. Neuroimaging studies point to the role of the reward system pathways in resilience and empowerment in patients. Taken together, videogames and mobile health applications open translational research opportunities to develop and deliver empowerment interventions to pediatric cancer patients and also to those with other chronic diseases. PMID:26287927

  1. Clinical and Neurobiological Perspectives of Empowering Pediatric Cancer Patients Using Videogames.

    PubMed

    Govender, Meveshni; Bowen, Randy C; German, Massiell L; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Bruggers, Carol S

    2015-10-01

    Pediatric oncology patients often experience fatigue and physical and mental deconditioning during and following chemotherapy treatments, contributing to diminished quality of life. Patient empowerment is a core principle of patient-centered care and reflects one's ability to positively affect his or her own health behavior and health status. Empowerment interventions may enhance patients' internal locus of control, resilience, coping skills, and self-management of symptoms related to disease and therapy. Clinical and technological advancements in therapeutic videogames and mobile medical applications (mobile health) can facilitate delivery of the empowerment interventions for medical purposes. This review summarizes clinical strategies for empowering pediatric cancer patients, as well as their relationship with developing a "fighting spirit" in physical and mental health. To better understand physiological aspects of empowerment and to elucidate videogame-based intervention strategies, brain neuronal circuits and neurotransmitters during stress, fear, and resilience are also discussed. Neuroimaging studies point to the role of the reward system pathways in resilience and empowerment in patients. Taken together, videogames and mobile health applications open translational research opportunities to develop and deliver empowerment interventions to pediatric cancer patients and also to those with other chronic diseases.

  2. Posaconazole plasma concentrations in pediatric patients receiving antifungal prophylaxis during neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Döring, Michaela; Cabanillas Stanchi, Karin Melanie; Klinker, Hartwig; Eikemeier, Melinda; Feucht, Judith; Blaeschke, Franziska; Schwarze, Carl-Philipp; Ebinger, Martin; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Handgretinger, Rupert; Heinz, Werner J

    2016-10-04

    Invasive fungal infections are one of the major complications in pediatric patients during prolonged neutropenia after chemotherapy. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of the triazole posaconazole in these patients is missing. This multicenter survey analyzed trough concentrations of 33 pediatric patients with a median age of 8 years during 108 neutropenic episodes who received prophylactic posaconazole oral suspension. A total of 172 posaconazole trough levels were determined to median 438 ng/ml (range 111-2011 ng/ml; mean 468 ± 244 ng/ml). Age and gender had no influence on posaconazole plasma levels. Posaconazole was not discontinued due to adverse events in any of the patients. Only hepatic parameters significantly increased beyond the upper normal limit to median values of ALT of 87 U/l (P < .0001), and AST of 67 U/l (P < .0001). One patient with a median posaconazole trough concentration of 306 ng/ml experienced an invasive fungal infection. In conclusion, posaconazole was effective, safe and feasible in 33 pediatric patients with neutropenia ≥5 days after chemotherapy. Median posaconazole plasma concentrations were approximately 1.6-fold lower than the recommended plasma level of 700 ng/ml. Larger patient cohorts are needed to evaluate these findings.

  3. Four Cases of Pediatric Photokeratitis Present to the Emergency Department After Watching the Same Theater Show

    PubMed Central

    Mangan, Mehmet Serhat; Arıcı, Ceyhun; Atalay, Eray; Tanyıldız, Burak; Oruçoğlu, Faik

    2015-01-01

    We report four consecutive cases of photokeratitis that presented to the emergency department, interestingly after having watched the same theatre performance in the same school. The patients’ ages (3 male, 1 female) ranged from 9 to 13 years. All patients presented with similar complaints consisting of pain, tearing, foreign body sensation, photophobia and blurred vision in both eyes. Patients reported watching a theatre performance in the same school approximately 4 hours before symptom onset. On slit-lamp examination, conjunctival injection and corneal punctate epithelial erosions were observed in the interpalpebral zone in both eyes. On fundus examination, no pathology was observed in the vitreous, posterior pole or peripheral retina. All cases were treated with topical antibiotics and lubricant eye drops. Corneas were clear two days later in the control visit. In this case report, exposure to ultraviolet light from high-power lamps used in the theatre was proposed as a possible cause of corneal epithelial cell damage and subsequent photokeratitis. PMID:27800238

  4. COMPLIANCE MEASUREMENTS OF THE UPPER AIRWAY IN PEDIATRIC DOWN SYNDROME SLEEP APNEA PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Dhananjay Radhakrishnan; Mylavarapu, Goutham; McConnell, Keith; Fleck, Robert J.; Shott, Sally R.; Amin, Raouf S.; Gutmark, Ephraim J.

    2015-01-01

    Compliance of soft tissue and muscle supporting the upper airway are two of several factors contributing to pharyngeal airway collapse. We present a novel, minimally invasive method of estimating regional variations in pharyngeal elasticity. Magnetic resonance images for pediatric sleep apnea patients with Down syndrome (9.5 ± 4.3 years (mean age ± standard deviation)) were analyzed to segment airways corresponding to baseline (no mask pressure) and two positive pressures. A three dimensional map was created to evaluate axial and circumferential variation in radial displacements of the airway, dilated by the positive pressures. The displacements were then normalized with respect to the appropriate transmural pressure and radius of an equivalent circle to obtain a measure of airway compliance. The resulting elasticity maps indicated the least and most compliant regions of the pharynx. Airway stiffness of the most compliant region (403 ± 204 (mean ± standard deviation) Pa) decreased with severity of OSA. The non-linear response of the airway wall to CPAP was patient specific and varied between anatomical locations. We identified two distinct elasticity phenotypes. Patient phenotyping based on airway elasticity can potentially assist clinical practitioners in decision making on the treatments needed to improve airway patency. PMID:26215306

  5. SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) in adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Amy E; Gillan, Eileen; DiMario, Francis Joseph

    2014-03-01

    SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) is a rare condition that involves complex migraines with focal neurologic findings in patients following cranial irradiation for central nervous system malignancies. Little is known about the mechanisms behind the disorder, making successful treatment challenging. We report 2 new cases of SMART syndrome in pediatric patients as well as review all documented cases of the syndrome. Each of our 2 pediatric patients suffered multiple episodes. Attacks were characterized by severe headache, visual disturbance, aphasia, and weakness. Recovery occurred over several days to weeks. The data from all documented reports of SMART syndrome indicate a greater prevalence for male gender. An age-dependent pattern of onset was also observed, with a greater variability of syndrome onset in patients who received cranial irradiation at a younger age. SMART appears to be a reversible, recurrent long-term complication of radiation therapy with possible age- and gender-related influences.

  6. Anxiety associated with High Resolution Anorectal Manometry in Pediatric Patients and Parents.

    PubMed

    Lamparyk, Katherine; Mahajan, Lori; Debeljak, Ashley; Steffen, Rita

    2017-03-30

    High resolution anorectal manometry (HRM) is an increasingly common procedure performed in pediatric patients to rule out Hirschsprungs as well as assess anorectal function and sensation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate anxiety of patients and their parents associated with HRM. Pre-procedural anxiety was assessed by standardized questionnaire in all parents and children over the age of 8 and observed behavioral distress was recorded by the attending pediatric gastroenterologist. Thirty-five children (mean age = 7.2 yrs, +- 2.8) and their parents completed the study. Patient anxiety was found to be markedly elevated. Observed behavioral distress was elevated compared to more invasive procedures. Self-reported parental anxiety was comparable to adults undergoing endoscopic procedures themselves. Despite the low risk of this procedure, healthcare providers should be aware of the high levels of anxiety and distress that occur in patients and their parents associated with anorectal manometry.

  7. Primitive chest wall neuroectodermal tumor in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengcheng; Zou, Wei; Ma, Guodong; Pan, Yanqing

    2011-10-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the chest wall is presented. After four cycles of chemotherapy, a computed tomography scan of his chest showed a larger mass invading the left upper lobe of the lung. He underwent resection of the left chest wall from the left fourth to sixth ribs, including the tumor, combined with left upper lobectomy and lymph node dissection. A diagnosis of primitive neuroectodermal tumor was confirmed histopathologically and immunohistochemically. After surgery, four cycles of chemotherapy with ifosfamide and etoposide were given. One year after treatment, the patient is currently doing well without evidence of recurrence.

  8. Perioperative management of pediatric patients on mechanical cardiac support.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Emad B; Motta, Pablo; Rossano, Joseph; Hale, Brittani; Morales, David L

    2011-05-01

    The population of children with end-stage heart failure requiring mechanical circulatory support is growing. These children present for diagnostic imaging studies, various interventions and noncardiac surgical procedures that require anesthetic care. This article is a review of the population demographics of children on mechanical cardiac support, the alternative devices available, and the important concepts for safe perioperative management of these patients. The discussion will be limited to devices for short- and long-term cardiac support, excluding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for respiratory support.

  9. Dosimetric Impact of Intrafractional Patient Motion in Pediatric Brain Tumor Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, Chris Trussell, John; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dosimetric consequences of intrafractional patient motion on the clinical target volume (CTV), spinal cord, and optic nerves for non-sedated pediatric brain tumor patients. The patients were immobilized for treatment using a customized thermoplastic full-face mask and bite-block attached to an array of reflectors. The array was optically tracked by infra-red cameras at a frequency of 10 Hz. Patients were localized based on skin/mask marks and weekly films were taken to ensure proper setup. Before each noncoplanar field was delivered, the deviation from baseline of the array was recorded. The systematic error (SE) and random error (RE) were calculated. Direct simulation of the intrafractional motion was used to quantify the dosimetric changes to the targets and critical structures. Nine patients utilizing the optical tracking system were evaluated. The patient cohort had a mean of 31 {+-} 1.5 treatment fractions; motion data were acquired for a mean of 26 {+-} 6.2 fractions. The mean age was 15.6 {+-} 4.1 years. The SE and RE were 0.4 and 1.1 mm in the posterior-anterior, 0.5 and 1.0 mm in left-right, and 0.6 and 1.3 mm in superior-inferior directions, respectively. The dosimetric effects of the motion on the CTV were negligible; however, the dose to the critical structures was increased. Patient motion during treatment does affect the dose to critical structures, therefore, planning risk volumes are needed to properly assess the dose to normal tissues. Because the motion did not affect the dose to the CTV, the 3-mm PTV margin used is sufficient to account for intrafractional motion, given the patient is properly localized at the start of treatment.

  10. Incidence and Correlates of Radiation Pneumonitis in Pediatric Patients With Partial Lung Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Chiaho; Hoth, Kelly A.; Wu Shengjie; Kun, Larry E.; Metzger, Monika L.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Xiong Xiaoping; Krasin, Mathew J.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To provide a radiation pneumonitis risk estimate and investigate the correlation of clinical and dosimetric factors in pediatric patients receiving chest irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 122 patients diagnosed with sarcoma or Hodgkin lymphoma who received radiotherapy to the chest were evaluated for symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 1 with respiratory symptom or higher grade). Pneumonitis data were collected from either prospective toxicity screenings as part of a clinical trial or through chart review. Dosimetric parameters including V{sub 10}-V{sub 25}, mean lung dose, binned lung dose, and tissue complication probability models were used, as well as clinical features to correlate with the development of pneumonitis. Results: The 1- and 2-year cumulative incidence of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis for all patients was 8.2% and 9.1%, respectively. Nine patients experienced symptomatic Grade 1 toxicity, and 2 experienced Grade 2. From univariate analysis, chemotherapy containing bleomycin ({chi}{sup 2} test, p = 0.027) and V{sub 24} (logistic regression, p = 0.019) were the clinical and dosimetric factors that resulted in statistically significant differences in the occurrence of pneumonitis. The probability of pneumonitis increased more dramatically with increasing V{sub 24} in patients receiving bleomycin than in those who did not. Adult tissue complication models did not differentiate pediatric patients with radiation pneumonitis from those without. Conclusions: The incidence of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in pediatric patients is low and its severity mild. Parameters frequently used in adult radiation oncology provide some guidance as to risk, but pediatric patients warrant their own specific models for risk assessment, incorporating dosimetry and clinical factors.

  11. Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder with tic symptoms: clinical presentation and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Højgaard, Davíð R M A; Skarphedinsson, Gudmundur; Nissen, Judith Becker; Hybel, Katja A; Ivarsson, Tord; Thomsen, Per Hove

    2016-12-28

    Some studies have shown that children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and co-morbid tics differ from those without co-morbid tics in terms of several demographic and clinical characteristics. However, not all studies have confirmed these differences. This study examined children and adolescents with OCD and with possible or definite tic specifiers according to the DSM-5 in order to see whether they differ from patients without any tic symptoms regarding clinical presentation and outcome of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). The full sample included 269 patients (aged 7-17) with primary DSM-IV OCD who had participated in the Nordic Long-term Treatment Study (NordLOTS). Symptoms of tics were assessed using the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS-PL). One or more tic symptoms were found in 29.9% of participants. Those with OCD and co-morbid tic symptoms were more likely male, more likely to have onset of OCD at an earlier age, and differed in terms of OCD symptom presentation. More specifically, such participants also showed more symptoms of OCD-related impairment, externalization, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), social anxiety, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the two groups showed no difference in terms of OCD severity or outcome of CBT. Children and adolescents with OCD and co-morbid tic symptoms differ from those without tic symptoms in several aspects of clinical presentation, but not in their response to CBT. Our results underscore the effectiveness of CBT for tic-related OCD.

  12. Moebius syndrome: clinical manifestations in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luciana Monti; Diniz, Michele Baffi; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2009-01-01

    Moebius syndrome is a congenital, nonprogressive disorder clinically characterized by loss of facial expression, impaired stomatognathic system functions, incapacity to close the eyelids, and several oral impairments. The purpose of this paper was to present the clinical manifestations and the dental treatment in a 5-year, 2-month-old male Moebius syndrome patient. The child presented with facial asymmetry, difficulty performing facial mimic movements and pronouncing some letters, and compromised suction, mastication, breathing, and deglutition. An intraoral examination revealed hypofunction of the perioral muscles, cheeks and tongue, ankyloglossia, anterior open bite, and absence of carious lesions and dental anomalies. The dental treatment consisted of frenectomy and further placement of a removable orthodontic appliance with a palatal crib for correction of the anterior open bite. After 12 months of follow-up, anterior open bite decreased and speech, deglutition, and mastication improved.

  13. Pilot program on patient dosimetry in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile

    SciTech Connect

    Ubeda, Carlos; Vano, Eliseo; Miranda, Patricia; Leyton, Fernando

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to present the results of a pilot program on patient dosimetry carried out in Chile during the last 5 yr, using a biplane x-ray angiography system settled for pediatrics. This research was conducted in Latin America under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supporting programs on radiological protection (RP) of patients. Methods: Patient age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time, and two dosimetric quantities [air kerma-area product (P{sub ka}) and cumulative dose (CD) at the patient entrance reference point] were recorded for each procedure. Results: The study includes 544 patients grouped into four age groups. The distributions by age group were 150 for <1 yr; 203 for 1 to <5 yr; 97 for 5 to <10 yr; and 94 for 10 to <16 yr. Median values of P{sub ka} and CD for the four age groups were 0.94, 1.46, 2.13, and 5.03 Gy cm{sup 2} and 23.9, 26.8, 33.5, and 51.6 mGy, respectively. No significant statistical differences were found between diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A moderate correlation (r = 0.64) was seen between P{sub ka} and patient weight. Conclusions: The dose values reported in this paper were lower than those published in the previous work for the same age groups as a result of the optimization actions carried out by cardiologists and medical physicists with the support of the IAEA. Methodology and results will be used as a starting point for a wider survey in Chile and Latin America with the goal to obtain regional diagnostic reference levels as recently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for interventional procedures.

