Science.gov

Sample records for pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation

  1. A spatiotemporal analysis of gait freezing and the impact of pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Thevathasan, Wesley; Cole, Michael H; Graepel, Cara L; Hyam, Jonathan A; Jenkinson, Ned; Brittain, John-Stuart; Coyne, Terry J; Silburn, Peter A; Aziz, Tipu Z; Kerr, Graham; Brown, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Gait freezing is an episodic arrest of locomotion due to an inability to take normal steps. Pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation is an emerging therapy proposed to improve gait freezing, even where refractory to medication. However, the efficacy and precise effects of pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation on Parkinsonian gait disturbance are not established. The clinical application of this new therapy is controversial and it is unknown if bilateral stimulation is more effective than unilateral. Here, in a double-blinded study using objective spatiotemporal gait analysis, we assessed the impact of unilateral and bilateral pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation on triggered episodes of gait freezing and on background deficits of unconstrained gait in Parkinson's disease. Under experimental conditions, while OFF medication, Parkinsonian patients with severe gait freezing implanted with pedunculopontine nucleus stimulators below the pontomesencephalic junction were assessed during three conditions; off stimulation, unilateral stimulation and bilateral stimulation. Results were compared to Parkinsonian patients without gait freezing matched for disease severity and healthy controls. Pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation improved objective measures of gait freezing, with bilateral stimulation more effective than unilateral. During unconstrained walking, Parkinsonian patients who experience gait freezing had reduced step length and increased step length variability compared to patients without gait freezing; however, these deficits were unchanged by pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation. Chronic pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation improved Freezing of Gait Questionnaire scores, reflecting a reduction of the freezing encountered in patients' usual environments and medication states. This study provides objective, double-blinded evidence that in a specific subgroup of Parkinsonian patients, stimulation of a caudal pedunculopontine nucleus region selectively improves gait

  2. A spatiotemporal analysis of gait freezing and the impact of pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael H.; Graepel, Cara L.; Hyam, Jonathan A.; Jenkinson, Ned; Brittain, John-Stuart; Coyne, Terry J.; Silburn, Peter A.; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Kerr, Graham; Brown, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gait freezing is an episodic arrest of locomotion due to an inability to take normal steps. Pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation is an emerging therapy proposed to improve gait freezing, even where refractory to medication. However, the efficacy and precise effects of pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation on Parkinsonian gait disturbance are not established. The clinical application of this new therapy is controversial and it is unknown if bilateral stimulation is more effective than unilateral. Here, in a double-blinded study using objective spatiotemporal gait analysis, we assessed the impact of unilateral and bilateral pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation on triggered episodes of gait freezing and on background deficits of unconstrained gait in Parkinson’s disease. Under experimental conditions, while OFF medication, Parkinsonian patients with severe gait freezing implanted with pedunculopontine nucleus stimulators below the pontomesencephalic junction were assessed during three conditions; off stimulation, unilateral stimulation and bilateral stimulation. Results were compared to Parkinsonian patients without gait freezing matched for disease severity and healthy controls. Pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation improved objective measures of gait freezing, with bilateral stimulation more effective than unilateral. During unconstrained walking, Parkinsonian patients who experience gait freezing had reduced step length and increased step length variability compared to patients without gait freezing; however, these deficits were unchanged by pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation. Chronic pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation improved Freezing of Gait Questionnaire scores, reflecting a reduction of the freezing encountered in patients’ usual environments and medication states. This study provides objective, double-blinded evidence that in a specific subgroup of Parkinsonian patients, stimulation of a caudal pedunculopontine nucleus region selectively improves gait

  3. Computational modeling of pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitella, Laura M.; Mohsenian, Kevin; Pahwa, Mrinal; Gloeckner, Cory; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) near the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been posited to improve medication-intractable gait and balance problems in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, clinical studies evaluating this DBS target have not demonstrated consistent therapeutic effects, with several studies reporting the emergence of paresthesia and oculomotor side effects. The spatial and pathway-specific extent to which brainstem regions are modulated during PPN-DBS is not well understood. Approach. Here, we describe two computational models that estimate the direct effects of DBS in the PPN region for human and translational non-human primate (NHP) studies. The three-dimensional models were constructed from segmented histological images from each species, multi-compartment neuron models and inhomogeneous finite element models of the voltage distribution in the brainstem during DBS. Main Results. The computational models predicted that: (1) the majority of PPN neurons are activated with -3 V monopolar cathodic stimulation; (2) surgical targeting errors of as little as 1 mm in both species decrement activation selectivity; (3) specifically, monopolar stimulation in caudal, medial, or anterior PPN activates a significant proportion of the superior cerebellar peduncle (up to 60% in the human model and 90% in the NHP model at -3 V) (4) monopolar stimulation in rostral, lateral or anterior PPN activates a large percentage of medial lemniscus fibers (up to 33% in the human model and 40% in the NHP model at -3 V) and (5) the current clinical cylindrical electrode design is suboptimal for isolating the modulatory effects to PPN neurons. Significance. We show that a DBS lead design with radially-segmented electrodes may yield improved functional outcome for PPN-DBS.

  4. Computational modeling of pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zitella, Laura M.; Mohsenian, Kevin; Pahwa, Mrinal; Gloeckner, Cory; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Deep brain stimulation (DBS) near the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been posited to improve medication-intractable gait and balance problems in patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, clinical studies evaluating this DBS target have not demonstrated consistent therapeutic effects, with several studies reporting the emergence of paresthesia and oculomotor side effects. The spatial and pathway-specific extent to which brainstem regions are modulated during PPN-DBS is not well understood. Approach Here, we describe two computational models that estimate the direct effects of DBS in the PPN region for human and translational non-human primate (NHP) studies. The three-dimensional models were constructed from segmented histological images from each species, multi-compartment neuron models, and inhomogeneous finite element models of the voltage distribution in the brainstem during DBS. Main Results The computational models predicted that: 1) the majority of PPN neurons are activated with −3V monopolar cathodic stimulation; 2) surgical targeting errors of as little as 1 mm in both species decrement activation selectivity; 3) specifically, monopolar stimulation in caudal, medial, or anterior PPN activates a significant proportion of the superior cerebellar peduncle (up to 60% in the human model and 90% in the NHP model at -3V); 4) monopolar stimulation in rostral, lateral, or anterior PPN activates a large percentage of medial lemniscus fibers (up to 33% in the human model and 40% in the NHP model at −3V); and, 5) the current clinical cylindrical electrode design is suboptimal for isolating the modulatory effects to PPN neurons. Significance We show that a DBS lead design with radially-segmented electrodes may yield improved functional outcome for PPN-DBS. PMID:23723145

  5. A block to pre-prepared movement in gait freezing, relieved by pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Thevathasan, Wesley; Pogosyan, Alek; Hyam, Jonathan A; Jenkinson, Ned; Bogdanovic, Marko; Coyne, Terry J; Silburn, Peter A; Aziz, Tipu Z; Brown, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Gait freezing and postural instability are disabling features of Parkinsonian disorders, treatable with pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation. Both features are considered deficits of proximal and axial musculature, innervated predominantly by reticulospinal pathways and tend to manifest when gait and posture require adjustment. Adjustments to gait and posture are amenable to pre-preparation and rapid triggered release. Experimentally, such accelerated release can be elicited by loud auditory stimuli--a phenomenon known as 'StartReact'. We observed StartReact in healthy and Parkinsonian controls. However, StartReact was absent in Parkinsonian patients with severe gait freezing and postural instability. Pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation restored StartReact proximally and proximal reaction times to loud stimuli correlated with gait and postural disturbance. These findings suggest a relative block to triggered, pre-prepared movement in gait freezing and postural instability, relieved by pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation.

  6. Pedunculopontine nucleus evoked potentials from subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Neagu, Bogdan; Tsang, Eric; Mazzella, Filomena; Hamani, Clement; Moro, Elena; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lozano, Andres M; Chen, Robert

    2013-12-01

    The effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation on the pedunculopontine nucleus area (PPNR) evoked activities were examined in two patients with Parkinson's disease. The patients had previously undergone bilateral STN deep brain stimulation (DBS) and subsequently received unilateral DBS electrodes in the PPNR. Evoked potentials were recorded from the local field potentials (LFP) from the PPNR with STN stimulation at different frequencies and bipolar contacts. Ipsilateral and contralateral short latency (<2ms) PPNR responses were evoked from left but not from right STN stimulation. In both patients, STN stimulation evoked contralateral PPNR responses at medium latencies between 41 and 45ms. Cortical evoked potentials to single pulse STN stimulation were observed at latencies between 18 and 27ms. These results demonstrate a functional connection between the STN and the PPNR. It likely involves direct projections between the STN and PPNR or polysynaptic pathways with thalamic or cortical relays.

  7. Stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus area in Parkinson's disease: effects on speech and intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Serge; Ferraye, Murielle; Espesser, Robert; Fraix, Valérie; Maillet, Audrey; Guirchoum, Jennifer; Layani-Zemour, Deborah; Ghio, Alain; Chabardès, Stéphan; Pollak, Pierre; Debû, Bettina

    2014-10-01

    Improvement of gait disorders following pedunculopontine nucleus area stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease has previously been reported and led us to propose this surgical treatment to patients who progressively developed severe gait disorders and freezing despite optimal dopaminergic drug treatment and subthalamic nucleus stimulation. The outcome of our prospective study on the first six patients was somewhat mitigated, as freezing of gait and falls related to freezing were improved by low frequency electrical stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus area in some, but not all, patients. Here, we report the speech data prospectively collected in these patients with Parkinson's disease. Indeed, because subthalamic nucleus surgery may lead to speech impairment and a worsening of dysarthria in some patients with Parkinson's disease, we felt it was important to precisely examine any possible modulations of speech for a novel target for deep brain stimulation. Our results suggested a trend towards speech degradation related to the pedunculopontine nucleus area surgery (off stimulation) for aero-phonatory control (maximum phonation time), phono-articulatory coordination (oral diadochokinesis) and speech intelligibility. Possibly, the observed speech degradation may also be linked to the clinical characteristics of the group of patients. The influence of pedunculopontine nucleus area stimulation per se was more complex, depending on the nature of the task: it had a deleterious effect on maximum phonation time and oral diadochokinesis, and mixed effects on speech intelligibility. Whereas levodopa intake and subthalamic nucleus stimulation alone had no and positive effects on speech dimensions, respectively, a negative interaction between the two treatments was observed both before and after pedunculopontine nucleus area surgery. This combination effect did not seem to be modulated by pedunculopontine nucleus area stimulation. Although limited in our group of

  8. The pedunculopontine nucleus area: critical evaluation of interspecies differences relevant for its use as a target for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mesbah; Schwabe, Kerstin; Krauss, Joachim K

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the pedunculopontine nucleus has been highlighted as a target for deep brain stimulation for the treatment of freezing of postural instability and gait disorders in Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. There is great controversy, however, as to the exact location of the optimal site for stimulation. In this review, we give an overview of anatomy and connectivity of the pedunculopontine nucleus area in rats, cats, non-human primates and humans. Additionally, we report on the behavioural changes after chemical or electrical manipulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus. We discuss the relation to adjacent regions of the pedunculopontine nucleus, such as the cuneiform nucleus and the subcuneiform nucleus, which together with the pedunculopontine nucleus are the main areas of the mesencephalic locomotor region and play a major role in the initiation of gait. This information is discussed with respect to the experimental designs used for research purposes directed to a better understanding of the circuitry pathway of the pedunculopontine nucleus in association with basal ganglia pathology, and with respect to deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus area in humans.

  9. Deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus in Parkinson's disease. Preliminary experience at Oxford.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E A; Muthusamy, K A; De Pennington, N; Joint, C A; Aziz, T Z

    2008-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a novel neurosurgical therapy developed to address symptoms of gait freezing and postural instability in Parkinson's disease and related disorders. Here, we summarize our non-human primate and neuroimaging research of relevance to our surgical targeting of the PPN. We also describe our clinical experience of PPN DBS with greatest motor improvements achieved by stimulation at low frequencies.

  10. Regional anatomy of the pedunculopontine nucleus: relevance for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fournier-Gosselin, Marie-Pierre; Lipsman, Nir; Saint-Cyr, Jean A; Hamani, Clement; Lozano, Andres M

    2013-09-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is currently being investigated as a potential deep brain stimulation target to improve gait and posture in Parkinson's disease. This review examines the complex anatomy of the PPN region and suggests a functional mapping of the surrounding nuclei and fiber tracts that may serve as a guide to a more accurate placement of electrodes while avoiding potentially adverse effects. The relationships of the PPN were examined in different human brain atlases. Schematic representations of those structures in the vicinity of the PPN were generated and correlated with their potential stimulation effects. By providing a functional map and representative schematics of the PPN region, we hope to optimize the placement of deep brain stimulation electrodes, thereby maximizing safety and clinical efficacy.

  11. Pedunculopontine Nucleus Region Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson Disease: Surgical Anatomy and Terminology

    PubMed Central

    Hamani, Clement; Aziz, Tipu; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Brown, Peter; Chabardes, Stephan; Coyne, Terry; Foote, Kelly; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Lozano, Andres M.; Mazzone, Paolo A.M.; Okun, Michael S.; Hutchison, William; Silburn, Peter; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Alam, Mesbah; Goetz, Laurent; Pereira, Erlick; Rughani, Anand; Thevathasan, Wesley; Moro, Elena; Krauss, Joachim K.

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence over the last few years have been important in ascertaining that the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) region could be considered as a potential target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat freezing and other problems as part of a spectrum of gait disorders in Parkinson disease and other akinetic movement disorders. Since the introduction of PPN DBS, a variety of clinical studies have been published. Most indicate improvements in freezing and falls in patients who are severely affected by these problems. The results across patients, however, have been variable, perhaps reflecting patient selection, heterogeneity in target selection and differences in surgical methodology and stimulation settings. Here we outline both the accumulated knowledge and the domains of uncertainty in surgical anatomy and terminology. Specific topics were assigned to groups of experts, and this work was accumulated and reviewed by the executive committee of the working group. Areas of disagreement were discussed and modified accordingly until a consensus could be reached. We demonstrate that both the anatomy and the functional role of the PPN region need further study. The borders of the PPN and of adjacent nuclei differ when different brainstem atlases and atlas slices are compared. It is difficult to delineate precisely the PPN pars dissipata from the nucleus cuneiformis, as these structures partially overlap. This lack of clarity contributes to the difficulty in targeting and determining the exact localization of the electrodes implanted in patients with akinetic gait disorders. Future clinical studies need to consider these issues. PMID:27723662

  12. Critical evaluation of the anatomical location of the Barrington nucleus: relevance for deep brain stimulation surgery of pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Lisette; Yuste, Jose Enrique; Carrillo-de Sauvage, María Angeles; Gómez, Aurora; Fernández-Villalba, Emiliano; Avilés-Olmos, Itciar; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Herrero, María Trinidad

    2013-09-05

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become the standard surgical procedure for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPN) has emerged as a potential target for DBS in patients whose quality of life is compromised by freezing of gait and falls. To date, only a few groups have published their long-term clinical experience with PPN stimulation. Bearing in mind that the Barrington (Bar) nucleus and some adjacent nuclei (also known as the micturition centre) are close to the PPN and may be affected by DBS, the aim of the present study was to review the anatomical location of this structure in human and other species. To this end, the Bar nucleus area was analysed in mouse, monkey and human tissues, paying particular attention to the anatomical position in humans, where it has been largely overlooked. Results confirm that anatomical location renders the Bar nucleus susceptible to influence by the PPN DBS lead or to diffusion of electrical current. This may have an undesirable impact on the quality of life of patients.

  13. Pedunculopontine Nucleus Region Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson Disease: Surgical Techniques, Side Effects, and Postoperative Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hamani, Clement; Lozano, Andres M.; Mazzone, Paolo A.M.; Moro, Elena; Hutchison, William; Silburn, Peter A.; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Alam, Mesbah; Goetz, Laurent; Pereira, Erlick; Rughani, Anand; Thevathasan, Wesley; Aziz, Tipu; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Brown, Peter; Chabardes, Stephan; Coyne, Terry; Foote, Kelly; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Okun, Michael S.; Krauss, Joachim K.

    2017-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) region has received considerable attention in clinical studies as a target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson disease. These studies have yielded variable results with an overall impression of improvement in falls and freezing in many but not all patients treated. We evaluated the available data on the surgical anatomy and terminology of the PPN region in a companion paper. Here we focus on issues concerning surgical technique, imaging, and early side effects of surgery. The aim of this paper was to gain more insight into the reasoning for choosing specific techniques and to discuss short-comings of available studies. Our data demonstrate the wide range in almost all fields which were investigated. There are a number of important challenges to be resolved, such as identification of the optimal target, the choice of the surgical approach to optimize electrode placement, the impact on the outcome of specific surgical techniques, the reliability of intraoperative confirmation of the target, and methodological differences in postoperative validation of the electrode position. There is considerable variability both within and across groups, the overall experience with PPN DBS is still limited, and there is a lack of controlled trials. Despite these challenges, the procedure seems to provide benefit to selected patients and appears to be relatively safe. One important limitation in comparing studies from different centers and analyzing outcomes is the great variability in targeting and surgical techniques, as shown in our paper. The challenges we identified will be of relevance when designing future studies to better address several controversial issues. We hope that the data we accumulated may facilitate the development of surgical protocols for PPN DBS. PMID:27728909

  14. c-Fos expression after deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine Parkinson model.

    PubMed

    Saryyeva, Assel; Nakamura, Makoto; Krauss, Joachim K; Schwabe, Kerstin

    2011-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used to alleviate motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD). The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) may be a potential target for severe freezing and postural instability with 25 Hz stimulation being considered more effective than 130 Hz stimulation. Here we evaluated the expression of c-Fos after 25 Hz and 130 Hz DBS of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg, i.e., the rodent equivalent to the human PPN) in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) PD model. Anaesthetized male Sprague Dawley rats with unilateral 6-OHDA-induced nigrostriatal lesions were stimulated with 25 Hz, 130 Hz, or 0 Hz sham-stimulation for 4h by electrodes implanted into the ipsilateral PPTg. Thereafter the distribution and number of neurons expressing the immediate early gene c-Fos, a marker for acute neuronal activity, was assessed. DBS of the PPTg induced strong ipsilateral c-Fos expression at the stimulation site, with 25 Hz having a more marked impact than 130 Hz. Additionally, c-Fos was strongly expressed in the central gray. In the dorsal part expression was stronger after 25 Hz stimulation, while in the medial and ventral part there was no difference between 25 Hz and 130 Hz stimulation. Expression in the basal ganglia was negligible. In the rat 6-OHDA PD model stimulation of the PPTg did not affect c-Fos expression in the basal ganglia, but had a strong impact on other functional circuitries. PPN stimulation in humans might therefore also have an impact on other systems than the motor system.

  15. Deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus modulates neuronal hyperactivity and enhanced beta oscillatory activity of the subthalamic nucleus in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine model.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mesbah; Heissler, Hans E; Schwabe, Kerstin; Krauss, Joachim K

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) area has been introduced as a novel surgical therapy for dopamine refractory gait problems, freezing and postural instability in the late stage of Parkinson's disease (PD). Lesions of the pedunculopontine tegmental (PPTg) nucleus, the equivalent of the PPN in rodents, were shown to reduce the elevated discharge rate of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD. In order to further elucidate the modulatory effect of the PPTg on the STN we examined the effect of 25 Hz low frequency PPTg stimulation on neuronal single unit activity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs) of the STN, and on the electrocorticogram (ECoG) of the primary motor cortex region in rats with unilateral 6-OHDA induced nigrostriatal lesions. Stimulation of the PPTg reduced the enhanced firing rate in the STN, without affecting the firing pattern or approximate entropy (ApEn). It also reduced the activity in the beta band (15-30 Hz) of the STN, which is elevated in 6-OHDA lesioned rats, without affecting beta activity in the motor cortex. We showed a modulatory effect of PPTg stimulation on altered neuronal STN activity in the PD 6-OHDA rat model, indicating that PPTg DBS may alter activity of the basal ganglia circuitry at least partially. It remains unclear, however, how these changes are exactly mediated and whether they are relevant with regard to the descending PPTg projections in the lower brainstem.

  16. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus (PPN) Influences Visual Contrast Sensitivity in Human Observers.

    PubMed

    Strumpf, Hendrik; Noesselt, Toemme; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel; Voges, Jürgen; Panther, Patricia; Kaufmann, Joern; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Hopf, Jens-Max

    2016-01-01

    The parapontine nucleus of the thalamus (PPN) is a neuromodulatory midbrain structure with widespread connectivity to cortical and subcortical motor structures, as well as the spinal cord. The PPN also projects to the thalamus, including visual relay nuclei like the LGN and the pulvinar. Moreover, there is intense connectivity with sensory structures of the tegmentum in particular with the superior colliculus (SC). Given the existence and abundance of projections to visual sensory structures, it is likely that activity in the PPN has some modulatory influence on visual sensory selection. Here we address this possibility by measuring the visual discrimination performance (luminance contrast thresholds) in a group of patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD) treated with deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of the PPN to control gait and postural motor deficits. In each patient we measured the luminance-contrast threshold of being able to discriminate an orientation-target (Gabor-grating) as a function of stimulation frequency (high 60Hz, low 8/10, no stimulation). Thresholds were determined using a standard staircase-protocol that is based on parameter estimation by sequential testing (PEST). We observed that under low frequency stimulation thresholds increased relative to no and high frequency stimulation in five out of six patients, suggesting that DBS of the PPN has a frequency-dependent impact on visual selection processes at a rather elementary perceptual level.

  17. The effect of low frequency stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus on basal ganglia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunkyoung; Song, Inho; Jang, Dong Pyo; Kim, In Young

    2014-08-08

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has recently been introduced as an alternative target to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus internus (GPi) for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease with severe and medically intractable axial symptoms such as gait and postural impairment. However, it is little known about how electrical stimulation of the PPN affects control of neuronal activities between the PPN and basal ganglia. We examined how low frequency stimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) affects control of neuronal activities between the PPN and basal ganglia in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. In order to identify the effect of low frequency stimulation on the PPTg, neuronal activity in both the STN and substantia nigra par reticulata (SNr) were recorded and subjected to quantitative analysis, including analysis of firing rates and firing patterns. In this study, we found that the firing rates of the STN and SNr were suppressed during low frequency stimulation of the PPTg. However, the firing pattern, in contrast to the firing rate, did not exhibit significant changes in either the STN or SNr of 6-OHDA lesioned rats during low frequency stimulation of the PPTg. In addition, we also found that the firing rate of STN and SNr neurons displaying burst and random pattern were decreased by low frequency stimulation of PPTg, while the neurons displaying regular pattern were not affected. These results indicate that low frequency stimulation of the PPTg affects neuronal activity in both the STN and SNr, and may represent electrophysiological efficacy of low frequency PPN stimulation.

  18. Pedunculopontine Nucleus Stimulation: Where are We Now and What Needs to be Done to Move the Field Forward?

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Hokuto; Hass, Chris J.; Moro, Elena; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Kumar, Rajeev; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Falls and gait impairment in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, significantly impacting quality of life and contributing heavily to disability. Thus far axial symptoms, such as postural instability and gait freezing, have been refractory to current treatment approaches and remain a critical unmet need. There has been increased excitement surrounding the surgical targeting of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) for addressing axial symptoms in PD. The PPN and cuneate nucleus comprise the mesencephalic locomotor region, and electrophysiologic studies in animal models and human imaging studies have revealed a key role for the PPN in gait and postural control, underscoring a potential role for DBS surgery. Previous limited studies of PPN deep brain stimulation (DBS) in treating gait symptoms have had mixed clinical outcomes, likely reflect targeting variability and the inherent challenges of targeting a small brainstem structure that is both anatomically and neurochemically heterogeneous. Diffusion tractography shows promise for more accurate targeting and standardization of results. Due to the limited experience with PPN DBS, several unresolved questions remain about targeting and programing. At present, it is unclear if there is incremental benefit with bilateral versus unilateral targeting of PPN or whether PPN targeting should be performed as an adjunct to one of the more traditional targets. The PPN also modulates non-motor functions including REM sleep, cognition, mood, attention, arousal, and these observations will require long-term monitoring to fully characterize potential side effects and benefits. Surgical targeting of the PPN is feasible and shows promise for addressing axial symptoms in PD but may require further refinements in targeting, improved imaging, and better lead design to fully realize benefits. This review summarizes the current knowledge of PPN as a DBS target and areas that need to be addressed to advance

  19. Alpha oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus correlate with gait performance in parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Thevathasan, Wesley; Pogosyan, Alek; Hyam, Jonathan A.; Jenkinson, Ned; Foltynie, Tom; Limousin, Patricia; Bogdanovic, Marko; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Green, Alexander L.; Aziz, Tipu Z.

    2012-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus, a component of the reticular formation, is topographically organized in animal models and implicated in locomotor control. In Parkinson's disease, pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation is an emerging treatment for gait freezing. Local field potentials recorded from pedunculopontine nucleus electrodes in such patients have demonstrated oscillations in the alpha and beta frequency bands, reactive to self-paced movement. Whether these oscillations are topographically organized or relevant to locomotion is unknown. Here, we recorded local field potentials from the pedunculopontine nucleus in parkinsonian patients during rest and unconstrained walking. Relative gait speed was assessed with trunk accelerometry. Peaks of alpha power were present at rest and during gait, when they correlated with gait speed. Gait freezing was associated with attenuation of alpha activity. Beta peaks were less consistently observed across rest and gait, and did not correlate with gait speed. Alpha power was maximal in the caudal pedunculopontine nucleus region and beta power was maximal rostrally. These results indicate a topographic distribution of neuronal activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus region and concur with animal data suggesting that the caudal subregion has particular relevance to gait. Alpha synchronization, proposed to suppress ‘task irrelevant’ distraction, has previously been demonstrated to correlate with performance of cognitive tasks. Here, we demonstrate a correlation between alpha oscillations and improved gait performance. The results raise the possibility that stimulation of caudal and rostral pedunculopontine nucleus regions may differ in their clinical effects. PMID:22232591

  20. Neurophysiological evaluation of the pedunculopontine nucleus in humans.

    PubMed

    Profice, P; Mazzone, P; Pilato, F; Dileone, M; Insola, A; Ranieri, F; Di Lazzaro, V

    2011-10-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPTg) is constituted by a heterogeneous cluster of neurons located in caudal mesencephalic tegmentum which projects to the thalamus to trigger thalamocortical rhythms and the brainstem to modulate muscle tone and locomotion. It has been investigated as potential deep brain stimulation (DBS) target for treating Parkinson's disease (PD) symptoms. Neurophysiological studies conducted in humans using DBS electrodes for exploring functional properties of PPTg in vivo, reviewed in this paper, demonstrated that the functional connections between PPTg and cortex, basal ganglia, brainstem network involved in sleep/wake control, and spinal cord can be explored in vivo and provided useful insights about the physiology of this nucleus and pathophysiology of PD.

  1. Deep brain stimulation of pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus: role in sleep modulation in advanced Parkinson disease patients: one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Peppe, Antonella; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Baiamonte, Valentina; Moschella, Vincenzo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Stanzione, Paolo; Stefani, Alessandro

    2012-12-01

    Sleep disorders are frequent non-motor symptoms in Parkinson disease (PD), probably due to multifactorial pathogeneses including disease progression, dopaminergic drugs, or concomitant illness. In recent years, the pedunculopontine tegmental (PPTg) nucleus has been considered a surgical target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in advanced PD patients. As it is involved in controlling the sleep-wake cycle, we investigated the long-lasting effects of PPTg-DBS on the sleep of five PD patients implanted in both the PPTg and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) by rating two subjective clinical scales for sleep: the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS), and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Sleep scales were administered a week before surgery (T0), three months after DBS (T1), and one year later (T2). In this study, STN-DBS was kept constantly in ON, and three different patterns of PPTg-DBS were investigated: STN-ON (PPTg switched off); PPTg-ON (PPTg stimulated 24 h/day); PPTg-cycle (PPTg stimulated only at night). In post-surgery follow-up, PD patients reported a marked improvement of sleep quality in all DBS conditions. In particular, stimulation of the PPTg nucleus produced not only a remarkable long-term improvement of nighttime sleep, but unlike STN-DBS, also produced significant amelioration of daytime sleepiness. Our study suggests that PPTg-DBS plays an important role in reorganizing regular sleep in PD patients.

  2. The serendipity case of the pedunculopontine nucleus low-frequency brain stimulation: chasing a gait response, finding sleep, and cognition improvement.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Alessandro; Peppe, Antonella; Galati, Salvatore; Bassi, Mario Stampanoni; D'Angelo, Vincenza; Pierantozzi, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an efficacious therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) but its effects on non-motor facets may be detrimental. The low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN or the nucleus tegmenti pedunculopontini - PPTg-) opened new perspectives. In our hands, PPTg-LFS revealed a modest influence on gait but increased sleep quality and degree of attentiveness. At odds with potential adverse events following STN-DBS, executive functions, under PPTg-ON, ameliorated. A recent study comparing both targets found that only PPTg-LFS improved night-time sleep and daytime sleepiness. Chances are that different neurosurgical groups influence either the PPN sub-portion identified as pars dissipata (more interconnected with GPi/STN) or the caudal PPN region known as pars compacta, preferentially targeting intralaminar and associative nucleus of the thalamus. Yet, the wide electrical field delivered affects a plethora of en passant circuits, and a fine distinction on the specific pathways involved is elusive. This review explores our angle of vision, by which PPTg-LFS activates cholinergic and glutamatergic ascending fibers, influencing non-motor behaviors.

  3. The Serendipity Case of the Pedunculopontine Nucleus Low-Frequency Brain Stimulation: Chasing a Gait Response, Finding Sleep, and Cognition Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Alessandro; Peppe, Antonella; Galati, Salvatore; Stampanoni Bassi, Mario; D’Angelo, Vincenza; Pierantozzi, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an efficacious therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) but its effects on non-motor facets may be detrimental. The low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN or the nucleus tegmenti pedunculopontini – PPTg-) opened new perspectives. In our hands, PPTg-LFS revealed a modest influence on gait but increased sleep quality and degree of attentiveness. At odds with potential adverse events following STN-DBS, executive functions, under PPTg-ON, ameliorated. A recent study comparing both targets found that only PPTg-LFS improved night-time sleep and daytime sleepiness. Chances are that different neurosurgical groups influence either the PPN sub-portion identified as pars dissipata (more interconnected with GPi/STN) or the caudal PPN region known as pars compacta, preferentially targeting intralaminar and associative nucleus of the thalamus. Yet, the wide electrical field delivered affects a plethora of en passant circuits, and a fine distinction on the specific pathways involved is elusive. This review explores our angle of vision, by which PPTg-LFS activates cholinergic and glutamatergic ascending fibers, influencing non-motor behaviors. PMID:23761781

  4. Muscarinic and alpha(1)-adrenergic mechanisms contribute to the spinal mediation of stimulation-induced antinociception from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dias, Quintino M; Crespilho, Simone F; Silveira, João Walter S; Prado, Wiliam A

    2009-05-01

    The effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) injection of antagonists of acetylcholine, noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, opioids and GABA on stimulation-produced antinociception (SPA) from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) of rats were studied using the tail-flick test. The electrical stimulation of the PPTg produced a strong and long-lasting increase in tail-flick latency. The intensity and duration of the effect were significantly reduced in rats pretreated with i.p. or i.t. atropine (a non-selective muscarinic cholinergic antagonist), or i.t. phenoxybenzamine or WB 4101 (non-selective and selective alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonists, respectively). Intraperitoneal phenoxybenzamine, i.p. or i.t. methysergide or naloxone (non-selective serotonin and opioid antagonists, respectively), or i.t. idazoxan (a selective alpha(2)-adrenergic antagonist) only reduced the duration of the effect. The duration of SPA from the PPTg was increased by i.t. phaclofen (a GABA(B) antagonist). The effect from the nucleus was not altered following i.t. bicuculline (a GABA(A) antagonist), or i.p. or i.t. mecamylamine, propranolol or haloperidol (non-selective nicotinic cholinergic, beta-adrenergic and dopaminergic antagonists, respectively). Thus, SPA from the PPTg involves the spinal activation of muscarinic and alpha(1)-adrenergic but not nicotinic cholinergic, beta-adrenergic and dopaminergic mechanisms. Serotonergic, endogenous opioid and alpha(2)-adrenergic mechanisms are involved in the duration but not in the intensity of the effect.

  5. Connectivity of the pedunculopontine nucleus in parkinsonian freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Schweder, Patrick M; Hansen, Peter C; Green, Alex L; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Stein, John; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2010-10-06

    Parkinson's disease (PD) may involve sudden unintended arrests in gait or failure to initiate gait, known as gait freezing. Deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been found to be an effective therapy for this phenomenon. In this study, we characterized the connectivity of the PPN freezing of gait (FOG) patients, compared with non-FOG PD and healthy controls using diffusion tensor imaging techniques. Differences in PPN connectivity profiles of the study groups were shown in the cerebellum and pons. The PPN showed connectivity with the cerebellum in controls and non-FOG PD. FOG patients showed absence of cerebellar connectivity, and increased visibility of the decussation of corticopontine fibres in the anterior pons. The findings suggest that corticopontine projections, which cross at the pons are increased in gait freezing, highlighting the importance and role of corticopontine-cerebellar pathways in the pathophysiology of this phenomenon.

  6. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology - Deep brain stimulation (DBS).

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; D'Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J

    2015-11-01

    This review describes the wake/sleep symptoms present in Parkinson׳s disease, and the role of the pedunculopontine nucleus in these symptoms. The physiology of PPN cells is important not only because it is a major element of the reticular activating system, but also because it is a novel target for deep brain stimulation in the treatment of gait and postural deficits in Parkinson׳s disease. A greater understanding of the physiology of the target nuclei within the brainstem and basal ganglia, amassed over the past decades, has enabled increasingly better patient outcomes from deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

  7. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology – Deep brain stimulation (DBS)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; D’Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the wake/sleep symptoms present in Parkinson׳s disease, and the role of the pedunculopontine nucleus in these symptoms. The physiology of PPN cells is important not only because it is a major element of the reticular activating system, but also because it is a novel target for deep brain stimulation in the treatment of gait and postural deficits in Parkinson׳s disease. A greater understanding of the physiology of the target nuclei within the brainstem and basal ganglia, amassed over the past decades, has enabled increasingly better patient outcomes from deep brain stimulation for movement disorders. PMID:26779322

  8. Glutamate and GABA modulate dopamine in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus.

    PubMed

    Steiniger, Björn; Kretschmer, Beate D

    2003-04-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) has an important anatomical position connecting basal ganglia and limbic systems with motor execution structures in the pons and spinal cord. It receives glutamatergic and GABAergic input and has additional reciprocal connections with mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons, suggesting that the PPTg plays a key role in frontostriatal information processing. In vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats, in combination with behavioral analysis, was used in this study to investigate whether the dopaminergic input can be modulated at the level of the PPTg via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) or GABA(B) receptors. Stimulation of the GABA(B) receptor decreased dopamine release in the PPTg while that of the AMPA and NMDA receptors increased it. A time-related comparison of the effects of NMDA (0.75 and 1 mM) and AMPA (50 and 25 microM) revealed a more long-lasting effect after AMPA stimulation than after NMDA. However, only the infusion of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen (100 and 200 microM) stimulated stereotyped behavior (e.g. sniffing, digging or head movements) and contralateral circling. This study clearly demonstrates that GABAergic as well as glutamatergic terminals in the PPTg are critically involved in the modulation of the dopamine system. Moreover, a decrease in PPTg dopamine via GABA(B) receptor stimulation seems to be behaviorally relevant.

  9. Implications of gamma band activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; Luster, B.; D’Onofrio, S.; Mahaffey, S.; Bisagno, V.; Urbano, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    The fact that the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the reticular activating system places it in a unique position to modulate sensory input and fight-or-flight responses. Arousing stimuli simultaneously activate ascending projections of the PPN to the intralaminar thalamus to trigger cortical high frequency activity and arousal, as well as descending projections to reticulospinal systems to alter posture and locomotion. As such, the PPN has become a target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD), modulating gait, posture, and higher functions. This article describes the latest discoveries on PPN physiology and the role of the PPN in a number of disorders. It has now been determined that high frequency activity during waking and REM sleep is controlled by two different intracellular pathways and two calcium channels in PPN cells. Moreover, there are three different PPN cell types that have one or both calcium channels and may be active during waking only, REM sleep only, or both. Based on the new discoveries, novel mechanisms are proposed for insomnia as a waking disorder. In addition, neuronal calcium sensor protein-1 (NCS-1), which is over expressed in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, may be responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in at least some patients with these diseases. Recent results suggest that NCS-1 modulates PPN gamma band activity and that lithium acts to reduce the effects of over expressed NCS-1, accounting for its effectiveness in bipolar disorder. PMID:26597124

  10. Pedunculopontine nucleus microelectrode recordings in movement disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Moran; Hamani, Clement; Hutchison, William D; Moro, Elena; Lozano, Andres M; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O

    2008-06-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) lies within the brainstem reticular formation and is involved in the motor control of gait and posture. Interest has focused recently on the PPN as a target for implantation of chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes for Parkinson's disease (PD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) therapy. The aim of this study was to examine the neurophysiology of the human PPN region and to identify neurophysiological landmarks that may aid the proper placement of DBS electrodes in the nucleus for the treatment of PD and PSP. Neuronal firing and local field potentials were recorded simultaneously from two independently driven microelectrodes during stereotactic neurosurgery for implantation of a unilateral DBS electrode in the PPN in five PD patients and two PSP patients. Within the PPN region, the majority (57%) of the neurons fired randomly while about 21% of the neurons exhibited 'bursty' firing. In addition, 21% of the neurons had a long action potential duration and significantly lower firing rate suggesting they were cholinergic neurons. A change in firing rate produced by passive and/or active contralateral limb movement was observed in 38% of the neurons that were tested in the PPN region. Interestingly, oscillatory local field potential activity in the beta frequency range ( approximately 25 Hz) was also observed in the PPN region. These electrophysiological characteristics of the PPN region provide further support for the proposed role of this region in motor control. It remains to be seen to what extent the physiological characteristics of the neurons and the stimulation-evoked effects will permit reliable identification of PPN and determination of the optimal target for DBS therapy.

  11. Effects of bilateral vestibular deafferentation in rat on hippocampal theta response to somatosensory stimulation, acetylcholine release, and cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Phillip; Zheng, Yiwen; Smith, Paul F

    2017-03-27

    Vestibular dysfunction has been shown to cause spatial memory impairment. Neurophysiological studies indicate that bilateral vestibular loss (BVL), in particular, is associated with an impairment of the response of hippocampal place cells and theta rhythm. However, the specific neural pathways through which vestibular information reaches the hippocampus are yet to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the hypothesised 'theta-generating pathway' from the brainstem vestibular nucleus to the hippocampus. BVL, and in some cases, unilateral vestibular loss (UVL), induced by intratympanic sodium arsanilate injections in rats, were used to investigate the effects of vestibular loss on somatosensory-induced type 2 theta rhythm, acetylcholine (ACh) release in the hippocampus, and the number of cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg), an important part of the theta-generating pathway. Under urethane anaesthesia, BVL was found to cause a significant increase in the maximum power of the type 2 theta (3-6 Hz) frequency band compared to UVL and sham animals. Rats with BVL generally exhibited a lower basal level of ACh release than sham rats; however, this difference was not statistically significant. The PPTg of BVL rats exhibited significantly more choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive neurons than that of sham animals, as did the contralateral PPTg of UVL animals; however, the number of ChAT-positive neurons on the ipsilateral side of UVL animals was not significantly different from sham animals. The results of these studies indicate that parts of the theta-generating pathway undergo a significant reorganisation following vestibular loss, which suggests that this pathway is important for the interaction between the vestibular system and the hippocampus.

  12. [Pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. Anatomy, functional considerations and physiopathological implications].

    PubMed

    Erro, E; Giménez-Amaya, J M

    1999-01-01

    Pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus is formed by an ensemble of cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons located in the caudal pontomesencephalic tegmentum, surrounding the superior cerebellar peduncle. It is an integral part of the reticulate formation of the brain stem, with extensive anatomical connections and highly varied functions. By means of ascendant projections that it sends to the thalamus, it intervenes in the waking-sleep cycle. Besides, it constitutes the most caudal nucleus of the neuroaxis, receiving connections from the basal ganglia, for which reason it has attracted the interest of those researchers concerned with the study of these structures. Thanks to its reciprocal connections with the basal ganglia, as well as to its descending projections to different structures of the pons, medulla and spinal cord; it has been related to the control of locomotion. Recently, it has also been considered as a possible centre for the integration of the motor information provided by the dorsal striatum with the motivational or limbic information proceeding from the ventral striatum, to permit its direct access to bulbar or spinal motor centres. In this work we will review its anatomical and functional characteristics, as well as its implication in some diseases of the nervous system such as narcolepsy, progressive supranuclear paralysis, schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease.

  13. Functional Connectivity of the Pedunculopontine Nucleus and Surrounding Region in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taulu, Samu; Thevathasan, Wesley; Hyam, Jonathan A.; Foltynie, Tom; Limousin, Patricia; Bogdanovic, Marko; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Green, Alexander L.; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Friston, Karl; Brown, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus and surrounding region (PPNR) is a novel treatment strategy for gait freezing in Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, clinical results have been variable, in part because of the paucity of functional information that might help guide selection of the optimal surgical target. In this study, we use simultaneous magnetoencephalography and local field recordings from the PPNR in seven PD patients, to characterize functional connectivity with distant brain areas at rest. The PPNR was preferentially coupled to brainstem and cingulate regions in the alpha frequency (8–12 Hz) band and to the medial motor strip and neighboring areas in the beta (18–33 Hz) band. The distribution of coupling also depended on the vertical distance of the electrode from the pontomesencephalic line: most effects being greatest in the middle PPNR, which may correspond to the caudal pars dissipata of the pedunculopontine nucleus. These observations confirm the crucial position of the PPNR as a functional node between cortical areas such as the cingulate/ medial motor strip and other brainstem nuclei, particularly in the dorsal pons. In particular they suggest a special role for the middle PPNR as this has the greatest functional connectivity with other brain regions. PMID:28316456

  14. The role of pedunculopontine nucleus in choice behavior under risk

    PubMed Central

    Leblond, Mona; Sukharnikova, Tatyana; Yu, Chunxiu; Rossi, Mark A.; Yin, Henry H.

    2014-01-01

    The dopaminergic projections to the basal ganglia have long been implicated in reward guided behavior and decision making, yet little is known about the role of the posterior pedunculopontine nucleus (pPPN), a major source of excitatory input to the mesolimbic dopamine system. Here we studied the contributions of pPPN to decision making under risk, using excitoxic lesions and reversible inactivation in rats. Rats could choose between two options: a small but certain reward on one lever, or a large but uncertain reward on the other lever. The overall payoff associated with each choice is the same, but the reward variance (risk) associated with the risky choice is much higher. In Experiment 1, we showed that excitotoxic lesions of the pPPN before training did not affect acquisition of lever pressing. But whereas the controls strongly preferred the safe choice, the lesioned rats did not. In Experiment 2, we found that muscimol inactivation of the pPPN also reversibly altered choice behavior. These results show that permanent lesions or reversible inactivation of the pPPN both abolish risk aversion in decision making. PMID:24617747

  15. [The pedunculopontine nucleus. A structure involved in motor and emotional processing].

    PubMed

    Blanco-Lezcano, L; Pavón-Fuentes, N; Serrano-Sánchez, T; Blanco-Lezcano, V; Coro-Grave de Peralta, Y; Joseph-Bouza, Y

    There is currently a growing interest for conducting studies into the electrical and neurochemical activity of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) due to the privileged position occupied by this structure in the flow of information to and from the cortex. This nucleus acts as a relay, not only for the motor information that is processed in the basal ganglia but also for information of an emotional type, whose main centre is the nucleus accumbens. It is also strongly linked with the aspects that determine the mechanisms governing addiction to certain drugs. We conduct a detailed analysis of the main findings from studies of the role played by the PPN in the physiopathology of Parkinsonism, namely the study of metabolic activity, immunohistochemical studies with different tracers, electrophysiological studies that have confirmed the immunohistochemical observations, as well as deep electrical stimulation carried out in non human primates. Furthermore, we also examine the part played by this structure in the processing of emotional information associated with different learning tasks. Overall, the authors grant the PPN a privileged position in the physiopathology of the axial disorders related to Parkinson s disease; its most important afference, stemming from the subthalamic nucleus, appears to play a key role in the understanding of the part played by the PPN in Parkinsonism.

  16. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging for the pedunculopontine nucleus: proof of concept and histological correlation.

    PubMed

    Alho, A T D L; Hamani, C; Alho, E J L; da Silva, R E; Santos, G A B; Neves, R C; Carreira, L L; Araújo, C M M; Magalhães, G; Coelho, D B; Alegro, M C; Martin, M G M; Grinberg, L T; Pasqualucci, C A; Heinsen, H; Fonoff, E T; Amaro, E

    2017-03-10

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been proposed as target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with postural instability and gait disorders due to its involvement in muscle tonus adjustments and control of locomotion. However, it is a deep-seated brainstem nucleus without clear imaging or electrophysiological markers. Some studies suggested that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may help guiding electrode placement in the PPN by showing the surrounding fiber bundles, but none have provided a direct histological correlation. We investigated DTI fractional anisotropy (FA) maps from in vivo and in situ post-mortem magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared to histological evaluations for improving PPN targeting in humans. A post-mortem brain was scanned in a clinical 3T MR system in situ. Thereafter, the brain was processed with a special method ideally suited for cytoarchitectonic analyses. Also, nine volunteers had in vivo brain scanning using the same MRI protocol. Images from volunteers were compared to those obtained in the post-mortem study. FA values of the volunteers were obtained from PPN, inferior colliculus, cerebellar crossing fibers and medial lemniscus using histological data and atlas information. FA values in the PPN were significantly lower than in the surrounding white matter region and higher than in areas with predominantly gray matter. In Nissl-stained histologic sections, the PPN extended for more than 10 mm in the rostro-caudal axis being closely attached to the lateral parabrachial nucleus. Our DTI analyses and the spatial correlation with histological findings proposed a location for PPN that matched the position assigned to this nucleus in the literature. Coregistration of neuroimaging and cytoarchitectonic features can add value to help establishing functional architectonics of the PPN and facilitate neurosurgical targeting of this extended nucleus.

  17. The Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus as a Motor and Cognitive Interface between the Cerebellum and Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Fumika; Okada, Ken-ichi; Nomura, Taishin; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of ascending activating systems, brainstem cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) are involved in the regulation of motor control (locomotion, posture and gaze) and cognitive processes (attention, learning and memory). The PPTg is highly interconnected with several regions of the basal ganglia, and one of its key functions is to regulate and relay activity from the basal ganglia. Together, they have been implicated in the motor control system (such as voluntary movement initiation or inhibition), and modulate aspects of executive function (such as motivation). In addition to its intimate connection with the basal ganglia, projections from the PPTg to the cerebellum have been recently reported to synaptically activate the deep cerebellar nuclei. Classically, the cerebellum and basal ganglia were regarded as forming separated anatomical loops that play a distinct functional role in motor and cognitive behavioral control. Here, we suggest that the PPTg may also act as an interface device between the basal ganglia and cerebellum. As such, part of the therapeutic effect of PPTg deep brain stimulation (DBS) to relieve gait freezing and postural instability in advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients might also involve modulation of the cerebellum. We review the anatomical position and role of the PPTg in the pathway of basal ganglia and cerebellum in relation to motor control, cognitive function and PD. PMID:27872585

  18. Cholinergic, Glutamatergic, and GABAergic Neurons of the Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus Have Distinct Effects on Sleep/Wake Behavior in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Daniel; Ferrari, Loris L; Petit, Gaetan; Mahoney, Carrie E; Fuller, Patrick M; Arrigoni, Elda; Scammell, Thomas E

    2017-02-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nucleus has long been implicated in the regulation of cortical activity and behavioral states, including rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep. For example, electrical stimulation of the PPT region during sleep leads to rapid awakening, whereas lesions of the PPT in cats reduce REM sleep. Though these effects have been linked with the activity of cholinergic PPT neurons, the PPT also includes intermingled glutamatergic and GABAergic cell populations, and the precise roles of cholinergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic PPT cell groups in regulating cortical activity and behavioral state remain unknown. Using a chemogenetic approach in three Cre-driver mouse lines, we found that selective activation of glutamatergic PPT neurons induced prolonged cortical activation and behavioral wakefulness, whereas inhibition reduced wakefulness and increased non-REM (NREM) sleep. Activation of cholinergic PPT neurons suppressed lower-frequency electroencephalogram rhythms during NREM sleep. Last, activation of GABAergic PPT neurons slightly reduced REM sleep. These findings reveal that glutamatergic, cholinergic, and GABAergic PPT neurons differentially influence cortical activity and sleep/wake states. More than 40 million Americans suffer from chronic sleep disruption, and the development of effective treatments requires a more detailed understanding of the neuronal mechanisms controlling sleep and arousal. The pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nucleus has long been considered a key site for regulating wakefulness and REM sleep. This is mainly because of the cholinergic neurons contained in the PPT nucleus. However, the PPT nucleus also contains glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons that likely contribute to the regulation of cortical activity and sleep-wake states. The chemogenetic experiments in the present study reveal that cholinergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic PPT neurons each have distinct effects on sleep/wake behavior, improving our

  19. Cholinergic, Glutamatergic, and GABAergic Neurons of the Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus Have Distinct Effects on Sleep/Wake Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger, Daniel; Ferrari, Loris L.; Mahoney, Carrie E.; Arrigoni, Elda

    2017-01-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nucleus has long been implicated in the regulation of cortical activity and behavioral states, including rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep. For example, electrical stimulation of the PPT region during sleep leads to rapid awakening, whereas lesions of the PPT in cats reduce REM sleep. Though these effects have been linked with the activity of cholinergic PPT neurons, the PPT also includes intermingled glutamatergic and GABAergic cell populations, and the precise roles of cholinergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic PPT cell groups in regulating cortical activity and behavioral state remain unknown. Using a chemogenetic approach in three Cre-driver mouse lines, we found that selective activation of glutamatergic PPT neurons induced prolonged cortical activation and behavioral wakefulness, whereas inhibition reduced wakefulness and increased non-REM (NREM) sleep. Activation of cholinergic PPT neurons suppressed lower-frequency electroencephalogram rhythms during NREM sleep. Last, activation of GABAergic PPT neurons slightly reduced REM sleep. These findings reveal that glutamatergic, cholinergic, and GABAergic PPT neurons differentially influence cortical activity and sleep/wake states. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT More than 40 million Americans suffer from chronic sleep disruption, and the development of effective treatments requires a more detailed understanding of the neuronal mechanisms controlling sleep and arousal. The pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nucleus has long been considered a key site for regulating wakefulness and REM sleep. This is mainly because of the cholinergic neurons contained in the PPT nucleus. However, the PPT nucleus also contains glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons that likely contribute to the regulation of cortical activity and sleep–wake states. The chemogenetic experiments in the present study reveal that cholinergic, glutamatergic, and GABAergic PPT neurons each have distinct effects on sleep/wake behavior

  20. Vestibular responses in the macaque pedunculopontine nucleus and central mesencephalic reticular formation

    PubMed Central

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2012-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) and central mesencephalic reticular formation (cMRF) both send projections and receive input from areas with known vestibular responses. Noting their connections with the basal ganglia, the locomotor disturbances that occur following lesions of the PPN or cMRF, and the encouraging results of PPN deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease patients, both the PPN and cMRF have been linked to motor control. In order to determine the existence of and characterize vestibular responses in the PPN and cMRF, we recorded single neurons from both structures during vertical and horizontal rotation, translation, and visual pursuit stimuli. The majority of PPN cells (72.5%) were vestibular-only cells that responded exclusively to rotation and translation stimuli but not visual pursuit. Visual pursuit responses were much more prevalent in the cMRF (57.1%) though close to half of cMRF cells were vestibular-only cells (41.1%). Directional preferences also differed between the PPN, which was preferentially modulated during nose-down pitch, and cMRF, which was preferentially modulated during ipsilateral yaw rotation. Finally, amplitude responses were similar between the PPN and cMRF during rotation and pursuit stimuli, but PPN responses to translation were of higher amplitude than cMRF responses. Taken together with their connections to the vestibular circuit, these results implicate the PPN and cMRF in the processing of vestibular stimuli and suggest important roles for both in responding to motion perturbations like falls and turns. PMID:22864184

  1. Deep brain stimulation of different pedunculopontine targets in a novel rodent model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Gut, Nadine K; Winn, Philip

    2015-03-25

    The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) has been proposed as a target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in parkinsonian patients, particularly for symptoms such as gait and postural difficulties refractory to dopaminergic treatments. Several patients have had electrodes implanted aimed at the PPTg, but outcomes have been disappointing, with little evidence that gait and posture are improved. The PPTg is a heterogeneous structure. Consequently, exact target sites in PPTg, possible DBS mechanisms, and potential benefits still need systematic investigation in good animal models. We have investigated the role of PPTg in gait, developed a refined model of parkinsonism including partial loss of the PPTg with bilateral destruction of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons that mimics human pathophysiology, and investigated the effect of DBS at different PPTg locations on gait and posture using a wireless device that lets rats move freely while receiving stimulation. Neither partial nor complete lesions of PPTg caused gait deficits, underlining questions raised previously about the status of PPTg as a motor control structure. The effect of DBS in the refined and standard model of parkinsonism were very different despite minimal behavioral differences in nonstimulation control conditions. Anterior PPTg DBS caused severe episodes of freezing and worsened gait, whereas specific gait parameters were mildly improved by stimulation of posterior PPTg. These results emphasize the critical importance of intra-PPTg DBS location and highlight the need to take PPTg degeneration into consideration when modeling parkinsonian symptoms. They also further implicate a role for PPTg in the pathophysiology of parkinsonism.

  2. Recording Gamma Band Oscillations in Pedunculopontine Nucleus Neurons.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francisco J; Luster, Brennon R; D'Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2016-09-14

    Synaptic efferents from the PPN are known to modulate the neuronal activity of several intralaminar thalamic regions (e.g., the centrolateral/parafascicular; Cl/Pf nucleus). The activation of either the PPN or Cl/Pf nuclei in vivo has been described to induce the arousal of the animal and an increment in gamma band activity in the cortical electroencephalogram (EEG). The cellular mechanisms for the generation of gamma band oscillations in Reticular Activating System (RAS) neurons are the same as those found to generate gamma band oscillations in other brains nuclei. During current-clamp recordings of PPN neurons (from parasagittal slices from 9 - 25 day-old rats), the use of depolarizing square steps rapidly activated voltage-dependent potassium channels that prevented PPN neurons from being depolarized beyond -25 mV. Injecting 1 - 2 sec long depolarizing current ramps gradually depolarized PPN membrane potential resting values towards 0 mV. However, injecting depolarizing square pulses generated gamma-band oscillations of membrane potential that showed to be smaller in amplitude compared to the oscillations generated by ramps. All experiments were performed in the presence of voltage-gated sodium channels and fast synaptic receptors blockers. It has been shown that the activation of high-threshold voltage-dependent calcium channels underlie gamma-band oscillatory activity in PPN neurons. Specific methodological and pharmacological interventions are described here, providing the necessary tools to induce and sustain PPN subthreshold gamma band oscillation in vitro.

  3. Electrolytic lesions of the pedunculopontine nucleus disrupt concurrent learned aversion induced by NaCl.

    PubMed

    Mediavilla, C; Molina, F; Puerto, A

    2000-09-01

    Bilateral electrolytic lesions in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) impair acquisition of short-term, or concurrent, Taste Aversion Learning (TAL) in rats. This type of TAL is characterized by the daily presentation of two different flavor stimuli at the same time, one associated with simultaneous intragastric administration of an aversive product (hypertonic NaCl) and the other with physiological saline. Sham-lesioned control animals learn this taste discrimination task, but both lesioned animals and control animals learn a long-term, or delayed, TAL task in which each gustatory stimulus is presented individually every other day and the intragastric products, LiCl (0.15 M) and physiological saline, are administered after a 15-min delay. These results are analyzed in the context of the cerebellar circuits involved in learning and in relation to the two TAL modalities described above.

  4. Mitochondrial Abnormality Associates with Type-Specific Neuronal Loss and Cell Morphology Changes in the Pedunculopontine Nucleus in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pienaar, Ilse S.; Elson, Joanna L.; Racca, Claudia; Nelson, Glyn; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Morris, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic neuronal loss in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) associates with abnormal functions, including certain motor and nonmotor symptoms. This realization has led to low-frequency stimulation of the PPN for treating patients with Parkinson disease (PD) who are refractory to other treatment modalities. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PPN neuronal loss and the therapeutic substrate for the clinical benefits following PPN stimulation remain poorly characterized, hampering progress toward designing more efficient therapies aimed at restoring the PPN's normal functions during progressive parkinsonism. Here, we investigated postmortem pathological changes in the PPN of PD cases. Our study detected a loss of neurons producing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as their output and glycinergic neurons, along with the pronounced loss of cholinergic neurons. These losses were accompanied by altered somatic cell size that affected the remaining neurons of all neuronal subtypes studied here. Because studies showed that mitochondrial dysfunction exists in sporadic PD and in PD animal models, we investigated whether altered mitochondrial composition exists in the PPN. A significant up-regulation of several mitochondrial proteins was seen in GABAergic and glycinergic neurons; however, cholinergic neurons indicated down-regulation of the same proteins. Our findings suggest an imbalance in the activity of key neuronal subgroups of the PPN in PD, potentially because of abnormal inhibitory activity and altered cholinergic outflow. PMID:24099985

  5. Astrocyte-Dependent Slow Inward Currents (SICs) Participate in Neuromodulatory Mechanisms in the Pedunculopontine Nucleus (PPN)

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Adrienn; Pál, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Slow inward currents (SICs) are known as excitatory events of neurons caused by astrocytic glutamate release and consequential activation of neuronal extrasynaptic NMDA receptors. In the present article we investigate the role of these astrocyte-dependent excitatory events on a cholinergic nucleus of the reticular activating system (RAS), the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN). It is well known about this and other elements of the RAS, that they do not only give rise to neuromodulatory innervation of several areas, but also targets neuromodulatory actions from other members of the RAS or factors providing the homeostatic drive for sleep. Using slice electrophysiology, optogenetics and morphological reconstruction, we revealed that SICs are present in a population of PPN neurons. The frequency of SICs recorded on PPN neurons was higher when the soma of the given neuron was close to an astrocytic soma. SICs do not appear simultaneously on neighboring neurons, thus it is unlikely that they synchronize neuronal activity in this structure. Occurrence of SICs is regulated by cannabinoid, muscarinic and serotonergic neuromodulatory mechanisms. In most cases, SICs occurred independently from tonic neuronal currents. SICs were affected by different neuromodulatory agents in a rather uniform way: if control SIC activity was low, the applied drugs increased it, but if SIC activity was increased in control, the same drugs lowered it. SICs of PPN neurons possibly represent a mechanism which elicits network-independent spikes on certain PPN neurons; forming an alternative, astrocyte-dependent pathway of neuromodulatory mechanisms. PMID:28203147

  6. Pedunculopontine Nucleus Gamma Band Activity-Preconscious Awareness, Waking, and REM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; D’Onofrio, Stasia M.; Luster, Brennon R.; Beck, Paige B.; Hyde, James Robert; Bisagno, Veronica; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a major component of the reticular activating system (RAS) that regulates waking and REM sleep, states of high-frequency EEG activity. Recently, we described the presence of high threshold, voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type calcium channels in RAS nuclei that subserve gamma band oscillations in the mesopontine PPN, intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD). Cortical gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. That is, the RAS may play an early permissive role in volition. Our latest results suggest that (1) the manifestation of gamma band activity during waking may employ a separate intracellular pathway compared to that during REM sleep, (2) neuronal calcium sensor (NCS-1) protein, which is over expressed in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, modulates gamma band oscillations in the PPN in a concentration-dependent manner, (3) leptin, which undergoes resistance in obesity resulting in sleep dysregulation, decreases sodium currents in PPN neurons, accounting for its normal attenuation of waking, and (4) following our discovery of electrical coupling in the RAS, we hypothesize that there are cell clusters within the PPN that may act in concert. These results provide novel information on the mechanisms controlling high-frequency activity related to waking and REM sleep by elements of the RAS. PMID:25368599

  7. Pedunculopontine Nucleus Gamma Band Activity-Preconscious Awareness, Waking, and REM Sleep.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francisco J; D'Onofrio, Stasia M; Luster, Brennon R; Beck, Paige B; Hyde, James Robert; Bisagno, Veronica; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a major component of the reticular activating system (RAS) that regulates waking and REM sleep, states of high-frequency EEG activity. Recently, we described the presence of high threshold, voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type calcium channels in RAS nuclei that subserve gamma band oscillations in the mesopontine PPN, intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD). Cortical gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. That is, the RAS may play an early permissive role in volition. Our latest results suggest that (1) the manifestation of gamma band activity during waking may employ a separate intracellular pathway compared to that during REM sleep, (2) neuronal calcium sensor (NCS-1) protein, which is over expressed in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, modulates gamma band oscillations in the PPN in a concentration-dependent manner, (3) leptin, which undergoes resistance in obesity resulting in sleep dysregulation, decreases sodium currents in PPN neurons, accounting for its normal attenuation of waking, and (4) following our discovery of electrical coupling in the RAS, we hypothesize that there are cell clusters within the PPN that may act in concert. These results provide novel information on the mechanisms controlling high-frequency activity related to waking and REM sleep by elements of the RAS.

  8. Effects of scopolamine on dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra: role of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2009-08-01

    Previous neurochemical and behavioral studies suggest that muscarinic receptor antagonism has an excitatory effect on the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. Using in vivo extracellular single unit recording, this study examined whether blockade of the muscarinic receptor by scopolamine alters the firing properties of DA neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Scopolamine was administered either systemically or locally to DA neurons using microiontophoresis. Surprisingly, scopolamine did not cause any significant change in either the firing rate or pattern of the spontaneously active DA neurons. However, systemic injection of scopolamine significantly increased the number of active DA neurons in the SN. Local infusion of scopolamine into the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) mimicked the effect induced by systemically administered scopolamine, significantly increasing the number of active DA neurons without altering the firing rate and pattern. These results suggest that the reported increase in striatal DA release induced by scopolamine is in part mediated by activation of silent nigral DA neurons. The experiments with PPT local infusion further suggest that part of the effect of scopolamine may be due to its blockade of the inhibitory muscarinic autoreceptors on PPT cholinergic cells. The latter effect may lead to activation of quiescent DA neurons by increasing acetylcholine (ACh) release in the SN or in other brain areas providing inputs to DA neurons. Further understanding of the mechanism of action of scopolamine may help us further understand the role of ACh in both the pathophysiology and treatment of DA-related disorders including schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease.

  9. Reward prediction-related increases and decreases in tonic neuronal activity of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Ken-ichi; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    The neuromodulators serotonin, acetylcholine, and dopamine have been proposed to play important roles in the execution of movement, control of several forms of attentional behavior, and reinforcement learning. While the response pattern of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and its specific role in reinforcement learning have been revealed, the roles of the other neuromodulators remain elusive. Reportedly, neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus, one major source of serotonin, continually track the state of expectation of future rewards by showing a correlated response to the start of a behavioral task, reward cue presentation, and reward delivery. Here, we show that neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTN), one major source of acetylcholine, showed similar encoding of the expectation of future rewards by a systematic increase or decrease in tonic activity. We recorded and analyzed PPTN neuronal activity in monkeys during a reward conditioned visually guided saccade task. The firing patterns of many PPTN neurons were tonically increased or decreased throughout the task period. The tonic activity pattern of neurons was correlated with their encoding of the predicted reward value; neurons exhibiting an increase or decrease in tonic activity showed higher or lower activity in the large reward-predicted trials, respectively. Tonic activity and reward-related modulation ended around the time of reward delivery. Additionally, some tonic changes in activity started prior to the appearance of the initial stimulus, and were related to the anticipatory fixational behavior. A partially overlapping population of neurons showed both the initial anticipatory response and subsequent predicted reward value-dependent activity modulation by their systematic increase or decrease of tonic activity. These bi-directional reward- and anticipatory behavior-related modulation patterns are suitable for the presumed role of the PPTN in reward processing and motivational control. PMID

  10. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus: from basic neuroscience to neurosurgical applications: arousal from slices to humans: implications for DBS.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Simon, Christen; Smith, Kristen; Kezunovic, Nebosja; Hyde, James

    2011-10-01

    One element of the reticular activating system (RAS) is the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), which projects to the thalamus to trigger thalamocortical rhythms and the brainstem to modulate muscle tone and locomotion. The PPN is a posterior midbrain site known to induce locomotion in decerebrate animals when activated at 40-60 Hz, and has become a target for DBS in disorders involving gait deficits. We developed a research program using brainstem slices containing the PPN to study the cellular and molecular organization of this region. We showed that PPN neurons preferentially fire at gamma band frequency (30-60 Hz) when maximally activated, accounting for the effects of electrical stimulation. In addition, we developed the P13 midlatency auditory evoked potential, which is generated by PPN outputs, in freely moving rats. This allows the study of PPN cellular and molecular mechanisms in the whole animal. We also study the P50 midlatency auditory evoked potential, which is the human equivalent of the rodent P13 potential, allowing us to study PPN-related processes detected in vitro, confirmed in the whole animal, and tested in humans. Previous findings on the P50 potential in PD suggest that PPN output in this disorder is overactive. This translational research program led to the discovery of a novel mechanism of sleep-wake control based on electrical coupling, pointing the way to a number of new clinical applications in the development of novel stimulants (e.g., modafinil) and anesthetics. In addition, it provides methods for monitoring therapeutic efficacy of DBS in humans and animal models.

  11. REM sleep diversity following the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus lesion in rat.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that two REM clusters, which emerge following bilateral pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) lesions in rats, are two functionally distinct REM states. We performed the experiments in Wistar rats, chronically instrumented for sleep recording. Bilateral PPT lesions were produced by the microinfusion of 100 nl of 0.1M ibotenic acid (IBO). Following a recovery period of 2 weeks, we recorded their sleep for 6h. Bilateral PPT lesions were identified by NADPH - diaphorase histochemistry. We applied Fourier analysis to the signals acquired throughout the 6h recordings, and each 10s epoch was differentiated as a Wake, NREM or REM state. We analyzed the topography of the sleep/wake states architecture and their transition structure, their all state-related EEG microstructures, and the sensorimotor (SMCx) and motor (MCx) cortex REM related cortico-muscular coherences (CMCs). Bilateral PPT lesion in rats increased the likelihood of the emergence of two distinct REM sleep states, specifically expressed within the MCx: REM1 and REM2. Bilateral PPT lesion did not change the sleep/wake states architecture of the SMCx, but pathologically increased the duration of REM1 within the MCx, alongside increasing Wake/REM1/Wake and NREM/REM2/NREM transitions within both cortices. In addition, the augmented total REM SMCx EEG beta amplitude and REM1 MCx EEG theta amplitude was the underlying EEG microstructure pathology. PPT lesion induced REM1 and REM2 are differential states with regard to total EMG power, topographically distinct EEG microstructures, and locomotor drives to nuchal musculature.

  12. Spatiotemporal properties of high-speed calcium oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, James; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a component of the reticular activating system (RAS), and is involved in the activated states of waking and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Gamma oscillations (approximately 30–80 Hz) are evident in all PPN neurons and are mediated by high-threshold voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type calcium channels. We tested the hypothesis that high-speed calcium imaging would reveal calcium-mediated oscillations in dendritic compartments in synchrony with patch-clamp recorded oscillations during depolarizing current ramps. Patch-clamped 8- to 16-day-old rat PPN neurons (n = 67 out of 121) were filled with Fura 2, Bis Fura, or OGB1/CHR. This study also characterized a novel ratiometric technique using Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (OGB1) with coinjections of a new long-stokes-shift dye, Chromeo 494 (CHR). Fluorescent calcium transients were blocked with the nonspecific calcium channel blocker cadmium, or by the combination of ω-agatoxin-IVA, a specific P/Q-type calcium channel blocker, and ω-conotoxin-GVIA, a specific N-type calcium channel blocker. The calcium transients were evident in different dendrites (suggesting channels are present throughout the dendritic tree) along the sampled length without interruption (suggesting channels are evenly distributed), and appeared to represent a summation of oscillations present in the soma. We confirm that PPN calcium channel-mediated oscillations are due to P/Q- and N-type channels, and reveal that these channels are distributed along the dendrites of PPN cells. PMID:23990242

  13. Properties of distinct ventral tegmental area synapses activated via pedunculopontine or ventral tegmental area stimulation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Good, Cameron H; Lupica, Carl R

    2009-01-01

    Anatomical studies indicate that synaptic inputs from many cortical and subcortical structures converge on neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Although in vitro electrophysiological studies have examined synaptic inputs to dopamine (DA) and non-DA neurons in the VTA, they have largely relied upon local electrical stimulation to activate these synapses. This provides little information regarding the distinct properties of synapses originating from different brain areas. Using whole-cell recordings in parasagittal rat brain slices that preserved subcortical axons from the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) to the VTA, we compared these synapses with those activated by intra-VTA stimulation. PPN-evoked currents demonstrated longer latencies than intra-VTA-evoked currents, and both VTA and PPN responses were mediated by GABAA and AMPA receptors. However, unlike VTA-evoked currents, PPN currents were exclusively mediated by glutamate in 25–40% of the VTA neurons. Consistent with a cholinergic projection from the PPN to the VTA, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) were activated by endogenous acetylcholine released during PPN, but not VTA, stimulation. This was seen as a reduction of PPN-evoked, and not VTA-evoked, synaptic currents by the α7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) and the agonist nicotine. The β2-nAChR subunit antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine had no effect on VTA- or PPN-evoked synaptic currents. The effects of MLA on PPN-evoked currents were unchanged by the GABAA receptor blocker picrotoxin, indicating that α7-nAChRs presynaptically modulated glutamate and not GABA release. These differences in physiological and pharmacological properties demonstrate that ascending PPN and presumed descending inputs to VTA utilize distinct mechanisms to differentially modulate neuronal activity and encode cortical and subcortical information. PMID:19188251

  14. Properties of distinct ventral tegmental area synapses activated via pedunculopontine or ventral tegmental area stimulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Good, Cameron H; Lupica, Carl R

    2009-03-15

    Anatomical studies indicate that synaptic inputs from many cortical and subcortical structures converge on neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Although in vitro electrophysiological studies have examined synaptic inputs to dopamine (DA) and non-DA neurons in the VTA, they have largely relied upon local electrical stimulation to activate these synapses. This provides little information regarding the distinct properties of synapses originating from different brain areas. Using whole-cell recordings in parasagittal rat brain slices that preserved subcortical axons from the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) to the VTA, we compared these synapses with those activated by intra-VTA stimulation. PPN-evoked currents demonstrated longer latencies than intra-VTA-evoked currents, and both VTA and PPN responses were mediated by GABA(A) and AMPA receptors. However, unlike VTA-evoked currents, PPN currents were exclusively mediated by glutamate in 25-40% of the VTA neurons. Consistent with a cholinergic projection from the PPN to the VTA, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) were activated by endogenous acetylcholine released during PPN, but not VTA, stimulation. This was seen as a reduction of PPN-evoked, and not VTA-evoked, synaptic currents by the alpha7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) and the agonist nicotine. The beta2-nAChR subunit antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine had no effect on VTA- or PPN-evoked synaptic currents. The effects of MLA on PPN-evoked currents were unchanged by the GABA(A) receptor blocker picrotoxin, indicating that alpha7-nAChRs presynaptically modulated glutamate and not GABA release. These differences in physiological and pharmacological properties demonstrate that ascending PPN and presumed descending inputs to VTA utilize distinct mechanisms to differentially modulate neuronal activity and encode cortical and subcortical information.

