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  1. Burke and Nietzsche.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawhee, Debra

    1999-01-01

    Explores the complex linkages between K. Burke and F. Nietzsche, particularly regarding Burke's concept of perspective by incongruity, motive, terministic screens, and dramatism. Focuses on how Nietzsche's philosophy helped shape Burke's views on the nature of language and the effects language produces. Considers Nietzsche's influence on Burke's…

  2. Teaching Burke Using Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Charles U.

    Kenneth Burke's concepts of identification, the five terms of dramatism, and strategic uses of ambiguity can be successfully taught to undergraduates if appropriate and familiar examples are used. Print and electronic advertising offer the instructor an up-to-date, familiar, and abundant source of classroom examples. Market segmentation models…

  3. Professor Jensen, Meet Miss Burks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberger, Arthur S.

    This paper critically examines the portions of Arthur Jensen's books, "Genetics and Education" and "Educability and Group Differences," that concern Barbara Burks' 1928 study of adoptive families. Jensen cites the low correlations of children's IQs with measures of home environment from Burks' study as evidence that environment plays only a minor…

  4. Burke and Academia: Revenge of the Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambkin, David J.

    Kenneth Burke was a college dropout who did not enjoy notable success until quite late in life. His major interest was the development of a meta-theory of language, which he called "rhetoric." Denied the resources and material rewards of academia, Burke was both scapegoated and redeemed by the academic community. Furthermore, the scapegoaters and…

  5. Catolaccus grandis (Burks)(Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catolaccus grandis is an ectoparasitoid of the boll weevil classified initially within the genus Heterolaccus (Burks 1954). It was first introduced to the U.S. during the early 1970’s and released in experimental fields in Mississippi State, MS (Johnson et al. 1973). Researchers observed encouraging...

  6. Antithetical Ethics: Kenneth Burke and the Constitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Virginia

    1995-01-01

    Shows how the textuality of the United States Constitution, the most venerable of classic democratic icons, might be exploited to nurture postmodern ethics. Shows how Kenneth Burke's reading of the Constitution accords with and augments the postmodern theories of J.-F. Lyotard and S. Jarratt. Discusses a postmodern Constitution and the…

  7. Attitudes toward Education: Kenneth Burke and New Rhetoric

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutten, Kris; Soetaert, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    In this article we introduce the special issue "Attitudes Toward Education: Kenneth Burke and New Rhetoric," which brings together a number of contributions that were first presented at the conference "Rhetoric as Equipment for Living. Kenneth Burke, Culture and Education" (Ghent University, May 2013). Kenneth Burke [1897-1993]…

  8. Burke Bingo: Using Active Learning to Introduce Dramatism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Ben

    2011-01-01

    Kenneth Burke is typically regarded as the single most significant figure in 20th-century rhetorical studies. Undergraduate textbooks in rhetorical criticism, rhetorical theory, and communication theory typically include coverage of Burke's theory of dramatism. In this article, the author describes a classroom activity dubbed "Burke Bingo" that…

  9. Becoming Symbol-Wise: Kenneth Burke's Pedagogy of Critical Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enoch, Jessica

    2004-01-01

    In this essay, I analyze Kenneth Burke's Cold War pedagogy and explore the ways it connects to (and complicates) Paulo Freire's conception of praxis. I argue that Burke's theory and practice adds a rhetorical nuance to critical reflection and then envision how his 1955 educational concerns gain significance for teachers and scholars today who,…

  10. Kenneth Burke's Appendicitis: A Feminist's Case for Complaint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worsham, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    Demonstrates the relationship of disease and language in Kenneth Burke's work, tracing it to a chronic symbolic condition, the symptoms of which are found in his frequent recourse to the genre of the appendix and its close relations--the postscript, the addendum, and the afterward. Discusses Burke's work from a feminist and anatomical perspective.…

  11. 78 FR 59955 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum... Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington (Burke Museum), has completed an... of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Burke Museum. If...

  12. Obituary: Edward W. Burke, Jr. (1924-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomer, Raymond, Jr.

    2011-12-01

    Dr. Edward W. Burke Jr. passed away on June 15, 2011, after suffering a heart attack. Dr. Burke devoted his professional life to the research and teaching of physics and astronomy at King College in Bristol, Tennessee. Edward W. Burke, Jr., was born in Macon, Georgia, on September 16, 1924. He was a Navy veteran, having been commissioned as an ensign in 1944. He served in the Pacific near the end of World War II. He proceeded to complete his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Presbyterian College in 1947 and pursued the M.S. and Ph.D. in physics (1949 and 1954, respectively) at the University of Wisconsin. Under the direction of Professor Julian Mack, his thesis was titled "Isotope Shift in the Spectra of Boron." Although he did research in atomic spectra in the early part of his career, his interest in astronomy and variable stars in particular were his primary interests during his long academic career. Dr. Burke began his illustrious career at King College in 1949. He initiated the astronomy program there in 1950, included constructing a 12.5 inch Newtonian telescope, homemade as was most everything in those days. Many of his students learned about photometry at the Burke Observatory on the college campus. Burke was known for his trips to the Kitt Peak and Lowell observatories accompanied by undergraduate students on his trips, all of which were made by automobile which he preferred over flying. His initial interest in Ap stars later broadened into variable and especially eclipsing binary stars. His motivation was maintained by his desire to have his students experience basic research and to spark their interest in advanced degrees. Numerous students achieved advanced science and medical degrees because of Burke's encouragement and mentoring. In 1959, Dr. Burke was awarded a Fulbright professorship and traveled to Chile where he taught physics for a year in the Engineering School at the University of Chile in Santiago. He worked to establish a physics

  13. Burke, Nietzsche, Lacan: Three Perspectives on the Rhetoric of Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Douglas

    1993-01-01

    Examines the complex relationship between rhetoric and order in the works of Kenneth Burke, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Jacques Lacan. Argues for three differing, yet complementary, views of rhetoric and order, each having a corresponding epistemology and axiology. Concludes with an analysis of the construction of order in Thomas Hobbe's "Leviathan."…

  14. "The Moon Ring": A Conversation with Randy DuBurke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how the author, currently Editor-at-Large of Chronicle Books, chooses books to publish and discusses four attributes in a book that catch her eye. Presents an interview with Randy DuBurke and a conversation about his first picture book, "The Moon Ring." (SG)

  15. "The Piety of Degradation": Kenneth Burke, the Bureau of Social Hygiene, and "Permanence and Change"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Jordynn

    2004-01-01

    Kenneth Burke's employment with the Bureau of Social Hygiene informed his rhetorical theory in the 1930s. Between 1926 and 1930, Burke researched criminology and drug addiction and ghostwrote a book for Colonel Arthur Woods, "Dangerous Drugs". An investigation of archives indicates that this research left its mark on Burke's "Permanence and…

  16. "The Piety of Degradation": Kenneth Burke, the Bureau of Social Hygiene, and "Permanence and Change"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Jordynn

    2004-01-01

    Kenneth Burke's employment with the Bureau of Social Hygiene informed his rhetorical theory in the 1930s. Between 1926 and 1930, Burke researched criminology and drug addiction and ghostwrote a book for Colonel Arthur Woods, Dangerous Drugs. An investigation of archives indicates that this research left its mark on Burke's Permanence and Change…

  17. 75 FR 36671 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... the Federal Register (75 FR 5105-5106, February 1, 2010). In the Federal Register, paragraph number 7... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum... funerary objects in the possession of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke...

  18. Triaxial Burke-Schumann Flames with Applications to Flame Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. H.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Gokoglu, Suleyman (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The problem of a flame generated by three coaxial flows is solved by extending the Burke-Schumann methodology to include a third stream. The solution is particularly relevant to flame synthesis wherein multiple tubes are often employed either to introduce inert as a diffusion barrier or to introduce more than two reactants. The general problem is solved where the inner and outer tubes contain reactants and the middle tube contains either an inert or a third reactant. Relevant examples are considered and the results show that the triaxial Burke-Schumann flame can be substantially more complicated than the traditional Burke-Schumann flame. When the middle flow is inert the flame temperature is no longer constant but increases axially, reaching a maximum at the flame centerline. At the exit the flame does not sit on the tube exit but instead resides between the inner and outer tubes, resulting in an effective barrier for particle build-up on the burner rim. For the case of a third reactant in the middle flow, synthesis chemistry where the inner reaction is endothermic and the outer reaction is exothermic is considered. In addition to showing the flame temperature and flame shape, the results identify conditions wherein reaction is not possible due to insufficient heat transfer from the outer flame to support the inner flame reaction.

  19. Burke's Dialogic Theory: An Epistemology of Interpretive Practice for Poetry Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Melissa Ann

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes K. Burke's dialogic theories and exemplifies how they describe not only Edward Burne-Jones's interpretations of his paintings, but also his painted interpretations of poetry. Discusses how Burke's epistemology of interpretive practice contributes to the discipline of poetry therapy. (SG)

  20. 75 FR 434 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Coroner's Office to the Burke Museum in 1965 (Burke Accn. 1966-77). All human remains are now missing. No... language group of Salish cultures. The Duwamish people primarily occupied this area, specifically the Lake people (Swanton 1952:423). In the 1870s, as the City of Seattle developed, the Lake people were...

  1. "More Than Lessons in How To Read": Burke, Freud, and the Resources of Symbolic Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quandahl, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Argues that Kenneth Burke used "The Interpretation of Dreams," as well as other works by Sigmund Freud, as a lesson on reading, taking over the central tropes of dreamwork and making them broadly dialectical rather than strictly psychoanalytic terms. Suggests that Freud's "tropology" of dreaming is crucial for reading Burke. (SG)

  2. Burke's Method of Dramatism and Its Use as a Tool for Teaching Developmental Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raign, Kathryn Rosser

    Many basic writers, who are virtually unable to create a coherent paragraph, are nonetheless capable of presenting orally well-constructed narratives of depth and feeling. Thus, teachers must try to get students to harness the strength of their oral abilities to improve their writing skills, and Kenneth Burke's pentad may provide a key. Burke's…

  3. Equipment for Thinking: Or Why Kenneth Burke Is Still Worth Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In a market place crowded with practical rhetoric books what educational value could a challenging work such as Kenneth Burke's "A Rhetoric of Motives" (1950) possibly have? Burke knows but doesn't use the terminology of the classical art and rather than analysing the persuasive rhetoric of well-known speeches to equip us with…

  4. 75 FR 36672 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum... Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed... sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the...

  5. Structure and Stability of Burke-Schumann Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yong G.; Chen, Lea-Der; Brooker, John E.; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1997-01-01

    The general goal of this NASA Grant is twofold: to improve our understanding of (1) the influence of buoyancy on the stability and structure of Burke-Schumann type diffusion flames, and (2) the effects of buoyancy on vortex-flame interactions in co-flow diffusion flames. A numerical code with a higher order accuracy for spatial discretization is developed in this project for simulation of time-dependent diffusion flames by Sheu and Sheu and Chen, and an extended reduced mechanism is incorporated for prediction of methane oxidation and NO(x)(NO, NO2, and N2O) formation and emission from methane Burke-Schumann diffusion flame (BSDF) as reported in Sheu, and Sheu and Chen. Initial investigation of vortex and flame interaction within the context of fast chemistry is reported. Experiments are conducted in reduced pressure to study the lift-off and stabilization of methane-fueled BSDF in reduced buoyancy environments due to reduced pressure. Measurements of temperature and species concentrations are made in normal and reduced pressure environments to study the effects of buoyancy on the structure of BSDF, and will be reported in this paper. To study the buoyancy effects on the lift-off and stabilization of methane-fueled jet diffusion flames in coflowing air, a glovebox investigation, Enclosed Laminar Flames (ELF), has been proposed and approved for space-based testing on the fourth United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-4) mission, scheduled for October 1997. A brief description of the ELF investigation is also presented.

  6. Dynamic response of a pulsed Burke-Schumann diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheu, Jyh-Cherng; Stocker, Dennis P.; Chen, Lea-Der

    1995-01-01

    Turbulent flames are often envisioned as an ensemble of random vortices interacting with the combustion process. A better understanding of the vortex-flame interactions therefore would be useful in improving the modeling of turbulent diffusion flames. Substantial simplification may be made by investigating controlled interactions in a laminar flame, as opposed to random interactions in a turbulent flame. The general goals of the research project are to improve our understanding of (1) the influence of buoyancy on co-flow diffusion flames and (2) the effects of buoyancy on vortex-flame interactions in co-flow diffusion flames. As a first step toward objective (2), we conducted a joint experimental and numerical investigation of the vortex-flame interaction. Vortices were produced by mechanically pulsing the fuel flow at a low frequency, e.g., 10 Hz. Experiments were conducted using a nonflickering Burke-Schumann flame in both microgravity (mu-g) and normal gravity (1g) as a means of varying the buoyant force without modification of the pressure (i.e., density). The effects of buoyant convection may then be determined by a comparison of the mu-g and 1g results. The mu-g results may also reveal the important mechanisms which are masked or overwhelmed by buoyant convection in 1g. A numerical investigation was conducted using a validated, time-accurate numerical code to study the underlying physics during the flame interaction and to assist the interpretation of the experimental results.

  7. Lightcurve Analysis of 3948 Bohr and 4874 Burke: An International Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinglesmith, Daniel A., III; Risley, Ethan; Turk, Janek; Vargas, Angelica; Warren, Curtis; Ferrero, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    An international collaboration provided complete coverage of the 24.884 ± 0.002 h period for 3948 Bohr and a confirmation of a 3.657 ± 0.001 h period for 4874 Burke. The amplitudes were A = 0.89 ± 0.10 mag for 3948 Bohr and A = 0.22 ± 0.07 mag for 4874 Burke.

  8. A detailed numerical investigation of Burke-Schumann gaseous and spray flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawid, M. A.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    1991-01-01

    The classical Burke-Schumann gaseous diffusion flame, and the effect of introducing fuel in the form of liquid sprays are investigated numerically. The time-dependent two-dimensional, axisymmetric conservation equations are solved for the gas phase. A Lagrangian approach is used for the dispersed phase. The chemical reactions are modeled through the one-step global reaction scheme. The numerical results show that the computed flame structure is significantly different from that given by the analytical solution. The computed flame is about 15 percent longer and 5 percent narrower than the classical Burke-Schumann flame. The predicted flame shape is, however, in better agreement with experimental observations than the Burke-Schumann flame. The effects of introducing liquid sprays is found to produce thinner and longer flames than its counterpart gaseous flame. A detailed comparison of the structures of gaseous and spray flames is made, and the differences are discussed.

  9. Geology and paleontology of five cores from Screven and Burke counties, eastern Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Lucy E.

    2001-01-01

    Five deep stratigraphic test holes were drilled from 1991 to 1993 in support of multidisciplinary investigations to determine the stratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments of the coastal plain in east-central Georgia. Cored sediment and geological logs from the Millhaven test hole in Screven County and the Girard and Millers Pond test holes in Burke County are the primary sources of lithologic and paleontologic information from this report. Lithologic and paleontologic information from the Thompson Oak and McBean test holes in Burke County supplements the discussion of stratigraphy and sedimentation in the updip part of the study area near the Millers Pond test hole.

  10. Celebrating 50 Years of Service: A Conversation with Mary Thomas Burke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassar-McMillan, Sylvia C.

    2001-01-01

    Mary Thomas Burke, known affectionately to many in Charlotte, North Carolina, as "Sister," has devoted over 50 of the past years of her life to service. In this interview, she explores the paths that her service endeavors have followed, the influences and turning points in her life, and shares her insights on achieving balance in service and in…

  11. 75 FR 14467 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Pierce College District, Lakewood, WA, and Thomas Burke Memorial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Pierce College District, Lakewood, WA, and Thomas... in the control of the Pierce College District, Lakewood, WA, and in the physical custody of the... Pierce College professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Burke Museum and...

  12. Language as Sensuous Action: Sir Richard Paget, Kenneth Burke, and Gesture-Speech Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawhee, Debra

    2006-01-01

    This somatic genealogy of Dramatism's core terms--symbolic action, attitude, identification--argues for the importance of keeping rhetoric, rhetorical theory, and rhetorical pedagogy more closely tied to bodies that generate, induce, and respond to rhetoric. It does so by examining Burke's use of Sir Richard Paget's theory that spoken language…

  13. Embracing Profiiciency and Program Standards and Rising to the Challenge: A Response to Burke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedick, Diane J.

    2013-01-01

    In her paper, Burke questions whether top-down proficiency mandates will positively impact teacher practice. Her main argument is the following: The requirement that foreign language (FL) teachers demonstrate an advanced level of proficiency does not guarantee that they will be more effective K-12 FL teachers; on this point, the author agrees with…

  14. Implementing "Abbott v. Burke": A Guide to the 2006 K-12 Abbott Regulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Law Center, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Except for school construction, there is no legislation to guide implementation of the programs and reforms ordered by the New Jersey Supreme Court in the landmark "Abbott v. Burke" case. Instead, in its 1998 "Abbott V decision," the Supreme Court directed the Commissioner of Education to provide standards and procedures to Abbott districts and…

  15. A Case for Item-Level Indexing: The Kenneth Burke Papers at The Pennsylvania State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabre, Jeannette Mercer; Hamburger, Susan

    2008-01-01

    In light of numerous discussions about whether to follow Mark Greene and Dennis Meissner's suggestions to process lightly and broadly, valid reasons remain for continuing traditional practices for many literary correspondence collections. In this case study, the authors use the Kenneth Burke Papers in the Special Collections Library, Pennsylvania…

  16. 76 FR 58031 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... (NIC) describing 4 individuals and 42 associated funerary objects removed from the Cedar Cave site was published in the Federal Register [72 FR 52391-52392, September 13, 2007]. The Burke Museum and Central... Items In 1953-1954, human remains were removed from the Cedar Cave Site (45-KT-20), in Kittitas...

  17. One Hundred Years of Reading Research: Successes and Missteps of Edmund Burke Huey and Other Pioneers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walczyk, Jeffrey J.; Tcholakian, Talar; Igou, Frank; Dixon, Alexa P.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 100 years, research on the psychology of reading has proliferated. In this article, the authors wish to help modern reading researchers understand the origins of the discipline and benefit from its history. This article draws heavily on Edmund Burke Huey's 1908 landmark volume "The Psychology and Pedagogy of Reading,"…

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Energy distribution in pulsars (Burke-Spolaor+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke-Spolaor, S.; Johnston, S.; Bailes, M.; Bates, S. D.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Champion, D. J.; D'Amico, N.; Keith, M. J.; Kramer, M.; Levin, L.; Milia, S.; Possenti, A.; Stappers, B.; van Straten, W.

    2013-04-01

    The initial pulsar set included all pulsars in the med-lat survey region as queried through the online ATNF Pulsar Database (http://www.atnf.csiro.au/research/pulsar/psrcat/). We selected the observation of smallest angular distance within 0.25° to each pulsar, yielding 1159 observations near 1113 pulsars (some had multiple observations at roughly equal distance to the pulsar). We scrutinized the HTRU Fourier and single-pulse search results for each observation (as described in Keith et al., 2010MNRAS.409..619K and Burke-Spolaor et al., 2011MNRAS.416.2465B, respectively) to determine the pulsar's detectability. (1 data file).

  19. Factors related to establishment of Prosopis caldenia Burk. seedlings in central rangelands of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villalobos, A. E.; Peláez, D. V.; Elia, O. R.

    2005-03-01

    Prosopis caldenia Burk. is one of the woody species that is increasing in abundance due to poor grazing management in the semi-arid phytogeographic region of central Argentina, commonly known as the Caldenal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of herbaceous cover, cattle dung, soil disturbance, and water supply on emergence and survival of P. caldenia seedlings on sites with different grazing histories: (i) a site exposed to long-term continuous grazing by cattle (grazed site), and (ii) a long-term exclosure to domestic livestock (ungrazed site). Removal of grass cover, addition of cattle dung, and water supply enhanced seedling emergence and survival, especially in the grazed site. Results suggest that factors (direct and indirect) associated with prolonged grazing history markedly affect P. caldenia establishment. This in turn alters the grass-woody plant balance, which might reduce the potential capacity of livestock production in the Caldenal.

  20. Composing Dialogues To Express Self-Differentiation and Burke's Rhetoric: A Way To Comprehend Multilevel Inner Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, M. Ann

    2000-01-01

    This essay discusses the use of dialogue composition with gifted students in the context of Kenneth Burke's (1945) theory of rhetoric of empathic identification, which aims to develop higher order metacognitive skills and develop the art of interpretation. An example of the use of "Alice in Wonderland" to stimulate dialogue composition is…

  1. It Is the Poem that I Remake: Using Kenneth Burke's Pentad to Help Students Write about Robert Frost's 'Mending Wall.'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comprone, Joseph J.

    The teaching-questioning strategy developed in this paper, based on reader-response criticism and Kenneth Burke's pentad, can be used by teachers to elicit responses to any literary work and is designed to help students participate in a work's dramatic context, discover meaning as they read, and assure that their critical essays are based on an…

  2. "If Your Roommate Dies, You Get A 4.0": Reclaiming Rumor with Burke and Organizational Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheibel, Dean

    1999-01-01

    Argues for a reconsideration of rumor from an interpretive perspective and articulates a theoretical perspective that combines organizational culture with Burke's guilt-purification-redemption cycle. Concludes that students use rumor to make sense of and to cope with problematic aspects of their university-life pertaining to roommates, academic…

  3. Depositional model for Rival and Midale subintervals (Mississippian), north-central Burke County, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, T.L.

    1988-07-01

    The Rival and Midale subintervals (Charles Formation, Upper Mississippian), north-central Burke County, North Dakota, represent two relative sea level fluctuations. Updip (northeast), the Rival subinterval contains fine to medium-bedded and chicken-wire anhydrite with interbedded algal bindstone that was deposited on supratidal flats. Basinward (southwest), the lithology changes to oncolitic, peloidal, intraclastic grainstone/packstone that was deposited in intertidal and subtidal restricted lagoonal environments. Evaporites precipitated in the sediment of the intertidal to shallow subtidal restricted lagoonal environment. Overlying the Rival subinterval is skeletal wackestone and packstone of the lower Midale subinterval. The presence of normal-marine fauna (crinoids, brachiopods, trilobites, rugose and tabulate coral) indicates a significant relative sea level transgression occurred following deposition of the Rival. The middle and upper Midale subinterval consists of intensely burrowed dolowackestone and dolomudstone that contain a less diversified faunal assemblage. Overlying the Midale carbonates is a transitional zone of calcareous shale and dolomite that grades upward into mottled (burrowed.) and finely laminated microgranular dolomite and anhydrite. The upper Midale section represents a relative sea level regression (shoreline progradation). Updip (northeast) reservoirs produce from the Midale carbonates, which are sealed laterally and vertically by calcarous shale and microgranular dolomitic anhydrite of the Midale Evaporite. Downdip (southwest), the Rival produces from porous grainstone, which is sealed laterally by intertidal/supratidal carbonates and evaporites, resulting in a stratigraphic trap. Vuggy and intergranular porosity are the major porosity types in the Rival grainstone, and moldic and intercrystalline porosity are dominant in the Midale dolowackestone.

  4. Physical stratigraphy and hydrostratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene sediments, Burke and Screven Counties, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falls, W.F.; Baum, J.S.; Prowell, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    Six geologic units are recognized in the Cretaceous and the Paleocene sediments of eastern Burke and Screven Counties in Georgia on the basis of lithologic, geophysical, and paleontologic data collected from three continuously cored testholes in Georgia and one testhole in South Carolina. The six geologic units are separated by regional unconformities and are designated from oldest to youngest as the Cape Fear Formation, the Middendorf Formation, the Black Creek Group (undivided), and the Steel Creek Formation in the Upper Cretaceous section, and the Ellenton and the Snapp Formations in the Paleocene section. The geologic units provide a spatial and temporal framework for the identification and correlation of a basal confining unit beneath the Midville aquifer system and five aquifers and five confining units in the Dublin and the Midville aquifer systems. The Dublin aquifer system is divided hydrostratigraphically into the Millers Pond, the upper Dublin, and the lower Dublin aquifers. The Midville aquifer system is divided hydrostratigraphically into the upper and the lower Midville aquifers. The fine-grained sediments of the Millers Pond, the lower Dublin, and the lower Midville confining units are nonmarine deposits and are present in the upper part of the Snapp Formation, the Black Creek Group (undivided), and the Middendorf Formation, respectively. Hydrologic data for specific sets of monitoring wells at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina and the Millers Pond site in Georgia confirm that these three units are leaky confining units and locally impede vertical ground-water flow between adjacent aquifers. The fine-grained sediments of the upper Dublin and the upper Midville confining units are marine-deltaic deposits of the Ellenton Formation and the Black Creek Group (undivided), respectively. Hydrologic data confirm that the upper Dublin confining unit regionally impedes vertical ground-water flow on both sides of the Savannah River. The upper Midville

  5. The birthplace of planetary radio astronomy: The Seneca, Maryland observatory 50 years after Burke and Franklin's Jupiter radio emission discovery.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L. N.; Thieman, J. R.; Higgins, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    Burke and Franklin's discovery of radio emissions from Jupiter in 1955 effectively marked the birth of the field of planetary radio astronomy. The discovery was made near Seneca, Maryland using the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism/Carnegie Institution of Washington's Mills Cross Array. Fifty years later there is very little evidence of this 96-acre X-shaped array of dipoles still in existence, nor evidence of any of the other antennas used at this site. The site, now known as the McKee Besher Wildlife Management Area, is owned by the State of Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Radio Jove, a NASA/GSFC education and public outreach project, will recognize the 50th anniversary of this discovery through an historic reenactment using their receiver and dual-dipole array system. Our search through the DTM/CIW archives, our visit to the site to look for evidence of this array, and other efforts at commemorating this anniversary will be described.