  14. Dysregulated Chemokine Receptor Expression and Chemokine-Mediated Cell Trafficking in Pediatric Patients with ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Barbara; Dai, Wei Wei; Lesser, Martin L.; Trachtman, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Children and adolescents with ESRD on dialysis are susceptible to serious bacterial infections (SBI). Chemokines and chemokine receptors play a critical role in modulating macrophage and neutrophil function. This study examined the hypothesis that expression and/or function of these molecules is dysregulated in patients with ESRD, contributing to leukocyte dysfunction. Design setting, participants, & measurements: Pediatric patients, age 6 mo to 18 yr, with ESRD treated with either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis were enrolled in this prospective, nontherapeutic study. Blood was collected for plasma chemokine levels, chemokine receptor profiling by flow cytometry, and functional chemotaxis studies on neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Results: ESRD in children was associated with reduced expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR1 and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) on circulating neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. When ESRD patients were divided into two subgroups, those who were infection-free and those who had three or more SBI in the preceding year, the differences in chemokine receptor expression were statistically significant compared with control subjects only in those with recurrent infection. In addition to the effects of ESRD on baseline chemokine receptor expression, the hemodialysis procedure itself acutely lowered neutrophil CXCR1 and monocyte CCR2 expression. Furthermore, neutrophil and monocyte responsiveness to chemokine-mediated trafficking signals was impaired in all ESRD patients studied. This abnormality was independent of the level of chemokine receptor expression on the leukocytes. Conclusions: The data presented in this study suggest that chemokine receptor dysregulation contributes to leukocyte dysfunction in patients with ESRD. This alteration is especially prominent in ESRD patients with recurrent infection. PMID:18235145

  15. Evolution of Neurological Impairment in Pediatric Infratentorial Ependymoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morris, E. Brannon; Li, Chenghong; Khan, Raja B.; Sanford, Robert A; Boop, Frederick; Pinlac, Renee; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Infratentorial ependymoma is a common central nervous system tumor of childhood and in patients > 1 year of age is treated with maximally feasible surgical resection and radiotherapy. Because of this tumor typically arises within the 4th ventricle and can invade the brainstem, patients are at risk for significant neurological impairment. Purpose To characterize the incidence, evolution, and persistence of neurologic impairment in children with infratentorial ependymoma following maximal safe surgery and conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (CRT/IMRT). Patients and Methods After surgical resection, 96 children with non-metastatic infratentorial ependymoma were enrolled on a phase II study of image-guided radiation therapy and were prospectively followed with interval comprehensive neurological examinations. Late adverse neurological severity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. Results The most common deficits detected at baseline examination were limb dysmetria, cranial nerve VI/VII palsy, limb paresis, dysphagia, and truncal ataxia/hypotonia. When present, gait dysfunction and dysphagia were often severe. Oculomotor dysfunction, facial paresis, dysphagia, and gait impairment improved over time. With the exception of hearing loss, in the survivor cohort, very few severe late effects (CTCAE Grade 3/4/5) were present at 60 month survival. Conclusion In general, neurological deficits were maximal in the post-operative period and either remained stable or improved during radiation and the post-treatment evaluation period. With the exception of hearing, the majority of chronic residual neurological deficits in this at-risk population are mild and only minimally intrude upon daily life. PMID:19330288

  16. Parents' attitudes and expectations about music's impact on pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Kathi J; McLean, Thomas W

    2008-01-01

    Clinicians often have positive attitudes about the clinical effects of music. To better understand barriers to providing music in the clinic, we describe parents' attitudes about music for pediatric oncology outpatients. A cross-sectional survey was conducted between January 2005 and October 2007 in a pediatric oncology clinic in a tertiary hospital. Eligible subjects were one parent of pediatric leukemia patients. Surveys were distributed at a routine clinic visit as part of a study on the effects of music on subjective and objective well-being. Of the 67 eligible families, 45 (67%) parents responded; 82% reported playing music for the patient at home within the previous week. The most common reasons to use music for the patient were to entertain (88%), keep the patient company (71%), help the patient feel better (76%), or provide comfort (69%); fewer used music to distract the patient from pain (16%) or nausea (11%). Parents expected that music during clinic visits would have positive effects: relaxation (64%), comfort (42%), and/or distraction (33%); none expected negative effects. Parents often play music for their children, and they hold favorable attitudes about playing it in the clinic. Parents' attitudes are not barriers to providing music in the clinic.

  17. Influence of mesna on the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin and carboplatin in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kangarloo, Shahbal B; Gangopadhyay, Suman B; Syme, Rachel M; Wolff, Johannes E A; Glück, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Mesna, a reactive thiol, often encounters cisplatin and carboplatin in combination protocols involving oxazaphosphorines and platinum drugs. This co-administration might be unfavorable based on the inactivation of platinum drugs by thiol groups in vitro. We investigated whether mesna influences the pharmacokinetics of platinum drugs when co-administered with cisplatin or carboplatin. The pharmacokinetics of platinum drugs were investigated in 18 pediatric patients receiving either cisplatin or carboplatin in a combination with or without mesna. In cisplatin patients, a decrease in the distribution clearance of total platinum was observed when mesna was co-administered (CLd, 2.2 +/- 0.1 mL/min.kg; n = 3), compared to cisplatin without mesna (CLd, 4.8 +/- 1.5 mL/min.kg; n = 5) (p = 0.029, t-test). This might have been caused by an influence of mesna in slowing down the protein binding of cisplatin since a trend (p = 0.057) in prolonged distribution half-life of total platinum was also observed when mesna was present (t(1/2a) 65 +/- 21 min; n = 3) compared to cisplatin without mesna (t(1/2a), 32 +/- 18 min; n = 5). However, the impact of these changes on the area under the concentration time curve (AUC), total clearance (CLt), and volume of distribution (V) for total platinum and ultrafilterable platinum species was hardly noticeable. In carboplatin patients, when mesna was co-administered: AUC (2.5 +/- 0.4 mg.min/mL.400 mg/m2; n = 5) CLt, (6.8 +/- 5.1 mL/min.kg; n = 6), and V (0.7 +/- 0.4 L/kg; n = 6) for ultrafilterable platinum species were not significantly different from when carboplatin were administered without mesna: AUC (2.3 +/- 1.3 mg.min/mL.400 mg/m2; n = 4), CLt (5.8 +/- 4.6 mL/min.kg; n = 5), and V (1.1 +/- 1.1 L/kg; n = 5). Hence, mesna does not significantly influence the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin and carboplatin in pediatric cancer patients.

  18. Interventional Radiological Treatment of Perihepatic Vascular Stenosis or Occlusion in Pediatric Patients After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Uller, Wibke; Knoppke, Birgit; Schreyer, Andreas G.; Heiss, Peter; Schlitt, Hans J.; Melter, Michael; Stroszczynski, Christian; Zorger, Niels; Wohlgemuth, Walter A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of percutaneous treatment of vascular stenoses and occlusions in pediatric liver transplant recipients. Methods: Fifteen children (mean age 8.3 years) underwent interventional procedures for 18 vascular complications after liver transplantation. Patients had stenoses or occlusions of portal veins (n = 8), hepatic veins (n = 3), inferior vena cava (IVC; n = 2) or hepatic arteries (n = 5). Technical and clinical success rates were evaluated. Results: Stent angioplasty was performed in seven cases (portal vein, hepatic artery and IVC), and sole balloon angioplasty was performed in eight cases. One child underwent thrombolysis (hepatic artery). Clinical and technical success was achieved in 14 of 18 cases of vascular stenoses or occlusions (mean follow-up 710 days). Conclusion: Pediatric interventional radiology allows effective and safe treatment of vascular stenoses after pediatric liver transplantation (PLT). Individualized treatment with special concepts for each pediatric patient is necessary. The variety, the characteristics, and the individuality of interventional management of all kinds of possible vascular stenoses or occlusions after PLT are shown.

  19. Venous thromboembolism in pediatric patients: a single institution experience in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Won; Kim, Heon Min; Park, Hye Won

    2016-01-01

    Background While venous thromboembolism (VTE) is uncommon, its incidence is increasing in children. We aimed to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, treatment, and outcome of pediatric VTE cases at a single tertiary hospital in Korea. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the records of consecutive pediatric VTE patients admitted to the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between April 2003 and March 2016. Results Among 70,462 hospitalizations, 25 pediatric VTE cases were identified (3.27 cases per 10,000 admissions). Fifteen patients (60%) were male, 8 were neonates (32%), and the median age at diagnosis was 10.9 years (range, 0 days‒17 yr). Doppler ultrasonography was the most frequently used imaging modality. Thrombosis occurred in the intracerebral (20%), upper venous (64%), lower venous (12%), and combined upper and lower venous systems (4%). Twenty patients (80%) had underlying clinical conditions including venous catheterization (24%), malignancy (20%), and systemic diseases (12%). Protein C, protein S, and antithrombin deficiencies occurred in 2 of 13, 4 of 13, and 1 of 14 patients tested, respectively. Six patients were treated with heparin followed by warfarin, while 4 were treated with heparin or warfarin. Thrombectomy and inferior vena cava filter and/or thrombolysis were performed in 5 patients. Two patients died of pulmonary embolism, and 2 developed a post-thrombotic syndrome. Conclusion Compared with the reports from Western countries, VTE occurrence was lower in the Korean pediatric population under study, although similar clinical characteristics including bimodal age distribution, underlying diseases, treatment pattern, and outcomes were observed. PMID:27722126

  20. Assessing Predictive Performance of Published Population Pharmacokinetic Models of Intravenous Tobramycin in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Celeste; Staatz, Christine E.; Unwin, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Several population pharmacokinetic models describe the dose-exposure relationship of tobramycin in pediatric patients. Before the implementation of these models in clinical practice for dosage adjustment, their predictive performance should be externally evaluated. This study tested the predictive performance of all published population pharmacokinetic models of tobramycin developed for pediatric patients with an independent patient cohort. A literature search was conducted to identify suitable models for testing. Demographic and pharmacokinetic data were collected retrospectively from the medical records of pediatric patients who had received intravenous tobramycin. Tobramycin exposure was predicted from each model. Predictive performance was assessed by visual comparison of predictions to observations, by calculation of bias and imprecision, and through the use of simulation-based diagnostics. Eight population pharmacokinetic models were identified. A total of 269 concentration-time points from 41 pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis were collected for external evaluation. Three models consistently performed best in all evaluations and had mean errors ranging from −0.4 to 1.8 mg/liter, relative mean errors ranging from 4.9 to 29.4%, and root mean square errors ranging from 47.8 to 66.9%. Simulation-based diagnostics supported these findings. Models that allowed a two-compartment disposition generally had better predictive performance than those that used a one-compartment disposition model. Several published models of the pharmacokinetics of tobramycin showed reasonable low levels of bias, although all models seemed to have some problems with imprecision. This suggests that knowledge of typical pharmacokinetic behavior and patient covariate values alone without feedback concentration measurements from individual patients is not sufficient to make precise predictions. PMID:27001806

  1. Pediatric ventricular assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Burki, Sarah; Zafar, Farhan; Morales, David Luis Simon

    2015-01-01

    The domain of pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD) has recently gained considerable attention. Despite the fact that, historically, the practice of pediatric mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has lagged behind that of adult patients, this gap between the two groups is narrowing. Currently, the Berlin EXCOR VAD is the only pediatric-specific durable VAD approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The prospective Berlin Heart trial demonstrated a successful outcome, either bridge to transplantation (BTT), or in rare instances, bridge to recovery, in approximately 90% of children. Also noted during the trial was, however, a high incidence of adverse events such as embolic stroke, bleeding and infection. This has incentivized some pediatric centers to utilize adult implantable continuous-flow devices, for instance the HeartMate II and HeartWare HVAD, in children. As a result of this paradigm shift, the outlook of pediatric VAD support has dramatically changed: Treatment options previously unavailable to children, including outpatient management and even destination therapy, have now been becoming a reality. The sustained demand for continued device miniaturization and technological refinements is anticipated to extend the range of options available to children—HeartMate 3 and HeartWare MVAD are two examples of next generation VADs with potential pediatric application, both of which are presently undergoing clinical trials. A pediatric-specific continuous-flow device is also on the horizon: the redesigned Infant Jarvik VAD (Jarvik 2015) is undergoing pre-clinical testing, with a randomized clinical trial anticipated to follow thereafter. The era of pediatric VADs has begun. In this article, we discuss several important aspects of contemporary VAD therapy, with a particular focus on challenges unique to the pediatric population. PMID:26793341

  2. Cranial Reconstruction in a Pediatric Patient Using a Tissue Expander and Custom-made Hydroxyapatite Implant.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Tadashi; Hanai, Ushio; Kobayashi, Megumi; Nakajima, Serina; Kuroki, Takahiko; Miyasaka, Muneo; Imai, Masaaki

    2015-06-20

    A tissue expansion technique in conjunction with a custom-made artificial bone implant was effective for a large cranial reconstruction in a pediatric patient. The patient was an eight-year-old boy with cranial bone fracture, acute subdural hematoma in the left lobe, and acute epidural hematoma in the right lobe due to an accident. Wound dehiscence and artificial dura infection were observed as postoperative complications. Because of insufficiency of the skin flap caused by scar contracture, a scalp skin expansion using a tissue expander was necessary before reconstruction with the artificial bone implant. This combined procedure provided safe coverage of the implant and resulted in good wound healing. There are relatively few reports involving the use of tissue expanders for cranioplasty; furthermore, our search of the literature did not reveal any reports involving children. We believe that this procedure is safe and effective for early rehabilitation in pediatric patients.

  3. Health Care Providers' Perceptions of Nutrition Support in Pediatric Oncology and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Kathleen; Belongia, Meghan; Schulta, Christina; Mulberry, Mollie Haddigan; Nugent, Melodee L; Simpson, Pippa M

    2016-07-01

    One of the most common side effects of medical treatment for patients with an oncologic diagnosis is malnutrition. There is limited research that broadly assesses the perceptions of health care providers (HCPs) regarding nutrition support in the pediatric population. The purpose of this study was to describe the perceptions of nutrition support among pediatric oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplant HCPs. The study used a cross-sectional descriptive design using a 31-item survey. Results of the survey indicated that nurses were more likely to initiate conversations about nutrition support during the first month of diagnosis, while midlevel providers and physicians initiated discussions in response to a change in nutritional status evidenced by decreased oral intake or weight loss. Participants reported resistance by patients and families more often for enteral nutrition compared with parenteral nutrition. Findings suggest a need to develop a more unified service line-based approach for initiating discussions related to nutrition support that incorporate patient and family perceptions.

  4. Aripiprazole: in the treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Curran, Monique P

    2011-06-01

    Aripiprazole is an atypical antipsychotic approved for the treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder in pediatric patients aged 6-17 years. In two, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies in pediatric patients aged 6-17 years with irritability associated with autistic disorder, 8 weeks of treatment with aripiprazole 2-15 mg/day, compared with placebo, resulted in significant improvements in the Aberrant Behavior Checklist Irritability subscale score at endpoint (primary endpoint), and the mean Clinical Global Impression-Improvement score. Aripiprazole was generally well tolerated in this patient population in the two 8-week studies and a 52-week study, with most adverse events being mild to moderate in severity. Aripiprazole was associated with weight gain in both the short- and long-term studies; data from the long-term study indicated that the increase in bodyweight reached a plateau at 3-6 months.

  5. Children in chronic pain: promoting pediatric patients' symptom accounts in tertiary care.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Ignasi; Lee, Seung-Hee; Heritage, John

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines how clinicians promote pediatric patients' symptom accounts at the beginning of visits in three pediatric tertiary care clinics at a university hospital in the United States: pain, gastroenterology and neurology. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected for 69 patient-parent pairs, including videotaped intake visits. Two forms of child account promotion, together with their corresponding distribution across clinics, were identified: (1) Epistemic prefaces were used to upgrade the patient's epistemic status and to establish the child as primary informant; and, (2) non-focused questioning was used to permit children latitude in the formulation of symptoms and experiences. In general, epistemic prefaces were characteristic of the gastroenterology and neurology visits, while non-focused questioning was found overwhelmingly in the pain encounters.