  15. Effects of unilateral pedunculopontine stimulation on electromyographic activation patterns during gait in individual patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Caliandro, Pietro; Insola, A; Scarnati, E; Padua, L; Russo, G; Granieri, E; Mazzone, P

    2011-10-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), the effects of deep brain stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPTg-DBS) on gait has been object of international debate. Some evidence demonstrated that, in the late swing-early stance phase of gait cycle, a reduced surface electromyographic activation (sEMG) of tibialis anterior (TA) is linked to the striatal dopamine deficiency in PD patients. In the present study we report preliminary results on the effect of PPTg-DBS on electromyographic patterns during gait in individual PD patients. To evaluate the sEMG amplitude of TA, the root mean square (RMS) of the TA burst in late swing-early stance phase (RMS-A) was normalized as a percent of the RMS of the TA burst in late stance-early swing (RMS-B). We studied three male patients in the following conditions: on PPTg-DBS/on L: -dopa, on PPTg-DBS/off L: -dopa, off PPTg-DBS/on L: -dopa, off PPTg-DBS/off L: -dopa. For each assessment the UPDRS III was filled in. We observed no difference between on PPTg-DBS/off L: -dopa and off PPTg-DBS/off L: -dopa in UPDRS III scores. In off PPTg-DBS/off L: -dopa, patient A (right implant) showed absence of the right and left RMSA, respectively, in 80% and 83% of gait cycles. Patient B (right implant) showed absence of the right RMS-A in 86% of cycles. RMS-A of the patient C (left implant) was bilaterally normal. In on PPTg- DBS/off L: -dopa, no patient showed reduced RMS-A. Although the very low number of subjects we evaluated, our observations suggest that PPTg plays a role in modulating TA activation pattern during the steady state of gait.

  16. The anterior and posterior pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus are involved in behavior and neuronal activity of the cuneiform and entopeduncular nuclei.

    PubMed

    Jin, X; Schwabe, K; Krauss, J K; Alam, M

    2016-05-13

    Loss of cholinergic neurons in the mesencephalic locomotor region, comprising the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) and the cuneiform nucleus (CnF), is related to gait disturbances in late stage Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigate the effect of anterior or posterior cholinergic lesions of the PPN on gait-related motor behavior, and on neuronal network activity of the PPN area and basal ganglia (BG) motor loop in rats. Anterior PPN lesions, posterior PPN lesions or sham lesions were induced by stereotaxic microinjection of the cholinergic toxin AF64-A or vehicle in male Sprague-Dawley rats. First, locomotor activity (open field), postural disturbances (Rotarod) and gait asymmetry (treadmill test) were assessed. Thereafter, single-unit and oscillatory activities were measured in the non-lesioned area of the PPN, the CnF and the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), the BG output region, with microelectrodes under urethane anesthesia. Additionally, ECoG was recorded in the motor cortex. Injection of AF64-A into the anterior and posterior PPN decreased cholinergic cell counts as compared to naive controls (P<0.001) but also destroyed non-cholinergic cells. Only anterior PPN lesions decreased the front limb swing time of gait in the treadmill test, while not affecting other gait-related parameters tested. Main electrophysiological findings were that anterior PPN lesions increased the firing activity in the CnF (P<0.001). Further, lesions of either PPN region decreased the coherence of alpha (8-12 Hz) band between CnF and motor cortex (MCx), and increased the beta (12-30 Hz) oscillatory synchronization between EPN and the MCx. Lesions of the PPN in rats had complex effects on oscillatory neuronal activity of the CnF and the BG network, which may contribute to the understanding of the pathophysiology of gait disturbance in PD.

  17. Modulation of gamma oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus by neuronal calcium sensor protein-1: relevance to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    D'Onofrio, Stasia; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James R.; Luster, Brennon; Messias, Erick; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced levels of gamma-band activity are present in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. In the same disorders, increased neuronal calcium sensor protein-1 (NCS-1) expression was reported in a series of postmortem studies. These disorders are also characterized by sleep dysregulation, suggesting a role for the reticular activating system (RAS). The discovery of gamma-band activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), the cholinergic arm of the RAS, revealed that such activity was mediated by high-threshold calcium channels that are regulated by NCS-1. We hypothesized that NCS-1 normally regulates gamma-band oscillations through these calcium channels and that excessive levels of NCS-1, such as would be expected with overexpression, decrease gamma-band activity. We found that PPN neurons in rat brain slices manifested gamma-band oscillations that were increased by low levels of NCS-1 but suppressed by high levels of NCS-1. Our results suggest that NCS-1 overexpression may be responsible for the decrease in gamma-band activity present in at least some schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. PMID:25376789

  18. The pedunculopontine nucleus is related to visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: preliminary results of a voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Janzen, J; van 't Ent, D; Lemstra, A W; Berendse, H W; Barkhof, F; Foncke, E M J

    2012-01-01

    Visual hallucinations (VH) are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and lead to a poor quality of life. For a long time, dopaminergic therapy was considered to be the most important risk factor for the development of VH in PD. Recently, the cholinergic system, including the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), has been implicated in the pathophysiology of VH. The aim of the present study was to investigate grey matter density of the PPN region and one of its projection areas, the thalamus. Thirteen non-demented PD patients with VH were compared to 16 non-demented PD patients without VH, 13 demented PD patients (PDD) with VH and 11 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Isotropic 3-D T1-weighted MRI images (3T) were analysed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) with the PPN region and thalamus as ROIs. PD and PDD patients with VH showed grey matter reductions of the PPN region and the thalamus compared to PD patients without VH. VH in PD(D) patients are associated with atrophy of the PPN region and its thalamic target area, suggesting that a cholinergic deficit may be involved in the development of VH in PD(D).

  19. Protein Kinase A in the Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus of Rat Contributes to Regulation of Rapid Eye Movement Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Subimal; Desarnaud, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular signaling mechanisms within the pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nucleus for the regulation of recovery rapid eye movement (REM) sleep following REM sleep deprivation remain unknown. This study was designed to determine the role of PPT intracellular cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) in the regulation of recovery REM sleep in freely moving rats. The results show that a brief period (3 h) of selective REM sleep deprivation caused REM sleep rebound associated with increased PKA activity and expression of the PKA catalytic subunit protein (PKA-CU) in the PPT. Local application of a cAMP-PKA-activation-selective inhibitor, RpCAMPS (0.55, 1.1, and 2.2 nmol/100 µl; n = 8 rats/group), bilaterally into the PPT, reduced PKA activity and PKA-CU expression in the PPT, and suppressed the recovery REM sleep, in a dose-dependent manner. Regression analyses revealed significant positive relationships between: PPT levels of PKA activity and the total percentages of REM sleep recovery (Rsqr = 0.944; n = 40 rats); PPT levels of PKA-CU expression and the total percentages of REM sleep recovery (Rsqr = 0.937; n = 40 rats); PPT levels of PKA-CU expression and PKA activity (Rsqr = 0.945; n = 40 rats). Collectively, these results provide evidence that activation of intracellular PKA in the PPT contributes to REM sleep recovery following REM sleep deprivation. PMID:20844122

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Pedunculopontine Nuclei (PPN) Deep Brain Stimulation in the Treatment of Gait Disorders: A Meta-Analysis of Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Elahi, Behzad; Graham, Simon J; Das, Sunit; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-01-01

    Pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has complex reciprocal connections with basal ganglia, especially with internal globus pallidus and substantia nigra, and it has been postulated that PPN stimulation may improve gait instability and freezing of gait. In this meta-analysis, we will assess the evidence for PPN deep brain stimulation in treatment of gait and motor abnormalities especially focusing on Parkinson disease patients. PubMed and Scopus electronic databases were searched for related studies published before February 2014. Medline (1966-2014), Embase (1974-2010), CINAHL, Web of Science, Scopus bibliographic, and Google Scholar databases (1960-2014) were also searched for studies investigating effect of PPN deep brain stimulation in treatment of postural and postural instability and total of ten studies met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Our findings showed a significant improvement in postural instability (p<0.001) and motor symptoms of Parkinson disease on and off medications (p<0.05), but failed to show improvement in freezing of gait. Despite significant improvement in postural instability observed in included studies, evidence from current literature is not sufficient to generalize these findings to the majority of patients.

  1. Subpopulations of cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in the pedunculopontine nucleus contain calcium-binding proteins and are heterogeneously distributed.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Gonzalez, Cristina; Wang, Hui-Ling; Micklem, Benjamin R; Bolam, J Paul; Mena-Segovia, Juan

    2012-03-01

    Neurons in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) are highly heterogeneous in their discharge properties, their neurochemical markers, their pattern of connectivity and the behavioural processes in which they participate. Three main transmitter phenotypes have been described, cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic, and yet electrophysiological evidence suggests heterogeneity within these subtypes. To gain further insight into the molecular composition of these three populations in the rat, we investigated the pattern of expression of calcium binding proteins (CBPs) across distinct regions of the PPN and in relation to the presence of other neurochemical markers. Calbindin- and calretinin-positive neurons are as abundant as cholinergic neurons, and their expression follows a rostro-caudal gradient, whereas parvalbumin is expressed by a low number of neurons. We observed a high degree of expression of CBPs by GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, with a large majority of calbindin- and calretinin-positive neurons expressing GAD or VGluT2 mRNA. Notably, CBP-positive neurons expressing GAD mRNA were more concentrated in the rostral PPN, whereas the caudal PPN was characterized by a higher density of CBP-positive neurons expressing VGluT2 mRNA. In contrast to these two large populations, in cholinergic neurons expression of calretinin is observed only in low numbers and expression of calbindin is virtually non-existent. These findings thus identify novel subtypes of cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons based on their expression of CBPs, and further contribute to the notion of the PPN as a highly heterogeneous structure, an attribute that is likely to underlie its functional complexity.

  2. GABA mechanisms in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus influence particular aspects of nicotine self-administration selectively in the rat.

    PubMed

    Corrigall, W A; Coen, K M; Zhang, J; Adamson, K L

    2001-11-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) is part of the neuronal circuit activated by self-administered nicotine. The cholinergic neurons of the PPTg comprise a prominent projection to midbrain dopamine neurons. However, anatomical studies of Fos expression suggest that nicotine targets primarily non-cholinergic neurons in the PPTg, especially GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. The objective of these experiments was to examine the role of GABA manipulations in the PPTg on nicotine self-administration. Rats trained to self-administer nicotine or cocaine intravenously were prepared with brain microcannulae directed to the PPTg. Intra-PPTg microinfusions of the GABA agonists muscimol (10-50 ng) and baclofen (30-60 ng) reduced nicotine self-administration maintained on a fixed-ratio schedule of reinforcement (30 microg/kg per infusion); self-administration of cocaine (0.3 mg/kg per infusion) under an identical schedule was not affected. Muscimol and baclofen were also examined after intra-PPTg microinfusion in animals trained to self-administer nicotine on a progressive-ratio schedule (10 and 30 microg/kg per infusion). Progressive-ratio responding was sensitive to pharmacological manipulations such as a change in the nicotine dose available for self-administration, or intra-PPTg microinfusion of the nicotinic antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (30 microg). However, nicotine self-administration on a progressive-ratio schedule was not altered by intra-PPTg microinfusions of GABA agonists. These data confirm that the PPTg is involved in nicotine self-administration, a conclusion that is independent of the schedule of reinforcement that is used. GABAergic mechanisms in the PPTg play a selective role in nicotine reinforcement compared to cocaine, and that role is restricted to the characteristics of reinforcement measured by fixed-ratio responding.

  3. Calcium/Calmodulin Kinase II in the Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus Modulates the Initiation and Maintenance of Wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Subimal; O’Malley, Matthew W.; Patterson, Elissa H.

    2011-01-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmentum nucleus (PPT) is critically involved in the regulation of wakefulness (W) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, but our understanding of the mechanisms of this regulation remains incomplete. The present study was designed to determine the role of PPT intracellular calcium/calmodulin kinase (CaMKII) signaling in the regulation of W and sleep. To achieve this aim, three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 nmol) of the CaMKII activation inhibitor, KN-93, were microinjected bilaterally (100 nl/site) into the PPT of freely moving rats, and the effects on W, slow-wave sleep (SWS), REM sleep, and levels of phosphorylated CaMKII (pCaMKII) expression in the PPT were quantified. These effects, which were concentration-dependent and affected wake–sleep variables for 3 h, resulted in decreased W, due to reductions in the number and duration of W episodes; increased SWS and REM sleep, due to increases in episode duration; and decreased levels of pCaMKII expression in the PPT. Regression analyses revealed that PPT levels of pCaMKII were positively related with the total percentage of time spentin W (R2 = 0.864; n = 28 rats; p < 0.001) and negatively related with the total percentage of time spentin sleep (R2 = 0.863; p < 0.001). These data provide the first direct evidence that activation of intracellular CaMKII signaling in the PPT promotes W and suppresses sleep. These findings are relevant for designing a drug that could treat excessive sleepiness by promoting alertness. PMID:22114270

  4. Effect of neurotoxic lesion of pedunculopontine nucleus in nigral and striatal redox balance and motor performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Martin, J; Blanco-Lezcano, L; González-Fraguela, M E; Díaz-Hung, M-L; Serrano-Sánchez, T; Almenares, J L; Francis-Turner, L

    2015-03-19

    Early degeneration of pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is considered part of changes that characterize premotor stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this paper, the effects of unilateral neurotoxic lesion of the PPN in motor execution and in the development of oxidative stress events in striatal and nigral tissues in rats were evaluated. The motor performance was assessed using the beam test (BT) and the cylinder test (CT). Nigral and striatal redox balance, was studied by means of biochemical indicators such as malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and the catalase enzymatic activity (CAT EA). Lesioned rats showed fine motor dysfunction expressed both as an increase in the length (p<0.001) and deviation (p<0.001) of the traveled path and also in the time spent (p<0.01) in the circular small beam (CBS) (p<0.01) in comparison with control groups. In addition, the lesioned rats group presented a right asymmetry index greater than 0.5 which is consistent with a significant increase in the percentage of use of the right forelimb (ipsilateral to the lesion), compared with the control group (p<0.05). Biochemical studies revealed that after 48-h PPN neurotoxic injury, the CAT EA showed a significant increase in the subtantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) (p<0.05). This significant increase of CAT EA persisted in the nigral tissue (p<0.001) and reached the striatal tissue (p<0.001) seven days after PPN injury. Also at seven days post-injury PPN, increased concentrations of MDA (p<0.01) and a tendency to decrease in the concentrations of NO in both structures (SNpc and striatum) were found. The events associated with the generation of free radicals at nigral and striatal levels, can be part of the physiological mechanisms underlying motor dysfunction in rats with unilateral PPN neurotoxic lesion.

  5. Lesion of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus in rat augments cortical activation and disturbs sleep/wake state transitions structure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Jelena; Ciric, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2013-09-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) represents a major aggregation of cholinergic neurons in the mammalian brainstem, which is important in the generation and maintenance of REM sleep. We investigated the effects of unilateral and bilateral PPT lesions on sleep and all the conventional sleep-state related EEG frequency bands amplitudes, in an attempt to find the EEG markers for the onset and progression of PPT cholinergic neuronal degeneration. The experiments were performed on 35 adult male Wistar rats, chronically implanted for sleep recording. During the surgical procedure for EEG and EMG electrodes implantation, the unilateral or bilateral PPT lesion was produced under ketamine/diazepam anesthesia, by the stereotaxically guided microinfusion of 100 nl 0.1M ibotenic acid (IBO) into PPT. We applied Fourier analysis to signals acquired throughout 6h of recordings, and each 10s epoch was differentiated as a Wake, NREM or REM state. We also calculated the group probability density estimates (PDE) of all Wake, NREM and REM conventional EEG frequency amplitudes, and the number of all the transition states using MATLAB 6.5. Our results show that the unilateral or bilateral PPT lesions did not change the sleep/wake architecture, but did change the sleep/wake state transitions structure and the sleep/state related "EEG microstructure". Unilateral or bilateral PPT lesions sustainably increased Wake/REM and REM/Wake transitions from 14 to 35 days after lesions. This was followed by decreased NREM/REM and REM/NREM transitions from 28 days only in the case of the bilateral PPT lesion. The unilateral PPT lesion augmented both Wake theta and REM beta while it also attenuated the relative amplitude of the Wake delta frequency, with a delay of one week. Following a bilateral PPT lesion there was augmentation of the relative amplitude of the Wake, NREM, and REM beta and REM gamma frequency which occurred simultaneously to NREM and Wake delta attenuation. We have shown

  6. Reward and Behavioral Factors Contributing to the Tonic Activity of Monkey Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus Neurons during Saccade Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Ken-ichi; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) in the brainstem plays a role in controlling reinforcement learning and executing conditioned behavior. We previously examined the activity of PPTg neurons in monkeys during a reward-conditioned, visually guided saccade task, and reported that a population of these neurons exhibited tonic responses throughout the task period. These tonic responses might depend on prediction of the upcoming reward, successful execution of the task, or both. Here, we sought to further distinguish these factors and to investigate how each contributes to the tonic neuronal activity of the PPTg. In our normal visually guided saccade task, the monkey initially fixated on the central fixation target (FT), then made saccades to the peripheral saccade target and received a juice reward after the saccade target disappeared. Most of the tonic activity terminated shortly after the reward delivery, when the monkey broke fixation. To distinguish between reward and behavioral epochs, we then changed the task sequence for a block of trials, such that the saccade target remained visible after the reward delivery. Under these visible conditions, the monkeys tended to continue fixating on the saccade target even after the reward delivery. Therefore, the prediction of the upcoming reward and the end of an individual trial were separated in time. Regardless of the task conditions, half of the tonically active PPTg neurons terminated their activity around the time of the reward delivery, consistent with the view that PPTg neurons might send reward prediction signals until the time of reward delivery, which is essential for computing reward prediction error in reinforcement learning. On the other hand, the other half of the tonically active PPTg neurons changed their activity dependent on the task condition. In the normal condition, the tonic responses terminated around the time of the reward delivery, while in the visible condition, the activity continued

  7. Effects of changing reward on performance of the delayed spatial win-shift radial maze task in pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Claire L; Kozak, Rouba; Latimer, Mary P; Winn, Philip

    2004-08-31

    Because it was designed to assess working memory, the delayed spatial win-shift (DSWS) radial maze task has been used to investigate the involvement of corticostriatal structures in executive processing. Excitotoxic lesions of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) produce profound deficits in performance of this task that are not accounted for by motor impairment. Thus, PPTg DSWS deficits are hypothesized to support a role for PPTg in complex cognitive processing. However, other studies indicate that the behaviour of PPTg lesioned rats varies depending on level of motivational excitement, assessed by the presence or absence of deprivation, or by manipulations of reward value. Since DSWS performance may also be affected by motivational dysfunction, the present experiment was conducted to examine the effects of post-surgical presentation of a more positive food reward (chocolate drops) on the DSWS retention performance of PPTg lesioned rats. Results confirmed a PPTg lesion deficit: lesioned rats made significantly more errors in both training and test phases, and made errors significantly earlier in their choice sequence in the test phase. Main effects of phase on number of errors indicated that the PPTg test phase deficit was not simply the result of a carry-over impairment from the training phase. PPTg rats receiving chocolate made significantly fewer errors than PPTg rats receiving food pellets. Results suggest that PPTg DSWS deficits are not the result of altered motivation or hedonic appreciation of reward value (or reward change) and therefore support the hypothesis of executive cognitive deficits in PPTg lesioned rats.

  8. [The effects of lesions in the compact part of the substantia nigra on glutamate and GABA release in the pedunculopontine nucleus].

    PubMed

    Blanco-Lezcano, L; Rocha-Arrieta, L L; Alvarez-González, L; Martínez-Martí, L; Pavón-Fuentes, N; González-Fraguela, M E; Bauzá-Calderín, Y; Coro-Grave de Peralta, Y

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), co-localized with the mesencephalic locomotor region, has been proposed as a key structure in the physiopathology of Parkinson's disease. The goal of the present study was to assess if the aminoacid neurotransmitter release in the PPN is modified by the degeneration of dopaminergic cells, from substantia nigra pars compacta in 6-hydroxidopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. In addition, it was studied the aminoacid neurotransmitter release in the PPN of rats with lesion of the subthalamic nucleus by quinolinic acid (QUIN) (100 nmol) intracerebral injection. Rats were assigned to five groups: untreated rats (I) (n = 13), 6-OHDA lesion (II) (n = 11), 6-OHDA + QUIN lesion (III) (n = 9), sham-operated (IV) (n = 10), QUIN, STN (V) lesioned (n = 9). The extracellular concentrations of glutamic acid (GLU) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were determined by brain microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). RESULTS. GLU released in PPN from 6-OHDA lesioned rats (group II), was significantly increased in comparison with the others groups (F(4, 47) = 18.21, p < 0.001). GABA released shows significant differences between experimental groups (F(4, 45) = 12.75, p < 0.001). It was detected a higher valour (p < 0.05) in-group II. The groups III and IV exhibited intermeddle valour (p < 0.001) and groups I and IV (p < 0.001) showed the lower GABA extracellular concentrations. The infusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid with higher potassium (100 mmol) induced an increase in the GLU and GABA released in all groups, which confirm the neuronal origin of the extracellular content. These results are in agreement with the current model of basal ganglia functioning and suggest the role of STN-PPN projection in the physiopathology of Parkinson's disease.

  9. Feasibility of multichannel human cochlear nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Luetje, C M; Whittaker, C K; Geier, L; Mediavilla, S J; Shallop, J K

    1992-01-01

    Bipolar electrical stimulation of the brainstem cochlear nucleus (CN) following acoustic tumor removal in an only-hearing ear can provide beneficial hearing. However, the benefits of multichannel stimulation have yet to be defined. Following removal of a second acoustic tumor in a patient with neurofibromatosis 2, a Nucleus mini-22 channel implant device was inserted with the electrode array tip from the foramen of Luschka cephalad along the root entry zone of the eighth nerve, secured by a single suture superficially in the brain stem. Initial stimulation on the sixth postoperative day indicated that electrodes 18 to 22 were capable of CN stimulation without seventh nerve stimulation. Presumed electrode migration precluded further CN stimulation 1 month later. This report illustrates the feasibility of brainstem CN stimulation with an existing multichannel system.

  10. Selective enhancement of rapid eye movement sleep by deep brain stimulation of the human pons.

    PubMed

    Lim, Andrew S; Moro, Elena; Lozano, Andres M; Hamani, Clement; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O; Hutchison, William D; Lang, Anthony E; Wennberg, Richard A; Murray, Brian J

    2009-07-01

    Animal studies suggest that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is governed by the interaction of REM-promoting and REM-inhibiting nuclei in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum. The pedunculopontine nucleus is proposed to be REM promoting. Using polysomnography, we studied sleep in five parkinsonian patients undergoing unilateral pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS). We demonstrated a near doubling of nocturnal REM sleep between the DBS "off" and DBS "on" states, without significant changes in other sleep states. This represents the first demonstration that DBS can selectively modulate human sleep, and it supports an important role for the pedunculopontine nucleus region in modulating human REM sleep. Ann Neurol 2009;66:110-114.

  11. Excitotoxic lesions of the tegmental pedunculopontine nucleus impair copulation in naive male rats and block the rewarding effects of copulation in experienced male rats.

    PubMed

    Kippin, Tod E; van der Kooy, Derek

    2003-11-01

    The tegmental pedunculopontine nucleus (TPP) of the brainstem mediates food reward in food-sated animals and opiate reward in drug-naive animals. In the present study, we examine the effect of excitotoxic lesions of the TPP on sexual behaviour in naive and experienced male rats. Male, Long-Evans rats received either 0.25 micro L injections of NMDA (4.2 micro g/side) or vehicle (shams) into the TPP. In sexually naive males, complete bilateral TPP lesions decreased all measure of copulation (i.e. mounts, intromissions and ejaculations), prevented acquisition of conditioned sexual excitement, decreased approach preference for a receptive female over a non-receptive one, and decreased non-contact erections; unilateral or bilateral posterior-sparing TPP lesions did not affect any of these measures. Conversely, in sexually experienced males, lesions not only failed to disrupt copulation, but also increased conditioned sexual excitement, decreased post-ejaculatory interval and blocked the effect of prolonged copulation on conditioned sexual excitement. Following differential pairing of distinctive environments with and without copulation, sham males with sexual experience displayed a significant preference for the environment paired with copulation, whereas the lesion males with sexual experience displayed a significant aversion for the environment paired with copulation. These findings indicate that the TPP is critical for the acquisition of copulation in naive males and mediates the rewarding consequences of copulation in experienced males. Together these findings demonstrate that the TPP mediates sexual reward, but that sexual experience is not sufficient to produce a deprivation state.

  12. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Modulates Thalamic Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weidong; Russo, Gary S.; Hashimoto, Takao; Zhang, Jianyu; Vitek, Jerrold L.

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective tool for the treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. The mechanism by which STN DBS elicits its beneficial effect, however, remains unclear. We previously reported STN stimulation increased the rate and produced a more regular and periodic pattern of neuronal activity in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi). Here we extend our observations to neurons in the pallidal (ventralis lateralis pars oralis (VLo) and ventralis anterior (VA)) and cerebellar (ventralis lateralis posterior pars oralis (VPLo)) receiving areas of the motor thalamus during STN DBS. Stimulation parameters that produced improvement in rigidity and bradykinesia resulted in changes in the pattern and power of oscillatory activity of neuronal activity that were similar in both regions of the motor thalamus. Neurons in both VA/VLo and VPLo tended to become more periodic and regular with a shift in oscillatory activity from low to high frequencies. Burst activity was reduced in VA/VLo, but was not significantly changed in VPLo. There was also a significant shift in the population of VA/VLo neurons that were inhibited during STN DBS, while VPLo neurons tended to be activated. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that STN DBS increases output from the nucleus and produces a change in the pattern and periodicity of neuronal activity in the basal ganglia thalamic network, and that these changes include cerebellar pathways likely via activation of adjacent cerebello-thalamic fiber bundles. PMID:19005057

  13. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology—Implications for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; D’Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by major sleep/wake disturbances including increased vigilance and arousal, decreased slow wave sleep, and increased REM sleep drive. Other arousal-related symptoms include sensory gating deficits as exemplified by decreased habituation of the blink reflex. There is also dysregulation of gamma band activity, suggestive of disturbances in a host of arousal-related mechanisms. This review examines the role of the reticular activating system, especially the pedunculopontine nucleus, in the symptoms of the disease. Recent discoveries on the physiology of the pedunculopontine nucleus help explain many of these disorders of arousal in, and point to novel therapeutic avenues for, schizophrenia. PMID:26483949

  14. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology-Implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; D'Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by major sleep/wake disturbances including increased vigilance and arousal, decreased slow wave sleep, and increased REM sleep drive. Other arousal-related symptoms include sensory gating deficits as exemplified by decreased habituation of the blink reflex. There is also dysregulation of gamma band activity, suggestive of disturbances in a host of arousal-related mechanisms. This review examines the role of the reticular activating system, especially the pedunculopontine nucleus, in the symptoms of the disease. Recent discoveries on the physiology of the pedunculopontine nucleus help explain many of these disorders of arousal in, and point to novel therapeutic avenues for, schizophrenia.

  15. Posterior occipitocervical instrumented fusion for dropped head syndrome after deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E A C; Wilson-MacDonald, J; Green, A L; Aziz, T Z; Cadoux-Hudson, T A D

    2010-04-01

    We describe dropped head syndrome in a patient with Parkinson's disease receiving subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS). Posterior occipitocervical instrumented fusion after transarticular screw fixation of an odontoid fracture is shown and its rationale explained. Pedunculopontine nucleus DBS as treatment for fall-predominant Parkinson's disease, and globus pallidus interna DBS for dystonia-predominant Parkinson's disease, are discussed.

  16. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology - Implications for insomnia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    We consider insomnia a disorder of waking rather than a disorder of sleep. This review examines the role of the reticular activating system, especially the pedunculopontine nucleus, in the symptoms of insomnia, mainly representing an overactive waking drive. We determined that high frequency activity during waking and REM sleep is controlled by two different intracellular pathways and channel types in PPN cells. We found three different PPN cell types that have one or both channels and may be active during waking only, REM sleep only, or both. These discoveries point to a specific mechanism and novel therapeutic avenues for insomnia.

  17. Facial expression recognition and subthalamic nucleus stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, U; Kuehler, A; Hennenlotter, A; Haslinger, B; Tronnier, V; Krause, M; Pfister, R; Sprengelmeyer, R; Lange, K; Ceballos-Baumann, A

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the impact of STN stimulation in Parkinson's disease on perception of facial expressions. Results: There was a selective reduction in recognition of angry faces, but not other expressions, during STN stimulation. Conclusions: The findings may have important implications for social adjustment in these patients. PMID:15026519

  18. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation in severe obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Luc; Polosan, Mircea; Jaafari, Nematollah; Baup, Nicolas; Welter, Marie-Laure; Fontaine, Denys; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas; Yelnik, Jérôme; Chéreau, Isabelle; Arbus, Christophe; Raoul, Sylvie; Aouizerate, Bruno; Damier, Philippe; Chabardès, Stephan; Czernecki, Virginie; Ardouin, Claire; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Bardinet, Eric; Chaynes, Patrick; Burbaud, Pierre; Cornu, Philippe; Derost, Philippe; Bougerol, Thierry; Bataille, Benoit; Mattei, Vianney; Dormont, Didier; Devaux, Bertrand; Vérin, Marc; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Pollak, Pierre; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Agid, Yves; Krack, Paul; Millet, Bruno; Pelissolo, Antoine

    2008-11-13

    Severe, refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling condition. Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, a procedure that is already validated for the treatment of movement disorders, has been proposed as a therapeutic option. In this 10-month, crossover, double-blind, multicenter study assessing the efficacy and safety of stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, we randomly assigned eight patients with highly refractory OCD to undergo active stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus followed by sham stimulation and eight to undergo sham stimulation followed by active stimulation. The primary outcome measure was the severity of OCD, as assessed by the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), at the end of two 3-month periods. General psychopathologic findings, functioning, and tolerance were assessed with the use of standardized psychiatric scales, the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale, and neuropsychological tests. After active stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, the Y-BOCS score (on a scale from 0 to 40, with lower scores indicating less severe symptoms) was significantly lower than the score after sham stimulation (mean [+/-SD], 19+/-8 vs. 28+/-7; P=0.01), and the GAF score (on a scale from 1 to 90, with higher scores indicating higher levels of functioning) was significantly higher (56+/-14 vs. 43+/-8, P=0.005). The ratings of neuropsychological measures, depression, and anxiety were not modified by stimulation. There were 15 serious adverse events overall, including 1 intracerebral hemorrhage and 2 infections; there were also 23 nonserious adverse events. These preliminary findings suggest that stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus may reduce the symptoms of severe forms of OCD but is associated with a substantial risk of serious adverse events. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00169377.) 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  19. Hypersexuality following subthalamic nucleus stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Paresh; Bhargava, Pranshu

    2008-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation is an established surgical treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). Though the motor benefits of STN stimulation are well understood, its cognitive and behavioral effects are still not fully understood. Manic psychosis, hypersexuality, pathological gambling and mood swings are associated with advanced PD. There have been reports to suggest improvement or worsening in these symptoms following STN deep brain stimulation (DBS). We report two cases as the sole behavioral side-effects of STN stimulation despite good clinical improvement on long-term follow-up. These patients and literature review suggests the complex role of STN stimulation in motor and behavioral control.

  20. Brain networks modulated by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Accolla, Ettore A; Herrojo Ruiz, Maria; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Draganski, Bogdan; Kühn, Andrea A

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Given the frequent occurrence of stimulation-induced affective and cognitive adverse effects, a better understanding about the role of the subthalamic nucleus in non-motor functions is needed. The main goal of this study is to characterize anatomical circuits modulated by subthalamic deep brain stimulation, and infer about the inner organization of the nucleus in terms of motor and non-motor areas. Given its small size and anatomical intersubject variability, functional organization of the subthalamic nucleus is difficult to investigate in vivo with current methods. Here, we used local field potential recordings obtained from 10 patients with Parkinson's disease to identify a subthalamic area with an analogous electrophysiological signature, namely a predominant beta oscillatory activity. The spatial accuracy was improved by identifying a single contact per macroelectrode for its vicinity to the electrophysiological source of the beta oscillation. We then conducted whole brain probabilistic tractography seeding from the previously identified contacts, and further described connectivity modifications along the macroelectrode's main axis. The designated subthalamic 'beta' area projected predominantly to motor and premotor cortical regions additional to connections to limbic and associative areas. More ventral subthalamic areas showed predominant connectivity to medial temporal regions including amygdala and hippocampus. We interpret our findings as evidence for the convergence of different functional circuits within subthalamic nucleus' portions deemed to be appropriate as deep brain stimulation target to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Potential clinical implications of our study are illustrated by an index case where deep brain stimulation of estimated predominant non-motor subthalamic nucleus induced hypomanic behaviour. © The

  1. Intermuscular coherence in Parkinson's disease: effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Marsden, J; Limousin-Dowsey, P; Fraix, V; Pollak, P; Odin, P; Brown, P

    2001-05-08

    It remains unclear how high frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improves parkinsonism. We hypothesized that stimulation may affect the organization of the cortical drive to voluntarily activated muscle. Normally this is characterized by oscillations at 15-30 Hz, manifest in coherence between muscles in the same frequency band. We therefore investigated the effects of STN stimulation on electromyographic (EMG) activity in co-contracting distal arm muscles in nine subjects with Parkinson's disease off drugs. Without stimulation, coherence between EMG signals was diminished at 15-30 Hz compared with nine controls. STN stimulation increased coherence in the 15-30 Hz band, so that it approached that in healthy subjects. The results suggest that STN stimulation facilitates the normal cortical drive to muscles.

  2. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation and somatosensory temporal discrimination in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Conte, Antonella; Modugno, Nicola; Lena, Francesco; Dispenza, Sabrina; Gandolfi, Barbara; Iezzi, Ennio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2010-09-01

    Whereas numerous studies document the effects of dopamine medication and deep brain stimulation on motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease, few have investigated deep brain stimulation-induced changes in sensory functions. In this study of 13 patients with Parkinson's disease, we tested the effects of deep brain stimulation on the somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold. To investigate whether deep brain stimulation and dopaminergic medication induce similar changes in somatosensory discrimination, somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values were acquired under four experimental conditions: (i) medication ON/deep brain stimulation on; (ii) medication ON/deep brain stimulation off; (iii) medication OFF/deep brain stimulation on; and (iv) medication OFF/deep brain stimulation off. Patients also underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluations during each experimental session. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values obtained in patients were compared with 13 age-matched healthy subjects. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values were significantly higher in patients than in healthy subjects. In patients, somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values were significantly lower when patients were studied in medication ON than in medication OFF conditions. Somatosensory temporal discrimination threshold values differed significantly between deep brain stimulation on and deep brain stimulation off conditions only when the patients were studied in the medication ON condition and were higher in the deep brain stimulation on/medication ON than in the deep brain stimulation off/medication ON condition. Dopamine but not subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation restores the altered somatosensory temporal discrimination in patients with Parkinson's disease. Deep brain stimulation degrades somatosensory temporal discrimination by modifying central somatosensory processing whereas dopamine restores the

  3. Tractography patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Arroyave, Nora; Lauro, Peter M; Huang, Ling; Hallett, Mark; Horovitz, Silvina G; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Lungu, Codrin

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation therapy is an effective symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease, yet the precise mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic effects remain unclear. Although the targets of deep brain stimulation are grey matter structures, axonal modulation is known to play an important role in deep brain stimulation's therapeutic mechanism. Several white matter structures in proximity to the subthalamic nucleus have been implicated in the clinical benefits of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. We assessed the connectivity patterns that characterize clinically beneficial electrodes in Parkinson's disease patients, after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We evaluated 22 patients with Parkinson's disease (11 females, age 57 ± 9.1 years, disease duration 13.3 ± 6.3 years) who received bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus at the National Institutes of Health. During an initial electrode screening session, one month after deep brain stimulation implantation, the clinical benefits of each contact were determined. The electrode was localized by coregistering preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative computer tomography images and the volume of tissue activated was estimated from stimulation voltage and impedance. Brain connectivity for the volume of tissue activated of deep brain stimulation contacts was assessed using probabilistic tractography with diffusion-tensor data. Areas most frequently connected to clinically effective contacts included the thalamus, substantia nigra, brainstem and superior frontal gyrus. A series of discriminant analyses demonstrated that the strength of connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus were positively associated with clinical effectiveness. The connectivity patterns observed in our study suggest that the modulation of white matter tracts directed to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus is associated with favourable clinical

  4. Pedunculopontine network dysfunction in Parkinson's disease with postural control and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Gallea, Cecile; Ewenczyk, Claire; Degos, Bertrand; Welter, Marie-Laure; Grabli, David; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Valabregue, Romain; Berroir, Pierre; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Bertasi, Eric; Fernandez-Vidal, Sara; Bardinet, Eric; Roze, Emmanuel; Benali, Habib; Poupon, Cyril; François, Chantal; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Vidailhet, Marie

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate pedunculopontine nucleus network dysfunctions that mediate impaired postural control and sleep disorder in Parkinson's disease. We examined (1) Parkinson's disease patients with impaired postural control and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (further abbreviated as sleep disorder), (2) Parkinson's disease patients with sleep disorder only, (3) Parkinson's disease patients with neither impaired postural control nor sleep disorder, and (4) healthy volunteers. We assessed postural control with clinical scores and biomechanical recordings during gait initiation. Participants had video polysomnography, daytime sleepiness self-evaluation, and resting-state functional MRIs. Patients with impaired postural control and sleep disorder had longer duration of anticipatory postural adjustments during gait initiation and decreased functional connectivity between the pedunculopontine nucleus and the supplementary motor area in the locomotor network that correlated negatively with the duration of anticipatory postural adjustments. Both groups of patients with sleep disorder had decreased functional connectivity between the pedunculopontine nucleus and the anterior cingulate cortex in the arousal network that correlated with daytime sleepiness. The degree of dysfunction in the arousal network was related to the degree of connectivity in the locomotor network in all patients with sleep disorder, but not in patients without sleep disorder or healthy volunteers. These results shed light on the functional neuroanatomy of pedunculopontine nucleus networks supporting the clinical manifestation and the interdependence between sleep and postural control impairments in Parkinson's disease. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  5. Activation of Pedunculopontine Glutamate Neurons Is Reinforcing.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Zell, Vivien; Wu, Johnathan; Punta, Cindy; Ramajayam, Nivedita; Shen, Xinyi; Faget, Lauren; Lilascharoen, Varoth; Lim, Byung Kook; Hnasko, Thomas S

    2017-01-04

    Dopamine transmission from midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons underlies behavioral processes related to motivation and drug addiction. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) is a brainstem nucleus containing glutamate-, acetylcholine-, and GABA-releasing neurons with connections to basal ganglia and limbic brain regions. Here we investigated the role of PPTg glutamate neurons in reinforcement, with an emphasis on their projections to VTA dopamine neurons. We used cell-type-specific anterograde tracing and optogenetic methods to selectively label and manipulate glutamate projections from PPTg neurons in mice. We used anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays to determine their patterns of connectivity and ascribe functional roles in reinforcement. We found that photoactivation of PPTg glutamate cell bodies could serve as a direct positive reinforcer on intracranial self-photostimulation assays. Further, PPTg glutamate neurons directly innervate VTA; photostimulation of this pathway preferentially excites VTA dopamine neurons and is sufficient to induce behavioral reinforcement. These results demonstrate that ascending PPTg glutamate projections can drive motivated behavior, and PPTg to VTA synapses may represent an important target relevant to drug addiction and other mental health disorders.

  6. Cholinergic mechanisms of high-frequency stimulation in entopeduncular nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, high-frequency (>100 Hz) electrical stimulation, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) is a highly effective therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) and dystonia. Despite some understanding of how it works acutely in PD models, there remain questions about its mechanisms of action. Several hypotheses have been proposed, such as depolarization blockade, activation of inhibitory synapses, depletion of neurotransmitters, and/or disruption/alteration of network oscillations. In this study we investigated the cellular mechanisms of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in entopeduncular nucleus (EP; rat equivalent of GPi) neurons using whole cell patch-clamp recordings. We found that HFS applied inside the EP nucleus induced a prolonged afterdepolarization that was dependent on stimulation frequency, pulse duration, and current amplitude. The high frequencies (>100 Hz) and pulse widths (>0.15 ms) used clinically for dystonia DBS could reliably induce these afterdepolarizations, which persisted under blockade of ionotropic glutamate (kynurenic acid, 2 mM), GABAA (picrotoxin, 50 μM), GABAB (CGP 55845, 1 μM), and acetylcholine nicotinic receptors (DHβE, 2 μM). However, this effect was blocked by atropine (2 μM; nonselective muscarinic antagonist) or tetrodotoxin (0.5 μM). Finally, the muscarinic-dependent afterdepolarizations were sensitive to Ca2+-sensitive nonspecific cationic (CAN) channel blockade. Hence, these data suggest that muscarinic receptor activation during HFS can lead to feedforward excitation through the opening of CAN channels. This study for the first time describes a cholinergic mechanism of HFS in EP neurons and provides new insight into the underlying mechanisms of DBS. PMID:26334006

  7. Asymmetric pedunculopontine network connectivity in parkinsonian patients with freezing of gait

    PubMed Central

    Fling, Brett W.; Cohen, Rajal G.; Mancini, Martina; Nutt, John G.; Fair, Damian A.

    2013-01-01

    Freezing of gait is one of the most debilitating symptoms in Parkinson’s disease as it causes falls and reduces mobility and quality of life. The pedunculopontine nucleus is one of the major nuclei of the mesencephalic locomotor region and has neurons related to anticipatory postural adjustments preceding step initiation as well as to the step itself, thus it may be critical for coupling posture and gait to avoid freezing. Because freezing of gait and postural impairments have been related to frontal lesions and frontal dysfunction such as executive function, we hypothesized that freezing is associated with disrupted connectivity between midbrain locomotor regions and medial frontal cortex. We used diffusion tensor imaging to quantify structural connectivity of the pedunculopontine nucleus in patients with Parkinson’s disease with freezing of gait, without freezing, and healthy age-matched controls. We also included behavioural tasks to gauge severity of freezing of gait, quantify gait metrics, and assess executive cognitive functions to determine whether between-group differences in executive dysfunction were related to pedunculopontine nucleus structural network connectivity. Using seed regions from the pedunculopontine nucleus, we were able to delineate white matter connections between the spinal cord, cerebellum, pedunculopontine nucleus, subcortical and frontal/prefrontal cortical regions. The current study is the first to demonstrate differences in structural connectivity of the identified locomotor pathway in patients with freezing of gait. We report reduced connectivity of the pedunculopontine nucleus with the cerebellum, thalamus and multiple regions of the frontal cortex. Moreover, these structural differences were observed solely in the right hemisphere of patients with freezing of gait. Finally, we show that the more left hemisphere-lateralized the pedunculopontine nucleus tract volume, the poorer the performance on cognitive tasks requiring the

  8. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology – Implications for insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    We consider insomnia a disorder of waking rather than a disorder of sleep. This review examines the role of the reticular activating system, especially the pedunculopontine nucleus, in the symptoms of insomnia, mainly representing an overactive waking drive. We determined that high frequency activity during waking and REM sleep is controlled by two different intracellular pathways and channel types in PPN cells. We found three different PPN cell types that have one or both channels and may be active during waking only, REM sleep only, or both. These discoveries point to a specific mechanism and novel therapeutic avenues for insomnia. PMID:26483950

  9. Selective Stimulation and Measurement in the Cochlear Nucleus With the Spike Microelectrode Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Selective Stimulation and Measurement in the Cochlear Nucleus with the Spike Microelectrode Array F. MASE1, H. TAKAHASHI1, T. EJIRI1, M. NAKAO1, N...aren’t always effective, because we don’t have sufficient knowledge of the auditory pathways and the Cochlear Nucleus (CN) functions to stimulate the... Cochlear Nucleus functionally. Our goals are to enhance our understanding of such functions and to develop effective stimulating strategies of the CN

  10. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation reverses mediofrontal influence over decision threshold.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Wiecki, Thomas V; Cohen, Michael X; Figueroa, Christina M; Samanta, Johan; Sherman, Scott J; Frank, Michael J

    2011-09-25

    It takes effort and time to tame one's impulses. Although medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is broadly implicated in effortful control over behavior, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is specifically thought to contribute by acting as a brake on cortico-striatal function during decision conflict, buying time until the right decision can be made. Using the drift diffusion model of decision making, we found that trial-to-trial increases in mPFC activity (EEG theta power, 4-8 Hz) were related to an increased threshold for evidence accumulation (decision threshold) as a function of conflict. Deep brain stimulation of the STN in individuals with Parkinson's disease reversed this relationship, resulting in impulsive choice. In addition, intracranial recordings of the STN area revealed increased activity (2.5-5 Hz) during these same high-conflict decisions. Activity in these slow frequency bands may reflect a neural substrate for cortico-basal ganglia communication regulating decision processes.

  11. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation-induced regional blood flow responses correlate with improvement of motor signs in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M; Golchin, N; Tabbal, S D; Hershey, T; Videen, T O; Wu, J; Usche, J W M; Revilla, F J; Hartlein, J M; Wernle, A R; Mink, J W; Perlmutter, J S

    2008-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) improves motor symptoms in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, yet the mechanism of action remains unclear. Previous studies indicate that STN DBS increases regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in immediate downstream targets but does not reveal which brain regions may have functional changes associated with improved motor manifestations. We studied 48 patients with STN DBS who withheld medication overnight and underwent PET scans to measure rCBF responses to bilateral STN DBS. PET scans were performed with bilateral DBS OFF and ON in a counterbalanced order followed by clinical ratings of motor manifestations using Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale 3 (UPDRS 3). We investigated whether improvement in UPDRS 3 scores in rigidity, bradykinesia, postural stability and gait correlate with rCBF responses in a priori determined regions. These regions were selected based on a previous study showing significant STN DBS-induced rCBF change in the thalamus, midbrain and supplementary motor area (SMA). We also chose the pedunculopontine nucleus region (PPN) due to mounting evidence of its involvement in locomotion. In the current study, bilateral STN DBS improved rigidity (62%), bradykinesia (44%), gait (49%) and postural stability (56%) (paired t-tests: P < 0.001). As expected, bilateral STN DBS also increased rCBF in the bilateral thalami, right midbrain, and decreased rCBF in the right premotor cortex (P < 0.05, corrected). There were significant correlations between improvement of rigidity and decreased rCBF in the SMA (r(s) = -0.4, P < 0.02) and between improvement in bradykinesia and increased rCBF in the thalamus (r(s) = 0.31, P < 0.05). In addition, improved postural reflexes correlated with decreased rCBF in the PPN (r(s) = -0.38, P < 0.03). These modest correlations between selective motor manifestations and rCBF in specific regions suggest possible regional selectivity for improvement of different motor

  12. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects incentive salience attribution in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Serranová, Tereza; Jech, Robert; Dušek, Petr; Sieger, Tomáš; Růžička, Filip; Urgošík, Dušan; Růžička, Evžen

    2011-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can induce nonmotor side effects such as behavioral and mood disturbances or body weight gain in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We hypothesized that some of these problems could be related to an altered attribution of incentive salience (ie, emotional relevance) to rewarding and aversive stimuli. Twenty PD patients (all men; mean age ± SD, 58.3 ± 6 years) in bilateral STN DBS switched ON and OFF conditions and 18 matched controls rated pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System according to emotional valence (unpleasantness/pleasantness) and arousal on 2 independent visual scales ranging from 1 to 9. Eighty-four pictures depicting primary rewarding (erotica and food) and aversive fearful (victims and threat) and neutral stimuli were selected for this study. In the STN DBS ON condition, the PD patients attributed lower valence scores to the aversive pictures compared with the OFF condition (P < .01) and compared with controls (P < .01). The difference between the OFF condition and controls was less pronounced (P < .05). Furthermore, postoperative weight gain correlated with arousal ratings from the food pictures in the STN DBS ON condition (P < .05 compensated for OFF condition). Our results suggest that STN DBS increases activation of the aversive motivational system so that more relevance is attributed to aversive fearful stimuli. In addition, STN DBS-related sensitivity to food reward stimuli cues might drive DBS-treated patients to higher food intake and subsequent weight gain.

  13. Functional imaging of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Boertien, Tessel; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Kahan, Joshua; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Hariz, Marwan; Mancini, Laura; Limousin, Patricia; Foltynie, Thomas

    2011-08-15

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an accepted treatment for the motor complications of Parkinson's disease. The therapeutic mechanism of action remains incompletely understood. Although the results of deep brain stimulation are similar to the results that can be obtained by lesional surgery, accumulating evidence from functional imaging and clinical neurophysiology suggests that the effects of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation are not simply the result of inhibition of subthalamic nucleus activity. Positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography has consistently demonstrated changes in cortical activation in response to subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation. However, the technique has limited spatial and temporal resolution, and therefore the changes in activity of subcortical projection sites of the subthalamic nucleus (such as the globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and thalamus) are not as clear. Clarifying whether clinically relevant effects from subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation in humans are mediated through inhibition or excitation of orthodromic or antidromic pathways (or both) would contribute to our understanding of the precise mechanism of action of deep brain stimulation and may allow improvements in safety and efficacy of the technique. In this review we discuss the published evidence from functional imaging studies of patients with subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation to date, together with how these data inform the mechanism of action of deep brain stimulation. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Opioids in the nucleus accumbens stimulate ethanol intake.

    PubMed

    Barson, Jessica R; Carr, Ambrose J; Soun, Jennifer E; Sobhani, Nasim C; Leibowitz, Sarah F; Hoebel, Bartley G

    2009-10-19

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) participates in the control of both motivation and addiction. To test the possibility that opioids in the NAc can cause rats to select ethanol in preference to food, Sprague-Dawley rats with ethanol, food, and water available, were injected with two doses each of morphine, the mu-receptor agonist [D-Ala(2),N-Me-Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]-Enkephalin (DAMGO), the delta-receptor agonist D-Ala-Gly-Phe-Met-NH2 (DALA), the k-receptor agonist (+/-)-trans-U-50488 methanesulfonate (U-50,488H), or the opioid antagonist naloxone methiodide (m-naloxone). As an anatomical control for drug reflux, injections were also made 2mm above the NAc. The main result was that morphine in the NAc significantly increased ethanol and food intake, whereas m-naloxone reduced ethanol intake without affecting food or water intake. Of the selective receptor agonists, DALA in the NAc increased ethanol intake in preference to food. This is in contrast to DAMGO, which stimulated food but not ethanol intake, and the k-agonist U-50,488H, which had no effect on intake. When injected in the anatomical control site 2mm dorsal to the NAc, the opioids had no effects on ethanol intake. These results demonstrate that ethanol intake produced by morphine in the NAc is driven in large part by the delta-receptor. In light of other studies showing ethanol intake to increase enkephalin expression in the NAc, the present finding of enkephalin-induced ethanol intake suggests the existence of a positive feedback loop that fosters alcohol abuse. Naltrexone therapy for alcohol abuse may then act, in part, in the NAc by blocking this opioid-triggered cycle of alcohol intake.

  15. Intracranial self-stimulation in the parafascicular nucleus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Vale-Martínez, A; Guillazo-Blanch, G; Aldavert-Vera, L; Segura-Torres, P; Martí-Nicolovius, M

    1999-03-01

    A behavioral analysis of intracranial self-stimulation was provided for parafascicular nucleus. To evaluate whether intracranial self-stimulation in this nucleus could be site-specific and to determine if the positive sites are the same parafascicular areas that facilitate learning when stimulated, rats were tested via monopolar electrodes situated throughout the parafascicular nucleus. Animals were trained to self-stimulate by pressing a lever in a conventional Skinner box (1-5 sessions). Twenty-two of the 42 animals included in the study, had the electrode at the parafascicular nucleus. Only two of them showed intracranial self-stimulation. Histological analyses indicated that the latter rats had the electrode implanted at the anterior area of the medial parafascicular. Other two animals also showed intracranial self-stimulation but they had the electrode in a more posterior brain region, between the Dark-schewitsch nucleus and the red nucleus. The animals implanted at the parafascicular showed higher response rates than the other two rats. These results confirm that: (a) the anterior region of the medial parafascicular is a positive site for stable and regular intracranial self-stimulation behavior, and (b) these positive sites do not coincide with the parafascicular regions related to learning improvement.

  16. Induction of a physiological memory in the cerebral cortex by stimulation of the nucleus basalis.

    PubMed

    Bakin, J S; Weinberger, N M

    1996-10-01

    Auditory cortical receptive field plasticity produced during behavioral learning may be considered to constitute "physiological memory" because it has major characteristics of behavioral memory: associativity, specificity, rapid acquisition, and long-term retention. To investigate basal forebrain mechanisms in receptive field plasticity, we paired a tone with stimulation of the nucleus basalis, the main subcortical source of cortical acetylcholine, in the adult guinea pig. Nucleus basalis stimulation produced electroencephalogram desynchronization that was blocked by systemic and cortical atropine. Paired tone/nucleus basalis stimulation, but not unpaired stimulation, induced receptive field plasticity similar to that produced by behavioral learning. Thus paired activation of the nucleus basalis is sufficient to induce receptive field plasticity, possibly via cholinergic actions in the cortex.

  17. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology—Effects of psychostimulant abuse

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Bisagno, Verónica; González, Betina; Celeste Rivero-Echeto, María; Muñiz, Javier A.; Luster, Brennon; D’Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the interactions between the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the thalamocortical system. Experiments using modulators of cholinergic receptors in the PPN clarified its role on psychostimulant-induced locomotion. PPN activation was found to be involved in the animal’s voluntary search for psychostimulants. Every PPN neuron is known to generate gamma band oscillations. Voltage-gated calcium channels are key elements in the generation and maintenance of gamma band activity of PPN neurons. Calcium channels are also key elements mediating psychostimulant-induced alterations in the thalamic targets of PPN output. Thus, the PPN is a key substrate for maintaining arousal and REM sleep, but also in modulating psychostimulant self-administration. PMID:26779323

  18. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology-Effects of psychostimulant abuse.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francisco J; Bisagno, Verónica; González, Betina; Celeste Rivero-Echeto, María; Muñiz, Javier A; Luster, Brennon; D'Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2015-11-01

    This review describes the interactions between the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the thalamocortical system. Experiments using modulators of cholinergic receptors in the PPN clarified its role on psychostimulant-induced locomotion. PPN activation was found to be involved in the animal's voluntary search for psychostimulants. Every PPN neuron is known to generate gamma band oscillations. Voltage-gated calcium channels are key elements in the generation and maintenance of gamma band activity of PPN neurons. Calcium channels are also key elements mediating psychostimulant-induced alterations in the thalamic targets of PPN output. Thus, the PPN is a key substrate for maintaining arousal and REM sleep, but also in modulating psychostimulant self-administration.

  19. Cardiovascular responses to chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in the rat: role of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Tetsuya; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of cardiovascular responses to chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) was studied in urethane-anesthetized adult male Wistar rats. At the baseline mean arterial pressure (BLMAP) close to normal, ARCN stimulation elicited decreases in MAP and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). The decreases in MAP elicited by ARCN stimulation were attenuated by either gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), neuropeptide Y (NPY), or beta-endorphin receptor blockade in the ipsilateral hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Combined blockade of GABA-A, NPY1 and opioid receptors in the ipsilateral PVN converted the decreases in MAP and SNA to increases in these variables. Conversion of inhibitory effects on the MAP and SNA to excitatory effects following ARCN stimulation was also observed when the BLMAP was decreased to below normal levels by an infusion of sodium nitroprusside. The pressor and tachycardic responses to ARCN stimulation at below normal BLMAP were attenuated by blockade of melanocortin 3/4 (MC3/4) receptors in the ipsilateral PVN. Unilateral blockade of GABA-A receptors in the ARCN increased the BLMAP and heart rate (HR) revealing tonic inhibition of the excitatory neurons in the ARCN. ARCN stimulation elicited tachycardia regardless of the level of BLMAP. ARCN neurons projecting to the PVN were immunoreactive for glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), NPY, and beta-endorphin. These results indicated that: 1) at normal BLMAP, decreases in MAP and SNA induced by ARCN stimulation were mediated via GABA-A, NPY1 and opioid receptors in the PVN, 2) lowering of BLMAP converted decreases in MAP following ARCN stimulation to increases in MAP, and 3) at below normal BLMAP, increases in MAP and HR induced by ARCN stimulation were mediated via MC3/4 receptors in the PVN. These results provide a base for future studies to explore the role of ARCN in cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Opioids in the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus Stimulate Ethanol Intake

    PubMed Central

    Barson, Jessica R.; Carr, Ambrose J.; Soun, Jennifer E.; Sobhani, Nasim C.; Rada, Pedro; Leibowitz, Sarah F.; Hoebel, Bartley G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Specialized hypothalamic systems that increase food intake might also increase ethanol intake. To test this possibility, morphine and receptor-specific opioid agonists were microinjected in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of rats that had learned to drink ethanol. To cross-validate the results, naloxone methiodide (m-naloxone), an opioid antagonist, was microinjected with the expectation that it would have the opposite effect of morphine and the specific opioid agonists. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were trained, without sugar, to drink 4% or 7% ethanol and were then implanted with chronic brain cannulas aimed at the PVN. After recovery, those drinking 7% ethanol, with food and water available, were injected with two doses each of morphine or m-naloxone. To test for receptor specificity, two doses each of the μ-receptor agonist [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin (DAMGO), δ-receptor agonist D-Ala-Gly-Phe-Met-NH2 (DALA), or k-receptor agonist U-50,488H were injected. DAMGO was also tested in rats drinking 4% ethanol without food or water available. As an anatomical control for drug reflux, injections were made 2 mm dorsal to the PVN. Results A main result was a significant increase in ethanol intake induced by PVN injection of morphine. The opposite effect was produced by m-naloxone. The effects of morphine and m-naloxone were exclusively on intake of ethanol, even though food and water were freely available. In the analysis with specific receptor agonists, PVN injection of the δ-agonist DALA significantly increased 7% ethanol intake without affecting food or water intake. This is in contrast to the k-agonist U-50,488H, which decreased ethanol intake, and the μ-agonist DAMGO, which had no effect on ethanol intake in the presence or absence of food and water. In the anatomical control location 2 mm dorsal to the PVN, no drug caused any significant changes in ethanol, food, or water intake, providing evidence that the active site was close to the

  1. Role of the red nucleus in suppressing the jaw-opening reflex following stimulation of the raphe magnus nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    In a previous study, we found that electrical and chemical stimulation of the red nucleus (RN) suppressed the high-threshold afferent-evoked jaw-opening reflex (JOR). It has been reported that the RN receives bilaterally projection fibers from the raphe magnus nucleus (RMg), and that stimulation of the RMg inhibits the tooth pulp-evoked nociceptive JOR. These facts imply that RMg-induced inhibition of the JOR could be mediated via the RN. The present study first examines whether stimulation of the RMg suppresses the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR. The JOR was evoked by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), and was recorded as the electromyographic response of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. The stimulus intensity was 4.0 (high-threshold) times the threshold. Conditioning electrical stimulation of the RMg significantly suppressed the JOR. A further study then examined whether electrically induced lesions of the RN or microinjection of muscimol into the RN affects RMg-induced suppression of the JOR. Electrically induced lesions of the bilateral RN and microinjection of muscimol into the bilateral RN both reduced the RMg-induced suppression of the JOR. These results suggest that RMg-induced suppression of the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR is mediated by a relay in the RN. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation and Dysarthria in Parkinson's Disease: A PET Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Serge; Thobois, Stephane; Costes, Nicolas; Le Bars, Didier; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Pollak, Pierre; Gentil, Michele

    2004-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, functional imaging studies during limb motor tasks reveal cerebral activation abnormalities that can be reversed by subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. The effect of STN stimulation on parkinsonian dysarthria has not, however, been investigated using PET. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of STN…

  3. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation and Dysarthria in Parkinson's Disease: A PET Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Serge; Thobois, Stephane; Costes, Nicolas; Le Bars, Didier; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Pollak, Pierre; Gentil, Michele

    2004-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, functional imaging studies during limb motor tasks reveal cerebral activation abnormalities that can be reversed by subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. The effect of STN stimulation on parkinsonian dysarthria has not, however, been investigated using PET. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of STN…

  4. GABA and glycine receptors in the nucleus ambiguus mediate tachycardia elicited by chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2015-07-01

    We have previously reported that stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) by microinjections of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) elicits tachycardia, which is partially mediated via inhibition of vagal inputs to the heart. The neuronal pools and neurotransmitters in them mediating tachycardia elicited from the ARCN have not been identified. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardia elicited from the ARCN may be mediated by inhibitory neurotransmitters in the nucleus ambiguus (nAmb). Experiments were done in urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated, male Wistar rats. In separate groups of rats, unilateral and bilateral microinjections of muscimol (1 mM), gabazine (0.01 mM), and strychnine (0.5 mM) into the nAmb significantly attenuated tachycardia elicited by unilateral microinjections of NMDA (10 mM) into the ARCN. Histological examination of the brains showed that the microinjections sites were within the targeted nuclei. Retrograde anatomic tracing from the nAmb revealed direct bilateral projections from the ARCN and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus to the nAmb. The results of the present study suggest that tachycardia elicited by stimulation of the ARCN by microinjections of NMDA is mediated via GABAA and glycine receptors located in the nAmb.

  5. [The neuronal responses of the caudate nucleus in the cat to sensory stimulation].

    PubMed

    Rodionova, E I; Pigarev, I N

    1990-01-01

    Responses of caudate neurons to a large variety of visual and other sensory stimuli were studied in alert cats. Sharp drops in the spontaneous activity of the unknown origin and differences in the activity level were revealed in adjacent parts of the caudate nucleus. The following types of neurons were recorded: neurons responding to visual stimulation; neurons responding to somatic stimulation; neurons responding to combined visual-somatic stimulation. The best response was observed to moving visual stimuli that attracted the animal's attention, alimentary objects specifically. The caudate nucleus of each hemisphere contained representation of both contra- and ipsilateral half of the animal body. Cell responses to sensory stimuli from the caudate nucleus have been compared with those from some cortical areas.

  6. Optogenetic neuronal stimulation of the lateral cerebellar nucleus promotes persistent functional recovery after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aatman M.; Ishizaka, Shunsuke; Cheng, Michelle Y.; Wang, Eric H.; Bautista, Alex R.; Levy, Sabrina; Smerin, Daniel; Sun, Guohua; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2017-01-01

    Stroke induces network-wide changes in the brain, affecting the excitability in both nearby and remotely connected regions. Brain stimulation is a promising neurorestorative technique that has been shown to improve stroke recovery by altering neuronal activity of the target area. However, it is unclear whether the beneficial effect of stimulation is a result of neuronal or non-neuronal activation, as existing stimulation techniques nonspecifically activate/inhibit all cell types (neurons, glia, endothelial cells, oligodendrocytes) in the stimulated area. Furthermore, which brain circuit is efficacious for brain stimulation is unknown. Here we use the optogenetics approach to selectively stimulate neurons in the lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN), a deep cerebellar nucleus that sends major excitatory output to multiple motor and sensory areas in the forebrain. Repeated LCN stimulations resulted in a robust and persistent recovery on the rotating beam test, even after cessation of stimulations for 2 weeks. Furthermore, western blot analysis demonstrated that LCN stimulations significantly increased the axonal growth protein GAP43 in the ipsilesional somatosensory cortex. Our results demonstrate that pan-neuronal stimulations of the LCN is sufficient to promote robust and persistent recovery after stroke, and thus is a promising target for brain stimulation. PMID:28569261

  7. Paradoxical augmented relapse in alcohol-dependent rats during deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Hadar, R; Vengeliene, V; Barroeta Hlusicke, E; Canals, S; Noori, H R; Wieske, F; Rummel, J; Harnack, D; Heinz, A; Spanagel, R; Winter, C

    2016-01-01

    Case reports indicate that deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens may be beneficial to alcohol-dependent patients. The lack of clinical trials and our limited knowledge of deep-brain stimulation call for translational experiments to validate these reports. To mimic the human situation, we used a chronic-continuous brain-stimulation paradigm targeting the nucleus accumbens and other brain sites in alcohol-dependent rats. To determine the network effects of deep-brain stimulation in alcohol-dependent rats, we combined electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and studied neurotransmitter levels in nucleus accumbens-stimulated versus sham-stimulated rats. Surprisingly, we report here that electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens led to augmented relapse behavior in alcohol-dependent rats. Our associated fMRI data revealed some activated areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex and caudate putamen. However, when we applied stimulation to these areas, relapse behavior was not affected, confirming that the nucleus accumbens is critical for generating this paradoxical effect. Neurochemical analysis of the major activated brain sites of the network revealed that the effect of stimulation may depend on accumbal dopamine levels. This was supported by the finding that brain-stimulation-treated rats exhibited augmented alcohol-induced dopamine release compared with sham-stimulated animals. Our data suggest that deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens enhances alcohol-liking probably via augmented dopamine release and can thereby promote relapse. PMID:27327255

  8. Responses evoked in the cerebellar cortex by stimulation of the caudate nucleus in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Mary; Williams, T. D.

    1968-01-01

    1. Responses evoked in the cerebellar cortex following stimulation of caudate nucleus are described. 2. The evoked responses recorded from the surface of the cerebellar cortex were found to be of two types, one with a short (4-6 msec) latency and one with a longer (12-17 msec) latency. 3. The short latency response was maximal in the lobulus simplex, the longer latency response was maximal in paramedian lobule. 4. Following lesions in the inferior olive the longer latency response was absent. 5. Recordings from within the cerebellar cortex showed that the short latency response was uniformly distributed throughout the grey matter, the longer latency response was maximal in the region of the Purkinje cell bodies. 6. It was concluded that the short latency response was due to activation via the mossy fibres and the longer latency response to activation via the climbing fibres. 7. It was found that responses could be evoked in the cerebellum following stimulation of only the latero-ventral part of the caudate nucleus; stimulation of the rest of the nucleus caused no response in the cerebellum. This division of the caudate nucleus into two parts is similar to the subdivision of the caudate nucleus made by other workers using different criteria. PMID:5698279

  9. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation improves deglutition in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ciucci, Michelle R; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie M; Sherman, Scott J

    2008-04-15

    Relatively little is known about the role of the basal ganglia in human deglutition. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) affords us a model for examining deglutition in humans with known impairment of the basal ganglia. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of subthalamic nuclei (STN) DBS on the oral and pharyngeal stages of deglutition in individuals with Parkinson's Disease (PD). It was hypothesized that DBS would be associated with improved deglutition. Within participant, comparisons were made between DBS in the ON and OFF conditions using the dependent variables: pharyngeal transit time, maximal hyoid bone excursion, oral total composite score, and pharyngeal total composite score. Significant improvement occurred for the pharyngeal composite score and pharyngeal transit time in the DBS ON condition compared with DBS OFF. Stimulation of the STN may excite thalamocortical or brainstem targets to sufficiently overcome the bradykinesia/hypokinesia associated with PD and return some pharyngeal stage motor patterns to performance levels approximating those of "normal" deglutition. However, the degree of hyoid bone excursion and oral stage measures did not improve, suggesting that these motor acts may be under the control of different sensorimotor pathways within the basal ganglia. 2007 Movement Disorder Society

  10. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Changes Velopharyngeal Control in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Michael J.; Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adequate velopharyngeal control is essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on velopharyngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of velopharyngeal…

  11. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Changes Velopharyngeal Control in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Michael J.; Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adequate velopharyngeal control is essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on velopharyngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of velopharyngeal…

  12. Influence of fastigial nucleus stimulation on heart rate variability of surgically induced myocardial infarction rats: fastigial nucleus stimulation and autonomous nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Abulaiti, Alimujiang; Hu, Dayi; Zhu, Danian; Zhang, Runfeng

    2011-11-01

    Electrical stimulation of the rostal cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FNS) has been proved to have neuroprotective effects, but it is not known whether FNS also has a cardioprotective effect. One hundred Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into four groups, including a sham-operation group (Sham group), rats whose coronary arteries were ligated but the FNs were sham stimulated (AMI group), rats in which both coronary arteries were ligated and FNs were stimulated (FNS group), and rats whose fastigial nuclei were lesioned 5 days before ligation, then their coronary arteries were ligated and FNs were stimulated (FNL group). Heart rate variability parameters were monitored 6 h, 24 h, 7 days and 21 days after ligation, and mortality rates, hemodynamic parameters and infarction sizes were compared after 21 days. FNS improved the survival of rats, and this may be due to the increased vagal and decreased sympathetic tone. FN stimulation does not affect infarction size and hemodynamic parameters. FN stimulation may have a protective effect on surgically induced myocardial infarction rats.