  6. Some Further (Orthodox?) Bourdieusian Reflections on the Notions of "Institutional Habitus" and "Family Habitus": A Reply to Burke, Emmerich, and Ingram

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Will

    2008-01-01

    This article is the author's reply to the Burke, Emmerich, and Ingram response to his critique of the notions of '"institutional habitus" and "family habitus" in the sociology of education. It begins by welcoming the work done by the threesome to distance themselves from some of the clumsier uses of the terms in previous research but then, via a…

  7. CCD Photometry and Lightcurve Analysis of Main-Belt Asteroids 14 Irene 4874 Burke, 1985 Hopmann, 3017 Petrovic, and 3070 Aitken from Observatori Carmelita in Tiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aymami, Josep Maria

    2012-07-01

    Observations carried out from 2011 December to late 2012 March allowed us to determine the synodic periods of 14 Irene, 1985 Hopmann, 3017 Petrovic, 3040 Aitken, and 4874 Burke. For 14 Irene, a period of 15.038 ± 0.002 h was found with an amplitude A = 0.10 mag, well in accordance with other published estimates. 1985 Hopmann exhibited a rotational period of 17.476 ± 0.003 h, A = 0.44 mag. 3017 Petrovic exhibited a rotational period of 4.080 ± 0.001 h, A = 0.62 mag. 3070 Aitken showed a period of 6.390 ± 0.005 h, A = 0.59 mag. For 4874 Burke we found a short rotational period of 3.657 ± 0.001 h with A = 0.31 mag.

  8. Preliminary correlation of geologic units in three coreholes along the Savannah River in Burke and Screven Counties, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Falls, W.F. ); Prowell, D.C. ); Edwards, L.E.; Frederiksen, N.O.; Gibson, T.G.; Bybell, L.M.; Gohn, G.S. )

    1993-03-01

    Preliminary lithologic and paleontologic correlations of geologic units in three deep coreholes along the Savannah River in Burke and Screven Counties in Georgia show four Upper Cretaceous units and five Tertiary units in a dip-oriented cross section. The basal unit of the Upper Cretaceous section consists of nonmarine sediments and is stratigraphically equivalent to the Cape Fear Formation. The next two successive units vary from nonmarine and marginal-marine sediments in up-dip areas to more marine sediments in down-dip areas. These strata are equivalent to the Middendorf Formation and the Black Creek Group. The uppermost unit of the Cretaceous sediments is present only in the down-dip cores and consists predominantly of marginal-marine sediments. This unit is probably equivalent to the Peedee Formation in South Carolina. Units in the Tertiary sediments include at least two Paleocene units, two middle Eocene units, and an upper Eocene unit. The lower unit in the Paleocene, the Ellenton Formation, consists of marginal-marine and marine clays and sands, whereas, the upper unit in the Paleocene consists of nonmarine kaolinitic clays and coarse sands and is probably equivalent to the Williamsburg Formation. The two middle Eocene units consist of marine sands, clays, and limestones and are correlative with the Congaree and Santee Formation. The upper Eocene unit, the Barnwell Group, includes marginal-marine clays and sands in up-dip areas and marine sands, clays and limestones in down-dip areas.

  9. Occurrence of Hysterothylacium and Anisakis nematodes (Ascaridida: Ascaridoidea) in the tanaka's snailfish Liparis tanakae (Gilbert & Burke) (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Ning; Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Lu-Ping; Hu, Yong-Hong; Li, Liang

    2014-04-01

    The tanaka's snailfish Liparis tanakae (Gilbert & Burke) (Scorpaeniformes: Liparidae) is an economically important marine fish species in China. However, the helminth parasites of this fish are still poorly known. During a helminthological survey of Chinese marine fishes from 2011 to 2012, we revealed that L. tanakae was heavily infected with third-stage larvae and adults of ascaridoid nematodes (total prevalence 100% and mean intensity 82.3 nematodes per fish). Four species of third-stage larvae Hysterothylacium liparis Li, Xu & Zhang, 2007, H. aduncum (Rudolphi, 1802), Hysterothylacium fabri (Rudolphi, 1819), and Anisakis pegreffii (Campana-Rouget & Biocca, 1955) and a single species of adults H. liparis were differentiated and identified by morphological and molecular methods. The detailed morphology of the four species of third-stage larvae was also studied using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The morphological and molecular characterization of the third-stage larvae of H. liparis was reported. Liparis tanakae represents a new host record for A. pegreffii and H. fabri. In addition, a new name, Hysterothylacium zhoushanense nom. nov. was also given to Hysterothylacium zhoushanensis Li, Liu & Zhang, 2012 to make the latinized specific epithet agree with this neuter generic name. PMID:24464274

  10. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems at Waynesboro, Burke County, Georgia, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogeology and water quality of the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems were characterized in the City of Waynesboro area in Burke County, Georgia, based on geophysical and drillers’ logs, flowmeter surveys, a 24-houraquifer test, and the collection and chemical analysis of water samples in a newly constructed well. At the test site, the Dublin aquifer system consists of interlayered sands and clays between depths of 396 and 691 feet, and the Midville aquifer system consists of a sandy clay layer overlying a sand and gravel layer between depths of 728 and 936 feet. The new well was constructed with three screened intervals in the Dublin aquifer system and four screened intervals in the Midville aquifer system. Wellbore-flowmeter testing at a pumping rate of 1,000 gallons per minute indicated that 52.2 percent of the total flow was from the shallower Dublin aquifer system with the remaining 47.8 percent from the deeper Midville aquifer system. The lower part of the lower Midville aquifer (900 to 930 feet deep), contributed only 0.1 percent of the total flow. Hydraulic properties of the two aquifer systems were estimated using data from two wellbore-flowmeter surveys and a 24-hour aquifer test. Estimated values of transmissivity for the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems were 2,000 and 1,000 feet squared per day, respectively. The upper and lower Dublin aquifers have a combined thickness of about 150 feet and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Dublin aquifer system averages 10 feet per day. The upper Midville aquifer, lower Midville confining unit, and lower Midville aquifer have a combined thickness of about 210 feet, and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Midville aquifer system averages 6 feet per day. Storage coefficient of the Dublin aquifer system, computed using the Theis method on water-level data from one observation well, was estimated to be 0.0003. With a thickness of about 150 feet, the specific storage of the Dublin aquifer

  11. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 16 (BURKTH00070016) on Town Highway 7, crossing Dish Mill Brook, Burke, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Ronda L.; Severance, Tim

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure BURKTH00070016 on Town Highway 7 crossing Dish Mill Brook, Burke, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the White Mountain section of the New England physiographic province in northeastern Vermont. The 6.0-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is forest except on the left bank upstream which is brushland. In the study area, Dish Mill Brook has an incised, sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.04 ft/ft, an average channel top width of 40 ft and an average bank height of 6 ft. The channel bed material ranges from sand to boulder with a median grain size (D50) of 94.1 mm (0.309 ft). The geomorphic assessment at the time of the Level I and Level II site visit on August 7, 1995, indicated that the reach was stable. The Town Highway 7 crossing of Dish Mill Brook is a 28-ft-long, two-lane bridge consisting of one 24-foot steel-beam span (Vermont Agency of Transportation, written communication, March 24, 1995). The opening length of the structure parallel to the bridge face is 24.8 ft. The bridge is supported by vertical, concrete abutments with wingwalls. The channel is skewed approximately 35 degrees to the opening while the computed opening-skew-to-roadway is 35 degrees. A scour hole 1.0 ft deeper than the mean thalweg depth was observed along the left and right

  12. Simulation and Particle-Tracking Analysis of Selected Ground-Water Pumping Scenarios at Vogtle Electric Generation Plant, Burke County, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cherry, Gregory S.; Clarke, John S.

    2007-01-01

    The source of ground water to production wells at Vogtle Electric Generation Plant (VEGP), a nuclear power plant in Burke County, Georgia, was simulated under existing (2002) and potential future pumping conditions using an existing U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) MODFLOW ground-water flow model of a 4,455-square-mile area in the Coastal Plain of Georgia and South Carolina. Simulation results for three steady-state pumping scenarios were compared to each other and to a 2002 Base Case condition. The pumping scenarios focused on pumping increases at VEGP resulting from projected future demands and the addition of two electrical-generating reactor units. Scenarios simulated pumping increases at VEGP ranging from 1.09 to 3.42 million gallons per day (Mgal/d), with one of the scenarios simulating the elimination of 5.3 Mgal/d of pumping at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a U.S. Department of Energy facility located across the Savannah River from VEGP. The largest simulated water-level changes at VEGP were for the scenario whereby pumping at the facility was more than tripled, resulting in drawdown exceeding 4-8 feet (ft) in the aquifers screened in the production wells. For the scenario that eliminated pumping at SRS, water-level rises of as much as 4-8 ft were simulated in the same aquifers at SRS. Results of MODFLOW simulations were analyzed using the USGS particle-tracking code MODPATH to determine the source of water and associated time of travel to VEGP production wells. For each of the scenarios, most of the recharge to VEGP wells originated in an upland area near the county line between Burke and Jefferson Counties, Georgia, with none of the recharge originating on SRS or elsewhere in South Carolina. An exception occurs for the scenario whereby pumping at VEGP was more than tripled. For this scenario, some of the recharge originates in an upland area in eastern Barnwell County, South Carolina. Simulated mean time of travel from recharge areas to VEGP wells for the

  13. Rapid preparative separation of six bioactive compounds from Gentiana crassicaulis Duthie ex Burk. using microwave-assisted extraction coupled with high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinru; Ito, Yoichiro; Zhang, Xinxin; He, Jiao; Sun, Wenji

    2013-12-01

    A rapid method combining microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) was applied for preparative separation of six bioactive compounds including loganic acid (I), isoorientin-4'-O-glucoside (II), 6'-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl gentiopicroside (III), swertiamarin (IV), gentiopicroside (V), sweroside (VI) from traditional Tibetan medicine Gentiana crassicaulis Duthie ex Burk. MAE parameters were predicted by central composite design response surface methodology. That is, 5.0 g dried roots of G. crassicaulis were extracted with 50 mL 57.5% aqueous ethanol under 630 W for 3.39 min. The extract (gentian total glycosides) was separated by HSCCC with n-butanol/ethyl acetate/methanol/1% acetic acid water (7.5:0.5:0.5:3.5, v/v/v/v) using upper phase mobile in tail-to-head elution mode. 16.3, 8.8, 12., 25.1, 40.7, and 21.8 mg of compounds I-VI were obtained with high purities in one run from 500 mg of original sample. The purities and identities of separated components were confirmed using HPLC with photo diode array detection and quadrupole TOF-MS and NMR spectroscopy. The study reveals that response surface methodology is convenient and highly predictive for optimizing extraction process, MAE coupled with HSCCC could be an expeditious method for extraction and separation of phytochemicals from ethnomedicine.

  14. Rapid preparative separation of six bioactive compounds from Gentiana crassicaulis Duthie ex Burk. using microwave-assisted extraction coupled with high-speed counter-current chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jinru; Ito, Yoichiro; Zhang, Xinxin; He, Jiao; Sun, Wenji

    2014-01-01

    A rapid method combining microwave-assisted extraction and high-speed counter-current chromatography was applied for preparative separation of six bioactive compounds including loganic acid (I), isoorientin-4'-O-glucoside (II), 6'-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl gentiopicroside (III), swertiamarin (IV), gentiopicroside (V), sweroside (VI) from traditional Tibetan medicine Gentiana crassicaulis Duthie ex Burk. Microwave-assisted extraction parameters were predicted by central composite design-response surface methodology. That is, 5.0 g dried roots of G. Crassicaulis was extracted with 50 mL 57.5% aqueous ethanol under 630 W for 3.39 min. The extract (gentian total glycosides) was separated by high-speed counter-current chromatography with n-butanol/ethyl acetate/methanol/1% acetic acid water (7.5:0.5:0.5:3.5, v/v/v/v) using upper phase mobile in tail-to-head elution mode. 16.3 mg, 8.8 mg, 12.8 mg, 25.1 mg, 40.7 mg and 21.8 mg of compounds I–VI were obtained with high purities in one run from 500 mg of original sample. The purities and identities of separated components were confirmed using HPCL with photo diode array detection and quadrupole time-of-flight MS and NMR spectroscopy. The study reveals that response surface methodology is convenient and highly predictive for optimizing extraction process, microwave-assisted extraction coupled with high-speed counter-current chromatography could be an expeditious method for extraction and separation of phytochemicals from ethnomedicine. PMID:24151213

  15. On the phase diagram of water with density functional theory potentials: the melting temperature of Ice I-h with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Soohaeng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2009-06-11

    The melting temperature (Tm) of ice Ih was determined from constant enthalphy (NPH) Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulations to be 417±3 K for the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) and 411±4 K for the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) density functionals using a coexisting ice (Ih)-liquid phase at constant pressures of P = 2,500 and 10,000 bar and a density ρ = 1 g/cm3, respectively. This suggests that ambient condition simulations at ρ = 1 g/cm3 will rather describe a supercooled state that is overstructured when compared to liquid water. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  16. Burke's Pentad as a Guide for Symbol-Using Citizens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Clarke; Rountree, John

    2015-01-01

    Ever since the rhetorical turn in education, education scholars have recognized the importance of rhetoric in constructing and mediating human society. They have turned to rhetorical theory to come to terms with this rhetorically mediated reality and to engage students as critical citizens within it. Much of this work draws on rhetorical theorist…

  17. Systematics of the parasitic wasp genus Oxyscelio Kieffer (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae s.l.), part II: the Australian and southwest Pacific fauna

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Roger A.; Masner, Lubomír; Johnson, Norman F.; Austin, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Australasian and southwest Pacific species of Oxyscelio (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae s.l.) are revised. A total of 80 species are recognized as valid, 13 of which are redescribed: O. atricoxa (Dodd), O. concoloripes (Dodd), O. flavipes (Kieffer), O. grandis (Dodd), O. hyalinipennis (Dodd), O. magniclava (Dodd), O. mirellus (Dodd), O. montanus (Dodd), O. nigriclava (Dodd), O. nigricoxa (Dodd), O. rugulosus (Dodd), O. shakespearei (Girault), and O. solitarius (Dodd). Oxyscelio glabriscutellum (Dodd) syn. n. is placed as a subjective junior synonym of O. rugulosus. Sixty-seven new species are described, many representing new distributional records for the genus - O. aciculae Burks, sp. n., O. anfractus Burks, sp. n., O. bellariorum Burks, sp. n., O. bicoloripedis Burks, sp. n., O. brevitas Burks, sp. n., O. catenae Burks, sp. n., O. caudarum Burks, sp. n., O. circulorum Burks, sp. n., O. clivi Burks, sp. n., O. clupei Burks, sp. n., O. conjuncti Burks, sp. n., O. contusionis Burks, sp. n., O. corrugationis Burks, sp. n., O. croci Burks, sp. n., O. cuspidis Burks, sp. n., O. densitatis Burks, sp. n., O. dissimulationis Burks, sp. n., O. divisionis Burks, sp. n., O. exiguitatis Burks, sp. n., O. fluctuum Burks, sp. n., O. foliorum Burks, sp. n., O. funis Burks, sp. n., O. gressus Burks, sp. n., O. hamorum Burks, sp. n., O. incisurae Burks, sp. n., O. lenitatis Burks, sp. n., O. leviventris Burks, sp. n., O. limbi Burks, sp. n., O. liminis Burks, sp. n., O. linguae Burks, sp. n., O. lintris Burks, sp. n., O. livens Burks, sp. n., O. mystacis Burks, sp. n., O. nasi Burks, sp. n., O. nitoris Burks, sp. n., O. obliquiatis Burks, sp. n., O. oblongiclypei Burks, sp. n., O. obturationis Burks, sp. n., O. oculi Burks, sp. n., O. palati Burks, sp. n., O. pectinis Burks, sp. n., O. pollicis Burks, sp. n., O. proceritatis Burks, sp. n., O. productionis Burks, sp. n., O. radii Burks, sp. n., O. rami Burks, sp. n., O. rupturae Burks, sp. n., O. sarcinae Burks, sp. n., O

  18. 76 FR 58034 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and... a cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact the... remains were removed by Dr. F.S. Hall of the Washington State Museum from the Pot Holes site or Hall...

  19. 76 FR 58039 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ...-3849. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves... sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native... located one human tooth, representing an additional individual, which had also been removed from the...

  20. 75 FR 52023 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... area surrounding Salem, OR, was occupied by the Kalapuyan speaking people (Ruby and Brown 1986, Swanton... 1855, the Kalapuyan people were moved to the Grand Ronde Reservation (Ruby and Brown 1986)....

  1. 77 FR 51564 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... between the Native American human remains and the Wrangell Cooperative Association. Additional Requestors... accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the... American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this...

  2. 78 FR 45958 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... modified bone fragment; 1 unmodified bone fragment; 1 stone abrader; 1 .22 caliber gun; 3 bags of buttons (glass, porcelain, bone, copper); 8 U.S. coins; 1 porcelain doll head; 1 bag containing metal buckle fragments; and 6 composite artifact bags containing wood, nails, charcoal, pebbles, metal, leather,...

  3. 78 FR 59956 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... include one lot of red ochre, one antler tine, one metal fragment, one bird bone, one mammal bone, one sediment sample and two lots of unmodified shell, mammal, and fish bone fragments. The Handel farm site is..., adze blades, red ochre, bone bipoints and faunal material is consistent with Native American...

  4. Planetary Radio Astronomy: The 60 Years from Burke and Franklin to ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    2014-11-01

    For nearly 60 years, radio astronomy has played a major role in the characterization and monitoring of thermal structure, composition, and temporal changes of the planets and small bodies in our solar system. At this, the 60th anniversary of the initial detection of radio emission by a planet, the role radio astronomy has played in the early characterization of solar system objects, in raising basic scientific questions and motivating planetary exploration missions, and in providing insight into the structure and temporal variations of planets is explored. The evolution of the instrumentation capabilities from crude total-power, or bolometric measurements averaged over an entire planetary disk to today's instrumentation providing radio images of planets and comets with high spectral resolution is also discussed. Major developments such as precise total-power calibration, ultra-large apertures, microwave and millimeter-wave array technology, and supporting laboratory spectroscopy have played major roles in enhancing the effectiveness of radio astronomical observations. The newest generation instruments such as the upgraded Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and the Altacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) now usher in a whole new level of capability in observation of solar system objects.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Southern SHARC catalogue (Burke+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, D. J.; Collins, C. A.; Sharples, R. M.; Romer, A. K.; Nichol, R. C.

    2003-06-01

    The Southern Serendipitous High-redshift Archival Cluster (SHARC) catalogue is a X-ray selected catalogue of galaxy clusters detected in deep ROSAT observations. The survey area is 17.7deg2 and is selected from long (greater than 10ks) ROSAT exposures with a declination <+20deg and excluding the Galactic plane (excluding galactic latitudes within the range [-20,20]deg). Optical follow-up was performed to confirm the presence of a galaxy cluster and measure its redshift. The final catalogue contains 32 galaxy clusters with redshifts between 0.05 and 0.70 and X-ray luminosities between 7x1035W and 4x1037W. Above a redshift of 0.3 - which forms the primary subsample of the survey - there are 16 clusters; the X-ray luminosities of these clusters are all greater than 2x10^36 W. All X-ray luminosities are quoted in the 0.5-2.0keV band and were calculated using an Einstein-de Sitter cosmology with H0 set to 50km/s/Mpc. (5 data files).

  6. 75 FR 5105 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... flakes; 5 unmodified stones; 1 bone bipoint; 1 bone tool; 1 bone tube; 5 charcoal samples; 1 core; 1 dog... containing stone, charcoal, shell, mammal, fish, and bird bones. The Watmough Bay archeological site is...

  7. 76 FR 28806 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ..., a Tlingit individual identified her as a shaman or Indian doctor known to have been removed from the... near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or...

  8. 77 FR 59649 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... site 45-SJ-240 are consistent with Native American morphology as evidenced through cranial deformation... Native American morphology as evidenced through cranial flattening. Historical and anthropological... a deer scapula. The human remains are consistent with Native American morphology as...

  9. 75 FR 436 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... morphology, as evidenced either through cranial deformation, bossing of the cranium, presence of wormian.... The human remains were determined to be consistent with Native American morphology, as evidenced... biological evidence. The human remains were determined to be consistent with Native American morphology,...

  10. 78 FR 11675 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Tribe of the Makah Indian Reservation; Port Gamble Band of S'Klallam Indians (previously listed as Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington); Quileute Tribe of the Quileute...; Port Gamble Band of S'Klallam Indians (previously listed as Port Gamble Indian Community of the...

  11. 77 FR 46117 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ...; Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington; Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup... Idaho); Nooksack Indian Tribe of Washington; Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble...

  12. 78 FR 44595 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... likely removed from the upper Columbia River Plateau, WA. This notice is published as part of the... minimum, one individual were most likely removed from the upper Columbia River Plateau, WA. The human... River Plateau was the aboriginal territory of the Moses-Columbia or Sinkiuse, and the Yakima...

  13. Effects of different cleaning treatments on heavy metal removal of Panax notoginseng (Burk) F. H. Chen.

    PubMed

    Dahui, Liu; Na, Xu; Li, Wang; Xiuming, Cui; Lanping, Guo; Zhihui, Zhang; Jiajin, Wang; Ye, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The quality and safety of Panax notoginseng products has become a focus of concern in recent years. Contamination with heavy metals is one of the important factors as to P. notoginseng safety. Cleaning treatments can remove dust, soil, impurities or even heavy metals and pesticide residues on agricultural products. But effects of cleaning treatments on the heavy metal content of P. notoginseng roots have still not been studied. In order to elucidate this issue, the effects of five different cleaning treatments (CK, no treatment; T1, warm water (50°C) washing; T2, tap water (10°C) washing; T3, drying followed by polishing; and T4, drying followed by tap water (10°C) washing) on P. notoginseng roots' heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, As and Hg) contents were studied. The results showed that heavy metal (all five) content in the three parts all followed the order of hair root > rhizome > root tuber under the same treatment. Heavy metal removals were in the order of Hg > As > Pb > Cu > Cd. Removal efficiencies of the four treatments were in the order of T2 > T1 > T3 > T4. Treatments (T1-T4) could decrease the contents of heavy metal in P. notoginseng root significantly. Compared with the requirements of WM/T2-2004, P. notoginseng roots' heavy metal contents of Cu, Pb, As and Hg were safe under treatments T1 and T2. In conclusion, the cleaning process after production was necessary and could reduce the content of heavy metals significantly. Fresh P. notoginseng root washed with warm water (T2) was the most efficient treatment to remove heavy metal and should be applied in production. PMID:25315359

  14. 78 FR 50443 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... speakers of the Northern dialect of the Lushootseed language claim cultural heritage to the Skagit River... tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation...

  15. 78 FR 64006 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... were included in a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register (78 FR 45958-45959... present. Native American speakers of the Northern dialect of the Lushootseed language claim cultural... Native American ancestry. Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group...

  16. 78 FR 59963 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ..., Native American speakers of the northern dialect of the Lushootseed language claim cultural heritage to... ceremony. Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can...

  17. 78 FR 50109 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... speakers of the Northern dialect of the Lushootseed language claim cultural heritage to the Skagit River... American individual. Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity...

  18. 78 FR 59964 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    .... Linguistically, Native American speakers of the northern dialect of the Lushootseed language claim cultural... identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the...

  19. Narrative and Rhetorical Approaches to Problems of Education. Jerome Bruner and Kenneth Burke Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutten, Kris; Soetaert, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades there has been a strong narrative "turn" within the humanities and social sciences in general and educational studies in particular. Especially Jerome Bruner's theory of narrative as a specific "mode of knowing" was very important for this growing body of work. To understand how the narrative mode works Bruner proposes to…

  20. 76 FR 58033 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... American human remains, The Tribes, and The Indian Group. Additional Requestors and Disposition... the Wanapum Band, a non-Federally recognized Indian group (hereinafter ``The Indian Group''). History..., in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes, and has determined that there is a...

  1. Effects of different cleaning treatments on heavy metal removal of Panax notoginseng (Burk) F. H. Chen.

    PubMed

    Dahui, Liu; Na, Xu; Li, Wang; Xiuming, Cui; Lanping, Guo; Zhihui, Zhang; Jiajin, Wang; Ye, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The quality and safety of Panax notoginseng products has become a focus of concern in recent years. Contamination with heavy metals is one of the important factors as to P. notoginseng safety. Cleaning treatments can remove dust, soil, impurities or even heavy metals and pesticide residues on agricultural products. But effects of cleaning treatments on the heavy metal content of P. notoginseng roots have still not been studied. In order to elucidate this issue, the effects of five different cleaning treatments (CK, no treatment; T1, warm water (50°C) washing; T2, tap water (10°C) washing; T3, drying followed by polishing; and T4, drying followed by tap water (10°C) washing) on P. notoginseng roots' heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, As and Hg) contents were studied. The results showed that heavy metal (all five) content in the three parts all followed the order of hair root > rhizome > root tuber under the same treatment. Heavy metal removals were in the order of Hg > As > Pb > Cu > Cd. Removal efficiencies of the four treatments were in the order of T2 > T1 > T3 > T4. Treatments (T1-T4) could decrease the contents of heavy metal in P. notoginseng root significantly. Compared with the requirements of WM/T2-2004, P. notoginseng roots' heavy metal contents of Cu, Pb, As and Hg were safe under treatments T1 and T2. In conclusion, the cleaning process after production was necessary and could reduce the content of heavy metals significantly. Fresh P. notoginseng root washed with warm water (T2) was the most efficient treatment to remove heavy metal and should be applied in production.