  6. Outcome after anterior callosal section that spares the splenium in pediatric patients with drop attacks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng-Fan; Lin, Qiao; Mei, Zhen; Chen, Zi-Qian; Zhang, Hui-Jian; Pei, Jia-Sheng; Tian, Jun; Jia, Yan-Zeng; Zhong, Zhong-Hui

    2014-07-01

    We report on the efficacy and safety of extended, one-stage anterior callosal section that spares the splenium, which is performed in a large series of pediatric patients with drop attacks. Twenty-nine pediatric patients with drop attacks were studied (19 males and 10 females; mean age: 9.9 years). As presurgical factors, the age at surgery, age at seizure onset, age at drop attack onset, sex, hemiparesis, severe mental retardation, electroencephalograph abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, and (18)fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography abnormalities were analyzed. All patients had multiple seizure types, including drop attacks, atypical absence seizures, complex partial seizures, tonic seizures, and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. All patients were developmentally impaired and had electroencephalograph results showing marked secondary bilateral synchrony. All patients received an extended, one-stage callosal section, leaving only the splenium intact. The mean follow-up time was 5.2 years. Seizure outcome (cessation of seizures or ≥ 90% seizure reduction) was achieved in 79.3% of patients with drop attacks. The families assessed the overall daily function as improved in 62.1% of the patients, unchanged in 24.1%, and worse in 13.8%. Family satisfaction with callosotomy was achieved in 82.8% of the patients. The majority of the patients had some degree of a transient acute postoperative disconnection syndrome that disappeared within 3 weeks. Postoperatively, patients showed a consistent increase in attention levels. We conclude that extended callosal sectioning that leaves the splenium intact should be considered a good palliative surgical option for pediatric patients with drop attacks and that diminishment of epileptic discharge synchrony is a good prognostic sign following callosotomy. We also found that the postoperative increase in attention levels was as useful as seizure control in improving the quality of life of these

  7. Evaluation of radiation dose to pediatric patients during certain special procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Elhag, B.; Babikir, E.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-11-01

    This study was intended to measure pediatric entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and effective dose during micturating cystourethrography (MCU), intravenous urography (IVU) and barium studies (barium meal, enema, and swallow) and to propose a local diagnostic reference level (DRL). ESAK was measured for patients using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs, GR200A). Effective doses (E) were calculated using the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. A total of 236 special pediatric procedures were investigated. 21.7% of the sample comprised barium procedures, 18.6% were MCU procedures while 59.5% of the sample were IVU procedures. The mean ESAK measurements (mGy) were 2.1±0.8, 3.0±23 and 1.2±0.2 for barium meal, enema and swallow in the same order. The mean patient dose for IVU procedures was 12.4±8.7 mGy per procedure and the mean patient dose per MCU procedure was 5.8±7 mGy. Local DRLs were proposed for all procedures. The patient doses in this study are within the reported values, suggesting that pediatric patients are adequately protected.

  8. Altered systemic bile acid homeostasis contributes to liver disease in pediatric patients with intestinal failure

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yong-Tao; Cao, Yi; Zhou, Ke-Jun; Lu, Li-Na; Cai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal failure (IF)-associated liver disease (IFALD), as a major complication, contributes to significant morbidity in pediatric IF patients. However, the pathogenesis of IFALD is still uncertain. We here investigate the roles of bile acid (BA) dysmetabolism in the unclear pathogenesis of IFALD. It found that the histological evidence of pediatric IF patients exhibited liver injury, which was characterized by liver bile duct proliferation, inflammatory infiltration, hepatocyte apoptosis and different stages of fibrosis. The BA compositions were altered in serum and liver of pediatric IF patients, as reflected by a primary BA dominant composition. In IF patients, the serum FGF19 levels decreased significantly, and were conversely correlated with ileal inflammation grades (r = −0.50, p < 0.05). In ileum, the inflammation grades were inversely associated with farnesoid X receptor (FXR) expression (r = −0.55, p < 0.05). In liver, the expression of induction of the rate-limiting enzyme in bile salt synthesis, cytochrome P450 7a1 (CYP7A1) increased evidently. In conclusion, ileum inflammation decreases FXR expression corresponding to reduce serum FGF19 concentration, along with increased hepatic bile acid synthesis, leading to liver damages in IF patients. PMID:27976737

  9. Pediatric urticaria.

    PubMed

    Tsakok, Teresa; Du Toit, George; Flohr, Carsten

    2014-02-01

    Although urticaria is not a life-threatening disease, its impact on quality of life in children should not be overlooked. A systematic search of online databases, including Medline, was performed to inform a review aiming to equip clinicians with an evidence-based approach to all aspects of pediatric urticaria. This review hinges on an illustrative case and includes a summary table of studies pertaining to disease management in children. The multiple issues faced by patients, their families, and treating clinicians are highlighted, and the current literature on the presentation, natural history, investigation, and management of this poorly understood condition is assessed.

  10. A pediatric case of pituitary macroadenoma presenting with pituitary apoplexy and cranial nerve involvement: case report

    PubMed Central

    Özçetin, Mustafa; Karacı, Mehmet; Toroslu, Ertuğ; Edebali, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas usually arise from the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and are manifested with hormonal disorders or mass effect. Mass effect usually occurs in nonfunctional tumors. Pituitary adenomas may be manifested with visual field defects or rarely in the form of total oculomotor palsy. Visual field defect is most frequently in the form of bitemporal hemianopsia and superior temporal defect. Sudden loss of vision, papilledema and ophthalmoplegia may be observed. Pituitary apoplexy is defined as an acute clinical syndrome characterized with headache, vomiting, loss of vision, ophthalmoplegia and clouding of consciousness. The problem leading to pituitary apoplexy may be decreased blood supply in the adenoma and hemorrhage following this decrease or hemorrhage alone. In this article, we present a patient who presented with fever, vomiting and sudden loss of vision and limited outward gaze in the left eye following trauma and who was found to have pituitary macroadenoma causing compression of the optic chiasma and optic nerve on the left side on cranial and pituitary magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27738402

  11. Long working distance optical coherence tomography for pediatric imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Ruobing; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Vajzovic, Lejla; Gramatikov, Boris I.; Guyton, David L.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems have working distances of about 25 mm, and require cooperative subjects to immobilize and fixate on a target. Handheld OCT probes have also been demonstrated for successful imaging of pre-term infants and neonates up to ~1 year old. However, no technology yet exists for OCT in young children due to their lack of attention and inherent fear of large objects close to their face. In this work, we demonstrate a prototype retinal swept-source OCT system with a long working distance (from the last optical element to the subject's eye) to facilitate pediatric imaging. To reduce the footprint and weight of the system compared to the conventional 4f scheme, a novel 2f scanning configuration was implemented to achieve a working distance of 348mm with a +/- 8° scanning angle prior to cornea. Employing two custom-designed lenses, the system design resolution was nearly diffraction limited throughout a -8D to +5D refractive corrections. A fixation target displayed on a LCD monitor and an iris camera were used to facilitate alignment and imaging. Our prototype was tested in consented adult subjects and has the potential to facilitate imaging of young children. With this apparatus, young children could potentially sit comfortably in caretaker's lap while viewing entertainment on the fixation screen designed to direct their gaze into the imaging apparatus.

  12. Reparative giant cell granuloma in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Duarte Ruiz, Blanca; Riba García, Francisco de Asís; Navarro Cuéllar, Carlos; Bucci, Tommaso; Cuesta Gil, Matías; Navarro Vila, Carlos

    2007-08-01

    Reparative giant cell granulomas are benign, infrequent tumors, of non-odontogenic origin, that develop at central or peripheral level. Peripherally located lesions are frequently denominated "giant cell epulis", and never correspond to true neoplasia, but rather to inflammatory reactions secondary to another lesion (hemorrhage, etc.). It should be taken into account, that in general, head and neck tumors of infancy usually demonstrate an atypical biological behaviour. Furthermore, the anatomicopathologic diagnosis is often compromised in this type of lesion. We present the case of a 6-year-old boy, who, three weeks after suffering a slight facial trauma, developed a painless, exophytic swelling of approximately 4 cm, with bleeding on palpation, in the ipsilateral hemimaxilla. The lesion demonstrated rapid, progressive and continuous growth. The facial CT and incisional biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnosis of reparative giant cell granuloma. The patient was surgically treated, carrying out a left marginal maxillectomy associated with the extirpation of the soft-tissue lesion. The resultant defect was reconstructed with a Bichat fat-pad providing the patient with optimal esthetic and functional results. The definitive anatomicopathologic report of the surgical piece is compatible with reparative giant cell granuloma.

  13. Antifungal susceptibility against yeasts isolated from pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Kersun, L S; Reilly, A F; Ingram, M E; Nicholaou, M J; McGowan, K L

    2008-06-01

    Yeast infections cause morbidity in children with cancer and we evaluated species distribution and antifungal susceptibilities of the etiologic agents in this group. Specimens from 58 children yielded 64 cultures positive for yeasts. Central venous catheters were present in 56 (97%) of the children and neutrophil counts were <500 cells/ml3 in 34% of the patients. Twenty-two (38%) had received recent antifungal treatment, with 15 (25%) receiving fluconazole (FLU) prophylaxis. The Candida isolates recovered from four (27%) of the children on FLU prophylaxis, were resistant to this drug. Candida albicans isolates were susceptible to 100% of antifungals tested, whereas non-C. albicans Candida spp. were variable in their susceptibility patterns. FLU prophylaxis minimally affected susceptibility.

  14. Lupus vulgaris in a pediatric patient: a clinicohistopathological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Afsar, F Sule; Afsar, Ilhan; Diniz, Gulden; Asilsoy, Suna; Sorguc, Yelda

    2008-04-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis which usually occurs in patients previously sensitized to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We present a case of a 10-year-old boy who was diagnosed as lupus vulgaris clinically and histopathologically. He had well demarcated, irregularly bordered, pink, infiltrated plaques on his left cheek showing apple-jelly appearance on diascopy. The histopathological examination showed tuberculoid granulomas with Langhans type giant cells. The Mantoux reactivity was in normal limits, and no acid-fast bacilli was found in the lesion, either by direct stained smears or by culture. The lesions showed marked improvement on anti-tuberculosis treatment. We want to emphasize that histopathological examination has diagnostic value in lupus vulgaris in correlation with clinical appearance, when direct analysis or culture is negative.

  15. Patient-specific biodegradable implant in pediatric craniofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Essig, H; Lindhorst, D; Gander, T; Schumann, P; Könü, D; Altermatt, S; Rücker, M

    2017-02-01

    Surgical correction of premature fusion of calvarial sutures involving the fronto-orbital region can be challenging due to the demanding three-dimensional (3D) anatomy. If fronto-orbital advancement (FOA) is necessary, surgery is typically performed using resorbable plates and screws that are bent manually intraoperatively. A new approach using individually manufactured resorbable implants (KLS Martin Group, Tuttlingen, Germany) is presented in the current paper. Preoperative CT scan data were processed in iPlan (ver. 3.0.5; Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany) to generate a 3D reconstruction. Virtual osteotomies and simulation of the ideal outer contour with reassembled bony segments were performed. Digital planning was transferred with a cutting guide, and an individually manufactured resorbable implant was used for rigid fixation. A resorbable patient-specific implant (Resorb X-PSI) allows precise surgery for FOA in craniosynostosis using a complete digital workflow and should be considered superior to manually bent resorbable plates.

  16. New Diagnostic Strategies for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Benjamin D.; Gilger, Mark A.; Czinn, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) is a common chronic bacterial infection that is an important cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastroduodenal disease in children. H pylori is also associated with extragastric manifestations, including growth reduction, iron-deficiency anemia, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Current guidelines recommend endoscopy with biopsy for the definitive demonstration of H pylori infection. In contrast to serology, the fecal antigen test and the urea breath test provide reliable, sensitive, and specific results for detecting active H pylori infection in children before and after treatment. The first-line treatment option for pediatric patients is triple therapy with a proton pump inhibitor and 2 antibiotics, which include amoxicillin and clarithromycin or metronidazole. Decreasing eradication rates and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of H pylori have led to the use of other treatments, such as sequential therapy or triple therapy with newer antibiotics, particularly in geographic areas with high rates of antibiotic resistance. Patients should be tested after treatment to confirm eradication, as the absence of symptoms does not necessarily mean that H pylori is no longer present. This clinical roundtable monograph provides an overview of H pylori infection, as well as expert insight into the diagnosis and management of H pylori infection in children. PMID:26491414

  17. Surgical Guides (Patient-Specific Instruments) for Pediatric Tibial Bone Sarcoma Resection and Allograft Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bellanova, Laura; Paul, Laurent; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2013-01-01

    To achieve local control of malignant pediatric bone tumors and to provide satisfactory oncological results, adequate resection margins are mandatory. The local recurrence rate is directly related to inappropriate excision margins. The present study describes a method for decreasing the resection margin width and ensuring that the margins are adequate. This method was developed in the tibia, which is a common site for the most frequent primary bone sarcomas in children. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerized tomography (CT) were used for preoperative planning to define the cutting planes for the tumors: each tumor was segmented on MRI, and the volume of the tumor was coregistered with CT. After preoperative planning, a surgical guide (patient-specific instrument) that was fitted to a unique position on the tibia was manufactured by rapid prototyping. A second instrument was manufactured to adjust the bone allograft to fit the resection gap accurately. Pathologic evaluation of the resected specimens showed tumor-free resection margins in all four cases. The technologies described in this paper may improve the surgical accuracy and patient safety in surgical oncology. In addition, these techniques may decrease operating time and allow for reconstruction with a well-matched allograft to obtain stable osteosynthesis. PMID:23533326

  18. Microwave beamforming for non-invasive patient-specific hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burfeindt, Matthew J.; Zastrow, Earl; Hagness, Susan C.; Van Veen, Barry D.; Medow, Joshua E.

    2011-05-01

    We present a numerical study of an array-based microwave beamforming approach for non-invasive hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain tumors. The transmit beamformer is designed to achieve localized heating—that is, to achieve constructive interference and selective absorption of the transmitted electromagnetic waves at the desired focus location in the brain while achieving destructive interference elsewhere. The design process takes into account patient-specific and target-specific propagation characteristics at 1 GHz. We evaluate the effectiveness of the beamforming approach using finite-difference time-domain simulations of two MRI-derived child head models from the Virtual Family (IT'IS Foundation). Microwave power deposition and the resulting steady-state thermal distribution are calculated for each of several randomly chosen focus locations. We also explore the robustness of the design to mismatch between the assumed and actual dielectric properties of the patient. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of the beamformer to suppress hot spots caused by pockets of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain. Our results show that microwave beamforming has the potential to create localized heating zones in the head models for focus locations that are not surrounded by large amounts of CSF. These promising results suggest that the technique warrants further investigation and development.

  19. Risk analysis, diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal mucositis in pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kuiken, Nicoline S S; Rings, Edmond H H M; Tissing, Wim J E

    2015-04-01

    Mucositis is a complex inflammatory reaction of the mucous membranes of the alimentary tract upon chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment in oncology patients. Mucositis can be subdivided in oral and gastrointestinal mucositis (GI mucositis). The damage to the gastrointestinal tract compromises the intestinal function and thereby the nutritional status and the quality of life, and eventually affects survival. The literature on GI mucositis focuses mainly on adults. This review focuses on data available on GI mucositis in pediatric cancer patients. An evaluation of the clinical presentation and consequences of GI mucositis in children is outlined. The review summarizes key issues for clinicians with respect to risk analysis for developing mucositis and the diagnosis of this condition in children. Information on these issues is obtained from clinical trials in children and adults, and from animal models. Diagnostic tools and assessment of severity of GI mucositis in children is elaborated on. Furthermore, the clinical management of the symptoms and consequences of GI mucositis in children, with specific focus on nutritional support, are discussed.