  13. Auditory Responses to Electric and Infrared Neural Stimulation of the Rat Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rohit; Guex, Amelie A.; Hancock, Kenneth E.; Durakovic, Nedim; McKay, Colette M.; Slama, Michaël C. C.; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve the auditory brainstem implant, a prosthesis in which user outcomes are modest, we applied electric and infrared neural stimulation (INS) to the cochlear nucleus in a rat animal model. Electric stimulation evoked regions of neural activation in the inferior colliculus and short-latency, multipeaked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). Pulsed INS, delivered to the surface of the cochlear nucleus via an optical fiber, evoked broad neural activation in the inferior colliculus. Strongest responses were recorded when the fiber was placed at lateral positions on the cochlear nucleus, close to the temporal bone. INS-evoked ABRs were multipeaked but longer in latency than those for electric stimulation; they resembled the responses to acoustic stimulation. After deafening, responses to electric stimulation persisted, whereas those to INS disappeared, consistent with a reported “optophonic” effect, a laser-induced acoustic artifact. Thus, for deaf individuals who use the auditory brainstem implant, INS alone did not appear promising as a new approach. PMID:24508368

  14. Mood Response to Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Meghan C.; Black, Kevin J.; Weaver, Patrick M.; Lugar, Heather M.; Videen, Tom O.; Tabbal, Samer D.; Karimi, Morvarid; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Hershey, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) in Parkinson disease (PD) improves motor function but has variable effects on mood. Little is known about the relationship between electrode contact location and mood response. We identified the anatomical location of electrode contacts and measured mood response to stimulation with the Visual Analog Scale in 24 STN DBS PD patients. Participants reported greater positive mood, decreased anxiety and apathy with bilateral and unilateral stimulation. Left DBS improved mood more than right DBS. Right DBS-induced increase in positive mood was related to more medial and dorsal contact locations. These results highlight the functional heterogeneity of the STN. PMID:22450611

  15. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in early stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Charles, David; Konrad, Peter E; Neimat, Joseph S; Molinari, Anna L; Tramontana, Michael G; Finder, Stuart G; Gill, Chandler E; Bliton, Mark J; Kao, Chris; Phibbs, Fenna T; Hedera, Peter; Salomon, Ronald M; Cannard, Kevin R; Wang, Lily; Song, Yanna; Davis, Thomas L

    2014-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective and approved therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), and a recent study suggests efficacy in mid-stage disease. This manuscript reports the results of a pilot trial investigating preliminary safety and tolerability of DBS in early PD. Thirty subjects with idiopathic PD (Hoehn & Yahr Stage II off medication), age 50-75, on medication ≥6 months but ≤4 years, and without motor fluctuations or dyskinesias were randomized to optimal drug therapy (ODT) (n = 15) or DBS + ODT (n = 15). Co-primary endpoints were the time to reach a 4-point worsening from baseline in the UPDRS-III off therapy and the change in levodopa equivalent daily dose from baseline to 24 months. As hypothesized, the mean UPDRS total and part III scores were not significantly different on or off therapy at 24 months. Medication requirements in the DBS + ODT group were lower at all time points with a maximal difference at 18 months. With a few exceptions, differences in neuropsychological functioning were not significant. Two subjects in the DBS + ODT group suffered serious adverse events; remaining adverse events were mild or transient. This study demonstrates that subjects with early stage PD will enroll in and complete trials testing invasive therapies and provides preliminary evidence that DBS is well tolerated in early PD. The results of this trial provide the data necessary to design a large, phase III, double-blind, multicenter trial investigating the safety and efficacy of DBS in early PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Deep brain stimulation effect on freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Ferraye, Murielle U; Debû, Bettina; Pollak, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The majority of patients with Parkinson's disease suffer from freezing of gait (FOG), which responds more or less to levodopa. Thalamic stimulation, mainly used in the treatment of tremor dominant Parkinson's disease is ineffective in FOG. GPi stimulation moderately improves FOG, but this effect may abate in the long term. STN stimulation was reported to improve levodopa-responsive FOG. In some patients, the benefit from levodopa is greater than that from STN stimulation, and levodopa and STN stimulation can have additive effects. On the contrary, STN stimulation is ineffective on levodopa-resistant FOG. In the few cases of levodopa-induced FOG, STN stimulation can indirectly be effective, thanks to a great decrease or arrest of levodopa. Stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus has recently been performed in small groups of patients suffering from both off- and on-levodopa gait impairments. The first results appear encouraging, but they need to be confirmed by controlled studies in larger series of patients.

  17. Freezing and hypokinesia of gait induced by stimulation of the subthalamic region.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Giorgio; Lopiano, Leonardo; Zibetti, Maurizio; Cinquepalmi, Annina; Fronda, Chiara; Bergamasco, Bruno; Ducati, Alessandro; Lanotte, Michele

    2007-07-15

    We report a case of a Parkinson's disease patient treated by bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, who developed freezing and hypokinesia of gait induced by stimulation through a left-side misplaced electrode which was more antero-medial than the planned trajectory. Subsequently, correct repositioning of the left electrode afforded complete relief of gait disturbances. Freezing and hypokinesia of gait may be side effects of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic region due to current spreading antero-medially to the subthalamic nucleus. These side effects are not subject to habituation and restrict any increase in stimulation parameters. We hypothesize that pallidal projections to the pedunculopontine nucleus could be responsible for these gait disturbances in our patient.

  18. Stimulation of the nucleus accumbens as behavioral reward in awake behaving monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bichot, Narcisse P; Heard, Matthew T; Desimone, Robert

    2011-08-15

    It has been known that monkeys will repeatedly press a bar for electrical stimulation in several different brain structures. We explored the possibility of using electrical stimulation in one such structure, the nucleus accumbens, as a substitute for liquid reward in animals performing a complex task, namely visual search. The animals had full access to water in the cage at all times on days when stimulation was used to motivate them. Electrical stimulation was delivered bilaterally at mirror locations in and around the accumbens, and the animals' motivation to work for electrical stimulation was quantified by the number of trials they performed correctly per unit of time. Acute mapping revealed that stimulation over a large area successfully supported behavioral performance during the task. Performance improved with increasing currents until it reached an asymptotic, theoretically maximal level. Moreover, stimulation with chronically implanted electrodes showed that an animal's motivation to work for electrical stimulation was at least equivalent to, and often better than, when it worked for liquid reward while on water control. These results suggest that electrical stimulation in the accumbens is a viable method of reward in complex tasks. Because this method of reward does not necessitate control over water or food intake, it may offer an alternative to the traditional liquid or food rewards in monkeys, depending on the goals and requirements of the particular research project.

  19. Addiction in Parkinson's disease: impact of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Witjas, Tatiana; Baunez, Christelle; Henry, Jean Marc; Delfini, Marie; Regis, Jean; Cherif, André Ali; Peragut, Jean Claude; Azulay, Jean Philippe

    2005-08-01

    In Parkinson's disease, dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) is characterized by severe dopamine addiction and behavioral disorders such as manic psychosis, hypersexuality, pathological gambling, and mood swings. Here, we describe the case of 2 young parkinsonian patients suffering from disabling motor fluctuations and dyskinesia associated with severe DDS. In addition to alleviating the motor disability in both patients, subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation greatly reduced the behavioral disorders as well as completely abolished the addiction to dopaminergic treatment. Dopaminergic addiction in patients with Parkinson's disease, therefore, does not constitute an obstacle to high-frequency STN stimulation, and this treatment may even cure the addiction.

  20. Combined pallidal and subthalamic nucleus stimulation in sporadic dystonia-parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Wöhrle, Johannes C; Blahak, Christian; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Fogel, Wolfgang; Bäzner, Hansjoerg; Krauss, Joachim K

    2012-01-01

    Multifocal deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a new technique that has been introduced recently. A 39-year-old man with dystonia-parkinsonism underwent the simultaneous implantation of subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus internus (GPi) DBS electrodes. While bilateral STN DBS controlled the parkinsonian symptoms well and allowed for a reduction in levodopa, the improvement of dystonia was only temporary. Additional GPi DBS also alleviated dystonic symptoms. Formal assessment at the 1-year follow-up showed that both the parkinsonian symptoms and the dystonia were markedly improved via continuous bilateral combined STN and GPi stimulation. Sustained benefit was achieved at 3 years postoperatively.

  1. Stimulation of contacts in ventral but not dorsal subthalamic nucleus normalizes response switching in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenhouse, Ian; Gould, Sherrie; Houser, Melissa; Aron, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Switching between responses is a key executive function known to rely on the frontal cortex and the basal ganglia. Here we aimed to establish with greater anatomical specificity whether such switching could be mediated via different possible frontal–basal-ganglia circuits. Accordingly, we stimulated dorsal vs. ventral contacts of electrodes in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's patients during switching performance, and also studied matched controls. The patients underwent three sessions: once with bilateral dorsal contact stimulation, once with bilateral ventral contact stimulation, and once Off stimulation. Patients Off stimulation showed abnormal patterns of switching, and stimulation of the ventral contacts but not the dorsal contacts normalized the pattern of behavior relative to controls. This provides some of the first evidence in humans that stimulation of dorsal vs. ventral STN DBS contacts has differential effects on executive function. As response switching is an executive function known to rely on prefrontal cortex, these results suggest that ventral contact stimulation affected an executive/associative cortico-basal ganglia circuit. PMID:23562963

  2. Cognitive and behavioural effects of chronic stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, A; Albanese, A; Contarino, M; Zinzi, P; Barbier, A; Gasparini, F; Romito, L; Bentivoglio, A; Scerrati, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate cognitive and behavioural effects of bilateral lead implants for high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's disease; and to discriminate between HFS and the effects of surgical intervention on cognitive function by carrying out postoperative cognitive assessments with the stimulators turned on or off. Methods: Motor, cognitive, behavioural, and functional assessments were undertaken in 20 patients with Parkinson's disease before implantation and then at three, six, and 12 months afterwards. Nine patients were also examined 18 months after surgery. Postoperative cognitive assessments were carried out with stimulators turned off at three and 18 months, and turned on at six and 12 months. Results: Cognitive assessment showed a significant postoperative decline in performance on tasks of letter verbal fluency (across all postoperative assessments, but more pronounced at three months) and episodic verbal memory (only at three months, with stimulators off). At three, six, and 12 months after surgery, there was a significant improvement in the mini-mental state examination and in a task of executive function (modified Wisconsin card sorting test). On all postoperative assessments, there was an improvement in parkinsonian motor symptoms, quality of life, and activities of daily living while off antiparkinsonian drugs. A significant postoperative decrease in depressive and anxiety symptoms was observed across all assessments. Similar results were seen in the subgroup of nine patients with an 18 month follow up. Following implantation, three patients developed transient manic symptoms and one showed persistent psychic akinesia. Conclusions: Bilateral HFS of the subthalamic nucleus is a relatively safe procedure with respect to long term cognitive and behavioural morbidity, although individual variability in postoperative cognitive and behavioural outcome invites caution. Stimulation of the subthalamic

  3. Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus stimulation reduces intestinal injury in rats with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Quan-Jun; Deng, Ding-Jing; Che, Jin; Zhao, Hai-Rong; Yu, Jun-Jie; Lu, Yong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect and mechanism of stimulation of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus with glutamate acid in rats with ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: The rats were anesthetized with 10% chloral hydrate via abdominal injection and treated with an equal volume of TNBS + 50% ethanol enema, injected into the upper section of the anus with the tail facing up. Colonic damage scores were calculated after injecting a certain dose of glutamic acid into the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and the effect of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and vagus nerve in alleviating UC injury through chemical stimulation of the PVN was observed in rats. Expression changes of C-myc, Apaf-1, caspase-3, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-17 during the protection against UC injury through chemical stimulation of the PVN in rats were detected by Western blot. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in colon tissues of rats were measured by colorimetric methods. RESULTS: Chemical stimulation of the PVN significantly reduced UC in rats in a dose-dependent manner. The protective effects of the chemical stimulation of the PVN on rats with UC were eliminated after chemical damage to the PVN. After glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid was injected into the PVN, the protective effects of the chemical stimulation of the PVN were eliminated in rats with UC. After AVP-Vl receptor antagonist ([Deamino-penl, val4, D-Arg8]-vasopressin) was injected into NTS or bilateral chemical damage to NTS, the protective effect of the chemical stimulation of PVN on UC was also eliminated. After chemical stimulation of the PVN, SOD activity increased, MDA content decreased, C-myc protein expression significantly increased, caspase-3 and Apaf-1 protein expression significantly decreased, and IL-6 and IL-17 expression decreased in colon tissues in rats with UC. CONCLUSION: Chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic PVN provides a protective effect against UC injury in

  4. Effects of contact location and voltage amplitude on speech and movement in bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tripoliti, Elina; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Martinez-Torres, Irene; Tisch, Stephen; Frost, Eleanor; Borrell, Ellie; Hariz, Marwan I; Limousin, Patricia

    2008-12-15

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is particularly effective in improving limb symptoms in Parkinson's disease. However, speech shows a variable response. Contact site and amplitude of stimulation have been suggested as possible factors influencing speech. In this double blind study, we assessed 14 patients post bilateral STN-DBS, without medication. Six conditions were studied in random order as follows: stimulation inside the STN at low voltage (2 V) and at high voltage (4 V); above the STN at 2 V and at 4 V, at usual clinical parameters, and off-stimulation. The site of stimulation was defined on the postoperative stereotactic MRI data. Speech protocol consisted of the assessment of intelligibility of the dysarthric speech, maximum sustained phonation, and a 1-minute monologue. Movement was assessed using the UPDRS-III. Stimulation at 4 V significantly reduced the speech intelligibility (P = 0.004) independently from the site of stimulation. Stimulation at 4 V significantly improved the motor function. Stimulation inside the nucleus was significantly more effective than outside the nucleus (P = 0.0006). The significant improvement in movement coupled with significant deterioration in speech intelligibility when patients are stimulated inside the nucleus at high voltage indicates a critical role for electrical stimulation parameters in speech motor control. (c) 2008 Movement Disorder Society.

  5. Nucleus accumbens deep brain stimulation in a rat model of binge eating.

    PubMed

    Doucette, W T; Khokhar, J Y; Green, A I

    2015-12-15

    Binge eating (BE) is a difficult-to-treat behavior with high relapse rates, thus complicating several disorders including obesity. In this study, we tested the effects of high-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a rodent model of BE. We hypothesized that BE rats receiving high-frequency DBS in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core would have reduced binge sizes compared with sham stimulation in both a 'chronic BE' model as well as in a 'relapse to chronic BE' model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (N=18) were implanted with stimulating electrodes in bilateral NAc core, and they received either active stimulation (N=12) or sham stimulation (N=6) for the initial chronic BE experiments. After testing in the chronic BE state, rats did not engage in binge sessions for 1 month, and then resumed binge sessions (relapse to chronic BE) with active or sham stimulation (N=5-7 per group). A significant effect of intervention group was observed on binge size in the chronic BE state, but no significant difference between intervention groups was observed in the relapse to chronic BE experiments. This research, making use of both a chronic BE model as well as a relapse to chronic BE model, provides data supporting the hypothesis that DBS of the NAc core can decrease BE. Further research will be needed to learn how to increase the effect size and decrease deep brain stimulation-treatment outcome variability across the continuum of BE behavior.

  6. Plasma corticosterone responses to lesions and stimulations of the limbic thalami nuclei, medial mammillary nucleus and cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Suárez, M; Perassi, N I

    1988-06-01

    The influence of extrahypothalamic limbic structures on adrenocortical activity was investigated in female adult rats. Bilateral lesions on the anteromedial thalami nucleus (AMTN), anteroventral thalami nucleus (AVTN) or the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) all elicited a significant decrease on plasma corticosterone, while their electrochemical stimulation produced a significant increase with respect to animals with sham lesions or sham stimulation. In contrast, after lesions of the dorsomedial thalami nucleus (DMTN), medial mammillary nucleus (pars lateralis) (MMN) or retrosplenial cortex (RC), values of plasma corticosterone were significantly higher than those found in controls, whereas following their stimulation plasma corticosterone levels were lower than in controls. Bilateral lesions or stimulations of anterior cingulate cortex had no significant effect upon corticosterone secretion. These findings may be interpreted as indicative of the existence of excitatory (AMTN, AVTN, and PCC) and inhibitory (DMTN, MMN and RC) central nervous structures for the control of corticoadrenal secretion besides those already known.

  7. Weight gain following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation: a PET study.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Le Jeune, Florence; Drapier, Sophie; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Haegelen, Claire; Lalys, Florent; Robert, Gabriel; Drapier, Dominique; Vérin, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain weight gain after deep brain stimulation (DBS), but none provides a fully satisfactory account of this adverse effect. We analyzed the correlation between changes in brain metabolism (using positron emission tomography [PET] imaging) and weight gain after bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS in patients with Parkinson's disease. Body mass index was calculated and brain activity prospectively measured using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose 3 months before and 4 months after the start of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in 23 patients with Parkinson's disease. Motor complications (United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]-IV scores) and dopaminergic medication were included in the analysis to control for their possible influence on brain metabolism. Mean ± standard deviation (SD) body mass index increased significantly by 0.8 ± 1.5 kg/m(2) (P = 0.03). Correlations were found between weight gain and changes in brain metabolism in limbic and associative areas, including the orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann areas [BAs] 10 and 11), lateral and medial parts of the temporal lobe (BAs 20, 21, 22,39 and 42), anterior cingulate cortex (BA 32), and retrosplenial cortex (BA 30). However, we found no correlation between weight gain and metabolic changes in sensorimotor areas. These findings suggest that changes in associative and limbic processes contribute to weight gain after subthalamic nucleus DBS in Parkinson's disease.

  8. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens shell attenuates cocaine reinstatement through local and antidromic activation.

    PubMed

    Vassoler, Fair M; White, Samantha L; Hopkins, Thomas J; Guercio, Leonardo A; Espallergues, Julie; Berton, Olivier; Schmidt, Heath D; Pierce, R Christopher

    2013-09-04

    Accumbal deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of addiction. Here, we demonstrate that DBS in the nucleus accumbens shell, but not the core, attenuates cocaine priming-induced reinstatement of drug seeking, an animal model of relapse, in male Sprague Dawley rats. Next, we compared DBS of the shell with pharmacological inactivation. Results indicated that inactivation using reagents that influenced (lidocaine) or spared (GABA receptor agonists) fibers of passage blocked cocaine reinstatement when administered into the core but not the shell. It seems unlikely, therefore, that intrashell DBS influences cocaine reinstatement by inactivating this nucleus or the fibers coursing through it. To examine potential circuit-wide changes, c-Fos immunohistochemistry was used to examine neuronal activation following DBS of the nucleus accumbens shell. Intrashell DBS increased c-Fos induction at the site of stimulation as well as in the infralimbic cortex, but had no effect on the dorsal striatum, prelimbic cortex, or ventral pallidum. Recent evidence indicates that accumbens DBS antidromically stimulates axon terminals, which ultimately activates GABAergic interneurons in cortical areas that send afferents to the shell. To test this hypothesis, GABA receptor agonists (baclofen/muscimol) were microinjected into the anterior cingulate, and prelimbic or infralimbic cortices before cocaine reinstatement. Pharmacological inactivation of all three medial prefrontal cortical subregions attenuated the reinstatement of cocaine seeking. These results are consistent with DBS of the accumbens shell attenuating cocaine reinstatement via local activation and/or activation of GABAergic interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex via antidromic stimulation of cortico-accumbal afferents.

  9. Impact of Combined Subthalamic Nucleus and Substantia Nigra Stimulation on Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Horn, A.; Hamel, W.; Koeppen, J. A.; Westphal, M.; Engel, A. K.; Gerloff, C.; Moll, C. K. E.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the study was to compare the tolerability and the effects of conventional subthalamic nucleus (STN) and combined subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra (STN+SNr) high-frequency stimulation in regard to neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease patients. In this single center, randomized, double-blind, cross-over clinical trial, twelve patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (1 female; age: 61.3 ± 7.3 years; disease duration: 12.3 ± 5.4 years; Hoehn and Yahr stage: 2.2 ± 0.39) were included. Apathy, fatigue, depression, and impulse control disorder were assessed using a comprehensive set of standardized rating scales and questionnaires such as the Lille Apathy Rating Scale (LARS), Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS), Becks Depression Inventory (BDI-I), Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (QUIP-RS), and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39). Three patients that were initially assigned to the STN+SNr stimulation mode withdrew from the study within the first week due to discomfort. Statistical comparison of data retrieved from patients who completed the study revealed no significant differences between both stimulation conditions in terms of mean scores of scales measuring apathy, fatigue, depression, impulse control disorder, and quality of life. Individual cases showed an improvement of apathy under combined STN+SNr stimulation. In general, combined STN+SNr stimulation seems to be safe in terms of neuropsychiatric side effects, although careful patient selection and monitoring in the short-term period after changing stimulation settings are recommended. PMID:28246572

  10. Optogenetic stimulation of the cochlear nucleus using channelrhodopsin-2 evokes activity in the central auditory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Darrow, Keith N.; Slama, Michaël C. C.; Owoc, Maryanna; Kozin, Elliott; Hancock, Kenneth; Kempfle, Judith; Edge, Albert; Lacour, Stephanie; Boyden, Edward; Polley, Daniel; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics has become an important research tool and is being considered as the basis for several neural prostheses. However, few studies have applied optogenetics to the auditory brainstem. This study explored whether optical activation of the cochlear nucleus (CN) elicited responses in neurons in higher centers of the auditory pathway, and it measured the evoked response to optical stimulation. Viral-mediated gene transfer was used to express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in the mouse CN. Blue light was delivered via an optical fiber placed near the surface of the infected CN and recordings were made in higher-level centers. Optical stimulation evoked excitatory multiunit spiking activity throughout the tonotopic axis of central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (IC) and the auditory cortex (Actx). The pattern and magnitude of IC activity elicited by optical stimulation was comparable to that obtained with a 50 dB SPL acoustic click stimulus. This broad pattern of activity was consistent with histological confirmation of GFP label of cell bodies and axons throughout the CN. Increasing pulse rates up to 320 Hz did not significantly affect threshold or bandwidth of the IC responses, but rates higher than 50 Hz resulted in desynchronized activity. Optical stimulation also evoked an auditory brainstem response, which had a simpler waveform than the response to acoustic stimulation. Control cases showed no responses to optical stimulation. These data suggest that optogenetic control of central auditory neurons is feasible, but opsins with faster channel kinetics will be necessary to convey information in rates typical of many auditory signals. PMID:25481416

  11. Impact of Combined Subthalamic Nucleus and Substantia Nigra Stimulation on Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Hidding, U; Gulberti, A; Horn, A; Buhmann, C; Hamel, W; Koeppen, J A; Westphal, M; Engel, A K; Gerloff, C; Weiss, D; Moll, C K E; Pötter-Nerger, M

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the study was to compare the tolerability and the effects of conventional subthalamic nucleus (STN) and combined subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra (STN+SNr) high-frequency stimulation in regard to neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease patients. In this single center, randomized, double-blind, cross-over clinical trial, twelve patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (1 female; age: 61.3 ± 7.3 years; disease duration: 12.3 ± 5.4 years; Hoehn and Yahr stage: 2.2 ± 0.39) were included. Apathy, fatigue, depression, and impulse control disorder were assessed using a comprehensive set of standardized rating scales and questionnaires such as the Lille Apathy Rating Scale (LARS), Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS), Becks Depression Inventory (BDI-I), Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (QUIP-RS), and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39). Three patients that were initially assigned to the STN+SNr stimulation mode withdrew from the study within the first week due to discomfort. Statistical comparison of data retrieved from patients who completed the study revealed no significant differences between both stimulation conditions in terms of mean scores of scales measuring apathy, fatigue, depression, impulse control disorder, and quality of life. Individual cases showed an improvement of apathy under combined STN+SNr stimulation. In general, combined STN+SNr stimulation seems to be safe in terms of neuropsychiatric side effects, although careful patient selection and monitoring in the short-term period after changing stimulation settings are recommended.

  12. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Alters Prefrontal Correlates of Emotion Induction.

    PubMed

    Bick, Sarah K B; Folley, Bradley S; Mayer, Jutta S; Park, Sohee; Charles, P David; Camalier, Corrie R; Pallavaram, Srivatsan; Konrad, Peter E; Neimat, Joseph S

    2017-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improves motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease. STN DBS may also affect emotion, possibly by impacting a parallel limbic cortico-striatal circuit. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in prefrontal cortical activity related to DBS during an emotion induction task. We used near infrared spectroscopy to monitor prefrontal cortex hemodynamic changes during an emotion induction task. Seven DBS patients were tested sequentially in the stimulation-on and stimulation-off states while on dopaminergic medication. Patients watched a series of positive, negative, and neutral videos. The general linear model was used to compare prefrontal oxygenated hemoglobin concentration between DBS states. Deep brain stimulation was correlated with prefrontal oxygenated hemoglobin changes relative to the stimulation off state in response to both positive and negative videos. These changes were specific to emotional stimuli and were not seen during neutral stimuli. These results suggest that STN stimulation influences the prefrontal cortical representation of positive and negative emotion induction. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  13. Changes in Vowel Articulation with Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Dysarthric Speakers with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Mélanie; Prud'Homme, Michel; Cantin, Léo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate changes in vowel articulation with the electrical deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in dysarthric speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Eight Quebec-French speakers diagnosed with idiopathic PD who had undergone STN DBS were evaluated ON-stimulation and OFF-stimulation (1 hour after DBS was turned off). Vowel articulation was compared ON-simulation versus OFF-stimulation using acoustic vowel space and formant centralization ratio, calculated with the first (F1) and second formant (F2) of the vowels /i/, /u/, and /a/. The impact of the preceding consonant context on articulation, which represents a measure of coarticulation, was also analyzed as a function of the stimulation state. Results. Maximum vowel articulation increased during ON-stimulation. Analyses also indicate that vowel articulation was modulated by the consonant context but this relationship did not change with STN DBS. Conclusions. Results suggest that STN DBS may improve articulation in dysarthric speakers with PD, in terms of range of movement. Optimization of the electrical parameters for each patient is important and may lead to improvement in speech fine motor control. However, the impact on overall speech intelligibility may still be small. Clinical considerations are discussed and new research avenues are suggested. PMID:25400977

  14. Motor behaviors in the sheep evoked by electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Linnea; Zhao, Yan; Kelly, Matthew T; Schindeldecker, William; Goetz, Steven; Nelson, Dwight E; Raike, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is used to treat movement disorders, including advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The pathogenesis of PD and the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS are not well understood. Large animal models are essential for investigating the mechanisms of PD and DBS. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel sheep model of STN DBS and quantify the stimulation-evoked motor behaviors. To do so, a large sample of animals was chronically-implanted with commercial DBS systems. Neuroimaging and histology revealed that the DBS leads were implanted accurately relative to the neurosurgical plan and also precisely relative to the STN. It was also possible to repeatedly conduct controlled evaluations of stimulation-evoked motor behavior in the awake-state. The evoked motor responses depended on the neuroanatomical location of the electrode contact selected for stimulation, as contacts proximal to the STN evoked movements at significantly lower voltages. Tissue stimulation modeling demonstrated that selecting any of the contacts stimulated the STN, whereas selecting the relatively distal contacts often also stimulated thalamus but only the distal-most contact stimulated internal capsule. The types of evoked motor behaviors were specific to the stimulation frequency, as low but not high frequencies consistently evoked movements resembling human tremor or dyskinesia. Electromyography confirmed that the muscle activity underlying the tremor-like movements in the sheep was consistent with human tremor. Overall, this work establishes that the sheep is a viable a large-animal platform for controlled testing of STN DBS with objective motor outcomes. Moreover, the results support the hypothesis that exaggerated low-frequency activity within individual nodes of the motor network can drive symptoms of human movement disorders, including tremor and dyskinesia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of varying subthalamic nucleus stimulation on apraxia of lid opening in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Giorgio; Krack, Paul; Fraix, Valérie; Pollak, Pierre

    2012-09-01

    Apraxia of lid opening (ALO) is a non-paralytic inability to open the eyes or sustain lid elevation at will. The exact pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the syndrome are still unknown. ALO has been reported in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) after subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS), suggesting a possible involvement of the basal ganglia. We aimed to assess the effects of varying STN stimulation voltage on ALO in PD patients. Seven out of 14 PD patients with bilateral STN stimulation consecutively seen in our centre presented with ALO. We progressively increased voltage on each STN, using either 130 Hz (high-frequency stimulation, HFS) or 2 or 3 Hz (low-frequency stimulation, LFS). In five patients, HFS induced ALO time-locked to stimulation in 7 out of 10 STNs at a voltage higher than that used for chronic stimulation. LFS induced myoclonus in the pretarsal orbicularis oculi muscle (pOOm) with a rhythm synchronous to the frequency. In the other two patients with ALO already present at the time of the study, HFS improved ALO in 3 out of 4 STNs. ALO recurred within minutes of stimulation arrest. Our findings show that STN-DBS can have opposite effects on ALO. On the one hand, ALO is thought to be a corticobulbar side effect due to lateral current spreading from the STN, in which case it is necessary to use voltages below the ALO-inducing threshold. On the other hand, ALO may be considered a form of off-phase focal dystonia possibly improved by increasing the stimulation voltages.

  16. Successful Management of Hemorrhage-Associated Hemiballism After Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation with Pallidal Stimulation: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Pabaney, Aqueel; Ali, Rushna; Lewitt, Peter A; Sidiropoulos, Christos; Schwalb, Jason M

    2015-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation has been widely used for treating several movement disorders including idiopathic Parkinson disease (IPD). The development of hemiballism after an iatrogenic injury to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) such as postoperative hemorrhage or stroke is rare. Employing pallidal DBS to manage hemiballism arising as a result of STN injury is a unique application of this therapeutic modality, which has only been reported twice in the literature. We present a case of a 54-year-old male with levodopa-responsive IPD who underwent STN electrode placement for deep brain stimulation. The immediate postoperative course was uneventful, but the patient suffered a fall 12 weeks after electrode implantation, leading to electrode displacement and subsequent STN hemorrhage, which led to hemiballism. The hemiballism was then subsequently treated with pallidal DBS after medical management was unsuccessful. In our case pallidal DBS was effective in treating hemiballism that arose as a result of traumatic displacement of STN DBS electrodes. Medical management and changes in stimulation parameters failed to produce any significant change in the hemiballism. This report is only the third of its kind in the literature wherein hemiballism arising as a result of STN damage after DBS was successfully treated with pallidal stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Observational learning in mice can be prevented by medial prefrontal cortex stimulation and enhanced by nucleus accumbens stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Parras, M Teresa; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M

    2012-02-21

    The neural structures involved in ongoing appetitive and/or observational learning behaviors remain largely unknown. Operant conditioning and observational learning were evoked and recorded in a modified Skinner box provided with an on-line video recording system. Mice improved their acquisition of a simple operant conditioning task by observational learning. Electrical stimulation of the observer's medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) at a key moment of the demonstration (when the demonstrator presses a lever in order to obtain a reward) cancels out the benefits of observation. In contrast, electrical stimulation of the observer's nucleus accumbens (NAc) enhances observational learning. Ongoing cognitive processes in the demonstrator could also be driven by electrical stimulation of these two structures, preventing the proper execution of the ongoing instrumental task (mPFC) or stopping pellet intake (NAc). Long-term potentiation (LTP) evoked in these two cortical structures did not prevent the acquisition or retrieval process--namely, mPFC and/or NAc stimulation only prevented, or modified, the ongoing behavioral process. The dorsal hippocampus was not involved in either of these two behavioral processes. Thus, both ongoing observational learning and performance of an instrumental task require the active contribution of the mPFC and/or the NAc.

  18. Medial auditory thalamus is necessary for acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning to cochlear nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Halverson, Hunter E; Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H

    2015-05-01

    Associative learning tasks commonly involve an auditory stimulus, which must be projected through the auditory system to the sites of memory induction for learning to occur. The cochlear nucleus (CN) projection to the pontine nuclei has been posited as the necessary auditory pathway for cerebellar learning, including eyeblink conditioning. However, the medial auditory thalamic nuclei (MATN), consisting of the medial division of the medial geniculate, suprageniculate, and posterior interlaminar nucleus have also been implicated as a critical auditory relay to the pontine nuclei for cerebellum-dependent motor learning. The MATN also conveys auditory information to the amygdala necessary for avoidance and fear conditioning. The current study used CN stimulation to increase activity in the pontine nuclei, relative to a tone stimulus, and possibly provide sufficient input to the cerebellum for acquisition or retention of eyeblink conditioning during MATN inactivation. Primary and secondary effects of CN stimulation and MATN inactivation were examined using 2-deoxy-glucose autoradiography. Stimulation of CN increased activity in the pontine nuclei, however, this increase was not sufficient for cerebellar learning during MATN inactivation. Results of the current experiment provide additional evidence indicating the MATN may be the critical auditory relay for many associative learning tasks.

  19. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens for the treatment of addiction.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ulf J; Voges, Jürgen; Steiner, Johann; Galazky, Imke; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Möller, Michaela; Pisapia, Jared; Halpern, Casey; Caplan, Arthur; Bogerts, Bernhard; Kuhn, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Despite novel medications and other therapeutic strategies, addiction to psychotropic substances remains one of the most serious public health problems worldwide. In this review, beginning with an introduction of deep brain stimulation (DBS), we highlight the importance of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the context of the reward circuitry and addictive behavior. We will provide a short historic overview of other neurosurgical approaches to treat addiction and describe the experimental and preclinical data on DBS in addiction. Finally, we call attention to key ethical issues related to using DBS to treat addiction that are important for future research and the design of clinical trials.

  20. Improved sequence learning with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation: evidence for treatment-specific network modulation.

    PubMed

    Mure, Hideo; Tang, Chris C; Argyelan, Miklos; Ghilardi, Maria-Felice; Kaplitt, Michael G; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2012-02-22

    We used a network approach to study the effects of anti-parkinsonian treatment on motor sequence learning in humans. Eight Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation underwent H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) while they performed kinematically matched sequence learning and movement tasks at baseline and during stimulation. Network analysis revealed a significant learning-related spatial covariance pattern characterized by consistent increases in subject expression during stimulation (p = 0.008, permutation test). The network was associated with increased activity in the lateral cerebellum, dorsal premotor cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, with covarying reductions in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and orbitofrontal cortex. Stimulation-mediated increases in network activity correlated with concurrent improvement in learning performance (p < 0.02). To determine whether similar changes occurred during dopaminergic pharmacotherapy, we studied the subjects during an intravenous levodopa infusion titrated to achieve a motor response equivalent to stimulation. Despite consistent improvement in motor ratings during infusion, levodopa did not alter learning performance or network activity. Analysis of learning-related rCBF in network regions revealed improvement in baseline abnormalities with STN stimulation but not levodopa. These effects were most pronounced in the SMA. In this region, a consistent rCBF response to stimulation was observed across subjects and trials (p = 0.01), although the levodopa response was not significant. These findings link the cognitive treatment response in PD to changes in the activity of a specific cerebello-premotor cortical network. Selective modulation of overactive SMA-STN projection pathways may underlie the improvement in learning found with stimulation.

  1. Improved Sequence Learning with Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: Evidence for Treatment-Specific Network Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Mure, Hideo; Tang, Chris C.; Argyelan, Miklos; Ghilardi, Maria-Felice; Kaplitt, Michael G.; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-01-01

    We used a network approach to study the effects of anti-parkinsonian treatment on motor sequence learning in humans. Eight Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation underwent H2 15Opositron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) while they performed kinematically matched sequence learning and movement tasks at baseline and during stimulation. Network analysis revealed a significant learning-related spatial covariance pattern characterized by consistent increases in subject expression during stimulation (p = 0.008, permutation test). The network was associated with increased activity in the lateral cerebellum, dorsal premotor cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, with covarying reductions in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and orbitofrontal cortex. Stimulation-mediated increases in network activity correlated with concurrent improvement in learning performance (p < 0.02). To determine whether similar changes occurred during dopaminergic pharmacotherapy, we studied the subjects during an intravenous levodopa infusion titrated to achieve a motor response equivalent to stimulation. Despite consistent improvement in motor ratings during infusion, levodopa did not alter learning performance or network activity. Analysis of learning-related rCBF in network regions revealed improvement in baseline abnormalities with STN stimulation but not levodopa. These effects were most pronounced in the SMA. In this region, a consistent rCBF response to stimulation was observed across subjects and trials (p = 0.01), although the levodopa response was not significant. These findings link the cognitive treatment response in PD to changes in the activity of a specific cerebello-premotor cortical network. Selective modulation of overactive SMA–STN projection pathways may underlie the improvement in learning found with stimulation. PMID:22357863

  2. Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation on Emotional Prosody Comprehension in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kreifelts, Benjamin; Krüger, Rejko; Wächter, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Background Although impaired decoding of emotional prosody has frequently been associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), to date only few reports have sought to explore the effect of Parkinson's treatment on disturbances of prosody decoding. In particular, little is known about how surgical treatment approaches such as high frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) affect emotional speech perception in patients with PD. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation on prosody processing. Methodology/Principal Findings To this end the performance of 13 PD patients on three tasks requiring the decoding of emotional speech was assessed and subsequently compared to the performance of healthy control individuals. To delineate the effect of STN-DBS, all patients were tested with stimulators turned on as well as with stimulators turned off. Results revealed that irrespective of whether assessments were made “on” or “off” stimulation, patients' performance was less accurate as compared to healthy control participants on all tasks employed in this study. However, while accuracy appeared to be unaffected by stimulator status, a facilitation of reactions specific to highly conflicting emotional stimulus material (i.e. stimulus material presenting contradicting emotional messages on a verbal and non-verbal prosodic level) was observed during “on” stimulation assessments. Conclusion In sum, presented results suggest that the processing of emotional speech is indeed modulated by STN-DBS. Observed alterations might, on the one hand, reflect a more efficient processing of highly conflicting stimulus material following DBS. However, on the other hand, given the lack of an improvement in accuracy, increased impulsivity associated with STN stimulation needs to be taken into consideration. PMID:21552518

  3. An in vivo investigation of inferior colliculus single neuron responses to cochlear nucleus pulse train stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Stefan J; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Rathbone, Graeme D; Paolini, Antonio G

    2012-12-01

    The auditory brain stem implant (ABI) is being used clinically to restore hearing to patients unable to benefit from a cochlear implant (CI). Speech perception outcomes for ABI users are typically poor compared with most CI users. The ABI is implanted either on the surface of or penetrating through the cochlear nucleus in the auditory brain stem and uses stimulation strategies developed for auditory nerve stimulation with a CI. Although the stimulus rate may affect speech perception outcomes with current stimulation strategies, no studies have systematically investigated the effect of stimulus rate electrophysiologically or clinically. We therefore investigated rate response properties and temporal response properties of single inferior colliculus (IC) neurons from penetrating ABI stimulation using stimulus rates ranging from 100 to 1,600 pulses/s in the rat. We found that the stimulus rate affected the proportion of response types, thresholds, and dynamic ranges of IC activation. The stimulus rate was also found to affect the temporal properties of IC responses, with higher rates providing more temporally similar responses to acoustic stimulation. Suppression of neural firing and inhibition in IC neurons was also found, with response properties varying with the stimulus rate. This study demonstrated that changes in the ABI stimulus rate results in significant differences in IC neuron response properties. Due to electrophysiological differences, the stimulus rate may also change perceptual properties. We suggest that clinical evaluation of the ABI stimulus rate should be performed.

  4. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrical and Optogenetic Deep Brain Stimulation at the Rat Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Daniel L.; Salzwedel, Andrew; Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Gao, Wei; Stuber, Garret D.; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens (NAc-DBS) is an emerging therapy for diverse, refractory neuropsychiatric diseases. Although DBS therapy is broadly hypothesized to work through large-scale neural modulation, little is known regarding the neural circuits and networks affected by NAc-DBS. Using a healthy, sedated rat model of NAc-DBS, we employed both evoked- and functional connectivity (fc) MRI to examine the functional circuit and network changes achieved by electrical NAc stimulation. Optogenetic-fMRI experiments were also undertaken to evaluate the circuit modulation profile achieved by selective stimulation of NAc neurons. NAc-DBS directly modulated neural activity within prefrontal cortex and a large number of subcortical limbic areas (e.g., amygdala, lateral hypothalamus), and influenced functional connectivity among sensorimotor, executive, and limbic networks. The pattern and extent of circuit modulation measured by evoked-fMRI was relatively insensitive to DBS frequency. Optogenetic stimulation of NAc cell bodies induced a positive fMRI signal in the NAc, but no other detectable downstream responses, indicating that therapeutic NAc-DBS might exert its effect through antidromic stimulation. Our study provides a comprehensive mapping of circuit and network-level neuromodulation by NAc-DBS, which should facilitate our developing understanding of its therapeutic mechanisms of action. PMID:27601003

  5. Targeting of the Subthalamic Nucleus for Deep Brain Stimulation: A Survey Among Parkinson Disease Specialists.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Wolfgang; Köppen, Johannes A; Alesch, François; Antonini, Angelo; Barcia, Juan A; Bergman, Hagai; Chabardes, Stephan; Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Cornu, Philippe; Demmel, Walter; Deuschl, Günther; Fasano, Alfonso; Kühn, Andrea A; Limousin, Patricia; McIntyre, Cameron C; Mehdorn, H Maximilian; Pilleri, Manuela; Pollak, Pierre; Rodríguez-Oroz, Maria C; Rumià, Jordi; Samuel, Michael; Timmermann, Lars; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Vesper, Jan; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Volkmann, Jens; Lozano, Andres M

    2017-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation within or adjacent to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) represents the most common stereotactic procedure performed for Parkinson disease. Better STN imaging is often regarded as a requirement for improving stereotactic targeting. However, it is unclear whether there is consensus about the optimal target. To obtain an expert opinion on the site regarded optimal for "STN stimulation," movement disorder specialists were asked to indicate their preferred position for an active contact on hard copies of the Schaltenbrand and Wahren atlas depicting the STN in all 3 planes. This represented an idealized setting, and it mimicked optimal imaging for direct target definition in a perfectly delineated STN. The suggested targets were heterogeneous, although some clustering was observed in the dorsolateral STN and subthalamic area. In particular, in the anteroposterior direction, the intended targets differed to a great extent. Most of the indicated targets are thought to also result in concomitant stimulation of structures adjacent to the STN, including the zona incerta, fields of Forel, and internal capsule. This survey illustrates that most sites regarded as optimal for STN stimulation are close to each other, but there appears to be no uniform perception of the optimal anatomic target, possibly influencing surgical results. The anatomic sweet zone for STN stimulation needs further specification, as this information is likely to make magnetic resonance imaging-based target definition less variable when applied to individual patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrical stimulation of the parabrachial nucleus induces reanimation from isoflurane general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Muindi, Fanuel; Kenny, Jonathan D; Taylor, Norman E; Solt, Ken; Wilson, Matthew A; Brown, Emery N; Van Dort, Christa J

    2016-06-01

    Clinically, emergence from general anesthesia is viewed as a passive process where anesthetics are discontinued at the end of surgery and anesthesiologists wait for the drugs to wear off. The mechanisms involved in emergence are not well understood and there are currently no drugs that can actively reverse the state of general anesthesia. An emerging hypothesis states that brain regions that control arousal become active during emergence and are a key part of the return to wakefulness. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that electrical activation of the glutamatergic parabrachial nucleus (PBN) in the brainstem is sufficient to induce reanimation (active emergence) during continuous isoflurane general anesthesia. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry as a marker of neural activity, we first show a selective increase in active neurons in the PBN during passive emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. We then electrically stimulated the PBN to assess whether it is sufficient to induce reanimation from isoflurane general anesthesia. Stimulation induced behavioral arousal and restoration of the righting reflex during continuous isoflurane general anesthesia. In contrast, stimulation of the nearby central inferior colliculus (CIC) did not restore the righting reflex. Spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed that stimulation produced a significant decrease in EEG delta power during PBN stimulation. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the PBN provides critical arousal input during emergence from isoflurane anesthesia.

  7. Bilateral deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens for comorbid obsessive compulsive disorder and Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Perminder Singh; Cannon, Elisabeth; Coyne, Terry J; Silburn, Peter

    2012-09-12

    We present the case of a 32-year-old Caucasian woman with severe treatment-refractory obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome. Both conditions were present prior to age 5 and impacted significantly on the patient's functioning. Multiple trials of evidence-based pharmacological and behavioural therapies had not achieved remission of symptoms. Bilateral deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens was undertaken to treat both illnesses but with a particular focus on OCD, as the patient identified this as the more debilitating of the two disorders. Following surgery there was an immediate improvement in OCD and tic severity. At follow-up 8 months later, there was a 90% improvement in OCD symptoms and a 57% improvement in tic severity. No intraoperative or postoperative complications or adverse events occurred and there were no undesired effects of stimulation.

  8. A case of musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Mantione, Mariska; Figee, Martijn; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Music is among all cultures an important part of the live of most people. Music has psychological benefits and may generate strong emotional and physiological responses. Recently, neuroscientists have discovered that music influences the reward circuit of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), even when no explicit reward is present. In this clinical case study, we describe a 60-year old patient who developed a sudden and distinct musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeted at the NAcc. This case report substantiates the assumption that the NAcc is involved in musical preference, based on the observation of direct stimulation of the accumbens with DBS. It also shows that accumbens DBS can change musical preference without habituation of its rewarding properties. PMID:24834035

  9. Effects of Nucleus Basalis Magnocellularis Stimulation on a Socially Transmitted Food Preference and c-Fos Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boix-Trelis, Nuria; Vale-Martinez, Anna; Guillazo-Blanch, Gemma; Costa-Miserachs, David; Marti-Nicolovius, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    Experiment 1 examined the effects of electrical stimulation of nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) on a relational odor-association task--the social transmission of food preference (STFP). Rats were stimulated unilaterally in the NBM for 20 min (100 [mu]A, 1 Hz) immediately before the social training. They were tested on their ability to…

  10. Effects of Nucleus Basalis Magnocellularis Stimulation on a Socially Transmitted Food Preference and c-Fos Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boix-Trelis, Nuria; Vale-Martinez, Anna; Guillazo-Blanch, Gemma; Costa-Miserachs, David; Marti-Nicolovius, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    Experiment 1 examined the effects of electrical stimulation of nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) on a relational odor-association task--the social transmission of food preference (STFP). Rats were stimulated unilaterally in the NBM for 20 min (100 [mu]A, 1 Hz) immediately before the social training. They were tested on their ability to…

  11. Programming for Stimulation-Induced Transient Nonmotor Psychiatric Symptoms after Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xi; Qiu, Yiqing; Simfukwe, Keith; Wang, Jiali; Chen, Jianchun

    2017-01-01

    Background Stimulation-induced transient nonmotor psychiatric symptoms (STPSs) are side effects following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We designed algorithms which (1) determine the electrode contacts that induce STPSs and (2) provide a programming protocol to eliminate STPS and maintain the optimal motor functions. Our objective is to test the effectiveness of these algorithms. Materials and Methods 454 PD patients who underwent programming sessions after STN-DBS implantations were retrospectively analyzed. Only STPS patients were enrolled. In these patients, the contacts inducing STPS were found and the programming protocol algorithms used. Results Eleven patients were diagnosed with STPS. Of these patients, two had four episodes of crying, and two had four episodes of mirthful laughter. In one patient, two episodes of abnormal sense of spatial orientation were observed. Hallucination episodes were observed twice in one patient, while five patients recorded eight episodes of hypomania. There were no statistical differences between the UPDRS-III under the final stimulation parameter (without STPS) and previous optimum UPDRS-III under the STPSs (p = 1.000). Conclusion The flow diagram used for determining electrode contacts that induce STPS and the programming protocol employed in the treatment of these symptoms are effective. PMID:28894620

  12. Effects of Anterior Thalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Chronic Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Beatriz; Cavarsan, Clarissa; Miranda, Maisa Ferreira; Aarão, Mayra C.; Madureira, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Antônio M.; Nobrega, José N.; Mello, Luiz E.; Hamani, Clement

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been investigated for the treatment of epilepsy. In rodents, an increase in the latency for the development of seizures and status epilepticus (SE) has been reported in different animal models but the consequences of delivering stimulation to chronic epileptic animals have not been extensively addressed. We study the effects of anterior thalamic nucleus (AN) stimulation at different current intensities in rats rendered epileptic following pilocarpine (Pilo) administration. Four months after Pilo-induced SE, chronic epileptic rats were bilaterally implanted with AN electrodes or had sham-surgery. Stimulation was delivered for 6 h/day, 5 days/week at 130 Hz, 90 µsec. and either 100 µA or 500 µA. The frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures in animals receiving stimulation was compared to that recorded in the preoperative period and in rats given sham treatment. To investigate the effects of DBS on hippocampal excitability, brain slices from animals receiving AN DBS or sham surgery were studied with electrophysiology. We found that rats treated with AN DBS at 100 µA had a 52% non-significant reduction in the frequency of seizures as compared to sham-treated controls and 61% less seizures than at baseline. Animals given DBS at 500 µA had 5.1 times more seizures than controls and a 2.8 fold increase in seizure rate as compared to preoperative values. In non-stimulated controls, the average frequency of seizures before and after surgery remained unaltered. In vitro recordings have shown that slices from animals previously given DBS at 100 µA had a longer latency for the development of epileptiform activity, shorter and smaller DC shifts, and a smaller spike amplitude compared to non-stimulated controls. In contrast, a higher spike amplitude was recorded in slices from animals given AN DBS at 500 µA. PMID:24892420

  13. GABA-mediated oxytocinergic inhibition in dorsal horn neurons by hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Piloni, Gerardo; López-Hidalgo, Mónica; Martínez-Lorenzana, Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Javier; Condés-Lara, Miguel

    2007-03-16

    In anaesthetized rats, we tested whether the unit activity of dorsal horn neurons that receive nociceptive input is modulated by electrical stimulation of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). An electrophysiological mapping of dorsal horn neurons at L3-L4 let us choose cells responding to a receptive field located in the toes region of the left hindpaw. Dorsal horn neurons were classified according to their response properties to peripheral stimulation. Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) cells responding to electrical stimulation of the peripheral receptive field and presenting synaptic input of Adelta, Abeta, and C-fibers were studied. Suspected interneurons that are typically silent and lack peripheral receptive field responses were also analyzed. PVN electrical stimulation inhibits Adelta (-55.0+/-10.2%), C-fiber (-73.1+/-6.7%), and post-discharge (-75.0+/-8.9%) peripheral activation in WDR cells, and silent interneurons were activated. So, this last type of interneuron was called a PVN-ON cell. In WDR cells, the inhibition of peripheral responses caused by PVN stimulation was blocked by intrathecal administration of a specific oxytocin antagonist or bicuculline. However, PVN-ON cell activation was blocked by the same specific oxytocin antagonist, but not by bicuculline. Our results suggest that PVN stimulation inhibits nociceptive peripheral-evoked responses in WDR neurons by a descending oxytocinergic pathway mediated by GABAergic PVN-ON cells. We discuss our observation that the PVN electrical stimulation selectively inhibits Adelta and C-fiber activity without affecting Abeta fibers. We conclude that Adelta and C-fibers receive a presynaptic inhibition mediated by GABA.

  14. Effect of bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation on gait in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Faist, M; Xie, J; Kurz, D; Berger, W; Maurer, C; Pollak, P; Lücking, C H

    2001-08-01

    The fundamental disturbance of the parkinsonian gait is the reduction in walking velocity. This is mainly due to reduction in stride length, while cadence (steps/min) is slightly enhanced. Treatment with L-dopa increases stride length while cadence is unchanged. Chronic stimulation of the thalamus has no effect on Parkinsonian gait. The efficacy of electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on gait in advanced Parkinson's disease has been clearly demonstrated clinically. The aim of the present study was to quantify the changes in gait measures induced by STN stimulation and L-dopa and to assess possible differential or additive effects. Eight Parkinson's disease patients (mean +/- SD age 48.1 +/- 7.3 years) with chronic bilateral STN stimulation (mean duration of disease 13.3 +/- 2.4 years, mean stimulation time 15.4 +/- 10.6 months) and 12 age-matched controls were investigated. Subjects walked on a special treadmill with a closed-loop ultrasound control system that used the subject's position to adjust treadmill speed continuously for the actual walking velocity. In an appropriate crossover design, spatiotemporal gait measures and leg joint angle movements were assessed for at least 120 stride cycles in four treatment conditions: with and without stimulation and with and without a suprathreshold dose of L-dopa. With STN stimulation, there were increases of almost threefold in mean walking velocity (from 0.35 to 0.96 m/s) and stride length (from 0.34 to 0.99 m). Cadence remained constant. The range of motion of the major leg joints also increased. L-Dopa alone had a slightly weaker effect, with an increase in walking velocity to 0.94 m/s and in stride length to 0.92 m at a similar cadence. These increased values were in the range of those for healthy age-matched subjects performing the same task. The combination of both treatments further increased the mean walking velocity to 1.19 m/s and stride length to 1.20 m at an unchanged cadence. However, not

  15. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation affects distractor interference in auditory working memory.

    PubMed

    Camalier, Corrie R; Wang, Alice Y; McIntosh, Lindsey G; Park, Sohee; Neimat, Joseph S

    2017-03-01

    Computational and theoretical accounts hypothesize the basal ganglia play a supramodal "gating" role in the maintenance of working memory representations, especially in preservation from distractor interference. There are currently two major limitations to this account. The first is that supporting experiments have focused exclusively on the visuospatial domain, leaving questions as to whether such "gating" is domain-specific. The second is that current evidence relies on correlational measures, as it is extremely difficult to causally and reversibly manipulate subcortical structures in humans. To address these shortcomings, we examined non-spatial, auditory working memory performance during reversible modulation of the basal ganglia, an approach afforded by deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We found that subthalamic nucleus stimulation impaired auditory working memory performance, specifically in the group tested in the presence of distractors, even though the distractors were predictable and completely irrelevant to the encoding of the task stimuli. This study provides key causal evidence that the basal ganglia act as a supramodal filter in working memory processes, further adding to our growing understanding of their role in cognition.

  16. Enhanced consumption of salient solutions following pedunculopontine tegmental lesions

    PubMed Central

    MacLaren, Duncan AA; Markovic, Tamara; Daniels, Derek; Clark, Stewart D

    2014-01-01

    Rats with lesions of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) reliably overconsume high concentration sucrose solution. This effect is thought to be indicative of response-perseveration or loss of behavioral control in conditions of high excitement. While these theories have anatomical and behavioral support, they have never been explicitly tested. Here, we used a contact lickometer to examine the microstructure of drinking behavior to gain insight into the behavioral changes during overconsumption. Rats received either excitotoxic (ibotenic acid) damage to all PPTg neuronal subpopulations or selective depletion of the cholinergic neuronal sub-population (Dtx-UII lesions). We offered rats a variety of pleasant, neutral and aversive tastants to assess the generalizability and specificity of the overconsumption effect. Ibotenic lesioned rats consumed significantly more 20% sucrose than sham controls, and did so through licking significantly more times. However, the behavioral microstructure during overconsumption was unaffected by the lesion and showed no indications of response-perseveration. Furthermore, the overconsumption effect did not generalize to highly consumed saccharin. In contrast, while only consuming small amounts of quinine solution, ibotenic lesioned rats had significantly more licks and bursts for this tastant. Selective depletion of cholinergic PPTg neurons had no effect on consumption of any tastant. We then assessed whether it is the salience of the solution which determines overconsumption by ibotenic lesioned rats. While maintained on free-food, ibotenic lesioned rats had normal consumption of sucrose and hypertonic saline. After mild food deprivation ibotenic PPTg lesioned rats overconsumed 20% sucrose. Subsequently, after dietary induced sodium deficiency, lesioned rats consumed significantly more saline than controls. These results establish that it is the salience of the solution which is the determining factor leading to

  17. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius: a thalamic site of graviceptive modulation.

    PubMed

    Baier, Bernhard; Vogt, Thomas; Rohde, Franziska; Cuvenhaus, Hannah; Conrad, Julian; Dieterich, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Based on animal studies, it has been shown that the nucleus ventralis intermedius (VIM) of the thalamus plays an important role within the vestibular system. A few human studies support the vestibular role of the VIM. In this study, we aimed to test the hypothesis whether changing the stimulation status in patients with unilateral deep brain stimulation in the VIM causally modulates the vestibular system, i.e., the graviceptive vertical perception. We tested six tremor patients for tilt of subjective visual vertical (SVV) with unilateral DBS in the VIM (mean age 67 years; mean time since electrode implantation 55 months). The mean tilt of the patients during the stimulator "on" condition was 1.4° to the contraversive side [standard deviation (SD) ± 0.4°] whereas during the "off" period a mean contraversive tilt of 4.4° (SD ± 3.0°) was obtained (p = 0.02). Thus, we were able to show that otolith-dominated graviceptive vertical perception can be directly modulated by changing the status of DBS VIM stimulation, indicating that the VIM is directly involved in (contraversive) vertical perception and its thalamic pathways.

  18. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation changes velopharyngeal control in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Michael J.; Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Adequate velopharyngeal control is essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on velopharyngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of velopharyngeal control, and whether these changes were correlated with limb function and stimulation settings. Methods Seventeen PD participants with bilateral STN DBS were tested within a morning session after a minimum of 12 h since their most recent dose of anti-PD medication. Testing occurred when STN DBS was on, and again 1 h after STN DBS was turned off, and included aerodynamic measures during syllable production, and standard neurological ratings of limb function. Results We found that PD participants exhibited changes with STN DBS, primarily consistent with increased intraoral pressure (n = 7) and increased velopharyngeal closure (n = 5). These changes were modestly correlated with measures of limb function, and were correlated with stimulation frequency. Conclusion Our findings suggest that STN DBS may change velopharyngeal control during syllable production in PD, with greater benefit associated with low frequency stimulation. However, DBS demonstrates a more subtle influence on speech-related velopharyngeal control than limb motor control. This distinction and its underlying mechanisms are important to consider when assessing the impact of STN DBS on PD. PMID:20708741

  19. Sedation with α2 Agonist Dexmedetomidine During Unilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Morace, Roberta; De Angelis, Michelangelo; Aglialoro, Emiliano; Maucione, Gianni; Cavallo, LuigiMaria; Solari, Domenico; Modugno, Nicola; Santilli, Marco; Esposito, Vincenzo; Aloj, Fulvio

    2016-05-01

    The α2 agonist dexmedetomidine (DEX) is an anesthetic agent that can provide sedation and analgesia without respiratory depression or changes in neuronal activity during microrecordings. The aim of our study was to confirm the efficacy and safety of anesthesia with DEX for unilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson disease. In 2013 and 2014, a series of 11 consecutive patients received continuous low-dose DEX infusion during unilateral deep brain stimulation of the STN. Intraoperative microrecordings, stimulation results, and patient reaction times in executing verbal and motor tasks were retrospectively analyzed. Functional outcomes were evaluated by comparing preoperative and 1-year postoperative Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III scores. Typical activity of the STN was recorded in all patients, and the delay in the execution of both motor and verbal tasks was ≤2 seconds. No hemorrhagic complications occurred, and no postoperative side effects were observed. The mean percentage of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III improvement at last follow-up was 39.01% (range, 23.70%-55.60%). The mean percentage of levodopa equivalent dose reduction was 45.86% (range, 21.50%-65.70%). The results of our study confirm that the use of DEX in managing patients with Parkinson disease during unilateral deep brain stimulation of the STN is safe and effective and can be considered a promising option for sedation during this type of procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation changes speech respiratory and laryngeal control in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2010-01-01

    Adequate respiratory and laryngeal motor control are essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on respiratory and laryngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of respiratory and laryngeal control, and whether these changes were correlated with limb function and stimulation parameters. Eighteen PD participants with bilateral STN DBS were tested within a morning session after a minimum of 12 h since their most recent dose of anti-PD medication. Testing occurred when DBS was on, and again 1 h after DBS was turned off, and included aerodynamic measures during syllable production, and standard clinical ratings of limb function. We found that PD participants exhibited changes with DBS, consistent with increased respiratory driving pressure (n = 9) and increased vocal fold closure (n = 9). However, most participants exceeded a typical operating range for these respiratory and laryngeal control variables with DBS. Changes were uncorrelated with limb function, but showed some correlation with stimulation frequency and pulse width, suggesting that speech may benefit more from low-frequency stimulation and shorter pulse width. Therefore, high-frequency STN DBS may be less beneficial for speech-related respiratory and laryngeal control than for limb motor control. It is important to consider these distinctions and their underlying mechanisms when assessing the impact of STN DBS on PD. PMID:20582431

  1. Cardiovascular and phrenic nerve responses to stimulation of the amygdala central nucleus in the anaesthetized rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, G E; Jordan, D; Paton, J F; Spyer, K M; Wood, L M

    1987-01-01

    1. The cardiovascular responses to electrical stimulation of the central nucleus of the amygdala (c.n.) have been studied in chloralose-anaesthetized rabbits. A pattern of response involving bradycardia, hypotension and hind-limb vasodilatation, accompanied by an increase in the rate of phrenic nerve discharge, was evoked only in response to stimulation within the medial portion of the c.n. 2. The cardiovascular responses were not secondary to the changes in respiratory activity since they were unaffected by altering central respiratory drive by either hypo- or hyperventilation of the animal. 3. The bradycardia was attenuated by the administration of atropine sulphate and abolished by the subsequent administration of propranolol, which when given alone attenuated the bradycardia. Atropine or propranolol given alone also attenuated the hypotension evoked by medial c.n. stimulation but the concurrent hind-limb vasodilatation was unaffected. 4. Atenolol, which unlike propranolol does not cross the blood-brain barrier, had little effect on the bradycardia in response to medial c.n. stimulation, but the subsequent administration of atropine abolished it. The hypotension in response to medial c.n. stimulation was also unaffected by atenolol. 5. The vasodilatation in response to medial c.n. stimulation was abolished by administration of guanethidine even after restoration of hind-limb perfusion pressure to control values by the infusion of angiotensin II into the hind-limb perfusion circuit. 6. Electrical stimulation of areas within 0.5 mm of the medial c.n. also resulted in bradycardia but then it was accompanied by hypertension and hind-limb vasoconstriction. Stimulation of areas 1.0 mm distant to the medial c.n. resulted in small and inconsistent cardiovascular responses. 7. These results show that hind-limb vasodilatation, mediated by withdrawal of sympathetic tone, occurs in response to stimulation within the medial c.n. of the rabbit and is in part responsible for

  2. The effect of nucleus basalis magnocellularis deep brain stimulation on memory function in a rat model of dementia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Eun; Jeong, Da Un; Lee, Jihyeon; Chang, Won Seok; Chang, Jin Woo

    2016-01-12

    Deep brain stimulation has recently been considered a potential therapy in improving memory function. It has been shown that a change of neurotransmitters has an effect on memory function. However, much about the exact underlying neural mechanism is not yet completely understood. We therefore examined changes in neurotransmitter systems and spatial memory caused by stimulation of nucleus basalis magnocellularis in a rat model of dementia. We divided rats into four groups: Normal, Lesion, Implantation, and Stimulation. We used 192 IgG-saporin for degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neuron related with learning and memory and it was injected into all rats except for the normal group. An electrode was ipsilaterally inserted in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis of all rats of the implantation and stimulation group, and the stimulation group received the electrical stimulation. Features were verified by the Morris water maze, immunochemistry and western blotting. All groups showed similar performances during Morris water maze training. During the probe trial, performance of the lesion and implantation group decreased. However, the stimulation group showed an equivalent performance to the normal group. In the lesion and implantation group, expression of glutamate acid decarboxylase65&67 decreased in the medial prefrontal cortex and expression of glutamate transporters increased in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. However, expression of the stimulation group showed similar levels as the normal group. The results suggest that nucleus basalis magnocellularis stimulation enhances consolidation and retrieval of visuospatial memory related to changes of glutamate acid decarboxylase65&67 and glutamate transporter.

  3. Effects of electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus on local cerebral blood flow in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Bonvento, G.; Lacombe, P.; Seylaz, J. )

    1989-06-01

    We have studied the effects of electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus on local cerebral blood flow (LCBF), as assessed by the quantitative ({sup 14}C)-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique. Stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus in the alpha-chloralose anesthetized rat caused a significant decrease in LCBF, ranging from -13 to -26% in 24 brain structures out of 33 investigated. The most pronounced decreases (-23 to -26%) were observed in the accumbens, amygdaloid, interpeduncular nuclei and in the median raphe nucleus, limbic system relays. The decreases also concerned cortical regions and the extrapyramidal system. These results indicate that activation of ascending serotonergic system produces a vasoconstriction and that the dorsal raphe nucleus has a widespread modulatory influence on the cerebral circulation.

  4. Effect of stimulation in the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus on limb control in Parkinson's disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pfann, K D; Penn, R D; Shannon, K M; Shapiro, M B; Corcos, D M

    1996-05-01

    This study focuses on upper extremity strength and movement control in a patient with Parkinson's disease who had stimulating electrodes surgically implanted in the ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM) of the left thalamus. We examined torque generation and control of movement distance in single degree-of-freedom elbow movements under three different stimulation conditions: (a) no stimulation, (b) high stimulation, in which tremor was minimized but there was also tingling and perceived weakness, and (c) moderate stimulation, in which tremor was partially reduced, but there was also a subjective sense of increased strength compared with the high-stimulation condition. The patient's ability to generate both steady torque and rapid movements was poorest with no stimulation. The patient generated the largest torques with moderate stimulation and performed the fastest movements with high stimulation. However, even with tremor minimized, the patient's electromyogram (EMG) burst patterns were not typical of those of neurologically healthy subjects, although the movements were clearly improved.

  5. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation modulates motor cortex oscillatory activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Devos, D; Labyt, E; Derambure, P; Bourriez, J L; Cassim, F; Reyns, N; Blond, S; Guieu, J D; Destée, A; Defebvre, L

    2004-02-01

    In Parkinson's disease, impaired motor preparation has been related to an increased latency in the appearance of movement-related desynchronization (MRD) throughout the contralateral primary sensorimotor (PSM) cortex. Internal globus pallidus (GPi) stimulation improved movement desynchronization over the PSM cortex during movement execution but failed to improve impaired motor preparation. PET studies indicate that subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation partly reverses the abnormal premotor pattern of brain activation during movement. By monitoring MRD, we aimed to assess changes in premotor and PSM cortex oscillatory activity induced by bilateral STN stimulation and to compare these changes with those induced by l-dopa. Ten Parkinson's disease patients and a group of healthy, age-matched controls performed self-paced wrist flexions in each of four conditions: without either stimulation or l-dopa (the 'off' condition), with stimulation and without l-dopa (On Stim), with l-dopa and without stimulation ('on drug'), and with both stimulation and l-dopa (On Both). Compared with the Off condition, in both the On Stim and the On Drug condition the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III score decreased by about 60% and in the On Both condition it decreased by 80%. The desynchronization latency over central regions contralateral to movement and the movement desynchronization over bilateral central regions were significantly increased by stimulation and by l-dopa, with a maximal effect when the two were associated. Furthermore, desynchronization latency significantly decreased over bilateral frontocentral regions in the three treatment conditions compared with the Off condition. In Parkinson's disease, STN stimulation may induce a change in abnormal cortical oscillatory activity patterns (similar to that produced by l-dopa) by decreasing the abnormal spreading of desynchronization over frontocentral regions and increasing PSM cortex activity during movement

  6. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus: All that glitters isn't gold?

    PubMed

    Galati, Salvatore; Stefani, Alessandro

    2015-04-15

    With the silver anniversary of deep brain stimulation (DBS) behind us, this would seem to be a good juncture to consider its successes and unanswered questions. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation has changed the clinical perspective of several thousand Parkinson's disease (PD) patients worldwide. A recent reappraisal animates the field with strong arguments in favor of an anticipation of the stereotactic approach in patients with as little as 5 to 6 years of disease history if they manifest motor complications. From what was once a no-choice option, STN-DBS is now becoming more and more attractive to neurologists dealing with movement disorders. Despite the development of new pharmacological treatment and renewed rehabilitation programs able to modify the severity of drug-related complications, a resurgence of stimulation therapy reminiscent of an old era of medicine with an attendant blinkered mindset has emerged. Yet, the DBS-mediated effects are modest on critical aspects such as gait impairment and extremely variable depending on the clinical phenotype and individual clinical profile. Hence, the indication for DBS should become more, and not less, individually tailored. Those physicians considering deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a therapeutic option need to evaluate results beyond short-term quality of life, giving the correct weight to the direct and indirect costs over the longer term as well as to life prognosis. Unequivocal recourse to early-stimulation surgery necessitates investigations not limited to a mere comparative assessment versus drug-mediated benefits, but instead showing evidence of a clear degree of disease-modifying effect or a rescue of basal ganglia plasticity.