  2. 78 FR 59955 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... removes a paragraph from a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register (78 FR 45958... correction notice has not occurred. Correction In the Federal Register (78 FR 45958-45960, July 30, 2013), paragraph 12 is removed in its entirety. In the Federal Register (78 FR 45958-45960, July 30,...

  3. "Extraordinary Understandings" of Composition at the University of Chicago: Frederick Champion Ward, Kenneth Burke, and Henry W. Sams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, James P.

    2007-01-01

    While Richard Weaver, R. S. Crane, Richard McKeon, and Robert Streeter have been most identified with rhetoric at the University of Chicago and its institutional return in the 1950s, the archival record demonstrates that Frederick Champion Ward, dean of the undergraduate "College" from 1947 to 1954, and Henry W. Sams, director of English in the…

  4. Systematics of the parasitic wasp genus Oxyscelio Kieffer (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae s.l.), Part I: Indo-Malayan and Palearctic fauna

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Roger A.; Masner, Lubomír; Johnson, Norman F.; Austin, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Indo-Malayan and Palearctic species of Oxyscelio (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae s.l.) are revised. A total of 90 species are recognized as valid, 19 of which are redescribed - Oxyscelio acutiventris (Kieffer), Oxyscelio brevinervis (Kieffer), Oxyscelio carinatus (Kieffer), Oxyscelio ceylonensis (Dodd), Oxyscelio consobrinus (Kieffer), Oxyscelio crassicornis (Kieffer), Oxyscelio cupularis (Kieffer), Oxyscelio dorsalis (Kieffer), Oxyscelio excavatus (Kieffer), Oxyscelio flavipennis (Kieffer), Oxyscelio florus Kononova, Oxyscelio foveatus Kieffer, Oxyscelio kiefferi Dodd, Oxyscelio magnus (Kieffer), Oxyscelio marginalis (Kieffer), Oxyscelio naraws Kozlov & Lê, Oxyscelio perpensus Kononova, Oxyscelio rugosus (Kieffer) and Oxyscelio spinosiceps (Kieffer), and 71 which are described as new - Oxyscelio aclavae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio amrichae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio anguli Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio angustifrons Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio angustinubbin Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio arcus Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio arvi Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio asperi Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio aureamediocritas Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio bipunctuum Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio brevidentis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio caesitas Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio capilli Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio capitis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio cavinetrion Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio chimaerae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio codae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio convergens Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio cordis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio crateris Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio crebritas Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio crustum Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio cuculli Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio cyrtomesos Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio dasymesos Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio dasynoton Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio dermatoglyphes Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio doumao Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio fistulae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio flabellae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio flaviventris Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio fodiens Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio fossarum Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio fossularum Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio

  5. Systematics of the parasitic wasp genus Oxyscelio Kieffer (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae s.l.), Part I: Indo-Malayan and Palearctic fauna

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Roger A.; Masner, Lubomír; Johnson, Norman F.; Austin, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Indo-Malayan and Palearctic species of Oxyscelio (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae s.l.) are revised. A total of 90 species are recognized as valid, 19 of which are redescribed - Oxyscelio acutiventris (Kieffer), Oxyscelio brevinervis (Kieffer), Oxyscelio carinatus (Kieffer), Oxyscelio ceylonensis (Dodd), Oxyscelio consobrinus (Kieffer), Oxyscelio crassicornis (Kieffer), Oxyscelio cupularis (Kieffer), Oxyscelio dorsalis (Kieffer), Oxyscelio excavatus (Kieffer), Oxyscelio flavipennis (Kieffer), Oxyscelio florus Kononova, Oxyscelio foveatus Kieffer, Oxyscelio kiefferi Dodd, Oxyscelio magnus (Kieffer), Oxyscelio marginalis (Kieffer), Oxyscelio naraws Kozlov & Lê, Oxyscelio perpensus Kononova, Oxyscelio rugosus (Kieffer) and Oxyscelio spinosiceps (Kieffer), and 71 which are described as new - Oxyscelio aclavae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio amrichae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio anguli Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio angustifrons Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio angustinubbin Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio arcus Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio arvi Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio asperi Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio aureamediocritas Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio bipunctuum Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio brevidentis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio caesitas Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio capilli Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio capitis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio cavinetrion Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio chimaerae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio codae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio convergens Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio cordis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio crateris Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio crebritas Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio crustum Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio cuculli Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio cyrtomesos Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio dasymesos Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio dasynoton Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio dermatoglyphes Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio doumao Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio fistulae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio flabellae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio flaviventris Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio fodiens Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio fossarum Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio fossularum Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio

  6. Novacon process: An alternative to limestone sorbents. Presentation to the Council of Industrial Boiler Owners, fluid bed XI. Held in Burke, Virginia, on November 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, S.H.; Luftglass, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of recent tests of a new type of sorbent useful for emissions control. The sorbent, referred to as thermally active marble (TAM), comprises a class of naturally-occurring metamorphic calcium carbonates. TAMs break down upon heating in combustors more evenly and with higher reactivity than limestone, resulting in better calcium utilization rates. Use of TAMS may also reduce NOx and CO emissions, excess air consumption and unburned carbon, and also improve combustion efficiency. In a full-scale (90 MW) demonstration comparing TAM to limestone, the Ca/S improved from 2.6 to 1.5 or better. Unburned carbon in fly ash decreased significantly and NOx levels were also reduced.

  7. Determination of aerosol content in the atmosphere from LANDSAT data. [San Diego, Salton Sea, Miami, Adrigole, Atlantic City, Barrow, and Burke, Divide, Hill, and Toole Counties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griggs, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A large set of LANDSAT 2 data, obtained at San Diego, showed excellent linear relationships, particularly for MSS 5 and MSS 6, between the radiance over the ocean and the atmospheric aerosol content. Two other data points obtained at Adrigole, Ireland, representing a different ocean and a different ground truth instrument, showed very good agreement with the San Diego data. It appeared that the technique could be used for global monitoring of the atmospheric aerosol content over the oceans. Results obtained at several inland bodies of water showed that MSS 4, MSS 5, and MSS 6 cannot be used due to the effect of water pollution generally present. However, the LANDSAT 1 results suggested that MSS 7, which operates at longer wavelengths, was not very sensitive to water pollution, and might be useful for inland measurements of aerosol content. Use of the longer wavelength would also minimize the effects of adjacent high albedo land, since atmospheric scattering was reduced at longer wavelengths.

  8. The influence of barometric pressure fluctuations, earth tides and rainfall loading on fluid pressures in coastal plain aquifers, Burke County, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.M.; Moore, J.; Daggett, J.; Snipes, D.S. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    High precision pressure measurements from several aquifers in the top 225 m of coastal plain sediments reveal that barometric pressure fluctuations, earth tides and rainfall loading create pressure fluctuations on the order of tens of centimeters. If not correctly identified, erroneous conclusions regarding the magnitude of pressure communication within and across aquifers during pumping tests may be inferred. Aquifer pressure data with an equivalent resolution of 0.1 mm change in water level were measured in 4 wells over a 10 day period at the USGS Miller's Pond Test Site. During this time, barometric pressures fluctuated by the equivalent of 20 cm of water. Aquifer pressures mimicked these changes, with corresponding barometric efficiencies ranging from 0.59 for the deepest well (215 to 224 m) to 0.73 for the shallowest (136 to 145 m). After removing barometric influences from the pressure data, periodic pressure fluctuations of 2 cm were observed. These correlate well with fluctuations in the earths gravitational field created by planetary motion. A twelve component earth tide model was used to calculate the magnitude of the gravitational fluctuations and provide a quantitative basis for comparing them to observed aquifer pressure fluctuations. Additionally, three rainfall events caused rapid and relatively large increases in aquifer pressures. Up to 4 cm increase in the aquifer pressure accompanied the heaviest rains. The pressures increased concurrent to the rains and decayed slowly to background levels over a several day period, indicating a loading response instead of an infiltration induced pressure increase. The relatively large magnitude of these influences, compared to the small changes induced by leakage across confining layers requires careful consideration in the data analysis.

  9. Systematics of the parasitic wasp genus Oxyscelio Kieffer (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae s.l.), part III: African fauna

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Roger A.; Masner, Lubomír; Johnson, Norman F.; Austin, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract African species of Oxyscelio (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae s.l.) are revised. A total of 14 species are recognized, 13 of which are described as new: Oxyscelio absentiae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio galeri Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio gyri Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio idoli Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio intensionis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio io Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio kylix Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio lunae Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio nemesis Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio pulveris Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio quassus Burks, sp. n., Oxyscelio teli Burks, sp. n. and Oxyscelio xenii Burks, sp. n. The genus Freniger Szabó, syn. n. is recognized as part of an endemic African species group of Oxyscelio with incomplete hind wing venation, and Oxyscelio bicolor (Szabó), comb. n. is therefore recognized as the only previously described species of Oxyscelio from Africa. The Oxyscelio crateris and Oxyscelio cuculli species groups, previously known from southeast Asia, are represented in Africa by seven and one species respectively. PMID:27081336

  10. 75 FR 14462 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA, and Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington... of Anthropology, Ellensburg, WA, and the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum... Henebry-DeLeon, NAGPRA Program Director, Department of Anthropology, Central Washington...

  11. Four new species of Cymatodera Gray from central and southern Mexico (Coleoptera, Cleridae, Tillinae).

    PubMed

    Burke, Alan F; Rifkind, Jacques; Zolnerowich, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Four new species of Cymatodera are described from Mexico: Cymatoderatortuosa Burke & Rifkind, sp. n. from Hidalgo and Tamaulipas; Cymatoderaortegae Burke, sp. n. from Colima, Jalisco and Michoacan; Cymatoderagerstmeieri Burke & Rifkind, sp. n. from Chiapas; and Cymatoderamixteca Burke & Rifkind, sp. n. from Puebla and Guerrero. Male genitalia and other characters of taxonomic value are illustrated.

  12. Four new species of Cymatodera Gray from central and southern Mexico (Coleoptera, Cleridae, Tillinae)

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Alan F.; Rifkind, Jacques; Zolnerowich, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Four new species of Cymatodera are described from Mexico: Cymatodera tortuosa Burke & Rifkind, sp. n. from Hidalgo and Tamaulipas; Cymatodera ortegae Burke, sp. n. from Colima, Jalisco and Michoacan; Cymatodera gerstmeieri Burke & Rifkind, sp. n. from Chiapas; and Cymatodera mixteca Burke & Rifkind, sp. n. from Puebla and Guerrero. Male genitalia and other characters of taxonomic value are illustrated. PMID:26257571

  13. Lichenometric dating: Science or pseudo-science?-Comment to the paper published by Osborn, McCarthy, LaBrie, and Burke, Quaternary Research 83 (2015), 1-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, Michael Aaron

    2016-09-01

    The 2015 article by Osborn and others entitled 'Lichenometric Dating: Science or Pseudo-Science?' delivers an unprecedented, in-depth critique of the cumulative problems associated with the development and application of lichenometric dating techniques over the past 65 years. Their stated goal is to appraise the validity of numerical ages derived from lichen measurements, but in doing so, they present a broader, systematic deconstruction of current lichenometric dating practices by emphasizing the unreliable, incomparable, and irreproducible results published by many studies. Osborn et al. revisit a few examples where some scientific rigor has been applied to the methodology, but overall, they cast doubt on the usefulness of any lichenometric analysis by revealing a global failure to avoid poor techniques and outcomes, heedless of the caveats stated in past literature.

  14. 75 FR 28664 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... Operating Company et al., for Vogtle Electric Generating Plant ESP Site Located in Burke County, GA AGENCY... Corporation, Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, and the City of Dalton, Georgia), for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP) ESP site located in Burke County, Georgia. The proposed amendment...

  15. 75 FR 39284 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company et al.; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Operating Company et al., for Vogtle Electric Generating Plant ESP Site Located In Burke County, GA AGENCY... Commission (NRC) is considering issuance of an amendment to Early Site Permit (ESP) No. ESP-004, issued on..., Georgia), for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP) ESP site located in Burke County, Georgia....

  16. [Environmental Education Experiences].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke County Board of Education, Morganton, NC.

    Environmental/ecological experiences, appropriate for elementary grades, are presented in this compilation. Designed as individual units of study, they consider components of the natural environment and in particular the local environment of Burke County, North Carolina. Units are titled: Burke County in a Nutshell, Our Culture, A Tour of the…

  17. The Role of Testing Language Proficiency as Part of Teacher Certification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aoki, Michele Anciaux

    2013-01-01

    Bridid M. Burke poses an interesting question: Is requiring high-stakes language proficiency tests really going to improve world language education? In her article, Dr. Burke shares testimonials from "several promising student teachers" [whose] dreams of being French, German, or Spanish teachers [were] crushed" based on not…

  18. A Dramatistic Theory of Apocalyptic Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Stephen D.

    1993-01-01

    Develops a theory of apocalyptic texts and movements by applying Kenneth Burke's conception of the tragic and comic frames of acceptance to the text of the Christian Apocalypse and to the history of its interpretation. Uses Burke's "psychology of form" to explain the recurring patterns of apocalyptic argument as functions of rhetoric/audience…

  19. 76 FR 62755 - National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... CONTACT: J. Robert Burk, Executive Director or Shirley Morgan-Jordan, Program Support Coordinator...-3684; fax: (202) 720-6199; or e-mail: Robert.Burk@ars.usda.gov or Shirley.Morgan@ars.usda.gov... new members and interested incumbent members will be held from 1 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Specific topics...

  20. 75 FR 61692 - Notice of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: J. Robert Burk, Executive Director or Shirley Morgan-Jordan, Program Support Coordinator...-3684; fax: (202) 720-6199; or e-mail: Robert.Burk@ars.usda.gov or Shirley.Morgan@ars.usda.gov... place at the Hotel Palomar, 2121 P Street, NW., Washington, DC 20037. Written comments from the...

  1. 76 FR 13124 - Notice of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ...-0321. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: J. Robert Burk, Executive Director or Shirley Morgan-Jordan... Board; telephone: (202) 720-3684; fax: (202) 720-6199; or e-mail: Robert.Burk@ars.usda.gov or Shirley.Morgan@ars.usda.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On Wednesday, March 30, 2011, from 8 a.m.-5 p.m.,...

  2. New Attitudes Shaping Labor-District Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Back in the mid-2000s, in public and in the news media, Joseph P. Burke, then superintendent of the Springfield public schools, and Timothy T. Collins, president of the local teachers' union, often seemed to be at odds with each other. Out of the public eye, however, the two men had begun meeting regularly. When Burke left the district, the work…

  3. Form in Technique: Counter-Nature's "Invitation To Participate" and the Ethics of Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Star A.

    This paper examines the rhetorician Kenneth Burke's reaction to "technologism," an area where Burke's rage at the vagaries of human motivation, industrial exploitation, and environmental victimage are most clear. The paper analyzes in-depth the formal movement of the Helhaven project as a reflexive satirical treatment of the problems of…

  4. Courting the Buyer: The Relationship of Newspaper, Audience, and Advertisers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Timothy N.

    By applying Kenneth Burke's concepts of Order, the Secret, and the Kill to the newspaper-audience-advertiser relationship, the narrow imagery that depicts that relationship only in economic terms can be counteracted. Burke's maps of hierarchy, mystery, and transcendence in human action allow the depiction of a complex meshing of patterns,…

  5. Reconciling disagreement over climate–conflict results in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hsiang, Solomon M.; Meng, Kyle C.

    2014-01-01

    A recent study by Burke et al. [Burke M, Miguel E, Satyanath S, Dykema J, Lobell D (2009) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106(49):20670–20674] reports statistical evidence that the likelihood of civil wars in African countries was elevated in hotter years. A following study by Buhaug [Buhaug H (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(38):16477–16482] reports that a reexamination of the evidence overturns Burke et al.’s findings when alternative statistical models and alternative measures of conflict are used. We show that the conclusion by Buhaug is based on absent or incorrect statistical tests, both in model selection and in the comparison of results with Burke et al. When we implement the correct tests, we find there is no evidence presented in Buhaug that rejects the original results of Burke et al. PMID:24520173

  6. Nasal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 43. Becker SS. Surgical management of polyps in the treatment of nasal airway ...

  7. Indian Control of Indian Education: A Burkian Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Bryan

    1985-01-01

    Applies Burke's concept of orientation (relationships developed by contingencies of experiences) to the place of Indians within the Canadian educational system, focusing upon the issues of band controlled schools, residential school systems, and Indian orientations to education. (NEC)

  8. Comedy as Cure for Tragedy: ACT UP and the Rhetoric of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiansen, Adrienne E.; Hanson, Jeremy J.

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes the rhetorical strategies of the direct action AIDS organization ACT UP using Kenneth Burke's concept of the comic frame. Suggests conditions under which other despised and oppressed groups may respond after having been scapegoated by society. (PA)

  9. OHIO INTERNATIONAL TELEVISION AND VIDEO FESTIVAL AWARD WINNERS FROM THE IMAGING TECHNOLOGY CENTER IT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    OHIO INTERNATIONAL TELEVISION AND VIDEO FESTIVAL AWARD WINNERS FROM THE IMAGING TECHNOLOGY CENTER ITC KEVIN BURKE - BILL FLETCHER - GARY NOLAN - EMERY ADANICH FOR THE VIDEO ENTITLED ICING FOR REGIONAL AND CORPORATE PILOTS

  10. 75 FR 5322 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisition of Shares of Bank or Bank Holding Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ..., Minnesota 55480-0291: 1. Charles H. Burke III, Pierre, South Dakota; as an individual, to acquire voting...., both of Pierre, South Dakota. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, January 28,...

  11. 40 CFR 81.334 - North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.334 North... Creek Township, Broadbay Township, Kernersville Township, Middle Fork Township, Old Town Township, South... County (2) Attainment. Burke County (part) Unifour Metropolitan Planning Organization Boundary...

  12. 40 CFR 81.334 - North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.334 North... Creek Township, Broadbay Township, Kernersville Township, Middle Fork Township, Old Town Township, South...) Attainment. Burke County (part) Unifour Metropolitan Planning Organization Boundary (2) Attainment....

  13. Perfection and the Bomb: Nuclear Weapons, Teleology, and Motives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brummett, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Uses Kenneth Burke's theory of perfection to explore the vocabularies of nuclear weapons in United States public discourse and how "the Bomb" as a God term has gained imbalanced ascendancy in centers of power. (MS)

  14. Experiential Professional Development: A Model for Meaningful and Long-Lasting Change in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Brigid M.

    2013-01-01

    An experiential approach to professional development (EPD) allowed Spanish teachers opportunities to improve their practice through demonstration, observation, collaboration, fieldwork, and reflection. As result of "experiential" professional development, Burke (2012) found that teachers' knowledge about communicative language teaching…

  15. The Sublime and the Vulgar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, Karen

    1990-01-01

    Explores how Edmund Burke's discourse on the sublime helps illuminate attacks on the vulgarization of culture (as typified by Allan Bloom), both for the presumedly "vulgar" reader and for the champions of high culture. (MG)

  16. How to use an inhaler - no spacer

    MedlinePlus

    Laube BL, Dolovich MB. Aerosols and aerosol drug delivery systems. In: Adkinson NF Jr, Bochner BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  17. How to use an inhaler - with spacer

    MedlinePlus

    Laube BL, Dolovich MB. Aerosols and aerosol drug delivery systems. In: Adkinson NF Jr, Bochner BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  18. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Early Childhood, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Reviews "La Educacion Preescolar: Desafio y Aventura" (Lavanchy Bobsien); "Working towards Better Childcare" (Peeters and Vandenbroeck, editors); "Children's Savings: A Study in the Development of Economic Behavior" (Sonuga-Barke and Webley); "Curvas de Crecimiento Estaturo-ponderal en Escolares" (Saez Crespo and others); and "Helping Bereaved…

  19. The Cartographic Representation of Linguistic Data. Discussion Papers in Geolinguistics Nos. 19-21. Selected Papers from a Geolinguistic Seminar (Le Pailly, France, September 10-13, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeters, Yvo J. D., Ed.; Williams, Colin H., Ed.

    Papers from a conference on cartography in geolinguistics include: "The Political Importance of Visualisation of Language Contact" (Yvo J. D. Peeters); "Some Considerations on People and Boundaries" (Guy Heraud); "Geolinguistic Developments and Cartographic Problems" (Colin H. Williams, John E. Ambrose); "A Conceptual Home for Geolinguistics:…

  20. Comment on Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T. S.; Diamond, P. H.; Gurcan, O. D.; Rewoldt, G.

    2009-03-12

    This response demonstrates that the comment by Peeters et al. contains an incorrect and misleading interpretation of our paper [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 055902 (2008)] regarding the density gradient dependence of momentum pinch and the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory.

  1. "Build Me a Male Role Model!" A Critical Exploration of the Perceived Qualities/Characteristics of Men in the Early Years (0-8) in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownhill, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Young boys' "underachievement" and their disaffection with learning continue to dominate education agendas [Francis, B. 2006. "Stop That Sex Drive." "Times Educational Supplement" 30; Peeters, J. 2007. "Including Men in Early Childhood Education: Insights from the European Experience." "NZ Research…

  2. Science Is Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Michael Burke is an artist who's work combines scientific principles with aesthetic goals. He will describe how he became an artist after careers in astronomy and city planning, and discuss the supposed separation of science and art. The talk will be illustrated with photographs of his work, including an installation in an Etruscan tomb and one at the port city of Savona in Italy. Mr. Burke sees a romance in science equivalent to that of art, and will argue that the two should not be so resolutely separated.

  3. Bobcat (Felis rufus) ecology and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, Judd A.

    1997-01-01

    The bobcat (Felis rufus) is a medium sized predator in the family Felidae found exclusively in North America. Extensive natural history information is available and is summarized in several bibliographies and reviews (Sweeny and Poelker 1977, McCord and Cardoza 1982, Boddicker 1983, Anderson 1987, Rolley 1987). The bobcat is a spotted cat with a short white-tipped tail, small dark ear tufts and is about twice the size of the house cat (Felis domesticus) because of the bobcat’s longer bone structure (McCord and Cardoza 1982, Jameson and Peeters 1988). The bobcat weights between 5- 15 kg with males larger than females. TL 700- 1000, T 95-150, E (from crown) 60-75 (Jameson and Peeters 1988).

  4. Coupling the beam tracing code TORBEAM and the Fokker-Planck solver RELAX for fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, O.; Poli, E.; Westerhof, E.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper the interface between the beam tracing code TORBEAM [Poli, Peeters and Pereverzev, Comp. Phys. Comm. 136, 90 (2001)] and the quasi-linear Fokker-Planck solver RELAX [Westerhof, Peeters and Schippers, Rijnhuizen Report No. RR 92-211 CA, 1992] is presented together with preliminary testing results for electron cyclotron waves in ITER plasmas and their effects on the electron distribution function. The resulting numerical package allows us to account for diffraction effects in the construction of the quasi-linear wave-particle diffusion operator. The coupling of the paraxial-WKB code TORBEAM to the ray-based code RELAX requires a reinterpretation of the paraxial wave field in terms of extended rays, which are addressed in details.

  5. Assessing Success in School Finance Litigation: The Case of New Jersey. Education, Equity, and the Law. No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goertz, Margaret E.; Weiss, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Education finance policy in New Jersey has been shaped by over 30 years of school finance litigation. Through its decisions in "Robinson v. Cahill" (1973-1976) and "Abbott v. Burke" (1985-2005), the justices of New Jersey's supreme court have defined the state's constitutional guarantee of a "thorough and efficient" education, set parameters for…

  6. DACA-Lamented? Spared Deportation, Immigrant Students Still Face Higher Ed Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lauren A.

    2014-01-01

    In this brief article, immigration lawyer and executive director of Atlas: DIY Lauren Burke describes the challenges faced by "DACA-mented" students--those who have received deportation reprieve through President Obama's 2012 memorandum. Atlas: DIY (www.atlasdiy.org) is a cooperative center for undocumented youth and their allies in…

  7. Beyond Strategy: A Reader-Centered Analysis of Irony's Dual Persuasive Uses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Kathryn M.; Olson, Clark D.

    2004-01-01

    Ironic texts offer pleasure both as what Burke called "ordinary" and "pure persuasion." Readers may engage these symbolic dimensions simultaneously, but in different relative proportions. Using the coincidence of the 1986 sentencing of sanctuary movement members and the rededication of the Statue of Liberty, we offer four possible interpretive…

  8. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Charlie, Ed.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This feature issue focuses on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), with articles discussing provisions of the ADA and its impact on people with developmental disabilities. Articles have the following titles and authors: "The ADA: What Does It Mean for People with Developmental Disabilities?" (Deborah L. McFadden and Edward P. Burke); "The…

  9. Reasoning and Sense Making with Pythagoras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Matt B.

    2014-01-01

    In 1996, a new proof of the Pythagorean theorem appeared in the "College Mathematics Journal" (Burk 1996). The occurrence is, perhaps, not especially notable given the fact that proofs of the Pythagorean theorem are numerous in the study of mathematics. Elisha S. Loomis in his treatise on the subject, "The Pythagorean…

  10. Contemporary Rhetoric: A Conceptual Background with Readings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterowd, W. Ross, Ed.

    Designed for use by composition students as well as teachers, the essays and background discussions in this book address themselves to questions of theory and practice in rhetoric. The book is divided into sections on invention, form, and style, and contains articles by such authors as Janet Emig, Wayne C. Booth, Richard L. Larson, Kenneth Burke,…

  11. Overcoming Communication Obstacles through Films in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Mary Anne

    C.M. Condit (1986) has pointed out that audiences regard characterizations as the most salient feature of any text. The power of identification or "the result of all the components in the rhetorical act" (K. Burke, 1945, 1950) is compelling. The power generated by viewers' responses to character-centered films can be harnessed in the classroom to…

  12. Drama in Life: The Uses of Communication in Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, James E.; Mansfield, Michael W.