  20. Surgical guides (patient-specific instruments) for pediatric tibial bone sarcoma resection and allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bellanova, Laura; Paul, Laurent; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2013-01-01

    To achieve local control of malignant pediatric bone tumors and to provide satisfactory oncological results, adequate resection margins are mandatory. The local recurrence rate is directly related to inappropriate excision margins. The present study describes a method for decreasing the resection margin width and ensuring that the margins are adequate. This method was developed in the tibia, which is a common site for the most frequent primary bone sarcomas in children. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerized tomography (CT) were used for preoperative planning to define the cutting planes for the tumors: each tumor was segmented on MRI, and the volume of the tumor was coregistered with CT. After preoperative planning, a surgical guide (patient-specific instrument) that was fitted to a unique position on the tibia was manufactured by rapid prototyping. A second instrument was manufactured to adjust the bone allograft to fit the resection gap accurately. Pathologic evaluation of the resected specimens showed tumor-free resection margins in all four cases. The technologies described in this paper may improve the surgical accuracy and patient safety in surgical oncology. In addition, these techniques may decrease operating time and allow for reconstruction with a well-matched allograft to obtain stable osteosynthesis.

  1. High rate of TTV infection in multitransfused patients with pediatric malignancy and hematological disorders.

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Hamada, H; Tsuda, A; Kaneko, K; Fukunaga, Y

    2000-09-01

    The prevalence of transfusion-transmitted virus (TTV) infection has not been known in patients suffering from pediatric malignancies and hematological disorders who receive blood transfusion and/or blood products during treatment. Blood samples were taken from 75 patients. TTV infection was identified when TTV DNA was detected in serum by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis G virus (HGV) RNA were also assayed by PCR. TTV DNA was detected in 38 of 75 patients (51%). In 4 of 38 patients, the amount of blood transfused was less than 3 units. By time since last transfusion, TTV DNA was detected in 12 of 35 patients after more than 4 years, 12 of 21 between 1 and 4 years, and 14 of 19 within 1 year. Six patients had mixed infection of TTV and HCV, and 12 patients had mixed infection of TTV and HGV. Three different kinds of virus were found simultaneously in serum from 3 patients. Eight out of 75 patients showed abnormal levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (>40 IU/liter), and 3 of them had TTV DNA. All patients who had TTV DNA and elevated ALT levels also were positive for HCV RNA and HGV RNA. The prevalence of TTV infection is high in patients with pediatric malignancies and hematological disorders after episodes of blood transfusion. Transfusion is one of the most important risk factors for TTV infection regardless of the amount of blood transfused.

  2. Candidiasis in pediatric patients with cancer interned in a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    De Carvalho Parahym, Ana Maria Rabelo; De Melo, Luciana Resende Bandeira; De Morais, Vera Lúcia Lins; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Fungi are common causes of infection in immunocompromised patients. Candida species are frequently involved in these cases. In order to investigate candidiasis in pediatric patients with cancer, clinical samples were collected from one hundred and twenty two patients interned in the Oswaldo Cruz University Hospital in Recife, Brazil. Yeasts were isolated from thirty-four clinical samples. The species isolated were: Candida albicans (fourteen isolates), C. parapsilosis (nine isolates), C. guilliermondii (two isolates) and C. tropicalis (two isolates). We found that candidemia was most frequent in patients with malignant hematology and that C. parapsilosis infections caused the highest mortality. PMID:24031365

  3. Patient safety, error reduction, and pediatric nurses' perceptions of smart pump technology.

    PubMed

    Mason, Janice Jackson; Roberts-Turner, Renée; Amendola, Virginia; Sill, Anne M; Hinds, Pamela S

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety and error reduction are essential to improve patient care, and new technology is expected to contribute to such improvements while reducing costs and increasing care efficiency in health care organizations. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships among pediatric nurses' perceptions of smart infusion pump (SIP) technology, patient safety, and error reduction. Findings revealed that RNs' perceptions of SIP correlated with patient safety. No significant relationship was found between RNs' perceptions of SIP and error reduction, but data retrieved from the pumps revealed 93 manipulations of the pumps, of which error reduction was captured 65 times.

  4. Pediatric electrocardiographic imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jennifer N A

    2015-03-01

    Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) has been used in pediatric and congenital heart patients to better understand their electrophysiologic substrates. In this article we focus on the 4 subjects related to pediatric ECGI: (1) ECGI in patients with congenital heart disease and Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, (2) ECGI in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and preexcitation, (3) ECGI in pediatric patients with Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, and (4) ECGI for pediatric cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  5. Pancytopenia in children: A 6-year spectrum of patients admitted to Pediatric Department of Rehman Medical Institute, Peshawar

    PubMed Central

    Zeb Jan, Anwar; Zahid, Bakhtyar; Ahmad, Samreen; Gul, Zahid

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the various spectrum of pancytopenia with its frequency on the basis of bone marrow examination in children from 6 months to 14 years. Methods: A retrospective descriptive study was carried out at Department of Pediatric Rehman Medical Institute Peshawar from January 2006 to December 2012. A total of 205 patient’s age between 6 months and 14 years, fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. Complete blood count, peripheral smear, bone marrow examination and Serum vitamin B12 level was done in all the cases. Results: Out of 14642 patients admitted to the Pediatric department during the study period, 205 (1.4%) patients were pancytopenic on their peripheral blood smear. Male outnumbered female with a ratio of 1.8:1. 42.5% of the patients were in the age group of 1 month to 5 years. Common etiological pattern identified were Aplastic anemia 58(28.3%), Hematological malignancies 49 (23.9%), megaloblastic anemia 40 (19.5%), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura 16 (7.8%), iron deficiency anemia 9 (4.4%), hemolytic anemia 7 (3.41%), Visceral leishmaniasis 6 (2.93%), hypersplenism 5 (2.44%), malaria 5 (2.44%), anemia of chronic disorder 4 (1.95%), Myelodisplastic syndrome 3 (1.46%), Niemen pick disease 2 (0.97%) and Gaucher disease in 1(0.49%). Common clinical presentations were fever, pallor, body aches, petechial hemorrhages and epistaxis. Conclusion: Pancytopenia is one of the importance occurrences in pediatric patients. Acute leukemia and bone marrow failure are the most common causes yet megaloblastic anemia and infections are the treatable and reversible causes of pancytopenia. PMID:24353710

  6. [Odontogenic myxoma of nasosinusal localization in a pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    Arjona Amo, M; Belmonte Caro, R; Valdivieso del Pueblo, C; Batista Cruzado, A; Torres Lagares, D; Gutiérrez Pérez, J L

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we report and discuss a case of odontogenic myxoma in a 13-month-old patient. Only two other reports have been published in the literature describing the occurrence of this type of tumor at an earlier age. Odontogenic myxoma is a benign mesenchymal neoplasm of the maxilla more common between the third and fourth decades of life. The case here reported is exceptional as it presents in an infant and, although some cases have been reported in the literature, this type of tumor is rare in early childhood. The most common locations include the ascending ramus and the angle of the jaw, although these tumors may also affect the upper maxilla, in which case they may involve the maxillary sinus. According to the review of the literature, these tumors show a recurrence rate of about 25%. Consequently, after the intraoperative clinical examination of the lesion and the assessment of the initial suspected diagnosis by means of intraoperative biopsy under general anesthesia, we carried out the resection of the tumor with wide margins at some points of the tumor location.

  7. [An epidemiological investigation of pediatric patients under 14 with large area burns: a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Cheng, W F; Zhao, D X; Shen, Z A; Zhang, H Y; Tu, J J; Yuan, Z Q; Duan, P; Song, G D

    2017-02-14

    of stay for pediatric burn patients was (52.3±40.2) days. Conclusions: Children under 3 years old are important target population of severe burns. Scald is the most common type of burns, while the proportion of flames increases as age goes up. Most patients are likely to get clinical treatment in time, however, the pre-hospital emergency burn care is not satisfying at present.

  8. Initial Observations of the Effects of Calcium Chloride Infusions in Pediatric Patients with Low Cardiac Output.

    PubMed

    Averin, Konstantin; Villa, Chet; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Pratt, Jesse; King, Eileen; Jefferies, John L; Nelson, David P; Cooper, David S; Ryan, Thomas D; Sawyer, Jaclyn; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Lorts, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial contractility and relaxation are highly dependent on calcium homeostasis. Immature myocardium, as in pediatric patients, is thought to be more dependent on extracellular calcium for optimal function. For this reason, intravenous calcium chloride infusions may improve myocardial function in the pediatric patient. The objectives of this study were to report the hemodynamic changes seen after administration of continuous calcium chloride to critically ill children. We retrospectively identified pediatric patients (newborn to 17 years old) with hemodynamic instability admitted to the cardiac ICU between May 2011 and May 2012 who received a continuous infusion of calcium chloride. The primary outcome was improvement in cardiac output, assessed by arterial-mixed venous oxygen saturation (A-V) difference. Sixty-eight patients, mean age 0.87 ± 2.67 years, received a total of 116 calcium infusions. Calcium chloride infusions resulted in significant improvements in primary and secondary measures of cardiac output at 2 and 6 h. Six hours after calcium initiation, A-V oxygen saturation difference decreased by 7.4 % (32.6 ± 2.1 to 25.2 ± 2.0 %, p < 0.001), rSO2 increased by 5.5 % (63.1 vs 68.6 %, p < 0.001), and serum lactate decreased by 0.9 mmol/l (3.3 vs 2.4 mmol/l, p < 0.001) with no change in HR (149.1 vs 145.6 bpm p = 0.07). Urine output increased 0.66 ml/kg/h in the 8-h period after calcium initiation when compared to pre-initiation (p = 0.003). Neonates had the strongest evidence of effectiveness with other age groups trending toward significance. Calcium chloride infusions improve markers of cardiac output in a heterogenous group of pediatric patients in a cardiac ICU. Neonates appear to derive the most benefit from utilization of these infusions.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spine in Children: Spinal Incidental Findings in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramadorai, Uma E.; Hire, Justin M.; DeVine, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective To determine the rate of spinal incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine in the pediatric population. Methods We reviewed MRI imaging of the neuraxial spine in patients less than 18 years of age and documented abnormal spinal findings. We then reviewed the charts of these patients to determine the reason for ordering the study. Those who presented with pain were considered symptomatic. Those who had no presenting complaint were considered asymptomatic. The data were analyzed to break down the rate of spinal incidental findings in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, respectively. Results Thirty-one of the 99 MRIs had positive findings, with the most common being disk protrusion (51.6%). Spinal incidental findings were most common in the lumbar spine (9.4%) versus the cervical spine (8%) or thoracic spine (4.7%). In this group, Schmorl nodes and disk protrusion were the two most common findings (37.5% each). Other spinal incidental findings included a vertebral hemangioma and a Tarlov cyst. In the thoracic spine, the only spinal incidental finding was a central disk protrusion without spinal cord or nerve root compression. Conclusion MRI is a useful modality in the pediatric patient with scoliosis or complaints of pain, but the provider should remain cognizant of the potential for spinal incidental findings. PMID:25396102

  10. Availability of mobile phones for discharge follow-up of pediatric Emergency Department patients in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    House, Darlene R; Cheptinga, Philip; Rusyniak, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Mobile phones have been successfully used for Emergency Department (ED) patient follow-up in developed countries. Mobile phones are widely available in developing countries and may offer a similar potential for follow-up and continued care of ED patients in low and middle-income countries. The goal of this study was to determine the percentage of families with mobile phones presenting to a pediatric ED in western Kenya and rate of response to a follow-up phone call after discharge. Methods. A prospective, cross-sectional observational study of children presenting to the emergency department of a government referral hospital in Eldoret, Kenya was performed. Documentation of mobile phone access, including phone number, was recorded. If families had access, consent was obtained and families were contacted 7 days after discharge for follow-up. Results. Of 788 families, 704 (89.3%) had mobile phone access. Of those families discharged from the ED, successful follow-up was made in 83.6% of cases. Conclusions. Mobile phones are an available technology for follow-up of patients discharged from a pediatric emergency department in resource-limited western Kenya.

  11. Pediatric unilateral below-elbow amputees: retrospective analysis of 34 patients given multiple prosthetic options.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Robin C; Tomhave, Wendy

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-four unilateral below-elbow amputees from the Shriners Hospitals for Children/Twin Cities were retrospectively analyzed in long-term follow-up. All of these patients were provided with a variety of prosthetic options, including a "passive" cosmetic upper extremity device. Most of the patients were also fitted with conventional prostheses using a body-powered voluntary closing terminal device (97%) as well as myoelectric prostheses (82%). These patients were considered consistent prosthetic users by the clinic team. The average follow-up was 14 years, with many of the patients being followed up throughout their entire childhood. All patients were sent questionnaires, and the authors carried out patient interviews and chart review. Final analysis indicated that 15 patients (44%) selected a simple cosmetic "passive hand" as their prosthesis of choice. In long-term follow-up 14 patients (41%) continued as multiple users. Fourteen patients (41%) selected the conventional prosthesis using a voluntary closing terminal device as the prosthesis of choice. Only five patients (15%) selected the myoelectric device as their primary prosthesis. The authors conclude that successful unilateral pediatric amputees may choose multiple prostheses on the basis of function and that frequently the most functional prosthesis selected in the long term is the simplest in design. The authors believe strongly that unilateral pediatric amputees should be offered a variety of prosthetic options to help with normal activities of daily living.

  12. Characterizing the Risk Factors Associated With Venous Thromboembolism in Pediatric Patients After Central Venous Line Placement

    PubMed Central

    Eades, Shannan; Turiy, Yuliya

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: With the apparent increase in venous thromboembolism noted in the pediatric population, it is important to define which children are at risk for clots and to determine optimal preventative therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors for venous thromboembolism in pediatric patients with central venous line placement. METHODS: This was an observational, retrospective, case-control study. Control subjects were patients aged 0 to 18 years who had a central venous line placed. Case subjects had a central line and a radiographically confirmed diagnosis of venous thromboembolism. RESULTS: A total of 150 patients were included in the study. Presence of multiple comorbidities, particularly the presence of a congenital heart defect (34.7% case vs. 14.7% control; p < 0.005), was found to put pediatric patients at increased risk for thrombosis. Additionally, the administration of parenteral nutrition through the central line (34.7% case vs. 18.7% control; p = 0.03) and location of the line increased the risk for clot formation. CONCLUSIONS: With increased awareness of central venous line–related thromboembolism, measures should be taken to reduce the number and duration of central line placements, and further studies addressing the need for thromboprophylaxis should be conducted. PMID:26472949

  13. Clinical outcomes in pediatric hemodialysis patients in the USA: lessons from CMS' ESRD CPM Project.

    PubMed

    Neu, Alicia M; Frankenfield, Diane L

    2009-07-01

    Although prospective randomized trials have provided important information and allowed the development of evidence-based guidelines in adult hemodialysis (HD) patients, with approximately 800 prevalent pediatric HD patients in the United States, such studies are difficult to perform in this population. Observational data obtained through the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS') End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Clinical Performance Measures (CPM) Project have allowed description of the clinical care provided to pediatric HD patients as well as identification of risk factors for failure to reach adult targets for clinical parameters such as hemoglobin, single-pool Kt/V (spKt/V) and serum albumin. In addition, studies linking data from the ESRD CPM Project and the United States Renal Data System have allowed evaluation of associations between achievement of those targets and the outcomes of hospitalization and death. The results of those studies, while unable to prove cause and effect, suggest that the adult ESRD CPM targets may assist in identifying pediatric HD patients at risk for poor outcomes.

  14. Shigella Infections in Household Contacts of Pediatric Shigellosis Patients in Rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    George, Christine Marie; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Talukder, Kaisar A; Azmi, Ishrat J; Perin, Jamie; Sack, R Bradley; Sack, David A; Stine, O Colin; Oldja, Lauren; Shahnaij, Mohammad; Chakraborty, Subhra; Parvin, Tahmina; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Bouwer, Edward; Zhang, Xiaotong; Hasan, Trisheeta N; Luna, Sharmin J; Akter, Fatema; Faruque, Abu S G

    2015-11-01

    To examine rates of Shigella infections in household contacts of pediatric shigellosis patients, we followed contacts and controls prospectively for 1 week after the index patient obtained care. Household contacts of patients were 44 times more likely to develop a Shigella infection than were control contacts (odds ratio 44.7, 95% CI 5.5-361.6); 29 (94%) household contacts of shigellosis patients were infected with the same species and serotype as the index patient's. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that 14 (88%) of 16 with infected contacts had strains that were indistinguishable from or closely related to the index patient's strain. Latrine area fly counts were higher in patient households compared with control households, and 2 patient household water samples were positive for Shigella. We show high susceptibility of household contacts of shigellosis patients to Shigella infections and found environmental risk factors to be targeted in future interventions.