  7. Distinct phenotypes of speech and voice disorders in Parkinson's disease after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Ohdake, Reiko; Yoneyama, Noritaka; Hara, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Hazuki; Senda, Jo; Atsuta, Naoki; Ito, Mizuki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Kajita, Yasukazu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Sobue, Gen

    2015-08-01

    To elucidate the phenotypes and pathophysiology of speech and voice disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD) with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). We conducted a cross-sectional study on 76 PD patients treated with bilateral STN-DBS (PD-DBS) and 33 medically treated PD patients (PD-Med). Speech and voice functions, electrode positions, motor function and cognitive function were comprehensively assessed. Moreover, speech and voice functions were compared between the on-stimulation and off-stimulation conditions in 42 PD-DBS patients. Speech and voice disorders in PD-DBS patients were significantly worse than those in PD-Med patients. Factor analysis and subsequent cluster analysis classified PD-DBS patients into five clusters: relatively good speech and voice function type, 25%; stuttering type, 24%; breathy voice type, 16%; strained voice type, 18%; and spastic dysarthria type, 17%. STN-DBS ameliorated voice tremor or low volume; however, it deteriorated the overall speech intelligibility in most patients. Breathy voice did not show significant changes and stuttering exhibited slight improvement after stopping stimulation. In contrast, patients with strained voice type or spastic dysarthria type showed a greater improvement after stopping stimulation. Spastic dysarthria type patients showed speech disorders similar to spastic dysarthria, which is associated with bilateral upper motor neuron involvement. Strained voice type and spastic dysarthria type appeared to be related to current diffusion to the corticobulbar fibres. Stuttering and breathy voice can be aggravated by STN-DBS, but are mainly due to aging or PD itself. Strained voice and spastic dysarthria are considered corticobulbar side effects. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Low-frequency subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for axial symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Christos; Walsh, Richard; Meaney, Christopher; Poon, Y Y; Fallis, Melanie; Moro, Elena

    2013-09-01

    Axial symptoms such as freezing of gait and falls are common manifestations of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) and are partially responsive to medical treatment. High-frequency (≥130 Hz) deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is highly efficacious in ameliorating appendicular symptoms in PD. However, it is typically less effective in improving axial symptomatology, especially in the long term. We have studied the effects of low-frequency stimulation (LFS) (≤80 Hz) for improving speech, gait and balance dysfunction in the largest patient population to date. PD patients with bilateral STN-DBS and resistant axial symptoms were switched from chronic 130 Hz stimulation to LFS and followed up to 4 years. Primary outcome measures were total motor UPDRS scores, and axial and gait subscores before and after LFS. Bivariate analyses and correlation coefficients were calculated for the different conditions. Potential predictors of therapeutic response were also investigated. Forty-five advanced PD patients who had high frequency stimulation (HFS) for 39.5 ± 27.8 consecutive months were switched to LFS. LFS was kept on for a median period of 111.5 days before the assessment. There was no significant improvement in any of the primary outcomes between HFS and LFS, although a minority of patients preferred to be maintained on LFS for longer periods of time. No predictive factors of response could be identified. There was overall no improvement from LFS in axial symptoms. This could be partly due to some study limitations. Larger prospective trials are warranted to better clarify the impact of stimulation frequency on axial signs.

  9. Clinical and economic results of bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Fraix, V; Houeto, J‐L; Lagrange, C; Pen, C Le; Krystkowiak, P; Guehl, D; Ardouin, C; Welter, M‐L; Maurel, F; Defebvre, L; Rougier, A; Benabid, A‐L; Mesnage, V; Ligier, M; Blond, S; Burbaud, P; Bioulac, B; Destée, A; Cornu, P; Pollak, P

    2006-01-01

    Background High frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an alternative but expensive neurosurgical treatment for parkinsonian patients with levodopa induced motor complications. Objective To assess the safety, clinical effects, quality of life, and economic cost of STN stimulation. Methods We conducted a prospective multicentre study in 95 consecutive Parkinson's disease (PD) patients receiving bilateral STN stimulation and assessed its effects over 12 months. A double blind randomised motor evaluation was carried out at 3 month follow up, and quality of life, self care ability, and predictive factors of outcome following surgery were assessed. The cost of PD was estimated over 6 months before and after surgery. Results The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score improved by 57% (p<0.0001) and activities of daily living improved by 48% (p<0.0001) at 12 month follow up. Double blind motor scoring improved by 51% at 3 month follow up (p<0.0001). The total PD Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL‐37) score improved by 28% (p<0.001). The better the preoperative motor score after a levodopa challenge, the better the outcome after STN stimulation. Five patients developed an intracerebral haematoma during electrode implantation with permanent after effects in two. The 6 month costs of PD decreased from €10 087 before surgery to €1673 after surgery (p<0.0001) mainly because of the decrease in medication. These savings allowed a return on the procedure investment, estimated at €36 904 over 2.2 years. Conclusions STN stimulation has good outcomes with relatively low risk and little cost burden in PD patients with levodopa induced motor complications. PMID:16543519

  10. Optogenetic versus electrical stimulation of dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens reveals local modulation of presynaptic release

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, James R.; Ferris, Mark J.; Stuber, Garret D.; Riddle, David R.; Jones, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens is highly heterogeneous, integrating regionally distinct afferent projections and accumbal interneurons, resulting in diverse local microenvironments. Dopamine (DA) neuron terminals similarly express a heterogeneous collection of terminal receptors that modulate DA signaling. Cyclic voltammetry is often used to probe DA terminal dynamics in brain slice preparations; however, this method traditionally requires electrical stimulation to induce DA release. Electrical stimulation excites all of the neuronal processes in the stimulation field, potentially introducing simultaneous, multi-synaptic modulation of DA terminal release. We used optogenetics to selectively stimulate DA terminals and used voltammetry to compare DA responses from electrical and optical stimulation of the same area of tissue around a recording electrode. We found that with multiple pulse stimulation trains, optically stimulated DA release increasingly exceeded that of electrical stimulation. Furthermore, electrical stimulation produced inhibition of DA release across longer duration stimulations. The GABAB antagonist, CGP 55845, increased electrically stimulated DA release significantly more than light stimulated release. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, dihydro-β-erythroidine hydrobromide, inhibited single pulse electrically stimulated DA release while having no effect on optically stimulated DA release. Our results demonstrate that electrical stimulation introduces local multi-synaptic modulation of DA release that is absent with optogenetically targeted stimulation. PMID:26011081

  11. The effects of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on parkinsonian tremor.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Alan; Shahed, Joohi; Jankovic, Joseph

    2007-09-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventral intermediate (Vim) nucleus of the thalamus has been the target of choice for patients with disabling essential tremor or medication refractory parkinsonian tremor. Recently there is evidence that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) should be the targets for patients with tremor associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). To assess the effects of STN DBS on parkinsonian tremor, eight consecutive patients with PD and disabling tremor were videotaped using a standardized tremor protocol. Evaluations were performed at least 12 h after last dose of medication with the DBS turned off followed by optimal DBS on state. A rater blinded to DBS status evaluated randomized video segments with the tremor components of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and Tremor Rating Scale (TRS). Compared with DBS off state there were significant improvements in mean UPDRS tremor score 79.4% (p=0.008), total TRS score 69.9% (p=0.008) and upper extremity 92.5% (p=0.008) TRS subscore. Functional improvement was noted with pouring liquids. Our findings provide support that STN DBS is an effective treatment of tremor associated with PD.

  12. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease: surgical technique, tips, tricks and complications.

    PubMed

    Kocabicak, Ersoy; Temel, Yasin

    2013-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become a frequently performed surgery in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. The technique has been further refined throughout the years by improved imaging techniques, advanced neurophysiological recording possibilities, and advances in hardware and software technology. In addition, the complications, which can be divided into surgery-related, target-related, and hardware-related complications, were better recognised and managed. In this review, we describe our experience specifically with the surgery of STN DBS in the light of the existing literature. Tips and tricks, complications and their management are the main elements of this article. In addition, we provide scientific information from our research and other groups in specific sections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of dysarthria following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Tripoliti, Elina; Strong, Laura; Hickey, Freya; Foltynie, Tom; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Candelario, Joseph; Hariz, Marwan; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is an established treatment for patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Speech impairment is a frequent side effect of the surgery. This study examined the efficacy of an intensive speech treatment (the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, LSVT) on dysarthria after STN-DBS. The LSVT was administered in ten patients with STN-DBS (surgical group) and ten patients without (medical group). Patients were assessed before, immediately after and six months following the speech treatment using sustained phonation, a speech intelligibility scale and monologue. Vocal loudness, speech intelligibility and perceptual ratings were the primary outcome measures. Vocal loudness and perceptual scores improved significantly across tasks for the medical group only. Speech intelligibility did not significantly change for either group. Results in the surgical group were variable with some patients deteriorating. Treatment of dysarthria following STN-DBS needs further investigation due to the variable response to LSVT. PMID:21953693

  14. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus improves pain in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pellaprat, Jean; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Canivet, Cindy; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Radji, Fatai; Arbus, Christophe; Gerdelat, Angélique; Chaynes, Patrick; Brefel-Courbon, Christine

    2014-06-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), chronic pain is a common symptom which markedly affects the quality of life. Some physiological arguments proposed that Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN-DBS) could improve pain in PD. We investigated in 58 PD patients the effect of STN-DBS on pain using the short McGill Pain Questionnaire and other pain parameters such as the Bodily discomfort subscore of the Parkinson's disease Questionnaire 39 and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale section II (UPDRS II) item 17. All pain scores were significantly improved 12 months after STN-DBS. This improvement was not correlated with motor improvement, depression scores or L-Dopa reduction. STN-DBS induced a substantial beneficial effect on pain in PD, independently of its motor effects and mood status of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Decisional impulsivity and the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus in obsessive-compulsive disorder: stimulation and connectivity.

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Droux, Fabien; Morris, Laurel; Chabardes, Stephan; Bougerol, Thierry; David, Olivier; Krack, Paul; Polosan, Mircea

    2017-02-01

    Why do we make hasty decisions for short-term gain? Rapid decision-making with limited accumulation of evidence and delay discounting are forms of decisional impulsivity. The subthalamic nucleus is implicated in inhibitory function but its role in decisional impulsivity is less well-understood. Here we assess decisional impulsivity in subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder who have undergone deep brain stimulation of the limbic and associative subthalamic nucleus. We show that stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is causally implicated in increasing decisional impulsivity with less accumulation of evidence during probabilistic uncertainty and in enhancing delay discounting. Subthalamic stimulation shifts evidence accumulation in subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder towards a functional less cautious style closer to that of healthy controls emphasizing its adaptive nature. Thus, subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder on subthalamic stimulation may be less likely to check for evidence (e.g. checking that the stove is on) with no difference in subjective confidence (or doubt). In a separate study, we replicate in humans (154 healthy controls) using resting state functional connectivity, tracing studies conducted in non-human primates dissociating limbic, associative and motor frontal hyper-direct connectivity with anterior and posterior subregions of the subthalamic nucleus. We show lateralization of functional connectivity of bilateral ventral striatum to right anterior ventromedial subthalamic nucleus consistent with previous observations of lateralization of emotionally evoked activity to right ventral subthalamic nucleus. We use a multi-echo sequence with independent components analysis, which has been shown to have enhanced signal-to-noise ratio, thus optimizing visualization of small subcortical structures. These findings in healthy controls converge with the effective contacts in obsessive compulsive disorder patients localized within the

  16. Decisional impulsivity and the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus in obsessive-compulsive disorder: stimulation and connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Droux, Fabien; Morris, Laurel; Chabardes, Stephan; Bougerol, Thierry; David, Olivier; Krack, Paul; Polosan, Mircea

    2017-01-01

    Why do we make hasty decisions for short-term gain? Rapid decision-making with limited accumulation of evidence and delay discounting are forms of decisional impulsivity. The subthalamic nucleus is implicated in inhibitory function but its role in decisional impulsivity is less well-understood. Here we assess decisional impulsivity in subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder who have undergone deep brain stimulation of the limbic and associative subthalamic nucleus. We show that stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is causally implicated in increasing decisional impulsivity with less accumulation of evidence during probabilistic uncertainty and in enhancing delay discounting. Subthalamic stimulation shifts evidence accumulation in subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder towards a functional less cautious style closer to that of healthy controls emphasizing its adaptive nature. Thus, subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder on subthalamic stimulation may be less likely to check for evidence (e.g. checking that the stove is on) with no difference in subjective confidence (or doubt). In a separate study, we replicate in humans (154 healthy controls) using resting state functional connectivity, tracing studies conducted in non-human primates dissociating limbic, associative and motor frontal hyper-direct connectivity with anterior and posterior subregions of the subthalamic nucleus. We show lateralization of functional connectivity of bilateral ventral striatum to right anterior ventromedial subthalamic nucleus consistent with previous observations of lateralization of emotionally evoked activity to right ventral subthalamic nucleus. We use a multi-echo sequence with independent components analysis, which has been shown to have enhanced signal-to-noise ratio, thus optimizing visualization of small subcortical structures. These findings in healthy controls converge with the effective contacts in obsessive compulsive disorder patients localized within the

  17. The effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on monoamine outflow in the nucleus accumbens shell in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Susanne; Gasca, Fernando; Richter, Lars; Leipscher, Ulrike; Trillenberg, Peter; Moser, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Evidence exists that modulation of neuronal activity in nucleus accumbens shell region may re-establish normal function in various neuropsychiatric conditions such as drug-withdrawal, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression and chronic pain. Here, we study the effects of acute repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on monoamine outflow in the nucleus accumbens shell in awake and freely moving rats using in vivo microdialysis. To scale the biochemical results to the induced electric field in the rat brain, we obtained a realistic simulation of the stimulation scenario using a finite element model. Applying 20 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in 6 trains of 50 stimuli with 280 μs pulse width at a magnetic field strength of 130% of the individual motor threshold, dopamine as well as serotonin outflow in the nucleus accumbens shell significantly increased compared to sham stimulation. Since the electric field decays rapidly with depth in the rat brain, we can conclude that the modulation in neurotransmitter outflow from the nucleus accumbens shell is presumably a remote effect of cortical stimulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modulation of Cortical Motor Evoked Potential After Stroke During Electrical Stimulation of the Lateral Cerebellar Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Furmaga, Havan; Cooperrider, Jessica; Gale, John T; Baker, Kenneth B; Machado, Andre G

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting the dentato-thalamo-cortical (DTC) pathway at its origin in the lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN) has been shown to enhance motor recovery in a rodent model of cortical ischemia. LCN DBS also yielded frequency-specific changes in motor cortex excitability in the normal brain, indexed by motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude. To investigate the effect of cortical stroke on cortical motor excitability in a rodent ischemia model and to measure the effects of LCN DBS on post-ischemia excitability as a function of stimulation parameters. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: naïve and stroke, with cortical ischemia induced through multiple, unilateral endothelin-1 injections. All animals were implanted with a bipolar electrode in the LCN opposite the affected hemisphere. MEPs were elicited from the affected hemisphere using intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) techniques. Multiple LCN DBS parameters were examined, including isochronal stimulation at 20, 30, 50, and 100 Hz as well as a novel burst stimulation pattern. ICMS-evoked MEPs were reduced in stroke (n = 10) relative to naïve (n = 12) animals. However, both groups showed frequency-dependent augmentation of cortical excitability in response to LCN DBS. In the naïve group, LCN DBS increased MEPs by 22-58%, while in the stroke group, MEPs were enhanced by 9-41% compared to OFF-DBS conditions. Activation of the DTC pathway increases cortical excitability in both naïve and post-stroke animals. These effects may underlie, at least partially, functional reorganization and therapeutic benefits associated with chronic LCN DBS in post-stroke animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Modulation of cortical motor evoked potential after stroke during electrical stimulation of the lateral cerebellar nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Furmaga, Havan; Cooperrider, Jessica; Gale, John T.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Machado, Andre G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting the dentato-thalamo-cortical (DTC) pathway at its origin in the lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN) has been shown to enhance motor recovery in a rodent model of cortical ischemia. LCN DBS also yielded frequency specific changes in motor cortex excitability in the normal brain, indexed by motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude. Objective To investigate the effect of cortical stroke on cortical motor excitability in a rodent ischemia model and to measure the effects of LCN DBS on post-ischemia excitability as a function of stimulation parameters. Methods Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: naïve and stroke, with cortical ischemia induced through multiple, unilateral endothelin-1 injections. All animals were implanted with a bipolar electrode in the LCN opposite the affected hemisphere. MEPs were elicited from the affected hemisphere using intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) techniques. Multiple LCN DBS parameters were examined, including isochronal stimulation at 20, 30, 50, and 100 Hz as well as a novel burst stimulation pattern. Results ICMS-evoked MEPs were reduced in stroke (n=10) relative to naïve (n=12) animals. However, both groups showed frequency-dependent augmentation of cortical excitability in response to LCN DBS. In the naïve group, LCN DBS increased MEPs by 22–58%, while in the stroke group, MEPs were enhanced by 9–41% compared to OFF DBS conditions. Conclusions Activation of the DTC pathway increases cortical excitability in both naïve and post-stroke animals. These effects may underlie, at least partially, functional reorganization and therapeutic benefits associated with chronic LCN DBS in post-stroke animals. PMID:26215752

  20. Dopamine efflux in the rat striatum evoked by electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus: potential mechanism of action in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kendall H; Blaha, Charles D; Harris, Brent T; Cooper, Shannon; Hitti, Frederick L; Leiter, James C; Roberts, David W; Kim, Uhnoh

    2006-02-01

    The precise mechanism whereby continuous high-frequency electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus ameliorates motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease is unknown. We examined the effects of high-frequency stimulation of regions dorsal to and within the subthalamic nucleus on dopamine efflux in the striatum of urethane-anaesthetized rats using constant potential amperometry. Complementary extracellular electrophysiological studies determined the activity of subthalamic nucleus neurons in response to similar electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus increased action potential firing in the subthalamic nucleus only during the initial stimulation period and was followed by a cessation of firing over the remainder of stimulation. Electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus with 15 pulses elicited stimulus-time-locked increases in striatal dopamine efflux with maximal peak effects occurring at 50 Hz frequency and 300 microA intensity. Extended subthalamic nucleus stimulation (1000 pulses at 50 Hz; 300 microA) elicited a similar peak increase in striatal dopamine efflux that was followed by a relatively lower steady-state elevation in extracellular dopamine over the course of stimulation. In contrast, extended stimulation immediately adjacent and dorsal to the subthalamic nucleus resulted in an 11-fold greater increase in dopamine efflux that remained elevated over the course of the stimulation. Immunohistochemical staining for tyrosine hydroxylase revealed catecholaminergic fibers running immediately dorsal to and through the subthalamic nucleus. Taken together, these results suggest that enhanced dopamine release within the basal ganglia may be an important mechanism whereby high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus improves motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

  1. Deep Brain Stimulation Frequency of the Subthalamic Nucleus Affects Phonemic and Action Fluency in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, Valéria de Carvalho; Rieder, Carlos R M; da Cruz, Aline Nunes; Beber, Bárbara Costa; Portuguez, Mirna Wetters

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been linked to a decline in verbal fluency. The decline can be attributed to surgical effects, but the relative contributions of the stimulation parameters are not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the frequency of STN-DBS on the performance of verbal fluency tasks in patients with PD. Methods. Twenty individuals with PD who received bilateral STN-DBS were evaluated. Their performances of verbal fluency tasks (semantic, phonemic, action, and unconstrained fluencies) upon receiving low-frequency (60 Hz) and high-frequency (130 Hz) STN-DBS were assessed. Results. The performances of phonemic and action fluencies were significantly different between low- and high-frequency STN-DBS. Patients showed a decrease in these verbal fluencies for high-frequency STN-DBS. Conclusion. Low-frequency STN-DBS may be less harmful to the verbal fluency of PD patients.

  2. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on characteristics of EMG activity underlying reaction time in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Hatice; Summerfield, Christopher; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of high-frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) on characteristics of electromyographic (EMG) activity of the agonist muscle in 8 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients were examined during STN-DBS (ON), and 30 minutes after switching off both stimulators (OFF). They were asked to make a ballistic movement in paradigms of simple reaction time (SRT) and choice reaction time (CRT) tasks. Onset of movement (MOVonset) was measured as the latency of the initial displacement from baseline of the signal from an accelerometer attached to the dorsum of the hand. In the associated EMG activity, recorded from wrist extensor muscles, we measured onset latency (EMGonset), size of the first EMG burst (EMGsize), and number of EMG bursts (EMGbursts) counted between EMGonset and task execution. MOVonset and EMGonset were significantly shorter in ON than in OFF conditions in CRT. EMGsize was larger, EMGbursts were reduced, and peak of the acceleration profile was larger in ON compared with OFF conditions in both SRT and CRT. Our results indicate that STN-DBS induces a significant improvement in motor performance of reaction time tasks in PD patients. Such improvement is associated with a change in features of the EMG activity suggesting an increase in the excitability of the motor pathways engaged in ballistic movements.

  3. Effect of electrical and chemical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on the release of striatal dopamine.

    PubMed

    Pazo, Jorge H; Höcht, Cristian; Barceló, Ana C; Fillipini, Bárbara; Lomastro, María J

    2010-12-01

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) alleviates the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease, but the mechanisms underlying these clinical results remain to be clarified. The HFS of STN is associated with the release of dopamine (DA) in the striatum. This study examines possible mechanisms by which HFS-STN release DA. The experiments were performed in rats anesthetized with urethane. The STN was stimulated by electrical HF and chemical microinjections of an antagonist and an agonist of GABA(A) receptors, the bicuculline, and the muscimol, respectively. The extracellular striatal DA-DOPAC (3-4-dihydroxyphenilacetic acid) content was collected by means of intracerebral microdialysis cannula and analyzed with HPLC with an electrochemical detector. The HFS of STN and microinjection of bicuculline intrasubthalamic produced a significant increase of extracellular striatal DA, whereas DOPAC levels were unchanged. The microinjection of muscimol depresses spontaneous release of DA, without changes in DOPAC. The kainic acid lesion of the globus pallidus (GP) and the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), ipsilateral to dialyzed striatum, did not modify the release of DA-DOPAC. These data provide evidence that the STN has a tonic action on the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), and the release of striatal DA by HFS-STN may be due to activation of the STN acting directly on SNc neurons. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Deep Brain Stimulation Frequency of the Subthalamic Nucleus Affects Phonemic and Action Fluency in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    da Cruz, Aline Nunes; Beber, Bárbara Costa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been linked to a decline in verbal fluency. The decline can be attributed to surgical effects, but the relative contributions of the stimulation parameters are not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the frequency of STN-DBS on the performance of verbal fluency tasks in patients with PD. Methods. Twenty individuals with PD who received bilateral STN-DBS were evaluated. Their performances of verbal fluency tasks (semantic, phonemic, action, and unconstrained fluencies) upon receiving low-frequency (60 Hz) and high-frequency (130 Hz) STN-DBS were assessed. Results. The performances of phonemic and action fluencies were significantly different between low- and high-frequency STN-DBS. Patients showed a decrease in these verbal fluencies for high-frequency STN-DBS. Conclusion. Low-frequency STN-DBS may be less harmful to the verbal fluency of PD patients. PMID:28050309

  5. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) for Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensive voice therapy (LSVT[R]LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes…

  6. Pitch Variability in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; van Doorn, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) pitch characteristics of connected speech in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The authors evaluated 16 patients preoperatively and 12 months after DBS surgery. Eight…

  7. Pitch Variability in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; van Doorn, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) pitch characteristics of connected speech in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The authors evaluated 16 patients preoperatively and 12 months after DBS surgery. Eight…

  8. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) for Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensive voice therapy (LSVT[R]LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes…

  9. Effects of Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus on Naming and Reading Nouns and Verbs in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveri, Maria Caterina; Ciccarelli, Nicoletta; Baldonero, Eleonora; Piano, Carla; Zinno, Massimiliano; Soleti, Francesco; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Albanese, Alberto; Daniele, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    An impairment for verbs has been described in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting that a disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits may result in dysfunction of the neural systems involved in action-verb processing. A previous study suggested that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) during verb generation…

  10. Effects of Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus on Naming and Reading Nouns and Verbs in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveri, Maria Caterina; Ciccarelli, Nicoletta; Baldonero, Eleonora; Piano, Carla; Zinno, Massimiliano; Soleti, Francesco; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Albanese, Alberto; Daniele, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    An impairment for verbs has been described in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting that a disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits may result in dysfunction of the neural systems involved in action-verb processing. A previous study suggested that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) during verb generation…

  11. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on motor cortex plasticity in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Jin; Udupa, Kaviraja; Ni, Zhen; Moro, Elena; Gunraj, Carolyn; Mazzella, Filomena; Lozano, Andres M.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lang, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) will improve long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in motor cortex in Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: We studied 8 patients with PD treated with STN-DBS and 9 age-matched healthy controls. Patients with PD were studied in 4 sessions in medication (Med) OFF/stimulator (Stim) OFF, Med-OFF/Stim-ON, Med-ON/Stim-OFF, and Med-ON/Stim-ON states in random order. Motor evoked potential amplitude and cortical silent period duration were measured at baseline before paired associated stimulation (PAS) and at 3 different time intervals (T0, T30, T60) up to 60 minutes after PAS in the abductor pollicis brevis and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Results: Motor evoked potential size significantly increased after PAS in controls (+67.7% of baseline at T30) and in patients in the Med-ON/Stim-ON condition (+55.8% of baseline at T30), but not in patients in the Med-OFF/Stim-OFF (−0.4% of baseline at T30), Med-OFF/Stim-ON (+10.3% of baseline at T30), and Med-ON/Stim-OFF conditions (+17.3% of baseline at T30). Cortical silent period duration increased after PAS in controls but not in patients in all test conditions. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that STN-DBS together with dopaminergic medications restore LTP-like plasticity in motor cortex in PD. Restoration of cortical plasticity may be one of the mechanisms of how STN-DBS produces clinical benefit. PMID:26156511

  12. MRI directed bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, N; Plaha, P; O'Sullivan, K; McCarter, R; Heywood, P; Gill, S

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Bilateral chronic high frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has emerged as an appropriate therapy for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease refractory to medical therapy. Advances in neuroimaging and neurophysiology have led to the development of varied targeting methods for the delivery of this treatment. Intraoperative neurophysiological and clinical monitoring is regarded by many to be mandatory for accurate STN localisation. We have examined efficacy of bilateral STN stimulation using a predominantly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-directed technique. Methods: DBS leads were stereotactically implanted into the STN using an MRI directed method, with intraoperative macrostimulation used purely for adjustment. The effects of DBS were evaluated in 16 patients followed up to 12 months, and compared with baseline assessments. Assessments were performed in both off and on medication states, and were based on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and timed motor tests. Functional status outcomes were examined using the PDQ-39 quality of life questionnaire. A battery of psychometric tests was used to assess cognition. Results: After 12 months, stimulation in the off medication state resulted in significant improvements in Activities of Daily Living and Motor scores (UPDRS parts II and III) by 62% and 61% respectively. Timed motor tests were significantly improved in the off medication state. Motor scores (UPDRS part III) were significantly improved by 40% in the on medication state. Dyskinesias and off duration were significantly reduced and the mean dose of L-dopa equivalents was reduced by half. Psychometric test scores were mostly unchanged or improved. Adverse events were few. Conclusions: An MRI directed targeting method for implantation of DBS leads into the STN can be used safely and effectively, and results are comparable with studies using intraoperative microelectrode neurophysiological

  13. Interventional magnetic resonance imaging-guided subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: Patient selection.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Hooman; Gupta, Fiona; Vukic, Mario; Kreitner, Jason; Kera, Elizabeth; Nicola, Gregory; Pierce, Sean; Panush, David; Cohen, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) guided deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD) has been shown to be effective. The costs of a dedicated intraoperative MRI may be prohibitive. The procedure can also be performed in a diagnostic scanner, however this presents challenges for utilization of time when the scanner is used both as a diagnostic and an interventional unit. This report outlines our novel methodology for patient selection for implantation in a diagnostic MR scanner, as an attempt to streamline the use of resources. A retrospective review of our outcomes is also presented. DBS candidacy evaluation included a PD questionnaire-39. Anxiety, age, difficulties in communication and body habitus were factors that were assessed in selecting patients for this technique. Eleven patients underwent iMRI-guided DBS implantation in the subthalamic nucleus. All patients were implanted bilaterally. Unified PD rating scale (UPDRS) part III and L-dopa dose were compared pre- and post-stimulation. A cohort of 11 DBS patients not selected for iMRI-guided DBS were also reported for comparison. For the iMRI-guided patients, mean "Off" UPDRS III score was 47.6 (standard deviation [SD] 8.26). Postoperative "On" medication, "On" stimulation UPDRS III was 13.6 (SD 5.23). Mean preoperative L-dopa dose was 1060 mg (SD 474.3) and mean postoperative L-dopa dose was 320 (SD 298.3). iMRI-guided DBS is a newly emerging technique for surgical treatment of patients with PD. We present a novel scoring system for patient selection assessing anxiety, age, ability to communicate, and body habitus to identify patients who will be benefited most from this technique.

  14. Deep brain stimulation of anterior nucleus thalami disrupts sleep in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Voges, Berthold R; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Hamel, Wolfgang; House, Patrick M; Kluge, Christian; Moll, Christian K E; Stodieck, Stefan R

    2015-08-01

    In view of the regulatory function of the thalamus in the sleep-wake cycle, the impact of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the anterior nucleus thalami (ANT) on sleep was assessed in a small consecutive cohort of epilepsy patients with standardized polysomnography (PSG). In nine patients treated with ANT-DBS (voltage 5 V, frequency 145 Hz, cyclic mode), the number of arousals during stimulation and nonstimulation periods, neuropsychiatric symptoms (npS), and seizure frequency were determined. Electroclinical arousals were triggered in 14.0 to 67.0% (mean 42.4 ± SD 16.8%) of all deep brain stimuli. Six patients reported npS. Nocturnal DBS voltages were reduced in eight patients (one patient without npS refused) and PSGs were repeated. Electroclinical arousals occurred between 1.4 and 6.7 (mean 3.3 ± 1.7) times more frequently during stimulation periods compared to nonstimulation periods; the number of arousals positively correlated with the level of DBS voltage (range 1 V to 5 V) (Spearman's rank coefficient 0.53121; p < 0.05). No patient experienced seizure deterioration and four patients reported remission of npS. This case-cohort study provides evidence that ANT-DBS interrupts sleep in a voltage-dependent manner, thus putatively resulting in an increase of npS. Reduction of nocturnal DBS voltage seems to lead to improvement of npS without hampering efficacy of ANT-DBS.

  15. Changes in speech characters of patients with Parkinson's disease after bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Zhang, Yuqing; Zheng, Zhe; Liu, Aihua; Wang, Xuan; Zhuang, Ping; Li, Yongjie; Wang, Xiaomin

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the effects of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on acoustic characteristics of speech in Chinese patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Eleven patients (five men and six women) diagnosed with PD participated in this study. Motor disabilities and speech samples were evaluated and recorded under six different conditions according to the states of medication and stimulation. Motor disabilities were evaluated with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Acoustic signals were recorded from the subjects during production of sustained vowels /a/, /i/, and/u/; repetitions of /pataka/; and sentence production tasks. Acoustic analysis was performed with the Multidimensional Voice Program (MDVP), the Motor Speech Profile (MSP), and Computerized Speech Lab (CSL) (Kay Elemetrics, Lincoln Park, NJ). Based on the UPDRS III scores, the motor ability of the patients improved. There was almost no change in the speech score, which was also supported by the instrumental analysis of PD speech. This indicated that bilateral STN-DBS was associated with a significant improvement in the patients' motor disabilities but did not have much influence on speech performance during the short time after the stimulation switch was turned on. Furthermore, gender-related differences for speech performance were demonstrated, with the vowel /i/ being more sensitive. These results are consistent with previous studies that have reported disparity between limb and speech improvements after neurosurgical intervention for PD, such as STN-DBS. The long-term effects of STN-DBS on Parkinsonian speech of Chinese patients should be studied further. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Predicting quality of life outcomes after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Scott E.; Griffith, Sandra D.; Machado, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine disease, treatment, cognitive, and psychological factors associated with quality of life (QoL) before and after surgery and assess the ability to predict QoL outcomes. Methods: We identified a retrospective, cross-sectional sample of 85 patients with Parkinson disease who underwent subthalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS). Patients' QoL was categorized as “improved” and “stable/worsened” using reliable change indices. Univariate correlational analyses identified relationships between Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire–39 ratings and disease (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale–III [UPDRS-III] motor scores on and off medications, disease duration), treatment (medication burden, unilateral vs bilateral DBS), cognitive (neuropsychological battery), and psychological (depression) variables. Step-wise multiple linear regression and logistic regression models included selected preoperative variables to predict change in QoL ratings and QoL outcome after surgery. Results: Fifty-one percent of patients reported clinically significant improvements in QoL while 47% reported stable QoL and 2% worsened. Motor scores (UPDRS-III) were not relevant to QoL changes, potentially because of the rarity of poor motor outcomes, while single-trial learning and depression scores were the most important variables in predicting QoL changes. There was a subtle additional benefit to undergoing bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS. Conclusions: The findings provide greater insight into the nonmotor features that contribute to the success of subthalamic nucleus DBS procedures from the patient's perspective and raise questions about the treatment focus and emphasis on symptom profiles in DBS candidacy evaluations. PMID:25274851

  17. Agmatine in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus stimulates feeding in rats: involvement of neuropeptide Y

    PubMed Central

    Taksande, BG; Kotagale, NR; Nakhate, KT; Mali, PD; Kokare, DM; Hirani, K; Subhedar, NK; Chopde, CT; Ugale, RR

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Agmatine, a multifaceted neurotransmitter, is abundantly expressed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Our aim was to assess (i) the effect of agmatine on feeding behaviour and (ii) its association, if any, with neuropeptide Y (NPY). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Satiated rats fitted with intra-PVN cannulae were administered agmatine, alone or jointly with (i) α2-adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine, or antagonist, yohimbine; (ii) NPY, NPY Y1 receptor agonist, [Leu31, Pro34]-NPY, or antagonist, BIBP3226; or (iii) yohimbine and NPY. Cumulative food intake was monitored at different post-injection time points. Furthermore, the expression of hypothalamic NPY following i.p. treatment with agmatine, alone or in combination with yohimbine (i.p.), was evaluated by immunocytochemistry. KEY RESULTS Agmatine robustly increased feeding in a dose-dependent manner. While pretreatment with clonidine augmented, yohimbine attenuated the orexigenic response to agmatine. Similarly, NPY and [Leu31, Pro34]-NPY potentiated the agmatine-induced hyperphagia, whereas BIBP3226 inhibited it. Moreover, yohimbine attenuated the synergistic orexigenic effect induced by the combination of NPY and agmatine. Agmatine increased NPY immunoreactivity in the PVN fibres and in the cells of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) and this effect was prevented by pretreatment with yohimbine. NPY immunoreactivity in the fibres of the ARC, dorsomedial, ventromedial and lateral nuclei of the hypothalamus was not affected by any of the above treatments. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The orexigenic effect of agmatine is coupled to increased NPY activity mediated by stimulation of α2-adrenoceptors within the PVN. This signifies the importance of agmatine or α2-adrenoceptor modulators in the development of novel therapeutic agents to treat feeding-related disorders. PMID:21564088

  18. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modulates sensitivity to decision outcome value in Parkinson’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Ben; Barbe, Michael; Dayan, Peter; Shiner, Tamara; Dolan, Ray; Fink, Gereon R.

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson’s disease is known to cause a subtle but important adverse impact on behaviour, with impulsivity its most widely reported manifestation. However, precisely which computational components of the decision process are modulated is not fully understood. Here we probe a number of distinct subprocesses, including temporal discount, outcome utility, instrumental learning rate, instrumental outcome sensitivity, reward-loss trade-offs, and perseveration. We tested 22 Parkinson’s Disease patients both on and off subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), while they performed an instrumental learning task involving financial rewards and losses, and an inter-temporal choice task for financial rewards. We found that instrumental learning performance was significantly worse following stimulation, due to modulation of instrumental outcome sensitivity. Specifically, patients became less sensitive to decision values for both rewards and losses, but without any change to the learning rate or reward-loss trade-offs. However, we found no evidence that DBS modulated different components of temporal impulsivity. In conclusion, our results implicate the subthalamic nucleus in a modulation of outcome value in experience-based learning and decision-making in Parkinson’s disease, suggesting a more pervasive role of the subthalamic nucleus in the control of human decision-making than previously thought.

  19. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modulates sensitivity to decision outcome value in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Ben; Barbe, Michael; Dayan, Peter; Shiner, Tamara; Dolan, Ray; Fink, Gereon R.

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson’s disease is known to cause a subtle but important adverse impact on behaviour, with impulsivity its most widely reported manifestation. However, precisely which computational components of the decision process are modulated is not fully understood. Here we probe a number of distinct subprocesses, including temporal discount, outcome utility, instrumental learning rate, instrumental outcome sensitivity, reward-loss trade-offs, and perseveration. We tested 22 Parkinson’s Disease patients both on and off subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), while they performed an instrumental learning task involving financial rewards and losses, and an inter-temporal choice task for financial rewards. We found that instrumental learning performance was significantly worse following stimulation, due to modulation of instrumental outcome sensitivity. Specifically, patients became less sensitive to decision values for both rewards and losses, but without any change to the learning rate or reward-loss trade-offs. However, we found no evidence that DBS modulated different components of temporal impulsivity. In conclusion, our results implicate the subthalamic nucleus in a modulation of outcome value in experience-based learning and decision-making in Parkinson’s disease, suggesting a more pervasive role of the subthalamic nucleus in the control of human decision-making than previously thought. PMID:27624437

  20. Characterizing effects of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on methamphetamine-induced circling behavior in hemi-Parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    So, Rosa Q; McConnell, George C; August, Auriel T; Grill, Warren M

    2012-09-01

    The unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat model is frequently used to study the effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, systematic knowledge of the effects of DBS parameters on behavior in this animal model is lacking. The goal of this study was to characterize the effects of DBS on methamphetamine-induced circling in the unilateral 6-OHDA lesioned rat. DBS parameters tested include stimulation amplitude, stimulation frequency, methamphetamine dose, stimulation polarity, and anatomical location of the electrode. When an appropriate stimulation amplitude and dose of methamphetamine were applied, high-frequency stimulation (> 130 Hz), but not low frequency stimulation (< 10 Hz), reversed the bias in ipsilateral circling without inhibiting movement. This characteristic frequency tuning profile was only generated when at least one electrode used during bipolar stimulation was located within the STN. No difference was found between bipolar stimulation and monopolar stimulation when the most effective electrode contact was selected, indicating that monopolar stimulation could be used in future experiments. Methamphetamine-induced circling is a simple, reliable, and sensitive behavioral test and holds potential for high-throughput study of the effects of STN DBS in unilaterally lesioned rats.

  1. Characterizing Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Methamphetamine-Induced Circling Behavior in Hemiparkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    So, Rosa Q.; McConnell, George C.; August, Auriel T.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-01-01

    The unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat model is frequently used to study the effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. However, systematic knowledge of the effects of DBS parameters on behavior in this animal model is lacking. The goal of this study was to characterize the effects of DBS on methamphetamine-induced circling in the unilateral 6-OHDA lesioned rat. DBS parameters tested include stimulation amplitude, stimulation frequency, methamphetamine dose, stimulation polarity, and anatomical location of the electrode. When an appropriate stimulation amplitude and dose of methamphetamine were applied, high frequency stimulation (> 130 Hz), but not low frequency stimulation (< 10 Hz), reversed the bias in ipsilateral circling without inhibiting movement. This characteristic frequency tuning profile was only generated when at least one electrode used during bipolar stimulation was located within the STN. No difference was found between bipolar stimulation and monopolar stimulation when the most effective electrode contact was selected, indicating that monopolar stimulation could be used in future experiments. Methamphetamine-induced circling is a simple, reliable, and sensitive behavioral test and holds potential for high-throughput study of the effects of STN DBS in unilaterally lesioned rats. PMID:22692937

  2. Fornix deep brain stimulation circuit effect is dependent on major excitatory transmission via the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Erika K.; Kim, Joo Pyung; Settell, Megan L.; Han, Seong Rok; Blaha, Charles D.; Min, Hoon-Ki; Lee, Kendall H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a circuit-based treatment shown to relieve symptoms from multiple neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. In order to treat the memory deficit associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), several clinical trials have tested the efficacy of DBS near the fornix. Early results from these studies indicated that patients who received fornix DBS experienced an improvement in memory and quality of life, yet the mechanisms behind this effect remain controversial. It is known that transmission between the medial limbic and corticolimbic circuits plays an integral role in declarative memory, and dysfunction at the circuit level results in various forms of dementia, including AD. Here, we aimed to determine the potential underlying mechanism of fornix DBS by examining the functional circuitry and brain structures engaged by fornix DBS. Methods A multimodal approach was employed to examine global and local temporal changes that occur in an anesthetized swine model of fornix DBS. Changes in global functional activity were measured by functional MRI (fMRI), and local neurochemical changes were monitored by fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) during electrical stimulation of the fornix. Additionally, intracranial microinfusions into the nucleus accumbens (NAc) were performed to investigate the global activity changes that occur with dopamine and glutamate receptor-specific antagonism. Results Hemodynamic responses in both medial limbic and corticolimbic circuits measured by fMRI were induced by fornix DBS. Additionally, fornix DBS resulted in increases in dopamine oxidation current (corresponding to dopamine efflux) monitored by FSCV in the NAc. Finally, fornix DBS-evoked hemodynamic responses in the amygdala and hippocampus decreased following dopamine and glutamate receptor antagonism in the NAc. Conclusions The present findings suggest that fornix DBS modulates dopamine release on presynaptic dopaminergic terminals in the NAc

  3. Change of the melanocortin system caused by bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Sevilla, F; Pérez-Navarro, M J; Muñoz-Pasadas, M; Sáez-Zea, C; Jouma-Katati, M; Piédrola-Maroto, G; Ramírez-Navarro, A; Mínguez-Castellanos, A

    2011-10-01

    OBJECTIVES - Determine whether bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with an increase in neuropeptide Y (NPY) and/or resistance to inhibition by leptin in relation to post-surgery weight gain. MATERIALS AND METHODS - This prospective study included 20 patients who underwent bilateral STN-DBS and 17 who refused surgery. Data were obtained at baseline, 3 and 6 months on neurological and nutritional status, including determination of body mass index (BMI) and serum NPY and leptin levels. RESULTS -  NPY and leptin levels changed over time, with a distinct pattern. The BMI increase at 6 months was greater in the surgical group (5.5 ± 6.3% vs 0.5 ± 3.5%; P = 0.035). Medical group exhibited a reduction in leptin level (-2.0 ± 4.3 ng/ml) and a consequent increase in NPY level (72.4 ± 58.7 pmol/ml). However, STN-DBS patients showed an increase in leptin (3.1 ± 5.0 ng/ml; P = 0.001 vs medical group) and also in NPY (12.1 ± 53.6 pmol/ml; P = 0.022 vs medical group) levels, which suggests resistance to inhibition by leptin. Rise in NPY level correlated with higher stimulation voltages. CONCLUSIONS -  Bilateral STN-DBS causes disruption of the melanocortin system, probably related to diffusion of the electric current to the hypothalamus. This mechanism may in part explain the weight gain of patients with PD after surgery.

  4. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus increases premature responding in a rat gambling task.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, Lily R; Creed, Meaghan C; Fletcher, Paul J; Lobo, Daniela S S; Hamani, Clement; Nobrega, José N

    2013-05-15

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a treatment option for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, several recent studies have found an association between STN-DBS and increased impulsivity. Currently, it is not clear whether the observed increase in impulsivity results from STN-DBS per se, or whether it involves an interaction with the underlying PD neuropathology and/or intake of dopaminergic drugs. We investigated the effects of STN-DBS on performance of intact rats on two tasks measuring impulsive responding: a novel rat gambling task (rGT) and a differential reinforcement of low rate responding (DRL20s) schedule. Following initial behavioural training, animals received electrode implantation into the STN (n=24) or sham surgery (n=24), and were re-tested on their assigned behavioural task, with or without STN-DBS. Bilateral STN-DBS administered for two hours immediately prior to testing, had no effects on rGT choice behaviour or on DRL response inhibition (p>0.05). However, STN-DBS significantly increased premature responding in the rGT task (p=0.0004), an effect that took several sessions to develop and persisted in subsequent trials when no stimulation was given. Consistent with the notion of distinct facets of impulsivity with unique neurochemical underpinnings, we observed differential effects of STN-DBS in the two tasks employed. These results suggest that STN-DBS in the absence of parkinsonism may not lead to a general loss of inhibitory control, but may instead affect impulsivity under specific conditions.

  5. Tremor reduction by subthalamic nucleus stimulation and medication in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Blahak, Christian; Wöhrle, Johannes C; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Grips, Eva; Weigel, Ralf; Hennerici, Michael G; Krauss, Joachim K

    2007-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has proved to be effective for tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD). Most of the recent studies used only clinical data to analyse tremor reduction. The objective of our study was to quantify tremor reduction by STN DBS and antiparkinsonian medication in elderly PD patients using an objective measuring system. Amplitude and frequency of resting tremor and re-emergent resting tremor during postural tasks were analysed using an ultrasound-based measuring system and surface electromyography. In a prospective study design nine patients with advanced PD were examined preoperatively off and on medication, and twice postoperatively during four treatment conditions: off treatment, on STN DBS, on medication, and on STN DBS plus medication. While both STN DBS and medication reduced tremor amplitude, STN DBS alone and the combination of medication and STN DBS were significantly superior to pre- and postoperative medication. STN DBS but not medication increased tremor frequency, and off treatment tremor frequency was significantly reduced postoperatively compared to baseline. These findings demonstrate that STN DBS is highly effective in elderly patients with advanced PD and moderate preoperative tremor reduction by medication. Thus, with regard to the advanced impact on the other parkinsonian symptoms, STN DBS can replace thalamic stimulation in this cohort of patients. Nevertheless, medication was still effective postoperatively and may act synergistically. The significantly superior efficacy of STN DBS on tremor amplitude and its impact on tremor frequency in contrast to medication might be explained by the influence of STN DBS on additional neural circuits independent from dopaminergic neurotransmission.

  6. Behavioral memory induced by stimulation of the nucleus basalis: effects of contingency reversal.

    PubMed

    Miasnikov, Alexandre A; Chen, Jemmy C; Weinberger, Norman M

    2009-03-01

    Specific behavioral associative memory induced by stimulation of the cortically-projecting cholinergic nucleus basalis (NB) is dependent on intrinsic acetylcholine and shares with natural memory such features as associativity, specificity, rapid formation, consolidation and long-term retention. Herein, we examined extinction and the effects of stimulus pre-exposure. Two groups of adult male rats (n=4 each) were first tested for behavioral responses (disruption of ongoing respiration) to tones (1-15 kHz), constituting a pre-training behavioral frequency generalization gradient (BFGG). They next received a first session of training, 200 trials of a tone (8.00 kHz, 70 dB, 2 s) either paired with electrical stimulation of the NB (100 Hz, 0.2 s, approximately 67 microA, NBstm) (group IP) or unpaired (group IU). Twenty-four hours later, they were tested for behavioral memory by obtaining post-training BFGGs. Then the contingencies were reversed yet another 24 h later; the IP group received tone and NBstm unpaired and the IU group received them paired. A final set of generalization gradients was obtained the next day. All stimuli were presented with subjects under state control indexed by regular respiration. Tested 24 h post-initial training, the IP group developed specific associative behavioral memory indicated by increased responses only to CS-band frequencies, while the IU group did not. After subsequent training with unpaired stimuli, the IP group exhibited experimental extinction. Furthermore, after initial exposure to the CS and NBstm unpaired, the IU group exhibited a tendency toward reduced conditioning to CS/NBstm pairing and a significant increase in latency of conditioned responses. The present findings provide additional support for the hypothesis that engagement of the NB is sufficient to induce natural associative memory and suggest that activation of the NB may be a normal component in the formation of natural associative memory.

  7. Fear recognition is impaired by subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Biseul, Isabelle; Sauleau, Paul; Haegelen, Claire; Trebon, Pascale; Drapier, Dominique; Raoul, Sylvie; Drapier, Sophie; Lallement, François; Rivier, Isabelle; Lajat, Youenn; Verin, Marc

    2005-01-01

    Behavioural disturbances such as disorders of mood, apathy or indifference are often observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with chronic high frequency deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS). Neuropsychological modifications causing these adverse events induced by STN DBS remain unknown, even if limbic disturbances are hypothesised. The limbic system supports neural circuits processing emotional information. The aim of this work is to evaluate changes of emotional recognition in PD patients induced by STN DBS. Thirty PD patients were assessed using a computerised paradigm of recognition of emotional facial expressions [Ekman, P., & Friesen, W. V. (1976). Pictures of facial affect. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press], 15 before STN DBS and 15 after. The two patients groups were compared to a group of 15 healthy control subjects. One series of 55 pictures of emotional facial expressions was presented to each patient. Patients had to classify the pictures according to seven basic emotions (happiness, sadness, fear, surprise, disgust, anger and no emotion). The intact ability to percept faces was firstly assured using the Benton Recognition Test. Recognition of fear expressions was significantly and selectively reduced in the post-operative group in comparison to both pre-operative and control groups. Our results demonstrate for the first time a selective reduction of recognition of facial expressions of fear by STN DBS. This impairment could be the first neuropsychological marker of a more general limbic dysfunction, thought to be responsible for the behavioural disorders reported after STN DBS.

  8. Clinical, neuropsychological, and pre-stimulus dorsomedial thalamic nucleus electrophysiological data in deep brain stimulation patients.

    PubMed

    Sweeney-Reed, Catherine M; Zaehle, Tino; Voges, Jürgen; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Buentjen, Lars; Kopitzki, Klaus; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Knight, Robert T; Rugg, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    The data presented here comprise clinical, neuropsychological, and intrathalamic electrophysiological data from 7 patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy and are related to the article "Pre-stimulus thalamic theta power predicts human memory formation" C.M. Sweeney-Reed, T. Zaehle, J. Voges, F.C. Schmitt, L. Buentjen, K. Kopitzki, et al. (2016) [1]. The patients participated in a memory paradigm after receiving electrodes implanted in the DMTN due to the surgical approach taken in electrode insertion for deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamic nucleus. Epilepsy duration and pre-operative neuropsychological tests provide an indication of the profile of patients receiving intrathalamic electrode implantation and the memory capabilities in such a patient group. The electrophysiological data were recorded from the right DMTN preceding stimulus presentation during intentional memory encoding. The patients viewed a series of photographic scenes, which they judged as indoors or outdoors. The 900 ms epochs prior to stimulus presentation were labeled as preceding successful or unsuccessful subsequent memory formation according to a subsequent memory test for the items. The difference between theta power preceding successful versus unsuccessful subsequent memory formation is shown against time for each patient individually.

  9. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation and medication on resting and postural tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sturman, Molly M; Vaillancourt, David E; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Bakay, Roy A E; Corcos, Daniel M

    2004-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and antiparkinsonian medication have proved to be effective treatments for tremor in Parkinson's disease. To date it is not known how and to what extent STN DBS alone and in combination with antiparkinsonian medication alters the pathophysiology of resting and postural tremor in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of STN DBS and antiparkinsonian medication on the neurophysiological characteristics of resting and postural hand tremor in Parkinson's disease. Resting and postural hand tremor were recorded using accelerometry and surface electromyography (EMG) from 10 Parkinson's disease patients and 10 matched control subjects. The Parkinson's disease subjects were examined under four treatment conditions: (i) off treatment; (ii) STN DBS; (iii) medication; and (iv) medication plus STN DBS. The amplitude, EMG frequency, regularity, and 1-8 Hz tremor-EMG coherence were analysed. Both STN DBS and medication reduced the amplitude, regularity and tremor-EMG coherence, and increased the EMG frequency of resting and postural tremor in Parkinson's disease. STN DBS was more effective than medication in reducing the amplitude and increasing the frequency of resting and postural tremor to healthy physiological levels. These findings provide strong evidence that effective STN DBS normalizes the amplitude and frequency of tremor. The findings suggest that neural activity in the STN is an important modulator of the neural network(s) responsible for both resting and postural tremor genesis in Parkinson's disease.

  10. Complex repetitive behavior: punding after bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pallanti, Stefano; Bernardi, Silvia; Raglione, Laura Maria; Marini, Paolo; Ammannati, Franco; Sorbi, Sandro; Ramat, Silvia

    2010-07-01

    "Punding" is the term used to describe a stereotyped motor behavior characterized by an intense fascination with repetitive purposeless movements, such as taking apart mechanical objects, handling common objects as if they were new and entertaining, constantly picking at oneself, etc. As a phenomenon with both impulsive and compulsive features, the phenomenology of punding is currently being questioned. In order to investigate the pathophysiology of this phenomenon, we screened a population of Parkinson's disease (PD) outpatients who underwent subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS). We conducted a patient-and-relative-completed survey with 24 consecutive patients in an academic outpatient care center, using a modified version of a structured interview. Patients were administered the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory and the Sheehan Disability Scale. Five (20.8%) of the 24 subjects were identified as punders, including three men (60%) and two women. The punders were comparable to the non-punders in terms of clinical and demographic factors. The punder and non-punder groups only differed statistically with regard to the length of time from DBS implantation. Those findings suggest that punding might be induced by STN DBS, and its rate of occurrence in DBS population seems to be more common than previously suspected. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic electrical stimulation of the contralesional lateral cerebellar nucleus enhances recovery of motor function after cerebral ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Andre G.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Schuster, Daniel; Butler, Robert S.; Rezai, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Novel neurorehabilitative strategies are needed to improve motor outcomes following stroke. Based on the disynaptic excitatory projections of the dentatothalamocortical pathway to the motor cortex as well as anterior and posterior cortical areas, we hypothesize that chronic electrical stimulation of the contralesional dentate (lateral cerebellar) nucleus output can enhance motor recovery after ischemia via augmentation of perilesional cortical excitability. Seventy five Wistar rats were pre-trained in the Montoya staircase task and subsequently suffered left cerebral ischemia with the 3-vessel occlusion model. All survivors underwent stereotactic right lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN) implantation of bipolar electrodes. Rats were then randomized to 4 groups: LCN stimulation at 10 pps, 20 pps, 50 pps or sham stimulation, which was delivered for a period of six weeks. Performance on the Montoya task was re-assessed over the last four weeks of the stimulation period. On the right (contralesional) side, motor performance of the groups undergoing sham, 10 pps, 20 pps and 50 pps stimulation was, respectively, 2.5± 2.7; 2.1 ± 2.5; 6.0 ± 3.9 (p<0.01) and 4.5 ± 3.5 pellets. There was no difference on the left (ipsilesional) side motor performance among the sham or stimulation groups, varying from 15.9 ± 6.7 to 17.2 ± 2.1 pellets. We conclude that contralesional chronic electrical stimulation of the lateral cerebellar nucleus at 20 pps but not at 10 or 50 pps improves motor recovery in rats following ischemic strokes. This effect is likely to be mediated by increased perilesional cortical excitability via chronic activation of the dentatothalamocortical pathway. PMID:19445910

  12. Hypoglycemia-activated GLUT2 neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius stimulate vagal activity and glucagon secretion.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Christophe M; Sanno, Hitomi; Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Picard, Alexandre; Magnan, Christophe; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Thorens, Bernard

    2014-03-04

    Glucose-sensing neurons in the brainstem participate in the regulation of energy homeostasis but have been poorly characterized because of the lack of specific markers to identify them. Here we show that GLUT2-expressing neurons of the nucleus of the tractus solitarius form a distinct population of hypoglycemia-activated neurons. Their response to low glucose is mediated by reduced intracellular glucose metabolism, increased AMP-activated protein kinase activity, and closure of leak K(+) channels. These are GABAergic neurons that send projections to the vagal motor nucleus. Light-induced stimulation of channelrhodospin-expressing GLUT2 neurons in vivo led to increased parasympathetic nerve firing and glucagon secretion. Thus GLUT2 neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius link hypoglycemia detection to counterregulatory response. These results may help identify the cause of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure, a major threat in the insulin treatment of diabetes.

  13. Electrical stimulation of reward sites in the ventral tegmental area increases dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens of the rat.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, D F; Coury, A; Fibiger, H C; Phillips, A G

    1993-06-30

    In vivo microdialysis with HPLC-ED was used to measure dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the nucleus accumbens of the rat, prior, during, and after 15-min periods of electrical brain stimulation at sites in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) that supported intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). In the first experiment, both ICSS and yoked stimulation of the VTA evoked significant increases in extracellular concentrations of DA, its metabolites, and 5-HIAA. Comparable results from ICSS and yoked groups were interpreted as evidence that the rewarding properties of VTA stimulation were a causal factor in the elevated DA transmission in the nucleus accumbens, rather than intense operant behavior. Further evidence for this hypothesis came from a second set of data in which changes in extracellular DA levels during the measurement of rate/intensity functions for ICSS were positively correlated. 5-HIAA concentrations also increased during ICSS but these changes were not correlated with either ICSS rate or current intensity, suggesting that changes in serotonin metabolism were unlikely to subserve brain stimulation reward in the VTA. These results add to the growing body of evidence linking changes in extracellular DA in the mesolimbic DA system with both brain stimulation reward and the conditioned and unconditioned rewarding effects of biologically relevant stimuli.

  14. Responses of the red nucleus neurons to stimulation of the paw pads of forelimbs before and after cerebellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Tarnecki, R; Lupa, K; Niechaj, A

    2001-09-01

    Cerebellar cortex ablation releases deep cerebellar nuclei of monosynaptic inhibition from Purkinje cells. Therefore, it strengthens excitatory influence from Interpositus Nucleus (IN) upon Red Nucleus (RN), which results in much higher facilitation of the rubro-spinal neurons. This causes a big increase of spontaneous discharge rate, and eliminates brakes of discharges from responses generated by somatosensory stimuli. These two changes destroy content and timing of feedback information flowing through the spino-cerebello-rubro-spinal loop. This false bias of the feedback information, very important for fast postural adjustment and coordination of ongoing movements executed by central motor program, may at least in part be responsible for abnormal motor behavior evoked by cerebellar damage. Hemicerebellectomy resulted in dramatically reduced spontaneous activity and responses to limb stimulation because of severing a major input to the red nucleus from deep cerebellar nuclei. Due to direct somatosensory input to magnocellular Red Nucleus (mcRN) from the spinal cord that bypassed the cerebellum, the latency of response to limb stimulation was not changed and the narrower receptive fields were still present.

  15. Electric stimulation of the tuberomamillary nucleus affects epileptic activity and sleep-wake cycle in a genetic absence epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Blik, Vitaliya

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising approach for epilepsy treatment, but the optimal targets and parameters of stimulation are yet to be investigated. Tuberomamillary nucleus (TMN) is involved in EEG desynchronization-one of the proposed mechanisms for DBS action. We studied whether TMN stimulation could interfere with epileptic spike-wave discharges (SWDs) in WAG/Rij rats with inherited absence epilepsy and whether such stimulation would affect sleep-wake cycle. EEG and video registration were used to determine SWD occurrence and stages of sleep and wake during three-hours recording sessions. Stimulation (100Hz) was applied in two modes: closed-loop (with previously determined interruption threshold intensity) or open-loop mode (with 50% or 70% threshold intensity). Closed-loop stimulation successfully interrupted SWDs but elevated their number by 148 ± 54% compared to baseline. It was accompanied by increase in number of episodes but not total duration of both active and passive wakefulness. Open-loop stimulation with amplitude 50% threshold did not change measured parameters, though 70% threshold stimulation reduced SWDs number by 40 ± 9%, significantly raised the amount of active wakefulness and decreased the amount of both slow-wave and rapid eye movement sleep. These results suggest that the TMN is unfavorable as a target for DBS as its stimulation may cause alterations in sleep-wake cycle. A careful choosing of parameters and control of sleep-wake activity is necessary when applying DBS in epilepsy.

  16. Systemically administered oxytocin decreases methamphetamine activation of the subthalamic nucleus and accumbens core and stimulates oxytocinergic neurons in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Carson, Dean S; Hunt, Glenn E; Guastella, Adam J; Barber, Lachlan; Cornish, Jennifer L; Arnold, Jonathon C; Boucher, Aurelie A; McGregor, Iain S

    2010-10-01

    Recent preclinical evidence indicates that the neuropeptide oxytocin may have potential in the treatment of drug dependence and drug withdrawal. Oxytocin reduces methamphetamine self-administration, conditioned place preference and hyperactivity in rodents. However, it is unclear how oxytocin acts in the brain to produce such effects. The present study examined how patterns of neural activation produced by methamphetamine were modified by co-administered oxytocin. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with either 2 mg/kg oxytocin (IP) or saline and then injected with either 2 mg/kg methamphetamine (IP) or saline. After injection, locomotor activity was measured for 80 minutes prior to perfusion. As in previous studies, co-administered oxytocin significantly reduced methamphetamine-induced behaviors. Strikingly, oxytocin significantly reduced methamphetamine-induced Fos expression in two regions of the basal ganglia: the subthalamic nucleus and the nucleus accumbens core. The subthalamic nucleus is of particular interest given emerging evidence for this structure in compulsive, addiction-relevant behaviors. When administered alone, oxytocin increased Fos expression in several regions, most notably in the oxytocin-synthesizing neurons of the supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. This provides new evidence for central actions of peripheral oxytocin and suggests a self-stimulation effect of exogenous oxytocin on its own hypothalamic circuitry. Overall, these results give further insight into the way in which oxytocin might moderate compulsive behaviors and demonstrate the capacity of peripherally administered oxytocin to induce widespread central effects.

  17. Interleaving subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation to avoid side effects while achieving satisfactory motor benefits in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shizhen; Zhou, Peizhi; Jiang, Shu; Wang, Wei; Li, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD). However, achieving ideal outcomes by conventional programming can be difficult in some patients, resulting in suboptimal control of PD symptoms and stimulation-induced adverse effects. Interleaving stimulation (ILS) is a newer programming technique that can individually optimize the stimulation area, thereby improving control of PD symptoms while alleviating stimulation-induced side effects after conventional programming fails to achieve the desired results. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed PD patients who received DBS programming during the previous 4 years in our hospital. We collected clinical and demographic data from 12 patients who received ILS because of incomplete alleviation of PD symptoms or stimulation-induced adverse effects after conventional programming had proven ineffective or intolerable. Appropriate lead location was confirmed with postoperative reconstruction images. The rationale and clinical efficacy of ILS was analyzed. Results: We divided our patients into 4 groups based on the following symptoms: stimulation-induced dysarthria and choreoathetoid dyskinesias, gait disturbance, and incomplete control of parkinsonism. After treatment with ILS, patients showed satisfactory improvement in PD symptoms and alleviation of stimulation-induced side effects, with a mean improvement in Unified PD Rating Scale motor scores of 26.9%. Conclusions: ILS is a newer choice and effective programming strategy to maximize symptom control in PD while decreasing stimulation-induced adverse effects when conventional programming fails to achieve satisfactory outcome. However, we should keep in mind that most DBS patients are routinely treated with conventional stimulation and that not all patients benefit from ILS. ILS is not recommended as the first choice of programming, and it is recommended only when patients have

  18. Deep brain stimulation of the medial septum or nucleus accumbens alleviates psychosis-relevant behavior in ketamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyi; Leung, L Stan

    2014-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to be effective for relief of Parkinson's disease, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder in humans, but the effect of DBS on psychosis is largely unknown. In previous studies, we showed that inactivation of the medial septum or nucleus accumbens normalized the hyperactive and psychosis-related behaviors induced by psychoactive drugs. We hypothesized that DBS of the medial septum or nucleus accumbens normalizes the ketamine-induced abnormal behaviors and brain activity in freely moving rats. Male Long-Evans rats were subcutaneously injected with ketamine (3 mg/kg) alone, or given ketamine and DBS, or injected with saline alone. Subcutaneous injection of ketamine resulted in loss of gating of hippocampal auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), deficit in prepulse inhibition (PPI) and hyperlocomotion, accompanied by increased hippocampal gamma oscillations of 70-100 Hz. Continuous 130-Hz stimulation of the nucleus accumbens, or 100-Hz burst stimulation of the medial septum (1s on and 5s off) significantly attenuated ketamine-induced PPI deficit and hyperlocomotion. Medial septal stimulation also prevented the loss of gating of hippocampal AEPs and the increase in hippocampal gamma waves induced by ketamine. Neither septal or accumbens DBS alone without ketamine injection affected spontaneous locomotion or PPI. The results suggest that DBS of the medial septum or nucleus accumbens may be an effective method to alleviate psychiatric symptoms of schizophrenia. The effect of medial septal DBS in suppressing both hippocampal gamma oscillations and abnormal behaviors induced by ketamine suggests that hippocampal gamma oscillations are a correlate of disrupted behaviors.

  19. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation impacts language in early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lara; Litcofsky, Kaitlyn A; Pelster, Michael; Gelfand, Matthew; Ullman, Michael T; Charles, P David

    2012-01-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia improves motor outcomes in Parkinson's disease (PD), its effects on cognition, including language, remain unclear. This study examined the impact of subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS on two fundamental capacities of language, grammatical and lexical functions. These functions were tested with the production of regular and irregular past-tenses, which contrast aspects of grammatical (regulars) and lexical (irregulars) processing while controlling for multiple potentially confounding factors. Aspects of the motor system were tested by contrasting the naming of manipulated (motor) and non-manipulated (non-motor) objects. Performance was compared between healthy controls and early-stage PD patients treated with either DBS/medications or medications alone. Patients were assessed on and off treatment, with controls following a parallel testing schedule. STN-DBS improved naming of manipulated (motor) but not non-manipulated (non-motor) objects, as compared to both controls and patients with just medications, who did not differ from each other across assessment sessions. In contrast, STN-DBS led to worse performance at regulars (grammar) but not irregulars (lexicon), as compared to the other two subject groups, who again did not differ. The results suggest that STN-DBS negatively impacts language in early PD, but may be specific in depressing aspects of grammatical and not lexical processing. The finding that STN-DBS affects both motor and grammar (but not lexical) functions strengthens the view that both depend on basal ganglia circuitry, although the mechanisms for its differential impact on the two (improved motor, impaired grammar) remain to be elucidated.

  20. Striatal Molecular Signature of Subchronic Subthalamic Nucleus High Frequency Stimulation in Parkinsonian Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lortet, Sylviane; Lacombe, Emilie; Boulanger, Nicolas; Rihet, Pascal; Nguyen, Catherine; Goff, Lydia Kerkerian-Le; Salin, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses the molecular mechanisms underlying the action of subthalamic nucleus high frequency stimulation (STN-HFS) in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and its interaction with levodopa (L-DOPA), focusing on the striatum. Striatal gene expression profile was assessed in rats with nigral dopamine neuron lesion, either treated or not, using agilent microarrays and qPCR verification. The treatments consisted in anti-akinetic STN-HFS (5 days), chronic L-DOPA treatment inducing dyskinesia (LIDs) or the combination of the two treatments that exacerbated LIDs. STN-HFS modulated 71 striatal genes. The main biological processes associated with the differentially expressed gene products include regulation of growth, of apoptosis and of synaptic transmission, and extracellular region is a major cellular component implicated. In particular, several of these genes have been shown to support survival or differentiation of striatal or of dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate that STN HFS may induce widespread anatomo-functional rearrangements in the striatum and create a molecular environment favorable for neuroprotection and neuroplasticity. STN-HFS and L-DOPA treatment share very few common gene regulation features indicating that the molecular substrates underlying their striatal action are mostly different; among the common effects is the down-regulation of Adrb1, which encodes the adrenergic beta-1- receptor, supporting a major role of this receptor in Parkinson's disease. In addition to genes already reported to be associated with LIDs (preprodynorphin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, metabotropic glutamate receptor 4, cannabinoid receptor 1), the comparison between DOPA and DOPA/HFS identifies immunity-related genes as potential players in L-DOPA side effects. PMID:23593219

  1. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Impacts Language in Early Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Lara; Litcofsky, Kaitlyn A.; Pelster, Michael; Gelfand, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia improves motor outcomes in Parkinson's disease (PD), its effects on cognition, including language, remain unclear. This study examined the impact of subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS on two fundamental capacities of language, grammatical and lexical functions. These functions were tested with the production of regular and irregular past-tenses, which contrast aspects of grammatical (regulars) and lexical (irregulars) processing while controlling for multiple potentially confounding factors. Aspects of the motor system were tested by contrasting the naming of manipulated (motor) and non-manipulated (non-motor) objects. Performance was compared between healthy controls and early-stage PD patients treated with either DBS/medications or medications alone. Patients were assessed on and off treatment, with controls following a parallel testing schedule. STN-DBS improved naming of manipulated (motor) but not non-manipulated (non-motor) objects, as compared to both controls and patients with just medications, who did not differ from each other across assessment sessions. In contrast, STN-DBS led to worse performance at regulars (grammar) but not irregulars (lexicon), as compared to the other two subject groups, who again did not differ. The results suggest that STN-DBS negatively impacts language in early PD, but may be specific in depressing aspects of grammatical and not lexical processing. The finding that STN-DBS affects both motor and grammar (but not lexical) functions strengthens the view that both depend on basal ganglia circuitry, although the mechanisms for its differential impact on the two (improved motor, impaired grammar) remain to be elucidated. PMID:22880117

  2. Subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation modulates neuronal reactivity to cocaine within the reward circuit.