    Bringing together 35 of the most notable contributions of authors such as Kenneth Burke, Erving Goffman, and Eric Berne, this book provides an introduction to the dramaturgical perspective of social actions. Selections stem from the conception that many "real-life" actions and events can most adequately be understood in terms of drama. Included…

  13. Celebrating the Constitution: A Bicentennial Retrospective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walch, Timothy G., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This commemorative document was published to celebrate the Bicentennial of the signing of the U.S. Constitution and to pay tribute to the bicentennial celebration efforts of the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration staff. The included articles are: (1) "Introduction: A Celebration at the National Archives" (F. Burke); (2) "The Odyssey…

  14. 78 FR 5200 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Washington, Department of Anthropology..., Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... Burke Museum acting on behalf of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology....

  15. Critical Understanding: The Powers and Limits of Pluralism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Wayne C.

    The problems created by the competing claims of various schools of criticism for a unified view of meaning are examined in this book. Chapters deal with the following topics: the problem of the plurality of modes, Ronald Crane and the pluralism of discrete modes, Kenneth Burke's multiplication of perspectives, history as criticism and the…

  16. Regrinding the Lens of Gender: Problematizing "Writing as a Woman."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Heather Brodie

    1993-01-01

    Argues that codifying the characteristics of "writing like a woman" (or like a man) can result in a limited--and limiting--conception of gender and its effect on writing. Uses the writing of Kenneth Burke as an example of "l'ecriture feminine" and the prose of Julia Kristeva as an example of writing like a man. (SR)

  17. Aesthetic Pursuits: Windows, Frames, Words, Images--Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Ken

    2005-01-01

    In Part I of this study (Burke, 2005), the author presented the essentials of Image Presentation Theory--IPT--and its application to the analytical explication of various spatial designs in and psychological responses to images, from the illusions of depth in what is referred to as "windows" in cinema theory to the more patterned abstractions of…

  18. Looking into a Crystal Ball: Is Requiring High-Stakes Language Proficiency Tests Really Going to Improve World Language Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Brigid M.

    2013-01-01

    Brigid Burke is the program coordinator of World Language Education at her university, which is housed in the College of Education and Human Development. Since obtaining this position 4 years ago, she has become most concerned about certain recommendations that were made by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) in 2002,…

  19. Erratum: “Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment” [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burke, Marcus G.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Bongard, Michael W.; Schlossberg, David J.; Winz, Gregory R.

    2016-07-18

    This article corrects an error in M.G. Burke et al., 'Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment,' Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012) pertaining to ion temperature. The conclusions of this paper are not altered by the revised ion temperature measurements.

  20. Public Data Set: Erratum: "Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Burke, Marcus G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000176193724); Fonck, Raymond J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Bongard, Michael W. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Schlossberg, David J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000287139448); Winz, Gregory R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000177627184)

    2016-07-18

    This data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in M.G. Burke et al., 'Erratum: "Multi-point, high-speed passive ion velocity distribution diagnostic on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment" [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D516 (2012)],' Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 079902 (2016).

  1. Fulfilling the Promise of Abbott: The Lighthouse Assessment Process--Improving Programs through Measured Outcomes. Policy Progress, Spring 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Children of New Jersey, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In an attempt to better prepare young children for the challenges of kindergarten and first grade, the Supreme Court of New Jersey, in its 1998 landmark decision of "Abbott v. Burke" (Abbott V), required the State's poorest school districts to implement high quality, intensive preschool for all 3-and 4-year old children. To take advantage of the…

  2. Rhetoric and Public Address: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1983 (Vol. 44 Nos. 1 through 6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 11 titles deal with the following topics: (1) applying Burke's cluster-agon method to Betty Friedan's rhetoric; (2) the rhetoric of nonviolent action; (3) the president's wife as public communicator; (4) the identification and…

  3. Perspectivism and Form in Drama: A Burkean Analysis of "Julius Caesar."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weier, Gary M.

    1996-01-01

    Employs a critical application of Kenneth Burke's notions of form and perspectivism. Argues for the potential of a complementary relationship between form and perspectivism in the appeal of rhetorical artifacts. Claims that form is perspectival, limiting possibilities for appropriate interpretations within a text. Applies this theoretical…

  4. Making Light of James Watt: A Burkean Approach to the Form and Attitude of Political Cartoons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostdorff, Denise M.

    1987-01-01

    Explores the rhetorical nature of political cartoons by applying Kenneth Burke's concepts and terminology to this graphic art form. Examines (1) formal strategy of "perspective by incongruity," (2) burlesque attitude in political cartoons, and (3) fusion of form and attitude in the tropal principles of this graphic art. Draws from political…

  5. 75 FR 31477 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company, et al; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28... of an amendment to Early Site Permit (ESP) No. ESP-004, issued to Southern Nuclear Operating Company... VEGP ESP site located in Burke County, Georgia. The proposed amendment would change the VEGP ESP...

  6. A Burkeian Analysis of the "Political Correctness" Confrontation in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bello, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Explains that Kenneth Burke's concept of "terministic screen" reveals three rhetorical strategies that those on both sides of the political correctness debate share: unique labeling phraseologies, pugilistic mystification, and a dependence on different pentadic ratios. Concludes with an appraisal of possible future trends. (TB)

  7. Ethical and Spiritual Values in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Mary Thomas, Ed.; Miranti, Judith G., Ed.

    This book presents a compilation of articles previously published in the journal "Counseling and Values." The follwing articles are included: (1) "Ethics and Spirituality: The Prevailing Forces Influencing the Counseling Profession" (Judith Miranti, Mary Thomas Burke); (2) "Three Contributions of a Spiritual Perspective to Counseling,…

  8. Film in Honors Rhetoric: Students' Dramaturgical Analyses of "The Mission."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caputo, John S.; Smith, Amanda

    Since narrative forms help provide the rules and contexts for guiding human behavior, film and television offer excellent sources for the study of rhetoric in the college classroom. Kenneth Burke, Ernest Bormann, and Erving Goffman are all theorists, working from a "dramaturgical" perspective, who disuccuss the powerful role of the media in…

  9. Conducting Qualitative Data Analysis: Qualitative Data Analysis as a Metaphoric Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    In the second of a series of "how-to" essays on conducting qualitative data analysis, Ron Chenail argues the process can best be understood as a metaphoric process. From this orientation he suggests researchers follow Kenneth Burke's notion of metaphor and see qualitative data analysis as the analyst systematically considering the "this-ness" of…

  10. Factors Influencing Sharing Activities in Transnational Public Sector Knowledge Networks: The Case of Mobile Disease Surveillance System Adoption in the 2009 Hajj

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gharawi, Mohammed A.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation contributes to the growing base of theory relating to Transnational Public Sector Knowledge Networks (TPSKNs) presented by Dawes, Gharawi, and Burke (2012). A case study explores the TPSKN formed between the United States Center for Disease Control and the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Health ahead of the 2009 Hajj, one of the…

  11. Common Core Companion: The Standards Decoded What They Say, What They Mean, How to Teach Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jim

    2013-01-01

    "The Common Core Companion: The Standards Decoded", by Jim Burke, provides schools, districts, and departments with a common language or set of reference points for effective school-wide implementation of the Common Core State Standards. The book--available in middle and high school editions--clarifies what each standard says, what each…

  12. Metaphor, Ambiguity, and Motive in Evolutionary Biology: W. D. Hamilton and the "Gene's Point of View"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journet, Debra

    2005-01-01

    This article analyzes the power of ambiguous metaphors to present scientific novelty. Its focus is a series of papers by the prominent population biologist W. D. Hamilton in which he redefined the meaning of biological altruism. In particular, the article draws on Kenneth Burke's dramatistic pentad to examine why suggestions of motive are so…

  13. The Homology Hypothesis: Pornography on the VCR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brummett, Barry

    1988-01-01

    Argues that texts may be especially rhetorically effective when the content, the medium used to convey the content, and the real life experiences that make the content relevant are formally or structurally similar. Suggests that formal linkage creates rhetorical effect, and uses Burke's theory of forms to explain the effect of formal links. (MS)

  14. The Role of Memory for Compounds in Cue Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandorpe, Stefaan; de Houwer, Jan; Beckers, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Revisions of common associative learning models incorporate a within-compound association mechanism in order to explain retrospective cue competition effects (e.g., [Dickinson, A., & Burke, J. (1996). Within-compound associations mediate the retrospective revaluation of causality judgements. "Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 49B", pp.…

  15. The Responding Reader: Nine New Approaches to Teaching Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ken, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Articles in this journal issue explore the relationship between the reader and the literature text, and discuss ways that instruction can enhance reader response to that literature. Following an introduction summarizing the nine articles, the titles and their authors are as follows: (1) "It Is the Poem That I Remake: Using Kenneth Burke's Pentad…

  16. Learning in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Scott; Moore, Tom

    2009-01-01

    When geometry and career and technical education (CTE) are cotaught in the process of building a house, learning is enhanced, test scores improve, and there's a waiting list of students wanting in. Geometry in Construction is a class instructed by the authors--a CTE teacher (Scott Burke) and a mathematics teacher (Tom Moore). While Moore instructs…

  17. The Abbott Preschool Program: Fifth Year Report on Enrollment and Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applewhite, Erain; Hirsch, Lesley

    2003-01-01

    The New Jersey Supreme Court's 1998 ruling in Abbott v. Burke represents the first judicial directive in the nation that public education must include a high-quality, well-planned preschool program starting at age three. This decision applies to 30 urban school districts, known as the Abbott districts, that serve approximately 25 percent of the…

  18. Verbal Patterns in Dyadic Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, Joe; Ivie, Robert L.

    Selected aspects of Kenneth Burke's "dramatistic" model of symbolic interaction were operationalized to describe and compare verbal patterns in transactions between five pairs of friends and five pairs of strangers. Based on Altman and Taylor's social penetration theory, it was predicted that interactants would display verbal patterns unique to…

  19. Applying the Deming Method to Higher Education for More Effective Human Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Richard I., Ed.

    This book discusses the application of the Deming Management Method to higher education in order to improve the management practices and operations of American colleges and universities. The contributing articles are as follows: (1) "The Parable of the Red Beads" (Joseph A. Burke); (2) Constancy of Purpose for the Improvement of Product and…

  20. The photometric follow-up observations for transiting exoplanet XO-2b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Sheng-hong; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Wang, Xiao-bin; Fang, Xiang-song; Cao, Dong-tao; Zhang, Li-yun

    2011-11-01

    Four new transit light curves of XO-2b obtained in 2008 and 2009, are analyzed by using MCMC algorithm, and the system parameters are derived. The result demonstrates that the orbital period of the system obtained from new observations is almost the same as Burke et al.'s one (2007), which does not confirm the result of Fernandez et al. (2009).

  1. The Neural Correlates of Inhibiting Pursuit to Smoothly Moving Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Melanie Rose; Barnes, Graham R.

    2011-01-01

    A previous study has shown that actively pursuing a moving target provides a predictive motor advantage when compared with passive observation of the moving target while keeping the eyes still [Burke, M. R., & Barnes, G. R. Anticipatory eye movements evoked after active following versus passive observation of a predictable motion stimulus. "Brain…

  2. Vocational Training and Lifelong Learning in Australia and Germany. Australia Centre Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Gerald, Ed.; Reuling, Jochen, Ed.

    This document contains 17 papers on vocational training and lifelong learning in Australia and Germany. The following papers are included: "Vocational Training and Lifelong Learning in Australia and Germany: Background" (Gerald Burke); "Vocational Training and Lifelong Learning in Australia: Observations and Conclusions from a German Perspective"…

  3. 76 FR 58424 - Transmission Relay Loadability Reliability Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Terence A. Burke (Legal Information), Office of the General Counsel, Federal Energy... (Technical Information), Office of Electric Reliability, Division of Reliability Standards, Federal Energy... INFORMATION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking September 15, 2011. 1. Pursuant to section 215 of the Federal...

  4. 76 FR 16645 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Notice of Availability of Application for a Combined License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... combined licenses (COLs) for two AP1000 advanced passive pressurized water reactors at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP) site located in Burke County, Georgia. The reactors are to be identified as VEGP... acting by and through its Board of Water, Light and Sinking Fund Commissioners (Dalton Utilities),...

  5. 76 FR 14699 - Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Notice of Availability of Application for a Combined License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... combined licenses (COLs) for two AP1000 advanced passive pressurized water reactors at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant (VEGP) site located in Burke County, Georgia. The reactors are to be identified as VEGP... acting by and through its Board of Water, Light and Sinking Fund Commissioners (Dalton Utilities),...

  6. Shakespeare's Poetics of Play-Making and Therapeutic Action in "The Tempest."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Melissa Ann

    2000-01-01

    Practices Kenneth Burke's rhetoric of empathic identification to read and understand six levels of consubstantiality between Shakespeare and his Elizabethan audience blueprinted by the authorized text of "The Tempest." Offers implications for the contemporary practices of poetry and drama therapy with participants capable of self-differentiation.…

  7. High-Impact Training Solutions: Top Issues Troubling Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lisa A., Ed.

    Designed for front-line training professionals, this book addresses the most pressing issues in the training and development field (T&D). "Introduction" (Lisa A. Burke) discusses the importance of viewing training as a subsystem of human resources, training as a systematic process, and indicators of high impact training. "Strategic Training:…

  8. Observing the What and When of Language Production for Different Age Groups by Monitoring Speakers' Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Zenzi M.; Spieler, Daniel H.

    2006-01-01

    Research on adult age differences in language production has traditionally focused on either the production of single words or the properties of language samples. Older adults are more prone to word retrieval failures than are younger adults (e.g., Burke, MacKay, Worthley, & Wade, 1991). Older adults also tend to produce fewer ideas per utterance…

  9. Instructions for Systemic Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seigel, Marika A.

    2009-01-01

    In the technical communication classroom, the received wisdom is that good instructions should "stay out of the way" of the users' engagement with technological systems. This article draws on Burke's concept of perspective by incongruity and on examples of instructions produced during the Women's Health Movement to demonstrate that sometimes…

  10. Job Satisfaction among High School Athletic Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Gregory; Reese, Shirley A.

    2006-01-01

    Coaching and supervising high school sport programs can be a rewarding, but stressful career. Many researchers have identified a close relationship between occupational stress and job satisfaction, or how one feels about the job (Burke 1971; Buck, 1972; Howard, 1978). Most studies of job satisfaction in education have tended to focus on teachers.…

  11. Examining the Choice of Business Majors to Participate in a Short-Term Study Abroad Program Using the Gap Analysis Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera Lopez, Janet

    2013-01-01

    The Clark and Estes (2008) Gap Analysis Process Model (Gap Analysis) was used to examine the reasons 33% of freshmen students do not participate in the Burke School of Business, Business Abroad Experience (BAE) program at New Wave University (NWU). The purpose of this study was to understand the considerations students make in their…

  12. Persistence among African American Males in the Honors College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson Goins, Johnell Roxann

    2014-01-01

    Retaining African American students, specifically African American males, is an issue that plagues the American higher education system. Research shows that African American male students are the lowest represented group in the gifted studies programs (Ford, 2010). Lockie and Burke (1999); Chen and DeJardins (2010) and Bell (2010a) found that…

  13. "Response to Comments": Straw Makeovers, Dogmatic Holism, and Interesting Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the author's response to commentaries by Eric Bredo, R. Burke Johnson, and Linda Tillman on his article "Positivist Dogmas, Rhetoric, and the Education Science Question." Each of the commentaries goes beyond merely characterizing and assessing the author's analysis to also suggest an alternative emphasis, if not an alternative…

  14. The Use of Behaviour Modification Techniques in a Class of Slow Learners. A Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advani, Kan; Beaumaster, Eugene

    Rules were established, improved behavior was rewarded, and undesirable behavior was ignored to change disruptive classroom behavior of 25 slow learning 10-year-olds and 13 controls in a classroom setting. Experimental teachers were instructed in application of behavior modification principles. Burk's Behaviour Rating Scale (included) was used to…

  15. Science Sublime: The Philosophy of the Sublime, Dewey's Aesthetics, and Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists and, in turn, science education has not accurately portrayed science to students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the classroom, this work draws on the writings of the sublime by Burke, Kant, Emerson, and Wordsworth…

  16. Two Thinking Skills Assessment Approaches: "Assessment of Pupils' Thinking Skills" and "Individual Thinking Skills Assessments"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lynsey A.; Williams, Joanne M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is linked to a previous paper outlining an evaluation of a thinking skills intervention (Burke & Williams, 2008). Following extensive requests for the assessment tools used in the intervention, this short paper presents the development and potential uses of two thinking skills assessment tools. The aim of the paper is simply to make…

  17. Exclusion, Engagement and Identity Construction in a Socioeconomically Diverse Middle School Wind Band Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Adria Rachel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this multiple case study was to explore the wind band classroom as a social context and examine its influence on middle-school students' identity constructions. The integration of sociologically based identity theory and social identity theory from social psychology suggested by Deaux and Martin as well as Stets and Burke proved…

  18. Changing Lives: Women, Inclusion and the PhD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Barbara Ann, Ed.; Gunter, Helen, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Heidi Safia Mirza, Penny Jane Burke, Jennifer Lavia, Gloria Gordon, Helen Gunter and Barbara Ann Cole each tells her story of completing doctoral studies at a particular personal and professional stage in her life. Their narratives reveal their experience of the resultant life changes and will speak to people who are at different stages in their…

  19. It Takes Capital to Defeat Dracula: A New Rhetorical Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    Argues the usefulness of the New Rhetorical method epitomized by the critical work of Kenneth Burke utilizing two concepts from communication theory. Specifically, demonstrates how the method can guide readers methodically to insights that make sense of apparent anomalies in "Dracula" and call attention to major features of the text that have been…

  20. Charlie's Words: Supporting Gifted Male Athletes Using Athletes' Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A gifted student-athlete, Charlie Bloomfield is introduced to athlete's journals by his coaches at Burke Mountain Academy (Vermont), an elite American ski school. Used by Olympians and professionals alike, journals provide athletes with ways to organize and reflect on training and competitions. Athlete's journals help gifted male athletes address…

  1. Diagnosis and Remediation Practices for Troubled School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burks, Harold F.

    2008-01-01

    In this resource for educators, Harold F. Burks offers a comprehensive guide to the evaluation techniques and intervention strategies that have worked with many school children experiencing problems. Thus, this book attempts to: clarify the understanding of observed, unwanted child behavior symptoms (whether they be physical, intellectual,…

  2. On Imaging the Future: The Secular Search for "Piety".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Jane; Muir, Janette Kenner

    1987-01-01

    Outlines requirements for an exploratory account of "imaging" the future. Examines relationship of Kenneth Burke's notions of "piety" to (1) the nature of language and forming, (2) Kenneth Boulding's concept of subjective knowledge structure presented in "The Image," and (3) various aspects of an "image." Argues that all forms contain a futurizing…

  3. Getting It Right from the Start: The Case for Early Parenthood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sticht, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    The idea that families need to provide enriching educational activities is not new. In 1908, Edmund Burke Huey, regarded as "one of the foremost leaders" in educating children with learning disabilities, wrote, "The school of the future will have as one of its important duties the instruction of parents in the means of assisting the child's…

  4. Rating Scales for Dystonia in Cerebral Palsy: Reliability and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monbaliu, E.; Ortibus, E.; Roelens, F.; Desloovere, K.; Deklerck, J.; Prinzie, P.; De Cock, P.; Feys, H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated the reliability and validity of the Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale (BADS), the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Movement Scale (BFMMS), and the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale (UDRS) in patients with bilateral dystonic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Three raters independently scored videotapes of 10 patients (five males, five females;…

  5. Learning-Style Assessment in Online Courses: A Prerequisite for Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gicco, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Educational researchers have extensively documented the benefits of utilizing learning styles in the processes of teaching and learning from early childhood to Adult Education (Burke & Dunn, 2003; Cicco, 2009). This article examines the need to consider and employ learning-styles instruction in the online classroom. Adult learners are unique…

  6. 75 FR 57974 - Senior Executive Service Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ..., Janice Aytes, Michael L. Bacon, Roxana Baldwin, William D. Baroukh, Nader Barr, Suzanne E. Bathurst..., Donna A. Bucher, Steven P. Buckingham, Patricia A. Burke, Richard Butcher, Michael Button, Christopher Cahill, Donna L. Callahan, Mary Ellen Canton, Lynn G. Capps, Michael Carpenter, Dea D. Carter,...

  7. Burned in: Fueling the Fire to Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Audrey A.; Reynolds, Luke

    2011-01-01

    Almost half of new teachers leave the profession within their first year. New teachers need support, mentoring, encouragement, and, most importantly, hope in order to survive the challenges of their first years of teaching. "Burned In" features essays from today's most visionary educators, including Jim Burke, Peter Elbow, James Loewen, Gregory…

  8. Partnering for Preschool: A Study of Center Directors in New Jersey's Mixed-Delivery Abbott Program. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitebook, Marcy; Ryan, Sharon; Kipnis, Fran; Sakai, Laura

    2008-01-01

    In a series of New Jersey Supreme Court decisions known as Abbott v. Burke, the 28 (now 31) urban school districts serving the state's poorest students were ordered to create systems of high-quality preschool for all three- and four-year-old children, beginning in the 1999-2000 school year. The Abbott Preschool Program now serves approximately…

  9. 76 FR 35396 - Notice of Intent To Reestablish the National Genetic Resources Advisory Council, and Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: J. Robert Burk, 202-720-3684. Correction In the Federal Register of May 14, 2011, in FR... Agricultural Research Service Notice of Intent To Reestablish the National Genetic Resources Advisory Council... Request for Nominations. SUMMARY: The notice announced USD intent to reestablish the National...

  10. Methamphetamine and the Changing Face of Child Welfare: Practice Principles for Child Welfare Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell-Carrick, Kelli

    2007-01-01

    Methamphetamine use and production is changing child welfare practice. Methamphetamine is a significant public health threat (National Institute of Justice, 1999) reaching epidemic proportions (Anglin, Burke, Perrochet, Stamper, & Dawud-Nouris, 2000). The manufacturing of methamphetamine is a serious problem for the child welfare system, yet child…

  11. Psychosocial Interventions for School Refusal Behavior with Primary and Secondary School Students: A Campbell Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Brendel, Kristen E.; Bulanda, Jeffery J; Thompson, Aaron M.; Pigott, Terri D.

    2015-01-01

    School refusal behavior, affecting between 1% and 5% of school-age children, is a psychosocial problem for students characterized by severe emotional distress and anxiety at the prospect of going to school, leading to difficulties in attending school and, in some cases, significant absences from school (Burke & Silverman, 1987; Elliot, 1999;…

  12. The Scapegoating of Bruno Richard Hauptmann: The Rhetorical Process in Prejudicial Publicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkie, Carol

    1981-01-01

    Examines the publicity in the 1935 trial for the kidnapping and death of Charles Lindbergh's son. Applies Burke's theory of human victimage. Concludes that this case may be one of the most blatant examples of journalistic scapegoating in history and a graphic illustration of publicity becoming dangerously prejudicial. (PD)

  13. Cleansing the Superdome: The Paradox of Purity and Post-Katrina Guilt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grano, Daniel A.; Zagacki, Kenneth S.

    2011-01-01

    The reopening of the New Orleans Superdome after Hurricane Katrina on Monday Night Football dramatized problematic rhetorical, visual, and spatial norms of purification rituals bound up in what Burke calls the paradox of purity. Hurricane Katrina was significant as a visually traumatic event in large part because it signified the ghetto as a…

  14. Toward a Theory of Liking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Kevin; Greteman, Adam

    2013-01-01

    In the current essay, Kevin Burke and Adam Greteman challenge this thing called love by looking at how we might instead "like" in education. Within education, multiculturalism can be viewed as a way of loving, or learning to love, diversity and, as such, learning to love the self; this tendency is notably apparent in the recent rise of concern…

  15. Early Childhood Education: The Sustainability of the Benefits of Preschool Participation in Abbott Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Norma

    2010-01-01

    The landmark New Jersey Supreme Court school funding case, "Abbott v. Burke", established the availability of preschool for all three- and four-year-olds living within the state's thirty-one poorest districts as a means of eradicating the effects of poverty. Longitudinal studies have shown the value of high quality preschool programs for improving…

  16. Mythical Structures in Community Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Ken

    To negotiate a balance between an ideological concern for society's historical-economic development and an understanding of the individual's need for a sense of self-realization, social theory researchers should look to B. Dervin's "gap theory model" of communication. Adapted from Kenneth Burke, it offers a dynamic means of understanding how…

  17. Literature as a Mode of Knowing: Rationale for the Teaching of Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Probst, Robert Edward

    This thesis proposes a philosophical foundation for literary instruction, based on several theories and philosophies of language and literature and on studies of student response to literature. Burke submits that literary art and common language uses find their origins in man's unique proclivity for creating symbols. Church agrees, arguing that…

  18. 40 CFR 81.334 - North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.334 North... Creek Township, Broadbay Township, Kernersville Township, Middle Fork Township, Old Town Township, South...-Lenoir, NC: Alexander County (2) Attainment. Burke County (part) Unifour Metropolitan...

  19. 77 FR 58782 - Closing of the Jamieson Line, NY Border Crossing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... minimal impact on the town closest to the crossing, the town of Burke, with a population of 1,359. The... Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Review Executive Orders 13563 and 12866 direct agencies to assess... land environment (73 FR 18384; April 3, 2008). See www.regulations.gov document numbers...

  20. 77 FR 44310 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... KENNETH BURKE ANGELA ROSEMARIE BROWN CAMPBELL DANIEL CARLTON NANCY CELLIER-PESTALOZZI URSULA BETTINA CHAN... SHUM LEUNG KING ANSELM LI ADRIENNE MAY LI JEREMY YUEN LIM LLAMANZARES MARY GRACE POE LO TINA YI-CHUN... CAROLE STAR GRACE DANA WHITE STATHAM ANDREW CRAIG STATON ALICE MARY STEIN AMELIA YUEN-YU STEPHANSEN...