  15. Non-Invasive Methods to Diagnose Fungal Infections in Pediatric Patients with Hematologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Badiee, Parisa; Hashemizadeh, Zahra; Ramzi, Mani; Karimi, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal infection (IFIs) is a major infectious complication in immunocompromised patients. Early diagnosis and initiation of antifungal therapy is important to achieve the best outcome. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate the incidence of IFIs and evaluate the diagnostic performance of non-invasive laboratory tests: serologic (β-D-glucan, galactomannan) and molecular (nested polymerase chain reaction) tests to diagnose fungal infections in hematologic pediatric patients. Patients and Methods In a cross-sectional study from October 2014 to January 2015, 321 blood samples of 62 pediatric patients with hematologic disorders and at high risk for fungal infections were analyzed. Non-invasive tests including the Platelia Aspergillus enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to detect galactomannan antigen, Glucatell for β–D–glucan and nested PCR to detect Candida and Aspergillus species-specific DNA were used in a weekly screening strategy. Results Twenty six patients (42%) were considered as proven and probable IFIs, including 3 (5%) proven and 23 (37%) probable cases. Eighteen patients (29%) were considered as possible cases. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for galactomannan test in 26 patients with proven and probable fungal infections were 94.4%, 100%, 100% and 94.7%; for β-D-glucan test 92.3%, 77.7%, 85%, 87.5% and for nested-PCR were 84.6%, 88.8%, 91.7% and 80%, respectively. Conclusions The rate of IFIs in pediatric patients with hematologic disorders is high, and sample collection from the sterile sites cannot be performed in immunocompromised patients. Detection of circulating fungal cell wall components and DNA in the blood using non-invasive methods can offer diagnostic help in patients with suspected IFIs. Their results should be interpreted in combination with clinical, radiological and microbiological findings. PMID:28138379

  16. Long-term Efficacy and Safety of Adalimumab in Pediatric Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dubinsky, Marla; Ruemmele, Frank M.; Escher, Johanna; Rosh, Joel; Hyams, Jeffrey S.; Eichner, Samantha; Li, Yao; Reilly, Nattanan; Thakkar, Roopal B.; Robinson, Anne M.; Lazar, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Background: IMAgINE 1 assessed 52-week efficacy and safety of adalimumab in children with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. Long-term efficacy and safety of adalimumab for patients who entered the IMAgINE 2 extension are reported. Methods: Patients who completed IMAgINE 1 could enroll in IMAgINE 2. Endpoints assessed from weeks 0 to 240 of IMAgINE 2 were Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index remission (Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index ≤ 10) and response (Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index decrease ≥15 from IMAgINE 1 baseline) using observed analysis and hybrid nonresponder imputation (hNRI). For hNRI, discontinued patients were imputed as failures unless they transitioned to commercial adalimumab (with study site closure) or adult care, where last observation was carried forward. Corticosteroid-free remission in patients receiving corticosteroids at IMAgINE 1 baseline, discontinuation of immunomodulators (IMMs) in patients receiving IMMs at IMAgINE 2 baseline, and linear growth improvement were reported as observed. Adverse events were assessed for patients receiving ≥1 adalimumab dose in IMAgINE 1 and 2 through January 2015. Results: Of 100 patients enrolled in IMAgINE 2, 41% and 48% achieved remission and response (hNRI) at IMAgINE 2 week 240. Remission rates were maintained by 45% (30/67, hNRI) of patients who entered IMAgINE 2 in remission. At IMAgINE 2 week 240, 63% (12/19) of patients receiving corticosteroids at IMAgINE 1 baseline achieved corticosteroid-free remission and 30% (6/20) of patients receiving IMMs at IMAgINE 2 baseline discontinued IMMs. Adalimumab treatment led to growth velocity normalization. No new safety signals were identified. Conclusions: Efficacy and safety profiles of prolonged adalimumab treatment in children with Crohn's disease were consistent with IMAgINE 1 and adult Crohn's disease adalimumab trials. PMID:28129288

  17. Cardiac complications in pediatric patients on the ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Best, T H; Franz, D N; Gilbert, D L; Nelson, D P; Epstein, M R

    2000-06-27

    Cardiac complications of the ketogenic diet, in the absence of selenium deficiency, have not been reported. Twenty patients on the ketogenic diet at one institution were investigated. Prolonged QT interval (QTc) was found in 3 patients (15%). There was a significant correlation between prolonged QTc and both low serum bicarbonate and high beta-hydroxybutyrate. In addition, three patients had evidence of cardiac chamber enlargement. One patient with severe dilated cardiomyopathy and prolonged QTc normalized when the diet was discontinued.

  18. Graded aerobic treadmill testing in pediatric sports-related concussion: safety, clinical use, and patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cordingley, Dean; Girardin, Richard; Reimer, Karen; Ritchie, Lesley; Leiter, Jeff; Russell, Kelly; Ellis, Michael J

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The objectives of this study were 2-fold: 1) to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and clinical use of graded aerobic treadmill testing in pediatric patients with sports-related concussion (SRC), and 2) to evaluate the clinical outcomes of treatment with a submaximal aerobic exercise program in patients with physiological post-concussion disorder (PCD). METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients (age < 20 years) with SRC who were referred to a multidisciplinary pediatric concussion program and underwent graded aerobic treadmill testing between October 9, 2014, and February 11, 2016. Clinical assessments were carried out by a single neurosurgeon and included clinical history taking, physical examination, and recording specific patient-reported concussion-related symptoms using the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS). Graded aerobic treadmill testing using a modified Balke protocol for incremental increases in intensity was used as a diagnostic tool to assess physiological recovery, classify post-concussion syndrome (PCS) subtype, and reassess patients following treatment. Patients with a symptom-limited threshold on treadmill testing (physiological PCD) were treated with an individually tailored submaximal exercise prescription and multidisciplinary targeted therapies. RESULTS One hundred six patients (mean age 15.1 years, range 11-19 years) with SRC underwent a total of 141 treadmill tests. There were no serious complications related to treadmill testing in this study. Overall, 138 (97.9%) of 141 tests were well tolerated and contributed valuable clinical information. Treadmill testing confirmed physiological recovery in 63 (96.9%) of 65 patients tested, allowing successful return to play in 61 (93.8%). Treadmill testing was used to diagnose physiological PCD in 58 patients and cervicogenic PCD in 1 patient. Of the 41 patients with physiological PCD who had complete follow-up and were treated with tailored submaximal

  19. The fecal microbiome in pediatric patients with short bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in the intestinal microbiome of patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) are thought to significantly affect clinical outcome. These changes may not only delay enteral diet advancement but may also predispose patients to bacterial translocation, bacteremia, and liver disease. Patients with S...

  20. Present Insights on Cardiomyopathy in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Felício, João Soares; Koury, Camila Cavalcante; Carvalho, Carolina Tavares; Neto, João Felício 
Abrahão; Miléo, Karem Barbosa; Arbage, Thaís Pontes; Silva, Denisson Dias; Ferreira de Oliveira, Alana; Peixoto, Amanda Soares; Junior, Antônio Bentes Figueiredo; Ribeiro dos Santos, Ândrea Kely Campos; Yamada, Elizabeth Sumi; Zanella, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is partially understood and is likely to be multifactorial, involving metabolic disturbances, hypertension and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN). Therefore, an important need remains to further delineate the basic mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy and to apply them to daily clinical practice. We attempt to detail some of these underlying mechanisms, focusing in the clinical features and management. The novelty of this review is the role of CAN and reduction of blood pressure descent during sleep in the development of DCM. Evidence has suggested that CAN might precede left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction in normotensive patients with type 2 diabetes, serving as an early marker for the evaluation of preclinical cardiac abnormalities. Additionally, a prospective study demonstrated that an elevation of nocturnal systolic blood pressure and a loss of nocturnal blood pressure fall might precede the onset of abnormal albuminuria and cardiovascular events in hypertensive normoalbuminuric patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, existing microalbuminuria could imply the presence of myocardium abnormalities. Considering that DCM could be asymptomatic for a long period and progress to irreversible cardiac damage, early recognition and treatment of the preclinical cardiac abnormalities are essential to avoid severe cardiovascular outcomes. In this sense, we recommend that all type 2 diabetic patients, especially those with microalbuminuria, should be regularly submitted to CAN tests, Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring and echocardiography, and treated for any abnormalities in these tests in the attempt of reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26364799

  1. The Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Arterial Stiffness of Pediatric Mucopolysaccharidosis Patients Are Increased Compared to Both Pediatric and Adult Controls

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Raymond Y.; Rudser, Kyle D.; Dengel, Donald R.; Braunlin, Elizabeth A.; Steinberger, Julia; Jacobs, David R.; Sinaiko, Alan R.; Kelly, Aaron S.

    2017-01-01

    Treatments for mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) have increased longevity, but cardiovascular disease causes mortality in a significant percentage of survivors. Markers must be developed to predict MPS cardiac risk and monitor efficacy of investigational therapies.MPS patients underwent carotid artery ultrasonography from which carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and three measures of arterial stiffness were calculated: carotid artery distensibility (cCSD), compliance (cCSC), and incremental elastic modulus (cIEM). MPS carotid measurements were compared to corresponding data from pediatric and adult healthy cohorts. 33 MPS patients (17 MPS I, 9 MPS II, 4 MPS IIIA, and 3 MPS VI; mean age 12.5 ± 4.7 years), 560 pediatric controls (age 13.1 ± 4.0 years), and 554 adult controls (age 39.2 ± 2.2 years) were studied. Age and sex-adjusted aggregate MPS cIMT (0.56 ± 0.05 mm) was significantly greater than both pediatric (+0.12 mm; 95% CI +0.10 to +0.14 mm) and adult (+0.10 mm; 95% CI +0.06 to +0.14 mm) control cohorts; similar findings were observed for all MPS subtypes. Mean MPS cIMT approximated the 80th percentile of the adult cohort cIMT. MPS patients also demonstrated significantly increased adjusted arterial stiffness measurements, evidenced by reduced cCSD, cCSC, and increased cIEM, compared to pediatric and adult control cohorts. Regardless of treatment, MPS patients demonstrate increased cIMT and arterial stiffness compared to healthy pediatric and adult controls. These data suggest that relatively young MPS patients demonstrate a “structural vascular age” of at least 40 years old. PMID:28294991

  2. Successful endovascular reconstruction of a recurrent giant middle cerebral artery aneurysm with multiple telescoping flow diverters in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Daniel S; Marlin, Evan S; Shaw, Andrew; Powers, Ciarán J

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms of the pediatric population are rare, but giant fusiform aneurysms (GFAs) of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) are common within this cohort of patients. These aneurysms are difficult to treat and often require advanced microsurgical skills, as they are usually not amenable to direct clipping. Here, we report the successful treatment of a recurrent GFA of the MCA with three telescoping Pipeline Embolization Devices 6 months after attempted clip reconstruction in a pediatric patient.

  3. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy of bilateral staghorn renal calculi in pediatric patients: 12 years experience in a tertiary care centre.

    PubMed

    Purkait, Bimalesh; Kumar, Manoj; Sokhal, Ashok Kumar; Bansal, Ankur; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Gupta, Ashok Kumar

    2016-09-15

    To assess the outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in bilateral staghorn calculi in pediatric patients, we have performed a retrospective analysis. Staghorn calculus is defined as stone that fills a greater part of the pelvic-caliceal system. Still, in developing countries, patients may present with staghorn calculus. PCNL is the preferred treatment modality for staghorn calculus both in adult and children. Our study included fifty-one pediatric patients (<15 years) of bilateral staghorn calculi from 2004 to 2015. Staged PCNL was done after 2-3 days if needed and opposite side PCNL was performed after 10-14 days. Fifty-one patients with bilateral staghorn renal calculi underwent PCNL. The mean age of the study group was 10.25 ± 2.13 (range 3-15). Mean stone burden was 778.3 + 613.4 (range 231-3850 mm(2)). Forty-five patients underwent single puncture, twenty-two patients underwent double punctures whereas six patients underwent triple punctures during first session PCNL procedure. Most common puncture location was through the superior calyx (58.82 %). The mean operating time was 77.25 + 30.21 (range 58-145). After the first session PCNL, the success rate was 76.47 %. Thirteen patients (17 renal units) underwent relook PCNL and seven patients underwent ESWL. Overall complication noted in twenty-four (47.05 %) cases. Most of the complications were minor grade. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy for staghorn calculus in children needs expertise. PCNL in B/L staghorn renal calculus in children is safe and effective. B/L staghorn renal calculi with compromised renal function have higher chance of complications including bleeding.

  4. Ultrasonographic Changes after Indirect Revascularization Surgery in Pediatric Patients with Moyamoya Disease.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Shin-Joe; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Chen, Ya-Fang; Liu, Hon-Man; Chen, Ying-An; Hsieh, Yu-Lin; Yang, Shih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Hsuan; Yang, Chi-Cheng; Kuo, Meng-Fai; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2016-12-01

    The marked cerebral hypoperfusion of moyamoya disease (MMD) can be treated with encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS), an indirect revascularization surgery. Collateral establishment after the surgery is a gradual process; thus, easy access to serial assessment is of great importance. We prospectively recruited 15 pediatric moyamoya patients who underwent EDAS surgeries on a total of 19 hemispheres. Ultrasonography of extracranial and intracranial arteries was performed pre-operatively and post-operatively at 1, 3 and 6 mo. Among the extracranial arteries, the superficial temporal artery had the most pronounced increase in flow velocity and decrease in flow resistance from 1 mo post-surgery (p < 0.01). Among the large intracranial arteries, a significant increase in peak systolic velocity was observed in the anterior cerebral artery from 3 mo post-surgery (p < 0.05). These findings indicate significant hemodynamic changes on ultrasonography in pediatric moyamoya patients after indirect revascularization surgery.

  5. Septic shock: recognizing and managing this life-threatening condition in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Adam M

    2015-04-01

    Septic shock is a relatively rare but life-threatening condition in pediatric patients that can often be difficult to recognize in the emergency department. Once recognized, the emphasis of therapy is to reverse deficits in cellular respiration by increasing oxygen and other substrate delivery to tissue beds. Providing oxygen, improving tissue perfusion through augmentation of cardiac output, and administering antibiotics in a timely manner have all been shown to significantly improve outcomes in children with septic shock. Goal-directed therapy is relatively straightforward, emphasizes the need for effective surveillance and timely recognition of this disease process, and has the potential to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. This review discusses how to identify specific populations at the greatest risk for septic shock, lays out the essential components of goal-directed therapy, examines potential pitfalls in management, and distinguishes additional ways that emergency clinicians can avoid the devastating consequences of septic shock in pediatric patients.

  6. A comparison between audio and audiovisual distraction techniques in managing anxious pediatric dental patients.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, A R; Marwah, N; Raju, O S

    2007-01-01

    Pain is not the sole reason for fear of dentistry. Anxiety or the fear of unknown during dental treatment is a major factor and it has been the major concern for dentists for a long time. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the two distraction techniques, viz, audio distraction and audiovisual distraction, in management of anxious pediatric dental patients. Sixty children aged between 4-8 years were divided into three groups. Each child had four dental visits--screening visit, prophylaxis visit, cavity preparation and restoration visit, and extraction visit. Child's anxiety level in each visit was assessed using a combination of four measures: Venham's picture test, Venham's rating of clinical anxiety, pulse rate, and oxygen saturation. The values obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis. It was concluded that audiovisual distraction technique was more effective in managing anxious pediatric dental patient as compared to audio distraction technique.