    PubMed

    Hachem-Delaunay, Sabira; Fournier, Marie-Line; Cohen, Candie; Bonneau, Nicolas; Cador, Martine; Baunez, Christelle; Le Moine, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a critical component of a complex network controlling motor, associative and limbic functions. High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the STN is an effective therapy for motor symptoms in Parkinsonian patients and can also reduce their treatment-induced addictive behaviors. Preclinical studies have shown that STN HFS decreases motivation for cocaine while increasing that for food, highlighting its influence on rewarding and motivational circuits. However, the cellular substrates of these effects remain unknown. Our objectives were to characterize the cellular consequences of STN HFS with a special focus on limbic structures and to elucidate how STN HFS may interfere with acute cocaine effects in these brain areas. Male Long-Evans rats were subjected to STN HFS (130 Hz, 60 μs, 50-150 μA) for 30 min before an acute cocaine injection (15 mg/kg) and sacrificed 10 min following the injection. Neuronal reactivity was analyzed through the expression of two immediate early genes (Arc and c-Fos) to decipher cellular responses to STN HFS and cocaine. STN HFS only activated c-Fos in the globus pallidus and the basolateral amygdala, highlighting a possible role on emotional processes via the amygdala, with a limited effect by itself in other structures. Interestingly, and despite some differential effects on Arc and c-Fos expression, STN HFS diminished the c-Fos response induced by acute cocaine in the striatum. By preventing the cellular effect of cocaine in the striatum, STN HFS might thus decrease the reinforcing properties of the drug, which is in line with the inhibitory effect of STN HFS on the rewarding and reinforcing properties of cocaine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patients' expectations in subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation surgery for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Harutomo; Samuel, Michael; Douiri, Abdel; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2014-12-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with advanced Parkinson disease. However, some patients feel less satisfied with the outcome of surgery. We sought to study the relationship between expectations, satisfaction, and outcome in STN DBS for Parkinson disease. Twenty-two consecutive patients undergoing STN DBS completed a modified 39-item Parkinson disease questionnaire (PDQ-39) preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. A satisfaction questionnaire accompanied the postoperative questionnaire. Patients expected a significant improvement from surgery preoperatively: preoperative score (median PDQ-39 summary score [interquartile range]): 37.0 (9.5), expected postoperative score: 13.0 (8.0), P < 0.001. Patients improved after surgery (preoperative score 39.0 [11.5], postoperative score 25.0 [14.3], P = 0.003), although there was a substantial disparity between the expected change (24.0 [15.0]) and actual change (14.0 [22.5]), P = 0.008. However, most patients felt that surgery fulfilled their expectations (mean score on a 0%-100% visual analog scale); (75.3 ± 17.8) and were satisfied (73.3 ± 25.3). Satisfaction correlated with fulfillment of expectations (r = 0.910, P < 0.001) but not with quantitative changes in PDQ-39 scores. Addressing patients' expectations both preoperatively and postoperatively may play an important role in patient satisfaction, and therefore overall success, of STN DBS surgery for Parkinson disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reduced GABA Content in the Motor Thalamus during Effective Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Alessandro; Fedele, Ernesto; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Galati, Salvatore; Marzetti, Francesco; Peppe, Antonella; Pastore, Francesco Saverio; Bernardi, Giorgio; Stanzione, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, is a well established therapeutic option, but its mechanisms of action are only partially known. In our previous study, the clinical transitions from OFF- to ON-state were not correlated with significant changes of GABA content inside GPi or substantia nigra reticulata. Here, biochemical effects of STN-DBS have been assessed in putamen (PUT), internal pallidus (GPi), and inside the antero-ventral thalamus (VA), the key station receiving pallidothalamic fibers. In 10 advanced PD patients undergoing surgery, microdialysis samples were collected before and during STN-DBS. cGMP, an index of glutamatergic transmission, was measured in GPi and PUT by radioimmunoassay, whereas GABA from VA was measured by HPLC. During clinically effective STN-DBS, we found a significant decrease in GABA extracellular concentrations in VA (−30%). Simultaneously, cGMP extracellular concentrations were enhanced in PUT (+200%) and GPi (+481%). These findings support a thalamic dis-inhibition, in turn re-establishing a more physiological corticostriatal transmission, as the source of motor improvement. They indirectly confirm the relevance of patterning (instead of mere changes of excitability) and suggest that a rigid interpretation of the standard model, at least when it indicates the hyperactive indirect pathway as key feature of hypokinetic signs, is unlikely to be correct. Finally, given the demonstration of a key role of VA in inducing clinical relief, locally administration of drugs modulating GABA transmission in thalamic nuclei could become an innovative therapeutic strategy. PMID:21519387

  5. Neuropsychological consequences of chronic bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Saint-Cyr, J A; Trépanier, L L; Kumar, R; Lozano, A M; Lang, A E

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine possible neuropsychological changes in patients with advanced idiopathic Parkinson's disease treated with bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Eleven patients (age = 67 +/- 8 years, years with Parkinson's disease = 15 +/- 3, verbal IQ = 114 +/- 12) were evaluated (in their best 'on state') with tests assessing processes reliant on the functional integrity of frontal striatal circuitry, prior to the procedure (n = 11), at 3-6 months (n = 11) and at 9-12 months (n =10) post-operatively. Six of these patients were older than 69 years. Despite clinical motor benefits at 3-6 months post-operative, significant declines were noted in working memory, speed of mental processing, bimanual motor speed and co-ordination, set switching, phonemic fluency, long-term consolidation of verbal material and the encoding of visuospatial material. Declines were more consistently observed in patients who were older than 69 years, leading to a mental state comparable with progressive supranuclear palsy. 'Frontal' behavioural dyscontrol without the benefit of insight was also reported by half (three of six) of the caregivers of the elderly subgroup. At 9-12 months postoperative, only learning based on multiple trials had recovered. Tasks reliant on the integrity of frontal striatal circuitry either did not recover or gradually worsened over time. Bilateral STN DBS can have a negative impact on various aspects of frontal executive functioning, especially in patients older than 69 years. Future studies will evaluate a larger group of patients and examine the possible reversibility of these effects by turning the DBS off.

  6. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation May Reduce Medication Costs in Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Mallory L; Currie, Amanda D; Molinari, Anna L; Turchan, Maxim; Millan, Sarah M; Heusinkveld, Lauren E; Roach, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter E; Davis, Thomas L; Neimat, Joseph S; Phibbs, Fenna T; Hedera, Peter; Byrne, Daniel W; Charles, David

    2016-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is well-known to reduce medication burden in advanced stage Parkinson's disease (PD). Preliminary data from a prospective, single blind, controlled pilot trial demonstrated that early stage PD subjects treated with STN-DBS also required less medication than those treated with optimal drug therapy (ODT). The purpose of this study was to analyze medication cost and utilization from the pilot trial of DBS in early stage PD and to project 10 year medication costs. Medication data collected at each visit were used to calculate medication costs. Medications were converted to levodopa equivalent daily dose, categorized by medication class, and compared. Medication costs were projected to advanced stage PD, the time when a typical patient may be offered DBS. Medication costs increased 72% in the ODT group and decreased 16% in the DBS+ODT group from baseline to 24 months. This cost difference translates into a cumulative savings for the DBS+ODT group of $7,150 over the study period. Projected medication cost savings over 10 years reach $64,590. Additionally, DBS+ODT subjects were 80% less likely to require polypharmacy compared with ODT subjects at 24 months (p <  0.05; OR = 0.2; 95% CI: 0.04-0.97). STN-DBS in early PD reduced medication cost over the two-year study period. DBS may offer substantial long-term reduction in medication cost by maintaining a simplified, low dose medication regimen. Further study is needed to confirm these findings, and the FDA has approved a pivotal, multicenter clinical trial evaluating STN-DBS in early PD.

  7. Verbal fluency in patients receiving bilateral versus left-sided deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Rickard L; Lidman, Elin; Häggström, Björn; Hariz, Marwan I; Linder, Jan; Fredricks, Anna; Blomstedt, Patric

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative effects of unilateral (left-sided) versus bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on verbal fluency. To do this, 10 Parkinson's disease patients with predominantly bilateral motor symptoms who received bilateral STN DBS were compared with 6 patients suffering from predominantly unilateral symptoms who received STN DBS on the left side only. The results suggest that unilateral STN DBS of the speech dominant hemisphere is associated with significantly less declines in measures of verbal fluency as compared to bilateral stimulation.

  8. Low-frequency deep brain stimulation for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Baizabal-Carvallo, José Fidel; Alonso-Juarez, Marlene

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, deep brain stimulation (DBS) for movement disorders (MDs) is provided using stimulation frequencies equal to or above 100 Hz. However, recent evidence suggests that relatively low-frequency stimulation (LFS) below 100 Hz is an option to treat some patients with MDs. We aimed to review the clinical and pathophysiological evidence supporting the use of stimulation frequencies below 100 Hz in different MDs. Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus at 60 Hz has provided benefit in gait and other axial symptoms such as swallowing and speech. Stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus between 20 and 45 Hz can provide benefit in freezing of gait, cognition, and sleep quality in select patients with Parkinson's disease. Stimulation of the globus pallidus internus below 100 Hz in patients with dystonia has provided benefit at the beginning of the therapy, although progressively higher stimulation frequencies seem to be necessary to maintain the clinical benefit. Relative LFS can lower energy requirements and reduce battery usage-a useful feature, particularly in patients treated with high current energy. DBS at frequencies below 100 Hz is a therapeutic option in select cases of Parkinson's disease with freezing of gait and other axial symptoms, and in select patients with dystonia and other hyperkinetic movements, particularly those requiring an energy-saving strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional MRI reveals frequency-dependent responses during deep brain stimulation at the subthalamic nucleus or internal globus pallidus.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Younce, John R; Albaugh, Daniel L; Kao, Yu-Chieh Jill; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents a widely used therapeutic tool for the symptomatic treatment of movement disorders, most commonly Parkinson's disease (PD). High frequency stimulation at both the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi) has been used with great success for the symptomatic treatment of PD, although the therapeutic mechanisms of action remain elusive. To better understand how DBS at these target sites modulates neural circuitry, the present study used functional blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to map global brain responses to DBS at the STN and GPi of the rat. Robust activation centered in the ipsilateral motor cortex was observed during high frequency stimulation at either target site, with peak responses observed at a stimulation frequency of 100Hz. Of note, frequency tuning curves were generated, demonstrating that cortical activation was maximal at clinically-relevant stimulation frequencies. Divergent responses to stimulation were noted in the contralateral hemisphere, with strong cortical and striatal negative BOLD signal during stimulation of the GPi, but not STN. The frequency-dependence of the observed motor cortex activation at both targets suggests a relationship with the therapeutic effects of STN and GPi DBS, with both DBS targets being functionally connected with motor cortex at therapeutic stimulation frequencies.

  10. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation induces impulsive action when patients with Parkinson's disease act under speed pressure.

    PubMed

    Pote, Inês; Torkamani, Mariam; Kefalopoulou, Zinovia-Maria; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin-Dowsey, Patricia; Foltynie, Thomas; Speekenbrink, Maarten; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2016-07-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is proposed to modulate response thresholds and speed-accuracy trade-offs. In situations of conflict, the STN is considered to raise response thresholds, allowing time for the accumulation of information to occur before a response is selected. Conversely, speed pressure is thought to reduce the activity of the STN and lower response thresholds, resulting in fast, errorful responses. In Parkinson's disease (PD), subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) reduces the activity of the nucleus and improves motor symptoms. We predicted that the combined effects of STN stimulation and speed pressure would lower STN activity and lead to fast, errorful responses, hence resulting in impulsive action. We used the motion discrimination 'moving-dots' task to assess speed-accuracy trade-offs, under both speed and accuracy instructions. We assessed 12 patients with PD and bilateral STN-DBS and 12 age-matched healthy controls. Participants completed the task twice, and the patients completed it once with STN-DBS on and once with STN-DBS off, with order counterbalanced. We found that STN stimulation was associated with significantly faster reaction times but more errors under speed instructions. Application of the drift diffusion model showed that stimulation resulted in lower response thresholds when acting under speed pressure. These findings support the involvement of the STN in the modulation of speed-accuracy trade-offs and establish for the first time that speed pressure alone, even in the absence of conflict, can result in STN stimulation inducing impulsive action in PD.

  11. Responses from two firing patterns in inferior colliculus neurons to stimulation of the lateral lemniscus dorsal nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-ting; Wang, Ning-yu; Wang, Yan-jun; Xu, Zhi-qing; Liu, Jin-feng; Bai, Yun-fei; Dai, Jin-sheng; Zhao, Jing-yi

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid neurons (GABAergic neurons) in the inferior colliculus are classified into various patterns based on their intrinsic electrical properties to a constant current injection. Although this classification is associated with physiological function, the exact role for neurons with various firing patterns in acoustic processing remains poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed characteristics of inferior colliculus neurons in vitro, and recorded responses to stimulation of the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Seven inferior colliculus neurons were tested and were classified into two firing patterns: sustained-regular (n = 4) and sustained-adapting firing patterns (n = 3). The majority of inferior colliculus neurons exhibited slight changes in response to stimulation and bicuculline. The responses of one neuron with a sustained-adapting firing pattern were suppressed after stimulation, but recovered to normal levels following application of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor antagonist. One neuron with a sustained-regular pattern showed suppressed stimulation responses, which were not affected by bicuculline. Results suggest that GABAergic neurons in the inferior colliculus exhibit sustained-regular or sustained-adapting firing patterns. Additionally, GABAergic projections from the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus to the inferior colliculus are associated with sound localization. The different neuronal responses of various firing patterns suggest a role in sound localization. A better understanding of these mechanisms and functions will provide better clinical treatment paradigms for hearing deficiencies. PMID:27335563

  12. Regulatory mechanisms of testosterone-stimulated song in the sensorimotor nucleus HVC of female songbirds.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Falk; Ramenda, Claudia; Grillitsch, Doris; Frankl-Vilches, Carolina; Ko, Meng-Ching; Hertel, Moritz; Goymann, Wolfgang; ter Maat, Andries; Gahr, Manfred

    2014-12-02

    In male birds, influence of the sex steroid hormone testosterone and its estrogenic metabolites on seasonal song behavior has been demonstrated for many species. In contrast, female song was only recently recognized to be widespread among songbird species, and to date, sex hormone effects on singing and brain regions controlling song development and production (song control nuclei) have been studied in females almost exclusively using domesticated canaries (Serinus canaria). However, domesticated female canaries hardly sing at all in normal circumstances and exhibit only very weak, if any, song seasonally under the natural photoperiod. By contrast, adult female European robins (Erithacus rubecula) routinely sing during the winter season, a time when they defend feeding territories and show elevated circulating testosterone levels. We therefore used wild female European robins captured in the fall to examine the effects of testosterone administration on song as well as on the anatomy and the transcriptome of the song control nucleus HVC (sic). The results obtained from female robins were compared to outcomes of a similar experiment done in female domesticated canaries. Testosterone treatment induced abundant song in female robins. Examination of HVC transcriptomes and histological analyses of song control nuclei showed testosterone-induced differentiation processes related to neuron growth and spacing, angiogenesis and neuron projection morphogenesis. Similar effects were found in female canaries treated with testosterone. In contrast, the expression of genes related to synaptic transmission was not enhanced in the HVC of testosterone treated female robins but was strongly up-regulated in female canaries. A comparison of the testosterone-stimulated transcriptomes indicated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) likely functions as a common mediator of the testosterone effects in HVC. Testosterone-induced singing of female robins correlated with cellular

  13. Deep brain stimulation in the internal capsule and nucleus accumbens region: responses observed during active and sham programming

    PubMed Central

    Okun, Michael S; Mann, Giselle; Foote, Kelly D; Shapira, Nathan A; Bowers, Dawn; Springer, Utaka; Knight, William; Martin, Pamela; Goodman, Wayne K

    2007-01-01

    Background Recently, anterior limb of the internal capsule and nucleus accumbens deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used in the treatment of medication‐refractory obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). This region has been previously explored with lesion therapy, but with the advent of DBS there exists the possibility of monitoring the acute and chronic effects of electrical stimulation. The stimulation‐induced benefits and side effects can be reversibly and blindly applied to a variety of locations in this region. Objective To explore the acute effects of DBS in the anterior limb of the internal capsule and nucleus accumbens region. Methods Ten total DBS leads in five patients with chronic and severe treatment‐refractory OCD were tested. Patients were examined 30 days after DBS placement and received either “sham” testing or actual testing of the acute effects of DBS (the alternative condition tested 30 days later). Results Pooled responses were reviewed for comparability of distribution using standard descriptive methods, and relationships between the variables of interest were sought using χ2 analysis. A total of 845 stimulation trials across the five patients were recorded and pooled. Of these 16% were elicited from sham stimulation and 17% from placebo (0 V stimulation). A comparison of active to sham trials showed that sham stimulation was not associated with significant side effects or responses from patients. Non‐mood‐related responses were found to be significantly associated with the ventral lead contacts (0 and 1) (p = 0.001). Responses such as taste, smell and smile were strongly associated with the most ventral lead positions. Similarly, physiological responses—for example, autonomic changes, increased breathing rate, sweating, nausea, cold sensation, heat sensation, fear, panic and panic episodes—were significantly associated with ventral stimulation (p = 0.001). Fear and panic responses appeared clustered around the

  14. Spinal direct current stimulation modulates the activity of gracile nucleus and primary somatosensory cortex in anaesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, J; Pulecchi, F; Dilena, R; Oliviero, A; Priori, A; Foffani, G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Afferent somatosensory activity from the spinal cord has a profound impact on the activity of the brain. Here we investigated the effects of spinal stimulation using direct current, delivered at the thoracic level, on the spontaneous activity and on the somatosensory evoked potentials of the gracile nucleus, which is the main entry point for hindpaw somatosensory signals reaching the brain from the dorsal columns, and of the primary somatosensory cortex in anaesthetized rats. Anodal spinal direct current stimulation (sDCS) increased the spontaneous activity and decreased the amplitude of evoked responses in the gracile nucleus, whereas cathodal sDCS produced the opposite effects. At the level of the primary somatosensory cortex, the changes in spontaneous activity induced by sDCS were consistent with the effects observed in the gracile nucleus, but the changes in cortical evoked responses were more variable and state dependent. Therefore, sDCS can modulate in a polarity-specific manner the supraspinal activity of the somatosensory system, offering a versatile bottom-up neuromodulation technique that could potentially be useful in a number of clinical applications. PMID:21825031

  15. Inhibitory effects of acupuncture manipulation and focal electrical stimulation of the nucleus submedius on a viscerosomatic reflex in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Sumiya, E; Kawakita, K

    1997-02-01

    To examine the participation of nucleus submedius (Sm) in the medial thalamus of pain inhibitory systems, we investigated the effects of acupuncture and focal electrical stimulation of the Sm and adjacent brain sites (0.3 ms, 50 Hz, 50-100 microA, 10 s) on the EMG activity of the external oblique muscle evoked by colorectal distension in urethane-anesthetized Wistar rats. The viscerosomatic reflex (VSR) activity was suppressed after the administration of morphine (1.0 mg/kg, i.v.) and the effect was reversed by naloxone (0.5 mg/kg, i.v.). Transection of the spinal cord at the Th2 level also eliminated the VSR. Acupuncture manipulation applied to the cheek (manual rotation at 1 Hz) suppressed the VSR, and this inhibition was eliminated by microinjections of lidocaine into the bilateral Sm nuclei (0.5 microliter of 1.0% solution). Electrical stimulation in the ventral part but not the dorsal part of the Sm suppressed the VSR. The inhibition of the VSR induced by electrical stimulation of the Sm was not reversed by the administration of naloxone (1.0 mg/kg, i.v.). Electrical stimulation of the adjacent medial thalamic nuclei (mediodorsal nucleus (MD) or centromedial nucleus (CM)) and ventrobasal complex (VB) of the thalamus had very little effect on the VSR. These results suggests that the Sm is not only involved in the relay of nociceptive information to the cortex, but may also be involved in a non-opioid mediated pain inhibitory system and may participate, at least in part, in the suppressive effects of intense acupuncture manipulation on VSR activity.

  16. Optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic brainstem neurons during focal limbic seizures: Effects on cortical physiology.

    PubMed

    Furman, Moran; Zhan, Qiong; McCafferty, Cian; Lerner, Benjamin A; Motelow, Joshua E; Meng, Jin; Ma, Chanthia; Buchanan, Gordon F; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Cardin, Jessica A; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-12-01

    Focal temporal lobe seizures often cause impaired cortical function and loss of consciousness. Recent work suggests that the mechanism for depressed cortical function during focal seizures may depend on decreased subcortical cholinergic arousal, which leads to a sleep-like state of cortical slow-wave activity. To test this hypothesis, we sought to directly activate subcortical cholinergic neurons during focal limbic seizures to determine the effects on cortical function. Here we used an optogenetic approach to selectively stimulate cholinergic brainstem neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus during focal limbic seizures induced in a lightly anesthetized rat model. We found an increase in cortical gamma activity and a decrease in delta activity in response to cholinergic stimulation. These findings support the mechanistic role of reduced subcortical cholinergic arousal in causing cortical dysfunction during seizures. Through further work, electrical or optogenetic stimulation of subcortical arousal networks may ultimately lead to new treatments aimed at preventing cortical dysfunction during seizures.

  17. Perceived articulatory precision in patients with Parkinson's disease after deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus and caudal zona incerta.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Elisabeth; Qvist, Johanna; Sandström, Lena; Viklund, Fanny; Van Doorn, Jan; Karlsson, Fredrik

    2015-02-01

    The effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and caudal zona incerta (cZi) on speech articulation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) was investigated. Read speech samples were collected from nine patients with STN-DBS and 10 with cZi-DBS. The recordings were made pre-operatively and 12 months post-operatively with stimulator on and off (on medication). Blinded, randomised, repeated perceptual assessments were performed on words and isolated fricatives extracted from the recordings to assess (1) overall articulatory quality ratings, (2) frequency of occurrence of misarticulation patterns and (3) fricative production. Statistically significant worsening of articulatory measures on- compared with off-stimulation occurred in the cZi-DBS group, with deteriorated articulatory precision ratings, increased presence of misarticulations (predominately altered realisations of plosives and fricatives) and a reduced accuracy in fricative production. A similar, but not significant, trend was found for the STN-DBS group.

  18. Cortical Plasticity Induction by Pairing Subthalamic Nucleus Deep-Brain Stimulation and Primary Motor Cortical Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Bahl, Nina; Ni, Zhen; Gunraj, Carolyn; Mazzella, Filomena; Moro, Elena; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lozano, Andres M; Lang, Anthony E; Chen, Robert

    2016-01-13

    Noninvasive brain stimulation studies have shown abnormal motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease (PD). These studies used peripheral nerve stimulation paired with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to primary motor cortex (M1) at specific intervals to induce plasticity. Induction of cortical plasticity through stimulation of the basal ganglia (BG)-M1 connections has not been studied. In the present study, we used a novel technique of plasticity induction by repeated pairing of deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of the BG with M1 stimulation using TMS. We hypothesize that repeated pairing of subthalamic nucleus (STN)-DBS and M1-TMS at specific time intervals will lead to plasticity in the M1. Ten PD human patients with STN-DBS were studied in the on-medication state with DBS set to 3 Hz. The interstimulus intervals (ISIs) between STN-DBS and TMS that produced cortical facilitation were determined individually for each patient. Three plasticity induction conditions with repeated pairings (180 times) at specific ISIs (∼ 3 and ∼ 23 ms) that produced cortical facilitation and a control ISI of 167 ms were tested in random order. Repeated pairing of STN-DBS and M1-TMS at short (∼ 3 ms) and medium (∼ 23 ms) latencies increased M1 excitability that lasted for at least 45 min, whereas the control condition (fixed ISI of 167 ms) had no effect. There were no specific changes in motor thresholds, intracortical circuits, or recruitment curves. Our results indicate that paired-associative cortical plasticity can be induced by repeated STN and M1 stimulation at specific intervals. These results show that STN-DBS can modulate cortical plasticity. We introduced a new experimental paradigm to test the hypothesis that pairing subthalamic nucleus deep-brain stimulation (STN-DBS) with motor cortical transcranial magnetic stimulation (M1-TMS) at specific times can induce cortical plasticity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We found that repeated pairing of STN

  19. Unilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation in the Treatment of Asymmetric Parkinson"s Disease with Early Motor Complications.

    PubMed

    Sobstyl, Michal; Zabek, Miroslaw; Zaczynski, Artur; Gorecki, Wojciech; Mossakowski, Zbigniew; Brzuszkiewicz-Kuzmicka, Grazyna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of unilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson"s disease (PD) with marked asymmetry of parkinsonian motor symptoms and early motor complications. The clinical series consisted of 32 consecutive PD patients, in whom unilateral STN stimulation was performed. All patients were assessed according to the Unified Parkinson"s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), and Hoehn and Yahr staging. The patients were assessed preoperatively, and at 12, and 24 months after unilateral STN stimulation. 22 patients were followed for 2 years. Medication off/stimulation on total UPDRS motor scores were improved by 29% when compared to the baseline medication off motor scores. The contralateral motor scores improved by 49%, whereas the axial motor scores by 18% in medication off/stimulation on condition. The duration and severity of levodopa induced dyskinesia were reduced respectively by 73% and by 77%. The daily levodopa dose was decreased by only 10%. Unilateral STN stimulation is a safe and effective procedure for selected patients with marked asymmetry Parkinson"s disease motor symptoms and early motor complications.

  20. A functionally relevant and long-term model of deep brain stimulation of the rat subthalamic nucleus: advantages and considerations.

    PubMed

    Spieles-Engemann, A L; Collier, T J; Sortwell, C E

    2010-10-01

    In this review we outline some relevant considerations with regards to the rat model of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS). In order to optimize the rat STN DBS model in terms of predictive validity for the clinical situation we propose that the STN stimulation experimental design parameters in rodents should incorporate the following features: (i) stimulation parameters that demonstrate functional alleviation of symptoms induced by nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) denervation; (ii) stimulation duration that is relatively long-term and continuous; (iii) stimulation that is initiated at a time when the denervation status of the nigrostriatal system is known to be partial and progressing; (iv) stimulation current spread that is minimized and optimized to closely approximate the clinical situation; (v) the appropriate control conditions are included; and (vi) implantation to the STN target is verified post-mortem. Further research that examines the effect of long-term STN DBS on the neurophysiology and neurochemistry of STN circuitry is warranted. The rat model of functionally relevant long-term STN DBS provides a most favorable preclinical experimental platform in which to conduct these studies.

  1. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation does not influence basal glucose metabolism or insulin sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Nicolette M; Sondermeijer, Brigitte M; Twickler, Th B Marcel; de Bie, Rob M; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Fliers, Eric; Schuurman, P Richard; La Fleur, Susanne E; Serlie, Mireille J

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that central dopamine signaling influences glucose metabolism. As a first step to show this association in an experimental setting in humans, we studied whether deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), which modulates the basal ganglia circuitry, alters basal endogenous glucose production (EGP) or insulin sensitivity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We studied 8 patients with PD treated with DBS STN, in the basal state and during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp using a stable glucose isotope, in the stimulated and non-stimulated condition. We measured EGP, hepatic insulin sensitivity, peripheral insulin sensitivity (Rd), resting energy expenditure (REE), glucoregulatory hormones, and Parkinson symptoms, using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Basal plasma glucose and EGP did not differ between the stimulated and non-stimulated condition. Hepatic insulin sensitivity was similar in both conditions and there were no significant differences in Rd and plasma glucoregulatory hormones between DBS on and DBS off. UPDRS was significantly higher in the non-stimulated condition. DBS of the STN in patients with PD does not influence basal EGP or insulin sensitivity. These results suggest that acute modulation of the motor basal ganglia circuitry does not affect glucose metabolism in humans.

  2. mu-Opioid receptor stimulation in the nucleus accumbens elevates fatty tastant intake by increasing palatability and suppressing satiety signals.

    PubMed

    Katsuura, Yoshihiro; Heckmann, Jennifer A; Taha, Sharif A

    2011-07-01

    Infusion of a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist into the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) drives voracious food intake, an effect hypothesized to occur through increased tastant palatability. While intake of many palatable foods is elevated by MOR stimulation, this manipulation has a preferential effect on fatty food ingestion. Consumption of high-fat foods is increased by NAcc MOR stimulation even in rats that prefer a carbohydrate-rich alternative under baseline conditions. This suggests that NAcc MOR stimulation may not simply potentiate palatability signals and raises the possibility that mechanisms mediating fat intake may be distinct from those underlying intake of other tastants. The present study was conducted to investigate the physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of NAcc MOR stimulation on fatty food intake. In experiment 1, we analyzed lick microstructure in rats ingesting Intralipid to identify the changes underlying feeding induced by infusion of a MOR-specific agonist into the NAcc. MOR stimulation in the NAcc core, but not shell, increased burst duration and first-minute licks, while simultaneously increasing the rate and duration of Intralipid ingestion. These results suggest that MOR activation in the core increases Intralipid palatability and attenuates inhibitory postingestive feedback. In experiment 2, we measured the effects of MOR stimulation in the NAcc core on consumption of nonnutritive olestra. A MOR-specific agonist dose dependently increased olestra intake, demonstrating that caloric signaling is not required for hyperphagia induced by NAcc MOR stimulation. Feeding induced by drug infusion in both experiments 1 and 2 was blocked by a MOR antagonist. In experiment 3, we determined whether MOR activation in the NAcc core could attenuate satiety-related signaling caused by infusion of the melanocortin agonist MTII into the third ventricle. Suppression of intake caused by MTII was reversed by MOR stimulation. Together, our results suggest

  3. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens shell increases impulsive behavior and tissue levels of dopamine and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Sesia, Thibaut; Bulthuis, Vincent; Tan, Sonny; Lim, Lee Wei; Vlamings, Rinske; Blokland, Arjan; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Sharp, Trevor; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Temel, Yasin

    2010-10-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is gaining interest as a target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in refractory neuropsychiatric disorders with impulsivity as core symptom. The nucleus accumbens is composed of two subterritories, core and shell, which have different anatomical connections. In animal models, it has been shown that DBS of the NAc changes impulsive action. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a change in impulsive action by DBS of the NAc is associated with changes in dopamine levels. Rats received stimulating electrodes either in the NAc core or shell, and underwent behavioral testing in a reaction time task. In addition, in a second experiment, the effect of DBS of the NAc core and shell on extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels was assessed in the NAc and medial prefrontal cortex. Control subjects received sham surgery. We have found that DBS of the NAc shell stimulation induced more impulsive action but less perseverative checking. These effects were associated with increased levels of dopamine and serotonin in the NAc, but not in the medial prefrontal cortex. DBS of the NAc core had no effect on impulsive action, but decreased perseverative responses indicative of a better impulse control. In these subjects, no effects were found on neurotransmitter levels. Our data point out that DBS of the NAc shell has negative effects on impulsive action which is accompanied by increases of dopamine and serotonin levels in the NAc, whereas DBS of the NAc core has beneficial behavioral effects.

  4. Camptocormia and deep brain stimulation: The interesting overlapping etiologies and the therapeutic role of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease with camptocormia.

    PubMed

    Ekmekci, Hakan; Kaptan, Hulagu

    2016-01-01

    Camptocormia is known as "bent spine syndrome" and defined as a forward hyperflexion. The most common etiologic factor is related with the movement disorders, mainly in Parkinson's disease (PD). We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who has been followed with PD for the last 10 years, and also under the therapy for PD. An unappreciated correlation low back pain with camptocormia developed. She underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus bilaterally and improved her bending posture. The relationship between the DBS and camptocormia is discussed in this unique condition.

  5. Camptocormia and deep brain stimulation: The interesting overlapping etiologies and the therapeutic role of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease with camptocormia

    PubMed Central

    Ekmekci, Hakan; Kaptan, Hulagu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Camptocormia is known as “bent spine syndrome” and defined as a forward hyperflexion. The most common etiologic factor is related with the movement disorders, mainly in Parkinson's disease (PD). Case Description: We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who has been followed with PD for the last 10 years, and also under the therapy for PD. An unappreciated correlation low back pain with camptocormia developed. She underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus bilaterally and improved her bending posture. Conclusion: The relationship between the DBS and camptocormia is discussed in this unique condition. PMID:26958425

  6. Modulation of solitary taste neurons by electrical stimulation of the ventroposteromedial nucleus of the thalamus in the hamster.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young K; Mao, Limin; Li, Cheng-Shu

    2008-07-24

    Taste neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NST) not only send axons to the parabrachial nuclei (PbN), but also receive descending projections from gustatory nuclei in the forebrain in rodents. The parvicellular portion of the ventroposteromedial nucleus of the thalamus (VPMpc) receives projections from the bilateral PbN and transmits taste information to the gustatory cortex. Here, we examined the influence of bilateral stimulation of the VPMpc on taste-responsive neurons in the NST. Extracellular single unit activity was recorded from the urethane-anesthetized hamster. Taste responses were confirmed by delivery of four basic tastants to the anterior tongue. After identifying a taste neuron in the NST, the VPMpc was stimulated bilaterally. Thirty seven out of 83 neurons were orthodromically activated following VPMpc stimulation: 30 were excited and seven were inhibited. Among these cells, seven were excited and one was inhibited bilaterally. In addition, four NST neurons were antidromically invaded from the ipsilateral VPMpc. The effect of VPMpc activation on taste-driven responses was tested on 8 of 30 cells that were excited, and all seven cells that were inhibited by the VPMpc stimulation. The VPMpc stimulation enhanced responses to the effective taste stimuli or suppressed the taste-evoked activities in all eight and seven cells tested, respectively, parallel to the type of the inputs which they received from the VPMpc. These results suggest that a subset of taste neurons in the NST is under the influence from the bilateral VPMpc and that the VPMpc activation modulates taste responses of these cells.

  7. Nucleus Accumbens Deep Brain Stimulation for Alcohol Addiction - Safety and Clinical Long-term Results of a Pilot Trial.

    PubMed

    Müller, U J; Sturm, V; Voges, J; Heinze, H-J; Galazky, I; Büntjen, L; Heldmann, M; Frodl, T; Steiner, J; Bogerts, B

    2016-07-01

    We report on the long-term clinical outcome (up to 8 years) of 5 patients who received deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens to treat their long-lasting and treatment-resistant alcohol addiction. All patients reported a complete absence of craving for alcohol; 2 patients remained abstinent for many years and 3 patients showed a marked reduction of alcohol consumption. No severe or long-standing side effects occurred. Therefore, DBS could be a promising, novel treatment option for severe alcohol addiction, but larger clinical trials are needed to further investigate the efficacy of DBS in addiction. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Capgras Syndrome in a Patient with Parkinson's Disease after Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Stahl, Mark C.; Eslinger, Paul; Subramanian, Thyagarajan; Lucassen, Elisabeth B.

    2015-01-01

    Capgras syndrome is a delusional misidentification syndrome (DMS) which can be seen in neurodegenerative diseases such as Lewy body dementia and, to a lesser extent, in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we report the case of a 78-year-old man with a history of idiopathic PD who developed Capgras syndrome following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS) implantation. As the risk of DMS has been related to deficits in executive, memory, and visuospatial function preoperatively, this case highlights the importance of continuing to improve patient selection for DBS surgery. Capgras syndrome is a rare potential complication of DBS surgery in PD patients with preexisting cognitive decline. PMID:26078747

  9. Medial Auditory Thalamus Is Necessary for Acquisition and Retention of Eyeblink Conditioning to Cochlear Nucleus Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Hunter E.; Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Associative learning tasks commonly involve an auditory stimulus, which must be projected through the auditory system to the sites of memory induction for learning to occur. The cochlear nucleus (CN) projection to the pontine nuclei has been posited as the necessary auditory pathway for cerebellar learning, including eyeblink conditioning.…

  10. Medial Auditory Thalamus Is Necessary for Acquisition and Retention of Eyeblink Conditioning to Cochlear Nucleus Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Hunter E.; Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Associative learning tasks commonly involve an auditory stimulus, which must be projected through the auditory system to the sites of memory induction for learning to occur. The cochlear nucleus (CN) projection to the pontine nuclei has been posited as the necessary auditory pathway for cerebellar learning, including eyeblink conditioning.…

  11. Stimulation of the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus Modulates Cardiorespiratory Responses via Oxytocinergic Innervation of Neurons in Pre-Bötzinger Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mack, S.O.; Wu, M.; Kc, P.; Haxhiu, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Previously we reported that oxytocin (OT)-containing neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) project to the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) region and phrenic motoneurons innervating the diaphragm (D). The aim of these studies was to determine pathways involved in PVN stimulation-induced changes in upper airway and chest wall pumping muscle activity. In addition, we determined the role of OT-containing neurons in the PVN in mediating increased respiratory output elicited by PVN stimulation. Neuroanatomical experiments, using pseudorabies virus (PRV) as a transneuronal tracer in C8 spinalectomized animals showed that PVN neurons project to hypoglossal motoneurons innervating the genioglossus (GG) muscle. Furthermore, microinjection of the PVN with bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, significantly increased (P<0.05) peak electromyographic activity of GG (GGEMG) and of DEMG, frequency discharge, and arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate. Prior injection of oxytocin antagonist [d-(CH2)5, Tyr(Me)2,Orn8]-vasotocin(OVT) intracisternally or blockade of oxytocin receptors in the preBötC region with oxytocin antagonist L-368,899, diminished GGEMG and DEMG responses and blunted the increase in BP and heart rate to PVN stimulation. These data show that PVN stimulation affects central regulatory mechanisms via the preBötC region controlling both respiratory and cardiovascular functions. The parallel changes induced by PVN stimulation were mediated mainly through an OT-OT receptor signaling pathway. PMID:16857863

  12. The effects of unilateral versus bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on prosaccades and antisaccades in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goelz, Lisa C; David, Fabian J; Sweeney, John A; Vaillancourt, David E; Poizner, Howard; Metman, Leonard Verhagen; Corcos, Daniel M

    2017-02-01

    Unilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease improves skeletomotor function assessed clinically, and bilateral STN DBS improves motor function to a significantly greater extent. It is unknown whether unilateral STN DBS improves oculomotor function and whether bilateral STN DBS improves it to a greater extent. Further, it has also been shown that bilateral, but not unilateral, STN DBS is associated with some impaired cognitive-motor functions. The current study compared the effect of unilateral and bilateral STN DBS on sensorimotor and cognitive aspects of oculomotor control. Patients performed prosaccade and antisaccade tasks during no stimulation, unilateral stimulation, and bilateral stimulation. There were three sets of findings. First, for the prosaccade task, unilateral STN DBS had no effect on prosaccade latency and it reduced prosaccade gain; bilateral STN DBS reduced prosaccade latency and increased prosaccade gain. Second, for the antisaccade task, neither unilateral nor bilateral stimulation had an effect on antisaccade latency, unilateral STN DBS increased antisaccade gain, and bilateral STN DBS increased antisaccade gain to a greater extent. Third, bilateral STN DBS induced an increase in prosaccade errors in the antisaccade task. These findings suggest that while bilateral STN DBS benefits spatiotemporal aspects of oculomotor control, it may not be as beneficial for more complex cognitive aspects of oculomotor control. Our findings are discussed considering the strategic role the STN plays in modulating information in the basal ganglia oculomotor circuit.

  13. Serotonin release in the central nucleus of the amygdala in response to noxious and innocuous cutaneous stimulation in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Ryota; Shimoju, Rie; Takagi, Noriaki; Shibata, Hideshi; Kurosawa, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effect of noxious (pinching) and innocuous (stroking) stimulation of skin on serotonin (5-HT) release in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in anesthetized rats. 5-HT in the CeA was collected by microdialysis methods. Dialysate output from consecutive 10-min periods was injected into a high-performance liquid chromatograph and 5-HT was measured with an electrochemical detector. Bilateral pinching of the back for 10 min increased 5-HT release significantly; 5-HT release was also increased with stimulation of the forelimb or hindlimb. In contrast, stroking of these areas decreased 5-HT release significantly. Furthermore, simultaneous stroking and pinching produced no change in the 5-HT release. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that 5-HT release in the CeA is regulated by somatic afferent stimulation in a modality-dependent manner, and that innocuous stimulation can dampen the change in 5-HT release that occurs in response to noxious stimulation.

  14. Brain stem responses evoked by stimulation of the mature cochlear nucleus with an auditory brain stem implant.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, Martin; El-Deredy, Wael; Ramsden, Richard T

    2011-01-01

    The Nucleus auditory brain stem implant (ABI) has been used in the hearing rehabilitation of totally deaf individuals for whom a cochlear implant is not an option such as in the case of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Intraoperative electrically evoked auditory brain stem responses (EABRs) are recorded to assist in the placement of the electrode array over the dorsal and ventral cochlear nuclei in the lateral recess of the IVth ventricle of the brain stem. This study had four objectives: (1) to characterize EABRs evoked by stimulation with an ABI in adolescents and adults with NF2, (2) to evaluate how the EABR morphology relates to auditory sensations elicited from stimulation by an ABI, (3) to establish whether there is evidence of morphology changes in the EABR with site of stimulation by the ABI, and (4) to investigate how the threshold of the EABR relates to behavioral threshold and comfortably loud sensations measured at initial device activation. Intraoperative EABRs were recorded from 34 subjects with ABIs: 19 male and 15 female, mean age 27 yrs (range 12 to 52 yrs). ABI stimulation was applied at seven different sites using either wide bipolar stimulation across the array or in subsections of the array from medial to lateral and inferior to superior. The EABRs were analyzed with respect to morphology, peak latency, and changes in these characteristics with the site of stimulation. In a subset of eight subjects, additional narrow bipolar sites were stimulated to compare the intraoperative EABR threshold levels with the behavioral threshold (T) and comfortably loud (C) levels of stimulation required at initial device activation. EABRs were elicited from 91% of subjects. Morphology varied from one to four vertex-positive peaks with mean latencies of 0.76, 1.53, 2.51, and 3.64 msecs, respectively. The presence of an EABR from stimulation by electrodes across the whole array had a high predictive value for the presence of auditory electrodes at initial device

  15. Dual electrode stimulation using the nucleus CI24RE cochlear implant: electrode impedance and pitch ranking studies.

    PubMed

    Busby, Peter A; Plant, Kerrie L

    2005-10-01

    The first aim of the study was to determine the reduction in electrode impedances using dual electrode stimulation compared with single electrode stimulation in the new Nucleus CI24RE receiver-stimulator. The CI24RE is connected to the Nucleus 22-electrode intracochlear array. Dual electrode stimulation is produced by electrically coupling two adjacent single electrodes. The second aim was to determine whether dual electrode stimulation produced pitch percepts that were intermediate to the pitch of the two adjacent single electrodes. Eight postlingually hearing-impaired adults with severe to profound loss, implanted with the CI24RE, participated in the study. Electrode impedances were measured by using the standard telemetry function of the system. A pitch ranking task was used to measure pitch for dual and single electrodes. Seven sets of three electrodes along the electrode array were tested. Each set of electrodes consisted of a dual electrode and the two adjacent single electrodes. Pitch ranking was measured using a two-alternative forced choice procedure, with the three electrodes in each set paired with each other as AB and BA pairs. The subject indicated which of the two stimuli had the higher pitch. Random variation in current level was used to remove any loudness cues. The average electrode impedance was 38.6% lower for dual electrodes compared with single electrodes. Three subjects were able to successfully rank the three electrodes in each set in the expected tonotopic order for all seven sets of electrodes along the array. Three other subjects were able to rank sets of electrodes in the tonotopic order for most of the tested positions on the array. The remaining two subjects gave more variable pitch ranking across positions along the array, although successful tonotopic ranking was demonstrated for several sets of electrodes. Dual electrode stimulation with the CI24RE receiver-stimulator produced systematically lower electrode impedances and was capable

  16. Electrical stimulation of the anterior nucleus of thalamus for treatment of refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert; Salanova, Vicenta; Witt, Thomas; Worth, Robert; Henry, Thomas; Gross, Robert; Oommen, Kalarickal; Osorio, Ivan; Nazzaro, Jules; Labar, Douglas; Kaplitt, Michael; Sperling, Michael; Sandok, Evan; Neal, John; Handforth, Adrian; Stern, John; DeSalles, Antonio; Chung, Steve; Shetter, Andrew; Bergen, Donna; Bakay, Roy; Henderson, Jaimie; French, Jacqueline; Baltuch, Gordon; Rosenfeld, William; Youkilis, Andrew; Marks, William; Garcia, Paul; Barbaro, Nicolas; Fountain, Nathan; Bazil, Carl; Goodman, Robert; McKhann, Guy; Babu Krishnamurthy, K; Papavassiliou, Steven; Epstein, Charles; Pollard, John; Tonder, Lisa; Grebin, Joan; Coffey, Robert; Graves, Nina

    2010-05-01

    We report a multicenter, double-blind, randomized trial of bilateral stimulation of the anterior nuclei of the thalamus for localization-related epilepsy. Participants were adults with medically refractory partial seizures, including secondarily generalized seizures. Half received stimulation and half no stimulation during a 3-month blinded phase; then all received unblinded stimulation. One hundred ten participants were randomized. Baseline monthly median seizure frequency was 19.5. In the last month of the blinded phase the stimulated group had a 29% greater reduction in seizures compared with the control group, as estimated by a generalized estimating equations (GEE) model (p = 0.002). Unadjusted median declines at the end of the blinded phase were 14.5% in the control group and 40.4% in the stimulated group. Complex partial and "most severe" seizures were significantly reduced by stimulation. By 2 years, there was a 56% median percent reduction in seizure frequency; 54% of patients had a seizure reduction of at least 50%, and 14 patients were seizure-free for at least 6 months. Five deaths occurred and none were from implantation or stimulation. No participant had symptomatic hemorrhage or brain infection. Two participants had acute, transient stimulation-associated seizures. Cognition and mood showed no group differences, but participants in the stimulated group were more likely to report depression or memory problems as adverse events. Bilateral stimulation of the anterior nuclei of the thalamus reduces seizures. Benefit persisted for 2 years of study. Complication rates were modest. Deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamus is useful for some people with medically refractory partial and secondarily generalized seizures.

  17. Comparison of two methods for selecting minimum stimulation levels used in programming the Nucleus 22 cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Skinner, M W; Holden, L K; Holden, T A; Demorest, M E

    1999-08-01

    Minimum stimulation levels for active electrodes in a Nucleus 22 cochlear implant were set at threshold (clinical default value) and raised levels (M = +2.04 dB) to determine if raised levels would improve recipients' understanding of soft speech sounds with the SPEAK speech coding strategy. Eight postlinguistically deaf adults participated in a 4-phase A1B1A2B2 test design. Speech recognition was evaluated with consonant-vowel nucleus-consonant (CNC) words in quiet and sentences in noise, both presented at 50, 60, and 70 dB SPL during 2 weekly sessions at the end of each phase. Group mean scores were significantly higher with the raised level program for words and phonemes at 50 and 60 dB SPL and for sentences at 50 and 70 dB SPL. All participants chose to use the raised level program in everyday life at the end of the study. The results suggest that clinical use of a raised level program for Nucleus 22 recipients has the potential to make soft sounds louder and, therefore, more salient in everyday life. Further research is needed to determine if this approach is appropriate for other cochlear implant devices.

  18. Population synaptic potentials evoked in lumbar motoneurons following stimulation of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis during carbachol-induced atonia.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, J; Jiménez, I; Morales, F; Rudomin, P; Chase, M

    1994-03-14

    The effect of electrical stimulation of the medullary nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) on lumbar spinal cord motoneurons was studied in the decerebrate cat using sucrose-gap recordings from ventral roots. The NRGc was stimulated ipsi- and contralaterally before and during atonia elicited by the microinjection of carbachol into the pontine reticular formation. Prior to carbachol administration, the NRGc-induced response recorded from the sucrose-gap consisted of two consecutive excitatory population synaptic potentials followed by a long-lasting, small amplitude inhibitory population synaptic potential. Following carbachol injection, the same NRGc stimulus evoked a distinct, large amplitude inhibitory population synaptic potential, whereas the excitatory population synaptic potentials decreased in amplitude. In addition, after carbachol administration, the amplitude of the monosynaptic excitatory population synaptic potential, which was evoked by stimulation of group Ia afferents in hindlimb nerves, was reduced by 18 to 43%. When evoked at the peak of the NRGc-induced inhibitory response, this potential was further decreased in amplitude. Systemic strychnine administration (0.07-0.1 mg/kg, i.v.) blocked the NRGc-induced inhibitory population synaptic potential and promoted an increase in the amplitude of the excitatory population synaptic potentials induced by stimulation of the NRGc and group Ia afferents. These data indicate that during the state of carbachol-induced atonia, the NRGc effects on ipsi- and contralateral spinal cord motoneurons are predominantly inhibitory and that glycine is likely to be involved in this inhibitory process. These results support the hypothesis that the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis is part of the system responsible for state-dependent somatomotor inhibition that occurs during active sleep.

  19. Dopamine Release in the Nonhuman Primate Caudate and Putamen Depends upon Site of Stimulation in the Subthalamic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Min, Hoon-Ki; Ross, Erika K; Jo, Hang Joon; Cho, Shinho; Settell, Megan L; Jeong, Ju Ho; Duffy, Penelope S; Chang, Su-Youne; Bennet, Kevin E; Blaha, Charles D; Lee, Kendall H

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment for medically refractory Parkinson's disease. Although DBS has recognized clinical utility, its biologic mechanisms are not fully understood, and whether dopamine release is a potential factor in those mechanisms is in dispute. We tested the hypothesis that STN DBS-evoked dopamine release depends on the precise location of the stimulation site in the STN and the site of recording in the caudate and putamen. We conducted DBS with miniature, scaled-to-animal size, multicontact electrodes and used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the best dopamine recording site in the brains of nonhuman primates (rhesus macaques), which are highly representative of human brain anatomy and circuitry. Real-time stimulation-evoked dopamine release was monitored using in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. This study demonstrates that STN DBS-evoked dopamine release can be reduced or increased by redirecting STN stimulation to a slightly different site. Electrical stimulation of deep structures of the brain, or deep brain stimulation (DBS), is used to modulate pathological brain activity. However, technological limitations and incomplete understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS prevent personalization of this therapy and may contribute to less-than-optimal outcomes. We have demonstrated that DBS coincides with changes in dopamine neurotransmitter release in the basal ganglia. Here we mapped relationships between DBS and changes in neurochemical activity. Importantly, this study shows that DBS-evoked dopamine release can be reduced or increased by refocusing the DBS on a slightly different stimulation site. Copyright © 2016 Min, Ross et al.

  20. Burst-firing activity of presumed 5-HT neurones of the rat dorsal raphe nucleus: electrophysiological analysis by antidromic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hajós, M; Sharp, T

    1996-11-18

    We recently reported raphe neurones which frequently fired spikes in short bursts. However, the action potentials were broad and the neurones fired in a slow and regular pattern, suggesting they were an unusual type of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) neurone. In the present study, we investigated whether these putative burst-firing 5-HT neurones project to the forebrain and whether all spikes fired in bursts propagate along the axon. In anaesthetised rats, electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle evoked antidromic spikes in both burst-firing neurones and in single-spiking, classical 5-HT neurones recorded in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Although the antidromic spike latency of the single-spiking and burst-firing neurones showed a clear overlap, burst-firing neurones had a significantly shorter latency than single-spiking neurones. For both burst-firing neurones and classical 5-HT neurones, antidromic spikes made collisions with spontaneously occurring spikes. Furthermore, in all burst-firing neurones tested, first, second and third order spikes in a burst could be made to collide with antidromic spike. Interestingly, in a small number of burst-firing neurones, antidromic stimulation evoked spike doublets, similar to those recorded spontaneously. From these data we conclude that burst-firing neurones in the dorsal raphe nucleus project to the forebrain, and each spike generated by the burst propagates along the axon and could thereby release transmitter (5-HT).

  1. Spatial distance between anatomically- and physiologically-identified targets in subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Parvaresh-Rizi, Mansour; Tabibkhoei, Alireza; Shahidi, Gholamali; Vaidyanathan, Janardan; Tabibkhoei, Amirreza; Rohani, Mohammad

    2016-01-05

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation is the treatment of choice for carefully chosen patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and refractory motor fluctuations. We evaluated the value of intraoperative electrophysiology during STN deep brain stimulation (DBS) procedures in refining the anatomically-defined target. We determined the spatial distance between the anatomical and physiological targets along x, y and z axes in 50 patients with PD who underwent bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS surgery. The mean spatial distance between anatomical and functional targets was 1.84 ± 0.88 mm and the least distances in different methods were 0.66 mm [standard error (SE): 0.07], 1.07 mm (SE: 0.08) and 1.01 mm (SE: 0.08) on x, y and z axes, respectively, for the combined method. The most physiologically-accurate anatomical targeting was achieved via a combination of multiple independent methods. There was a statistically significant difference between the anatomical and functional targets in all methods (even the combined) on the y coordinate, emphasizing the need for intra-operative electrophysiological monitoring to refine the anatomico-radiologically-defined target.

  2. Spatial distance between anatomically- and physiologically-identified targets in subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Parvaresh-Rizi, Mansour; Tabibkhoei, Alireza; Shahidi, Gholamali; Vaidyanathan, Janardan; Tabibkhoei, Amirreza; Rohani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation is the treatment of choice for carefully chosen patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and refractory motor fluctuations. We evaluated the value of intraoperative electrophysiology during STN deep brain stimulation (DBS) procedures in refining the anatomically-defined target. Methods: We determined the spatial distance between the anatomical and physiological targets along x, y and z axes in 50 patients with PD who underwent bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS surgery. Results: The mean spatial distance between anatomical and functional targets was 1.84 ± 0.88 mm and the least distances in different methods were 0.66 mm [standard error (SE): 0.07], 1.07 mm (SE: 0.08) and 1.01 mm (SE: 0.08) on x, y and z axes, respectively, for the combined method. Conclusion: The most physiologically-accurate anatomical targeting was achieved via a combination of multiple independent methods. There was a statistically significant difference between the anatomical and functional targets in all methods (even the combined) on the y coordinate, emphasizing the need for intra-operative electrophysiological monitoring to refine the anatomico-radiologically-defined target. PMID:27141275

  3. Ethanol injected into the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus induces behavioral stimulation in rats: an effect prevented by catalase inhibition and naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Raúl; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2008-10-01

    It is suggested that some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, including its psychomotor properties, are mediated by beta-endorphin and opioid receptors. Ethanol-induced increases in the release of hypothalamic beta-endorphin depend on the catalasemic conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde. Here, we evaluated the locomotor activity in rats microinjected with ethanol directly into the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ArcN), the main site of beta-endorphin synthesis in the brain and a region with high levels of catalase expression. Intra-ArcN ethanol-induced changes in motor activity were also investigated in rats pretreated with the opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone (0-2 mg/kg) or the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT; 0-1 g/kg). We found that ethanol microinjections of 64 or 128, but not 256 microg, produced locomotor stimulation. Intra-ArcN ethanol (128 microg)-induced activation was prevented by naltrexone and AT, whereas these compounds did not affect spontaneous activity. The present results support earlier evidence indicating that the ArcN and the beta-endorphinic neurons of this nucleus are necessary for ethanol to induce stimulation. In addition, our data suggest that brain structures that, as the ArcN, are rich in catalase may support the formation of ethanol-derived pharmacologically relevant concentrations of acetaldehyde and, thus be of particular importance for the behavioral effects of ethanol.

  4. Parafascicular thalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation decreases NMDA receptor GluN1 subunit gene expression in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cabrera, Mónica R; Selvas, Abraham; Miguéns, Miguel; Higuera-Matas, Alejandro; Vale-Martínez, Anna; Ambrosio, Emilio; Martí-Nicolovius, Margarita; Guillazo-Blanch, Gemma

    2017-04-21

    The rodent parafascicular nucleus (PFn) or the centromedian-parafascicular complex of primates is a posterior intralaminar nucleus of the thalamus related to cortical activation and maintenance of states of consciousness underlying attention, learning and memory. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the PFn has been proved to restore arousal and consciousness in humans and to enhance performance in learning and memory tasks in rats. The primary expected effect of PFn DBS is to induce plastic changes in target neurons of brain areas associated with cognitive function. In this study, Wistar rats were stimulated for 20mins in the PFn following a DBS protocol that had previously facilitated memory in rats. NMDA and GABAB receptor binding, and gene expression of the GluN1subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) were assessed in regions related to cognitive functions, such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The results showed that PFn DBS induced a decrease in NMDAR GluN1 subunit gene expression in the cingulate and prelimbic cortices, but no significant statistical differences were found in the density of NMDA or GABAB receptors in any of the analyzed regions. Taken together, our findings suggest a possible role for the NMDAR GluN1 subunit in the prefrontal cortex in the procognitive actions of the PFn DBS.

  5. Can We Rely on Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging for Subthalamic Nucleus Identification in Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery?

    PubMed

    Bot, Maarten; Bour, Lo; de Bie, Rob M; Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Schuurman, P Richard; van den Munckhof, Pepijn

    2016-03-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) offers significantly improved visibility of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) compared with traditional T2-weighted imaging. However, it is unknown whether the representation of the nucleus on SWI corresponds to the neurophysiological location of the STN. To determine the correlation between the intraoperative electrophysiological activity of the STN and the representation of the nucleus on different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences used for deep brain stimulation target planning. At stereotactic target depth, microelectrode recordings (MERs) of typical STN neuronal activity were mapped on 3 different preoperative MRI sequences: 1.5-T SWI, 1.5-T T2-weighted, and 3-T T2-weighted MRI. For each MRI sequence, it was determined whether the MER signal was situated inside or outside the contour of the STN. A total of 196 MER tracks in 34 patients were evaluated. In 165 tracks (84%), typical electrophysiological STN activity was measured. MER activity was situated more consistently inside hypointense STN contour representation on 1.5- and 3-T T2-weighted images compared with SWI (99% and 100% vs 79%, respectively). The 21% incongruence of electrophysiological STN activity outside the STN contour on SWI was seen almost exclusively in the anterior and lateral microelectrode channels. STN representation on SWI does not correspond to electrophysiological STN borders. SWI does not correctly display the lateral part of the STN. When aiming to target the superolateral sensorimotor part of the STN during deep brain stimulation surgery, SWI does not offer an advantage but a disadvantage compared with conventional T2. Future research is needed to determine whether these findings may also apply for high-field SWI.

  6. Acamprosate blocks the increase in dopamine extracellular levels in nucleus accumbens evoked by chemical stimulation of the ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cano-Cebrián, M J; Zornoza-Sabina, T; Guerri, C; Polache, A; Granero, L

    2003-10-01

    Recently, we have shown that acamprosate is able to modulate extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and may act as an antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Neurochemical studies show that chemical stimulation (using NMDA) of the ventral subiculum (vSub) of the hippocampus produces robust and sustained increases in extracellular DA levels in the NAc, an effect mediated through ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors. The present study examines whether acamprosate locally infused in the NAc of rats could block or attenuate the increase in NAc extracellular DA elicited by chemical stimulation (with 5 mM NMDA) of the ventral subiculum of the hippocampus. The stimulation of the vSub during perfusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid in NAc induced a significant and persistent increase in NAc DA levels. Reverse dialysis of 0.05 mM acamprosate in NAc blocked the increase in DA evoked by the chemical stimulation of the vSub. These data support the possibility that the antagonism at the NMDA receptors in NAc can explain, at least in part, the mechanism of action of this drug.

  7. Analysis of Gene Expression Changes in the Rat Hippocampus After Deep Brain Stimulation of the Anterior Thalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Tharakeswari; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Tierney, Travis

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery, targeting various regions of the brain such as the basal ganglia, thalamus, and subthalamic regions, is an effective treatment for several movement disorders that have failed to respond to medication. Recent progress in the field of DBS surgery has begun to extend the application of this surgical technique to other conditions as diverse as morbid obesity, depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. Despite these expanding indications, little is known about the underlying physiological mechanisms that facilitate the beneficial effects of DBS surgery. One approach to this question is to perform gene expression analysis in neurons that receive the electrical stimulation. Previous studies have shown that neurogenesis in the rat dentate gyrus is elicited in DBS targeting of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus1. DBS surgery targeting the ATN is used widely for treatment refractory epilepsy. It is thus of much interest for us to explore the transcriptional changes induced by electrically stimulating the ATN. In this manuscript, we describe our methodologies for stereotactically-guided DBS surgery targeting the ATN in adult male Wistar rats. We also discuss the subsequent steps for tissue dissection, RNA isolation, cDNA preparation and quantitative RT-PCR for measuring gene expression changes. This method could be applied and modified for stimulating the basal ganglia and other regions of the brain commonly clinically targeted. The gene expression study described here assumes a candidate target gene approach for discovering molecular players that could be directing the mechanism for DBS. PMID:25867749

  8. Electrical resistance increases at the tissue-electrode interface as an early response to nucleus accumbens deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kale, Rajas P; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Berk, Julian; Walder, Ken; Berk, Michael; Tye, Susannah J

    2016-08-01

    The therapeutic actions of deep brain stimulation are not fully understood. The early inflammatory response of electrode implantation is associated with symptom relief without electrical stimulation, but is negated by anti-inflammatory drugs. Early excitotoxic necrosis and subsequent glial scarring modulate the conductivity of the tissue-electrode interface, which can provide some detail into the inflammatory response of individual patients. The feasibility of this was demonstrated by measuring resistance values across a bipolar electrode which was unilaterally implanted into the nucleus accumbens of a rat while receiving continuous deep brain stimulation with a portable back-mounted device using clinical parameters (130Hz, 200μA, 90μs) for 3 days. Daily resistance values rose significantly (p<;0.0001), while hourly resistance analysis demonstrated a plateau after an initial spike in resistance, which was then followed by a steady increase (p<;0.05; p<;0.0001). We discuss that the biphasic nature of the inflammatory response may contribute to these observations and conclude that this method may translate to a safe predictive screening for more effective clinical deep brain stimulation.

  9. Deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus internus or ventralis intermedius nucleus of thalamus for Holmes tremor.

    PubMed

    Espinoza Martinez, Jairo Alberto; Arango, Gabriel J; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Reithmeier, Thomas; Escobar, Oscar Andrés; Furlanetti, Luciano; Alvarez Berastegui, G Rene; Fernandes da Silva, Fabio Eduardo; Contreras Lopez, William Omar

    2015-10-01

    Holmes tremor (HT) is a difficult-to-treat, very disabling symptomatic condition which characteristically appears weeks to years after a brain lesion. It features a unique combination of rest, action, and postural tremors. Pharmacotherapy is mostly not effective. Chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ventralis intermedius nucleus (Vim) of thalamus has been described as being the best surgical approach in singular case series; various authors observe, however, cases with partial responses only; therefore, alternatives are still needed. We report ten patients with HT unresponsive to best medical therapy who underwent DBS in our center from March 2002 to June 2012. Based in our previous experience dealing with cases of unsatisfactory Vim intraoperative tremor control and in order to optimize surgical results, presurgical target planning included two Nuclei: Vim and posteroventral Globus pallidus internus (GPi) (Espinoza et al. 2010; Espinoza et al. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 90(suppl 1):1-202, p 61, 2012). Definitive chosen target was decided after single-cell microelectrode recording, intraoperative test stimulation, thresholds for stimulation-induced adverse effects and best clinical response compared to baseline status. Fahn-Tolosa-Marin tremor rating scale (FTM-TRS) was used to evaluate outcome. The electrode was implanted in the nucleus with the best tremor suppression achievement; on the other hand, GPi DBS was initially decided if one of the following conditions was present: (a) If Vim nucleus anatomy was grossly altered; (b) when intraoperative tremor control was unsatisfactory despite Vim high-intensity stimulation; or (c) if unaffordable side effects or even tremor worsening occurred during intraoperative macrostimulation. Seven patients received definitive Gpi DBS implantation, while three patients received Vim DBS. In all observed cases, we observed an improvement on the TRS. In two cases where Vim thalamic anatomy was altered by the pathological insult

  10. Mechanism of heart rate responses elicited by chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Tetsuya; Chitravanshi, Vineet C.; Nakamura, Takeshi; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N.

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the mechanism of heart rate (HR) responses elicited by the stimulation of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Experiments were done in urethane-anesthetized, barodenervated, adult, male Wistar rats. Chemical stimulation of the PVN by unilateral microinjections of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) elicited increases in HR which were attenuated by bilateral vagotomy. PVN-induced tachycardia was also attenuated by the blockade of the spinal ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGLURs) which was accomplished by intrathecal injections at T9–T10 or direct application at T1–T4 of iGLUR antagonists. The blockade of spinal iGLURs combined with bilateral vagotomy completely blocked PVN-induced tachycardia. Blockade of GABA receptors in the medial nucleus tractus solitarius (mNTS) also attenuated the PVN-induced tachycardia. Complete blockade of PVN-induced tachycardia was also observed after the blockade of iGLURs in both the spinal cord and mNTS. Combination of the blockade of mNTS GABA receptors and spinal iGLURs also abolished PVN-induced tachycardia. PVN-induced tachycardia was not altered by the blockade of spinal vasopressin or oxytocin receptors at T1–T4. These results suggested that in barodenervated rats: 1) tachycardia elicited by the chemical stimulation of the PVN was mediated via both inhibition of vagal and activation of sympathetic outflows to the heart, 2) the vagal inhibition contributing to the PVN-induced tachycardia was mediated by the iGLURs and GABARs in the mNTS, 3) sympathetic activation contributing to the PVN-induced tachycardia was mediated via spinal iGLURs, and 4) spinal vasopressin and oxytocin receptors were not involved in the mediation of PVN-induced tachycardia. PMID:19022229

  11. Tuning in caudal fastigial nucleus units during natural and galvanic labyrinth stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, H G; Guldin, W O; Grüsser, O J

    2001-05-25

    Neurons of the caudal fastigial nucleus were investigated by means of single unit recordings. Natural vestibular stimuli were applied as well as galvanic labyrinth polarization. One-third of the neurons showed a convergence of vertical and horizontal canals. More than 80% of the neurons responded to polarization of both the ipsilateral and contralateral canals (binaural responders). Most neurons had a limited response range. Two classes of neurons could be distinguished: up to 1 Hz responders and up to 10 Hz responders. In addition a group of fastigial cells showed a tuning within a small range of frequencies (sharp-tuning responders).

  12. Microinfusion of nefazodone into the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala enhances defensive behavior induced by NMDA stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Maisonnette, S; Villela, C; Carotti, A P; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2000-01-01

    The inferior colliculus is notably associated with defensive behavior. Electrical or pharmacological stimulation of the inferior colliculus induces aversive reactions such as running and jumping. Lesion of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala decreases the threshold of aversive reactions induced by electrical stimulation of the inferior colliculus. The present work examined the influence of microinjections of nefazodone, a serotonin (5-HT(2)) antagonist, into the basolateral nucleus of amygdala on aversive reactions induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) microinjected into the inferior colliculus. Rats implanted with cannulae in the inferior colliculus and in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala were submitted to the open-field test where defensive behaviors were observed. Results indicated that microinjection of nefazodone into the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala increases aversive responses induced by NMDA injections into the inferior colliculus. This result suggests that the inferior colliculus and the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala have a functional relationship on the neural circuitry of defensive behavior. Moreover, 5-HT(2) receptors located at the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala seem to play an inhibitory role on defensive behaviors induced by inferior colliculus stimulation.

  13. Effects of ventro-medial mesencephalic tegmentum (VMT) stimulation on the spontaneous activity of nucleus accumbens neurones: influence of the dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Le Douarin, C; Penit, J; Glowinski, J; Thierry, A M

    1986-01-22

    The effects of VMT-stimulation (100-500 microA, 0.6 ms; 1 Hz) on the spontaneous activity of neurones in the nucleus accumbens were analyzed in ketamine-anaesthetized rats. On spontaneously active cells (firing greater than 0.5 spikes/s), 3 types of responses were observed: either inhibition (36%), excitation (5%) or a composite sequence of excitation followed by inhibition (12%). Moreover, 14% of silent nucleus accumbens neurones were excited by single pulse VMT-stimulation. Finally, 3% of nucleus accumbens neurones recorded were driven antidromically by VMT-stimulation. Destruction of dopamine (DA) projections by 6-hydroxydopamine prevented the inhibitory responses to VMT stimulation in the great majority of cells studied, without affecting the excitatory responses. After systemic administration of haloperidol or sulpiride, the inhibitory responses to VMT stimulation were attenuated markedly, whilst the excitatory responses were, however, maintained. These results suggest that the inhibitory, but not the excitatory, effects of VMT-stimulation on nucleus accumbens neurones may be mediated by an activation of the mesolimbic DA system.

  14. Light stimulates MSK1 activation in the suprachiasmatic nucleus via a PACAP-ERK/MAP kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Greg Q; Lee, Boyoung; Cheng, Hai-Ying M; Obrietan, Karl

    2005-06-01

    Signaling via the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been shown to be a key intracellular signaling event that couples light to entrainment of the mammalian circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Because many of the physiological effects of the MAPK pathway are mediated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-regulated kinases, it was of interest to identify kinase targets of ERK in the SCN. In this study, we examined whether mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1) is a downstream target of ERK in the SCN and whether it couples to clock gene expression. Here we show that photic stimulation during the subjective night stimulates MSK1 phosphorylation at serine 360, an event required for robust kinase activation. Activated ERK and MSK1 were colocalized in SCN cell nuclei after photic stimulation. The in vivo administration of the MAP kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor U0126 [1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(o-aminophenylmercapto) butadiene] attenuated MSK1 phosphorylation. MSK1 phosphorylation was more responsive to late-night than early-night photic stimulation, indicating that MSK1 may differentially contribute to light-induced phase advancing and phase delaying of the clock. The potential connection between pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) (a regulator of clock entrainment) and MSK1 phosphorylation was examined. PACAP infusion stimulated MSK1 phosphorylation, whereas PACAP receptor antagonist infusion attenuated light-induced MSK1 phosphorylation in the SCN. In reporter gene assays, MSK1 was shown to couple to mPeriod1 via a cAMP response element-binding protein-dependent mechanism. Together, these data identify MSK1 as both a downstream target of the MAPK cascade within the SCN and a regulator of clock gene expression.