  1. Researcher Effects on Mortality Salience Research: A Meta-Analytic Moderator Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Chih-Long; Cheng, Chung-Ping

    2013-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis of 164 terror management theory (TMT) papers indicated that mortality salience (MS) yields substantial effects (r = 0.35) on worldview and self-esteem-related dependent variables (B. L. Burke, A. Martens, & E. H. Faucher, 2010). This study reanalyzed the data to explore the researcher effects of TMT. By cluster-analyzing…

  2. Communication, Values, and Popular Television Series--A Seventeen-Year Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesebro, James W.

    1991-01-01

    Employs a dramatistic system based on the critical frameworks of Kenneth Burke and Northrop Frye to analyze 903 prime-time network television series. Classifies series as ironic, mimetic, leader-centered, romantic, or mythical. Concludes that over the period from 1974-91, series went from individualism, to idealism and authority, to authority…

  3. A Mathematician's Proposal. Carnegie Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke; Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative literacy, the ability to discriminate between good and bad data, the disposition to use quantitative information to think through complex problems are capacities that educators across fields should be helping students develop. Burke leads the reader to this conclusion through an extended example of income distribution, clarified and…

  4. 77 FR 11064 - National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20250-0321. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: J. Robert Burk, Executive Director or Shirley Morgan-Jordan, Program Support Coordinator, National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board; telephone: (202) 536-6547; fax: (202) 720-6199; or email:...

  5. Dhurrin content relates to sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L) Moench) seedling growth in marginal soils.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dhurrin content in leaves of mature sorghum plant is a quantitative measure of the level of pre-and postflowering drought tolerance (Burke et al., 2013). Postflowering drought tolerance in sorghum is linked to the staygreen (delayed senescence) trait (Howarth, 2000; Rosenow et al., 1977) which has b...

  6. "Reality" Revisited: Self-Assessment of Terministic Screens through a Political Autobiography Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Karla M.

    2016-01-01

    Courses: Argumentation, Public Speaking, Political Communication. Objectives: After completing this unit activity, students should be able to (1) demonstrate comprehension of Burke's (1941) concept of terministic screens; (2) apply the concept of terministic screens to write a brief political autobiography of themselves that analyzes the history…

  7. Ecological Stewardship and Gifted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHardy, Roberta J.; Blanchard, Pamela B.; de Wet, Catharina F.

    2009-01-01

    In even the earliest studies of giftedness in young children (Burks, Jensen, & Terman, 1930; Hollingworth, 1926), researchers noted distinct character traits among gifted students, which included global awareness, sensitivity to complex issues, and a tendency to worry about injustice and dangers that often are beyond a child's control. Dabrowski…

  8. African Americans in Adult Education: The Harlem Renaissance Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Bailey, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    This study examined a 25-year period of African Americans in adult education by accessing the archival holdings of three major data centers: the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, the Moorland-Spingarn Archives, and the Hollis Burke Frissell Library. The sociopolitical context of the data was analyzed using a Black feminist…

  9. New Perspectives on System and Campus Roles in a Public Multi-Campus System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Joseph C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Four papers address the changing roles of system administrators in multicampus public higher education systems such as the State University of New York (SUNY). In the first paper, by Joseph C. Burke, "Unity and Diversity: SUNY's Challenge Not Its Choice," the role of a public university system is defined as doing for its campuses only those…

  10. The Rhetorical Construction of the Nation in Education: The Case of Flanders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutten, Kris; Mottart, Andre; Soetaert, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines what can be learnt from "new rhetoric" (focusing on the work of the American rhetorician Kenneth Burke [1897-1993]) about (national) identity and discusses how nationalism can be taught from such a rhetorical perspective. Despite the "deconstruction" of nation(alism) as a grand narrative, there is a new tendency towards…

  11. Decision-Making Models with Sets of Strategies for Applications to Individuals and Groups in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Wanda E.

    Three decision-making models that have applications for college presidents and administrators are reviewed. While both individual and group decision-making are addressed, emphasis is placed on the importance of group decisions on institutional policy planning. The model of Edmund M. Burke (1979) presents specific decision-making strategies in…

  12. Maximizing School Guidance Program Effectiveness: A Guide for School Administrators & Program Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykeman, Cass, Ed.

    Twenty-three brief chapters provide administrators a comprehensive guide to school counseling that describes practices, problems, and processes for which school counselors' expertise may be relied on. Chapters are: (1) "Comprehensive School Counseling Programs" (Z. VanZandt, K. H. Burke, M. J. DeRespino); (2) "The Elementary School Counseling…

  13. Bridging Identities through Identity Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, Allison M.; Martiny, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    As indicated by Deaux and Burke (this volume), sociology and psychology have shared a tradition of discourse allowing social psychologists to build upon each other's ideas. A conversation between social identity theory and identity theory was initiated fifteen years ago and addressed the similarities and differences between these theories. This…

  14. Claiming Access to Elite Curriculum: Identification and Division at the Harvard Annex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enoch, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses the rhetorical practices deployed by the Society for the Collegiate Instruction for Women (SCIW) that sought to gain and maintain curricular access to Harvard University in the late 19th century Using Kenneth Burke's theory of identification as an analytical framework, the article considers how the SCIW composed Burkean…

  15. Form, Experience and the Centrality of Rhetoric to Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brummett, Barry

    2015-01-01

    This essay notes a resurgence of interest in rhetorical studies on the appeal of form, grounded in the work of rhetorical theorist Kenneth Burke. The essay argues that form is not only a way to structure discourses, it is a way to structure experience. Form is foundational in creating perceptions and thus experiences. Form is also highly…

  16. Contentious Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuidema, Leah A.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of joining a conversation through reading and writing is not new; in his 1941 book "The Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action," Kenneth Burke suggests that the acts of reading and writing are like entering a parlor where others are already conversing. The author explores the place of professional debate within NCTE and…

  17. The Status and Challenges of Higher Education Curricula Reforms in Four Highly Developed Regional/National Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilder, Eric

    2011-01-01

    In this article (part one of two) I will consider, using the dramatistic model pioneered by Kenneth Burke, the "scene" or historical cultural ground of each "highly developed' national/regional area (The EU, the USA, Hong Kong [SAR], and Singapore) in terms of their Higher Education (HE) systems. After these analyses, then I look to…

  18. Toward Reconstructing the Narrative of Teacher Education: A Rhetorical Analysis of "Preparing Teachers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullough, Robert V., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on insights from literary critic and theorist Kenneth Burke, this rhetorical analysis of "Preparing Teachers" (2010), a publication of the National Research Council, reveals then critiques' key assumptions that are shaping policies and current reform efforts in teacher education, including changes in U.S. teacher…

  19. National Identity within the National Museum: Subjectification within Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiser, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Rhetorician Kenneth Burke's theory of identification usefully demonstrates how (and where) communities are able to engage with difficult, opposing viewpoints as they develop or maintain a sense of shared identity. Identification, "establishing a shared sense of values, attitudes, and interests with [an audience]," is promoted…

  20. Drama in the Archives: Rereading Methods, Rewriting History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Cheryl; Enoch, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the historiographic trajectory of rhetoric and composition studies by analyzing archival research practices, using Kenneth Burke's dramatistic pentad as our analytical tool. We rely on a Burkean framework of "scenes, acts, agents, agencies, purposes, and attitudes" to invigorate our understanding of historiographic methods…

  1. Dhurrin content relates to sorghum [sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] seedling growth in marginal soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dhurrin content in leaves of mature sorghum plant is a quantitative measure of the level of pre-and postflowering drought tolerance (Burke et al., 2013). Postflowering drought tolerance in sorghum is linked to the staygreen (delayed senescence) trait (Howarth, 2000; Rosenow et al., 1977) which has ...

  2. Hope in Uncertainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Maria Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    When President Barack Obama announced that he would direct the Department of Homeland Security to grant deferred deportation and a work permit for two years to undocumented immigrant youth who meet certain criteria, he renewed hope for a better future for a million young people. Lauren Burke, an adjunct law professor at Brooklyn College of Law and…

  3. Oral Reading Errors of Average and Superior Reading Ability Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geoffrion, Leo David

    Oral reading samples were gathered from a group of twenty normal boys from the fourth through sixth grades. All reading errors were coded and classified using a modified version of the taxonomies of Goodman and Burke. Through cluster analysis two distinct error patterns were found. One group consisted of students whose performance was limited…

  4. Student Drivers Will Find This Defensive Course Difficult

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Map and description of 40-acre defensive driving range being built for secondary school driver education programs in the Burke County Public Schools of North Carolina. Features include a beginner course, streets, driveways, expressway, gravel road, a driver education building, and an emergency skid area. (Author/DN)

  5. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Literacy through Picture Books and Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Anne; Peterson, Shelley Stagg

    2007-01-01

    Anne Burke and Shelley Stagg Peterson argue that "picture books offer a medium for teaching visual and critical literacy across the curriculum." To support this idea, they describe a multidisciplinary unit on World War II that pushes high school students to utilize visual and print literacies to analyze, comprehend, and relate to public events and…

  6. Diagnosis of Enzyme Inhibition Using Excel Solver: A Combined Dry and Wet Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias, Albino A.; Pinto, Paula A.; Fraga, Irene; Bezerra, Rui M. F.

    2014-01-01

    In enzyme kinetic studies, linear transformations of the Michaelis-Menten equation, such as the Lineweaver-Burk double-reciprocal transformation, present some constraints. The linear transformation distorts the experimental error and the relationship between "x" and "y" axes; consequently, linear regression of transformed data…

  7. The Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching: Strategies of a Movement in the Comic Frame.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Kimberly A.

    1995-01-01

    Uses Kenneth Burke's comic frame to analyze how the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching (a coalition of white Southern women), 1930-1942, used four rhetorical strategies available to the comic rhetor to halt and eventually bring an end to lynching in the South. (SR)

  8. Teaching Tools: One Last Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Burke's own teacher-research has resulted in solutions for real classroom situations. In this, his last contribution as a column editor for "VM," he offers two more practical ideas for helping students achieve, and sends his readers off with advice to look to their own classrooms for solutions to the ever-present challenges of teaching. (Contains…

  9. Evidence-Based Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke-Smalley, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    In this rejoinder to "Let's Burn Them All: Reflections on the Learning-Inhibitory Nature of Introduction to Management and Introduction to Organizational Behavior Textbooks," by Robert A. Snyder (see EJ1039748), Lisa Burke-Smalley touches upon a number of Snyder's claims and explores questions sparked by his essay. She argues…

  10. Domal structure in Devonian rocks of Kimberling basin, Bland County, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, R.C.

    1988-08-01

    The Kimberling basin, which is floored with Middle Devonian clastic rocks, is a topographic and structural low in the Narrows fault block of the southern Appalachian Valley and Ridge province in Bland County, Virginia. The basin is bounded on the northwest and southeast by the southeast-dipping Narrows and Saltville thrust faults, respectively. Two doubly plunging anticlines lie along the strike of the basin. Lower Ordovician rocks are exposed in the Burkes Garden dome to the southwest, and Lower Cambrian rocks are present in the core of the Bane dome to the northeast. Previous workers have postulated continuity between the Burkes Garden and Bane domes through the Kimberling basin, as well as the presence in the basin of an anomalously thick Devonian clastic section, which has been ascribed by some authors to contemporaneous downwarp of a depositional syncline. Recent mapping has shown both of these postulates to be incorrect. The basin contains an anticline-syncline pair that is en echelon with the axes of the Burkes Garden and Bane anticlines and that trends about 20/degree/ more northerly than the regional strike of the bounding thrusts. Rediscovery of small outcrops of Lower and Middle Devonian Huntersville Chert and Rocky Gap Sandstone in the core of the Kimberling basin anticline, which were recorded by M.R. Campbell in 1896 but overlooked by later mappers, shows that the Devonian clastic sequence has a normal thickness and that the Kimberling basin contains a domal structure similar to the Burkes Garden and Bane domes.

  11. The Cigarette as Representational Ideograph in the Debate over Environmental Tobacco Smoke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mark P.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that the social construction of the cigarette in divergent synecdochic forms or "representational ideographs" is based on varying degrees of narrative and scientific knowledge. Broadens the existing theoretical perspective derived from Kenneth Burke and Michael McGee to include Jean-Francois Lyotard's view of narrative and scientific…

  12. Accountability through Assessment of Administrative Organizations in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniola, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Accountability is among the least understood policy issues in higher education (Burke 2005). The rapid rise in tuition costs in both public and private institutions (Heller 2006) in all corners of the globe (Altbach, Reisberg, and Rumbley 2009) has challenged the idea of higher education as a public good. Student learning outcomes is one…

  13. Strategic Responses to Accountability Demands: A Case Study of Three Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattimore, John B.; D'Amico, Mark M.; Hancock, Dawson R.

    2012-01-01

    As community colleges receive attention focused on their role in addressing postsecondary needs, they are subject to varying levels of accountability, which necessitates the development of strategic approaches to leading institutions. Burke (2005) recognizes three accountability perspectives that higher education institutions must consider:…

  14. Comment on 'Turbulent equipartition theory of toroidal momentum pinch' [Phys. Plasmas 15, 055902 (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, A. G.; Angioni, C.; Strintzi, D.

    2009-03-15

    The comment addresses questions raised on the derivation of the momentum pinch velocity due to the Coriolis drift effect [A. G. Peeters et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. These concern the definition of the gradient, and the scaling with the density gradient length. It will be shown that the turbulent equipartition mechanism is included within the derivation using the Coriolis drift, with the density gradient scaling being the consequence of drift terms not considered in [T. S. Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 055902 (2008)]. Finally the accuracy of the analytic models is assessed through a comparison with the full gyrokinetic solution.

  15. Social anxiety, alcohol expectancies, and self-efficacy as predictors of heavy drinking in college students.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Donna M; Turk, Cynthia L; Fresco, David M

    2006-03-01

    Burke and Stephens (1999) [Burke, R.S., Stephens, R.S. Social anxiety and drinking in college students: A social cognitive theory analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 19, (1999) 513-530.] proposed a social cognitive theory of heavy drinking in college students. According to this theory, alcohol expectancies for social facilitation and self-efficacy for refusing heavy drinking in anxiety-producing social situations moderate the relationship between social anxiety and drinking. In the current study, a significant three-way interaction was observed among social anxiety, expectancies, and self-efficacy when amount and frequency of drinking was the dependent variable. As predicted by the model, socially anxious college students with low self-efficacy for avoiding heavy drinking in social situations and high positive expectancies for social facilitation reported more alcohol consumption than other socially anxious individuals.

  16. Optical and thermoelectric properties of Tl-filled CoSb3 skutterudites from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee Kim, In; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2006-03-01

    Filled skutterudite antimonides have attracted much interest as a new class of thermoelectric materials. We have determined the electronic structures, optical and thermoelectric propertes of Tl-filled skutterudite CoSb3 by using the highly precise full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method within the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) form of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) to density functional theory. In contrast to the small-gap semiconducting CoSb3, Tl-filled CoSb3 is calculated to be metallic with Tl-sp bands stongly hybridized with all the other elements over the entire energy region. The thermoelectric properties, e.g. the Seebeck coefficient, are evaluated and discussed in terms of the diagonal terms of the optical matrix elements. B.C. Sales, D. Mandrus, and R. K. Williams, Science 272, 1325 (1996). Wimmer, Weinert, Krakauer, Freeman, Phys. Rev. B 24, 864 (1981). Perdew, Burke, Ernzerhof, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996).

  17. Applying Density Functional Theory for Atomic Vacancies in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaolan; Perdew, John P.

    2008-03-01

    We use a new generalized gradient approximation of density functional theory -- PBEsol, a revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA, to calculate the vacancy formation energies and other properties of metals and semiconductors: Al, Pt, Pd, GaN [1], etc. By restoring the gradient expansion over a wide range of density gradients, PBEsol [2] yields excellent jellium exchange and correlation surface energies. We expect that this new functional will improve the description of vacancies in real materials, since the vacancy formation energy is essentially the work needed to create an interior surface. [1] Thomas R.Mattsson and Ann E. Mattson. Phys. Rev. B 66, 214410 (2002). [2] John P. Perdew, Adrienn Ruzsinszky, Gabor I. Csonka, Oleg A. Vydrov, Gustavo E. Scuseria, Lucian A. Constantin, Xiaolan Zhou, and Kieron Burke, Restoring the density-gradient expansion for exchange in solids and surfaces, http://arxiv.org/abs/0711.0156

  18. On the structure of gaseous confined laminar diffusion flames: Numerical investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawid, M. A.; Bulzan, D. L.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The structure and characteristics of gaseous confined laminar diffusion flames are investigated by numerically solving the time-dependent two-dimensional axisymmetric conservation equations. The numerical model accounts for the important chemical and physical processes involved, including axial diffusion, viscous effects, radial convection, and finite-rate chemistry. The numerical results clearly show that the flame has a finite thickness and leakage of fuel vapor into the flame zone is possible. The effect of heat release is found to induce some radial flow. Predicted flame shape and dimensions are compared to the classical Burke-Schumann flame. The numerically calculated flame is observed to be about 15 percent taller and 5 percent narrower than that of the Burke-Schumann solution under the same conditions.

  19. Howison, the Cramond Murderer, and last person to be hanged and dissected.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, M H

    2000-02-01

    An articulated skeleton in Edinburgh University's Anatomy Museum of "Howison, The Cramond Murderer", shares a show-case with the articulated skeleton of "William Burke, The Murderer". While the murderous activities of William Burke are well known, because of his association and activities with William Hare, and because they sold the bodies of their victims to Dr Robert Knox, the anatomist, little these days is recalled of Howison. He was executed for the murder of a woman in Cramond in December 1831, and was hanged on 21st January 1832. The case is important because he was the last individual executed before the implementation of the Anatomy Act of 1832. Accordingly, under the conditions of the previous Act, of 1752, entitled "An Act for better preventing the horrid Crime of Murder", his body had to be handed across to the surgeons to be "dissected and anatomized", before it could be buried.

  20. The rhetoric of Kevorkian's battle.

    PubMed

    Kenny, R W

    2000-11-01

    Kenneth Burke's characterization of constitutions effectively describes the customs and values that are lived within a community, and he has well charted the dialectical process which such constitutions undergo when they actually submit to change. In this paper, the totality of thematically-relevant discursive events which arise during periods of constitutional amending are referred to, building from Bitzer, as a rhetorical situation. Using Bitzer alongside Burke, it will be shown that Jack Kevorkian's rhetorical intent, as expressed in his writings and public statements, is distinct from the rhetorical situation to which he has been assigned, illustrating the significant discrepancy between the would-be rhetorical utterances of a speaker and those utterances which have rhetorical impact. The argument will show how Kevorkian's intention to popularize obitiatry contrasts with his public image as a champion of physician-assisted dying.

  1. Revamping the Classroom Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner-Burke, Nanci

    2014-01-01

    Too often, students don't feel engaged in their research projects. The problem begins as early as the topic-creation stage, when students may choose from a list of teacher-selected topics that don't interest them or struggle to select a single fruitful topic on their own. Nanci Werner-Burke describes how two students in an English…

  2. Australia announces plans for expanded marine reserve network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-06-01

    Australia announces plans for expanded marine reserve network The Australian government has announced plans to increase the nation's network of marine reserves from 27 to 60, bringing the total size of the network to 3.1 million square kilometers, Australia's environment minister Tony Burke said on 14 June. The expansion, which would place more than one third of Australia's waters under protection, requires a 60-day consultation before it can become law.

  3. An Application of the Topological Degree to Gravitational Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Marco

    In this letter we provide a new proof of a general theorem on gravitational lenses, first proven by Burke (1981) for the special case of thin lenses. The theorem states that a transparent gravitational lens with non-singular mass distribution produces an odd number of images of a point source. Our general proof shows that the topological degree finds natural and interesting applications in the theory of gravitational lenses.

  4. Effects of deep brain stimulation in dyskinetic cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Koy, Anne; Hellmich, Martin; Pauls, K Amande M; Marks, Warren; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Fricke, Oliver; Timmermann, Lars

    2013-05-01

    Secondary dystonia encompasses a heterogeneous group with different etiologies. Cerebral palsy is the most common cause. Pharmacological treatment is often unsatisfactory. There are only limited data on the therapeutic outcomes of deep brain stimulation in dyskinetic cerebral palsy. The published literature regarding deep brain stimulation and secondary dystonia was reviewed in a meta-analysis to reevaluate the effect on cerebral palsy. The Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale movement score was chosen as the primary outcome measure. Outcome over time was evaluated and summarized by mixed-model repeated-measures analysis, paired Student t test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Twenty articles comprising 68 patients with cerebral palsy undergoing deep brain stimulation assessed by the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale were identified. Most articles were case reports reflecting great variability in the score and duration of follow-up. The mean Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale movement score was 64.94 ± 25.40 preoperatively and dropped to 50.5 ± 26.77 postoperatively, with a mean improvement of 23.6% (P < .001) at a median follow-up of 12 months. The mean Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale disability score was 18.54 ± 6.15 preoperatively and 16.83 ± 6.42 postoperatively, with a mean improvement of 9.2% (P < .001). There was a significant negative correlation between severity of dystonia and clinical outcome (P < .05). Deep brain stimulation can be an effective treatment option for dyskinetic cerebral palsy. In view of the heterogeneous data, a prospective study with a large cohort of patients in a standardized setting with a multidisciplinary approach would be helpful in further evaluating the role of deep brain stimulation in cerebral palsy. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  5. 77 FR 6591 - Investigations Regarding Certifications of Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... 01/13/12 Center--Peace Health (State/One-Stop). 81247 Quad Graphics (Union)...... Dickson, TN 01/18/12 01/17/12 81248 Burke Hosiery Mills, Inc. Hickory, NC 01/18/12 01/17/12 (Company). 81249 Jump...Vergne, TN 01/18/12 01/11/12 (Company). 81251 Isaacson's Structural Steel Berlin, NH 01/19/12...

  6. Structural and Thermoelectronic Properties of Chalcopyrite MgSiX2 (X = P, As, Sb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocak, B.; Ciftci, Y. O.; Surucu, G.

    2016-08-01

    We have explored the structural, electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of the magnesium-based chalcopyrites MgSiP2, MgSiAs2, and MgSiSb2 using density functional theory with five different generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals: Perdew-Wang (1991), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof, revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof, modified Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof for solids, and Armiento-Mattson (2005) as well as the local density approximation. Change of the constituent element from P to Sb significantly affected the lattice constants, elastic constants, and thermal and dielectric properties. Our theoretically computed results are in reasonable agreement with experiments and other theoretical calculations. The electronic band structure results imply that all three considered compounds are semiconductors. MgSiP2 has the highest value of elastic constants, and bulk and shear moduli compared with the other two binary chalcopyrites. Furthermore, the optical response in terms of the dielectric functions, optical reflectivity, refractive index, extinction coefficient, and electron energy loss of the compounds were also investigated in the energy range from 0 eV to 15 eV. The calculated optical results reveal optical polarization anisotropy for all three compounds, making them useful for optoelectronic device applications. Moreover, specific focus is also given to quantify the dependence of various thermal properties on finite pressure/temperature within the quasiharmonic approximation.

  7. Impact of the background toroidal rotation on particle and heat turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Camenen, Y.; Peeters, A. G.; Casson, F. J.; Hornsby, W. A.; Snodin, A. P.; Angioni, C.; Strintzi, D.

    2009-01-15

    Recent developments in the gyrokinetic theory have shown that, in a toroidal device, the Coriolis drift associated with the background plasma rotation significantly affects the small scale instabilities [A. G. Peeters et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. The later study, which focuses on the effect of the Coriolis drift on toroidal momentum transport is extended in the present paper to heat and particle transport. It is shown numerically using the gyrokinetic flux-tube code GKW[A. G. Peeters and D. Strintzi, Phys. Plasmas 11, 3748 (2004)], and supported analytically, that the Coriolis drift and the parallel dynamics play a similar role in the coupling of density, temperature, and velocity perturbations. The effect on particle and heat fluxes increases with the toroidal rotation (directly) and with the toroidal rotation gradient (through the parallel mode structure), depends on the direction of propagation of the perturbation, increases with the impurity charge number and with the impurity mass to charge number ratio. The case of very high toroidal rotation, relevant to spherical tokamaks, is investigated by including the effect of the centrifugal force in a fluid model. The main effect of the centrifugal force is to decrease the local density gradient at the low field side midplane and to add an extra contribution to the fluxes. The conditions for which the inertial terms significantly affect the heat and particle fluxes are evidenced.

  8. Sensitivity of High-Resolution Simulations of Hurricane Bob (1991) to Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    1999-01-01

    The MM5 mesoscale model is used to simulate Hurricane Bob (1991) using grids nested to high resolution (4 km). Tests are conducted to determine the sensitivity of the simulation to the available planetary boundary layer parameterizations, including the bulk-aerodynamic, Blackadar, Medium-RanGe Forecast (MRF) model, and Burk-Thompson boundary-layer schemes. Significant sensitivity is seen, with minimum central pressures varying by up to 17 mb. The Burk-Thompson and bulk-aerodynamic boundary-layer schemes produced the strongest storms while the MRF scheme produced the weakest storm. Precipitation structure of the simulated hurricanes also varied substantially with the boundary layer parameterizations. Diagnostics of boundary-layer variables indicated that the intensity of the simulated hurricanes generally increased as the ratio of the surface exchange coefficients for heat and momentum, C(sub h)/C(sub M), although the manner in which the vertical mixing takes place was also important. Findings specific to the boundary-layer schemes include: 1) the MRF scheme produces mixing that is too deep and causes drying of the lower boundary layer in the inner-core region of the hurricane; 2) the bulk-aerodynamic scheme produces mixing that is probably too shallow, but results in a strong hurricane because of a large value of C(sub h)/C(sub M) (approximately 1.3); 3) the MRF and Blackadar schemes are weak partly because of smaller surface moisture fluxes that result in a reduced value of C(sub h)/C(sub M) (approximately 0.7); 4) the Burk-Thompson scheme produces a strong storm with C(sub h)/C(sub M) approximately 1; and 5) the formulation of the wind-speed dependence of the surface roughness parameter, z(sub 0), is important for getting appropriate values of the surface exchange coefficients in hurricanes based upon current estimates of these parameters.