  7. The Post-Anesthetic Care of Pediatric Patients With Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chau, Destiny F; Gangadharan, Meera; Hartke, Lopa P; Twite, Mark D

    2016-03-01

    Few conditions make even the most experienced pediatric anesthesiologists take pause. Pulmonary hypertension is one such condition due to the associated high perioperative morbidity and mortality. Much is written about the intraoperative management of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. This article will instead focus on postoperative care and review the evidence in support of a risk stratification approach for the post-anesthetic disposition of these patients. The total risk for post-anesthetic adverse events includes the patient's baseline risk factors and the incremental risks imposed by the procedure and anesthetic. A proposal with recommendations to guide practitioners and a table summarizing relevant factors are provided. Last, the readers' attention is drawn to the heterogeneity of pulmonary hypertensive disease. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (precapillary) differs significantly from pulmonary venous hypertension (postcapillary); the anesthetic management for one may be relatively contraindicated in the other. Their dissimilarities justify the need to distinguish them for study and research endeavors.

  8. Interprofessional, multiple step simulation course improves pediatric resident and nursing staff management of pediatric patients with diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Larson-Williams, Linnea M; Youngblood, Amber Q; Peterson, Dawn Taylor; Zinkan, J Lynn; White, Marjorie L; Abdul-Latif, Hussein; Matalka, Leen; Epps, Stephen N; Tofil, Nancy M

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the use of a multidisciplinary, longitudinal simulation to educate pediatric residents and nurses on management of pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis. METHODS A multidisciplinary, multiple step simulation course was developed by faculty and staff using a modified Delphi method from the Pediatric Simulation Center and pediatric endocrinology department. Effectiveness of the simulation for the residents was measured with a pre- and post-test and a reference group not exposed to simulation. A follow up post-test was completed 3-6 mo after the simulation. Nurses completed a survey regarding the education activity. RESULTS Pediatric and medicine-pediatric residents (n = 20) and pediatric nurses (n = 25) completed the simulation course. Graduating residents (n = 16) were used as reference group. Pretest results were similar in the control and intervention group (74% ± 10% vs 76% ± 15%, P = 0.658). After completing the intervention, participants improved in the immediate post-test in comparison to themselves and the control group (84% ± 12% post study; P < 0.05). The 3-6 mo follow up post-test results demonstrated knowledge decay when compared to their immediate post-test results (78% ± 14%, P = 0.761). Residents and nurses felt the interdisciplinary and longitudinal nature of the simulation helped with learning. CONCLUSION Results suggest a multidisciplinary, longitudinal simulation improves immediate post-intervention knowledge but important knowledge decay occurs, future studies are needed to determine ways to decrease this decay. PMID:27896145

  9. Application of molecular assay for adenovirus detection among different pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Puerari, Diane; Camargo, Clarice; Gratura, Sandra; Watanabe, Aripuanã Sakurada Aranha; Granato, Celso; Bellei, Nancy Cristina Junqueira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adenoviruses play an important role in the etiology of severe acute lower respiratory infection, especially in young children. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the Human Adenovirus (HAdV) detection by different methods (Direct Fluorescence Assay DFA and Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction nested PCR), among samples collected from different groups of pediatric patients. METHODS: Collection of samples was made in children with congenital heart disease (CHD 123 nasal aspirates collected in the years of 2005, 2007 and 2008) and in community children (CC 165 nasal aspirates collected in 2008). Children were eligible if they presented acute respiratory infection (ARI) of probable viral etiology, within up to 7 days of symptoms' onset. All studied samples were evaluated by DFA and nested PCR assay. RESULTS: Of the 290 samples included during the study period, 43 (14.8%) were positive on at least one test: 17/165 (10.3%) of the CC and 26/125 (20.8%) of the CHD children. The nested PCR detection rates in the community children were 15/165 (9.1%), and for children with CHD, 24/125 (19.2%). Molecular method showed higher detection rates when compared to the DFA test (p<0.001). Univariate analysis showed that children with congenital heart disease presented a significantly higher chance for acquiring the HAdV (Odds Ratio 2.3; 95% CI: 1.18-4.43). CONCLUSIONS: Based on data obtained in the present evaluation, we suggest that a routine surveillance should be performed in high risk patients by molecular methods, thus improving diagnostic flow and efficiency. PMID:25890444

  10. Assessing patient experiences in the pediatric patient-centered medical home: a comparison of two instruments.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Chakravorty, Shourjo; Madden, Vanessa; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Gubernick, Ruth; Kairys, Steven; Pelaez-Velez, Cristina; Sanders, Lee M; Thompson, Lindsay

    2014-11-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a model of care that has been promoted as a way to transform a broken primary care system in the US. However, in order to convince more practices to make the transformation and to properly reimburse practices who are PCMHs, valid and reliable data are needed. Data that capture patient experiences in a PCMH is valuable, but which instrument should be used remains unclear. Our study aims to compare the validity and reliability of two national PCMH instruments. Telephone surveys were conducted with children who receive care from 20 pediatric practices across Florida (n = 990). All of the children are eligible for Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program. Analyses were conducted to compare the Consumer Assessment of Health Plan Survey-Patient-Centered Medical Home (CAHPS-PCMH) and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) medical home domain. Respondents were mainly White non-Hispanic, female, under 35 years old, and from a two-parent household. The NS-CSHCN outperformed the CAHPS-PCMH in regard to scale reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients all ≥0.81 vs. 0.56-0.85, respectively). In regard to item-domain convergence and discriminant validity the CAHPS-PCMH fared better than the NS-CSHCN (range of convergence 0.66-0.93 vs. 0.32-1.00). The CAHPS-PCMH did not correspond to the scale structure in construct validity testing. Neither instrument performed well in the known-groups validity tests. No clear best instrument was determined. Further revision and calibration may be needed to accurately assess patient experiences in the PCMH.

  11. Antithrombin III Doses Rounded to Available Vial Sizes in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stockton, Winifred M.; Padilla-Tolentino, Eimeira

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Children have decreased levels of antithrombin III (AT III) compared to adults. These levels may be further decreased during acute illness. Administration of exogenous AT III can increase anticoagulant efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate AT III doses rounded to available vial sizes compared to partial vial doses in critically ill pediatric patients, including patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). METHOD This retrospective review evaluated pediatric patients 0–18 years of age admitted to a 24-bed medical/surgical pediatric intensive care unit between June 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, who received plasma-derived AT III. Patients received unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or no anticoagulation. This review included patients who received ECMO and CRRT. RESULTS Eighty doses of AT III were administered to 24 patients (38 full vial size doses and 42 partial vial size doses). The AT III level following dose administration was ≥80% for 26 full vial doses (70%) and 16 partial vial doses (41%; p = 0.010). For patients who received multiple doses of AT III, the median time between doses was 45 hours following full vial doses, and 23 hours following partial vial doses (p = 0.011). Seven patients (29%) had documentation of new or increased bleeding. The median waste prevented from rounding doses to full vial sizes was 363 units. CONCLUSIONS After receiving AT III doses rounded to full vial sizes, patients were more likely to have a therapeutic AT III level and a longer interval between administrations. Rounding AT III doses to full vial sizes reduces waste and can result in cost savings.

  12. Improving Management of Pediatric Patients with Attention- Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-30

    customers would be the inclusion of NMCP’s capabilities to diagnose and treat ADHD more effectively than network providers into existing marketing efforts...the selection of a primary care or psychiatrist provider, is significantly different between direct care and network providers, given similar...Pediatric Patients Managed by Providers at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth and Network Providers Introduction Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD

  13. Automatic detection of immature platelets for decision making regarding platelet transfusion indications for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Saigo, Katsuyasu; Sakota, Yasuyuki; Masuda, Yukako; Matsunaga, Kyoko; Takenokuchi, Mariko; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Sugimoto, Takeshi; Sakurai, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Makoto; Yanai, Tomoko; Hayakawa, Akira; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Tsutomu; Kubota, Yoshitsugu; Kumagai, Shunichi

    2008-04-01

    Immature or reticulated platelets are known as a clinical marker of thrombopoiesis. Recently, an automatic method was established to detect reticulated platelets as immature platelet fraction (IPF) by means of hematology analyzer XE-2100. We assessed the effects of IPF detection after chemotherapy for various pediatric malignant disorders of 16 patients. Our results indicate that IPF should be considered a useful marker of imminent platelet recovery so that unnecessary platelet transfusion can be avoided.

  14. Health professionals' perceptions about the decision-making process in the care of pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Eliana de Andrade; Scarpa, Fernanda Cristina; Halal, Michel George El; Goldim, José Roberto; Carvalho, Paulo Roberto Antonacci

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the perceptions of physicians, nurses and nursing technicians of their participation in the decision-making process surrounding life support limitation in terminally ill pediatric patients, with comparisons by professional category. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in the pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary public university hospital with the participation of physicians, nurses and nursing technicians. The MacArthur Admission Experience Survey Voice Scale was used to assess and quantify the perceptions of professionals who assisted 17 pediatric patients with life support limitation within 24 hours after the outcome of each patient was determined. All professionals working in the unit (n = 117) who were potentially eligible for the study received a free and informed consent form prior to the occurrence of the cases studied. Results Study participants included 25/40 (62.5%) physicians, 10/17 (58.8%) nurses and 41/60 (68.3%) nursing technicians, representing 65% of the eligible professionals identified. The questionnaire return rate was higher for physicians than technicians (p = 0.0258). A perceived lack of voice was reported in all three professional categories at varying rates that were lower for physicians than for nurses and nursing technicians (p < 0.00001); there was no difference between the latter (p = 0.7016). In the three professional categories studied, three subscale items were reported. For two of the three statements, there were significant differences between physicians and nurses (p = 0.004) and between physicians and nursing technicians (p = 0.001). For one of the statements, there was no difference among the three professional categories. Conclusion Respondents perceived a lack of voice in the decision-making process at varying rates across the three categories of studied professionals who assisted terminally ill pediatric patients with life support limitation, with physicians expressing lowered rates of

  15. Omeprazole pharmacodynamics and gastric acid suppression in critically ill pediatric transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Olsen, K M; Bergman, K L; Kaufman, S S; Rebuck, J A; Collier, D S

    2001-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of omeprazole suspension in critically ill pediatric liver/intestinal transplant patients. DESIGN: Open-label pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic study. SETTING: Pediatric intensive care unit of an academic medical center. PATIENTS: Eleven pediatric liver and/or intestinal transplant patients. INTERVENTIONS: Extemporaneously prepared 0.5 mg/kg omeprazole suspension every 12 hrs via nasogastric tube before sequential measurements of omeprazole serum concentration and gastric pH monitoring. Gastric pH was monitored continuously for 48 hrs and plasma omeprazole concentrations were determined upon first and multiple dosing. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean onset of action of omeprazole in a sodium bicarbonate vehicle was 62 +/- 82 mins (range, 2-226 mins). Subjects <4 yrs of age exhibited a more variable onset of omeprazole action (range, 3-226 mins) when compared with older subjects (onset of action, 2-40 min). Omeprazole maximum concentration and area under the concentration-time curve for the dosage interval were significantly greater upon multiple dosing when compared with the first dose. Mean baseline gastric pH in this study population was 1.0 +/- 0.8. Gastric pH remained >4.0 for 78.8% +/- 18.9% of the first dosage interval and 97.8% +/- 5.4% of multiple dosage intervals regardless of age when administered twice daily as a suspension. CONCLUSION: These results support the use of omeprazole administered twice daily as a suspension to maintain gastric pH of >4.0 and to achieve maximal pharmacodynamic effect in pediatric liver and/or intestinal transplant patients.

  16. Nationwide Surveillance of Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Mika; Akaike, Hiroto; Kato, Atsushi; Nishizawa, Yoko; Saito, Aki; Kondo, Eisuke; Teranishi, Hideto; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Ogita, Satoko; Tanaka, Takaaki; Kawasaki, Kozo; Nakano, Takashi; Terada, Kihei; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2013-01-01

    We conducted nationwide surveillance to investigate regional differences in macrolide-resistant (MR) Mycoplasma pneumoniae strains in Japan. The prevalence of MR M. pneumoniae in pediatric patients gradually increased between 2008 and 2012. Although regional differences were observed, high levels of MR genes were detected in all seven surveillance areas throughout Japan and ranged in prevalence from 50% to 93%. These regional differences were closely related to the previous administration of macrolides. PMID:23716043

  17. Detection of enterovirus 68 in serum from pediatric patients with pneumonia and their clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Tadatsugu; Suzuki, Akira; Lupisan, Socorro; Kamigaki, Taro; Okamoto, Michiko; Roy, Chandra Nath; Olveda, Remigio; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 68 (EV68) infection occasionally manifests with fatal outcomes. However, detection of EV68 in serum and its clinical outcomes are yet to be determined. In this study, we retrospectively tested stored serum samples collected from pediatric pneumonia patients whose nasopharyngeal specimens were positive for EV68. Of total 28 nasopharyngeal sample-positive patients, EV68 was detected in serum samples among 12 (43%) patients aged between 1 and 4 years. Our results suggest that EV68 can cause viremia by which the virus may exhibit systemic manifestations.

  18. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in a Prepubertal Pediatric Japanese Patient Complicated by Severe Papilledema

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Akiko; Ikesugi, Kengo; Kondo, Mineo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a rare case of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in a prepubertal pediatric patient. Case Report The patient was an 11-year-old Japanese boy. Initially, an ophthalmologist found severe papilledema, and the patient was diagnosed with IIH. He was unresponsive to conservative therapy, and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted in the Neurosurgery Department because the visual impairment was severe. Twelve months after the shunt, the improvement in vision was limited due to optic disc atrophy. Conclusion Ophthalmologists need to be more aware of II, especially in cases with severe papilledema that can lead to permanent reduction of vision. PMID:27065853

  19. Antibiotic hypersensitivity in CF: drug-induced life-threatening hemolytic anemia in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Alma; Mian, Amir; Scurlock, Amy M; Blackall, Douglas; Com, Gulnur

    2010-12-01

    Adverse reactions to antibiotics in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are a growing concern. We report the case of a pediatric patient with CF with multiple comorbidities and a history of drug reactions, who developed life-threatening piperacillin-induced immune hemolytic anemia. We review drug-induced hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) in particular, and antibiotic hypersensitivity in CF in general, including the frequency, pathogenesis, and risk factors. Finally, we discuss the treatment options and propose an algorithm for the management of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with CF.

  20. Methemoglobinemia in a Pediatric Oncology Patient Receiving Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Timothy G; Carroll, Megan G

    2016-07-18

    BACKGROUND Methemoglobinemia due to the administration of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim has been documented in a series of case reports. However, all of these reports are on adult patients, and all patients received at least daily administration of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim for the treatment of active or suspected infection. CASE REPORT Herein we report the development of methemoglobinemia in a pediatric patient receiving sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim three times weekly for the prophylaxis of opportunistic infections. CONCLUSIONS The clinician should always consider sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, even when administered for opportunistic infection prophylaxis at reduced doses and intervals, as a possible cause of methemoglobinemia.