  15. High-Frequency Stimulation at the Subthalamic Nucleus Suppresses Excessive Self-Grooming in Autism-Like Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Andrew D; Berges, Victoria A; Chung, Sunho J; Fridman, Gene Y; Baraban, Jay M; Reti, Irving M

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one quarter of individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) display self-injurious behavior (SIB) ranging from head banging to self-directed biting and punching. Sometimes, these behaviors are extreme and unresponsive to pharmacological and behavioral therapies. We have found electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can produce life-changing results, with more than 90% suppression of SIB frequency. However, these patients typically require frequent maintenance ECT (mECT), as often as every 5 days, to sustain the improvement gained during the acute course. Long-term consequences of such frequent mECT started as early as childhood in some cases are unknown. Accordingly, there is a need for alternative forms of chronic stimulation for these patients. To explore the feasibility of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for intractable SIB seen in some patients with an ASD, we utilized two genetically distinct mouse models demonstrating excessive self-grooming, namely the Viaat-Mecp2−/y and Shank3B−/− lines, and administered high-frequency stimulation (HFS) via implanted electrodes at the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS). We found that STN-HFS significantly suppressed excessive self-grooming in both genetic lines. Suppression occurs both acutely when stimulation is switched on, and persists for several days after HFS is stopped. This effect was not explained by a change in locomotor activity, which was unaffected by STN-HFS. Likewise, social interaction deficits were not corrected by STN-HFS. Our data show STN-HFS suppresses excessive self-grooming in two autism-like mouse models, raising the possibility DBS might be used to treat intractable SIB associated with ASDs. Further studies are required to explore the circuitry engaged by STN-HFS, as well as other potential stimulation sites. Such studies might also yield clues about pathways, which could be modulated by non-invasive stimulatory techniques. PMID:26606849

  16. Stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus increases brown adipose tissue nerve activity via hypothalamic paraventricular and dorsomedial nuclei.

    PubMed

    Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2016-08-01

    Hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) stimulation elicited increases in sympathetic nerve activity (IBATSNA) and temperature (TBAT) of interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). The role of hypothalamic dorsomedial (DMN) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei in mediating these responses was studied in urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated, male Wistar rats. In different groups of rats, inhibition of neurons in the DMN and PVN by microinjections of muscimol attenuated the increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by microinjections of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid into the ipsilateral ARCN. In other groups of rats, blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors by combined microinjections of D(-)-2-amino-7-phosphono-heptanoic acid (D-AP7) and NBQX into the DMN and PVN attenuated increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by ARCN stimulation. Blockade of melanocortin 3/4 receptors in the DMN and PVN in other groups of rats resulted in attenuation of increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by ipsilateral ARCN stimulation. Microinjections of Fluoro-Gold into the DMN resulted in retrograde labeling of cells in the ipsilateral ARCN, and some of these cells contained proopiomelanocortin (POMC), α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), or vesicular glutamate transporter-3. Since similar projections from ARCN to the PVN have been reported by us and others, these results indicate that neurons containing POMC, α-MSH, and glutamate project from the ARCN to the DMN and PVN. Stimulation of ARCN results in the release of α-MSH and glutamate in the DMN and PVN which, in turn, cause increases in IBATSNA and TBAT. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Improvement of Advanced Parkinson’s Disease Manifestations with Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus: A Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rabie, Ahmed; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Fakhry, Mazen; Eassa, Ayman Youssef Ezeldin; Fouad, Wael; Shakal, Ahmed; Slavin, Konstantin V.

    2016-01-01

    We present our experience at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), describing our surgical technique, and reporting our clinical results, and morbidities. Twenty patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD) who underwent bilateral STN-DBS were studied. Patients were assessed preoperatively and followed up for one year using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in “on” and “off” medication and “on” and “off” stimulation conditions. At one-year follow-up, we calculated significant improvement in all the motor aspects of PD (UPDRS III) and in activities of daily living (UPDRS II) in the “off” medication state. The “off” medication UPDRS improved by 49.3%, tremors improved by 81.6%, rigidity improved by 50.0%, and bradykinesia improved by 39.3%. The “off” medication UPDRS II scores improved by 73.8%. The Levodopa equivalent daily dose was reduced by 54.1%. The UPDRS IVa score (dyskinesia) was reduced by 65.1%. The UPDRS IVb score (motor fluctuation) was reduced by 48.6%. Deep brain stimulation of the STN improves the cardinal motor manifestations of the idiopathic PD. It also improves activities of daily living, and reduces medication-induced complications. PMID:27983589

  18. Matching the neural adaptation in the rat ventral cochlear nucleus produced by artificial (electric) and acoustic stimulation of the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Loquet, Gérard; Pelizzone, Marco; Valentini, Gregory; Rouiller, Eric M

    2004-01-01

    To investigate neural adaptive properties, near-field evoked potentials were recorded from a chronically implanted electrode in the ventral cochlear nucleus in awake Long-Evans rats exposed to acoustic stimuli or receiving intracochlear electric stimulation. Stimuli were 250-ms trains of repetitive acoustic clicks (10, 30 and 50 dB SPL) or biphasic electric pulses (30, 50 and 70 microA) with intratrain pulse rates ranging from 100 to 1000 pulses per second (pps). The amplitude of the first negative (N(1)) to positive (P(1)) component of the average evoked potentials was measured for each consecutive individual pulse in the train. While a progressive exponential decrease in N(1)-P(1) amplitude was observed as a function of the position of the pulse within the train for both types of stimulation, the decrement of electric responses (adaptive pattern) was substantially less prominent than that observed for acoustic stimuli. Based on this difference, the present work was extended by modifying electric stimuli in order to try to restore normal adaptation phenomena. The results suggest the feasibility of mimicking acoustic adaptation by stimulation with exponentially decreasing electric pulse trains, which may be clinically applicable in the auditory implant field. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease: From history to the interaction with the monoaminergic systems.

    PubMed

    Faggiani, E; Benazzouz, A

    2017-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by the manifestation of motor symptoms, which are mainly attributed to the degeneration of dopamine neurons in the pars compacta of substantia nigra. Based on advancements in the understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, especially in animal models, the subthalamic nucleus has been pointed as a major target for deep brain stimulation in the treatment of motor symptoms, first developed in non-human primate and then successfully transfered to parkinsonian patients. Nevertheless, despite the focus on motor deficits, Parkinson's disease is also characterized by the manifestation of non-motor symptoms, which can be due to the additional degeneration of norepinephrine, serotonin and cholinergic systems. The pathophysiology of the non-motor symptoms is under studied and consequently not well treated. Furthermore, data from the literature about the impact of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on non-motor disorders are controversial and still under debate. Similarly, the risk of mood disorders post-deep brain stimulation surgery remains also controversial. Here, we review the clinical and experimental data of this neurosurgical approach on motor and non-motor behaviors and provide evidence for its interaction with the monoaminergic systems.

  20. The influence of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on impulsivity and prepulse inhibition in Parkinson’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Lucy; Smith, Heather; Cruz, Priscilla De La; Campbell, Joannalee; Fama, Chris; Haller, Jessica; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Durphy, Jennifer; Hanspal, Era; Molho, Eric; Barba, Anne; Shin, Damian; Pilitsis, Julie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background At least 14% of Parkinson disease (PD) patients develop impulse control disorders (ICDs). The pathophysiology behind these behaviors and the impact of deep brain stimulation in a real-life setting remains unclear. Objectives We prospectively examined the impact of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on ICDs in PD patients, as well as the relationship between impaired sensorimotor gaiting and impulsivity. Methods Patients undergoing bilateral STN-DBS were assessed for ICDs preoperatively and 1-year postoperatively using a validated questionnaire (QUIP-RS). A subset of patients completed the Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART) and auditory pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) testing. Results Analysis revealed 12 patients had an improvement in score assessing ICDs (“good responders” – GR; p = 0.006) while 4 had a worse or stable score (“poor responders” – PR; p > 0.05). GR further exemplified a significant decrease in hypersexual behavior (p = 0.005) and binge eating (p = 0.01). Impaired PPI responses also significantly correlated with impulsivity in BART (r = −0.72, p = 0.044). Discussion Following bilateral STN-DBS 75% of our cohort had a reduction in ICDs, thus suggesting deep brain stimulation effectively manages ICDs in PD. The role of impaired PPI in predisposition to ICDs in PD warrants further investigation. PMID:26066569

  1. Improvement of Advanced Parkinson's Disease Manifestations with Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus: A Single Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Rabie, Ahmed; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Fakhry, Mazen; Eassa, Ayman Youssef Ezeldin; Fouad, Wael; Shakal, Ahmed; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2016-12-13

    We present our experience at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), describing our surgical technique, and reporting our clinical results, and morbidities. Twenty patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) who underwent bilateral STN-DBS were studied. Patients were assessed preoperatively and followed up for one year using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in "on" and "off" medication and "on" and "off" stimulation conditions. At one-year follow-up, we calculated significant improvement in all the motor aspects of PD (UPDRS III) and in activities of daily living (UPDRS II) in the "off" medication state. The "off" medication UPDRS improved by 49.3%, tremors improved by 81.6%, rigidity improved by 50.0%, and bradykinesia improved by 39.3%. The "off" medication UPDRS II scores improved by 73.8%. The Levodopa equivalent daily dose was reduced by 54.1%. The UPDRS IVa score (dyskinesia) was reduced by 65.1%. The UPDRS IVb score (motor fluctuation) was reduced by 48.6%. Deep brain stimulation of the STN improves the cardinal motor manifestations of the idiopathic PD. It also improves activities of daily living, and reduces medication-induced complications.

  2. Deep brain stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus in medically refractory orthostatic tremor: preliminary observations.

    PubMed

    Espay, Alberto J; Duker, Andrew P; Chen, Robert; Okun, Michael S; Barrett, Edwin T; Devoto, Johnna; Zeilman, Pamela; Gartner, Maureen; Burton, Noël; Miranda, Helard A; Mandybur, George T; Zesiewicz, Theresa A; Foote, Kelly D; Revilla, Fredy J

    2008-12-15

    Orthostatic tremor (OT) is a disabling movement disorder associated with postural and gait impairment in the elderly. Medical therapy often yields insufficient benefit. We report the clinical and electrophysiological data on two patients with medication-refractory OT treated with deep brain stimulation of the ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (Vim DBS). Patient 1 underwent bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) and Patient 2 unilateral Vim DBS following 28 and 30 years of disease duration, respectively. Both patients showed increased latency to symptom onset after rising from a seated position, improved tolerance for prolonged standing, and slower crescendo of tremor severity when remaining upright. Postoperative evaluation demonstrated decreased amplitude of electromyographic activity with persistence of well-defined oscillatory behavior showing strong coherence at 15 Hz between all muscles tested in the upper and lower limbs. Postural sway was unchanged. Clinical benefits have been sustained for over 18 months in Patient 1, and receded after 3 months in Patient 2. These findings support the consideration of bilateral Vim DBS implantation as a therapeutic option in patients with medically refractory OT. Further efficacy studies on chronic stimulation to disrupt the abnormal oscillatory activity in this disorder are warranted.

  3. Low-frequency stimulation of the tuberomammillary nucleus facilitates electrical amygdaloid-kindling acquisition in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deng-Chang; Zhu-Ge, Zheng-Bing; Yu, Chao-Yang; Fang, Qi; Wang, Shuang; Jin, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong; Chen, Zhong

    2008-10-01

    Histamine plays a suppressive role in seizure. The tuberomammillary nucleus (TM) is the only locus of histaminergic neurons in the brain. To determine whether deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the TM provides protection against seizures, we tested the effects of low-frequency stimulation (LFS, 1 Hz), high frequency stimulation (HFS, 100 Hz), and electrolytic lesions of the TM on seizures generated by amygdaloid kindling, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) and maximal electroshock (MES) in rats. LFS of TM accelerated the progression of behavioral seizure stage and increased the mean afterdischarge duration (ADD) during acquisition of amygdaloid-kindling seizures, but had no considerable anticonvulsive effect in fully kindled animals. It augmented the MES-induced seizures as well, but had no appreciable effects on PTZ-kindled seizures. In addition, both HFS and bilateral lesions of the TM exacerbated the progression of amygdaloid-kindling seizures. These results suggest that specific negative sites for DBS exist in the brain, such as the TM. This study indicates that it is crucial to choose a suitable target for DBS in the clinical treatment of epilepsy.

  4. Choreatic Side Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation of the Anteromedial Subthalamic Nucleus for Treatment-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Mulders, Anne E P; Leentjens, Albert F G; Schruers, Koen; Duits, Annelien; Ackermans, Linda; Temel, Yasin

    2017-08-01

    Patients with treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are potential candidates for deep brain stimulation (DBS). The anteromedial subthalamic nucleus (STN) is among the most commonly used targets for DBS in OCD. We present a patient with a 30-year history of treatment-resistant OCD who underwent anteromedial STN-DBS. Despite a clear mood-enhancing effect, stimulation caused motor side effects, including bilateral hyperkinesia, dyskinesias, and sudden large amplitude choreatic movements of arms and legs when stimulating at voltages greater than approximately 1.5 V. DBS at lower amplitudes and at other contact points failed to result in a significant reduction of obsessions and compulsions without inducing motor side effects. Because of this limitation in programming options, we decided to reoperate and target the ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS), which resulted in a substantial reduction in key obsessive and compulsive symptoms without serious side effects. Choreatic movements and hemiballismus have previously been linked to STN dysfunction and have been incidentally reported as side effects of DBS of the dorsolateral STN in Parkinson disease (PD). However, in PD, these side effects were usually transient, and they rarely interfered with DBS programming. In our patient, the motor side effects were persistent, and they made optimal DBS programming impossible. To our knowledge, such severe and persistent motor side effects have not been described previously for anteromedial STN-DBS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamic nucleus paraventricularis mimics the effects of light on pineal melatonin synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Olcese, J.; Reuss, S.; Steinlechner, S.

    1987-02-02

    In an attempt to clarify further the role of the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei (PVN) in the control of pineal function, the effects of 2 min electrical stimulation of these nuclei were investigated in acutely blinded, adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Pineal serotonin-N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity, melatonin content and catecholamine levels were measured by means of radio-enzymatic, radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid-chromatography methods, respectively. All three pineal parameters underwent significant declines following brief PVN stimulation during the night time. These observations lend credence to the view that the neural pathways transmitting light information to the sympathetic innervation controlling pineal melatonin synthesis. 22 references, 1 figure.

  6. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Modulates Motor Cortex Oscillatory Activity in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devos, D.; Labyt, E.; Derambure, P.; Bourriez, J. L.; Cassim, F.; Reyns, N.; Blond, S.; Guieu, J. D.; Destee, A.; Defebvre, L.

    2004-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, impaired motor preparation has been related to an increased latency in the appearance of movement-related desynchronization (MRD) throughout the contralateral primary sensorimotor (PSM) cortex. Internal globus pallidus (GPi) stimulation improved movement desynchronization over the PSM cortex during movement execution but…

  7. Effect of subthalamic nucleus stimulation during exercise on the mesolimbocortical dopaminergic region in Parkinson's disease: a positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Takao; Sugiyama, Kenji; Yagi, Shunsuke; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Kanno, Toshihiko; Asakawa, Tetsuya; Ito, Tae; Terada, Tatsuhiro; Namba, Hiroki; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2013-03-01

    To elucidate the dynamic effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) during activity on the dopaminergic system, 12 PD patients who had STN-DBS operations at least 1 month prior, underwent two positron emission tomography scans during right-foot movement in DBS-off and DBS-on conditions. To quantify motor performance changes, the motion speed and mobility angle of the foot at the ankle were measured twice. Estimations of the binding potential of [(11)C]raclopride (BP(ND)) were based on the Logan plot method. Significant motor recovery was found in the DBS-on condition. The STN-DBS during exercise significantly reduced the [(11)C]raclopride BP(ND) in the caudate and the nucleus accumbens (NA), but not in the dorsal or ventral putamen. The magnitude of dopamine release in the NA correlated negatively with the magnitude of motor load, indicating that STN-DBS facilitated motor behavior more smoothly and at less expense to dopamine neurons in the region. The lack of dopamine release in the putamen and the significant dopamine release in the ventromedial striatum by STN-DBS during exercise indicated dopaminergic activation occurring in the motivational circuit during action, suggesting a compensatory functional activation of the motor loop from the nonmotor to the motor loop system.

  8. Selective serotonin receptor stimulation of the medial nucleus accumbens causes differential effects on food intake and locomotion.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Wayne E; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Connolly, Megan E; Skelly, Mary Jane

    2009-10-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that pharmacological manipulations of neural serotonin pathways influence ingestive behaviors. Despite the known role of the nucleus accumbens in directing appetitive and consummatory behavior, there has been little examination of the influences that serotonin receptors may play in modulating feeding within nucleus accumbens circuitry. In these experiments, the authors examined the effects of bilateral nucleus accumbens infusions of the 5-HT1/7 receptor agonist 5-CT (at 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, or 4.0 microg/0.5 microl/side), the 5-HT receptor agonist EMD 386088 (at 0.0, 1.0, and 4.0 microg/0.5 microl/side), or the 5-HT2C preferential agonist RO 60-0175 (at 0.0, 2.0, or 5.0 microg/0.5 microl/side) on food intake and locomotor activity in the rat. Intra-accumbens infusions of 5-CT caused a dose-dependent reduction of food intake and rearing behavior, both in food-restricted animals given 2-hr free access to Purina Protab RMH 3000 Chow, as well as in nondeprived rats offered 2-hr access to a highly palatable fat/sucrose diet. In contrast, stimulation of 5-HT receptors with EMD 386088 caused a dose-dependent increase of intake under both feeding conditions, without affecting measures of locomotion. Infusions of the moderately selective 5-HT2C receptor agonist RO 60-0175 had no effects on feeding or locomotor measures in food-restricted animals, but did reduce intake of the fat/sucrose in nonrestricted animals at the 2.0 microg, but not the 5.0 microg dose. Intra-accumbens infusions of selective antagonists for the 5-HT (SB 269970), 5-HT (SB 252585), and 5-HT2C (RS 102221) receptors did not affect locomotion, and demonstrated no lasting changes in feeding for any of the groups tested. These data are the first to suggest that the activation of different serotonin receptor subtypes within the feeding circuitry of the medial nucleus accumbens differentially influence consummatory behavior.

  9. Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Lesions and Stimulation upon Corticostriatal Afferents in the 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Rat

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ruth H.; Moore, Cindy; Davies, Georgia; Dirling, Lisa B.; Koch, Rick J.; Meshul, Charles K.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormalities of striatal glutamate neurotransmission may play a role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease and may respond to neurosurgical interventions, specifically stimulation or lesioning of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). The major glutamatergic afferent pathways to the striatum are from the cortex and thalamus, and are thus likely to be sources of striatal neuronally-released glutamate. Corticostriatal terminals can be distinguished within the striatum at the electron microscopic level as their synaptic vesicles contain the vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1. The majority of terminals which are immunolabeled for glutamate but are not VGLUT1 positive are likely to be thalamostriatal afferents. We compared the effects of short term, high frequency, STN stimulation and lesioning in 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA)-lesioned rats upon striatal terminals immunolabeled for both presynaptic glutamate and VGLUT1. 6OHDA lesions resulted in a small but significant increase in the proportions of VGLUT1-labeled terminals making synapses on dendritic shafts rather than spines. STN stimulation for one hour, but not STN lesions, increased the proportion of synapses upon spines. The density of presynaptic glutamate immuno-gold labeling was unchanged in both VGLUT1-labeled and -unlabeled terminals in 6OHDA-lesioned rats compared to controls. Rats with 6OHDA lesions+STN stimulation showed a decrease in nerve terminal glutamate immuno-gold labeling in both VGLUT1-labeled and -unlabeled terminals. STN lesions resulted in a significant decrease in the density of presynaptic immuno-gold-labeled glutamate only in VGLUT1-labeled terminals. STN interventions may achieve at least part of their therapeutic effect in PD by normalizing the location of corticostriatal glutamatergic terminals and by altering striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission. PMID:22427909

  10. Cervical Stimulation Activates A1 and Locus Coeruleus Neurons that Project to the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Poletini, Maristela O.; McKee, De’Nise T.; Szawka, Raphael E.; Bertram, Richard; Helena, Cleyde V. V.; Freeman, Marc E.

    2012-01-01

    In female rats, stimulation of the uterine cervix during mating induces two daily surges of prolactin. Inhibition of hypothalamic dopamine release and stimulation of oxytocin neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) are required for prolactin secretion. We aim to better understand how stimulation of the uterine cervix is translated into two daily prolactin surges. We hypothesize that noradrenergic neurons in the A1, A2, and locus coeruleus (LC) are responsible for conveying the peripheral stimulus to the PVN. In order to determine whether projections from these neurons to the PVN are activated by cervical stimulation (CS), we injected a retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Gold (FG), into the PVN of ovariectomized rats. Fourteen days after injection, animals were submitted to artificial CS or handling and perfused with a fixative solution. Brains were removed and sectioned from the A1, A2, and LC for c-Fos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and FG triple-labeling using immunohistochemistry. CS increased the percentage of TH/FG+ double-labeled neurons expressing c-Fos in the A1 and LC. CS also increased the percentage of TH+ neurons expressing c-Fos within the A1 and A2, independent of their projections to the PVN. Our data reinforce the significant contributions of the A1 and A2 to carry sensory information during mating, and provide evidence of a functional pathway in which CS activates A1 and LC neurons projecting to the PVN, which is potentially involved in the translation of CS into two daily prolactin surges. PMID:22732530

  11. Peripheral osmotic stimulation inhibits the brain's innate immune response to microdialysis of acidic perfusion fluid adjacent to supraoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sanmei

    2009-01-01

    During the brain's innate immune response microglia, astroglia and ependymal cells resolve/repair damaged tissue and control infection. Released interleukin-1β (IL-1β) reaching cerebroventricles stimulates circumventricular organs (CVOs; subfornical organ, SFO; organum vasculosum lamina terminalis, OVLT), the median preoptic nucleus (MePO), and magnocellular and parvocellular neurons in the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei. Hypertonic saline (HS) also activates these osmosensory CVOs and neuroendocrine systems, but, in contrast to IL-1β, inhibits the peripheral immune response. To examine whether the brain's innate immune response is attenuated by osmotic stimulation, sterile acidic perfusion fluid was microdialyzed (2 μl/min) in the SON area of conscious rats for 6 h with sterile HS (1.5 M NaCl) injected subcutaneously (15 ml/kg) at 5 h. Immunohistochemistry identified cytokine sources (IL-1β+; OX-42+ microglia) and targets (IL-1R+; inducible cyclooxygenase, COX-2+; c-Fos+) near the probe, in CVOs, MePO, ependymal cells, periventricular hypothalamus, SON, and PVN. Inserting the probe stimulated magnocellular neurons (c-Fos+; SON; PVN) via the MePO (c-Fos+), a response enhanced by HS. Microdialysis activated microglia (OX-42+; amoeboid/hypertrophied; IL-1β+) in the adjacent SON and bilaterally in perivascular areas of the PVN, periventricular hypothalamus and ependyma, coincident with c-Fos expression in ependymal cells and COX-2 in the vasculature. These microglial responses were attenuated by HS, coincident with activating parvocellular and magnocellular neuroendocrine systems and elevating circulating IL-1β, oxytocin, and vasopressin. Acidosis-induced cellular injury from microdialysis activated the brain's innate immune response by a mechanism inhibited by peripheral osmotic stimulation. PMID:19759333

  12. [Psychiatric symptoms of Parkinson's disease following deep brain stimulation surgery on the subthalamic nucleus].

    PubMed

    Salvador-Aguiar, C; Menéndez-Guisasola, L; Blázquez-Estrada, M; Fernández-González, F; Seijo-Fernández, F

    To review the increasing number of papers that report diverse neuropsychiatric disorders that happen in patients diagnosed of Parkinson's disease submitted to brain deep stimulation of subthalamic nuclei with high frequency current. It is a fact the need to evaluate carefully all the patients who have to submit to this surgical procedure analyzing previous psychiatric history, and the possible appearance of psychiatric sphere symptoms after surgery. The acute depression and the euphoric moods (than can occur immediately after surgery) and major depression, obsession, widespread anxiety and substance abuse (among those of more delayed appearance) constitute examples of this pathology. The treatment of previous psychiatric disorders is forced in all cases and specially relevant in the major depression when suicide ideas coexist. Information that allow to predict the risk of developing depressive disorders in the postoperative period does not exist at present time, though it is more predictable that it happens in those patients with previous severe depressive history. In general, euphoric moods, apathy and depression, usually are transient and of multifactorial origin that includes the existence of endogenous predisposition, the change to an independence pattern after surgery, the psychotropic effect of levodopa, and the high frequency current stimulation effect on the non motor structures target and in the adjacent regions. It must be outlined that it is possible the appearance of psychotic symptoms after brain deep stimulation of subthalamic nuclei in patients with ideal results on motor disability.

  13. Six questions on the subthalamic nucleus: lessons from animal models and from stimulated patients.

    PubMed

    Baunez, C; Yelnik, J; Mallet, L

    2011-12-15

    Since the early 90s, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has started to be the subject of an increasing interest not only in the community of the basal ganglia scientists but also for neurosurgeons and neurologists, thanks to the development of the surgical treatment for Parkinson's disease. The involvement of the STN in cognitive and motivational processes has been demonstrated since, and psychiatrists are now considering this small structure as a possible target for the treatment of various disorders. In this review, we will address six questions to highlight (1) How increased knowledge has led us from a strictly motor model to an integrative one. (2) How knowledge acquired in animal models can be similar or (3) different from the effects observed in human patients. (4) How clinical trials are sometimes ahead of fundamental research carried out in animals, showing effects that could not be predicted on the basis of animal studies, thus questioning the relevance of some animal models, especially for psychiatric disorders. We will also address the possible future orientations (5) and how the use, or precaution not to use, certain key words in animal research dedicated to STN functions can lead to the omission of a certain amount of available data in the literature (6). Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impulse control and related disorders in Parkinson's disease patients treated with bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation: a review.

    PubMed

    Broen, Martijn; Duits, Annelien; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Temel, Yasin; Winogrodzka, Ania

    2011-07-01

    Recently, impulse control and related disorders including punding and the dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) have been increasingly recognized in treated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Especially the impulse control disorders (ICD) such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive eating and buying may have dramatic repercussions on family, personal and professional life. Drug replacement therapy (DRT) is believed to play an important role in the onset of these behavioral disturbances. Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) might be a therapeutic option for those patients with DRT-related behavior, it may also induce ICD. So far, little is known about the relationship between STN DBS and impulse control and related disorders. Our aim was to review the current knowledge on this relationship in PD patients. The available studies showed that stimulation of the STN is associated with both favorable and negative outcome in terms of impulse control and related disorders. Preoperative disorders may resolve or improve after STN DBS, but these can also worsen or show no change at all. Moreover, STN DBS can also reveal or even induce ICD. Possible explanations for this variability are proposed and suggestions for clinical management are given. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characteristic laryngoscopic findings in Parkinson's disease patients after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation and its correlation with voice disorder.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Ohdake, Reiko; Yoneyama, Noritaka; Hara, Kazuhiro; Ito, Mizuki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Kajita, Yasukazu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Sobue, Gen

    2015-12-01

    Speech and voice disorders are one of the most common adverse effects in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients treated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). However, the pathophysiology of voice and laryngeal dysfunction after STN-DBS remains unclear. We assessed 47 PD patients (22 treated with bilateral STN-DBS (PD-DBS) and 25 treated medically (PD-Med); all patients in both groups matched by age, sex, disease duration, and motor and cognitive function) using the objective and subjective voice assessment batteries (GRBAS scale and Voice Handicap Index), and laryngoscopy. Laryngoscopic examinations revealed that PD-DBS patients showed a significantly higher incidence of incomplete glottal closure (77 vs 48 %; p = 0.039), hyperadduction of the false vocal folds (73 vs 44 %; p = 0.047), anteroposterior hypercompression (50 vs 20 %; p = 0.030) and asymmetrical glottal movement (50 vs 16 %; p = 0.002) than PD-Med patients. On- and off-stimulation assessment revealed that STN-DBS could induce or aggravate incomplete glottal closure, hyperadduction of the false vocal folds, anteroposterior hypercompression, and asymmetrical glottal movement. Incomplete glottal closure and hyperadduction of the false vocal folds significantly correlated with breathiness and strained voice, respectively (r = 0.590 and 0.539). We should adjust patients' DBS settings in consideration of voice and laryngeal functions as well as motor function.

  16. Anatomo-clinical correlation of intraoperative stimulation-induced side-effects during HF-DBS of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Tamma, F; Caputo, E; Chiesa, V; Egidi, M; Locatelli, M; Rampini, P; Cinnante, C; Pesenti, A; Priori, A

    2002-09-01

    The efficacy of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is dependent on the accuracy of targeting. In order to reduce the number of passes and, consequently, the duration of surgery and risk of bleeding, we have set up a new method based on direct magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) localisation of the STN. This procedure allows a short duration of the neurophysiological session (one or two initial tracks). Whenever a supplementary track is needed, the stimulation-induced side effects are analysed to choose from one of the remaining holes in Ben's gun. A good knowledge of anatomical structures surrounding the STN is mandatory to relate side effects to the actual position of the track. In our series of 11 patients (22 sides, 37 tracks), the most common and reproducible side effects were those characterised by motor, sensorial, oculomotor and vegetative signs and symptoms. Moreover, the therapeutic window (distance between the current intensity needed to obtain the best clinical effect and the intensity capable to induce side effects) predicted clinical efficacy in the long-term, and contributed to the choice of which among the examined tracks had to be implanted with the chronic macroelectrode.

  17. What is the best treatment for fluctuating Parkinson's disease: continuous drug delivery or deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus?

    PubMed

    Hilker, Rüdiger; Antonini, Angelo; Odin, Per

    2011-06-01

    Motor complications impair quality of life and cause severe disability in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Since they are often refractory to medical therapy, interventional therapies have been developed, which can provide a considerable reduction of daily off-time and dopaminergic dyskinesias. Continuous dopaminergic drug delivery (CDD) is based on the steady stimulation of striatal dopamine receptors by subcutaneous apomorphine or duodenal L: -DOPA infusions via portable minipumps. Advances in the understanding of basal ganglia functioning and in neurosurgical, electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques have led to a renaissance of neurosurgery for advanced PD. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is the most invasive procedure promising great benefit and the highest level of independency for suitable patients, but is definitely associated with surgical risks and DBS-related side effects. Each of these more or less invasive therapy options has its own profile, and a thorough consideration of its advantages and drawbacks for the individual situation is mandatory. In this paper, we summarize relevant facts for this decision and provide some guidelines for a responsible counseling of eligible patients.

  18. The angiotensin II-AT1 receptor stimulates reactive oxygen species within the cell nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, Karl D.; Gwathmey, TanYa M.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Grayson, Jason M.; Chappell, Mark C.

    2009-06-26

    We and others have reported significant expression of the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT1R) on renal nuclei; thus, the present study assessed the functional pathways and distribution of the intracellular AT1R on isolated nuclei. Ang II (1 nM) stimulated DCF fluorescence, an intranuclear indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while the AT1R antagonist losartan or the NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor DPI abolished the increase in ROS. Dual labeling of nuclei with antibodies against nucleoporin 62 (Nup62) and AT1R or the NADPH oxidase isoform NOX4 revealed complete overlap of the Nup62 and AT1R (99%) by flow cytometry, while NOX4 was present on 65% of nuclei. Treatment of nuclei with a PKC agonist increased ROS while the PKC inhibitor GF109203X or PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 abolished Ang II stimulation of ROS. We conclude that the Ang II-AT1R-PKC axis may directly influence nuclear function within the kidney through a redox sensitive pathway.

  19. Effects of Medication and Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Tongue Movements in Speakers with Parkinson's Disease Using Electropalatography: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartinger, Mariam; Tripoliti, Elina; Hardcastle, William J.; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects speech in the majority of patients. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is particularly effective in reducing tremor and rigidity. However, its effect on speech is variable. The aim of this pilot study was to quantify the effects of bilateral STN-DBS and medication on articulation, using…

  20. Articulatory Closure Proficiency in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Caudal Zona Incerta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; van Doorn, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed at comparing the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) on the proficiency in achieving oral closure and release during plosive production of people with Parkinson's disease. Method: Nineteen patients participated preoperatively and…

  1. PET Mapping for Brain-Computer Interface Stimulation of the Ventroposterior Medial Nucleus of the Thalamus in Rats with Implanted Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yunqi; Xu, Kedi; Xu, Caiyun; Zhang, Jiacheng; Ji, Jianfeng; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology has great potential for improving the quality of life for neurologic patients. This study aimed to use PET mapping for BCI-based stimulation in a rat model with electrodes implanted in the ventroposterior medial (VPM) nucleus of the thalamus. PET imaging studies were conducted before and after stimulation of the right VPM. Stimulation induced significant orienting performance. (18)F-FDG uptake increased significantly in the paraventricular thalamic nucleus, septohippocampal nucleus, olfactory bulb, left crus II of the ansiform lobule of the cerebellum, and bilaterally in the lateral septum, amygdala, piriform cortex, endopiriform nucleus, and insular cortex, but it decreased in the right secondary visual cortex, right simple lobule of the cerebellum, and bilaterally in the somatosensory cortex. This study demonstrated that PET mapping after VPM stimulation can identify specific brain regions associated with orienting performance. PET molecular imaging may be an important approach for BCI-based research and its clinical applications. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  2. Articulatory Closure Proficiency in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Caudal Zona Incerta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; van Doorn, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed at comparing the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) on the proficiency in achieving oral closure and release during plosive production of people with Parkinson's disease. Method: Nineteen patients participated preoperatively and…

  3. Effects of Medication and Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Tongue Movements in Speakers with Parkinson's Disease Using Electropalatography: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartinger, Mariam; Tripoliti, Elina; Hardcastle, William J.; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects speech in the majority of patients. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is particularly effective in reducing tremor and rigidity. However, its effect on speech is variable. The aim of this pilot study was to quantify the effects of bilateral STN-DBS and medication on articulation, using…

  4. [Effects of electric stimulation at the cerebellar fastigial nucleus on astrocytes in the hippocampus of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Li; Jia, Tian-Ming; Luan, Bin; Liu, Tao; Yuan, Yan

    2011-04-01

    To study the effects of electric stimulation at the cerebellar fastigial nucleus on astrocytes in the hippocampus of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) and the possible mechanism. One hundred and eighty 7-day-old neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group) and HIBD with and without electric stimulation (n=60 each). The HIBD model of neonatal rats was prepared by the Rice-Vennucci method. Electric stimulation at the cerebellar fastigial nucleus was given 24 hrs after the operation in the electric stimulation group once daily and lasted for 30 minutes each time. The other two groups were not subjected to electric stimulation but captured to fix in corresponding periods. Rats were sacrificed 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after stimulations to observe the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression by immunohistochemisty and the ultrastructural changes of astrocytes in the hippocampus under an electron microscope. Immunohistochemical analysis showed the expression of GFAP in the HIBD groups with and without electric stimulation increased significantly compared with the control group on day 3, reached the peak on day 7, and the increased expression remained till to day 21. The GFAP expression in the electric stimulation group was significantly lower than that in the untreated HIBD group at all time points. Under the electron microscope, the astrocytes in the untreated HIBD group were swollen and the amount of organelles was reduced, while the swelling of astrocytes was alleviated and the organelles remained in integrity in the electric stimulation group. The electric stimulation at the cerebellar fastigial nucleus can inhibit the excessive proliferation of astrocytes and relieve the structural damage of astrocytes in neonatal rats following HIBD.

  5. Deep Brain Stimulation of Medial Dorsal and Ventral Anterior Nucleus of the Thalamus in OCD: A Retrospective Case Series.

    PubMed

    Maarouf, Mohammad; Neudorfer, Clemens; El Majdoub, Faycal; Lenartz, Doris; Kuhn, Jens; Sturm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The current notion that cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits are involved in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has instigated the search for the most suitable target for deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, despite extensive research, uncertainty about the ideal target remains with many structures being underexplored. The aim of this report is to address a new target for DBS, the medial dorsal (MD) and the ventral anterior (VA) nucleus of the thalamus, which has thus far received little attention in the treatment of OCD. In this retrospective trial, four patients (three female, one male) aged 31-48 years, suffering from therapy-refractory OCD underwent high-frequency DBS of the MD and VA. In two patients (de novo group) the thalamus was chosen as a primary target for DBS, whereas in two patients (rescue DBS group) lead implantation was performed in a rescue DBS attempt following unsuccessful primary stimulation. Continuous thalamic stimulation yielded no significant improvement in OCD symptom severity. Over the course of thalamic DBS symptoms improved in only one patient who showed "partial response" on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive (Y-BOCS) Scale. Beck Depression Inventory scores dropped by around 46% in the de novo group; anxiety symptoms improved by up to 34%. In the de novo DBS group no effect of DBS on anxiety and mood was observable. MD/VA-DBS yielded no adequate alleviation of therapy-refractory OCD, the overall strategy in targeting MD/VA as described in this paper can thus not be recommended in DBS for OCD. The magnocellular portion of MD (MDMC), however, might prove a promising target in the treatment of mood related and anxiety disorders.

  6. Deep Brain Stimulation of Medial Dorsal and Ventral Anterior Nucleus of the Thalamus in OCD: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lenartz, Doris; Kuhn, Jens; Sturm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Background The current notion that cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits are involved in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has instigated the search for the most suitable target for deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, despite extensive research, uncertainty about the ideal target remains with many structures being underexplored. The aim of this report is to address a new target for DBS, the medial dorsal (MD) and the ventral anterior (VA) nucleus of the thalamus, which has thus far received little attention in the treatment of OCD. Methods In this retrospective trial, four patients (three female, one male) aged 31–48 years, suffering from therapy-refractory OCD underwent high-frequency DBS of the MD and VA. In two patients (de novo group) the thalamus was chosen as a primary target for DBS, whereas in two patients (rescue DBS group) lead implantation was performed in a rescue DBS attempt following unsuccessful primary stimulation. Results Continuous thalamic stimulation yielded no significant improvement in OCD symptom severity. Over the course of thalamic DBS symptoms improved in only one patient who showed “partial response” on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive (Y-BOCS) Scale. Beck Depression Inventory scores dropped by around 46% in the de novo group; anxiety symptoms improved by up to 34%. In the de novo DBS group no effect of DBS on anxiety and mood was observable. Conclusion MD/VA-DBS yielded no adequate alleviation of therapy-refractory OCD, the overall strategy in targeting MD/VA as described in this paper can thus not be recommended in DBS for OCD. The magnocellular portion of MD (MDMC), however, might prove a promising target in the treatment of mood related and anxiety disorders. PMID:27504631

  7. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation is neuroprotective in the A53T α‐synuclein Parkinson's disease rat model

    PubMed Central

    Musacchio, Thomas; Rebenstorff, Maike; Fluri, Felix; Brotchie, Jonathan M.; Volkmann, Jens; Koprich, James B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a highly effective symptomatic therapy for motor deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD). An additional, disease‐modifying effect has been suspected from studies in toxin‐based PD animal models, but these models do not reflect the molecular pathology and progressive nature of PD that would be required to evaluate a disease‐modifying action. Defining a disease‐modifying effect could radically change the way in which DBS is used in PD. Methods We applied STN‐DBS in an adeno‐associated virus (AAV) 1/2‐driven human mutated A53T α‐synuclein (aSyn)‐overexpressing PD rat model (AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn). Rats were injected unilaterally, in the substantia nigra (SN), with AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn or control vector. Three weeks later, after behavioral and nigrostriatal dopaminergic deficits had developed, rats underwent STN‐DBS electrode implantation ipsilateral to the vector‐injected SN. Stimulation lasted for 3 weeks. Control groups remained OFF stimulation. Animals were sacrificed at 6 weeks. Results Motor performance in the single pellet reaching task was impaired in the AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn–injected stim‐OFF group, 6 weeks after AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn injection, compared to preoperative levels (–82%; p < 0.01). Deficits were reversed in AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn, stim‐ON rats after 3 weeks of active stimulation, compared to the AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn stim‐OFF rats (an increase of ∼400%; p < 0.05), demonstrating a beneficial effect of DBS. This motor improvement was maintained when the stimulation was turned off and was accompanied by a higher number of tyrosine hydroxylase+ SN neurons (increase of ∼29%), compared to AAV1/2‐A53T‐aSyn stim‐OFF rats (p < 0.05). Interpretation Our data support the putative neuroprotective and disease‐modifying effect of STN‐DBS in a mechanistically relevant model of PD. Ann Neurol 2017;81:825–836 PMID:28470693

  8. GLP-1 Receptor Stimulation of the Lateral Parabrachial Nucleus Reduces Food Intake: Neuroanatomical, Electrophysiological, and Behavioral Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jennifer E.; Farkas, Imre; Anesten, Fredrik; Anderberg, Rozita H.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank; Jansson, John-Olov; Liposits, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    The parabrachial nucleus (PBN) is a key nucleus for the regulation of feeding behavior. Inhibitory inputs from the hypothalamus to the PBN play a crucial role in the normal maintenance of feeding behavior, because their loss leads to starvation. Viscerosensory stimuli result in neuronal activation of the PBN. However, the origin and neurochemical identity of the excitatory neuronal input to the PBN remain largely unexplored. Here, we hypothesize that hindbrain glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) neurons provide excitatory inputs to the PBN, activation of which may lead to a reduction in feeding behavior. Our data, obtained from mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein in GLP-1-producing neurons, revealed that hindbrain GLP-1-producing neurons project to the lateral PBN (lPBN). Stimulation of lPBN GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) reduced the intake of chow and palatable food and decreased body weight in rats. It also activated lPBN neurons, reflected by an increase in the number of c-Fos-positive cells in this region. Further support for an excitatory role of GLP-1 in the PBN is provided by electrophysiological studies showing a remarkable increase in firing of lPBN neurons after Exendin-4 application. We show that within the PBN, GLP-1R activation increased gene expression of 2 energy balance regulating peptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and IL-6. Moreover, nearly 70% of the lPBN GLP-1 fibers innervated lPBN CGRP neurons. Direct intra-lPBN CGRP application resulted in anorexia. Collectively, our molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral data provide evidence for a functional role of the GLP-1R for feeding control in the PBN. PMID:25116706

  9. [Discrepancy between imaging and neurophysiology in deep brain stimulation of medial pallidum and subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Guridi, J; Rodríguez-Oroz, M C; Ramos, E; Linazasoro, G; Obeso, J A

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the discrepancy in distance between the target chosen by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the final electrode placement after intraoperative microrecording in patients submitted to deep brain stimulation (DBS) for alleviating the Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirty patients with PD and motor complications were operated with stereotactic surgery by MRI and microrecording. In 19 patients, the target chosen was the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and in 11 others the target was globus pallidus internus (GPi). In this work it is considered that the electrode has a current field below usual parameters of 1.5 mm radius. Consequently, when the distance error between the final physiological target and the MRI target, is between 1.5 and 3 mm was considered as partial discrepancy and distances of 3 mm or more were considered as total discrepancy. Partial discrepancy for STN and GPi were in 25 and 33% of the cases respectively and total discrepancy was 57 and 42% for each nucleus. The average distance error between both targets, final and image, for X stereotactic coordinate (mediolateral distance) was 1.54 mm for STN and 0.8 mm for GPi. The average distance for Y coordinate (anteroposterior distance) was 2.3 mm for STN and 2.2 mm for GPi. There is a significant discrepancy between the final physiological target after microrecording and the target chosen by MRI during surgery for alleviating PD that may induce variations or absence of clinical efficacy in parkinsonian patients submitted to the DBS surgery. Authors suggest the necessity of the microelectrode recording in order to reach the surgical target with the best clinical condition.

  10. The non-peptide neurokinin-1 antagonist, RPR 100893, decreases c-fos expression in trigeminal nucleus caudalis following noxious chemical meningeal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cutrer, F M; Moussaoui, S; Garret, C; Moskowitz, M A

    1995-02-01

    The effect of RPR 100893, a selective and specific neurokinin-1 antagonist, or its enantiomer RPR 103253 was examined on c-fos antigen expression in brain stem and upper cervical cord 2 h after intracisternal capsaicin injection (30.5 micrograms/ml) in pentobarbital-anesthetized Hartley guinea-pigs. Positive cells were counted at three levels corresponding to obex, -2.25 mm and -6.75 mm in 18 sections (50 microns). Immunoreactivity was strongly expressed within laminae I and IIo of trigeminal nucleus caudalis, area postrema and the leptomeninges. Moderate labeling was present in the nucleus of the solitary tract and the medullary lateral reticular nucleus, whereas few positive cells were found in the ventral portion of the medullary reticular nucleus and Rexed laminae III-V and X. The distribution of labeled cells was consistent with previously reported results following subarachnoid placement of the noxious agents, blood or carrageenin. Pretreatment with RPR 100893 (1, 10 and 100 micrograms/kg, i.v.) but not its enantiomer (100 micrograms/kg, i.v.) 30 min prior to capsaicin injection significantly reduced the number of positive cells in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (P < 0.01) in a dose-dependent manner, but not within area postrema or nucleus of the solitary tract. These results indicate that (i) the instillation of capsaicin into the subarachnoid space is an effective stimulus for the induction of c-fos antigen within trigeminal nucleus caudalis, presumably through activation of trigeminovascular afferents, and (ii) the neurokinin-1 antagonist RPR 100893 reduces the number of positive cells selectively within this nucleus. The findings are significant because drugs which alleviate vascular headaches decrease the number of c-fos-positive cells within trigeminal nucleus caudalis following noxious meningeal stimulation. Hence, strategies aimed at blocking the neurokinin-1 receptor may be useful for treating migraine and cluster headache.

  11. Striatal dopaminergic stimulation produces c-Fos expression in the PPT and an increase in wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Mena-Segovia, Juan; Giordano, Magda

    2003-10-03

    Striatal activation can modify activity in cortical areas related to specific striatal functions possibly through a process of disinhibition within the basal ganglia. Anatomical studies have shown substantial GABAergic innervation from these nuclei to the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT). Thus, dopaminergic stimulation of the striatum could produce PPT disinhibition and result in non-specific cortical activation. To test this hypothesis, d-amphetamine was infused both into the striatum of freely moving rats for motor and electrocorticographic recordings, and into the striatum of animals under deep anesthesia for c-Fos immunohistochemistry. The results show that intrastriatal amphetamine increases wakefulness independent of motor activity, and it increases c-Fos expression in the PPT and adjacent areas. They also suggest that the striatum participates in non-specific cortical activation probably as a result of its relationship with the PPT.

  12. Microelectrode targeting of the subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Erwin B

    2012-09-15

    Though microelectrode recordings likely increase the risks and costs of DBS, incremental improvement in accuracy may translate into improved outcomes that justify these risks and costs. Clinically based, controlled studies to resolve these issues are problematic. Until such studies are reported, physicians must rely on indirect evidence. The spatial variability of physiologically defined optimal targets, as determined by microelectrode recording (MER), necessary for targeting the STN was calculated. Study of the effectiveness of a MER algorithm was based on the number of penetrations required. The radius of the volume with a 99% chance of including the physiologically defined optimal target, based on 108 cases, was 4.5 mm. This is larger than the estimated radius of the DBS effect, which is variously estimated to be 2 to 3.9 mm. The 99% confidence radius in the plane orthogonal to the lead was 3.2 mm. In 70% of cases, the imaging-based trajectories corresponded to the physiologically defined optimal target. For the remaining 30% of cases, 70% required only a single additional MER tract. The radii of the 99% confidence volume and area may be larger than the effective radius of stimulation. Surveying within those volumes or areas is therefore necessary to assure that at least 99% of cases will cover the physiologically defined target. The MER algorithm was robust in detecting the physiologically defined optimal target. However, there are significant caveats in interpretation of the data.

  13. Bar pressing for food: differential consequences of lesions to the anterior versus posterior pedunculopontine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David I G; MacLaren, Duncan A A; Winn, Philip

    2009-08-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) is in a key position to participate in operant reinforcement via its connections with the corticostriatal architecture and the medial reticular formation. Indeed, previous work has demonstrated that rats bearing lesions of the whole PPTg are impaired when learning to make two bar presses for amphetamine reinforcement. Anterior and posterior portions of the PPTg make different anatomical connections, including preferential projections by the anterior PPTg to substantia nigra pars compacta dopamine neurons and by the posterior PPTg to ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons. We wanted to assess the effects of anterior and posterior PPTg ibotenate lesions on rats learning simple and more complex schedules of natural reinforcement. We trained rats with lesions to the anterior PPTg (n = 11) and the posterior PPTg (n = 5) [and appropriate controls (n = 15)] to bar press for food on a variety of fixed-ratio and variable-ratio reinforcement schedules and then during extinction. We found that posterior PPTg-lesioned rats bar pressed at lower rates, were slower to learn to bar press, and often had deficits characteristic of impaired learning and/or motivation. In contrast, anterior PPTg-lesioned rats learned to bar press for reinforcement at normal rates. However, they made errors of perseveration and anticipation throughout many schedules, and pressed at a higher rate than controls during extinction, deficits best characterized as reflecting disorganized response control. Together, these data suggest that the anterior PPTg and posterior PPTg (and their related circuits) contribute differently to reinforcement learning, incentive motivation, and response control, processes that are considered to malfunction in drug addiction.

  14. Potentiating effect of eszopiclone on GABA(A) receptor-mediated responses in pedunculopontine neurons.

    PubMed

    Ye, Meijun; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2009-07-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the cholinergic arm of the reticular activating system, which is mostly active during waking and REM sleep. GABAergic modulation of this area appears to regulate sleep-wake cycles. Eszopiclone (ESZ), a nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic agent, appears to modulate GABAergic receptors. However, the action site of ESZ in the brain is still unresolved. We tested the hypothesis that ESZ acts by potentiating GABA(A) receptors on PPN neurons. Wholecell voltage clamp recordings were performed on PPN neurons in 7-15 day rat brainstem slices, and the potentiating effects of ESZ on the responses to the GABA(A) receptor agonist isoguvacine (IGV), and on GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs), were determined. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, ESZ (1) increased the amplitude of the outward current induced by IGV, (2) increased its duration, and (3) enhanced the IGV-induced decrease in input resistance (Rin). The GABA(A) receptor antagonist gabazine (GBZ) blocked these effects. ESZ alone did not induce detectable currents or change Rin at a holding potential of -60 mV, but when held at 0 mV, ESZ induced an outward current in 13/21 PPN cells, an effect blocked by GBZ. ESZ also increased the amplitude (n = 18/21), duration (n = 17/21), and frequency (n = 13/15) of IPSCs. ESZ may potentiate GABA(A) inhibition in the PPN via pre- and post-synaptic modulation, which may underlie the hypnotic effects of ESZ. The differential effects of ESZ on both pre- and post-synaptic sites may partially explain why it has less significant side effects compared to other hypnotic agents.

  15. Distinct types of non-cholinergic pedunculopontine neurons are differentially modulated during global brain states.

    PubMed

    Ros, H; Magill, P J; Moss, J; Bolam, J P; Mena-Segovia, J

    2010-09-29

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is critically involved in brain-state transitions that promote neocortical activation. In addition, the PPN is involved in the control of several behavioral processes including locomotion, motivation and reward, but the neuronal substrates that underlie such an array of functions remain elusive. Here we analyzed the physiological properties of non-cholinergic PPN neurons in vivo across distinct brain states, and correlated these with their morphological properties after juxtacellular labeling. We show that non-cholinergic neurons in the PPN whose firing is not strongly correlated to neocortical activity are highly heterogeneous and are composed of at least three different subtypes: (1) "quiescent" neurons, which are nearly silent during slow-wave activity (SWA) but respond robustly to neocortical activation; (2) "tonic firing" neurons, which have a stationary firing rate that is independent of neocortical activity across different brain states; and (3) "irregular firing" neurons, which exhibit a variable level of correlation with neocortical activity. The majority of non-cholinergic neurons have an ascending axonal trajectory, with the exception of some irregular firing neurons that have descending axons. Furthermore, we observed asymmetric synaptic contacts within the PPN arising from the axon collaterals of labeled neurons, suggesting that excitatory, non-cholinergic neurons can shape the activity of neighboring cells. Our results provide the first evidence of distinct firing properties associated with non-cholinergic neuronal subtypes in the PPN, suggesting a functional heterogeneity, and support the notion of a local network assembled by projection neurons, the properties of which are likely to determine the output of the PPN in diverse behavioral contexts. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A long-term follow-up of weight changes in subthalamic nucleus stimulated Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Foubert-Samier, A; Maurice, S; Hivert, S; Guelh, D; Rigalleau, V; Burbaud, P; Cuny, E; Meissner, W; Tison, F

    2012-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) constitutes the mainstay treatment in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) with motor fluctuations. Despite its efficacy on motor signs and quality of life, emergent adverse events have been recently reported. Among them, weight gain (WG) is a recognized adverse event of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Also, WG is poorly known at the long-term and predisposing factors have not yet been identified. We conducted a cross-sectional study of WG in 47 STN-DBS PD patients between 1999-2006. Data on disease history, motor status and dopaminergic drug treatment were retrospectively collected at surgery and 1 year post-surgery. Weight at disease diagnosis and at surgery, as well as the current weight and height were gathered by an autoquestionnaire. Moreover, the weight before surgery was obtained and verified in medical files in more than 90% of our patients. Sixty-six patients who underwent surgery between 1999-2006 were included, but six were deceased, four refused to participate and nine were lost for follow-up. So, 47 (71%) were retained in our analysis. A total of 78.7% of patients gained weight. On average 4.7 years follow up after surgery, the mean weight gain was +7.2±8.1kg compared to the preoperative assessment (p<0.001) and the mean BMI gain was +2.7±3.0kg/m(2) compared to pre-surgery values (p<0.001). The patients gained more weight after surgery than they had lost during disease evolution before surgery. Women and patients with a more severe UPDRS-III "off" drug score before surgery significantly gained more weight. Our study provides further evidence that the WG is a problem after STN-DBS and concerns a majority of patients at the long term. It may expose them to complications that should be considered for prevention and the patient's information before surgery.

  17. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus inhibits the firing of juxtacellular labelled 5-HT-containing neurones.

    PubMed

    Hartung, H; Tan, S K H; Steinbusch, H M W; Temel, Y; Sharp, T

    2011-07-14

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an established neurosurgical therapy for movement disability in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), but some patients experience psychiatric side-effects like depression. In a previous electrophysiological study, we observed that HFS of the STN inhibited a population of neurones in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), with firing properties characteristic of 5-HT neurones. The present study extended these findings to a second population of neurones, and combined extracellular recording with juxtacellular-labelling to investigate the chemical identity of the neurones affected by HFS. Bilateral HFS (130 Hz, 100-200 μA, 5 min) of the STN inhibited (26.0±2.9%) the firing of 37/74 DRN neurones displaying a slow, regular firing pattern. Slower firing neurones were more strongly inhibited than those firing faster. Importantly, 10 inhibited DRN neurones were juxtacellular-labelled with neurobiotin, and all neurones contained 5-HT as shown by post-mortem 5-HT immunocytochemistry. A minority of slow firing DRN neurones (18/74) were activated by STN HFS (37.9±8.3%) which was not observed previously. Of these neurones, three were juxtacellular-labelled and one was 5-HT immunopositive. Also a small number of DRN neurones (19/74) did not respond to HFS, four of which were juxtacellular-labelled and all contained 5-HT. These data show that individual chemically-identified 5-HT-containing neurones in the DRN were modulated by STN HFS, and that the majority were inhibited but some were activated and some failed to respond. These data extend previous findings of modulation of the 5-HT system by STN HFS but suggest a destabilisation of the 5-HT system rather than simple inhibition as indicated previously. Although the mechanism is not yet known, such changes may contribute to the psychiatric side-effects of STN stimulation in some PD patients. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modulation of nutritional state in Parkinsonian patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Joana; Matos, Eduarda; Rosas, Maria José; Vieira-Coelho, Augusta; Borges, Nuno; Correia, Flora; Vaz, Rui; Garrett, Carolina

    2009-12-01

    Chronic bilateral subthalamic stimulation (DBS-STN) provides considerable clinical benefits in Parkinson disease patients, with improvement in primary symptoms and resolution of side effects of chronic pharmacological treatment. Apart from its therapeutic effects on PD symptoms, DBS-STN also appears to induce weight gain, which may itself induce critical metabolic disorders and limit the benefits of surgery. No data are available in literature showing the efficacy of a nutritional intervention to prevent rapid and/or excessive weight gain after DBSSTN. Fifty-seven PD patients were included in this study and were divided into two groups: Group 1 comprised 16 patients with a nutritional intervention immediately after surgery (1 week after); Group 2 comprised 41 patients with a nutritional intervention in a later period after surgery (mean time of 2.5 ± 1.6 years). Weight, body mass index (BMI), percentage of fat mass, levodopa daily dose (LDD) and part III of the Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) were studied before and after an individualized and structured nutritional intervention. Three months after nutritional intervention, Group 1 had a mean BMI (24.1 ± 2.99), that was not significantly different (p = 0.114) from BMI before intervention, with stability of the weight and in percentage of fat mass. In Group 2 all the patients gained weight, reaching to 13.17 ± 10%; a total of 63% of patients became overweight (BMI 25 kg/m(2)). Three months after nutritional intervention, Group 2 had a mean BMI (24.80 ± 2.45) that was significantly (p = 0.03) different from BMI before intervention (26.75 ± 2.99), although percentage of fat mass was higher in women. With this study, we have conclude that nutritional intervention adequate to patient-age, disease characteristics, medical therapy with L-dopa and physical activity, is effective incontrolling weight after DBS-STN surgery.

  19. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Early Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Charles, David; Konrad, Peter E.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Molinari, Anna L.; Tramontana, Michael G.; Finder, Stuart G.; Gill, Chandler E.; Bliton, Mark J.; Kao, Chris C.; Phibbs, Fenna T.; Hedera, Peter; Salomon, Ronald M.; Cannard, Kevin R.; Wang, Lily; Song, Yanna; Davis, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective and approved therapy for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), and a recent study suggests efficacy in mid-stage disease. This manuscript reports the results of a pilot trial investigating preliminary safety and tolerability of DBS in early PD. Methods Thirty subjects with idiopathic PD (Hoehn & Yahr Stage II off medication), age 50–75, on medication ≥ 6 months but < 4 years, and without motor fluctuations or dyskinesias were randomized to optimal drug therapy (ODT) (n=15) or DBS+ODT (n=15). Co-primary endpoints were the time to reach a 4-point worsening from baseline in the UPDRS-III off therapy and the change in levodopa equivalent daily dose from baseline to 24 months. Results As hypothesized, the mean UPDRS total and part III scores were not significantly different on or off therapy at 24 months. The DBS+ODT group took less medication at all time points, and this reached maximum difference at 18 months. With a few exceptions, differences in neuropsychological functioning were not significant. Two subjects in the DBS+ODT group suffered serious adverse events; remaining adverse events were mild or transient. Conclusions This study demonstrates that subjects with early stage PD will enroll in and complete trials testing invasive therapies and provides preliminary evidence that DBS is well tolerated in early PD. The results of this trial provide the data necessary to design a large, phase III, double-blind, multicenter trial investigating the safety and efficacy of DBS in early PD. PMID:24768120

  20. Effects of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation and levodopa on energy production rate and substrate oxidation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Perlemoine, Caroline; Macia, Frédéric; Tison, François; Coman, Isabelle; Guehl, Dominique; Burbaud, Pierre; Cuny, Emmanuel; Baillet, Laurence; Gin, Henri; Rigalleau, Vincent

    2005-02-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often lose weight, but after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), they gain weight. We compared daily energy intake (DEI), resting energy expenditure (REE) and substrate oxidation rates (measured by indirect calorimetry) in nineteen STN-DBS-treated patients (Group S), thirteen others on pharmacologic treatment by levodopa (Group L) and eight control subjects. We also determined the acute effects of STN-DBS and levodopa on REE and substrate oxidation rates. STN-DBS treated patients gained 9.7 (SEM 7.1) kg after surgery, whereas patients on pharmacologic treatment lost 3.8 (SEM 10.0) kg since diagnosis. In STN-DBS-treated patients, REE (-16.5 %; P<0.001), lipid oxidation (-27 %; P<0.05) and protein oxidation (-46 %; P<0.05) were decreased, whereas glucose oxidation was elevated (+81 %; P<0.05) as compared to patients on pharmacologic treatment. Levodopa acutely reduced REE (-8.3 %; P<0.05) and glucose oxidation (-37 %; P<0.01) with a slight hyperglycaemic effect (after levodopa challenge: 5.6 (SEM 0.8) v. before levodopa challenge: 5.3 (SEM 0.6) mmol/l; P<0.01). Switching 'on' STN-DBS acutely reduced REE (-17.5 %; P<0.01) and lipid oxidation (-24 %; P<0.001) 30 min after starting stimulation. Fasting glycaemia was slightly but significantly reduced (5.4 (SEM 1.4) v. 5.5 (SEM 1.3) mmol/l; P<0.01). After STN-DBS, the normalization of REE and the reduction in lipid and protein oxidation contribute to the restoration of weight. As levodopa decreases glucose oxidation, the reduction in daily dose of levodopa in STN-DBS-treated patients helps prevent the effect of weight gain on glycaemia.

  1. Modulation of motor cortex neuronal activity and motor behavior during subthalamic nucleus stimulation in the normal primate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Luke A; Xu, Weidong; Baker, Kenneth B; Zhang, Jianyu; Vitek, Jerrold L

    2015-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a well-established surgical therapy for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). An emerging hypothesis is that the therapeutic benefit of DBS is derived from direct modulation of primary motor cortex (M1), yet little is known about the influence of STN DBS on individual neurons in M1. We investigated the effect of STN DBS, delivered at discrete interval intensities (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100%) of corticospinal tract threshold (CSTT), on motor performance and M1 neuronal activity in a naive nonhuman primate. Motor performance during a food reach and retrieval task improved during low-intensity stimulation (20% CSTT) but worsened as intensity approached the threshold for activation of corticospinal fibers (80% and 100% CSTT). To assess cortical effects of STN DBS, spontaneous, extracellular neuronal activity was collected from M1 neurons before, during, and after DBS at the same CSTT stimulus intensities. STN DBS significantly modulated the firing of a majority of M1 neurons; however, the direction of effect varied with stimulus intensity such that, at 20% CSTT, most neurons were suppressed, whereas at the highest stimulus intensities the majority of neurons were activated. At a population level, firing rates increased as stimulus intensity increased. These results show that STN DBS influences both motor performance and M1 neuronal activity systematically according to stimulus intensity. In addition, the unanticipated reduction in reach times suggests that STN DBS, at stimulus intensities lower than typically used for treatment of PD motor signs, can enhance normal motor performance.

  2. Effect of glutamate stimulation of the cuneiform nucleus on cardiovascular regulation in anesthetized rats: role of the pontine Kolliker-Fuse nucleus.

    PubMed

    Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Nasimi, Ali

    2011-04-18

    Cuneiform nucleus (CnF) is a reticular nucleus of the midbrain involved in cardiovascular function and stress. There is no report on the cardiovascular effects of the glutamatergic system in the CnF. In the present study, we investigated the cardiovascular effects of glutamate and its NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors in the CnF. In addition, the possible mediation of Kolliker-Fuse (KF) nucleus in the cardiovascular effects of the CnF was explored. l-glutamate, AP5 (an NMDA receptor antagonist), and CNQX (an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist) (50-100 nl) were microinjected into the CnF of anesthetized rats. Also, the KF was blocked by cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) then l-glutamate was microinjected into the CnF. The maximum changes of blood pressure and heart rate were compared with the pre-injection (paired t-test) and control (independent t-test) values. Microinjection of glutamate (25 nmol/100 nl) into the CnF produced either a short pressor and bradycardic or a long pressor and tachycardic responses. Microinjection of AP5 or CNQX alone did not affect the basal arterial pressure and heart rate. However, co-injection of glutamate with AP5 strongly attenuated the short and moderately attenuated the long cardiovascular responses elicited by glutamate. Co-injection of glutamate with CNQX did not attenuate the short and weakly attenuated the long cardiovascular responses elicited by glutamate. These data suggest that the responses are mediated mainly through NMDA receptors. Blockade of the KF nucleus strongly attenuated the short response and weakly attenuated the long response to glutamate microinjection, suggesting that the cardiovascular effects of glutamate in the CnF, especially the short responses, were mediated by the KF nucleus. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Nucleus Accumbens Core Affects Trait Impulsivity in a Baseline-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Schippers, Maria C.; Bruinsma, Bastiaan; Gaastra, Mathijs; Mesman, Tanja I.; Denys, Damiaan; De Vries, Taco J.; Pattij, Tommy

    2017-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NA) is explored as a treatment for refractory psychiatric disorders, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), depressive disorder (MDD), and substance use disorder (SUD). A common feature of some of these disorders is pathological impulsivity. Here, the effects of NAcore DBS on impulsive choice and impulsive action, two distinct forms of impulsive behavior, were investigated in translational animal tasks, the delayed reward task (DRT) and five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), respectively. In both tasks, the effects of NAcore DBS were negatively correlated with baseline impulsive behavior, with more pronounced effects in the 5-CSRTT. To further examine the effects of DBS on trait impulsive action, rats were screened for high (HI) and low (LI) impulsive responding in the 5-CSRTT. NAcore DBS decreased impulsive, premature responding in HI rats under conventional conditions. However, upon challenged conditions to increase impulsive responding, NAcore DBS did not alter impulsivity. These results strongly suggest a baseline-dependent effect of DBS on impulsivity, which is in line with clinical observations. PMID:28386221

  4. Cognitive Changes following Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation of Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Meng, Xiangyu; Xiao, Jinsong; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Junjian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nowadays, it has been largely acknowledged that deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) can alleviate motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, but its effects on cognitive function remain unclear, which are not given enough attention by many clinical doctors and researchers. To date, 3 existing meta-analyses focusing on this issue included self-control studies and have not drawn consistent conclusions. The present study is the first to compare effect sizes of primary studies that include control groups, hoping to reveal the net cognitive outcomes after STN DBS and the clinical significance. Methods. A structured literature search was conducted using strict criteria. Only studies with control group could be included. Data on age, duration of disease, levodopa equivalent dosage (LED), and multiple cognitive scales were collected and pooled. Results. Of 172 articles identified, 10 studies (including 3 randomized controlled trials and 7 nonrandomized controlled studies) were eligible for inclusion. The results suggest that STN DBS results in decreased global cognition, memory, verbal fluency, and executive function compared with control group. No significant difference is found in other cognitive domains. Conclusions. STN DBS seems relatively safe with respect to cognitive function, and further studies should focus on the exact mechanisms of possible verbal deterioration after surgery in the future.

  5. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT®LOUD) for Parkinson’s disease following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Intensive voice therapy (LSVT®LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes for surgical subjects were comparable to non-surgical cohorts. Methods Eight subjects with PD (four with STN-DBS and four without) received LSVT LOUD four times a week for four weeks. Four additional subjects with PD remained untreated. Voice intensity (SPL), Vowel Articulation Index (VAI), the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and a structured interview were evaluated before and after treatment and again six months later. Results Both treated groups showed significant increases in SPL from pre to post and six-month follow up. VAI was significantly higher for the treated groups compared to the untreated subjects at follow up. Several treated individuals had significant clinical improvement in VHI scores, particularly within the LSVT-DBS group. Treated individuals reported improvements in voice and speech in structured interviews; however, answers suggest more variable long-term maintenance within the LSVT-DBS group. The untreated group exhibited no significant changes in any measure throughout the study. Conclusions Results support LSVT LOUD for treating voice and speech in individuals with PD following STN-DBS surgery. However, modifications may be required to maintain functional improvements. PMID:21724193

  6. Comparison of Globus Pallidus Interna and Subthalamic Nucleus in Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson Disease: An Institutional Experience and Review

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Umar; Dewey III, Richard; Dewey, Richard B.; Miocinovic, Svjetlana

    2017-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has revolutionized the lives of patients of Parkinson disease, offering therapeutic options to those not benefiting entirely from medications alone. With its proven track record of outperforming the best medical management, the goal is to unlock the full potential of this therapy. Currently, the Globus Pallidus Interna (GPi) and Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) are both viable targets for DBS, and the choice of site should focus on the constellation of symptoms, both motor and nonmotor, which are key determinants to quality of life. Our article sheds light on the specific advantages and drawbacks of the two sites, highlighting the need for matching the inherent properties of a target with specific desired effects in patients. UT Southwestern Medical Center has a robust and constantly evolving DBS program and the narrative from our center provides invaluable insight into the practical realities of DBS. The ultimate decision in selecting a DBS target is complex, ideally made by a multidisciplinary team, tailored towards each patient's profile and their expectations, by drawing upon scientific evidence coupled with experience. Ongoing research is expanding our knowledge base, which should be dynamically incorporated into an institute's DBS paradigm to ensure that patients receive the optimal therapy. PMID:28706748

  7. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Early Stage Parkinson's Disease Is Not Associated with Increased Body Mass Index.

    PubMed

    Millan, Sarah H; Hacker, Mallory L; Turchan, Maxim; Molinari, Anna L; Currie, Amanda D; Charles, David

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD) leads to weight gain. This study analyzes changes in body mass index (BMI) in 29 subjects from a prospective, single-blind trial of DBS in early stage PD (age 50-75, Hoehn & Yahr stage II off medication, treated with antiparkinsonian medications for ≥6 months but <4 years, and without a history of motor fluctuations, dyskinesias, or dementia). Subjects were randomized to DBS plus optimal drug therapy (DBS+ODT; n = 15) or ODT (n = 14) and followed for 24 months. Weight and height were recorded at baseline and each follow-up visit and used to calculate BMI. BMIs were compared within and between groups using nonparametric t-tests. Mean BMI at baseline was 29.7 in the ODT group and 32.3 in the DBS+ODT group (p > 0.05). BMI change over two years was not different between the groups (p = 0.62, ODT = -0.89; DBS+ODT = -0.17). This study suggests that STN-DBS is not associated with weight gain in subjects with early stage PD. This finding will be tested in an upcoming FDA-approved phase III multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pivotal clinical trial evaluating DBS in early stage PD (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00282152).