  9. Study of structural and electronic properties of ScN and ScAs in rocksalt and zincblende structure: A DFT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Vikas Verma, U. P.

    2015-08-28

    In this paper, we have studied the structural and electronic properties of ScN and ScAs in zincblende (ZB) and rocksalt (RS) phases. We have employed the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-APW) method within the density functional theory (DFT). Generalized gradient approximation (GGA), due to Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) has been used to estimate the exchange-correlation functional. Our band structure results for ScN shows the metallic nature, whereas ScAs shows the semiconducting behavior. The obtained results are in excellent agreement with earlier reported data.

  10. Number of deployments, relationship satisfaction and perpetration of partner violence among U.S. Navy members.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Michelle L; Stambaugh, Leyla; Milletich, Robert J; Veprinsky, Anna; Snell, Alicia K

    2015-08-01

    The present brief report examined whether number of deployments, relationship satisfaction, and the interaction between number of deployments and relationship satisfaction predicted Navy members' reports of perpetrating physical partner violence. Participants were 80 U.S. Navy members assigned to an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer anticipating an 8-month deployment after Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom. The effect that the number of deployments had on perpetrating physical partner violence diminished as relationship satisfaction increased. Results suggest the importance of designing domestic violence intervention and treatment efforts toward those who report high levels of deployment and low relationship satisfaction.

  11. Plume Generation Zones On The Core Mantle Boundary: their origin and what they tell about how the Earth works - and how it has worked (Arthur Holmes Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    It is more than 50 years since Wilson (1963) suggested that a fixed plume of deep origin from the convecting mantle is generating the Hotspots of the Hawaiian chain on the overlying moving rigid lithosphere and nearly 45 years since Morgan (1972) followed by suggesting that the plumes which generate Hotspots rise only from the Core/Mantle Boundary (CMB). During the past ~ 15 years testing has begun of a refinement of Morgan's idea based on the observation that Plumes responsible for Hotspots, Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) and a significant fraction of other igneous rocks (including kimberlites) originate only in Plume Generation Zones (PGZs) at the edges on the CMB of one or other of TUZO and JASON the 2 antipodal, equatorial, Large Low Shear Wave Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) of the deep mantle (Garnero et al. 2007) or from similar PGZs at the edges on the CMB of ~8 smaller Low Shear Wave Velocity Provinces. Today I will: (i) demonstrate using dated Hotspot, Large Igneous Province and Kimberlite occurrence history and paleomagnetic rotations (e.g. Torsvik et al. 2010, Burke et al.2008) the stability throughout the past 0.55 Ga of the LLSVPs and LSVPs (ii) show from the history of the Earth and Mars how the LLSVPs and LSVPs are likely to have formed early in Earth history and to have been stable since ~ 4.4 Ga (Burke et al. 2012) (iii) show, following an analogy suggested by Jack Whitehead of similarity to atmospheric fronts, why plumes are generated only from PGZs on the CMB at the margins of LLSVPs and LSVPs. (iv) show from results of recent seismological studies of Iceland, Jan Mayen, Hawaii, Yellowstone, the Afar and Ontong Java, that although plumes rise vertically in the deep mantle from the CMB their fate in the top ~ 1, 000 km of the mantle is proving to be varied and to depend largely, as Wilson suggested, on how they interact with the plates above them. Properties of the Plume Generation Zones (PGZs) on the CMB and of the plumes that rise from them are

  12. DFT investigation on structure, electronic and magnetic properties of Crn (n=2-8) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Esha V.; Kumar, Vipin; Roy, Debesh R.

    2016-05-01

    A density functional investigation on the series of chromium clusters, i.e., Crn (n=2-8) is performed for finding their lowest energy structures and various electronic and magnetic properties. For electronic properties, we have predicted binding energy, HOMO-LUMO (HLG), chemical hardness (η) etc., and also for magnetic behavior, we have predicted the magnetic moments of the lowest energy cluster isomers. A systematic search imposing all possible initial magnetic configurations of the clusters is considered for finding lowest energy structures. All the calculations is carried out using a very popular GGA functional Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (PBE), as implemented in the VASP code.

  13. The rhetorical construction of the predatorial virus: a Burkian analysis of nonfiction accounts of the Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Weldon, R A

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, a new subgenre of horror films, referred to as plague films, has turned our focus to the threat of a hemorrhagic viral pandemic, comparable to the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1916. Based on the Ebola viral outbreaks of 1976, various writers have presented their accounts under the guise of increasing interest and prevention strategies. Disregarding inappropriate health care practices as the cause of these epidemics, accountability is refocused onto the rhetorically constructed, predatory nature of the virus. By employing Burke's theory of dramatism and pentadic analysis, the author examines this rhetorical construction of Ebola as a predatorial virus and its implications for public perceptions of public health endeavors.

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of polyhydroxy benzophenone as mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianlong; Hu, Xuesen; Ma, Lin

    2011-06-01

    A series of polyhydroxy benzophenone were synthesized and evaluated as mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors. The results demonstrated that most of the target compounds had remarkable inhibitory activities on mushroom tyrosinase. Among all these compounds, 2,3,4,3',4',5'-hexahydroxy-diphenylketone 10 was found to be the most potent tyrosinase inhibitor with IC(50) value of 1.4 μM. In addition, the inhibition kinetics analyzed by Lineweaver-Burk plots revealed that such compounds were competitive inhibitors. These results suggested that such compounds might be utilized for the development of new candidate for treatment of dermatological disorders.

  15. Lunar optical telescopes: an historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stewart W.

    1992-11-01

    There is a long history of thought and discussion on the possibilities of astronomical observatories on the Moon. Numerous ideas have been suggested and a variety of concepts have resulted for lunar optical telescopes. This paper reviews some of the ideas and efforts of individuals and working groups including Hershel, Clarke, Malina, Herbig, and Hess; working groups of the 1960s; and recent initiatives of Burke, Burns, and others. The enhanced technologies of the 1980s and 1990s can make past dreams of lunar observatories come to reality in the 21st century.

  16. On statistical properties of test functions in nonparametric methods for periodogram analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.; Chinarova, L. L.

    Periodogram analysis methods in the modifications by Lafler and Kinman (1965), Burke et al. (1970), Deeming (1970), Renson (1978), and Dworetsky (1983) are compared. Mean values, variances, skewness, and excesses of test functions are determined for some numerical models, and correlations between them are discussed. Analytical estimates are obtained for the mathematical expectation of test functions in different methods and for the variance of the test function by Lafler and Kinman (1965). An algorithm of choosing the optimum period is discussed, the technique proposed is used to determine the orbital period of the eclipsing binary star HBV 426 = V1147 Cyg; the period is found to be 1.097383d.

  17. LIGO/VIRGO Searches for Gravitational Radiation in Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.

    2002-08-01

    A torus around a stellar-mass Kerr black hole can emit about 10% of the spin energy of a black hole in gravitational radiation, which is potentially associated with a gamma-ray burst (GRB). Wide tori may develop buckling modes by the Papaloizou-Pringle instability and gravitational radiation-reaction forces in the Burke-Thorne approximation. Gravitational-wave experiments may discover these emissions in a fraction of nearby supernovae. This provides a test for Kerr black holes and for GRB inner engines by a comparison with the deredshifted durations of long GRBs.

  18. Lunar optical telescopes: An historical perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Stewart W.

    1992-01-01

    There is a long history of thought and discussion on the possibilities of astronomical observatories on the Moon. Numerous ideas have been suggested and a variety of concepts have resulted for lunar optical telescopes. This paper reviews some of the ideas and efforts of individuals and working groups including Hershel, Clarke, Malina, Herbig, and Hess; working groups of the 1960s; and recent initiatives of Burke, Burns, and others. The enhanced technologies of the 1980s and 1990s can make past dreams of lunar observatories come to reality in the 21st century.

  19. Hanford Site climatological data summary 1997, with historical data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoitink, D.J.; Burk, K.W.

    1998-03-01

    This document presents the climatological data measured at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site for calendar year 1997. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the Hanford Meteorology Station and the Hanford Meteorological Monitoring Network from which these data were collected. The information contained herein includes updated historical climatologies for temperature, precipitation, normal and extreme values of temperature and precipitation, and other miscellaneous meteorological parameters. Further, the data are adjunct to and update Hoitink and Burk; however, Appendix B - Wind Climatology is excluded.

  20. Pilot clinical trial of a robot-aided neuro-rehabilitation workstation with stroke patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs, Hermano I.; Hogan, Neville; Aisen, Mindy L.; Volpe, Bruce T.

    1996-12-01

    This paper summarizes our efforts to apply robotics and automation technology to assist, enhance, quantify, and document neuro-rehabilitation. It reviews a pilot clinical trial involving twenty stroke patients with a prototype robot-aided rehabilitation facility developed at MIT and tested at Burke Rehabilitation Hospital. In particular, we present a few results: (a) on the patient's tolerance of the procedure, (b) whether peripheral manipulation of the impaired limb influences brain recovery, (c) on the development of a robot-aided assessment procedure.

  1. Theoretical investigation on structural and electronic properties of PdO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, E.; Sundareswari, M. E-mail: sundare65@gmail.com; Jayalakshmi, D. S.; Manjula, M.

    2015-06-24

    Theoretical studies on rutile type Palladium Dioxide were carried out with the aim of analyzing structural and electronic properties at ambient condition using the first principle calculation based on density functional theory. Within the framework of density functional theory, we used full potential linearized augmented plane wave method(FP-LAPW) in Wien 2k code. The exchange and correlation effect is treated with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) using the Perdew, Burke and Eruzeroff form. The charge density plots, density of states and band structure are plotted and discussed.

  2. Kinetics studies on triacontanyl palmitate: a urease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Lodhi, Muhammad Arif; Abbasi, Muhammad Athar; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal; Ahmad, Viqar Uddin

    2007-07-10

    The mechanism of inhibition of jack bean and Bacillus pasteurii ureases was investigated by triacontanyl palmitate (1) which is a long-chain fatty ester and has been isolated from Symplocos racemosa Roxb. Lineweaver-Burk, Dixon plots, and their secondary replots showed that 1 is a non-competitive inhibitor of these enzymes. K(i) values were found to be 60.03 +/- 1.72 and 88.23 +/- 0.31 microM against jack bean and B. pasteurii ureases, respectively.

  3. Urethane as an inhibitor of the firefly light reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nehls, S.M.; Bittar, E.E. )

    1989-01-01

    A study has been made to test the hypothesis that general anesthetics such as urethane are able to inhibit light from a firefly reaction mixture. Urethane was found to reduce light emission in a dose-dependent manner, the minimal effective concentration being about 20 mM. Dixon plots gave a Ki value in the range of 175 to 215 mM. Lineweaver-Burk plots showed that urethane increases the apparent Km for ATP and reduces V{sub max} for the reaction. This is taken to mean that urethane acts as both a competitive and noncompetitive inhibitor of the firefly light reaction (mixed-type inhibition).

  4. Theoretical prediction of structural and elastic behavior of AlRu under pressure: A FP-LAPW study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ekta; Pagare, Gitanjali; Devi, Hansa; Sanyal, S. P.

    2015-06-01

    Using full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method, the structural and elastic properties of AlRu intermetallic compound have been determined within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The exchange correlation potential is used for generalized gradient approximations in the scheme of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA-PBE), Wu-Cohen (GGA-WC) and Perdew et. al. (GGA-PBEsol). Furthermore we have analyzed the trend of elastic constants (C11, C12 and C44) and elastic moduli (B, G and E) under variable pressure.

  5. A revised classification of the Icteridae (Aves) based on DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Remsen, J V Jr; Powell, Alexis F L A; Schodde, Richard; Barker, F Keith; Lanyon, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    The higher-level classification of the New World blackbirds (Icteridae; Aves) has remained relatively stable for nearly a half-century, with most currently used classifications (e.g. Sibley & Monroe 1990; Jaramillo & Burke 1999; Fraga 2011; Remsen et al. 2015) following Blake's (1968) delimitation and sequence of genera in the Peters Check-list of Birds of the World series. Early molecular studies (e.g., Lanyon 1992, 1994; Johnson & Lanyon 1999; Price & Lanyon 2002; Cadena et al. 2004) produced only minor modifications. PMID:27394496

  6. Hydrogen molecule on lithium adsorbed graphene: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Gaganpreet, Dharamvir, Keya

    2016-05-01

    Electronic structure calculations for the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on lithium (Li) decorated and pristine graphene have been studied systematically using SIESTA code [1] within the framework of the first-principle DFT under the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) form of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)[2], including spin polarization. The energy of adsorption of hydrogen molecule on graphene is always enhanced by the presence of co-adsorbed lithium. The most efficient adsorption configuration is when H2 is lying parallel to lithium adsorbed graphene which is in contrast to its adsorption on pristine graphene (PG) where it prefers perpendicular orientation.

  7. On the nature of fermion-monopole supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyushchay, M. S.

    2000-07-01

    It is shown that the generator of the nonstandard fermion-monopole supersymmetry uncovered by De Jonghe, Macfarlane, Peeters and van Holten, and the generator of its standard /N=1/2 supersymmetry have to be supplemented by their product operator to be treated as independent supercharge. As a result, the fermion-monopole system possesses the nonlinear /N=3/2 supersymmetry having the nature of the 3D spin-1/2 free particle's supersymmetry generated by the supercharges represented in a scalar form. Analyzing the supercharges' structure, we trace how under reduction of the fermion-monopole system to the spherical geometry the nonlinear /N=3/2 superalgebra comprising the Hamiltonian and the total angular momentum as even generators is transformed into the standard linear /N=1 superalgebra with the Hamiltonian to be the unique even generator.

  8. Nonlinear superconformal symmetry of a fermion in the field of a Dirac monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, Carlos; Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2004-02-01

    We study a longstanding problem of identification of the fermion-monopole symmetries. We show that the integrals of motion of the system generate a nonlinear classical Z2-graded Poisson, or quantum superalgebra, which may be treated as a nonlinear generalization of the osp(2|2)⊕su(2). In the nonlinear superalgebra, the shifted square of the full angular momentum plays the role of the central charge. Its square root is the even osp(2|2) spin generating the u(1) rotations of the supercharges. Classically, the central charge's square root has an odd counterpart whose quantum analog is, in fact, the same osp(2|2) spin operator. As an odd integral, the osp(2|2) spin generates a nonlinear supersymmetry of De Jonghe, Macfarlane, Peeters and van Holten, and may be identified as a grading operator of the nonlinear superconformal algebra.

  9. Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) ecology and management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, Judd A.

    1997-01-01

    The gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) is a petite member of the family Canidae in the order Carnivora with a long muzzle and pointed ears (Samuel and Nelson 1982). The coat of the gray fox is silver gray across the back with significant amounts of rufus along the sides. This characteristic is often confused by people who see the flash of red and assume that the fox is a red fox (Vulpes vulpes). The gray fox has a black tipped tail with a dorsal black stripe that differentiates this species from the kit fox (Vulpes macrotis). The red fox has a white tipped tail. The gray fox weighs between 3-5 kg, occasionally to 7 kg. TL 800-1125, T 275-443, HF 100-150. (Jameson and Peeters 1988).

  10. Automatic vigilance: the attention-grabbing power of approach- and avoidance-related social information.

    PubMed

    Wentura, D; Rothermund, K; Bak, P

    2000-06-01

    The automatic processing of information was investigated, varying valence (positive vs. negative) and relevance (other-relevant traits [ORT] vs. possessor-relevant traits [PRT]; G. Peeters, 1983) of stimuli. ORTs denote unconditionally positive or negative consequences for persons in the social environment of the holder of the trait (e.g., honest, brutal) whereas PRTs denote unconditionally positive or negative consequences for the trait holder (e.g., happy, depressive). In 2 experiments using the Stroop paradigm, larger interference effects were found for ORTs than PRTs. This is due to the behavior-relatedness of ORTs. In a go/no-go lexical decision task (Experiment 3), participants either had to withdraw their finger from a pressed key (i.e., "avoid") or had to press a key (i.e., "approach") if a word was presented. Responses to negative ORTs were relatively faster in the withdraw condition, whereas positive ORTs were relatively faster in the press condition. PMID:10870906

  11. Low-volatility poly-oxygenates in the OH-initiated atmospheric oxidation of alpha-pinene: impact of non-traditional peroxyl radical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Vereecken, L; Müller, J F; Peeters, J

    2007-10-14

    Following new insights on non-traditional peroxyl radical chemistry, we present an update to our earlier OH-initiated alpha-pinene degradation mechanism (Peeters et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2001, 3, 5489), incorporating ring closure reactions and a fast H-shift isomerization in certain key peroxyl and oxy radical intermediates. These changes, affecting only a single branch of the comprehensive mechanism and based on extensive quantum-chemical and theoretical kinetic calculations, show significant formation, approximately 20% overall, of poly-oxygenated (hydro)peroxides in atmospheric conditions. These low-volatility compounds are expected to have a significant impact on aerosol formation, and are believed to be the high-mass product compounds observed in available experimental work. The proposed changes also affect the predicted acetone yield, matching the experimental data closely.

  12. What does it means to be a critical scholar? A metalogue between science education doctoral students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cian, Heidi; Dsouza, Nikeetha; Lyons, Renee; Alston, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    This manuscript is written in response to Lydia Burke and Jesse Bazzul's article Locating a space of criticality as new scholars in science education. As doctoral students finding our place in the culture of science education, we respond by discussing our journeys towards the development of a scholarly identity, with particular focus on whether or how we see ourselves as critical scholars. Since each of us authoring this paper has a different perspective, a metalogue format is utilized to ensure all of our voices and journeys are represented. We use the Burke and Bazzul article as a platform for conversations about challenges faced for emerging scholars in the field of science education and explore how we see our role in responding to these challenges. Specifically, we discuss the barriers to publication, dissemination of research to practitioners, and how to approach these problems from a grounding in critical theory. As a result of our conversations, we conclude that there is a need to reshape the field of science education to invite more unorthodox research perspectives, methodologies, and publication formats. To do so, the issues we explore require a continued conversation between emerging scholars, practicing researchers, and practicing educators.

  13. Psychoanalytic theory in times of terror.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Angela

    2003-09-01

    Recent events have underlined in the most tragic and dramatic way the need for depth psychology to turn its attention to the psychology of terror. The present paper attempts to distinguish between the psychological modes of horror and terror and explores the different theoretical approaches of Burke, Freud, Kristeva and Jung to this problem in order to cast light on the individual and collective functions that horror and terror play. While all these authors stress that terror and horror play a role in structuring the sense of identity and in strengthening community bonds, Freud and Kristeva believe that the experience of horror works to increase the exclusion of otherness through mechanisms of repression or foreclosure while Burke and Jung see in the encounter with the Negative Sublime or with the Shadow the possibility of widening the boundaries of ego consciousness and of integration of 'otherness'. The paper then uses the analysis of two horror movies and of a particular socio-cultural context to illustrate these different functions of horror and terror and to delineate possible solutions to the problems facing society.

  14. Psychoanalytic theory in times of terror.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Angela

    2003-09-01

    Recent events have underlined in the most tragic and dramatic way the need for depth psychology to turn its attention to the psychology of terror. The present paper attempts to distinguish between the psychological modes of horror and terror and explores the different theoretical approaches of Burke, Freud, Kristeva and Jung to this problem in order to cast light on the individual and collective functions that horror and terror play. While all these authors stress that terror and horror play a role in structuring the sense of identity and in strengthening community bonds, Freud and Kristeva believe that the experience of horror works to increase the exclusion of otherness through mechanisms of repression or foreclosure while Burke and Jung see in the encounter with the Negative Sublime or with the Shadow the possibility of widening the boundaries of ego consciousness and of integration of 'otherness'. The paper then uses the analysis of two horror movies and of a particular socio-cultural context to illustrate these different functions of horror and terror and to delineate possible solutions to the problems facing society. PMID:14513476

  15. Role of the Charge-Transfer State in Reduced Langevin Recombination in Organic Solar Cells: A Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reduced Langevin recombination has been observed in organic solar cells (OSCs) for many years, but its origin is still unclear. A recent work by Burke et al. (Adv. Energy Mater.2015, 5, 1500123-1) was inspired by this reduced Langevin recombination, and they proposed an equilibrium model of charge-transfer (CT) states that correlates the open-circuit voltage of OSCs with experimentally available device parameters. In this work, we extend Burke et al.’s CT model further and for the first time directly correlate the reduced Langevin recombination with the energetic and dynamic behavior of the CT state. Recombination through CT states leads in a straightforward manner to a decrease in the Langevin reduction factor with increasing temperature, without explicit consideration of the temperature dependence of the mobility. To verify the correlation between the CT states and reduced Langevin recombination, we incorporated this CT model and the reduced Langevin model into drift-diffusion simulations of a bilayer OSC. The simulations not only successfully reproduced realistic current–voltage (J–V) characteristics of the bilayer OSC, but also demonstrate that the two models consistently lead to same value of the apparent Langevin reduction factor. PMID:26640611

  16. Implicit bias against sexual minorities in medicine: cycles of professional influence and the role of the hidden curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fallin-Bennett, Keisa

    2015-05-01

    Despite many recent advances in rights for sexual and gender minorities in the United States, bias against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people still exists. In this Commentary, the author briefly reviews disparities with regard to LGBT health, in both health care and medical education, and discusses the implications of Burke and colleagues’ study of implicit and explicit biases against lesbian and gay people among heterosexual first-year medical students, published in this issue of Academic Medicine. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which physicians’ implicit bias against LGBT people can create a cycle that perpetuates a professional climate reinforcing the bias. The hidden curriculum in academic health centers is discussed as both a cause of this cycle and as a starting point for a research and intervention agenda. The findings from Burke and colleagues’ study, as well as other evidence, support raising awareness of LGBT discrimination, increasing exposure to LGBT individuals as colleagues and role models in academic health centers, and modifying medical education curricula as methods to break the cycle of implicit bias in medicine.

  17. Overview of energy-conserving development planning and design techniques based on five case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Findings and recommendations are presented of a review of five case studies of ways to conserve energy through development planning and site design in communities. Two approaches were used. In the first approach, a conventional, pre-existing plan was analyzed to determine potential energy use. Once energy-conservation options were identified and evaluated, the conventional plan was modified by employing those options. This approach was used in The Woodlands, Burke Center, and Radisson studies. In the second approach, energy-conservation options are independently identified and evaluated. Those options that passed specific criteria screening were then utilized in developing one or more totally new plans based on energy objectives. This approach was used in Greenbrier and Shenandoah. Radisson is a new town on the outskirts of Syracuse, New York. Greenbrier is a 3000 acre planned community adjacent to Norfolk and Virginia Beach. Shenandoah is a proposed new town in the Atlanta urbanized area. The Woodlands is a new community under development north of Houston. Burke Center is a residential planned unit development in Fairfax County, Virgnia. (MCW)

  18. New Developments Regarding the KT Event and Other Catastrophes in Earth History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This volume contains papers that have been accepted for presentation at the conference on New Developments Regarding the KT Event and Other Catastrophes in Earth History, February 9-12, 1994, in Houston, Texas. The Program Committee consisted of W. Alvarez (University of California, Berkeley), D. Black (Lunar and Planetary Institute), J. Bourgeois (National Science Foundation), K. Burke (University of Houston), R. Ginsburg (University of Miami), G. Keller (Princeton University), C. Koeberl (University of Vienna), J. Longoria (Florida International University), G. Ryder (Lunar and Planetary Institute), V. Sharpton, convener (Lunar and Planetary Institute), H. Sigurdsson (University of Rhode Island), R. Turco (University of California, Los Angeles), and P. Ward (University of Washington). The Scientific Organizing Committee consisted of W. Alvarez (University of California, Berkeley), D. Black (Lunar and Planetary Institute), K. Burke (University of Houston), R. Ginsburg (University of Miami), L. Hunt (National Academy of Sciences), G. Keller (Princeton University), L. Marin (UNAM, cd. Universitaria), D. Raup (University of Chicago), V. Sharpton (Lunar and Planetary Institute), E. Shoemaker (U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff), and G. Suarez (UNAM, cd. Universitaria). Logistics and administrative and publications support were provided by the Publications and Program Services Department staff at the Lunar and Planetary Institute.

  19. Temperature Variations and N+/O+ in the Orion Nebula II. The Collision Strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, R. H.; Dufour, R. J.; Martin, P. G.; Ferland, G. J.; Baldwin, J. A.; Ortiz, C. O.; Walter, D. K.

    2001-03-01

    We continue an investigation of electron temperature (T[e]), mean-square T[e] variation (t2), and the N+/O+ abundance ratio. Our previous analysis of HST spectra of the Orion Nebula used collision strengths for N+ by Stafford et al. (1994). Here we examine the consequences of changing just these collision strengths by using those of Lennon & Burke (1994). Rather than utilize the standard analytical, low electron density (N[e]) regime treatment for the analysis, we develop a numerical technique that is valid at any density. With Stafford et al. collision strengths, we find the average N[e] for the (N+, O+)-zone is 7500 cm-3, the average T[e] is 9160 K, t2 is 0.045, and N+/O+ is 0.14. Using Lennon & Burke values, the ``best" solution is found when these respective quantities are: 9000 cm-3, 9920 K, 0.00073, and 0.15. The value for t2 is dramatically lower than that found using Stafford et al. data.