  1. Genotypic linkages of gene segments of rotaviruses circulating in pediatric patients with acute gastroenteritis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chaimongkol, Natthawan; Khamrin, Pattara; Malasao, Rungnapa; Thongprachum, Aksara; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2012-10-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of morbidity and mortality of infants and young children with diarrhea throughout the world. In Thailand, extensive studies of rotavirus infections have been reported continually and rotavirus diarrhea remains a common illness. To monitor the epidemiological situation of rotavirus in Chiang Mai, Thailand, surveillance of rotavirus circulating in pediatric patients was conducted. A total of 160 fecal specimens collected from children hospitalized with diarrhea were tested for rotaviruses groups A, B, and C by RT-PCR and their genotypes were identified by multiplex PCR and nucleotide sequencing. Group A rotavirus was detected at 29.4% but none of group B and C was found in this study. Molecular characterizations of G- and P-genotypes revealed three different G-P combinations, G1P[8] was the most predominant genotype with the prevalence of 72.3% followed by G2P[4] at 19.2%, and G3P[8] at 8.5%. Phylogenetic analyses of VP7 and VP4 genes of the representative strains detected in the present study, G1, G2, G3, and P[4] and P[8], respectively, revealed that G1 belonged to G1-Ic and G1-II, G2 belonged to G2-II, and G3 belonged to G3-III-S4 lineages while P[4] and P[8] were identified as P[4]-V and P[8]-III lineages. Analyses of VP6, NSP4, and NSP5 genes demonstrated that these representative strains belonged to genotypes I1 and I2, E1 and E2, and H1 and H2, respectively. Analyzing the association of G- and P-genotypes with I, E, H genotypes revealed unique patterns of genotypic linkage. The G1P[8] and G3P[8] were intimately linked with I1, E1, H1 genotypes and displayed the genetic features of G1-P[8]-I1-E1-H1 and G3-P[8]-I1-E1-H1, respectively, while G2P[4] was closely linked to I2, E2, H2 genotypes and showed the genetic pattern of G2-P[4]-I2-E2-H2. This study provides epidemiological information and insight into the genetic background of rotaviruses circulating in pediatric patients in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

  2. Detection of Common Respiratory Viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Patient-Occupied Rooms in Pediatric Wards

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have assessed viral contamination in the rooms of hospital wards. This cross-sectional study evaluated the air and objects in patient-occupied rooms in pediatric wards for the presence of common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Air samplers were placed at a short (60–80 cm) and long (320 cm) distance from the head of the beds of 58 pediatric patients, who were subsequently confirmed to be infected with enterovirus (n = 17), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 13), influenza A virus (n = 13), adenovirus (n = 9), or M pneumoniae (n = 6). Swab samples were collected from the surfaces of 5 different types of objects in the patients’ rooms. All air and swab samples were analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of the above pathogens. All pathogens except enterovirus were detected in the air, on the objects, or in both locations in the patients’ rooms. The detection rates of influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae for the long distance air sampling were 15%, 67%, and 17%, respectively. Both adenovirus and M pneumoniae were detected at very high rates, with high concentrations, on all sampled objects. The respiratory pathogens RSV, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae were detected in the air and/or on the objects in the pediatric ward rooms. Appropriate infection control measures should be strictly implemented when caring for such patients. PMID:27057827

  3. [Use of RRa sensor in a pediatric patient with post-adenotonsillectomy].

    PubMed

    Niwa, Yasunori; Inoue, Soichiro; Nakamura, Fumito; Taga, Naoyuki; Takeuchi, Mamoru; Konishi, Hiroaki

    2013-07-01

    Rad-87 and RRa are new acoustic monitoring devices which can monitor the respiratory rate. To our knowledge, no studies have reported the RRa sensor used in pediatric patients after surgery. We succeeded in measuring the respiratory rate with the RRa sensor in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit(PICU). A 10-year-old boy, 14.5 kg in weight and 119.6 cm in height, with cerebral palsy, mental retardation, epilepsy, and obstructive sleep apnea due to adenoidal and tonsillar hypertrophy, was scheduled for adenotonsillectomy under general anesthesia. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, air, sevoflurane (1.5-2.0%), remifentanil (0.1 to 0.5 microg . kg-1. min-1), and fentanyl (4 microg . kg-1). The operating time was 55 minutes, and the duration of anesthesia was 133 minutes. After finishing the surgery, we attached the RRa sensor to his anterior neck and monitored his respiratory rate. Furthermore, RRa could count his respiratory rate, during transfer from the operating room to PICU. The patient was sedated with dexmedetomidine (0.28 microg . kg-1 . min-1) at PICU, and his respiratory rate was accurately measured with the RRa sensor. We hope that Rad-87 and RRa sensors will become useful for measuring the respiratory rate in pediatric patients in the future.

  4. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia among pediatric cancer patients in Egypt: Risks and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Mohamed; Hassan, Tamer; Sakr, Hanan; Karam, Nehad; Rahman, Doaa Abdel; Shahbah, Doaa; Zakaria, Marwa; Fehr, Sahbaa

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN) is the major dose-limiting toxicity of systemic chemotherapy and it is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and treatment cost. The aim of the present study was to identify the risk factors that may predispose pediatric cancer patients who receive myelosuppressive chemotherapy to CIN and associated sequelae. A total of 113 neutropenia episodes were analyzed and the risk factors for CIN were classified as patient-specific, disease-specific and regimen-specific, while the consequences of CIN were divided into infectious and dose-modifying sequelae. The risks and consequences were analyzed to target high-risk patients with appropriate preventive strategies. Among our patients, 28% presented with a single neutropenia attack, while 72% experienced recurrent attacks during their treatment cycles. The mean absolute neutrophil count was 225.5±128.5 ×109/l (range, 10–497 ×109/l), starting 14.2±16.3 days (range, 2–100 days) after the onset of chemotherapy and resolving within 11.2±7.3 days, either with (45.1%) or without (54.9%) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). No significant association was observed between any patient characteristics or disease stage and the risk for CIN. However, certain malignancies, such as acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), neuroblastoma and Burkitt's lymphoma, and certain regimens, such as induction block for ALL and acute myelocytic leukemia, exerted the most potent myelotoxic effect, with severe and prolonged episodes of neutropenia. G-CSF significantly shortened the duration of the episodes and enhanced bone marrow recovery. Febrile neutropenia was the leading complication among our cases (73.5%) and was associated with several documented infections, particularly mucositis (54.9%), respiratory (45.1%), gastrointestinal tract (38.9%) and skin (23.9%) infections. A total of 6% of our patients succumbed to infection-related complications. Neutropenia was responsible for treatment

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of pneumothorax among patients admitted to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    El-Nawawy, Ahmed Ahmed; Al-Halawany, Amina Sedky; Antonios, Manal Abdelmalik; Newegy, Reem Gamal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pneumothorax should be considered a medical emergency and requires a high index of suspicion and prompt recognition and intervention. Aims: The objective of the study was to evaluate cases developing pneumothorax following admission to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) over a 5-year period. Settings and Design: Case notes of all PICU patients (n = 1298) were reviewed, revealing that 135 cases (10.4%) developed pneumothorax, and these were compared with those patients who did not. The most common tool for diagnosis used was chest X-ray followed by a clinical examination. Subjects and Methods: Case notes of 1298 patients admitted in PICU over 1-year study. Results: Patients with pneumothorax had higher mortality rate (P < 0.001), longer length of stay (P < 0.001), higher need for mechanical ventilation (MV) (P < 0.001), and were of younger age (P < 0.001), lower body weight (P < 0.001), higher pediatric index of mortality 2 score on admission (P < 0.001), higher pediatric logistic organ dysfunction score (P < 0.001), compared to their counterpart. Iatrogenic pneumothorax (IP) represented 95% of episodes of pneumothorax. The most common causes of IP were barotrauma secondary to MV, central vein catheter insertion, and other (69.6%, 13.2%, and 17.2%, respectively). Compared to ventilated patients without pneumothorax, ventilated patients who developed pneumothorax had a longer duration of MV care (P < 0.001) and higher nonconventional and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation settings (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that pneumothorax is common in Alexandria University PICU patients, especially in those on MV and emphasized the importance of the strict application of protective lung strategies among ventilated patients to minimize the risk of pneumothorax. PMID:27630456

  6. Evaluation of the Tolerability of Intermittent Intravenous Sildenafil in Pediatric Patients With Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hasselman, Ty E.; Wang, Yanzhi; Harthan, Aaron A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The primary purpose of this study was to determine the tolerability of intermittent intravenous (IV) sildenafil for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension in pediatric patients. Secondary objectives were to evaluate parameters related to efficacy. METHODS: This was a retrospective chart review from January 2013 to August 2014 of pediatric patients under age 18 years treated with intermittent doses of IV sildenafil for pulmonary hypertension. Patients were excluded if they were over age 18 years or received sildenafil for other indications. Measures collected to assess tolerability include blood pressure and heart rate before and after the administration of IV sildenafil, as well as adverse events. RESULTS: Thirty-seven patients (21 females and 16 males) were identified meeting inclusion criteria, and 21 (56.8%) were on oral sildenafil prior to the initial IV dose. The mean decrease in blood pressure after the first dose of IV sildenafil was 7.16/2.74 mmHg. The decrease in systolic blood pressure was statistically significant. During the study period, 5 patients experienced medication related adverse events, primarily hypotension. Despite this, none of the patients had the medication discontinued due to these events. For secondary objectives, a statistically significant difference was not found between other clinical measures before and after intermittent IV sildenafil dosing. CONCLUSIONS: Sildenafil, when administered as intermittent IV doses, was tolerated by the majority of patients evaluated in this study. For pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension in whom enteral or continuous IV sildenafil cannot be administered, intermittent IV sildenafil may be considered as an alternative administration option. PMID:27877095

  7. "Stories Take Your Role Away From You": Understanding the Impact on Health Care Professionals of Viewing Digital Stories of Pediatric and Adolescent/Young Adult Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Laing, Catherine M; Moules, Nancy J; Estefan, Andrew; Lang, Mike

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this philosophical hermeneutic study was to understand the effects on health care providers (HCPs) of watching digital stories made by (past and present) pediatric and adolescent/young adult (AYA) oncology patients. Twelve HCPs participated in a focus group where they watched digital stories made by pediatric/AYA oncology patients and participated in a discussion related to the impact the stories had on them personally and professionally. Findings from this research revealed that HCPs found digital stories to be powerful, therapeutic, and educational tools. Health care providers described uses for digital stories ranging from education of newly diagnosed families to training of new staff. Digital stories, we conclude, can be an efficient and effective way through which to understand the patient experience, implications from which can range from more efficient patient care delivery to decision making. Recommendations for incorporating digital storytelling into healthcare delivery are offered.

  8. A 6-Year Case-Control Study of the Presentation and Clinical Sequelae for Noninflicted, Negligent, and Inflicted Pediatric Burns.

    PubMed

    Collier, Zachary J; Ramaiah, Veena; Glick, Jill C; Gottlieb, Lawrence J

    Inflicted burns are one of the leading causes of abuse-related fatalities in children. Between 30 and 60% of children accidentally returned to abusive homes suffer reabuse. Given the high chance for abuse recurrence and the associated morbidity/mortality, it is critical that inflicted burns are promptly identified to guide appropriate medical and child welfare management. Although previous studies proposed historical and mechanistic features using noncomparative or poorly powered data, this study utilized comparative data from a 6-year period (2009-2014) at a certified burn center along with expert analysis from Child Advocacy and Protective Services (CAPS) to provide higher level evidence supporting classical findings while elucidating new features with respect to burn severity and required interventions. A retrospective chart review of 408 pediatric burns was cross-referenced with the respective CAPS consultations to construct a multidisciplinary, deidentified database. The average age was 2.9 years (0.04-17 years) with 232 (57%) males and 330 (81%) African-Americans. CAPS investigations confirmed burn etiologies: noninflicted (346 [85%]), negligent (30 [7%]), and inflicted (32 [8%]). In comparing the three etiologies, statistical significance (P < .05) was observed for numerous variables including historical inconsistency, burn age, child welfare history, burn size and depth, distribution, concomitant injury rates, number of surgical interventions, infectious complications, and hospital length of stay. In addition to reaffirming classical features of abusive burns to fortify etiologic diagnoses, this study elucidated appreciable differences in burn severity, interventional sequelae, and burn-related complications, which will help guide medical and surgical interventions for future pediatric burn patients.

  9. West Virginia University Pediatric Stroke Registry: Clinical Description and Risk Factors Identification in Patients Living in a Rural Area

    PubMed Central

    Pergami, P.; Thayapararajah, S. W.; Seemaladinne, N.

    2015-01-01

    We develop an institutional pediatric stroke database at West Virginia University to support the classification and description of clinical and radiographic characteristics of children with stroke in West Virginia. Methods A custom-made database was developed using Microsoft Access to include specific query forms for data retrieval. Data were collected retrospectively from electronic medical record of pediatric patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, with emphasis on clinical presentation, risk factors and neuroimaging studies, between 2000 and 2012. Results In the children group cardiac disease was over-represented over vasculitis and hypercoagulable disorders. Neonates diagnosed with acute stroke were almost exclusively very sick or symptomatic patents. Conclusion Paediatric stroke in rural areas might be under-detected, particularly in neonates or in patients with mild or transient neurological signs. Patients with very high risk for stroke were over-represented in our registry; this support the need for increased awareness about paediatric stroke among practitioners and emergency room doctors in rural locations. PMID:25049311

  10. Recurrent Oral and Genital Ulcers in an Infant: Neonatal Presentation of Pediatric Behçet Disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Emma F; Hawkins, Danielle M; Gifford, Laura K; Smidt, Aimee C

    2015-01-01

    Behçet disease is a complex, multisystem disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcerations. It rarely occurs in infants or children. Neonatal Behçet disease has been reported in infants whose ulcers resolve at or before 9 weeks of age. Few cases of neonatal Behçet disease persisting into childhood have previously been reported. We report the case of a 1-month-old infant who presented with severe recurrent genital ulcerations and at 6 months developed recurrent oral ulcerations. Her orogenital ulcerations continue to recur. Human leukocyte antigen testing revealed HLA-B51 and B44 positivity. This is a case of pediatric Behçet disease in the neonatal period. Behçet disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent genital and oral ulcerations in infants and children.

  11. Dosing celecoxib in pediatric patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswami, Sriram; Hutmacher, Matt M; Robbins, Jeffery L; Bello, Akintunde; West, Christine; Bloom, Bradley J

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to derive dosing recommendations for the use of celecoxib in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) using pharmacokinetic (PK) and exposure-response data. PK and efficacy data from a randomized, double-blind, 12-week study of celecoxib dosed at 3 and 6 mg/kg twice a day (bid) as an investigational suspension formulation in 152 JRA patients aged 2 to 17 years, PK data from 36 adult RA patients, and relative bioavailability data in healthy adults comparing suspension or capsule sprinkles with the commercial capsule were analyzed. Typical oral clearance (L/h) values were 40% and 24% lower in patients weighing 10 and 25 kg, respectively, compared with a 70-kg patient. Longitudinal, logistic pharmacodynamic models incorporating linear effects of dose/area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) over 0 to 12 hours (AUC(0-12)) suggested that the percentage of responders increased with celecoxib exposure. Systemic exposures (AUC) were similar for the suspension, capsule sprinkles, and intact capsule. Administration of a 50-mg bid capsule (or sprinkles) for patients weighing 10 to 25 kg and 100 mg bid for patients >25 kg was predicted to yield similar exposures and response rates as those observed in the JRA trial. Doses and dosage forms not studied in the JRA trial were approved based on the results of this analysis.

  12. A rare case of splenic pseudoaneurysm in pediatric splenic blunt trauma patient: Review of diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Roger Chen; Kurbatov, Vadim; Leung, Patricia; Sugiyama, Gainosuke; Roudnitsky, Valery

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Splenic pseudoaneurysms (SPA) are a rare but serious sequela of blunt traumatic injury to the spleen. Management of adult blunt splenic trauma is well-studied, however, in children, the management is much less well-defined. Presentation of case A 15 year-old male presented with severe abdominal pain of acute onset after sustaining injury to his left side while playing football. FAST was positive for free fluid in the abdomen. Initial abdomen CT demonstrated a grade III/IV left splenic laceration with moderate to large hemoperitoneum with no active extravasation or injury to the splenic vessels noted. A follow-up CT angiography of the abdomen demonstrated a splenic hypervascular structure suspicious for a small pseudoaneurysm. Splenic arteriogram which demonstrated multiple pseudoaneurysms arising from the second order splenic artery branches which was angioembolized and treated. Discussion & conclusion Questions still remain regarding the timing of repeat imaging for diagnosis of SPA following non-operative blunt splenic trauma, which patients should be imaged, and how to manage SPA upon diagnosis. More clinical study and basic science research is warranted to study the disease process of SPA in pediatric patient. We believe that our proposed management algorithm timely detect formation of delayed SPA formation and addresses the possible fatal disease course of pediatric SPA. PMID:26117449

  13. Predictors of serious bacterial infections in pediatric burn patients with fever.

    PubMed

    Vyles, David; Sinha, Madhumita; Rosenberg, David I; Foster, Kevin N; Tran, Melissa; Drachman, David

    2014-01-01

    To determine predictors of serious bacterial infections in pediatric burn patients with fever (core temp ≥38.5°C), the authors conducted a retrospective review of medical records of pediatric (0-18 years) patients admitted to the Arizona Burn Center between 2008 and 2011 with greater than 5% TBSA and inpatient hospitalization for ≥72 hours. The study group comprised patients with a febrile episode during their inpatient stay. Serious bacterial infection (the primary outcome variable) was defined as: bacteremia, urinary tract infection, meningitis (blood, urine, or cerebrospinal fluid culture positive for a pathogen respectively), pneumonia, line, and wound infection. A generalized estimating equation analysis was done to predict the presence or absence of serious bacterial infection. Of 1082 pediatric burn patients hospitalized during the study period, 353 met the study eligibility criteria. A total of 108 patients (30.6%) had at least one fever episode (fever group). No difference in demographic characteristics was noted between the fever and no-fever groups; significant differences were observed for: third-degree TBSA, second-degree TBSA, total operating room visits, length of stay, Injury Severity Score, and death. A total of 47.2% of the patients had one or more episodes of fever with serious bacterial infection. In a generalized estimating equation predictive model, presence of a central line, second-, and third-degree TBSA were predictive of serious bacterial infection in burn patients with fever. In this study, individual clinical variables such as tachypnea and tachycardia were not predictive of serious bacterial infections, but the presence of a central line, and larger TBSA were significant predictors of serious bacterial infections. Younger age (P =.08) and ventilator support (P =.057) also approached significance as predictors of serious bacterial infections.