  8. Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects on Diadochokinetic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Unger, Elin; Wahlgren, Sofia; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; Zafar, Hamayun; van Doorn, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The hypokinetic dysarthria observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) affects the range, speed, and accuracy of articulatory gestures in patients, reducing the perceived quality of speech acoustic output in continuous speech. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) and of the caudal zona incerta (cZi-DBS) are current surgical treatment options for PD. This study aimed at investigating the outcome of STN-DBS (7 patients) and cZi-DBS (7 patients) in two articulatory diadochokinesis tasks (AMR and SMR) using measurements of articulation rate and quality of the plosive consonants (using the percent measurable VOT metric). The results indicate that patients receiving STN-DBS increased in articulation rate in the Stim-ON condition in the AMR task only, with no effect on production quality. Patients receiving cZi-DBS decreased in articulation rate in the Stim-ON condition and further showed a reduction in production quality. The data therefore suggest that cZi-DBS is more detrimental for extended articulatory movements than STN-DBS. PMID:22007342

  9. Deep Brain Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus does not negatively affect social cognitive abilities of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Enrici, Ivan; Mitkova, Antonia; Castelli, Lorys; Lanotte, Michele; Lopiano, Leonardo; Adenzato, Mauro

    2017-08-25

    Bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a treatment option for patients with advanced idiopathic PD successful at alleviating disabling motor symptoms. Nevertheless, the effects of STN-DBS on cognitive functions remain controversial and few studies have investigated modification of social cognitive abilities in patients with PD treated with STN-DBS. Here we expanded the typically-investigated spectrum of these abilities by simultaneously examining emotion recognition, and both affective and cognitive Theory of Mind (ToM). By means of a cross-sectional study, 20 patients with PD under dopaminergic replacement therapy, 18 patients with PD treated with STN-DBS, and 20 healthy controls performed the Ekman 60-Faces test, the full version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test, and the Protocol for the Attribution of Communicative Intentions. There were no differences between the PD groups (treated and not treated with STN-DBS) on any of the social cognitive tests. Our results suggest that patients with PD who are treated with STN-DBS do not experience detrimental effects on their social cognitive abilities. The present study, the first one examining a wide spectrum of social cognitive abilities after DBS of the STN, suggests that this surgical procedure can be considered safe from this standpoint.

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Lateral Cerebellar Nucleus Produces Frequency-Specific Alterations in Motor Evoked Potentials in the Rat In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kenneth B.; Schuster, Daniel; Cooperrider, Jessica; Machado, Andre G.

    2010-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is tightly and reciprocally linked to the cerebellum and the ascending dentato-thalalmo-cortical pathway influences widespread cortical regions. Using a rodent model of middle cerebral artery stroke, we showed previously that chronic, 20 Hz stimulation of the contralateral lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN) improved motor recovery, while 50 Hz stimulation did not. Using motor evoked potentials (MEP) elicited by intracortical microstimulation, we now show the effect of LCN stimulation on motor cortex excitability as a function of pulse frequency in propofol-anesthetized rats. MEPs were recorded serially, at 15-second intervals, with cerebellar stimulation delivered in 10-minute blocks at rates of 20, 30, 40, 50 or 100 Hz. Stimulation at 20, 30, 40 or 50 Hz enhanced the average MEP response across the block, with the maximal overall increase observed during 30 Hz stimulation. However, the effect varied as a function of both repeated trials within the block and LCN stimulation frequency, such that 40 Hz and 50 Hz stimulation showed a reduced effect over time. Stimulation at 100 Hz produced a transient increase in MEP amplitude in some animals; however the overall effect across the block was a trend towards reduced cortical excitability. These results suggest that direct stimulation of the LCN can yield frequency-dependent changes in cortical excitability and may provide a therapeutic approach to modulating cortical activity for the treatment of strokes or other focal cortical lesions, movement disorders and epilepsy. PMID:20816822

  11. The MDS-UPDRS tracks motor and non-motor improvement due to subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kelvin L; Taylor, Jennifer L; Patil, Parag G

    2013-11-01

    The Movement Disorders Society revision of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) improves upon the original UPDRS by adding more non-motor items, making it a more robust tool to evaluate the severity of motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson disease. Previous studies on deep brain stimulation have not used the MDS-UPDRS. To determine if the MDS-UPDRS could detect improvement in both motor and non-motor symptoms after bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson disease. We compared scores on the entire MDS-UPDRS prior to surgery (baseline) and approximately six months following the initial programming visit in twenty subjects (12M/8F) with Parkinson disease undergoing bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. STN DBS significantly improved the scores for every section of the MDS-UPDRS at the 6 month follow-up. Part I improved by 3.1 points (22%), Part II by 5.3 points (29%), Part III by 13.1 points (29%) with stimulation alone, and Part IV by 7.1 points (74%). Individual non-motor items in Part I that improved significantly were constipation, light-headedness, and fatigue. Both motor and non-motor symptoms, as assessed by the MDS-UPDRS, improve with bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation six months after the stimulator is turned on. We recommend that the MDS-UPDRS be utilized in future deep brain stimulation studies because of the advantage of detecting change in non-motor symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. MSG-Evoked c-Fos Activity in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Is Dependent upon Fluid Delivery and Stimulation Parameters.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Jennifer M; Thompson, John A

    2016-03-01

    The marker of neuronal activation, c-Fos, can be used to visualize spatial patterns of neural activity in response to taste stimulation. Because animals will not voluntarily consume aversive tastes, these stimuli are infused directly into the oral cavity via intraoral cannulae, whereas appetitive stimuli are given in drinking bottles. Differences in these 2 methods make comparison of taste-evoked brain activity between results that utilize these methods problematic. Surprisingly, the intraoral cannulae experimental conditions that produce a similar pattern of c-Fos activity in response to taste stimulation remain unexplored. Stimulation pattern (e.g., constant/intermittent) and hydration state (e.g., water-restricted/hydrated) are the 2 primary differences between delivering tastes via bottles versus intraoral cannulae. Thus, we quantified monosodium glutamate (MSG)-evoked brain activity, as measured by c-Fos, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS; primary taste nucleus) across several conditions. The number and pattern of c-Fos neurons in the nTS of animals that were water-restricted and received a constant infusion of MSG via intraoral cannula most closely mimicked animals that consumed MSG from a bottle. Therefore, in order to compare c-Fos activity between cannulae-stimulated and bottle-stimulated animals, cannulated animals should be water restricted prior to stimulation, and receive taste stimuli at a constant flow.

  13. Electrical stimulation of cerebellar fastigial nucleus promotes the expression of growth arrest and DNA damage inducible gene β and motor function recovery in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Li, Jianrui; Li, Longling; Yu, Lehua; Li, Changqing

    2012-06-27

    This study focused on the effects of electrical stimulation of cerebellar fastigial nucleus on the expression of growth arrest and DNA damage inducible gene β (Gadd45β) and on motor function recovery after focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in rats. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham I/R (control group), I/R (I/R group), I/R with sham stimulation and I/R with electrical stimulation at 6h, 12h, 24h, 2d and 3d after I/R. Cerebral ischemia and reperfusion was established by nylon monofilament occlusion method. Fastigial nucleus (FN) electrical stimulation was applied at 2h after ischemia for 1h. The changes in the expression of Gadd45β were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western-blot respectively. Another group of rats were divided into the same 4 groups. Montoya staircase test score was used to test the motor function of affected forelimb. The levels of Gadd45β were significantly elevated after I/R injury. FN electrical stimulation treatment elevated the expression of Gadd45β further and improved motor function recovery. These results suggest that FN electrical stimulation can promote the expression of Gadd45β and motor function recovery after focal cerebral ischemia.

  14. MSG-Evoked c-Fos Activity in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Is Dependent upon Fluid Delivery and Stimulation Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The marker of neuronal activation, c-Fos, can be used to visualize spatial patterns of neural activity in response to taste stimulation. Because animals will not voluntarily consume aversive tastes, these stimuli are infused directly into the oral cavity via intraoral cannulae, whereas appetitive stimuli are given in drinking bottles. Differences in these 2 methods make comparison of taste-evoked brain activity between results that utilize these methods problematic. Surprisingly, the intraoral cannulae experimental conditions that produce a similar pattern of c-Fos activity in response to taste stimulation remain unexplored. Stimulation pattern (e.g., constant/intermittent) and hydration state (e.g., water-restricted/hydrated) are the 2 primary differences between delivering tastes via bottles versus intraoral cannulae. Thus, we quantified monosodium glutamate (MSG)-evoked brain activity, as measured by c-Fos, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS; primary taste nucleus) across several conditions. The number and pattern of c-Fos neurons in the nTS of animals that were water-restricted and received a constant infusion of MSG via intraoral cannula most closely mimicked animals that consumed MSG from a bottle. Therefore, in order to compare c-Fos activity between cannulae-stimulated and bottle-stimulated animals, cannulated animals should be water restricted prior to stimulation, and receive taste stimuli at a constant flow. PMID:26762887

  15. The integration of neural information by a passive kinetic stimulus and galvanic vestibular stimulation in the lateral vestibular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyutae; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Lee, Sangmin

    2017-02-07

    Despite an easy control and the direct effects on vestibular neurons, the clinical applications of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) have been restricted because of its unclear activities as input. On the other hand, some critical conclusions have been made in the peripheral and the central processing of neural information by kinetic stimuli with different motion frequencies. Nevertheless, it is still elusive how the neural responses to simultaneous GVS and kinetic stimulus are modified during transmission and integration at the central vestibular area. To understand how the neural information was transmitted and integrated, we examined the neuronal responses to GVS, kinetic stimulus, and their combined stimulus in the vestibular nucleus. The neuronal response to each stimulus was recorded, and its responding features (amplitude and baseline) were extracted by applying the curve fitting based on a sinusoidal function. Twenty-five (96.2%) comparisons of the amplitudes showed that the amplitudes decreased during the combined stimulus (p < 0.001). However, the relations in the amplitudes (slope = 0.712) and the baselines (slope = 0.747) were linear. The neuronal effects by the different stimuli were separately estimated; the changes of the amplitudes were mainly caused by the kinetic stimulus and those of the baselines were largely influenced by GVS. Therefore, the slopes in the comparisons implied the neural sensitivity to the applied stimuli. Using the slopes, we found that the reduced amounts of the neural information were transmitted. Overall, the comparisons of the responding features demonstrated the linearity and the subadditivity in the neural transmission.

  16. Release of Norepinephrine in the Preoptic Area Activates Anteroventral Periventricular Nucleus Neurons and Stimulates the Surge of Luteinizing Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Poletini, Maristela O.; Leite, Cristiane M.; Bernuci, Marcelo P.; Kalil, Bruna; Mendonça, Leonardo B.D.; Carolino, Ruither O. G.; Helena, Cleyde V. V.; Bertram, Richard; Franci, Celso R.; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A.

    2013-01-01

    The role of norepinephrine (NE) in regulation of LH is still controversial. We investigated the role played by NE in the positive feedback of estradiol and progesterone. Ovarian-steroid control over NE release in the preoptic area (POA) was determined using microdialysis. Compared with ovariectomized (OVX) rats, estradiol-treated OVX (OVX+E) rats displayed lower release of NE in the morning but increased release coincident with the afternoon surge of LH. OVX rats treated with estradiol and progesterone (OVX+EP) exhibited markedly greater NE release than OVX+E rats, and amplification of the LH surge. The effect of NE on LH secretion was confirmed using reverse microdialysis. The LH surge and c-Fos expression in anteroventral periventricular nucleus neurons were significantly increased in OVX+E rats dialyzed with 100 nm NE in the POA. After Fluoro-Gold injection in the POA, c-Fos expression in Fluoro-Gold/tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons increased during the afternoon in the A2 of both OVX+E and OVX+EP rats, in the locus coeruleus (LC) of OVX+EP rats, but was unchanged in the A1. The selective lesion of LC terminals, by intracerebroventricular N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine, reduced the surge of LH in OVX+EP but not in OVX+E rats. Thus, estradiol and progesterone activate A2 and LC neurons, respectively, and this is associated with the increased release of NE in the POA and the magnitude of the LH surge. NE stimulates LH secretion, at least in part, through activation of anteroventral periventricular neurons. These findings contribute to elucidation of the role played by NE during the positive feedback of ovarian steroids. PMID:23150494

  17. Movement-Related Discharge in the Macaque Globus Pallidus during High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zimnik, Andrew J.; Nora, Gerald J.; Desmurget, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) has largely replaced ablative therapies for Parkinson's disease. Because of the similar efficacies of the two treatments, it has been proposed that DBS acts by creating an “informational lesion,” whereby pathologic neuronal firing patterns are replaced by low-entropy, stimulus-entrained firing patterns. The informational lesion hypothesis, in its current form, states that DBS blocks the transmission of all information from the basal ganglia, including both pathologic firing patterns and normal, task-related modulations in activity. We tested this prediction in two healthy rhesus macaques by recording single-unit spiking activity from the globus pallidus (232 neurons) while the animals completed choice reaction time reaching movements with and without STN-DBS. Despite strong effects of DBS on the activity of most pallidal cells, reach-related modulations in firing rate were equally prevalent in the DBS-on and DBS-off states. This remained true even when the analysis was restricted to cells affected significantly by DBS. In addition, the overall form and timing of perimovement modulations in firing rate were preserved between DBS-on and DBS-off states in the majority of neurons (66%). Active movement and DBS had largely additive effects on the firing rate of most neurons, indicating an orthogonal relationship in which both inputs contribute independently to the overall firing rate of pallidal neurons. These findings suggest that STN-DBS does not act as an indiscriminate informational lesion but rather as a filter that permits task-related modulations in activity while, presumably, eliminating the pathological firing associated with parkinsonism. PMID:25740526

  18. Deep-Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Selectively Decreases Risky Choice in Risk-Preferring Rats.

    PubMed

    Adams, Wendy K; Vonder Haar, Cole; Tremblay, Melanie; Cocker, Paul J; Silveira, Mason M; Kaur, Sukhbir; Baunez, Christelle; Winstanley, Catharine A

    2017-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) can improve the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and negate the problematic side effects of dopamine replacement therapy. Although there is concern that STN-DBS may enhance the development of gambling disorder and other impulse control disorders in this patient group, recent data suggest that STN-DBS may actually reduce iatrogenic impulse control disorders, and alleviate obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here, we sought to determine whether STN-DBS was beneficial or detrimental to performance of the rat gambling task (rGT), a rodent analogue of the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) used to assess risky decision making clinically. Rats chose between four options associated with different amounts and probabilities of sugar pellet rewards versus timeout punishments. As in the IGT, the optimal approach was to favor options associated with smaller per-trial gains but lower timeout penalties. Once a stable behavioral baseline was established, electrodes were implanted bilaterally into the STN, and the effects of STN-DBS assessed on-task over 10 consecutive sessions using an A-B-A design. STN-DBS did not affect choice in optimal decision makers that correctly favored options associated with smaller per-trial gains but also lower penalties. However, a minority (∼25%) preferred the maladaptive "high-risk, high-reward" options at baseline. STN-DBS significantly and progressively improved choice in these risk-preferring rats. These data support the hypothesis that STN-DBS may be beneficial in ameliorating maladaptive decision making associated with compulsive and addiction disorders.

  19. Release of norepinephrine in the preoptic area activates anteroventral periventricular nucleus neurons and stimulates the surge of luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Szawka, Raphael E; Poletini, Maristela O; Leite, Cristiane M; Bernuci, Marcelo P; Kalil, Bruna; Mendonça, Leonardo B D; Carolino, Ruither O G; Helena, Cleyde V V; Bertram, Richard; Franci, Celso R; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A

    2013-01-01

    The role of norepinephrine (NE) in regulation of LH is still controversial. We investigated the role played by NE in the positive feedback of estradiol and progesterone. Ovarian-steroid control over NE release in the preoptic area (POA) was determined using microdialysis. Compared with ovariectomized (OVX) rats, estradiol-treated OVX (OVX+E) rats displayed lower release of NE in the morning but increased release coincident with the afternoon surge of LH. OVX rats treated with estradiol and progesterone (OVX+EP) exhibited markedly greater NE release than OVX+E rats, and amplification of the LH surge. The effect of NE on LH secretion was confirmed using reverse microdialysis. The LH surge and c-Fos expression in anteroventral periventricular nucleus neurons were significantly increased in OVX+E rats dialyzed with 100 nm NE in the POA. After Fluoro-Gold injection in the POA, c-Fos expression in Fluoro-Gold/tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons increased during the afternoon in the A2 of both OVX+E and OVX+EP rats, in the locus coeruleus (LC) of OVX+EP rats, but was unchanged in the A1. The selective lesion of LC terminals, by intracerebroventricular N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine, reduced the surge of LH in OVX+EP but not in OVX+E rats. Thus, estradiol and progesterone activate A2 and LC neurons, respectively, and this is associated with the increased release of NE in the POA and the magnitude of the LH surge. NE stimulates LH secretion, at least in part, through activation of anteroventral periventricular neurons. These findings contribute to elucidation of the role played by NE during the positive feedback of ovarian steroids.

  20. An investigation into the effects and prognostic factors of cognitive decline following subthalamic nucleus stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nimura, Taro; Nagamatsu, Ken-Ichi; Ando, Tadashi; Matsumoto, Arifumi; Hisanaga, Kinya; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-10-01

    We retrospectively investigated the effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation (STN-DBS) on new postoperative onset of cognitive decline and prognostic factors for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). We studied 39 PD patients who had received bilateral STN-DBS. Clinical symptoms, cognitive function, psychiatric function, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were assessed before and six months after surgery. Based on the results of neuropsychological examinations six months after the surgery, the subjects were divided into those with and those without cognitive decline. We compared pre- and post-operative assessments between the two groups. Prognostic factors were investigated using multiple logistic regression analyses. Seven patients had cognitive decline six months after the operation (17.9%); they were significantly older than those without cognitive decline. Preoperative neuropsychological examinations revealed impairments in language and executive function. No differences were found in clinical symptoms. Patients with cognitive decline had significantly worse apathy scale scores. The HRQOL revealed significant declines in the Mental Component Summary (MCS), vitality, and mental health (MH) domains. Postoperative comparisons revealed novel significant differences in activities of daily living in the "on" and "off" states and in daytime drowsiness. Preoperative differences seen in the MCS and vitality indices were no longer present. Word fluency, and apathy scale and MH scores were independent preoperative prognostic factors for cognitive decline. New postoperative onset of cognitive decline due to STN-DBS affected activities of daily living and psychiatric function. Preoperative non-motor symptoms may be prognostic factors for new onset of cognitive decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation effects on single and combined task performance in Parkinson's disease patients: a PET study.

    PubMed

    Atkinson-Clement, Cyril; Maillet, Audrey; LeBars, Didier; Lavenne, Franck; Redouté, Jérôme; Krainik, Alexandre; Pollak, Pierre; Thobois, Stéphane; Pinto, Serge

    2016-10-04

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) represents one of the most efficacious treatments for Parkinson's disease, along with L-dopa therapy. The objective of the present work was to identify the cerebral networks associated with hand movement and speech production tasks performed alone and simultaneously, as well as the effects of STN-DBS on these profiles. Clinical, behavioral, and neuroimaging (oxygen 15-labeled water and Positron Emission Tomography) investigations were used to study single and combined performances of unilateral hand movements and speech production in 11 unmedicated individuals with PD, both off and on STN-DBS. Specifically, a flexible factorial design with the tasks (hand movement, speech production, combined task) and the STN-DBS conditions (off, on) as main factors was chosen for brain activation statistical analysis, using a Family-Wise Error corrected p-value at the cluster level of at least 10 contiguous voxels. Increased activation of fronto-parietal and cingulate areas was observed under STN-DBS for hand movement in single and combined tasks, respectively, reflecting a partial restoration of cortico-sub-cortical connections. The lack of results for speech production for both off and on STN-DBS could illustrate its relatively poor response to the treatment. STN-DBS tended to restore the additive function capacity that can be achieved when performing the combined task. We confirmed with original neuroimaging data that speech is much less responsive to STN-DBS than any other motor function and we concluded that speech outcomes following STN-DBS can be different from those observed pre-operatively following L-dopa administration.

  2. Elastic and viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues on the implanting trajectory of sub-thalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Deng, Jianxin; Zhou, Jun; Li, Xueen

    2016-11-01

    Corresponding to pre-puncture and post-puncture insertion, elastic and viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues on the implanting trajectory of sub-thalamic nucleus stimulation are investigated, respectively. Elastic mechanical properties in pre-puncture are investigated through pre-puncture needle insertion experiments using whole porcine brains. A linear polynomial and a second order polynomial are fitted to the average insertion force in pre-puncture. The Young's modulus in pre-puncture is calculated from the slope of the two fittings. Viscoelastic mechanical properties of brain tissues in post-puncture insertion are investigated through indentation stress relaxation tests for six interested regions along a planned trajectory. A linear viscoelastic model with a Prony series approximation is fitted to the average load trace of each region using Boltzmann hereditary integral. Shear relaxation moduli of each region are calculated using the parameters of the Prony series approximation. The results show that, in pre-puncture insertion, needle force almost increases linearly with needle displacement. Both fitting lines can perfectly fit the average insertion force. The Young's moduli calculated from the slope of the two fittings are worthy of trust to model linearly or nonlinearly instantaneous elastic responses of brain tissues, respectively. In post-puncture insertion, both region and time significantly affect the viscoelastic behaviors. Six tested regions can be classified into three categories in stiffness. Shear relaxation moduli decay dramatically in short time scales but equilibrium is never truly achieved. The regional and temporal viscoelastic mechanical properties in post-puncture insertion are valuable for guiding probe insertion into each region on the implanting trajectory.

  3. MEK5 and ERK5 are localized in the nuclei of resting as well as stimulated cells, while MEKK2 translocates from the cytosol to the nucleus upon stimulation.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Ziv; Kalie, Eyal; Seger, Rony

    2004-04-01

    The ERK5 signaling cascade acts through sequential activation of MEKK2/3, MEK5 and ERK5 and transmits signals to a variety of stress and mitogenic related targets. In this study we examined the subcellular localization of the components of the ERK5 cascade and found that in resting, as well as in EGF-stimulated HeLa and Rat-1 cells, endogenous ERK5 is localized mainly in the nucleus. This location is different from the previously described location of exogenous ERK5, in the cytosol of resting cells, which is confirmed in this study. The reason for the different localization could be a saturation of anchoring moieties by the endogenous ERK5. Indeed, in situ detergent extraction analysis using Nonidet P-40, revealed that ERK5 is bound to detergent resistant moieties in the nucleus, while the exogenous protein fails to interact with those anchors. The upstream activator MEK5 is also localized in the nucleus both before and after EGF stimulation and is resistant to NP-40 extraction in resting cells. ERK5 remains bound to these nuclear moieties even after stimulation, while MEK5 is detached from the anchors but remains localized in the nucleus. Unlike ERK5 and MEK5, their upstream activator MEKK2 is localized mainly in the cytosol of resting cells, and translocates into the nucleus upon EGF stimulation, allowing transmission of signals to the nuclear MEK5. The nuclear localization of MEK5 and ERK5 is different from that of ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 in resting cells, indicating that each MAPK cascade uses distinct mechanisms to transmit extracellular signals to their nuclear targets.

  4. Meta-analysis comparing deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus and subthalamic nucleus to treat advanced Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Li, Weina; Tan, Changhong; Liu, Xi; Wang, Xin; Gui, Yuejiang; Qin, Lu; Deng, Fen; Hu, Changlin; Chen, Lifen

    2014-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the surgical procedure of choice for patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD). The globus pallidus internus (GPi) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are commonly targeted by this procedure. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy of DBS in each region. MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge, and the Cochrane Library were searched for English-language studies published before April 2013. of studies investigating the efficacy and clinical outcomes of DBS of the GPi and STN for PD were analyzed. Six eligible trials containing a total of 563 patients were included in the analysis. Deep brain stimulation of the GPi or STN equally improved motor function, measured by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Section III (UPDRSIII) (motor section, for patients in on- and off-medication phases), within 1 year postsurgery. The change score for the on-medication phase was 0.68 (95% CI - 2.12 to 3.47, p > 0.05; 5 studies, 518 patients) and for the off-medication phase was 1.83 (95% CI - 3.12 to 6.77, p > 0.05; 5 studies, 518 patients). The UPDRS Section II (activities of daily living) scores for patients on medication improved equally in both DBS groups (p = 0.97). STN DBS allowed medication dosages to be reduced more than GPi DBS (95% CI 129.27-316.64, p < 0.00001; 5 studies, 540 patients). Psychiatric symptoms, measured by Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition scores, showed greater improvement from baseline after GPi DBS than after STN DBS (standardized mean difference -2.28, 95% CI -3.73 to -0.84, p = 0.002; 3 studies, 382 patients). GPi and STN DBS improve motor function and activities of daily living for PD patients. Differences in therapeutic efficacy for PD were not observed between the 2 procedures. STN DBS allowed greater reduction in medication for patients, whereas GPi DBS provided greater relief from psychiatric symptoms. An understanding of other symptomatic aspects of targeting each region and long

  5. High Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Leads to Presynaptic GABA(B)-Dependent Depression of Subthalamo-Nigral Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Dvorzhak, Anton; Gertler, Christoph; Harnack, Daniel; Grantyn, Rosemarie

    2013-01-01

    Patients with akinesia benefit from chronic high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Among the mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic success of HFS-STN might be a suppression of activity in the output region of the basal ganglia. Indeed, recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) of fully adult mice revealed that HFS-STN consistently produced a reduction of compound glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents at a time when the tetrodotoxin-sensitive components of the local field potentials had already recovered after the high frequency activation. These observations suggest that HFS-STN not only alters action potential conduction on the way towards the SNr but also modifies synaptic transmission within the SNr. A classical conditioning-test paradigm was then designed to better separate the causes from the indicators of synaptic depression. A bipolar platinum-iridium macroelectrode delivered conditioning HFS trains to a larger group of fibers in the STN, while a separate high-ohmic glass micropipette in the rostral SNr provided test stimuli at minimal intensity to single fibers. The conditioning-test interval was set to 100 ms, i.e. the time required to recover the excitability of subthalamo-nigral axons after HFS-STN. The continuity of STN axons passing from the conditioning to the test sites was examined by an action potential occlusion test. About two thirds of the subthalamo-nigral afferents were occlusion-negative, i.e. they were not among the fibers directly activated by the conditioning STN stimulation. Nonetheless, occlusion-negative afferents exhibited signs of presynaptic depression that could be eliminated by blocking GABA(B) receptors with CGP55845 (1 µM). Further analysis of single fiber-activated responses supported the proposal that the heterosynaptic depression of synaptic glutamate release during and after HFS-STN is mainly caused by the tonic release of GABA from co-activated striato

  6. [The effect of electroacupuncture on the neuronal responses of the oral trigeminal nucleus in the cat during nociceptive and non-nociceptive stimulation].

    PubMed

    Dolgikh, V G; Reshetniak, V K

    1989-12-01

    Effects of electroacupuncture (EAP) on the responses of different functional types of neurons of the oral trigeminal nucleus (OTN) by nociceptive and non-nociceptive stimulation were studied in acute experiments on adult cats. It was demonstrated that the main part of neurons of the OTN is a wide dynamic range of neurons. Characteristic feature of the OTN is neurons with low-threshold pulp afferent input. EAP inhibit nociceptive responses of neurons (preferentially nonspecific neurons), while responses to non-nociceptive stimulation are not changed at all. The results are discussed from the point of view that OTN takes part in nociceptive and non-nociceptive reactions.

  7. Lateral hypothalamic area stimulation excites neurons in the region of the subfornical organ with efferent projections to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, J; Kaba, H; Saito, H; Seto, K

    1986-07-30

    Fifteen neurons in the region of the subfornical organ (SFO) were antidromically activated by electrical stimulation of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in the rat. Electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) excited the activity of 9 of the identified units, but did not affect the remaining units. The excitatory response of the identified units was blocked by microiontophoretically (MIPh) applied saralasin (Sar), an angiotensin II (ANGII) antagonist, but not by atropine (Atr), a muscarinic antagonist. These results suggest that the LHA has an excitatory influence on the activity of neurons in the region of the SFO with efferent projections to the PVN and that the influence may be mediated by ANGII receptors.

  8. The effect of blockade of dopamine receptors on the inhibition of episodic luteinizing hormone release during electrical stimulation of the arcuate nucleus in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Gallo, R V

    1978-04-01

    This study examined the possible involvement of dopamine (DA) in mediating the inhibition of episodic LH release that occurs during electrical stimulation of the arcuate nucleus (ARH) in ovariectomized rats. Animals were treated before stimulation with pimozide (1.26--2.0 mg/kg) or d-butaclamol (1 mg/kg), blockers of DA receptors, or l-butaclamol. Apomorphine, which inhibits episodic LH release by activating DA receptors, was given near the end of the experiment to determine if these receptors were blocked. ARH stimulation suppressed pulsatile LH release in six rats when DA receptors were not blocked by pimozide (as well as two in which blockade was not tested). A transient increase occurred in one other animal. When DA receptors were blocked by pimozide, stimulation of the ARH inhibited episodic LH release in nine rats, suggesting that DA may have no role in mediating this inhibition. However, because increased LH release occurred in five additional animals, as well as in one with partial receptor blockade, the possibility remains that DA may perhaps have a minor role in this inhibitory response. Although ARH stimulation increased LH release after DA receptor blockade by d-butaclamol, this effect could not be ascribed to the DA antagonist property of this agent, because elevated blood LH levels also occurred during stimulation in rats treated with l-butaclamol, in which DA receptors were not blocked. d- and l-butaclamol may possess a non-stereospecific action on a non-dopaminergic event, thus reversing the response to ARH stimulation. Finally, whether DA receptors were blocked or not by pimozide, d-, or l-butaclamol, activation of the ventromedial hypothalamic and periventricular nucleus regions suppressed episodic LH release, but did not increase LH secretion. This suggests that the region through which stimulation can inhibit, but not increase, LH release may extend in the hypothalamus to these two areas.

  9. Repeated cocaine enhances ventral hippocampal-stimulated dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens and alters ventral hippocampal NMDA receptor subunit expression.

    PubMed

    Barr, Jeffrey L; Forster, Gina L; Unterwald, Ellen M

    2014-08-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens is important for various reward-related cognitive processes including reinforcement learning. Repeated cocaine enhances hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and phasic elevations of accumbal dopamine evoked by unconditioned stimuli are dependent on impulse flow from the ventral hippocampus. Therefore, sensitized hippocampal activity may be one mechanism by which drugs of abuse enhance limbic dopaminergic activity. In this study, in vivo microdialysis in freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats was used to investigate the effect of repeated cocaine on ventral hippocampus-mediated dopaminergic transmission within the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens. Following seven daily injections of saline or cocaine (20 mg/kg, ip), unilateral infusion of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 0.5 μg) into the ventral hippocampus transiently increased both motoric activity and ipsilateral dopamine efflux in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens, and this effect was greater in rats that received repeated cocaine compared to controls that received repeated saline. In addition, repeated cocaine altered NMDA receptor subunit expression in the ventral hippocampus, reducing the NR2A : NR2B subunit ratio. Together, these results suggest that repeated exposure to cocaine produces maladaptive ventral hippocampal-nucleus accumbens communication, in part through changes in glutamate receptor composition. A behaviorally sensitizing regimen of cocaine (20 mg/kg, ip 7 days) also sensitized ventral hippocampus (hipp)-mediated dopaminergic transmission within the nucleus accumbens (Nac) to NMDA stimulation (bolts). This was associated with reduced ventral hippocampal NR2A:NR2B subunit ratio, suggesting that repeated exposure to cocaine produces changes in hippocampal NMDA receptor composition that lead to enhanced ventral hippocampus-nucleus accumbens communication.

  10. Pilot study assessing the feasibility of applying bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in very early stage Parkinson's disease: study design and rationale.

    PubMed

    Charles, David; Tolleson, Christopher; Davis, Thomas L; Gill, Chandler E; Molinari, Anna L; Bliton, Mark J; Tramontana, Michael G; Salomon, Ronald M; Kao, Chris; Wang, Lily; Hedera, Peter; Phibbs, Fenna T; Neimat, Joseph S; Konrad, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation provides significant symptomatic benefit for people with advanced Parkinson's disease whose symptoms are no longer adequately controlled with medication. Preliminary evidence suggests that subthalamic nucleus stimulation may also be efficacious in early Parkinson's disease, and results of animal studies suggest that it may spare dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. We report the methodology and design of a novel Phase I clinical trial testing the safety and tolerability of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease and discuss previous failed attempts at neuroprotection. We recently conducted a prospective, randomized, parallel-group, single-blind pilot clinical trial of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease. Subjects were randomized to receive either optimal drug therapy or deep brain stimulation plus optimal drug therapy. Follow-up visits occurred every six months for a period of two years and included week-long therapy washouts. Thirty subjects with Hoehn & Yahr Stage II idiopathic Parkinson's disease were enrolled over a period of 32 months. Twenty-nine subjects completed all follow-up visits; one patient in the optimal drug therapy group withdrew from the study after baseline. Baseline characteristics for all thirty patients were not significantly different. This study demonstrates that it is possible to recruit and retain subjects in a clinical trial testing deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease. The results of this trial will be used to support the design of a Phase III, multicenter trial investigating the efficacy of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease.

  11. Effects of Thalamic Reticular Nucleus Electrical Stimulation in Rats in a T-maze Perseverative Behavior Model Induced by 8-OH-DPAT.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Pablo; Carrillo-Ruiz, José D; Ramírez, Ylián; Jiménez, Fiacro

    2010-01-01

    Objective. Evaluate the possible decrease of chemically induced perseverative behavior in rats after electrical stimulation at different frequencies in the thalamic reticular nucleus. Material and Methods. A total of 28 male rats were divided in four groups: control, sham, OFF stimulation, and ON stimulation (450 µsec, 1 V, 6 and 120 Hz) that underwent the administration of saline solution and 8-OH-DPAT. The animals were evaluated in a T-maze model in which three choices or more in the same branch are considered as perseverative. Intragroup analysis was done through paired T-student and intergroup analysis through an ANOVA test. Results. The numbers of perseverations mean for the control group were 1.3 before and 1.4 post saline solution injections. Sham group mean of 1.3 pre and 3.4 post 8-OH-DPAT administration; OFF stimulation group 1.1 pre and 3.3 post 8-OH-DPAT administration; and for ON stimulation 1.1 pre and 1.9 post 8-OH-DPAT administration for stimulation at low frequency (6 Hz) and 3.4 at high frequency (120 Hz). Evident intergroup statistical differences were shown (p < 0.01). Conclusions. Electrical stimulation with the low-frequency group was the only group that after manipulation with 8-OH-DPAT showed a decrease in perseverative behavior, even close to baseline.

  12. Effects of medication and subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on tongue movements in speakers with Parkinson's disease using electropalatography: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hartinger, Mariam; Tripoliti, Elina; Hardcastle, William J; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects speech in the majority of patients. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is particularly effective in reducing tremor and rigidity. However, its effect on speech is variable. The aim of this pilot study was to quantify the effects of bilateral STN-DBS and medication on articulation, using electropalatography (EPG). Two patients, PT1 and PT2, were studied under four conditions: on and off medication and ON and OFF stimulation. The EPG protocol consisted of a number of target words with alveolar and velar stops, repeated 10 times in random order. The motor part III of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) indicated significantly improved motor scores in the ON stimulation condition in both patients. However, PT1's articulation patterns deteriorated with stimulation whereas PT2 showed improving articulatory accuracy in the same condition. The results revealed different effects of stimulation and medication on articulation particularly with regard to timing. The study quantified less articulatory undershoot for velar stops in comparison to alveolars. Furthermore, the findings provided preliminary evidence that stimulation with medication has a more detrimental effect on articulation than stimulation without medication.

  13. Single-unit analysis of the human posterior hypothalamus and red nucleus during deep brain stimulation for aggressivity.

    PubMed

    Micieli, Robert; Rios, Adriana Lucia Lopez; Aguilar, Ricardo Plata; Posada, Luis Fernando Botero; Hutchison, William D

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the posterior hypothalamus (PH) has been reported to be effective for aggressive behavior in a number of isolated cases. Few of these case studies have analyzed single-unit recordings in the human PH and none have quantitatively analyzed single units in the red nucleus (RN). The authors report on the properties of ongoing neuronal discharges in bilateral trajectories targeting the PH and the effectiveness of DBS of the PH as a treatment for aggressive behavior. METHODS DBS electrodes were surgically implanted in the PH of 1 awake patient with Sotos syndrome and 3 other anesthetized patients with treatment-resistant aggressivity. Intraoperative extracellular recordings were obtained from the ventral thalamus, PH, and RN and analyzed offline to discriminate single units and measure firing rates and firing patterns. Target location was based on the stereotactic coordinates used by Sano et al. in their 1970 study and the location of the dorsal border of the RN. RESULTS A total of 138 units were analyzed from the 4 patients. Most of the PH units had a slow, irregular discharge (mean [± SD] 4.5 ± 2.7 Hz, n = 68) but some units also had a higher discharge rate (16.7 ± 4.7 Hz, n = 15). Two populations of neurons were observed in the ventral thalamic region as well, one with a high firing rate (mean 16.5 ± 6.5 Hz, n = 5) and one with a low firing rate (mean 4.6 ± 2.8 Hz, n = 6). RN units had a regular firing rate with a mean of 20.4 ± 9.9 Hz and displayed periods of oscillatory activity in the beta range. PH units displayed a prolonged period of inhibition following microstimulation compared with RN units that were not inhibited. Patients under anesthesia showed a trend for lower firing rates in the PH but not in the RN. All 4 patients displayed a reduction in their aggressive behavior after surgery. CONCLUSIONS During PH DBS, microelectrode recordings can provide an additional mechanism to help identify the PH target and

  14. Responses of single units in the inferior olive to stimulation of the limb nerves, peripheral skin receptors, cerebellum, caudate nucleus and motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sedgwick, E. M.; Williams, T. D.

    1967-01-01

    1. Extra- and intracellular responses of single units in the inferior olive following stimulation of the cerebellum, limb nerves, skin receptors, the caudate nucleus and cerebral cortex have been described. 2. Responses following cerebellar stimulation were assumed to be antidromic spikes when they occurred after a latency of less than 4 msec and followed stimulus frequencies greater than 220/sec. Other responses with longer latencies were thought to be transynaptic. Evidence for recurrent inhibition of the Renshaw type is given. 3. Following limb nerve stimulation two types of units have been observed; units responding after a short latency and to stimulation of one limb only and units responding with a long latency following stimulation of one or more of the limbs. 4. Units responding to stimulation of the limb nerve after a short latency could often be excited by hair movement and/or light touch on the pads. Other units were excited by pinching and others could not be excited by a physiological stimulus. The receptive field of these units was small and there was no evidence of fringe inhibition. 5. Most units observed represented the contralateral forelimb but there was a significant number of units representing the ipsilateral limbs. 6. The caudato-olivary pathway has been shown to be excitatory. Short latency limb units do not receive afferents from the caudate nucleus. 7. Afferents from the motor cortex excite units in the inferior olive. A remarkable correlation of latencies of responses from both the cerebral cortex and the limbs on to individual units has been described. 8. The results suggest a complex organization of neurones within the inferior olive. A possible plan of the organization of neurones is given and discussed. PMID:5340538

  15. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus selectively reverses dopamine denervation-induced cellular defects in the output structures of the basal ganglia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Salin, Pascal; Manrique, Christine; Forni, Claude; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia

    2002-06-15

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is now recognized as an effective treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease, but the molecular basis of its effects remains unknown. This study examined the effects of unilateral STN HFS (2 hr of continuous stimulation) in intact and hemiparkinsonian awake rats on STN neuron metabolic activity and on neurotransmitter-related gene expression in the basal ganglia, by means of in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunocytochemistry. In both intact and hemiparkinsonian rats, this stimulation was found to induce c-fos protein expression but to decrease cytochrome oxidase subunit I mRNA levels in STN neurons. STN HFS did not affect the dopamine lesion-mediated overexpression of enkephalin mRNA or the decrease in substance P in the ipsilateral striatum. The lesion-induced increases in intraneuronal glutamate decarboxylase 67 kDa isoform (GAD67) mRNA levels on the lesion side were reversed by STN HFS in the substantia nigra, partially antagonized in the entopeduncular nucleus but unaffected in the globus pallidus. The stimulation did not affect neuropeptide or GAD67 mRNA levels in the side contralateral to the dopamine lesion or in intact animals. These data furnish the first evidence that STN HFS decreases the metabolic activity of STN neurons and antagonizes dopamine lesion-mediated cellular defects in the basal ganglia output structures. They provide molecular substrate to the therapeutic effects of this stimulation consistent with the current hypothesis that HFS blocks STN neuron activity. However, the differential impact of STN HFS on the effects of dopamine lesion among structures receiving direct STN inputs suggests that this stimulation may not cause simply interruption of STN outflow.

  16. Functional role of Barrington's nucleus in the micturition reflex: relevance in the surgical treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Blanco, L; Ros, C M; Tarragón, E; Fernández-Villalba, E; Herrero, M T

    2014-04-25

    The pontine micturition center or Barrington's nucleus (BN) - besides regulating micturition - co-regulates the activity of other pelvic viscera such as the colon and genitals. At present, this issue is gaining particular importance due to: (i) recent findings of α-synuclein in BN, (ii) known urinary dysfunction in parkinsonian patients (part of the so-called non-motor symptoms), other patients with dementia and as in very old individuals; and (iii) its proximity to the pedunculopontine nucleus, a surgical target in deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease (PD). The structural and functional organization of the micturition reflex comprises a coordinating action of somatic motor activity with both divisions of the autonomic nervous system, modulated by trunk encephalic and cortical centers that involve the BN as locus coeruleus and periaqueductal gray matter, among other trunk encephalic structures. The involvement of dopaminergic activity (physiologic inhibition of the micturition reflex mediated by dopaminergic D1 activity) that diminishes in Parkinsonism and leads to overactivity of the micturition reflex is also well known. In this review, the integrating role of the BN in the context of vesical and gastrointestinal behavior is revisited, and the principal morpho-functional findings that associate dysfunction with the urinary disorders that appear during the pre-motor stages of PD are summarized.

  17. Excitatory projections from the amygdala to neurons in the nucleus pontis oralis in the rat: an intracellular study.

    PubMed

    Xi, M; Fung, S J; Sampogna, S; Chase, M H

    2011-12-01

    There is a consensus that active (REM) sleep (AS) is controlled by cholinergic projections from the laterodorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei (LDT/PPT) to neurons in the nucleus pontis oralis (NPO) that generate AS (i.e. AS-Generator neurons). The present study was designed to provide evidence that other projections to the NPO, such as those from the amygdala, are also capable of inducing AS. Accordingly, the responses of neurons, recorded intracellularly in the NPO, were examined following stimulation of the ipsilateral central nucleus of the amygdala (CNA) in urethane-anesthetized rats. Single pulse stimulation in the CNA produced an early, fast depolarizing potential (EPSP) in neurons within the NPO. The mean latency to the onset of these excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) was 3.6±0.2 ms. A late, small-amplitude inhibitory synaptic potential (IPSP) was present following EPSPs in a portion of the NPO neurons. Following stimulation of the CNA with a train of 8-10 pulses, NPO neurons exhibited a sustained depolarization (5-10 mV) of their resting membrane potential. When single subthreshold intracellular depolarizing current pulses were delivered to NPO neurons, CNA-induced EPSPs were sufficient to promote the discharge of these cells. Stimulation of the CNA with a short train of stimuli induced potent temporal facilitation of EPSPs in NPO neurons. Two forms of synaptic plasticity were revealed by the patterns of response of NPO neurons following stimulation of the CNA: paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) and post-tetanic potentiation (PTP). Six of recorded NPO neurons were identified morphologically with neurobiotin. They were medium to large, multipolar cells with diameters >20 μM, which resemble AS-on cells in the NPO. The present results demonstrate that amygdalar projections are capable of exerting a powerful excitatory postsynaptic drive that activates NPO neurons. Therefore, we suggest that the amygdala is capable of inducing AS via direct

  18. Posterior hypothalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation restores locomotion in rats with haloperidol-induced akinesia but not skilled forelimb use in pellet reaching and lever pressing.

    PubMed

    Young, C K; Whishaw, I Q; Bland, B H

    2011-09-29

    Recent studies have shown that electrical stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH) facilitates locomotion in control rats, and rats were made akinetic by dopaminergic blockade via haloperidol or dopamine depletion by the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. These findings suggest that PH stimulation might be a promising treatment for akinesia associated with dopamine loss in Parkinson's disease. The present study further examined the positive effects of PH stimulation on behavior by characterizing its potential facilitatory effects on tasks that require skilled movements. Rats were trained to reach for food pellets with a forelimb (skilled reaching) or press a bar in an operant conditioning task for food. PH stimulation in undrugged rats not only facilitated locomotion in each of the tasks, but also impaired performance of the skilled movement components of the tasks. Haloperidol reduced locomotion and skilled movement, and PH stimulation only restored locomotion. The results are discussed in relation to the idea that PH stimulation selectively facilitates locomotor behavior and may have limited use in restoring impairments in skilled movements and consummatory behavior that results from dopaminergic depletion.

  19. Dorsal periaqueductal gray post-stimulation freezing is counteracted by neurokinin-1 receptor antagonism in the central nucleus of the amygdala in rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M C; Santos, J M; Brandão, M L

    2015-05-01

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) in rats generates defensive responses that are characterized by freezing and escape behaviors, followed by post-stimulation freezing that resembles symptoms of panic attacks. dPAG post-stimulation freezing involves the processing of ascending aversive information to prosencephalic centers, including the amygdala, which allows the animal to evaluate the consequences of stressful situations. The basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) is thought to act as a filter for innate and learned aversive information that is transmitted to higher structures. The central (CeA) and medial (MeA) nuclei of the amygdala constitute an output for the expression of fear reactions through projections to limbic and brainstem regions. Neurokinin (NK) receptors are abundant in the CeA, MeA, and BLA, but their role in the expression of defensive responses and processing of aversive information that is evoked by electrical stimulation of the dPAG is still unclear. In the present study, we examined the role of NK1 receptors in these amygdala nuclei in the expression of defensive responses induced by electrical stimulation of the dPAG in rats and fear memory of this aversive stimulation. Rats were implanted with an electrode into the dPAG for electrical stimulation and one cannula in the CeA, MeA, or BLA for injections of vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) or the NK1 receptor antagonist spantide (SPA; 100 pmol/0.2 μl). Injections of SPA into the CeA but not BLA or MeA reduced the duration of post-stimulation freezing evoked by electrical stimulation of the dPAG, without changing the aversive thresholds of freezing or escape. Twenty-four hours later, exploratory behavior was evaluated in the elevated plus maze test (EPM) in the CeA group of rats. Electrical stimulation of the dPAG rats that received vehicle exhibited higher aversion to the open arms of the EPM than sham rats that did not receive any dPAG stimulation. SPA

  20. Transient Manic-like Episode Following Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation of the Nucleus Accumbens and the Internal Capsule in a Patient With Tourette Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Jens; Lenartz, Doris; Huff, Wolfgang; Mai, Jürgen K; Koulousakis, Athanasios; Maarouf, Mohammad; Lee, Sun Hee; Klosterkoetter, Joachim; Sturm, Volker

    2008-04-01

    Objective.  Deep brain stimulation (DBS) increasingly attracts attention as a potential treatment of mental disorders. Beside depression and obsessive-compulsive disorders, DBS has already been shown to be beneficial for Tourette syndrome (TS). Clinical Presentation/Method.  The authors report on the outcome of a patient with treatment-resistant TS who underwent bilateral DBS of the nucleus accumbens and the internal capsule. Results.  Within the 10-month follow-up, a substantial reduction of tics has been observed. Yet, as a side-effect of DBS, the patient developed a transient manic-like episode when primarily stimulated by the most proximally contact in the internal capsule. Conclusions.  This case supports the hypothesis that DBS of the nucleus accumbens and the internal capsule represents an effective therapeutic alternative for otherwise treatment-resistant TS. Yet, future controlled studies are needed to determine optimal stimulation parameters and to reduce negative side-effects such as transient hypomanic episodes. © 2008 International Neuromodulation Society.

  1. FGF-2 is required to prevent astrogliosis in the facial nucleus after facial nerve injury and mechanical stimulation of denervated vibrissal muscles.

    PubMed

    Hizay, Arzu; Seitz, Mark; Grosheva, Maria; Sinis, Nektarios; Kaya, Yasemin; Bendella, Habib; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Dunlop, Sarah A; Angelov, Doychin N

    2016-03-01

    Recently, we have shown that manual stimulation of paralyzed vibrissal muscles after facial-facial anastomosis reduced the poly-innervation of neuromuscular junctions and restored vibrissal whisking. Using gene knock outs, we found a differential dependence of manual stimulation effects on growth factors. Thus, insulin-like growth factor-1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are required to underpin manual stimulation-mediated improvements, whereas FGF-2 is not. The lack of dependence on FGF-2 in mediating these peripheral effects prompted us to look centrally, i.e. within the facial nucleus where increased astrogliosis after facial-facial anastomosis follows "synaptic stripping". We measured the intensity of Cy3-fluorescence after immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as an indirect indicator of synaptic coverage of axotomized neurons in the facial nucleus of mice lacking FGF-2 (FGF-2(-/-) mice). There was no difference in GFAP-Cy3-fluorescence (pixel number, gray value range 17-103) between intact wildtype mice (2.12±0.37×10(7)) and their intact FGF-2(-/-) counterparts (2.12±0.27×10(7)) nor after facial-facial anastomosis +handling (wildtype: 4.06±0.32×10(7); FGF-2(-/-): 4.39±0.17×10(7)). However, after facial-facial anastomosis, GFAP-Cy3-fluorescence remained elevated in FGF-2(-/-)-animals (4.54±0.12×10(7)), whereas manual stimulation reduced the intensity of GFAP-immunofluorescence in wild type mice to values that were not significantly different from intact mice (2.63±0.39×10). We conclude that FGF-2 is not required to underpin the beneficial effects of manual stimulation at the neuro-muscular junction, but it is required to minimize astrogliosis in the brainstem and, by implication, restore synaptic coverage of recovering facial motoneurons.

  2. High frequency stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus restores movement and reinstates hippocampal-striatal theta coherence following haloperidol-induced catalepsy.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jesse; Young, Calvin K; Hu, Bin; Bland, Brian H

    2008-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus has been used extensively in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, the efficacy of such treatments on bradykinesia/akinesia remains low. DBS of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH) elicits spontaneous, non-stereotypical motor behaviours. We tested the hypothesis that PH stimulation could restore movement in animals made cataleptic by the D(2) receptor antagonist haloperidol. We further hypothesized that hippocampal-striatal neural synchrony may be important in the organization of motor behaviours. Animals chronically implanted with hippocampal and striatal recording electrodes and PH stimulating electrode were tested in open field, catalepsy and active avoidance paradigms. The degree of hippocampal-striatal theta (5-10 Hz) field coherence was assessed during baseline avoidance testing and following the administration of haloperidol. Haloperidol abolished movement in open field and active avoidance tasks and increased the latency to respond in the catalepsy test. Stimulation of the PH under haloperidol reversed catalepsy. Hippocampal-striatal theta coherence was high throughout the active avoidance task in control experiments but was greatly reduced under haloperidol. PH stimulation was able to reinstate the hippocampal-striatal theta coherence while restoring task-related behaviours. These results support the hypothesis that DBS of the PH could restore motor behaviours in rats made cataleptic with haloperidol, thus providing strong support for the PH as a promising candidate for DBS in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, the results support the view that hippocampal-striatal theta coherence may be important for the planning and execution of goal-oriented behaviors.

  3. Sub-threshold cross-modal sensory interaction in the thalamus: lemniscal auditory response in the medial geniculate nucleus is modulated by somatosensory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Donishi, T; Kimura, A; Imbe, H; Yokoi, I; Kaneoke, Y

    2011-02-03

    Recent studies have highlighted cross-modal sensory modulations in the primary sensory areas in the cortex, suggesting that cross-modal sensory interactions occur at early stages in the hierarchy of sensory processing. Multi-modal sensory inputs from non-lemniscal thalamic nuclei and cortical inputs from the secondary sensory and association areas are considered responsible for the modulations. On the other hand, there is little evidence of cross-sensory modal sensitivities in lemniscal thalamic nuclei. In the present study, we were interested in a possibility that somatosensory stimulation may affect auditory response in the ventral division (MGV) of the medial geniculate nucleus (MG), a lemniscal thalamic nucleus that is considered to be dedicated to auditory uni-modal processing. Experiments were performed on anesthetized rats. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the hindpaw, which is thought to evoke nociception and seems unrelated to auditory processing, modulated unit discharges in response to auditory stimulation (noise bursts). The modulation was observed in the MGV and non-lemniscal auditory thalamic nuclei such as the dorsal and medial divisions of the MG. The major effect of somatosensory stimulation was suppression. The most robust suppression was induced by electrical stimuli given simultaneously with noise bursts or preceding noise bursts by 10 to 20 ms. The results indicate that the lemniscal (MGV) and non-lemniscal auditory nuclei are subject to somatosensory influence. In everyday experience intense somatosensory stimuli such as pain interrupt our ongoing hearing or interfere with clear recognition of sound. The modulation of lemniscal auditory response by somatosensory stimulation may underlie such cross-modal disturbance of auditory perception as a form of cross-modal switching of attention. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective serotonin receptor stimulation of the medial nucleus accumbens differentially affects appetitive motivation for food on a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Wayne E; Schall, Megan A; Choi, Eugene

    2012-03-09

    Previously, we reported that stimulation of selective serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes in the nucleus accumbens shell differentially affected consumption of freely available food. Specifically, activation of 5-HT(6) receptors caused a dose-dependent increase in food intake, while the stimulation of 5-HT(1/7) receptor subtypes decreased feeding [34]. The current experiments tested whether similar pharmacological activation of nucleus accumbens serotonin receptors would also affect appetitive motivation, as measured by the amount of effort non-deprived rats exerted to earn sugar reinforcement. Rats were trained to lever press for sugar pellets on a progressive ratio 2 schedule of reinforcement. Across multiple treatment days, three separate groups (N=8-10) received bilateral infusions of the 5-HT(6) agonist EMD 386088 (at 0.0, 1.0 and 4.0 μg/0.5 μl/side), the 5-HT(1/7) agonist 5-CT (at 0, 0.5, 1.0, or 4.0 μg/0.5 μl/side), or the 5-HT(2C) agonist RO 60-0175 fumarate (at 0, 2.0, or 5.0 μg/0.5 μl/side) into the anterior medial nucleus accumbens prior to a 1-h progressive ratio session. Stimulation of 5-HT(6) receptors caused a dose-dependent increase in motivation as assessed by break point, reinforcers earned, and total active lever presses. Stimulation of 5-HT(1/7) receptors increased lever pressing at the 0.5 μg dose of 5-CT, but inhibited lever presses and break point at 4.0 μg/side. Injection of the 5-HT(2C) agonist had no effect on motivation within the task. Collectively, these experiments suggest that, in addition to their role in modulating food consumption, nucleus accumbens 5-HT(6) and 5-HT(1/7) receptors also differentially regulate the appetitive components of food-directed motivation.

  5. Efficacy of unilateral deep brain stimulation of the thalamic ventralis intermedius nucleus in a patient with bipolar disorder associated with Klinefelter syndrome and essential tremor. Case report.

    PubMed

    Telfeian, A E; Boockvar, J A; Simuni, T; Jaggi, J; Skolnick, B; Baltuch, G H

    2000-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the ventralis intermedius nucleus (Vim) is a safe and effective treatment for essential tremor. Bipolar disorder and essential tremor had each been reported to occur in association with Klinefelter syndrome but the three diseases have been reported to occur together in only one patient. The genetic basis and natural history of these disorders are not completely understood and may be related rather than coincidental. The authors report on a 23-year-old man with Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) and bipolar disorder who was treated successfully with unilateral DBS of the thalamic Vim for essential tremor.

  6. Selective serotonin receptor stimulation of the medial nucleus accumbens differentially affects appetitive motivation for food on a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Wayne E.; Schall, Megan A.; Choi, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we reported that stimulation of selective serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes in the nucleus accumbens shell differentially affected consumption of freely available food. Specifically, activation of 5-HT6 receptors caused a dose-dependent increase in food intake, while the stimulation of 5-HT1/7 receptor subtypes decreased feeding [34]. The current experiments tested whether similar pharmacological activation of nucleus accumbens serotonin receptors would also affect appetitive motivation, as measured by the amount of effort non-deprived rats exerted to earn sugar reinforcement. Rats were trained to lever press for sugar pellets on a progressive ratio 2 schedule of reinforcement. Across multiple treatment days, three separate groups (N = 8–10) received bilateral infusions of the 5-HT6 agonist EMD 386088 (at 0.0, 1.0 and 4.0 μg/0.5 μl/side), the 5-HT1/7 agonist 5-CT (at 0, 0.5, 1.0, or 4.0 μg/0.5 μl/side), or the 5-HT2C agonist RO 60-0175 fumarate (at 0, 2.0, or 5.0 μg/0.5 μl/side) into the anterior medial nucleus accumbens prior to a 1-hr progressive ratio session. Stimulation of 5-HT6 receptors caused a dose-dependent increase in motivation as assessed by break point, reinforcers earned, and total active lever presses. Stimulation of 5-HT1/7 receptors increased lever pressing at the 0.5 μg dose of 5-CT, but inhibited lever presses and break point at 4.0 μg/side. Injection of the 5- HT2C agonist had no effect on motivation within the task. Collectively, these experiments suggest that, in addition to their role in modulating food consumption, nucleus accumbens 5-HT6 and 5-HT1/7 receptors also differentially regulate the appetitive components of food-directed motivation. PMID:22306095

  7. Hemisphere-Specific Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Speaking Rate and Articulatory Accuracy of Syllable Repetitions in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Emily Q; Metman, Leo Verhagen; Bakay, Roy A E; Arzbaecher, Jean; Bernard, Bryan; Corcos, Daniel M

    2006-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that left versus right deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) would have differential effects on speech. Twenty right-handed individuals with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) underwent unilateral STN DBS. Ten were operated on the right and 10 on the left hemisphere as indicated by severity of nonspeech motor function. Speech was evaluated before surgery and 3 to 6 months after surgery with stimulator-off and with stimulator-on, with all participants off anti-parkinsonian medication for 12 hours before evaluation. Evaluators and patient speakers were blinded to the stimulator status at the postsurgery evaluations. Motor performance was assessed with UPDRS-III. Each participant produced three samples of diadochokinetic syllables. Syllable rate, syllable and vowel duration, VOT, and F0 were obtained. The diadochokinetic syllables were rated for articulatory accuracy and speaking rate. Twenty graduate clinicians served as judges. The samples were randomly presented via headphones. A mixed ANOVA with repeated measures was used to assess the significance of the changes in UPRS-III scores and speech measures. The results indicated that unilateral STN DBS produced improvement in nonspeech motor function regardless of the side of stimulation. In contrast, the changes in articulatory accuracy and syllable rate associated with the STN DBS were hemisphere specific.

  8. Nucleus-nucleus potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Satchler, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The significance of a nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed. Information about such potentials obtained from scattering experiments is reviewed, including recent examples of so-called rainbow scattering that probe the potential at smaller distances. The evidence for interactions involving the nuclear spins is summarized, and their possible origin in couplings to non-elastic channels. Various models of the potentials are discussed.

  9. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens shell attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of both cocaine and sucrose seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Guercio, Leonardo A; Schmidt, Heath D; Pierce, R Christopher

    2015-03-15

    Stimuli previously associated with drug taking can become triggers that can elicit craving and lead to relapse of drug-seeking behavior. Here, we examined the influence of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the nucleus accumbens shell on cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, an animal model of relapse. Rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.254 mg, i.v.) for 2 h daily for 21 days, with each infusion of cocaine being paired with a cue light. After 21 days of self-administration, cocaine-taking behavior was extinguished by replacing cocaine with saline in the absence of the cue light. Next, during the reinstatement phase, DBS was administered bilaterally into the nucleus accumbens shell through bipolar stainless steel electrodes immediately prior to re-exposure to cues previously associated with cocaine reinforcement. DBS continued throughout the 2 h reinstatement session. Parallel studies examined the influence of accumbens shell DBS on reinstatement induced by cues previously associated with sucrose reinforcement. Results indicated that DBS of the nucleus accumbens shell significantly attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine and sucrose seeking. Together, these results indicate that DBS of the accumbens shell disrupts cue-induced reinstatement associated with both a drug and a natural reinforcer.

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Alters Frontal Activity during Spatial Working Memory Maintenance of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Jutta S.; Neimat, Joseph; Folley, Bradley S.; Bourne, Sarah K.; Konrad, Peter E.; Charles, David; Park, Sohee

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improves the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The STN may represent an important relay station not only in the motor but also the associative cortico-striato-thalamocortical pathway. Therefore, STN stimulation may alter cognitive functions such as working memory (WM). We examined cortical effects of STN-DBS on WM in early PD patients using functional near-infrared spectroscopy. The effects of dopaminergic medication on WM were also examined. Lateral frontal activity during WM maintenance was greater when patients were taking dopaminergic medication. STN-DBS led to a trend-level worsening of WM performance, accompanied by increased lateral frontal activity during WM maintenance. These findings suggest that STN-DBS in PD might lead to functional modifications of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical pathway during WM maintenance. PMID:27337498

  11. Neural Circuit Modulation During Deep Brain Stimulation at the Subthalamic Nucleus for Parkinson's Disease: What Have We Learned from Neuroimaging Studies?

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN) represents a powerful clinical tool for the alleviation of many motor symptoms that are associated with Parkinson's disease. Despite its extensive use, the underlying therapeutic mechanisms of STN-DBS remain poorly understood. In the present review, we integrate and discuss recent literature examining the network effects of STN-DBS for Parkinson's disease, placing emphasis on neuroimaging findings, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography. These techniques enable the noninvasive detection of brain regions that are modulated by DBS on a whole-brain scale, representing a key experimental strength given the diffuse and far-reaching effects of electrical field stimulation. By examining these data in the context of multiple hypotheses of DBS action, generally developed through clinical and physiological observations, we define a multitude of consistencies and inconsistencies in the developing literature of this rapidly moving field. PMID:24147633

  12. Betting on DBS: Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Risk-Taking and Decision-Making in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Jason; Rogerson, Mark; Al-Joudi, Haya; Reckess, Gila; Shpritz, Barnett; Umeh, Chizoba C.; Aljehani, Noha; Mills, Kelly; Mari, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Concerns persist that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson’s disease (PD) increases impulsivity and/or induces excessive reward-seeking. We report here the performance of PD patients with implanted subthalamic nucleus electrodes, with stimulation on and off, on three laboratory tasks of risk-taking and decision-making. They are compared to PD patients maintained on medication and normal control subjects. Methods and Results In the Game of Dice Task, a test of “risky” decision-making, PD patients with or without DBS made highest-risk bets more often, and ended up with less money, than normal controls. There was a trend for DBS stimulation to ameliorate this effect. Deal or No-Deal is an “ambiguous” decision-making task that assessed preference for risk (holding on to one’s briefcase) over a “sure thing” (accepting the banker’s offer). Here, DBS patients were more conservative with stimulation on than off. They accepted smaller offers from the banker and won less money in the DBS-on condition. Overall, the two PD groups won less money than healthy participants. The Framing Paradigm assessed willingness to gamble on a fixed (unambiguous) prize depending on whether the reward was “framed” as a loss or a gain. Nonsurgical PD patients tended to be more risk-averse than normal subjects, whereas DBS patients were more willing to gamble for gains as well as losses both on and off stimulation. Conclusions On “risky” decision-making tasks, DBS patients were more risk-taking than normal, but stimulation may temper this tendency. In contrast, in an “ambiguous risk” situation, DBS patients were more risk-averse (conservative) than normal, and this tendency was greatest with stimulation. PMID:25486385

  13. Pilot Study Assessing the Feasibility of Applying Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Very Early Stage Parkinson's Disease: Study design and rationale

    PubMed Central

    Charles, David; Tolleson, Christopher; Davis, Thomas L.; Gill, Chandler E.; Molinari, Anna L.; Bliton, Mark J.; Tramontana, Michael G.; Salomon, Ronald M.; Kao, Chris; Wang, Lily; Hedera, Peter; Phibbs, Fenna T.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Konrad, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation provides significant symptomatic benefit for people with advanced Parkinson's disease whose symptoms are no longer adequately controlled with medication. Preliminary evidence suggests that subthalamic nucleus stimulation may also be efficacious in early Parkinson's disease, and results of animal studies suggest that it may spare dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Objective We report the methodology and design of a novel Phase I clinical trial testing the safety and tolerability of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease and discuss previous failed attempts at neuroprotection. Methods We recently conducted a prospective, randomized, parallel-group, single-blind pilot clinical trial of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease. Subjects were randomized to receive either optimal drug therapy or deep brain stimulation plus optimal drug therapy. Follow-up visits occurred every six months for a period of two years and included week-long therapy washouts. Results Thirty subjects with Hoehn & Yahr Stage II idiopathic Parkinson's disease were enrolled over a period of 32 months. Twenty-nine subjects completed all follow-up visits; one patient in the optimal drug therapy group withdrew from the study after baseline. Baseline characteristics for all thirty patients were not significantly different. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it is possible to recruit and retain subjects in a clinical trial testing deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease. The results of this trial will be used to support the design of a Phase III, multicenter trial investigating the efficacy of deep brain stimulation in early Parkinson's disease. PMID:23938229

  14. Functional connectivity between the thalamus and postsubiculum: analysis of evoked responses elicited by stimulation of the laterodorsal thalamic nucleus in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Shires, Kate L; Hawthorne, James P; Hope, Alexander M J; Dudchenko, Paul A; Wood, Emma R; Martin, Stephen J

    2013-07-01

    The laterodorsal nucleus (LDN) of the thalamus provides a prominent afferent projection to the postsubiculum (dorsal presubiculum). To characterize synaptic transmission in this pathway, we placed stimulating electrodes in the LDN and recorded fEPSPs elicited in the postsubiculum of urethane-anesthetized rats. LDN stimulation elicited a source-sink dipole between the deep and superficial layers of the postsubiculum, respectively, consistent with anatomical evidence for the termination of thalamic afferents in the superficial layers of the structure, and the existence of deep layer neurons with apical dendrites extending into these layers. Postsubicular fEPSPs were typically 0.5-1.0 mV in amplitude, with a peak latency of approximately 6 ms. Consistent with anatomical observations, the short onset latency of fEPSPs elicited by LDN stimulation, and their ability to follow a 60-Hz train of stimulation, indicate that the projection is monosynaptic. Paired-pulse stimulation revealed pronounced paired-pulse depression that was maximal at 100 ms, suggesting that initial release probabilities are high at LDN-postsubiculum synapses, in common with many neocortical pathways. A conventional tetanus protocol that yields LTP in hippocampal pathways had no effect on postsubicular fEPSPs, but long-term depression could be induced by 60-Hz stimulation. Drug infusion studies revealed that synaptic transmission in the LDN-postsubiculum projection is predominantly AMPA-receptor mediated. Rats were implanted with indwelling infusion cannulae targeting the postsubiculum, and, after a recovery period, were anaesthetized withurethane, and implanted with stimulating and recording electrodes. Infusion of CNQX almost completely abolished postsubicular fEPSPs, whereas D-AP5 had little effect. However, 60-Hz LTD was blocked by D-AP5 infusion, revealing that this form of synaptic plasticity is NMDA-receptor dependent.

  15. Alterations in blood glucose and plasma glucagon concentrations during deep brain stimulation in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens in rats.

    PubMed

    Diepenbroek, Charlene; van der Plasse, Geoffrey; Eggels, Leslie; Rijnsburger, Merel; Feenstra, Matthijs G P; Kalsbeek, Andries; Denys, Damiaan; Fliers, Eric; Serlie, Mireille J; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is an effective therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and is currently under investigation as a treatment for eating disorders. DBS of this area is associated with altered food intake and pharmacological treatment of OCD is associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Therefore we examined if DBS of the NAc-shell (sNAc) influences glucose metabolism. Male Wistar rats were subjected to DBS, or sham stimulation, for a period of 1 h. To assess the effects of stimulation on blood glucose and glucoregulatory hormones, blood samples were drawn before, during and after stimulation. Subsequently, all animals were used for quantitative assessment of Fos immunoreactivity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) using computerized image analysis. DBS of the sNAc rapidly increased plasma concentrations of glucagon and glucose while sham stimulation and DBS outside the sNAc were ineffective. In addition, the increase in glucose was dependent on DBS intensity. In contrast, the DBS-induced increase in plasma corticosterone concentrations was independent of intensity and region, indicating that the observed DBS-induced metabolic changes were not due to corticosterone release. Stimulation of the sNAc with 200 μA increased Fos immunoreactivity in the LHA compared to sham or 100 μA stimulated animals. These data show that DBS of the sNAc alters glucose metabolism in a region- and intensity- dependent manner in association with neuronal activation in the LHA. Moreover, these data illustrate the need to monitor changes in glucose metabolism during DBS-treatment of OCD patients.