  20. Kinetics of the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase from desert cobra (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom by local anesthetics: procaine and tetracaine.

    PubMed

    al-Jafari, A A; Kamal, M A; Duhaiman, A S; Alhomida, A S

    1996-10-01

    The kinetic parameters of W. aegyptia venom acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition by procaine and tetracaine hydrochloride were investigated in the present study. Procaine and tetracaine reversibly inhibited the AChE activity in a concentration-dependent manner, the IC50 being about 0.28 and 0.04 mM, respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) for the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine iodide was found to be 0.051 mM with Vmax 10.2 mumole/min/mg protein. Both K(m) and Vmax were affected by procaine while only Vmax decreased with tetracaine. A Lineweaver-Burk plot and its secondary replot indicated that the nature of the inhibition is of the linear mixed type for procaine which is considered to be a mixture of competitive and noncompetitive types while the inhibition was noncompetitive for tetracaine. The values of Ki(slope) and K(intercept were estimated as 0.133 mM and 0.451 mM for procaine and 7.2 x 10(-3) mM for tetracaine, respectively, by the secondary replots of the Lineweaver-Burk plot.

  1. Implicit bias against sexual minorities in medicine: cycles of professional influence and the role of the hidden curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fallin-Bennett, Keisa

    2015-05-01

    Despite many recent advances in rights for sexual and gender minorities in the United States, bias against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people still exists. In this Commentary, the author briefly reviews disparities with regard to LGBT health, in both health care and medical education, and discusses the implications of Burke and colleagues’ study of implicit and explicit biases against lesbian and gay people among heterosexual first-year medical students, published in this issue of Academic Medicine. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which physicians’ implicit bias against LGBT people can create a cycle that perpetuates a professional climate reinforcing the bias. The hidden curriculum in academic health centers is discussed as both a cause of this cycle and as a starting point for a research and intervention agenda. The findings from Burke and colleagues’ study, as well as other evidence, support raising awareness of LGBT discrimination, increasing exposure to LGBT individuals as colleagues and role models in academic health centers, and modifying medical education curricula as methods to break the cycle of implicit bias in medicine. PMID:25674911

  2. The impact of a national strategy to increase physical activity among older adults on national organizations.

    PubMed

    Park, Chae-Hee; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek; Ory, Marcia G; Gleason-Senior, Jane; Bazzarre, Terry L; Mockenhaupt, Robin

    2010-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the impact of the National Blueprint (NB) on the policies, programs, and organizational culture of selected national organizations. The theoretical model selected to assess the impact of the NB on organizational behavior was Burke's system theory of organizational change. Three organizations, AARP, the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and the Administration on Aging (AoA), were selected for the study. Two individuals in each of these organizations were selected for interview. Semistructured interviews and document reviews were used in the data-collection process. Findings showed that the publication and establishment of the NB resulted in changes in the operating procedures of AARP, ACSM, and AoA. The results were broadly consistent with Burke's system theory of organizational change. The publication of the NB was shown to affect the behavior of organizational leaders, organizational culture, policies, programs, and individual and organizational performance. The new information generated has increased our understanding of the impact of health campaigns on organizational behavior.

  3. Atomic structures of 13-atom clusters by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Wei, Ching-Ming

    2007-03-01

    The 13-atom cluster structures of the alkaline metals, alkaline earth metals, boron group, 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals in the periodic table, and Pb are investigated by density functional theory with three kinds of exchange correlation approximation: i) LDA (Local Density Approximation), ii) GGA (Generalized Gradient Approximation) [1], and iii) PBE (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) [2]. The results mainly focus on five 3-D structures: icosahedral, cuboctahedral, hexagonal-closed packed, body-center cubic, decahedral, and the other two layer structures: buckled biplanar (bbp) and garrison-cap biplanar (gbp) structures. Limited by accuracy of exchange correlation approximation, two interesting results are found. The ground states of Ca13, Sr13, Ba13, Sc13, Y13, La13, Ti13, Zr13, and Hf13 are icosahedral structures. The clusters of Ir13, Pt13, Cu13, Ag13, and Au13 are more favorable for layer structures (i.e. bbp and gbp) than the other five 3-D structures. [1] J. P. Perdew et al., Phys. Rev. B 46, 6671 (1992). [2] J. P. Perdew, K. Burke, and M. Ernzerhof, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996).

  4. Mechanisms related to reduction of radical in mouse lung using an L-band ESR spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, K; Hamada, A; Utsumi, H

    1999-04-01

    Reduction of radicals in mouse lung was characterized in whole animals using an L-band ESR technique and nitroxide radicals as probes. An aqueous solution of nitroxide radical was immediately instilled intratracheally to mouse after euthanasia. Nitroxide radicals without charged groups were reduced significantly in the lung, while radicals with charged groups were only slightly reduced. Permeation rates across lung plasma membrane were not rate limiting of the stage of reduction of the noncharged nitroxides. Michaelis parameters, apparent Km and apparent Vmax, were obtained from the Lineweaver-Burk plots of the reduction. Among noncharged nitroxides with constant apparent Vmax, radicals with a larger n-octanol/water partition coefficient showed a lower apparent Km, thereby suggesting that the concentration of these nitroxides in the membrane contributes to apparent Km. The reduction rate of noncharged nitroxide, hydroxy-TEMPO, was influenced by noncharged SH reagents instilled together with the nitroxide; dithiothreitol stimulated the reduction, while the oxidized reagent inhibited it. The Lineweaver-Burk plots of the nitroxide reduction in the presence of various concentrations of dithiothreitol suggest the possibility that the reduction system for hydroxy-TEMPO is based on a kind of ping pong bi-reactant mechanism, and that the reduction system utilizes SH as an electron donor. Endogenous glutathione contributed partially to the reduction.

  5. Norm-conserving pseudopotentials with chemical accuracy compared to all-electron calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willand, Alex; Kvashnin, Yaroslav O.; Genovese, Luigi; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Deb, Arpan Krishna; Sadeghi, Ali; Deutsch, Thierry; Goedecker, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    By adding a nonlinear core correction to the well established dual space Gaussian type pseudopotentials for the chemical elements up to the third period, we construct improved pseudopotentials for the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof [J. Perdew, K. Burke, and M. Ernzerhof, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.3865] functional and demonstrate that they exhibit excellent accuracy. Our benchmarks for the G2-1 test set show average atomization energy errors of only half a kcal/mol. The pseudopotentials also remain highly reliable for high pressure phases of crystalline solids. When supplemented by empirical dispersion corrections [S. Grimme, J. Comput. Chem. 27, 1787 (2006), 10.1002/jcc.20495; S. Grimme, J. Antony, S. Ehrlich, and H. Krieg, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 154104 (2010), 10.1063/1.3382344] the average error in the interaction energy between molecules is also about half a kcal/mol. The accuracy that can be obtained by these pseudopotentials in combination with a systematic basis set is well superior to the accuracy that can be obtained by commonly used medium size Gaussian basis sets in all-electron calculations.

  6. Pallidal deep brain stimulation: an effective treatment in Chinese patients with tardive dystonia.

    PubMed

    Woo, Peter Y M; Chan, Danny T M; Zhu, X L; Yeung, Jonas H M; Chan, Anne Y Y; Au, Angie C W; Cheng, K M; Lau, K Y; Wing, Y K; Mok, Vincent C T; Poon, W S

    2014-10-01

    Tardive dystonia is an iatrogenic complication of dopamine receptor antagonist medication such as first-generation antipsychotics. It occurs in up to 2% of patients and only 10% recover after stopping medication. Deep brain stimulation for primary dystonia has proven to be effective and its application for secondary dystonias is gaining acceptance. We report our experience in treating three ethnic Chinese schizophrenia patients with severe medically refractory tardive dystonia by globus pallidus internus deep brain stimulation. Preoperatively, all required assistance with essential activities of daily living and two were bed-bound. The mean Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale score was 61 (range, 44-80) and mean Global Dystonia Rating Scale score was 47 (range, 40-52). No procedure-related complications were encountered. By 3 months all could return to unassisted living and walk with support with a mean of 77% and 66% improvement in the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale and Global Dystonia Rating Scale scores, respectively. Quality-of-life assessment performed for two patients using the EuroQol-5 dimensions visual analogue scale showed a mean improvement of 86% at 3 months. On clinical follow-up, the effect was well maintained for a period of 3 to 10 years. Pallidal deep brain stimulation is a safe and highly effective form of symptomatic treatment for patients with medically refractory tardive dystonia.

  7. Accurate Diels-Alder reaction energies from efficient density functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Mezei, Pál D; Csonka, Gábor I; Kállay, Mihály

    2015-06-01

    We assess the performance of the semilocal PBE functional; its global hybrid variants; the highly parametrized empirical M06-2X and M08-SO; the range separated rCAM-B3LYP and MCY3; the atom-pairwise or nonlocal dispersion corrected semilocal PBE and TPSS; the dispersion corrected range-separated ωB97X-D; the dispersion corrected double hybrids such as PWPB95-D3; the direct random phase approximation, dRPA, with Hartree-Fock, Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof, and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof hybrid reference orbitals and the RPAX2 method based on a Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof exchange reference orbitals for the Diels-Alder, DARC; and self-interaction error sensitive, SIE11, reaction energy test sets with large, augmented correlation consistent valence basis sets. The dRPA energies for the DARC test set are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. CCSD(T)/CBS energies were used as a reference. The standard global hybrid functionals show general improvements over the typical endothermic energy error of semilocal functionals, but despite the increased accuracy the precision of the methods increases only slightly, and thus all reaction energies are simply shifted into the exothermic direction. Dispersion corrections give mixed results for the DARC test set. Vydrov-Van Voorhis 10 correction to the reaction energies gives superior quality results compared to the too-small D3 correction. Functionals parametrized for energies of noncovalent interactions like M08-SO give reasonable results without any dispersion correction. The dRPA method that seamlessly and theoretically correctly includes noncovalent interaction energies gives excellent results with properly chosen reference orbitals. As the results for the SIE11 test set and H2(+) dissociation show that the dRPA methods suffer from delocalization error, good reaction energies for the DARC test set from a given method do not prove that the method is free from delocalization error. The RPAX2 method shows good performance for the DARC

  8. Calosota Curtis (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea, Eupelmidae) – review of the New World and European fauna including revision of species from the West Indies and Central and North America

    PubMed Central

    Gary A.P., Gibson

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Two of three species previously classified in Calosota Curtis (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae) from the Neotropical region are transferred to Eupelminae. Calosota eneubulus (Walker) from Galapagos Islands is transferred to Eupelmus Dalman as Eupelmus (Eupelmus) eneubulus (Walker), comb. n., and Calosota silvai (Brèthes) from Chile is transferred to Brasema Cameron as Brasema silvai comb. n. Calosota cecidobius (Kieffer) from Argentina is retained in Calosota, with reservation, as an unrecognized species. The species of Calosota from the New World excluding South America are revised. Eleven species are recognized, including the seven newly described species Calosota albipalpus sp. n. (Costa Rica, Mexico, USA, Venezuela), Calosota bicolorata sp. n. (USA), Calosota elongata sp. n. (USA), Calosota longivena sp. n. (USA), Calosota panamaensis sp. n. (Panama), Calosota setosa sp. n. (Bahamas, Dominican Republic, USA), and Calosota speculifrons sp. n. (Costa Rica, USA). The 11 regional species and the Palaearctic species Calosota vernalis Curtis are keyed and illustrated. Calosota vernalis is not known to occur in the New World but is included in the key and diagnosed because it has been intercepted in quarantine in Canada. Calosota pseudotsugae Burks is placed in synonymy under Calosota acron (Walker), syn. n.,and Calosota kentra Burks, Calosota montana Burks and Calosota septentrionalis Hedqvist are placed in synonymy under Calosota aestivalis Curtis syn. n. Calosota modesta Bolívar y Pieltain is removed from synonymy under Calosota viridis Masi, stat. rev., and Calosota viridis, Calosota matritensis Bolívar y Pieltain, and Calosota coerulea Nikol’skaya are placed in synonymy under Calosota metallica (Gahan), syn. n. Calosota grylli Erdös is confirmed as a separate species from Calosota metallica based on features of both sexes. It is suggested that Calosota ariasi Bolívar y Pieltain may be a synonym of Calosota aestivalis, Calosota bolivari Askew may be a

  9. Infrared spectra of interstellar deuteronated PAHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buragohain, Mridusmita; Pathak, Amit; Sarre, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have emerged as a potential constituent of the ISM that emit strong features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.2 and 12.7 μm with weaker and blended features in the 3-20μm region. These features are proposed to arise from the vibrational relaxation of PAH molecules on absorption of background UV photons (Tielens 2008). These IR features have been observed towards almost all types of astronomical objects; say H II regions, photodissociation regions, reflection nebulae, planetary nebulae, young star forming regions, external galaxies, etc. A recent observation has proposed that interstellar PAHs are major reservoir for interstellar deuterium (D) (Peeters et al. 2004). According to the `deuterium depletion model' as suggested by Draine (2006), some of the Ds formed in the big bang are depleted in PAHs, which can account for the present value of D/H in the ISM. Hence, study of deuterated PAHs (PADs) is essential in order to measure D/H in the ISM.In this work, we consider another probable category of the large PAH family, i.e. Deuteronated PAHs (DPAH+). Onaka et al. have proposed a D/H ratio which is an order of magnitude smaller than the proposed value of D/H by Draine suggesting that if Ds are depleted in PAHs, they might be accommodated in large PAHs (Onaka et al. 2014). This work reports a `Density Functional Theory' calculation of large deuteronated PAHs (coronene, ovalene, circumcoronene and circumcircumcoronene) to determine the expected region of emission features and to find a D/H ratio that is comparable to the observational results. We present a detailed analysis of the IR spectra of these molecules and discuss the possible astrophysical implications.ReferencesDraine B. T. 2006, in ASP Conf. Ser. 348, Proc. Astrophysics in the Far Ultraviolet: Five Years of Discovery with FUSE, ed. G. Sonneborn, H. Moos, B-G Andersson (San Francisco, CA:ASP) 58Onaka T., Mori T. I., Sakon I., Ohsawa R., Kaneda H., Okada Y., Tanaka M

  10. Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy and Kinetics of HO_2+HCHO: Detection of the ν_1 and {A}- {X} Bands of HOCH_2OOCAVITY Ringdown Spectroscopy and Kinetics of HO_2+HCHO: Detection of the ν_1 and {A}- {X} Bands of HOCH_2OO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, Matthew K.; Okumura, Mitchio; Sander, Stanley P.

    2011-06-01

    The reactions of HO_2 with carbonyl compounds are believed to be a sink for carbonyl compounds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. These reactions proceed through a hydrogen bound intermediate before isomerizing. The reaction of HO_2 + formaldehyde (HCHO) serves as a prototype for this class of reactions, forming the isomerization product hydroxymethylperoxy (HOCH_2OO, HMP). Previous studies measured the spectrum and kinetics of HMP using either FTIR detection of the end products or direct detection of HMP by the unstructured tilde{B}-tilde{X} transition. Despite these studies, considerable uncertainty exists in the rate constant of HMP formation (±80%, 2σ). In this talk, we report the first detection of the ν_1 (OH stretch) and tilde{A}-tilde{X} electronic spectra of the HMP radical. The OH stretch spectrum is broad and featureless, while the tilde{A}(0)-tilde{X}(0) origin and combination band with the OOCO torsion tilde{A}(NOOCO=1)-tilde{X}(0) are rotationally resolved. Quantum chemistry calculations have been performed on both the tilde{A} and tilde{X} states as a function of the OOCO and HOCO dihedral angles to estimate the tilde{A}-tilde{X} transition frequency and to assess the coupling between the two torsional modes. We also present kinetics data showing the rates of production and destruction of HMP. I. Hermans, J. F. Muller, T. L. Nguyen, P. A. Jacobs, and J. Peeters. J. Phys. Chem. A 2005, 109, 4303. F. Su, J. G. Calvert, and J. H. Shaw J. Phys. Chem. 1979, 83, 3185. B. Veyret, R. Lesclaux, M. T. Rayez, J. C. Rayez, R. A. Cox, and G. K. Moortgat J. Phys. Chem. 1989, 93, 2368. J. P. Burrows, G. K. Moortgat, G. S. Tyndall, R. A. Cox, M. E. Jenkin, G. D. Hayman, and B. Veyret J. Phys. Chem. 1989, 93, 2375 S. P. Sander, B. J. Finlayson-Pitts, D. M. Golden, R. E. Huie, C. E. Kolb, M. J. Kurylo, M. J. Molina, et al. Chemical Kinetics and Photochemical Data for Use in Atmospheric Studies, Evaluation Number 16, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 2009 I

  11. Past changes of landscape due to increased dynamics of erosion processes in the Bezděz-Doksy region (Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vysloužilová, Barbora; Dreslerová, Dagmar; Kozáková, Radka; Poništiak, Štefan; Chuman, Tomáš; Šefrna, Luděk

    2016-04-01

    This study broadens the archaeological research of the the Bezděz - Doksy region in Northern Bohemia, Czech Republic (Dreslerová et al., 2013). Extensive field works between 2008 and 2012 showed that the region has been settled since the La Tène period. Survey of the alluvial plain of the Robečský stream revealed a record of two intensive erosion episodes in the catchment. We suppose that the first episode may be connected to land use changes and the beginnings of agriculture at the site in the La Tène period. The second episode may be connected to the foundation of the medieval village of Okna, which came into existence in the vicinity of the La Tène settlement. The accelerated erosion of former albeluvisols (on loess) led to significant changes of landscape in the region. The aim of this contribution is to bring a reconstruction of soils, vegetation and relief at the site of Okna before the human occupancy and to detect landscape changes over the time. It focuses on the hypothesis that the accelerated soil erosion has been occurring at the site since the first anthropogenic influence like it is demonstrated by other studies in Europe (e.g. Leopold and Völkel, 2007; Boardman, 2013). An abrupt change of land use from forest to arable land is proved by palynological records. Simultaneously there are buried soil horizons and alluvial sediments which can be studied as geoarchives. The difficulties in reconstruction of relief and quantification of the historical erosion effects are faced by applying GIS and model approaches (Peeters et al., 2003). References Boardman, J., 2013. Soil Erosion in Britain: Updating the Record. Agriculture 3, 418-442. doi:10.3390/agriculture3030418 Dreslerová, D., Waldhauser, J., Abraham, V., Kočár, P., Křivánek, R., Meduna, P., Sádlo, J., 2013. The Bezděz - Doksy region (Northern Bohemia) in prehistory and the La Tène settlement at Okna (in Czech). Archeologické rozhledy LXV, 535-573. Leopold, M., Völkel, J., 2007

  12. Inhibition of aldose reductase and anti-cataract action of trans-anethole isolated from Foeniculum vulgare Mill. fruits.

    PubMed

    Dongare, Vandana; Kulkarni, Chaitanya; Kondawar, Manish; Magdum, Chandrakant; Haldavnekar, Vivek; Arvindekar, Akalpita

    2012-05-01

    Foeniculum vulgare fruits are routinely consumed for their carminative and mouth freshening effect. The plant was evaluated for aldose reductase inhibition and anti-diabetic action. Bioguided fractionation using silica gel column chromatography, HPLC, and GC-MS analysis revealed trans-anethole as the bioactive constituent possessing potent aldose reductase inhibitory action, with an IC50 value of 3.8μg/ml. Prolonged treatment with the pet ether fraction of the F. vulgare distillate demonstrated improvement in blood glucose, lipid profile, glycated haemoglobin and other parameters in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Trans-anethole could effectively show anti-cataract activity through the increase in soluble lens protein, reduced glutathione, catalase and SOD activity on in vitro incubation of the eye lens with 55mM glucose. Trans-anethole demonstrated noncompetitive to mixed type of inhibition of lens aldose reductase using Lineweaver Burk plot.

  13. Mad Men as health communication: health-related themes in the hit AMC television series.

    PubMed

    Baglia, Jay; Foster, Elissa

    2015-01-01

    As a popular contemporary text, the appeal of cable television's Mad Men (AMC) lies in its capacity to highlight the differences between 1960s sensibilities and 21st-century assumptions. Viewers can enjoy a sense of superiority by recognizing the "folly" of the beliefs and actions of the characters with the benefit of historic hindsight, as well as noting the evolution of technology, philosophy, and human rights. Health-related scenes and themes in the series are a particularly interesting focus for analysis. We employ Burke's four master tropes as an analytical lens and argue that the dominant dramatic technique of irony, particularly in the form that we call strategic anachronism-derived from an audience's enjoyment of historical hindsight-highlights the racism, sexism, homophobia, and overall conservatism of the early 1960s while simultaneously serving to obfuscate the ways in which we still have much to critique in the delivery of contemporary health care and other body politics. PMID:24483343

  14. Pressure dependence of electronic properties of BaI{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Vedeshwar, Agnikumar G.

    2015-08-28

    We present Density Functional Theoretical (DFT) calculations of the electronic properties of scintillator material BaI{sub 2} under pressure which were carried out using Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof genralized gradient approximation. We found that BaI{sub 2} is a direct band gap material with band gap calculated as 3.35 eV. The pressure effect on BaI{sub 2} indicates a linear monotonously decreasing band gap and increasing valence band width with pressure. We have observed the shifting of band extrema from the Γ point with pressure. The pressure coefficient of band gap is found to be −0.047 eV/GPa. The interatomic ionicity factor of BaI{sub 2} is found to be 0.51. Trends in bonding and ionicity under pressure are also discussed.

  15. A novel glutamine biosensor based on zinc oxide nanorod and glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Dilruba; Karakuş, Emine

    2016-01-01

    A novel biosensor for determination of L-glutamine in pharmaceutical glutamine powder was developed via immobilizing our produced glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina onto our prepared zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod and chitosan. ZnO nanorods were prepared as surface-dependent and surface-independent and both were used. The biosensor is specific for L-glutamine and the peculiar analytical properties (linearity range, reproducibility, and accuracy) of it were experimentally determined. The optimum operating conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, and medium temperature effect on the response of biosensor were studied. Km and Vmax values for the our-producing glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina immobilized on the biosensor were also determined as 0.29 mM and 208.33 mV/min., respectively, from Lineweaver-Burk plot. The biosensor was then used for the determination of glutamine contained in pharmaceutical formulations.

  16. Spectroscopic analyses and studies on respective interaction of cyanuric acid and uric acid with bovine serum albumin and melamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dandan; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Wang, Qi; Qiao, Heng

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the fluorescence quenching was used to study the interaction of cyanuric acid (CYA) and uric acid (UA) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) at two different temperatures (283 K and 310 K). The bimolecular quenching constant (Kq), apparent quenching constant (Ksv), effective binding constant (KA) and corresponding dissociation constant (KD), binding site number (n) and binding distance (r) were calculated by adopting Stern-Volmer, Lineweaver-Burk, Double logarithm and overlap integral equations. The results show that CYA and UA are both able to obviously bind to BSA, but the binding strength order is BSA + CYA < BSA + UA. And then, the interactions of CYA and UA with melamine (MEL) under the same conditions were also studied by using similar methods. The results indicates that both CYA and UA can bind together closely with melamine (MEL). It is wished that these research results would facilitate the understanding the formation of kidney stones and gout in the body after ingesting excess MEL.

  17. Stability Analysis of TiN, ZrN and HfN: An ab-initio Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dinesh; Chauhan, Mamta

    2013-06-01

    In the present study density functional theory has been applied to analyze the stability of Titanium nitride, Zirconium nitride and Hafnium nitride in their zinc blende (B3), rocksalt (B1) and CsCl (B2)-type phases. The ground state total energy calculation approach of the system has been used through generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) type parameterization as exchange correlation functional within the framework of SIESTA code. Stability analyses shows that the B1 phase of these nitrides is more stable as compared to the B3 and B2 phases and follows the stability trend as B1 -->B3 -->B2. The authors acknowledge financial support to this work by UGC and DST, New Delhi.

  18. Monitoring enzyme kinetic behavior of enzyme-quantum dot bioconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, Jonathan C.; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Ancona, Mario G.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2014-05-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) hold tremendous promise for in vivo biosensing, cellular imaging, theranostics, and smart molecular sensing probes due to their small size and favorable photonic properties such as resistance to photobleaching, size-tunable PL, and large effective Stokes shifts. Herein, we demonstrate how QD-based bioconjugates can be used to enhance enzyme kinetics. Enzyme-substrate kinetics are analyzed for solutions containing both alkaline phosphatase enzymes and QDs with enzyme-to- QD molar ratios of 2, 12, and 24 as well as for a solution containing the same concentration of enzymes but without QDs. The enzyme kinetic paramters Vmax, KM, and Kcat/KM are extracted from the enzyme progress curves via the Lineweaver-Burk plot. Results demonstrate an approximate increase in enzyme efficiency of 5 - 8% for enzymes immobilized on the QD versus free in solution without QD immobilization.