  14. The impact of human rhinovirus infection in pediatric patients undergoing heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Corcoran, Claudia; Witte, Madolin K; Ampofo, Krow; Castillo, Ramon; Bodily, Stephanie; Bratton, Susan L

    2014-12-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV), the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in children, can present as bronchiolitis, pneumonia, or asthma exacerbations. The impact of HRV in infants and toddlers with congenital heart disease is poorly defined. A case-control study was performed to compare the clinical course for 19 young children with respiratory symptoms who tested positive for rhinovirus after heart surgery with that of 56 matched control subjects. The control subjects were matched by surgical repair, age, weight, and time of the year. Patients with known HRVs before surgery and control subjects with respiratory symptoms or positive test results for viruses were excluded from the study. Human rhinovirus infection was associated with more than a tenfold increase in the odds of noninvasive ventilation after extubation (odds ratio [OR] 11.45; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.97-38.67), a 12-fold increase in the probability of extubation failure (OR 12.84; 95 % CI 2.93-56.29), and increased use of pulmonary medications including bronchodilator and nitric oxide (p < 0.001). As a result, the hospital length of stay (HLOS) was two times longer than for the control subjects (p < 0.001), and the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) length of stay (CICU LOS) was three times longer (p < 0.0001). The intubation time was significantly longer (p < 0.001), and the CICU respiratory charges were significantly greater (p = 0.001) for the infected patients. Human rhinovirus increases resource use and prolongs postoperative recovery after pediatric heart surgery. Surgery timing should be delayed for patients with rhinovirus if possible.

  15. Relationship between dose of antithyroid drugs and adverse events in pediatric patients with Graves’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Kie; Miyoshi, Yoko; Tachibana, Makiko; Namba, Noriyuki; Miki, Kazunori; Nakata, Yukiko; Takano, Toru; Ozono, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. Graves’ disease (GD) accounts for a large proportion of pediatric hyperthyroidism, and the first-line treatment is antithyroid drug (ATD) therapy. Methimazole (MMI) is effective in most patients but is associated with significant adverse events (AEs). We reviewed the medical records of GD patients (n = 56) with onset age of <15 yr and investigated the relationship between MMI dose and AEs. The study population comprised 11 male and 45 female patients and the median age at diagnosis was 11 yr. All patients were initially treated with ATDs. Among the 52 patients initially treated with MMI, 20 received a low dose, and 32 received a high dose of MMI (< 0.7 vs ≥ 0.7 mg/kg/day, respectively). AEs occurred in 20% of the patients in the low-dose MMI group, and in 50% patients in the high-dose MMI group (p = 0.031). A greater variety of AEs was observed in the high-dose group. Neutropenia and rash were observed in both groups. With treatment transition to low-dose MMI according to the Japanese Society for Pediatric Endocrinology guidelines, we expect a decrease in the incidence of AEs in future. However, we should be careful as neutropenia and rash can occur independently of the MMI dose. PMID:28203042

  16. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Hepatic Artery Stenosis in Adult and Pediatric Patients After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Maruzzelli, Luigi; Miraglia, Roberto Caruso, Settimo; Milazzo, Mariapina; Mamone, Giuseppe; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous endovascular techniques for the treatment of hepatic artery stenosis (HAS) occurring after liver transplantation (LT) in adult and pediatrics patients. From February 2003 to March 2009, 25 patients (15 adults and 10 children) whose developed HAS after LT were referred to our interventional radiology unit. Technical success was achieved in 96% (24 of 25) of patients. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed in 13 patients (7 children), and stenting was performed in 11 patients (2 children). After the procedure, all patients were followed-up with liver function tests, Doppler ultrasound, and/or computed tomography. Mean follow-up was 15.8 months (range 5 days to 58 months). Acute hepatic artery thrombosis occurred immediately after stent deployment in 2 patients and was successfully treated with local thrombolysis. One patient developed severe HA spasm, which reverted after 24 h. After the procedure, mean trans-stenotic pressure gradient decreased from 30.5 to 6.2 mmHg. Kaplan-Meyer curve of HA primary patency was 77% at 1 and 2 years. During the follow-up period, 5 patients (20%) had recurrent stenosis, and 2 patients (8.3%) had late thrombosis. Two of 7 patients with stenosis/thrombosis underwent surgical revascularization (n = 1) and liver retransplantation (n = 1). Six (25%) patients died during follow-up, but overall mortality was not significantly different when comparing patients having patent hepatic arteries with those having recurrent stenosis/thrombosis. There were no significant differences in recurrent stenosis/thrombosis and mortality comparing patients treated by PTA versus stenting and comparing adult versus pediatric status. Percutaneous interventional treatment of HAS in LT recipients is safe and effective and decreases the need for surgical revascularization and liver retransplantation. However, the beneficial effects for survival are not clear, probably because

  17. Central nervous system histoplasmosis in an immunocompetent pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Ignacio; Minces, Pablo; De Cristofano, Analía M; Negroni, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    Neurohistoplasmosis is a rare disease, most prevalent in immunosuppressed patients, secondary to disseminated disease with a high mortality rate when diagnosis and treatment are delayed. We report a previously healthy 12 year old girl, from a bat infested region of Tucuman Province, Argentine Republic, who developed meningoencephalitis due to Histoplasma capsulatum. Eighteen months prior to admission the patient started with headaches and intermittent fever. The images of the central nervous system showed meningoencephalitis suggestive of tuberculosis. She received antibiotics and tuberculostatic medications without improvement. Liposomal amphotericin B was administered for six weeks. The patient's clinical status improved remarkably. Finally the culture of cerebral spinal fluid was positive for micelial form of Histoplasma capsulatum. The difficulties surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of neurohistoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients are discussed in this manuscript, as it also intends to alert to the presence of a strain of Histoplasma capsulatum with affinity for the central nervous system.

  18. Psychosocial adjustment of pediatric patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Felder-Puig, R; Peters, C; Matthes-Martin, S; Lamche, M; Felsberger, C; Gadner, H; Topf, R

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the psychosocial adjustment of patients who had been treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in our clinic. Selection criteria for patients were to be aged 14-30 years at the time of the follow-up, to be at least 2 years post-SCT and to have a very good knowledge of German. Among 31 eligible patients, 26 participated (84% response rate). The patients were between 15 and 27 years old and were on average 7 years (range 2-13) post-SCT. Research instruments consisted of a demographic questionnaire and various subscales of established psychological measures for which data from a sample of bone cancer survivors and population norms were available. About 35% of patients showed high levels of anxiety, 62% appeared to be extremely sensitive and vulnerable, and 35% showed strong, unfulfilled needs in their love lives. In the other domains tested (self-esteem, family and peer relationships, school/vocational performance, etc), no noticeable differences were found between the subjects and comparable populations. There was no significant association between psychosocial outcome and demographic features or clinical data. Our results suggest that patients who underwent SCT in their childhood or adolescence are at risk of developing long-term emotional or social problems. Due to the retrospective design of our study and the small sample size, no predictive factors for psychosocial distress could be identified.

  19. Molecular identification of adenovirus causing respiratory tract infection in pediatric patients at the University of Malaya Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are at least 51 adenovirus serotypes (AdV) known to cause human infections. The prevalence of the different human AdV (HAdV) serotypes varies among different regions. Presently, there are no reports of the prevalent HAdV types found in Malaysia. The present study was undertaken to identify the HAdV types associated primarily with respiratory tract infections (RTI) of young children in Malaysia. Methods Archived HAdV isolates from pediatric patients with RTI seen at the University of Malaya Medical Center (UMMC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from 1999 to 2005 were used. Virus isolates were inoculated into cell culture and DNA was extracted when cells showed significant cytopathic effects. AdV partial hexon gene was amplified and the sequences together with other known HAdV hexon gene sequences were used to build phylogenetic trees. Identification of HAdV types found among young children in Malaysia was inferred from the phylograms. Results At least 2,583 pediatric patients with RTI sought consultation and treatment at the UMMC from 1999 to 2005. Among these patients, 48 (< 2%) were positive for HAdV infections. Twenty-seven isolates were recovered and used for the present study. Nineteen of the 27 (~70%) isolates belonged to HAdV species C (HAdV-C) and six (~22%) were of HAdV species B (HAdV-B). Among the HAdV-C species, 14 (~74%) of them were identified as HAdV type 1 (HAdV-1) and HAdV type 2 (HAdV-2), and among the HAdV-B species, HAdV type 3 (HAdV-3) was the most common serotype identified. HAdV-C species also was isolated from throat and rectal swabs of children with hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Two isolates were identified as corresponding to HAdV-F species from a child with HFMD and a patient with intestinal obstruction. Conclusions HAdV-1 and HAdV-2 were the most common HAdV isolated from pediatric patients who sought treatment for RTI at the UMMC from 1999 to 2005. HAdV-B, mainly HAdV-3, was recovered from ~22% of the patients. These

  20. Identification of mutant alleles of JAK3 in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yin, Changhong; Sandoval, Claudio; Baeg, Gyeong-Hun

    2015-05-01

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have an 80% chance of long-term survival. Despite the high rate of cure, children relapse, and recurrent ALL is difficult to cure with chemotherapeutic regimens. Therefore, improved biological understanding of ALL and the development of rationally designed therapeutics targeting molecules associated with the pathogenesis of ALL are essential. We identified missense and synonymous JAK3 mutations in 16 of 91 pediatric patients with ALL. The expression of JAK3(V722I) mutant caused the cytokine-independent activation of Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling and conferred the factor-independent growth of murine interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent pro-B Ba/F3 cells. Importantly, inhibition of JAK3 by the known JAK3 inhibitor CP-690 550 converted the Ba/F3-JAK3(V722I) cells back to factor-dependent growth. These observations suggest that JAK3 may contribute to the pathogenesis of pediatric ALL and serve as an important therapeutic target which can be leveraged to improve outcomes for pediatric patients with ALL.

  1. Preclinical evidence of potential craniofacial adverse effect of zoledronic acid in pediatric patients with bone malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lézot, Frédéric; Chesneau, Julie; Battaglia, Séverine; Brion, Régis; Castaneda, Beatriz; Farges, Jean-Christophe; Heymann, Dominique; Rédini, Françoise

    2014-11-01

    High doses of zoledronic acid (ZOL), one of the most potent inhibitors of bone resorption, are currently evaluated in phase III clinical trials in Europe for the treatment of malignant pediatric primary bone tumors. The impact of such an intensive treatment on the craniofacial skeleton growth is a critical question in the context of patients with actively growing skeleton; in particular, in light of our previous studies evidencing that endochondral bone formation was transiently disturbed by high doses of ZOL. Two protocols adapted from pediatric treatments were developed for newborn mice (a total of 5 or 10 injections of ZOL 50μg/kg every two days). Their impact on skull bones and teeth growth was analyzed by X-rays, microCT and histology up to 3months after the last injection. ZOL administrations induced a transient delay of skull bone growth and an irreversible delay in incisor, first molar eruption and root elongation. Other teeth were affected, but most were erupted by 3months. Root histogenesis was severely impacted for all molars and massive odontogenic tumor-like structures were observed in all mandibular incisors. High doses of ZOL irreversibly disturbed teeth eruption and elongation, and delayed skull bone formation. These preclinical observations are essential for the follow-up of onco-pediatric patients treated with ZOL.

  2. Value of postmortem studies in deceased neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Raphael; Caduff, Rosmarie; Giudici, Luca; Zhong, Qing; Vogetseder, Alexander; Arlettaz, Romaine; Frey, Bernhard; Moch, Holger; Bode, Peter K

    2017-02-01

    Worldwide, various autopsy studies have shown a decrease in the diagnostic error rate over the last years. The cause of this positive development is mainly due to the improvement of modern medicine. However, intensive care unit patients are thought to have a higher risk for diagnostic errors, which is documented in several studies in the adult population. In contrast, there is only limited information about diagnostic errors in pediatrics, particularly in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. The aims of this study were to analyze the spectrum of childhood death, determine the prevalence and distribution of autopsy-confirmed diagnostic errors, and describe patient characteristics that might have influenced the discordance between antemortem and postmortem findings. We analyzed 143 autopsy reports from 2004 to 2013 and correlated these with clinical reports. The overall autopsy rate during this interval was 20.3%. The leading causes of death were congenital malformations (28%), diseases closely associated with perinatal disorders (25%), disorders of the cardiovascular system (18%), and infections (15%). Additional findings were obtained in 23% of the autopsies. Major diagnostic errors were found in 6%, the lowest reported value in a developed country as yet. Most cases (75%) showed complete concordance between clinical diagnoses and postmortem findings, in line with improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic processes over the last decades. In conclusion, autopsy of neonates, infants, and children represents an important tool for monitoring the quality of pediatric and neonatal medical care.

  3. Physicochemical stability of captopril and enalapril extemporaneous formulations for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Casas, Marta; Álvarez, José; Lucero, María Jesús

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence of hypertension among children has been increasing. Community and Hospital Pharmacists are often challenged to provide an oral liquid extemporaneous formulation for pediatric patients, because there are no appropriate dosage drugs to the specific needs of the child. The objective of this study is to choose and develop suitable pediatric extemporaneous formulations for captopril and enalapril maleate and to determine their physicochemical stability. A survey was carried out to evaluate the extent of dispensation of these drugs in Hospitals in Spain. Stability studies of formulations have been studied according to ICH normative at 5, 25 and 40 °C. Three samples from each temperature were withdrawn and assessed for stability on days 0, 15, 30, 50 and 90 using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) mass spectrometer assay. Rheological studies were carried out to ensure the maintenance of the physical characteristics of these non-Newtonian fluids. Captopril and enalapril maleate formulations used the pure drug and were stable during 50 days at 5 °C. We have developed easy antihypertensive oral liquid extemporaneous formulations for pediatric patients with physical and chemical stability higher than those provided by the majority of Hospitals.

  4. Catheter malplacement during central venous cannulation through arm veins in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Arvind; Bithal, Parmod K; Dash, Harihar; Chauhan, Rajendra S; Mohanty, Bibekanand

    2003-07-01

    For successful catheter placement, central venous cannulation (CVC) through internal jugular vein and subclavian vein has been recommended in both adult and pediatric patients. But it carries a risk of serious complications, such as pneumothorax, carotid, or subclavian artery puncture, which can be life-threatening, particularly in critically ill children. So a prospective study was carried out to determine the success rate of correct catheter tip placement during CVC through antecubital veins in pediatric neurosurgical patients. A total of 200 pediatric patients (age 1-15 years) of either sex were studied. Basilic or cephalic veins of either arm were selected. All the patients were cannulated in the operation room under general anesthesia. Single lumen, proper size catheters (with sti