  16. Effect of Electrical Stimulation of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract on Electroencephalographic Spectral Power and the Sleep-Wake Cycle in Freely Moving Cats.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Vargas, D; Valdés-Cruz, A; Magdaleno-Madrigal, V M; Fernández-Mas, R; Almazán-Alvarado, S

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) plays a determinant role in the antiepileptic effects of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). One mechanism underlying the efficacy of VNS is the induction of cortical changes, detected by electroencephalogram (EEG), which can be mediated by the NTS through its projections to the cerebral nuclei responsible for modulating cortical activity. The effect of the electrical stimulation of the nucleus of the solitary tract (ENTS) on EEG activity and sleep states in freely moving animals is unknown. This study aims to analyze the effects of ENTS on the EEG spectral power and sleep-wake cycle in freely moving cats. EEG was performed on the left amygdala and both pre-frontal cortices for 23 hours under baseline conditions and with ENTS in freely moving cats. The changes induced by ENTS on the EEG spectral power and the architecture of the sleep-wake cycle were analyzed. ENTS increased the theta and beta band power for 12 hours. Furthermore, an increase in wakefulness occurred in the first six hours, followed by an increase in the total time of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. ENTS produces a long-lasting increase in the theta and beta band power, which favors wakefulness and REM sleep in freely moving cats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential cellular FGF-2 upregulation in the rat facial nucleus following axotomy, functional electrical stimulation and corticosterone: a possible therapeutic target to Bell's palsy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The etiology of Bell's palsy can vary but anterograde axonal degeneration may delay spontaneous functional recovery leading the necessity of therapeutic interventions. Corticotherapy and/or complementary rehabilitation interventions have been employed. Thus the natural history of the disease reports to a neurotrophic resistance of adult facial motoneurons leading a favorable evolution however the related molecular mechanisms that might be therapeutically addressed in the resistant cases are not known. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) pathway signaling is a potential candidate for therapeutic development because its role on wound repair and autocrine/paracrine trophic mechanisms in the lesioned nervous system. Methods Adult rats received unilateral facial nerve crush, transection with amputation of nerve branches, or sham operation. Other group of unlesioned rats received a daily functional electrical stimulation in the levator labii superioris muscle (1 mA, 30 Hz, square wave) or systemic corticosterone (10 mgkg-1). Animals were sacrificed seven days later. Results Crush and transection lesions promoted no changes in the number of neurons but increased the neurofilament in the neuronal neuropil of axotomized facial nuclei. Axotomy also elevated the number of GFAP astrocytes (143% after crush; 277% after transection) and nuclear FGF-2 (57% after transection) in astrocytes (confirmed by two-color immunoperoxidase) in the ipsilateral facial nucleus. Image analysis reveled that a seven days functional electrical stimulation or corticosterone led to elevations of FGF-2 in the cytoplasm of neurons and in the nucleus of reactive astrocytes, respectively, without astrocytic reaction. Conclusion FGF-2 may exert paracrine/autocrine trophic actions in the facial nucleus and may be relevant as a therapeutic target to Bell's palsy. PMID:21062430

  18. Inclusion of Cocoa as a Dietary Supplement Represses Expression of Inflammatory Proteins in Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus in Response to Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Ryan J.; Denson, Jennifer E.; Durham, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Central sensitization is implicated in the pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and other types of orofacial pain. We investigated the effects of dietary cocoa on expression of proteins involved in the development of central sensitization in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN) in response to inflammatory stimulation of trigeminal nerves. Methods and results Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a control diet or an isocaloric diet consisting of 10% cocoa powder 14 days prior to bilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the temporomandibular joint to promote prolonged activation of trigeminal ganglion neurons and glia. While dietary cocoa stimulated basal expression of GLAST and MKP-1 when compared to animals on a normal diet, cocoa suppressed basal calcitonin gene-related peptide levels in the STN. CFA-stimulated levels of protein kinase A, P2X3, P-p38, GFAP, and OX-42, whose elevated levels in the STN are implicated in central sensitization, were repressed to near control levels in animals on a cocoa enriched diet. Similarly, dietary cocoa repressed CFA-stimulated inflammatory cytokine expression. Conclusion Based on our findings, we speculate that cocoa enriched diets could be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for TMD and other chronic orofacial pain conditions. PMID:23576361

  19. Blockade of D1-like dopamine receptors within the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens attenuates antinociceptive responses induced by chemical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Marzieh; Fatahi, Zahra; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-07-10

    It was established that stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) can induce antinociception. Previous studies showed a role for the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) in antinociception induced by LH stimulation through the orexinergic system. In this study, we tried to assess the involvement of dopamine D1-like receptors within the VTA and NAc in the LH stimulation-induced antinociception. Male Wistar rats were unilaterally implanted with two separate cannulae into the LH and VTA or NAc. Animals received intra-VTA or intra-accumbal infusion of SCH-23390, as a D1-like dopamine receptor antagonist (0.125, 0.25, 1 and 4 μg/rat), 2 min before intra-LH administration of carbachol (125 nM/rat). The antinociceptive effects of SCH-23390 were measured by using a tail-flick analgesiometer and represented as maximal possible effect (%MPE). Results showed that intra-VTA and/or accumbal administration of SCH-23390 could prevent carbachol-induced antinociception. These findings revealed that D1-like dopamine receptors within the VTA and NAc play an important role in antinociceptive effect induced by chemical stimulation of the LH.

  20. In Parkinson's disease on a probabilistic Go/NoGo task deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus only interferes with withholding of the most prepotent responses.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Dejan; Dirnberger, Georg; Wilkinson, Leonora; Limousin, Patricia; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2016-04-01

    The evidence on the impact of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on action restraint on Go/NoGO reaction time (RT) tasks in Parkinson's disease (PD) is inconsistent; with some studies reporting no effect and others finding that STN stimulation interferes with withholding of responses and results in more commission errors relative to STN-DBS off. We used a task in which the probability of Go stimuli varied from 100% (simple RT task) to 80, 50 and 20% (probabilistic Go/NoGo RT task), thus altering the prepotency of the response and the difficulty in withholding it on NoGo trials. Twenty PD patients with STN-DBS, ten unoperated PD patients and ten healthy controls participated in the study. All participants were tested twice; the order of on versus off stimulation for STN-DBS PD patients was counterbalanced. Both STN-DBS and unoperated PD patients were tested on medication. The results indicated that STN-DBS selectively decreased discriminability when the response was most prepotent (high--80%, as compared to low Go probability trials--50 and 20%). Movement times were faster with STN stimulation than with DBS off across different Go probability levels. There was neither an overall nor a selective effect of STN-DBS on RTs depending on the level of Go probability. Furthermore, compared to healthy controls, both STN-DBS and unoperated PD patients were more prone to making anticipatory errors; which was not influenced by STN stimulation. The results provide evidence for 'load-dependent' effects of STN stimulation on action restraint as a function of the prepotency of the Go response.

  1. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus alters the cortical profile of response inhibition in the beta frequency band: a scalp EEG study in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Swann, Nicole; Poizner, Howard; Houser, Melissa; Gould, Sherrie; Greenhouse, Ian; Cai, Weidong; Strunk, Jon; George, Jobi; Aron, Adam R

    2011-01-01

    Stopping an initiated response could be implemented by a fronto-basal-ganglia circuit, including the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Intracranial recording studies in humans reveal an increase in beta-band power (~16-20 Hz) within the rIFC and STN when a response is stopped. This suggests that the beta-band could be important for communication in this network. If this is the case, then altering one region should affect the electrophysiological response at the other. We addressed this hypothesis by recording scalp EEG during a stop task while modulating STN activity with deep brain stimulation. We studied 15 human patients with Parkinson's Disease and 15 matched healthy control subjects. Behaviorally, patients OFF stimulation were slower than controls to stop their response. Moreover, stopping speed was improved for ON compared to OFF stimulation. For scalp EEG, there was greater beta power, around the time of stopping, for patients ON compared to OFF stimulation. This effect was stronger over the right compared to left frontal cortex, consistent with the putative right-lateralization of the stopping network. Thus, deep brain stimulation of the STN improved behavioral stopping performance and increased the beta-band response over the right frontal cortex. These results complement other evidence for a structurally-connected, functional, circuit between right frontal cortex and the basal ganglia. The results also suggest that deep brain stimulation of the STN may improve task performance by increasing the fidelity of information transfer within a fronto-basal ganglia circuit. PMID:21490213

  2. Paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus: axonal projections to the brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Geerling, Joel C.; Shin, Jung-Won; Chimenti, Peter C.; Loewy, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    The paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) contains many neurons that innervate the brainstem, but information regarding their target sites remains incomplete. Here, we labeled neurons in the rat PVH with an anterograde axonal tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL) and studied their descending projections in reference to specific neuronal subpopulations throughout the brainstem. While many of their target sites were identified previously, numerous new observations were made. Major findings include: (1) In the midbrain, the PVH projects lightly to the ventral tegmental area, Edinger-Westphal nucleus, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter, reticular formation, pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, and dorsal raphe nucleus. (2) In the dorsal pons, the PVH projects heavily to the pre-locus coeruleus, yet very little to the catecholamine neurons in the locus coeruleus, and selectively targets the viscerosensory subregions of the parabrachial nucleus; (3) In the ventral medulla, the superior salivatory nucleus, retrotrapezoid nucleus, compact and external formations of the nucleus ambiguus, A1 and caudal C1 catecholamine neurons, and caudal pressor area receive dense axonal projections, generally exceeding the PVH projection to the rostral C1 region; (4) The medial nucleus of the solitary tract (including A2 noradrenergic and aldosterone-sensitive neurons) receives the most extensive projections of the PVH, substantially more than the dorsal vagal nucleus or area postrema. Our findings suggest that the PVH may modulate a range of homeostatic functions, including cerebral and ocular blood flow, corneal and nasal hydration, ingestive behavior, sodium intake, and glucose metabolism, as well as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and respiratory activities. PMID:20187136

  3. Microelectrode Guided Implantation of Electrodes into the Subthalamic Nucleus of Rats for Long-term Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Fluri, Felix; Bieber, Micheal; Volkmann, Jens; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a widely used and effective therapy for several neurologic disorders, such as idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, dystonia or tremor. DBS is based on the delivery of electrical stimuli to specific deep anatomic structures of the central nervous system. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of DBS remain enigmatic. This has led to an interest in investigating the impact of DBS in animal models, especially in rats. As DBS is a long-term therapy, research should be focused on molecular-genetic changes of neural circuits that occur several weeks after DBS. Long-term DBS in rats is challenging because the rats move around in their cage, which causes problems in keeping in place the wire leading from the head of the animal to the stimulator. Furthermore, target structures for stimulation in the rat brain are small and therefore electrodes cannot easily be placed at the required position. Thus, a set-up for long-lasting stimulation of rats using platinum/iridium electrodes with an impedance of about 1 MΩ was developed for this study. An electrode with these specifications allows for not only adequate stimulation but also recording of deep brain structures to identify the target area for DBS. In our set-up, an electrode with a plug for the wire was embedded in dental cement with four anchoring screws secured onto the skull. The wire from the plug to the stimulator was protected by a stainless-steel spring. A swivel was connected to the circuit to prevent the wire from becoming tangled. Overall, this stimulation set-up offers a high degree of free mobility for the rat and enables the head plug, as well as the wire connection between the plug and the stimulator, to retain long-lasting strength. PMID:26485522

  4. Role of dopamine D2-like receptors within the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens in antinociception induced by lateral hypothalamus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Marzieh; Yazdanian, Mohamadreza; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-10-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown that stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) can induce antinociception. It has been indicated that hypothalamic orexinergic neurons send projections throughout the dopamine mesolimbic pathway. Functional interaction between the LH and the main area of the mesolimbic pathway such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) implicates in pain modulation. Thus, in this study, we investigated the role of D2-like dopamine receptors within the VTA and NAc in the LH stimulation-induced antinociception. Male Wistar rats weighing 230-280 g were unilaterally implanted with two separate cannulae into the LH and VTA or NAc. Animals received intra-VTA (0.25, 1 and 4 μg/0.3 μl DMSO) and intra-accumbal (0.125, 0.25, 1 and 4 μg/0.5 μl DMSO) infusions of sulpiride as a selective D2-like receptor antagonist, prior to intra-LH carbachol (125 nM/rat) administration. In the tail-flick test, the antinociceptive effects were measured using a tail-flick algesiometer and represented as maximal possible effect (%MPE) within 5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after injections. Our results showed that intra-VTA and intra-accumbal sulpiride dose-dependently attenuated the LH stimulation-induced antinociception. However, the blockade of D2-like receptors within the NAc was more significant than that of the VTA. These findings show that D2-like dopamine receptors in these regions play an important role in the LH-mediated modulation of nociceptive information in the acute model of pain in the rats. It seems that this pain modulating system is more relevant to D2-like receptors in the nucleus accumbens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Acoustic stimulation in vivo and corticotropin-releasing factor in vitro increase tryptophan hydroxylase activity in the rat caudal dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew K; Heerkens, Jasper L T; Lowry, Christopher A

    2009-05-08

    Exposure of rats to unpredictable loud sound pulses increases activity of the rate-limiting enzyme for serotonin synthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), in the median raphe nucleus (MnR) and a mesolimbocortical serotonergic system. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-induced activation of a subset of serotonergic neurons in the caudal dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) may underlie stress-related increases in TPH activity in the MnR and a mesolimbocortical serotonergic system. An in vivo acoustic stimulation paradigm and an in vitro brain slice preparation were designed to test the hypothesis that stress-related stimuli and CRF receptor activation have convergent actions on TPH activity in the caudal DR (DRC). We measured 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) accumulation as an index of TPH activity following inhibition of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (using NSD-1015). To examine effects of acoustic stimulation on TPH activity, male Wistar rats, pretreated with NSD-1015, were exposed to a 30 min sham, predictable or unpredictable acoustic stimulation paradigm; brains were frozen and microdissected for analyses of tissue 5-HTP concentrations in subregions of the DR. To examine the effect of CRF receptor activation on TPH activity, freshly prepared brain slices were exposed to CRF (0-2000 nM) for 10 min in the presence of NSD-1015, then frozen and microdissected for analysis of tissue 5-HTP concentrations. Increases in TPH activity in the DRC, but not other subregions, were observed in both paradigms. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that stress-related increases in TPH activity are mediated via effects of CRF or CRF-related neuropeptides on a mesolimbocortical serotonergic system originating in the DRC.

  6. Selective optogenetic stimulation of the retrotrapezoid nucleus in sleeping rats activates breathing without changing blood pressure or causing arousal or sighs

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Peter G. R.; Kanbar, Roy; Viar, Kenneth E.; Stornetta, Ruth L.

    2015-01-01

    Combined optogenetic activation of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN; a CO2/proton-activated brainstem nucleus) with nearby catecholaminergic neurons (C1 and A5), or selective C1 neuron stimulation, increases blood pressure (BP) and breathing, causes arousal from non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep, and triggers sighs. Here we wished to determine which of these physiological responses are elicited when RTN neurons are selectively activated. The left rostral RTN and nearby A5 neurons were transduced with channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2+) using a lentiviral vector. Very few C1 cells were transduced. BP, breathing, EEG, and neck EMG were monitored. During non-REM sleep, photostimulation of ChR2+ neurons (20s, 2-20 Hz) instantly increased V̇e without changing BP (13 rats). V̇e and BP were unaffected by light in nine control (ChR2−) rats. Photostimulation produced no sighs and caused arousal (EEG desynchronization) more frequently in ChR2+ than ChR2− rats (62 ± 5% of trials vs. 25 ± 2%; P < 0.0001). Six ChR2+ rats then received spinal injections of a saporin-based toxin that spared RTN neurons but destroyed surrounding catecholaminergic neurons. Photostimulation of the ChR2+ neurons produced the same ventilatory stimulation before and after lesion, but arousal was no longer elicited. Overall (all ChR2+ rats combined), ΔV̇e correlated with the number of ChR2+ RTN neurons whereas arousal probability correlated with the number of ChR2+ catecholaminergic neurons. In conclusion, RTN neurons activate breathing powerfully and, unlike the C1 cells, have minimal effects on BP and have a weak arousal capability at best. A5 neuron stimulation produces little effect on breathing and BP but does appear to facilitate arousal. PMID:25858492

  7. Cervical vagus nerve stimulation augments spontaneous discharge in second- and higher-order sensory neurons in the rat nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Eric; Campbell, Regenia P; Andresen, Michael C; Scofield, Stephanie; Singh, Krishna; Libbus, Imad; KenKnight, Bruce H; Snyder, Logan; Cantrell, Nathan

    2017-08-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) currently treats patients with drug-resistant epilepsy, depression, and heart failure. The mild intensities used in chronic VNS suggest that primary visceral afferents and central nervous system activation are involved. Here, we measured the activity of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in anesthetized rats using clinically styled VNS. Our chief findings indicate that VNS at threshold bradycardic intensity activated NTS neuron discharge in one-third of NTS neurons. This VNS directly activated only myelinated vagal afferents projecting to second-order NTS neurons. Most VNS-induced activity in NTS, however, was unsynchronized to vagal stimuli. Thus, VNS activated unsynchronized activity in NTS neurons that were second order to vagal afferent C-fibers as well as higher-order NTS neurons only polysynaptically activated by the vagus. Overall, cardiovascular-sensitive and -insensitive NTS neurons were similarly activated by VNS: 3/4 neurons with monosynaptic vagal A-fiber afferents, 6/42 neurons with monosynaptic vagal C-fiber afferents, and 16/21 polysynaptic NTS neurons. Provocatively, vagal A-fibers indirectly activated C-fiber neurons during VNS. Elevated spontaneous spiking was quantitatively much higher than synchronized activity and extended well into the periods of nonstimulation. Surprisingly, many polysynaptic NTS neurons responded to half the bradycardic intensity used in clinical studies, indicating that a subset of myelinated vagal afferents is sufficient to evoke VNS indirect activation. Our study uncovered a myelinated vagal afferent drive that indirectly activates NTS neurons and thus central pathways beyond NTS and support reconsideration of brain contributions of vagal afferents underpinning of therapeutic impacts.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Acute vagus nerve stimulation elevated activity in neurons located in the medial nucleus of the solitary tract. Such stimuli directly activated only myelinated vagal afferents but

  8. Inhibition of the amygdala central nucleus by stimulation of cerebellar output in rats: a putative mechanism for extinction of the conditioned fear response.

    PubMed

    Magal, Ari; Mintz, Matti

    2014-11-01

    The amygdala and the cerebellum serve two distinctively different functions. The amygdala plays a role in the expression of emotional information, whereas the cerebellum is involved in the timing of discrete motor responses. Interaction between these two systems is the basis of the two-stage theory of learning, according to which an encounter with a challenging event triggers fast classical conditioning of fear-conditioned responses in the amygdala and slow conditioning of motor-conditioned responses in the cerebellum. A third stage was hypothesised when an apparent interaction between amygdala and cerebellar associative plasticity was observed: an adaptive rate of cerebellum-dependent motor-conditioned responses was associated with a decrease in amygdala-dependent fear-conditioned responses, and was interpreted as extinction of amygdala-related fear-conditioned responses by the cerebellar output. To explore this hypothesis, we mimicked some components of classical eyeblink conditioning in anesthetised rats by applying an aversive periorbital pulse as an unconditioned stimulus and a train of pulses to the cerebellar output nuclei as a cerebellar neuronal-conditioned response. The central amygdala multiple unit response to the periorbital pulse was measured with or without a preceding train to the cerebellar output nuclei. The results showed that activation of the cerebellar output nuclei prior to periorbital stimulation produced diverse patterns of inhibition of the amygdala response to the periorbital aversive stimulus, depending upon the nucleus stimulated, the laterality of the nucleus stimulated, and the stimulus interval used. These results provide a putative extinction mechanism of learned fear behavior, and could have implications for the treatment of pathologies involving abnormal fear responses by using motor training as therapy.

  9. Thalamotomy-Like Effects From Partial Removal of a Ventral Intermediate Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulator Lead in a Patient With Essential Tremor: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rolston, John D.; Ramos, Alexander D.; Heath, Susan; Englot, Dario J.; Lim, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE The ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus is a primary target of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with essential tremor. Despite reliable control of contralateral tremor, there is sometimes a need for lead revision in cases of infection, hardware malfunction, or failure to relieve symptoms. Here, we present the case of a patient undergoing revision after ventral intermediate nucleus (Vim) DBS failed to control his tremor. During the electrode removal, the distal portion of the lead was found to be tightly adherent to tissue within the deep brain. Partial removal of the electrode in turn caused weakness, paresthesias, and tremor control similar to the effects produced by thalamotomy or thalamic injury. CLINICAL PRESENTATION A 48-year-old man with essential tremor had bilateral Vim DBS leads implanted 10 years earlier but had poor control of his tremor and ultimately opted for surgical revision with lead placement in the zona incerta. During attempted removal of his right lead, the patient became somnolent with contralateral weakness and paresthesias. The procedure was aborted, and postoperative neuroimaging was immediately obtained, showing no signs of stroke or hemorrhage. The patient had almost complete control of his left arm tremor postoperatively, and his weakness soon resolved. CONCLUSION To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of cerebral injury after DBS revision and offers insights into the mechanism of high-frequency electric stimulation compared with lesions. That is, although high-frequency stimulation failed to control this patient’s tremor, thalamotomy-like injury was completely effective. PMID:26200771

  10. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG) neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure (BP) signals may modulate choroidal blood flow (ChBF), we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40–80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (ChBVol; i.e., vasodilation) and choroidal blood velocity (ChBVel; possibly due to orbital vessel dilation). Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA), thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that the NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the BP-dependent regulation of ChBF. PMID:27774055

  11. Selective lesions of the cholinergic neurons within the posterior pedunculopontine do not alter operant learning or nicotine sensitization.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, Duncan A A; Wilson, David I G; Winn, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Cholinergic neurons within the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus have been implicated in a range of functions, including behavioral state control, attention, and modulation of midbrain and basal ganglia systems. Previous experiments with excitotoxic lesions have found persistent learning impairment and altered response to nicotine following lesion of the posterior component of the PPTg (pPPTg). These effects have been attributed to disrupted input to midbrain dopamine systems, particularly the ventral tegmental area. The pPPTg contains a dense collection of cholinergic neurons and also large numbers of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Because these interdigitated populations of neurons are all susceptible to excitotoxins, the effects of such lesions cannot be attributed to one neuronal population. We wished to assess whether the learning impairments and altered responses to nicotine in excitotoxic PPTg-lesioned rats were due to loss of cholinergic neurons within the pPPTg. Selective depletion of cholinergic pPPTg neurons is achievable with the fusion toxin Dtx-UII, which targets UII receptors expressed only by cholinergic neurons in this region. Rats bearing bilateral lesions of cholinergic pPPTg neurons (>90% ChAT+ neuronal loss) displayed no deficits in the learning or performance of fixed and variable ratio schedules of reinforcement for pellet reward. Separate rats with the same lesions had a normal locomotor response to nicotine and furthermore sensitized to repeated administration of nicotine at the same rate as sham controls. Previously seen changes in these behaviors following excitotoxic pPPTg lesions cannot be attributed solely to loss of cholinergic neurons. These findings indicate that non-cholinergic neurons within the pPPTg are responsible for the learning deficits and altered responses to nicotine seen after excitotoxic lesions. The functions of cholinergic neurons may be related to behavioral state control and attention rather than learning.

  12. 5-HT1A receptor-responsive pedunculopontine tegmental neurons suppress REM sleep and respiratory motor activity.

    PubMed

    Grace, Kevin P; Liu, Hattie; Horner, Richard L

    2012-02-01

    Serotonin type 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor-responsive neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTn) become maximally active immediately before and during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. A prevailing model of REM sleep generation indicates that activation of such neurons contributes significantly to the generation of REM sleep, and if correct then inactivation of such neurons ought to suppress REM sleep. We test this hypothesis using bilateral microperfusion of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 10 μm) into the PPTn; this tool has been shown to selectively silence REM sleep-active PPTn neurons while the activity of wake/REM sleep-active PPTn neurons is unaffected. Contrary to the prevailing model, bilateral microperfusion of 8-OH-DPAT into the PPTn (n = 23 rats) significantly increased REM sleep both as a percentage of the total recording time and sleep time, compared with both within-animal vehicle controls and between-animal time-controls. This increased REM sleep resulted from an increased frequency of REM sleep bouts but not their duration, indicating an effect on mechanisms of REM sleep initiation but not maintenance. Furthermore, an increased proportion of the REM sleep bouts stemmed from periods of low REM sleep drive quantified electrographically. Targeted suppression of 5-HT(1A) receptor-responsive PPTn neurons also increased respiratory rate and respiratory-related genioglossus activity, and increased the frequency and amplitude of the sporadic genioglossus activations occurring during REM sleep. These data indicate that 5-HT(1A) receptor-responsive PPTn neurons normally function to restrain REM sleep by elevating the drive threshold for REM sleep induction, and restrain the expression of respiratory rate and motor activities.

  13. Functional interaction between the orexin-1 and CB1 receptors within the nucleus accumbens in the conditioned place preference induced by the lateral hypothalamus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fatahi, Zahra; Assar, Nasim; Mahmoudi, Dorna; Pahlevani, Pouyan; Moradi, Marzieh; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-02-28

    Several studies have shown that chemical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) by carbachol induces the conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats. LH is the main source of the orexinergic neurons and sends projections to some areas of the brain such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We tried to determine the role of intra-accumbal orexin-1 (OX1) receptors in development (acquisition) and expression of reward-related behaviors induced by LH stimulation and involvement of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in this area. Adult male Wistar rats were unilaterally implanted by two separate cannulae into the LH and NAc. The CPP paradigm was done; conditioning scores and locomotor activities were recorded. The results showed that intra-accumbal administration of SB334867 as a selective OX1 receptor antagonist (1, 3, 10 and 30nM/0.5μl DMSO) 5min before intra-LH carbachol (250nM/0.5μl saline) during 3-day conditioning phase, could dose-dependently inhibit the development of LH-induced CPP. In expression experiments, intra-NAc administration of SB334867 on the test day could decrease the expression of LH stimulation-induced CPP. Furthermore, concurrent intra-accumbal administration of effective/ineffective doses of SB334867 and AM251 (45 and 15μM) as a CB1 receptor antagonist, before carbachol during the conditioning phase, could attenuate the development of LH stimulation-induced CPP. It seems that the orexinergic projection from the LH to the NAc is involved in the LH stimulation-induced CPP and OX1 receptor in the NAc has a substantial role in this phenomenon. Our findings also suggest the existence a functional interaction between OX1 and CB1 receptors within the NAc in place preference.

  14. The Subthalamic Nucleus becomes a Generator of Bursts in the Dopamine-Depleted State. Its High Frequency Stimulation Dramatically Weakens Transmission to the Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Ammari, Rachida; Bioulac, Bernard; Garcia, Liliana; Hammond, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Excessive burst firing in the dopamine-depleted basal ganglia correlates with severe motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease that are attenuated by high frequency electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Here we test the hypothesis that pathological bursts in dopamine-deprived basal ganglia are generated within the STN and transmitted to globus pallidus neurons. To answer this question we recorded excitatory synaptic currents and potentials from subthalamic and pallidal neurons in the basal ganglia slice (BGS) from dopamine-depleted mice while continuously blocking GABAA receptors. In control mice, a single electrical stimulus delivered to the internal capsule or the rostral pole of the STN evoked a short duration, small amplitude, monosynaptic EPSC in subthalamic neurons. In contrast, in the dopamine-depleted BGS, this monosynaptic EPSC was amplified and followed by a burst of polysynaptic EPSCs that eventually reverberated three to seven times, providing a long lasting response that gave rise to bursts of EPSCs and spikes in GP neurons. Repetitive (10–120 Hz) stimulation delivered to the STN in the dopamine-depleted BGS attenuated STN-evoked bursts of EPSCs in pallidal neurons after several minutes of stimulation but only high frequency (90–120 Hz) stimulation replaced them with small amplitude EPSCs at 20 Hz. We propose that the polysynaptic pathway within the STN amplifies subthalamic responses to incoming excitation in the dopamine-depleted basal ganglia, thereby transforming the STN into a burst generator and entraining pallidal neurons in pathogenic bursting activities. High frequency stimulation of the STN prevents the transmission of this pathological activity to globus pallidus and imposes a new glutamatergic synaptic noise on pallidal neurons. PMID:21716635

  15. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain increases heart rate and arterial blood pressure in awake humans

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Judith M; Aziz, Tipu; Schlugman, David; Paterson, David J

    2002-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus, basal ganglia or pedunculopontine nucleus in decorticate animals results in locomotion and a cardiorespiratory response resembling that seen during exercise. This has led to the hypothesis that parallel activation of cardiorespiratory and locomotor systems from the midbrain could form part of the ‘central command’ mechanism of exercise. However, the degree to which subcortical structures play a role in cardiovascular activation in awake humans has not been established. We studied the effects on heart rate (HR) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of electrically stimulating the thalamus and basal ganglia in awake humans undergoing neurosurgery for movement disorders (n = 13 Parkinson's disease, n = 1 myoclonic dystonia, n = 1 spasmodic torticollis). HR and MAP increased during high frequency (> 90 Hz) electrical stimulation of the thalamus (HR 5 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.002, MAP 4 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.05, n = 9), subthalamic nucleus (HR 5 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.002, MAP 5 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.006, n = 8) or substantia nigra (HR 6 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.001, MAP 5 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.005, n = 8). This was accompanied by the facilitation of movement, but without the movement itself. Stimulation of the internal globus pallidus did not increase cardiovascular variables but did facilitate movement. Low frequency (< 20 Hz) stimulation of any site did not affect cardiovascular variables or movement. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain in awake humans can cause a modest increase in cardiovascular variables that is not dependent on movement feedback from exercising muscles. The relationship between this type of response and that occurring during actual exercise is unclear, but it indicates that subcortical command could be involved in ‘parallel activation’ of the locomotor and cardiovascular systems and thus contribute to the neurocircuitry of ‘central command’. PMID:11882692

  16. Dominant efficiency of nonregular patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder in a data-driven computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamintziou, Sofia D.; Deligiannis, Nick G.; Piallat, Brigitte; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stephan; David, Olivier; Stathis, Pantelis G.; Tagaris, George A.; Boviatsis, Efstathios J.; Sakas, Damianos E.; Polychronaki, Georgia E.; Tsirogiannis, George L.; Nikita, Konstantina S.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Almost 30 years after the start of the modern era of deep brain stimulation (DBS), the subthalamic nucleus (STN) still constitutes a standard stimulation target for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the use of STN-DBS is also now supported by level I clinical evidence for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Disruption of neural synchronization in the STN has been suggested as one of the possible mechanisms of action of standard and alternative patterns of STN-DBS at a local level. Meanwhile, recent experimental and computational modeling evidence has signified the efficiency of alternative patterns of stimulation; however, no indications exist for treatment-refractory OCD. Here, we comparatively simulate the desynchronizing effect of standard (regular at 130 Hz) versus temporally alternative (in terms of frequency, temporal variability and the existence of bursts or pauses) patterns of STN-DBS for PD and OCD, by means of a stochastic dynamical model and two microelectrode recording (MER) datasets. Approach. The stochastic model is fitted to subthalamic MERs acquired during eight surgical interventions for PD and eight surgical interventions for OCD. For each dynamical system simulated, we comparatively assess the invariant density (steady-state phase distribution) as a measure inversely related to the desynchronizing effect yielded by the applied patterns of stimulation. Main results. We demonstrate that high (130 Hz)—and low (80 Hz)—frequency irregular patterns of stimulation, and low-frequency periodic stimulation interrupted by bursts of pulses, yield in both pathologic conditions a significantly stronger desynchronizing effect compared with standard STN-DBS, and distinct alternative patterns of stimulation. In PD, values of the invariant density measure are proven to be optimal at the dorsolateral oscillatory region of the STN including sites with the optimal therapeutic window. Significance. In addition to providing

  17. Dominant efficiency of nonregular patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder in a data-driven computational model.

    PubMed

    Karamintziou, Sofia D; Deligiannis, Nick G; Piallat, Brigitte; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stephan; David, Olivier; Stathis, Pantelis G; Tagaris, George A; Boviatsis, Efstathios J; Sakas, Damianos E; Polychronaki, Georgia E; Tsirogiannis, George L; Nikita, Konstantina S

    2016-02-01

    Almost 30 years after the start of the modern era of deep brain stimulation (DBS), the subthalamic nucleus (STN) still constitutes a standard stimulation target for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), but the use of STN-DBS is also now supported by level I clinical evidence for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Disruption of neural synchronization in the STN has been suggested as one of the possible mechanisms of action of standard and alternative patterns of STN-DBS at a local level. Meanwhile, recent experimental and computational modeling evidence has signified the efficiency of alternative patterns of stimulation; however, no indications exist for treatment-refractory OCD. Here, we comparatively simulate the desynchronizing effect of standard (regular at 130 Hz) versus temporally alternative (in terms of frequency, temporal variability and the existence of bursts or pauses) patterns of STN-DBS for PD and OCD, by means of a stochastic dynamical model and two microelectrode recording (MER) datasets. The stochastic model is fitted to subthalamic MERs acquired during eight surgical interventions for PD and eight surgical interventions for OCD. For each dynamical system simulated, we comparatively assess the invariant density (steady-state phase distribution) as a measure inversely related to the desynchronizing effect yielded by the applied patterns of stimulation. We demonstrate that high (130 Hz)-and low (80 Hz)-frequency irregular patterns of stimulation, and low-frequency periodic stimulation interrupted by bursts of pulses, yield in both pathologic conditions a significantly stronger desynchronizing effect compared with standard STN-DBS, and distinct alternative patterns of stimulation. In PD, values of the invariant density measure are proven to be optimal at the dorsolateral oscillatory region of the STN including sites with the optimal therapeutic window. In addition to providing novel insights into the efficiency of low

  18. Effect of Bilateral Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus on Different Speech Subsystems in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putzer, Manfred; Barry, William J.; Moringlane, Jean Richard

    2008-01-01

    The effect of deep brain stimulation on the two speech-production subsystems, articulation and phonation, of nine Parkinsonian patients is examined. Production parameters (stop closure voicing; stop closure, VOT, vowel) in fast syllable-repetitions were defined and measured and quantitative, objective metrics of vocal fold function were obtained…

  19. Therapeutic high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease produces global increases in cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Sidtis, John J; Tagliati, Michele; Alterman, Ron; Sidtis, Diana; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2012-01-01

    Chronic, high-frequency electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nuclei (STNs) has become an effective and widely used therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the therapeutic mechanism is not understood. Stimulation of the STN is believed to reorganize neurophysiological activity patterns within the basal ganglia, whereas local field effects extending to tracts adjacent to the STN are viewed as sources of nontherapeutic side effects. This study is part of a larger project investigating the effects of STN stimulation on speech and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in human subjects with PD. While generating measures of global CBF (gCBF) to normalize regional CBF values for a subsequent combined analysis of regional CBF and speech data, we observed a third effect of this therapy: a gCBF increase. This effect was present across three estimates of gCBF ranging from values based on the highest activity voxels to those based on all voxels. The magnitude of the gCBF increase was related to the subject's duration of PD. It is not clear whether this CBF effect has a therapeutic role, but the impact of deep brain stimulation on cerebrovascular control warrants study from neuroscience, pathophysiological, and therapeutic perspectives.

  20. Differential regulation of serotonin-1A receptor-stimulated [35S]GTP gamma S binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus by citalopram and escitalopram.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Dania V; Burke, Teresa F; Hensler, Julie G

    2008-03-31

    The effect of chronic citalopram or escitalopram administration on 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus was determined by measuring [35S]GTP gamma S binding stimulated by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist (R)-(+)-8-OH-DPAT (1nM-10 microM). Although chronic administration of citalopram or escitalopram has been shown to desensitize somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors, we found that escitalopram treatment decreased the efficacy of 5-HT1A receptors to activate G proteins, whereas citalopram treatment did not. The binding of [3H]8-OH-DPAT to the coupled, high affinity agonist state of the receptor was not altered by either treatment. Interestingly, escitalopram administration resulted in greater occupancy of serotonin transporter sites as measured by the inhibition of [3H]cyanoimipramine binding. As the binding and action of escitalopram is limited by the inactive enantiomer R-citalopram present in racemic citalopram, we propose that the regulation of 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus at the level of receptor-G protein interaction may be a result of greater inhibition of the serotonin transporter by escitalopram.

  1. Subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation for early motor complications in Parkinson's disease-the EARLYSTIM trial: early is not always better.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Tiago A; Espay, Alberto J; Marras, Connie; Eckman, Mark H; Pollak, Pierre; Lang, Anthony E

    2014-12-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) has revolutionized the management of disabling motor complications in Parkinson's disease. The EARLYSTIM trial applied this treatment to patients who had been experiencing motor complications for less than three years. STN-DBS significantly improved all primary and secondary outcome measures while best medical therapy failed to provide any improvement at the two-year follow-up time point. On face value these results strongly favor the application of STN-DBS far earlier than is currently applied, when patients are just beginning to experience problems with motor complications. Here we review the application of early DBS and the EARLYSTIM trial from the perspectives of clinical issues, health economics and study design and patient expectation of benefit. We conclude that the most relevant issue is not when to operate but on whom and that early is not always better. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  2. High frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus has beneficial antiparkinsonian effects on motor functions in rats, but less efficiency in a choice reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Darbaky, Yassine; Forni, Claude; Amalric, Marianne; Baunez, Christelle

    2003-08-01

    Chronic subthalamic nucleus high frequency stimulation (STN HFS) improves motor function in Parkinson's disease. However, its efficacy on cognitive function and the mechanisms involved are less known. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of STN HFS in hemiparkinsonian awake rats performing different specific motor tests and a cognitive operant task. Unilateral STN HFS applied in unilaterally DA-depleted rats decreased the apomorphine-induced circling behaviour and reduced catalepsy induced by the neuroleptic haloperidol. DA-depleted rats exhibited severe deficits in the operant task, among which the inability to perform the task was not alleviated by STN HFS. However, in a few animals showing less impairment, STN HFS significantly reduced the contralateral neglect induced by the lesion. These results are the first to demonstrate a beneficial effect of STN HFS applied in awake rats on basic motor functions. However, STN HFS appears to be less effective on impaired cognitive functions.

  3. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for refractory total body dystonia secondary to metabolic autopallidotomy in a 4-year-old boy with infantile methylmalonic acidemia: case report.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Santo; Hasegawa, Harutomo; Lumsden, Daniel E; Ali, Wisam; Kaminska, Margaret; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2013-10-01

    The methylmalonic acidemias (MMAs) are a group of inborn errors of metabolism resulting in the accumulation of methylmalonic acid in body tissues and fluids. A recognized complication of MMA is bilateral liquefaction of the globus pallidi, resulting in a fulminant total body dystonia of childhood often refractory to medical treatment. This case of total body dystonia due to MMA in a 4-year-old boy had been medically refractory for 15 months. Complete metabolic destructive liquefaction of the pallidi, that is, autopallidotomy, necessitated an alternative, bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) with a marked improvement in dystonia and reduction in pain. The case illustrates the efficacy of STN DBS in this condition and the technical challenges in targeting the STN in a small child.

  4. Effects of deep brain stimulation on balance and gait in patients with Parkinson's disease: A systematic neurophysiological review.

    PubMed

    Collomb-Clerc, A; Welter, M-L

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi) deep brain stimulation (DBS) provides an efficient treatment for the alleviation of motor signs in patients with Parkinson's disease. The effects of DBS on gait and balance disorders are less successful and may even lead to an aggravation of freezing of gait and imbalance. The identification of a substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr)-mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) network in the control of locomotion and postural control and of its dysfunction/lesion in PD patients with gait and balance disorders led to suggestion that DBS should be targeting the SNr and the pedunculopontine nucleus (part of the MLR) for PD patients with these disabling axial motor signs. However, the clinical results to date have been disappointing. In this review, we discuss the effects of DBS of these basal ganglia and brainstem structures on the neurophysiological parameters of gait and balance control in PD patients. Overall, the data suggest that both STN and GPi-DBS improve gait parameters and quiet standing postural control in PD patients, but have no effect or may even aggravate dynamic postural control, in particular with STN-DBS. Conversely, DBS of the SNr and PPN has no effect on gait parameters but improves anticipatory postural adjustments and gait postural control.

  5. Acute deep brain stimulation in the thalamic reticular nucleus protects against acute stress and modulates initial events of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel; Pantoja-Jiménez, Christopher Rodrigo; Bazaldúa, Adrián; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador; Bolaños-Alejos, Fernanda; Ortíz-López, Leonardo; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabé

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used as an alternative therapeutic procedure for pharmacoresistant psychiatric disorders. Recently the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) gained attention due to the description of a novel pathway from the amygdala to this nucleus suggesting that may be differentially disrupted in mood disorders. The limbic system is implicated in the regulation of these disorders that are accompanied by neuroplastic changes. The hippocampus is highly plastic and shows the generation of new neurons, process affected by stress but positively regulated by antidepressant drugs. We explored the impact of applying acute DBS to the TRN (DBS-TRN) in male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress caused by the forced-swim Porsolt's test (FST) and on initial events of hippocampal neurogenesis. After the first session of forced-swim, rats were randomly subdivided in a DBS-TRN and a Sham group. Stimulated rats received 10min of DBS, thus the depressant-like behavior reflected as immobility was evaluated in the second session of forced-swim. Locomotricity was evaluated in the open field test. Cell proliferation and doublecortin-associated cells were quantified in the hippocampus of other cohorts of rats. No effects of electrode implantation were found in locomotricity. Acute DBS-TRN reduced immobility in comparison to the Sham group (p<0.001). DBS-TRN increased cell proliferation (Ki67 or BrdU-positive cells; p=0.02, p=0.02) and the number of doublecortin-cells compared to the Sham group (p<0.02). Similar effects were found in rats previously exposed to the first session of forced-swim. Our data could suggest that TRN brain region may be a promising target for DBS to treat intractable depression.

  6. Encoding of the amplitude modulation of pulsatile electrical stimulation in the feline cochlear nucleus by neurons in the inferior colliculus; effects of stimulus pulse rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreery, Douglas; Han, Martin; Pikov, Victor; Yadav, Kamal; Pannu, Satinderpall

    2013-10-01

    Objectives. Persons without a functional auditory nerve cannot benefit from cochlear implants, but some hearing can be restored by an auditory brainstem implant (ABI) with stimulating electrodes implanted on the surface of the cochlear nucleus (CN). Most users benefit from their ABI, but speech recognition tends to be poorer than for users of cochlear implants. Psychophysical studies suggest that poor modulation detection may contribute to the limited performance of ABI users. In a cat model, we determined how the pulse rate of the electrical stimulus applied within or on the CN affects temporal and rate encoding of amplitude modulation (AM) by neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). Approach. Stimulating microelectrodes were implanted chronically in and on the cats' CN, and multi-site recording microelectrodes were implanted chronically into the ICC. Encoding of AM pulse trains by neurons in the ICC was characterized as vector strength (VS), the synchrony of neural activity with the AM, and as the mean rate of neuronal action potentials (neuronal spike rate (NSR)). Main results. For intranuclear microstimulation, encoding of AM as VS was up to 3 dB greater when stimulus pulse rate was increased from 250 to 500 pps, but only for neuronal units with low best acoustic frequencies, and when the electrical stimulation was modulated at low frequencies (10-20 Hz). For stimulation on the surface of the CN, VS was similar at 250 and 500 pps, and the dynamic range of the VS was reduced for pulse rates greater than 250 pps. Modulation depth was encoded strongly as VS when the maximum stimulus amplitude was held constant across a range of modulation depth. This ‘constant maximum’ protocol allows enhancement of modulation depth while preserving overall dynamic range. However, modulation depth was not encoded as strongly as NSR. Significance. The findings have implications for improved sound processors for present and future ABIs. The performance of

  7. Deep brain stimulation for movement disorders: update on recent discoveries and outlook on future developments.

    PubMed

    Mahlknecht, Philipp; Limousin, Patricia; Foltynie, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a routine therapy for patients with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, generalized or segmental dystonia and for multiple forms of tremor. Growing numbers of publications also report beneficial effects in other movement disorders such as Tourette's syndrome, various forms of chorea and DBS is even being studied for Parkinson's-related dementia. While exerting remarkable effects on many motor symptoms, DBS does not restore normal neurophysiology and therefore may also have undesirable side effects including speech and gait deterioration. Furthermore, its efficacy might be compromised in the long term, due to progression of the underlying disease. Various programming strategies have been studied to try and address these issues, e.g., the use of low-frequency rather than high-frequency stimulation or the targeting of alternative brain structures such as the pedunculopontine nucleus. In addition, further technical developments will soon provide clinicians with an expanded choice of hardware such as segmented electrodes allowing for a steering of the current to optimize beneficial effects and reduce side effects as well as the possibility of adaptive stimulation systems based on closed-loop concepts with or without accompanying advances in programming and imaging software. In the present article, we will provide an update on the most recent achievements and discoveries relevant to the application of DBS in the treatment of movement disorder patients and give an outlook on future clinical and technical developments.

  8. Changes in Nutritional Status after Deep Brain Stimulation of the Nucleus Basalis of Meynert in Alzheimer's Disease--Results of a Phase I Study.

    PubMed

    Noreik, M; Kuhn, J; Hardenacke, K; Lenartz, D; Bauer, A; Bührle, C P; Häussermann, P; Hellmich, M; Klosterkötter, J; Wiltfang, J; Maarouf, M; Freund, H-J; Visser-Vandewalle, V; Sturm, V; Schulz, R-J

    2015-10-01

    The progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with impaired nutritional status. New methods, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), are currently being tested to decrease the progression of AD. DBS is an approved method in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and its suitability for the treatment of AD patients is currently under experimental investigation. To evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of this new treatment, it is important to assess potential side effects of DBS regarding the nucleus basalis of Meynert; this new treatment is thought to positively affect cognition and might counteract the deterioration of nutritional status and progressive weight loss observed in AD. This study aims to assess the nutritional status of patients with AD before receiving DBS of the nucleus basalis of Meynert and after 1 year, and to analyze potential associations between changes in cognition and nutritional status. A 1-year phase I proof-of-concept study. The Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy at the University of Cologne. We assessed a consecutive sample of patients with mild to moderate AD (n=6) who fulfilled the inclusion criteria and provided written informed consent. Bilateral low-frequency DBS of the nucleus basalis of Meynert. Nutritional status was assessed using a modified Mini Nutritional Assessment, bioelectrical impedance analysis, a completed 3-day food diary, and analysis of serum levels of vitamin B12 and folate. With a normal body mass index (BMI) at baseline (mean 23.75 kg/m²) and after 1 year (mean 24.59 kg/m²), all but one patient gained body weight during the period of the pilot study (mean 2.38 kg, 3.81% of body weight). This was reflected in a mainly stable or improved body composition, assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis, in five of the six patients. Mean energy intake increased from 1534 kcal/day (min 1037, max 2370) at baseline to 1736 kcal/day (min 1010, max 2663) after 1 year, leading to the improved fulfillment

  9. Effect of electrical stimulation of nucleus accumbens with low, median and high currents intensities on conditioned place preference induced by morphine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Radahmadi, Maryam; Ramshini, Effat; Hosseini, Nasrin; Karimi, Sara; Alaei, Hojjatallah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Some investigators indicated the effect of electrical or chemical stimulation on different parts of the brain and its effect on animal's behaviors. Furthermore, drug addiction is known to be associated with dysfunction of memory and motivational systems. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of electrical stimulation of nucleus accumbens (NAc) with different currents intensities on conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by morphine. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided for experimental groups (n = 8). We investigated the influence of electrical stimulation with different current intensities (low: 15 μA, median: 50 μA and high: 100 μA) on NAc with ineffective and effective dose of morphine (0.5 and 5 mg/kg, respectively) on acquisition and expression of morphine-induced place conditioning in male rats. Results: The doses of subcutaneous administration morphine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg, P < 0.05 and P < 0.001; respectively) induced CPP compared with saline group. Furthermore, our findings are showed that electrical stimulation (100 μA) of NAc suppressed morphine-induced CPP. It revealed impairment of learning and memory formation in conditioning process due to morphine administration. Conclusion: It is possible that high current intensity (100 μA) had an accompanied effect by a reversal of the increased tissue contents of dopamine and its metabolites in the NAc of morphine-induced CPP rats. Furthermore, high current intensity in combination with ineffective dose of morphine (0.5 mg/kg) increased morphine-induced CPP probability via the prove reward system. PMID:24600598

  10. Mu-Opioid Stimulation in Rat Prefrontal Cortex Engages Hypothalamic Orexin/Hypocretin-Containing Neurons, and Reveals Dissociable Roles of Nucleus Accumbens and Hypothalamus in Cortically Driven Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Jesus D.; Selleck, Ryan A.

    2013-01-01

    Mu-opioid receptor (μOR) stimulation within ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) induces feeding and hyperactivity, resulting possibly from recruitment of glutamate signaling in multiple vmPFC projection targets. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing Fos expression in vmPFC terminal fields after intra-vmPFC μOR stimulation, and by examining of the impact of glutamate receptor blockade in two feeding-related targets of vmPFC, the lateral-perifornical hypothalamic area (LH-PeF) and nucleus accumbens shell (Acb shell), upon behavioral effects elicited by intra-vmPFC μOR stimulation in rats. Intra-vmPFC infusion of the μOR agonist, DAMGO, provoked Fos expression in the dorsomedial sector of tuberal hypothalamus (including the perifornical area) and increased the percentage of Fos-expressing hypocretin/orexin-immunoreactive neurons in these zones. NMDA receptor blockade in the LH-PeF nearly eliminated intra-vmPFC DAMGO-induced food intake without altering DAMGO-induced hyperactivity. In contrast, blocking AMPA-type glutamate receptors within the Acb shell (the feeding-relevant subtype in this structure) antagonized intra-vmPFC DAMGO-induced hyperlocomotion but enhanced food intake. Intra-vmPFC DAMGO also elevated the breakpoint for sucrose-reinforced progressive-ratio responding; this effect was significantly enhanced by concomitant AMPA blockade in the Acb shell. Conversely, intra-Acb shell AMPA stimulation reduced breakpoint and increased nonspecific responding on the inactive lever. These data indicate intra-vmPFC μOR signaling jointly modulates appetitive motivation and generalized motoric activation through functionally dissociable vmPFC projection targets. These findings may shed light on the circuitry underlying disorganized appetitive responses in psychopathology; e.g., binge eating and opiate or alcohol abuse, disorders in which μORs and aberrant cortical activation have been implicated. PMID:24259576

  11. Angiotensin II in the paraventricular nucleus stimulates sympathetic outflow to the cardiovascular system and make vasopressin release in rat.

    PubMed

    Khanmoradi, Mehrangiz; Nasimi, Ali

    2016-10-06

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) plays essential roles in neuroendocrine and autonomic functions, including cardiovascular regulation. It was shown that microinjection of angiotensin II (AngII) into the PVN produced a pressor response. In this study, we explored the probable mechanisms of this pressor response. AngII was microinjected into the PVN and cardiovascular responses were recorded. Then, the responses were re-tested after systemic injection of a ganglionic blocker, Hexamethonium, or a vasopressin V1 receptor blocker. Hexamethonium pretreatment (i.v.) greatly and significantly attenuated the pressor response to AngII, with no significant effect on heart rate, indicating that the sympathetic system is involved in the cardiovascular effect of AngII in the PVN. Systemic pretreatment (i.v.) with V1 antagonist greatly and significantly attenuated the pressor response to AngII, with no significant effect on heart rate, indicating that vasopressin release is involved in the cardiovascular effect of AngII in the PVN. Overall, we found that AngII microinjected into the PVN produced a pressor response mediated by the sympathetic system and vasopressin release, indicating that other than circulating AngII, endogenous AngII of the PVN increases the vasopressin release from the PVN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduced tonicity stimulates an inflammatory response in nucleus pulposus tissue that can be limited by a COX-2-specific inhibitor.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Bart; Potier, Esther; van DIjk, Maarten; Langelaan, Marloes; Papen-Botterhuis, Nicole; Ito, Keita

    2015-11-01

    In intervertebral disc herniation with nucleus pulposus (NP) extrusion, the elicited inflammatory response is considered a key pain mechanism. However, inflammatory cytokines are reported in extruded herniated tissue, even before monocyte infiltration, suggesting that the tissue itself initiates the inflammation. Since herniated tissue swells, we investigated whether this simple mechanobiological stimulus alone could provoke an inflammatory response that could cause pain. Furthermore, we investigated whether sustained-release cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitor would be beneficial in such conditions. Healthy bovine NP explants were allowed to swell freely or confined. The swelling explants were treated with Celecoxib, applied either as a bolus or in sustained-release. Swelling explants produced elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) for 28 days, while confined explants did not. Both a high concentration bolus and 10 times lower concentration in sustained release completely inhibited PGE2 production, but did not affect IL-6 production. Swelling of NP tissue, without the inflammatory system response, can trigger cytokine production and Celecoxib, even in bolus form, may be useful for pain control in extruded disc herniation. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus counteracts cortical expression of major histocompatibility complex genes in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Grieb, Benjamin; Engler, Gerhard; Sharott, Andrew; von Nicolai, Constantin; Streichert, Thomas; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Schulte, Alexander; Westphal, Manfred; Lamszus, Katrin; Engel, Andreas K; Moll, Christian K E; Hamel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) is widely used as therapeutic intervention in patients suffering from advanced Parkinson's disease. STN-HFS exerts a powerful modulatory effect on cortical motor control by orthodromic modulation of basal ganglia outflow and via antidromic activation of corticofugal fibers. However, STN-HFS-induced changes of the sensorimotor cortex are hitherto unexplored. To address this question at a genomic level, we performed mRNA expression analyses using Affymetrix microarray gene chips and real-time RT-PCR in sensorimotor cortex of parkinsonian and control rats following STN-HFS. Experimental parkinsonism was induced in Brown Norway rats by bilateral nigral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine and was assessed histologically, behaviorally, and electrophysiologically. We applied prolonged (23h) unilateral STN-HFS in awake and freely moving animals, with the non-stimulated hemisphere serving as an internal control for gene expression analyses. Gene enrichment analysis revealed strongest regulation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) related genes. STN-HFS led to a cortical downregulation of several MHC class II (RT1-Da, Db1, Ba, and Cd74) and MHC class I (RT1CE) encoding genes. The same set of genes showed increased expression levels in a comparison addressing the effect of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning. Hence, our data suggest the possible association of altered microglial activity and synaptic transmission by STN-HFS within the sensorimotor cortex of 6-hydroxydopamine treated rats.

  14. Caffeine Induces a Stimulant Effect and Increases Dopamine Release in the Nucleus Accumbens Shell Through the Pulmonary Inhalation Route of Administration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Galvalisi, Martín; Prieto, José Pedro; Martínez, Marcela; Abin-Carriquiry, Juan Andrés; Scorza, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Oral, intraperitoneal, or intravenous have been the common routes of administration used to study the behavioral and neurochemical pharmacology of caffeine, one of the most widely used psychoactive substances worldwide. We have reported that caffeine is an active adulterant frequently found in coca-paste (CP)-seized samples, a highly addictive form of smokable cocaine. The role of caffeine in the psychostimulant and neurochemical effects induced by CP remains under study. No preclinical animal studies have been performed so far to characterize the effects of caffeine when it is administered through the pulmonary inhalation route. Caffeine (10, 25, and 50 mg) was volatilized and rats were exposed to one inhalation session of its vapor. The stimulant effect was automatically recorded and plasmatic levels of caffeine were measured. Caffeine capability (50 mg) to increase extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in nucleus accumbens shell was also studied by in vivo microdialysis in non-anesthetized animals. A dose-dependent stimulant effect induced by volatilized caffeine was observed and this effect was directly related with caffeine plasmatic levels. A significant increase in the extracellular DA was achieved after 50 mg of volatilized caffeine exposure. This is the first report showing pharmacological acute effects of caffeine through the pulmonary inhalation route of administration and suggests that this could be a condition under which caffeine can elevate its weak reinforcing effect and even enhance the psychostimulant effect and abuse liability of smokable adulterated psychostimulant drugs.

  15. The stereoisomer (+)-naloxone potentiates G-protein coupling and feeding associated with stimulation of mu opioid receptors in the parabrachial nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chaijale, Nayla N; Aloyo, Vincent J; Simansky, Kenny J

    2013-03-01

    Classically, opioids produce their effects by activating Gi-proteins that inhibit adenylate cyclase activity. Previous studies proposed that mu-opioid receptors can also stimulate adenylate cyclase due to an initial transient coupling to Gs-proteins. Treatment with ultra-low doses of the nonselective opioid antagonist (-)-naloxone or its inactive enantiomer (+)-naloxone blocks this excitatory effect and enhances Gi-coupling. Previously we reported that infusion of the mu-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Glycinol5]-Enkephalin (DAMGO) into the mu-opioid receptor expressing lateral parabrachial nucleus increases feeding. Pretreatment with (-)-naloxone blocks this effect. We used this parabrachial circuit as a model to assess cellular actions of ultra-low doses of (-)-naloxone and (+)-naloxone in modifying the effects of DAMGO. Our results showed that an ultra-low concentration of (-)-naloxone (0.001 nM) and several concentrations of (+)-naloxone (0.01-10 nM) enhanced DAMGO-stimulated guanosine-5'-0-(γ-thio)-triphosphate incorporation in parabrachial sections in vitro. Further, we analyzed the relevance of these effects in vivo. In the present study, we show that (+)-naloxone can potentiate DAMGO-induced feeding at doses at which (-)-naloxone was an antagonist. These results implicated (+)-naloxone as a novel tool for studying mu-opioid receptor functions and suggest that (+)-naloxone may have therapeutic value to enhance clinical actions of opiate drugs.

  16. Stimulation of the nucleus raphe medialis modifies basal synaptic transmission at the dentate gyrus, but not long-term potentiation or its reinforcement by stimulation of the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Bergado, Jorge A; Scherf, Thomas; Almaguer-Melian, William; Frey, Sabine; López, Jeffrey; Frey, Julietta U

    2009-10-30

    Affective factors importantly interact with behavior and memory. Physiological mechanisms that underlie such interactions are objects of intensive studies. This involves the direct investigation of its relevance to understand learning and memory formation as well as the search for possibilities to treat memory disorders. The prolonged maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP) - a cellular model for memory formation - is characterized by neuromodulatory, associative requirements. During the last years, we have delineated a neural system that may be responsible for affective-cognitive interactions at the cellular level. The stimulation of the basolateral amygdala (BLA), within an effective, associative time window, reinforces a normally transient, protein synthesis-independent early-LTP (less than 4-6h) into a long-lasting, protein synthesis-dependent late-LTP in the dentate gyrus (DG) in freely moving rats (Frey et al., 2001 [12]). LTP reinforcement by stimulation of the BLA was mediated by cholinergic projection of the medial septum to the DG, and the noradrenergic projection from the locus coeruleus (Bergado et al., 2007 [2]). We were now interested to investigate a possible interaction of the nucleus raphe medialis (NRM) with DG-LTP. Although, NRM stimulation resulted in a depressing effect on basal synaptic transmission, we did not observe any interactions with early-LTP or with the BLA-DG LTP-reinforcement system.

  17. c-Fos expression in the parabrachial nucleus following intraoral bitter stimulation in the rat with dietary-induced zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Akiyo; Honma, Shiho; Inui-Yamamoto, Chizuko; Ito, Akira; Niwa, Hitoshi; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2017-03-15

    Zinc deficiency causes various symptoms including taste disorders. In the present study, changes in expression of c-Fos immunoreactivity in neurons of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN), one of the relay nuclei for transmission of gustatory information, after bitter stimulation to the dorsal surface of the tongue were examined in zinc-deficient rats. Experimental zinc-deficient animals were created by feeding a low-zinc diet for 4weeks, and showed the following symptoms of zinc deficiency: low body weight, low serum zinc content and behavioral changes to avoid bitter stimulation. In normal control animals, intraoral application of 1mM quinine caused increased numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive (c-Fos-IR) neurons in the external lateral subnucleus and external medial subnucleus of the PBN (elPBN and emPBN, respectively) compared with application of distilled water. However, in the zinc-deficient animals, the numbers of c-Fos-IR neurons in the elPBN and emPBN did not differ significantly between application of quinine and distilled water. After feeding the zinc-deficient animals a normal diet for 4weeks, the symptoms of zinc deficiency recovered, and the expression of c-Fos-IR neurons following intraoral bitter stimulation became identical to that in the normal control animals. The present results indicate that dietary zinc deficiency causes alterations to neuronal activities in the gustatory neural circuit, and that these neuronal alterations can be reversed by changing to a normal diet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Inverted-U shaped effects of D1 dopamine receptor stimulation in the medial preoptic nucleus on sexually motivated song in male European starlings.

    PubMed

    Riters, Lauren V; Pawlisch, Benjamin A; Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A; Stevenson, Sharon A

    2014-02-01

    Past studies in songbirds have highlighted a central role for the medial preoptic nucleus (mPOA) in context-appropriate vocal communication. During the breeding season, male songbirds sing primarily to attract females (sexually motivated song) and to repel competitors (agonistically motivated song). Past data have linked dopamine and D1 dopamine receptors in the mPOA to sexually motivated but not agonistically motivated song; however, direct effects of dopamine receptor manipulations in the mPOA on song have not been experimentally tested. Here, we tested the hypothesis that D1 receptor stimulation in the mPOA selectively influences sexually motivated male song, and the possibility that the effects of D1 receptor agonism differ at low and high doses. In a first study, breeding-condition male European starlings received infusions of saline or a single dose of the D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 on separate test days into the mPOA or hypothalamic control areas. Stimulation of D1 receptors in the mPOA triggered sexually motivated but not agonistically motivated song. A second study showed inverted-U shaped dose-response effects of the agonist, such that low levels of sexually motivated song were observed at low and high levels of D1 receptor activation. A third study showed that the effects of the D1 receptor agonist were blocked by the D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. These findings suggest that an optimal level of D1 receptor stimulation in the mPOA is needed to facilitate sexually motivated vocal production. The results support a central, context-specific role for the mPOA in vocal communication, and more broadly demonstrate a complex, modulatory influence of D1 receptors in the mPOA on sexually motivated behavior. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Load-Dependent Interference of Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus with Switching from Automatic to Controlled Processing During Random Number Generation in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Isobel Anne; Wilkinson, Leonora; Limousin, Patricia; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) ameliorates the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, some aspects of executive control are impaired with STN DBS. We tested the prediction that (i) STN DBS interferes with switching from automatic to controlled processing during fast-paced random number generation (RNG) (ii) STN DBS-induced cognitive control changes are load-dependent. Fifteen PD patients with bilateral STN DBS performed paced-RNG, under three levels of cognitive load synchronised with a pacing stimulus presented at 1, 0.5 and 0.33 Hz (faster rates require greater cognitive control), with DBS on or off. Measures of output randomness were calculated. Countscore 1 (CS1) indicates habitual counting in steps of one (CS1). Countscore 2 (CS2) indicates a more controlled strategy of counting in twos. The fastest rate was associated with an increased CS1 score with STN DBS on compared to off. At the slowest rate, patients had higher CS2 scores with DBS off than on, such that the differences between CS1 and CS2 scores disappeared. We provide evidence for a load-dependent effect of STN DBS on paced RNG in PD. Patients could switch to more controlled RNG strategies during conditions of low cognitive load at slower rates only when the STN stimulators were off, but when STN stimulation was on, they engaged in more automatic habitual counting under increased cognitive load. These findings are consistent with the proposal that the STN implements a switch signal from the medial frontal cortex which enables a shift from automatic to controlled processing.

  20. Low-frequency stimulation in anterior nucleus of thalamus alleviates kainate-induced chronic epilepsy and modulates the hippocampal EEG rhythm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Liang, Jiao; Xu, Cenglin; Wang, Ying; Kuang, Yifang; Xu, Zhenghao; Guo, Yi; Wang, Shuang; Gao, Feng; Chen, Zhong

    2016-02-01

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the anterior nucleus of thalamus (ANT) is a new and alternative option for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. However, the responder rate is relatively low. The present study was designed to determine the effect of low-frequency stimulation (LFS) in ANT on chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures and related pathological pattern in intra-hippocampal kainate mouse model. We found that LFS (1 Hz, 100 μs, 300 μA), but not HFS (100 Hz, 100 μs, 30 μA), in bilateral ANT significantly decreased the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures, either non-convulsive focal seizures or tonic-clonic generalized seizures. The anti-epileptic effect persisted for one week after LFS cessation, which manifested as a long-term inhibition of the frequency of seizures with short (20-60 s) and intermediate duration (60-120 s). Meanwhile, LFS decreased the frequency of high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) and interictal spikes, two indicators of seizure severity, whereas HFS increased the HFO frequency. Furthermore, LFS decreased the power of the delta band and increased the power of the gamma band of hippocampal background EEG. In addition, LFS, but not HFS, improved the performance of chronic epileptic mice in objection-location task, novel objection recognition and freezing test. These results provide the first evidence that LFS in ANT alleviates kainate-induced chronic epilepsy and cognitive impairment, which may be related to the modulation of the hippocampal EEG rhythm. This may be of great therapeutic significance for clinical treatment of epilepsy with deep brain stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Deep brain stimulation reveals a dissociation of consummatory and motivated behaviour in the medial and lateral nucleus accumbens shell of the rat.

    PubMed

    van der Plasse, Geoffrey; Schrama, Regina; van Seters, Sebastiaan P; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Westenberg, Herman G M

    2012-01-01

    Following the successful application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and promising results in clinical trials for obsessive compulsive disorder and major depression, DBS is currently being tested in small patient-populations with eating disorders and addiction. However, in spite of its potential use in a broad spectrum of disorders, the mechanisms of action of DBS remain largely unclear and optimal neural targets for stimulation in several disorders have yet to be established. Thus, there is a great need to examine site-specific effects of DBS on a behavioural level and to understand how DBS may modulate pathological behaviour. In view of the possible application of DBS in the treatment of disorders characterized by impaired processing of reward and motivation, like addiction and eating disorders, we examined the effect of DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) on food-directed behavior. Rats were implanted with bilateral stimulation electrodes in one of three anatomically and functionally distinct sub-areas of the NAcc: the core, lateral shell (lShell) and medial shell (mShell). Subsequently, we studied the effects of DBS on food consumption, and the motivational and appetitive properties of food. The data revealed a functional dissociation between the lShell and mShell. DBS of the lShell reduced motivation to respond for sucrose under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement, mShell DBS, however, profoundly and selectively increased the intake of chow. DBS of the NAcc core did not alter any form of food-directed behavior studied. DBS of neither structure affected sucrose preference. These data indicate that the intake of chow and the motivation to work for palatable food can independently be modulated by DBS of subregions of the NAcc shell. As such, these findings provide important leads for the possible future application of DBS as a treatment for eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa.

  2. Load-Dependent Interference of Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus with Switching from Automatic to Controlled Processing During Random Number Generation in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Isobel Anne; Wilkinson, Leonora; Limousin, Patricia; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) ameliorates the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, some aspects of executive control are impaired with STN DBS. Objective: We tested the prediction that (i) STN DBS interferes with switching from automatic to controlled processing during fast-paced random number generation (RNG) (ii) STN DBS-induced cognitive control changes are load-dependent. Methods: Fifteen PD patients with bilateral STN DBS performed paced-RNG, under three levels of cognitive load synchronised with a pacing stimulus presented at 1, 0.5 and 0.33 Hz (faster rates require greater cognitive control), with DBS on or off. Measures of output randomness were calculated. Countscore 1 (CS1) indicates habitual counting in steps of one (CS1). Countscore 2 (CS2) indicates a more controlled strategy of counting in twos. Results: The fastest rate was associated with an increased CS1 score with STN DBS on compared to off. At the slowest rate, patients had higher CS2 scores with DBS off than on, such that the differences between CS1 and CS2 scores disappeared. Conclusions: We provide evidence for a load-dependent effect of STN DBS on paced RNG in PD. Patients could switch to more controlled RNG strategies during conditions of low cognitive load at slower rates only when the STN stimulators were off, but when STN stimulation was on, they engaged in more automatic habitual counting under increased cognitive load. These findings are consistent with the proposal that the STN implements a switch signal from the medial frontal cortex which enables a shift from automatic to controlled processing. PMID:25720447

  3. Contrasting effects of 5-HT3 receptor stimulation of the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmentum on food intake in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Wayne E; Lin, Peagan; Pierce-Messick, Zachary; Ilesanmi, Adeolu O; Clissold, Kara A

    2017-04-14

    Although serotonin (5-HT) signaling is known to regulate food intake and energy homeostasis, the roles of the 5-HT3 receptor in feeding processes have been elusive. 5-HT3 receptors are found throughout mesolimbic circuitry that promote feeding not only in response to hunger, but also to the palatable and rewarding properties of food. These experiments examined if stimulation or blockade of the 5-HT3 receptor of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) or ventral tegmentum affected food intake in the rat in response to hunger or the presence of a palatable diet. Rats (N=6-9/group) received bilateral injections of the 5-HT3 agonist m-chlorophenylbiguanide hydrochloride (mCPBG; at 0.0, 10.0, or 20.0μg/0.5μl/side) or the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron hydrochloride (at 0.0, 1.0, 2.0, or 5.0μg/0.5μl/side) into either the NAcc or the ventral tegmentum. NAcc 5-HT3 receptor stimulation significantly increased 2-h food intake in food-deprived animals offered rat chow and in a separate group of unrestricted rats offered a sweetened fat diet. In contrast to the feeding increase seen with NAcc treatments, stimulation of 5-HT3 receptors of the ventral tegmentum significantly reduced food and water intake in food-restricted animals; reductions of intake in non-restricted rats offered the palatable diet did not approach significance. Blockade of the 5-HT3 receptor had no effect on feeding in either brain region. These data support a functional role for serotonergic signaling in the mesolimbic pathway on motivated behavior, and demonstrate that 5-HT3 receptors differentially modulate food consumption in a region-dependent manner.

  4. Response of neurons in the thalamic nucleus submedius (Sm) to noxious stimulation and electrophysiological identification of on- and off-cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian-Jun; Tang, Jing-Shi; Yuan, Bin; Jia, Hong

    2002-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that thalamic nucleus submedius (Sm) is involved in nociceptive modulation and plays an important role in an endogenous analgesic system (a feedback loop) consisting of spinal cord (Sc)-Sm-ventrolateral orbital cortex-periaqueductal gray-Sc. However, the function of different types of Sm neurons in nociceptive modulation is unclear. For this reason, on the basis of further studies of properties of the Sm neurons responding to noxious stimuli, the different effects of systemic morphine on the Sm neurons were examined and two classes of nociceptive modulatory neurons, named as off- and on-cells, in this region were identified in lightly anesthetized rats. The results showed that (1) most (84%, 132/157) of the Sm neurons responded to peripheral noxious stimuli. Of these neurons, 66% (n = 87) were inhibited, 34% (n = 45) excited. All neurons had very large and bilateral, even all body receptive fields. No neuron was found to be responsive to innocuous stimulation; (2) systemic morphine increased the firing rate of neurons inhibited by noxious stimulation, but decreased that of neurons excited by the same stimulation. Furthermore, the effects of morphine could be reversed by systemic naloxone; (3) 45 of Sm neurons examined could be divided into three different classes: off-cells that decreased the firing rate from tail heating just prior to occurrence of the tail-flick (TF) reflex (3140 +/- 167 ms, n = 27), on-cells that increased t