  19. Magnetism in zigzag and armchair CuO nanotubes: Ab-initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Samir; Dandeliya, Sushmita; Chaurasiya, Rajneesh; Srivastava, Anurag; Kaphle, Gopi Chandra

    2016-05-01

    The structural stability, electronic band structure and magnetic properties of zigzag (4≤n≤12) and armchair (3≤n≤8) copper oxide nanotubes have been analyzed by employing a standard Density Functional Theory based ab-intio approach using spin polarized generalized gradient approximation with revised Perdew Burke Ernzerhoff type parameterization. The binding energy of both zigzag as well as armchair CuO nanotubes increases with increasing diameter. Whereas, calculated total magnetic moment decreases with increasing diameter. Among the considered chiralities, (5, 5) armchair (diameter 9.08 Å) and (9, 0) zigzag (diameter 9.47 Å) CuO nanotubes show highest degree of spin polarization, however total magnetic moment is found to be highest for (4, 0) zigzag and (3, 3) armchair CuO nanotubes. The computed electronic properties of considered CuO Nanotube, confirms the metallic nature of these nanotubes.

  20. Reproducibility in density functional theory calculations of solids.

    PubMed

    Lejaeghere, Kurt; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Björkman, Torbjörn; Blaha, Peter; Blügel, Stefan; Blum, Volker; Caliste, Damien; Castelli, Ivano E; Clark, Stewart J; Dal Corso, Andrea; de Gironcoli, Stefano; Deutsch, Thierry; Dewhurst, John Kay; Di Marco, Igor; Draxl, Claudia; Dułak, Marcin; Eriksson, Olle; Flores-Livas, José A; Garrity, Kevin F; Genovese, Luigi; Giannozzi, Paolo; Giantomassi, Matteo; Goedecker, Stefan; Gonze, Xavier; Grånäs, Oscar; Gross, E K U; Gulans, Andris; Gygi, François; Hamann, D R; Hasnip, Phil J; Holzwarth, N A W; Iuşan, Diana; Jochym, Dominik B; Jollet, François; Jones, Daniel; Kresse, Georg; Koepernik, Klaus; Küçükbenli, Emine; Kvashnin, Yaroslav O; Locht, Inka L M; Lubeck, Sven; Marsman, Martijn; Marzari, Nicola; Nitzsche, Ulrike; Nordström, Lars; Ozaki, Taisuke; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Pickard, Chris J; Poelmans, Ward; Probert, Matt I J; Refson, Keith; Richter, Manuel; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; Saha, Santanu; Scheffler, Matthias; Schlipf, Martin; Schwarz, Karlheinz; Sharma, Sangeeta; Tavazza, Francesca; Thunström, Patrik; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Torrent, Marc; Vanderbilt, David; van Setten, Michiel J; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Wills, John M; Yates, Jonathan R; Zhang, Guo-Xu; Cottenier, Stefaan

    2016-03-25

    The widespread popularity of density functional theory has given rise to an extensive range of dedicated codes for predicting molecular and crystalline properties. However, each code implements the formalism in a different way, raising questions about the reproducibility of such predictions. We report the results of a community-wide effort that compared 15 solid-state codes, using 40 different potentials or basis set types, to assess the quality of the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof equations of state for 71 elemental crystals. We conclude that predictions from recent codes and pseudopotentials agree very well, with pairwise differences that are comparable to those between different high-precision experiments. Older methods, however, have less precise agreement. Our benchmark provides a framework for users and developers to document the precision of new applications and methodological improvements.

  1. Forchlorfenuron detection based on its inhibitory effect towards catalase immobilized on boron nitride substrate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Cai, Lijuan; Zhao, Huijie; Tang, Jiaqian; Shen, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoya; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-01-15

    An enzymatic procedure based on a catalase biosensor for the detection of forchlorfenuron (CPPU) has been reported in this work. Catalase was immobilized on boron nitride (BN) sheets dispersed in chitosan by adsorption. The immobilized catalase exhibited direct electron transfer character and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 reduction. After introducing CPPU into the H2O2 containing phosphate buffer solution, the catalase-catalyzed H2O2 reduction current decreased. By measuring the current decrease, CPPU can be determined in the range of 0.5-10.0 µM with the detection limit of 0.07 μM. The non-competitive inhibition behavior of CPPU towards catalase was verified by the Lineweaver-Burk plots. Long stability character has been ascribed to this biosensor. Possible use of this biosensor in flow systems is illustrated. The proposed biosensor has been successfully applied to CPPU determination in fruits samples with satisfactory results.

  2. First-principles study on the formation energies of Ga1_xCrxAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, N.; Rodríguez Martínez, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The electronic structure and formation energy of the Ga1-xCrxAs compound has been studied by principles of methods based on the Density Functional Theory. The formation energy of the compound is calculated, as well as the vacancies and substitutions. The equations of Kohn-Sham are solved employing the plane wave method and the ultra-soft atomic pseudopotentials approximation. The generalized gradient approximation was employed for the exchange and correlation energy in the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) parametrization as it is implemented in the computational code Quantum Espresso. It was found that the most favourable configuration is the GaAs lattice by doing the substitution of one Ga atom by one Cr in the analyzed lattices.

  3. The First-Principles Stability Study of PdC and CdC Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ateser, Engin; Ozisik, Havva Bogaz; Deligoz, Engin; Colakoglu, Kemal

    2013-03-01

    We have studied structural, mechanical and dynamical properties of PdC and CdC compounds to predict the most stable structure. We have focused on seven binary structure types as rock salt (RS), caesium chloride (CsCl), zinc blende (ZB), wurtzite (WZ), tungsten carbide (WC), cadmium telluride (CdTe) and nickel arsenide (NiAs). For modelling exchange-correlation effects we have used generalized gradient (GGA) approximation based on Perdew-Burke-Ernzhorf functional (PBE). The polycrystalline elastic moduli such as Young's and shear moduli, Poisson's ratio, sound velocities, Debye temperatures and shear anisotropic factors have been presented for mechanically stable structures using second-order elastic constants calculated from the stress-strain relations. The results show that PdC is thermodynamically, mechanically and dynamically stable in ZB structure. On the other hand, while CdC is energetically in favor of RS structure, it is mechanically and dynamically stable in ZB structure.

  4. Ultrasoft pseudopotentials for lanthanide solvation complexes: core or valence character of the 4f electrons.

    PubMed

    Pollet, Rodolphe; Clavaguéra, Carine; Dognon, Jean-Pierre

    2006-04-28

    The 4f electrons of lanthanides, because of their strong localization in the region around the nucleus, are traditionally included in a pseudopotential core. This approximation is scrutinized by optimizing the structures and calculating the interaction energies of Gd(3+)(H(2)O) and Gd(3+)(NH(3)) microsolvation complexes within plane wave Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof calculations using ultrasoft pseudopotentials where the 4f electrons are included either in the core or in the valence space. Upon comparison to quantum chemical MP2 and CCSD(T) reference calculations it is found that the explicit treatment of the 4f electrons in the valence shell yields quite accurate results including the required small spin polarization due to ligand charge transfer with only modest computational overhead.

  5. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K(M) and V(max) values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K(i) value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation.

  6. Atomistic Explanation of Shear-Induced Amorphous Band Formation in Boron Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (011¯ 1¯)/⟨1¯101⟩ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon bond between neighboring icosahedral clusters breaks to form a carbon lone pair (Lewis base) on the C within the icosahedron. Further shear then leads this Lewis base C to form a new bond with the Lewis acidic B in the middle of a CBC chain. This then initiates destruction of this icosahedron. The result is the amorphous structure observed experimentally. We suggest how this insight could be used to strengthen B4C.

  7. Deformation of Eemian and Glacial ice at NEEM, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keegan, Kaitlin; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Montagnat, Maurine; Weikusat, Ilka; Kipfstuhl, Sepp

    2015-04-01

    New findings from deep Greenland ice cores and airborne radio echo sounding (RES) images show that basal ice flow is very unstable, and a basal layer of disturbed ice is often observed. At NEEM, Greenland this folding occurs at the boundary between the Eemian and glacial ice regimes, suggesting that differences in physical properties of the ice play a role in the disturbance. Past work in metallurgy (Burke, 1957) and ice (Hammer et al., 1978; Langway et al., 1988; Dahl-Jensen et al., 1997), suggests that impurity content controls grain evolution, and therefore deformation, which we hypothesize to be analogous to the differences in ice flow seen deep in the NEEM ice core. Here we present results of fabric, grain size, impurity content, and deformation studies from samples above and below this unstable boundary in the ice sheet.

  8. Systems Engineering Management Plan NASA Traffic Aware Planner Integration Into P-180 Airborne Test-Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maris, John

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Traffic Aware Planner (TAP) is a cockpit decision support tool that provides aircrew with vertical and lateral flight-path optimizations with the intent of achieving significant fuel and time savings, while automatically avoiding traffic, weather, and restricted airspace conflicts. A key step towards the maturation and deployment of TAP concerned its operational evaluation in a representative flight environment. This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) addresses the test-vehicle design, systems integration, and flight-test planning for the first TAP operational flight evaluations, which were successfully completed in November 2013. The trial outcomes are documented in the Traffic Aware Planner (TAP) flight evaluation paper presented at the 14th AIAA Aviation Technology, Integration, and Operations Conference, Atlanta, GA. (AIAA-2014-2166, Maris, J. M., Haynes, M. A., Wing, D. J., Burke, K. A., Henderson, J., & Woods, S. E., 2014).

  9. Kinetics of ergothioneine inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wayne C; Wu, Wen Hong; Tsai, Pei-Chuan; Wang, Hui-Feng; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Chan, Chin-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The native amino acid ergothioneine, a thiourea derivative of histidine, inhibits mushroom tyrosinase activity in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC(50) value of 1.025 mg/ml (4.47 mM). By contrast, histidine exhibited no inhibitory effect on mushroom tyrosinase activity. We characterized ergothioneine as a noncompetitive tyrosinase inhibitor using a Lineweaver-Burk plot of experimental kinetic data. The IC(50) value for ergothioneine scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl was 6.110 ± 0.305 mg/ml, much higher than the IC(50) for inhibition of tyrosinase activity which indicating ergothioneine on tyrosinase shows a weak correlation to its antioxidative activity. The results demonstrated that ergothioneine has a potent inhibition effect on tyrosinase enzyme activity, resulting from the presence of the sulfur substituted imidazole ring in ergothioneine.

  10. A Simple Method for Demonstrating Enzyme Kinetics Using Catalase from Beef Liver Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kristin A.

    2000-11-01

    This paper describes a simple visual method of demonstrating enzyme kinetics using beef liver catalase. A catalase solution is obtained by homogenizing beef liver in a phosphate buffer. In the demonstration, filter paper is saturated with beef liver extract and placed into a solution of hydrogen peroxide. The catalase in the extract decomposes the hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen. Oxygen forms on the filter paper, and the filter paper rises to the top of the beaker. Catalase activity is measured by timing the rise of the enzyme-soaked filter paper to the top of beakers containing different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. The data are plotted as a Lineweaver-Burk double-reciprocal plot, and the Km and Vmax for the reaction are calculated.

  11. Combining density-functional theory and density-matrix-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rohr, Daniel R.; Pernal, Katarzyna; Toulouse, Julien

    2010-11-15

    We combine density-functional theory with density-matrix-functional theory to draw the best from both worlds. This is achieved by range separation of the electronic interaction which permits one to rigorously combine a short-range density functional with a long-range density-matrix functional. The short-range density functional is approximated by the short-range version of the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional (srPBE). The long-range density-matrix functional is approximated by the long-range version of the Buijse-Baerends functional (lrBB). The obtained srPBE+lrBB method accurately describes both the static and dynamic electron correlation at a computational cost similar to that of standard density-functional approximations. This is shown for the dissociation curves of the H{sub 2}, LiH, BH, and HF molecules.

  12. FP-LAPW investigations of SrS1-xSex, SrS1-xTex and SrSe1-xTex ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labidi, S.; Meradji, H.; Ghemid, S.; Labidi, M.; El Haj Hassan, F.

    2008-11-01

    The ab initio full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within density functional theory (DFT) was applied to study the effect of composition on the structural, electronic, optical and thermodynamic properties of SrS1-xSex, SrS1-xTex and SrSe1-xTex ternary alloys. For exchange-correlation energy and corresponding potential, the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) and Engel-Vosko (EVGGA) have been used. Deviation of the lattice constants from Vegard's law and the bulk modulus from linear concentration dependence (LCD) were observed for the three alloys. The microscopic origins of the gap bowing were explained by using the approach of Zunger and co-workers. The refractive index and optical dielectric constant for the alloys of interest are calculated by using different models. In addition the thermodynamic stability of the alloys was investigated by calculating the critical temperatures of alloys.

  13. Reproducibility in density functional theory calculations of solids.

    PubMed

    Lejaeghere, Kurt; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Björkman, Torbjörn; Blaha, Peter; Blügel, Stefan; Blum, Volker; Caliste, Damien; Castelli, Ivano E; Clark, Stewart J; Dal Corso, Andrea; de Gironcoli, Stefano; Deutsch, Thierry; Dewhurst, John Kay; Di Marco, Igor; Draxl, Claudia; Dułak, Marcin; Eriksson, Olle; Flores-Livas, José A; Garrity, Kevin F; Genovese, Luigi; Giannozzi, Paolo; Giantomassi, Matteo; Goedecker, Stefan; Gonze, Xavier; Grånäs, Oscar; Gross, E K U; Gulans, Andris; Gygi, François; Hamann, D R; Hasnip, Phil J; Holzwarth, N A W; Iuşan, Diana; Jochym, Dominik B; Jollet, François; Jones, Daniel; Kresse, Georg; Koepernik, Klaus; Küçükbenli, Emine; Kvashnin, Yaroslav O; Locht, Inka L M; Lubeck, Sven; Marsman, Martijn; Marzari, Nicola; Nitzsche, Ulrike; Nordström, Lars; Ozaki, Taisuke; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Pickard, Chris J; Poelmans, Ward; Probert, Matt I J; Refson, Keith; Richter, Manuel; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; Saha, Santanu; Scheffler, Matthias; Schlipf, Martin; Schwarz, Karlheinz; Sharma, Sangeeta; Tavazza, Francesca; Thunström, Patrik; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Torrent, Marc; Vanderbilt, David; van Setten, Michiel J; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Wills, John M; Yates, Jonathan R; Zhang, Guo-Xu; Cottenier, Stefaan

    2016-03-25

    The widespread popularity of density functional theory has given rise to an extensive range of dedicated codes for predicting molecular and crystalline properties. However, each code implements the formalism in a different way, raising questions about the reproducibility of such predictions. We report the results of a community-wide effort that compared 15 solid-state codes, using 40 different potentials or basis set types, to assess the quality of the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof equations of state for 71 elemental crystals. We conclude that predictions from recent codes and pseudopotentials agree very well, with pairwise differences that are comparable to those between different high-precision experiments. Older methods, however, have less precise agreement. Our benchmark provides a framework for users and developers to document the precision of new applications and methodological improvements. PMID:27013736

  14. A theoretical study of a laminar diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frair, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical models of an axisymmetric laminar diffusion flame are discussed, with an emphasis on the behavior of such flames at increasing pressures. The flame-sheet or Burke-Schumann model (in terms of Bessel functions) and various boundary layer numerical solutions are presented and their results compared with experimental data. The most promising theoretical model combines the numerical flow field solution of the Patankar-Spalding computer code with the Pratt-Wormeck chemical reaction subroutine. The flame shapes for pressures of 1, 5, 10, 20, and 50 atmospheres were computed and agree remarkably well with experimental data. There is a noticeable shape change with pressure, believed to be a result of buoyancy effects. The chemical concentration profiles do not exhibit much dependence on pressure, a reflection of the fact that only one chemical mechanism was utilized at all pressures.

  15. Polymorphism of resorcinol explored by complementary vibrational spectroscopy (FT-RS, THz-TDS, INS) and first-principles solid-state computations (plane-wave DFT).

    PubMed

    Drużbicki, Kacper; Mikuli, Edward; Pałka, Norbert; Zalewski, Sławomir; Ossowska-Chruściel, Mirosława D

    2015-01-29

    The polymorphism of resorcinol has been complementary studied by combining Raman, time-domain terahertz, and inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy with modern solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The spectral differences, emerging from the temperature-induced structural phase transition, have been successfully interpreted with an emphasis on the low-wavenumber range. The given interpretation is based on the plane-wave DFT computations, providing an excellent overall reproduction of both wavenumbers and intensities and revealing the source of the observed spectral differences. The performance of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals in prediction of the structural parameters and the vibrational spectra of the normal-pressure polymorphs of resorcinol has been extensively examined. The results show that the standard Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE) approach along with its "hard" revised form tends to be superior if compared to the "soft" GGA approximation.

  16. Layer modeling of zinc removal from metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards by vacuum distillation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yujie; Li, Xingang; Ding, Hui

    2015-08-01

    A layer model was established to elucidate the mechanism of zinc removal from the metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards by vacuum distillation. The removal process was optimized by response surface methodology, and the optimum operating conditions were the chamber pressure of 0.1Pa, heating temperature of 923K, heating time of 60.0min, particle size of 70 mesh (0.212mm) and initial mass of 5.25g. Evaporation efficiency of zinc, the response variable, was 99.79%, which indicates that the zinc can be efficiently removed. Based on the experimental results, a mathematical model, which bears on layer structure, evaporation, mass transfer and condensation, interprets the mechanism of the variable effects. Especially, in order to reveal blocking effect on the zinc removal, the Blake-Kozeny-Burke-Plummer equation was introduced into the mass transfer process. The layer model can be applied to a wider range of metal removal by vacuum distillation.

  17. Asymptotic analysis with reduced chemistry for the burning of n-heptane droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, J. M.; Williams, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The method of rate-ratio asymptotics is used with reduced chemistry to analyze the flame structure and extinction of an isolated n-heptane droplet burning under quasisteady, spherically symmetrical conditions. The outer transport zones are described by the classical Burke-Schumann solution. The inner reaction zone consists of a thin layer, on the rich side of the flame, where the fuel is consumed, and on the lean side, a broader but still asymptotically thin oxidation layer, where H2 and CO are consumed. Special attention is given to differences in predictions of extinction conditions, caused by different chemical-kinetic approximations in the reduced chemistry, including fuel-chemistry effects through molecules containing more than one carbon atom. From the analysis, extinction diameters for n-heptane droplets are estimated for different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations. The results show that extinction diameters are extremely sensitive to the number of radicals consumed in breaking down each fuel molecule.

  18. An Deficiency of High Redshift, High Luminosity X-ray Clusters: Evidence for a High Value for Omega.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, R. C.; Reichart, D.; Romer, A. Kathy; Collins, C. A.; Burke, D. J.; Holden, B. P.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1997-12-01

    There have been several recent analyses of clusters taken from the EMSS sample (Henry et al 1997) that have yielded yield low values (Omega_0<0.3) for the cosmic density (Donahue et al 1997, Carlberg et al 1997). By contrast, the results from a new analysis - which takes full account of the evolution in the luminosity temperature relationship - supports values of Omega_0 close to unity. We present our method and its application to two flux limited samples of high redshift clusters; the revised EMSS sample from Nichol et al (1997) and the SHARC South sample of Burke et al (1997). We go on to discuss possible systematic errors in our method and in the two cluster samples that might be mimicing a high value of Omega.

  19. On statistical properties of the test functions of the nonparametric methods for periodogram analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.; Chinarova, L. L.

    1997-12-01

    Numerical comparison of methods for the periodogram analysis is carried out for modifications by Lafler and Kinman (1965), Burke et al. (1970), Deeming (1970), Renson (1978) and Dworetsky (1983). For some numerical models the values of the mean, variance, asymmetry, and excess of the test functions are determined, the correlations between them are discussed. Analytic estimates of the mathematical expectation of the test function for different methods and of the dispersion of the test function by Lafler and Kinman (1965) are obtained. The algorithm of choosing the optimum period is discussed. By using the proposed method, the orbital period of the eclipsing binary star HBV 426 = V1147 Cyg is determined, which is 1.097383d.

  20. The distribution of period ratios in Kepler planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Hwang, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler's multi-planet systems are a valuable tool to understand the architectures and dynamics of the inner parts of planetary systems. I present an analysis of the distribution of orbital period ratios from candidate systems identified in the Quarter 8 catalog (Burke et al. 2014). This distribution is corrected for the effects of geometric transit probabilities and the completeness of the data reduction pipeline. We find that the distribution of period ratios falls as a power law with exponent -1.26 ± 0.05. We also identify a new, statistically significant feature near a period ratio of 2.2. These observations may provide insights into the formation and evolution of these systems.

  1. The Dynamics of known Short-period Multi-planet Systems in the Presence of Outer Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados Contreras, Agueda P.; Boley, Aaron C.

    2014-11-01

    Among the Kepler planet candidate sample, 23% of stellar hosts contain multiple transiting planet candidates (Burke et al. 2014). The false positive rate among the multi-candidate systems is expected to be very low, suggesting that the candidates in these systems are truly planets. The large abundance of these systems suggests that the formation of multi-planet systems at short orbital periods (the candidate period distribution peaks between 10 and 20 days) is a fundamental mode of planet formation. However, we do not understand what processes lead to the diversity of planetary systems or whether the formation processes that give rise to Kepler multi-planet systems also permit the formation of distant planets akin to the Solar System. To this end, we explore the consequences that outer planets have on the stability and observability of known Kepler and Kepler-like multi-planet systems.

  2. Enhancing Our Knowledge of Northern Cepheids through Photometric Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. G.; Majaess, D. J.; Lane, D. J.; Szabados, L.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Usenko, I. A.; Berdnikov, L. N.

    2009-09-01

    A selection of known and newly-discovered northern hemisphere Cepheids and related objects are being monitored regularly through CCD observations at the automated Abbey Ridge Observatory, near Halifax, and photoelectric photometry from the Saint Mary's University Burke-Gaffney Observatory. Included is Polaris, which is displaying unusual fluctuations in its growing light amplitude, and a short-period, double-mode Cepheid, HDE 344787, with an amplitude smaller than that of Polaris, along with a selection of other classical Cepheids in need of additional observations. The observations are being used to establish basic parameters for the Cepheids, for application to the Galactic calibration of the Cepheid period-luminosity relation as well as studies of Galactic structure.

  3. Report of the Working Design Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-11-01

    The engineering study group in the LOUISA workshop was responsible for producing a preliminary general design for an optical synthetic aperture telescope on the Moon. This design is intended to be a test case for focusing continuing design studies. The scope of the design included consideration of the array geometry, individual telescopes, metrology, site attributes, and construction. However, no attempt was made to go into further depth in the design than to cover the essential characteristics of the instrument. The starting point for the array design was the lunar optical array discussed by Burke (1985). His array geometry followed the design and correlation procedure of the 27-element Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescopes near Socorro, New Mexico.

  4. Second post-Newtonian radiative evolution of the relative orientations of angular momenta in spinning compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergely, László Á.

    2000-07-01

    The radiative evolution of the relative orientations of the spin and orbital angular momentum vectors S1, S2 and L, characterizing a binary system on an eccentric orbit is studied up to the second post-Newtonian order. As an intermediate result, all Burke-Thorne type instantaneous radiative changes in the spins are shown to average out over a radial period. It is proved that spin-orbit and spin-spin terms contribute to the radiative angular evolution equations, while Newtonian, first and second post-Newtonian terms together with the leading order tail terms do not. In complement to the spin-orbit contribution, given earlier, the spin-spin contribution is computed and split into two-body and self-interaction parts. The latter provide the second post-Ne wtonian order corrections to the 3/2 order Lense-Thirring description.

  5. Fast Radio Bursts: The Search for Their Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke Spolaor, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration radio signals whose swept-frequency signals indicate a non-local origin.FRB science has been building rapidly since the first discovery of an FRB in 2007; proof of an FRB population in 2013 (Thornton et al.) was quickly followed by further evidence of their likely, although not yet definite, extragalactic origin (e.g. Kulkarni et al. 2014, Burke-Spolaor & Bannister 2014). Until recently, only circumstantial evidence allowed statements on what progenitors FRBs might arise from, and whether they are local, Galactic, or extragalactic. However, we are now able to detect FRB events in real-time, and have the capability to detect FRBs with radio interferometers. This has opened up the possibility to understand their origins through arcsecond localization and the identification of multi-wavelength counterparts. I will describe what we currently know about FRBs, and the status of the FRB hunt for their enigmatic origins.

  6. Relation between the variations of the solar wind and the noon-time equatorial ionospheric electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoj, C.; Maus, S.; Alken, P.; Gentile, L.; Burke, W.

    2007-12-01

    We compare the solar wind measurements from ACE satellite with the vertical plasma drift (observed by JULIA radar) and the EEJ magnetic signals (observed at HUA observatory) from the South American equatorial sector. The aim is to understand the effect of solar wind on the variations of the electric field in the noon time equatorial ionosphere. We restrict our study to local noon time conditions, geomagnetically active days and while interplanetary Bz is negative. The estimates of electric field intensities (E_VS) at equatorial plain of the magnetosphere were made from ACE data using a combination of Volland-Stern and Siscoe-Hill models (Burke et al, 2007). The JULIA and magnetometer data were high-pass filtered to remove the regular daily variations. The relation between the data set will be presented as a coherence spectrum. In addition, the use of the ACE measurements to improve the climatological models of EEJ during geomagnetically active days will be explored.

  7. NE V in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, F. P.; Burke, V. M.; Aggarwal, K. M.

    1991-04-01

    The improved atomic data of Lennon and Burke (1991) are used there to rederive Ne V diagnostic line ratios applicable to PNe for a range of electron temperatures and densities. These results are found to be somewhat different from those determined when the earlier R-matrix atomic data of Baluja et al. (1980) and Aggarwal (1983) are used in the line ratio calculations. It is shown that it is unwise to use R1 or R3 alone as a temperature or density diagnostic, unless the density or temperature of the Ne V emitting region of the plasma has been independently determined. However, reliable estimates of both Ne and Te may be found when R1 and R3 are used together, while R2 may be used by itself as an accurate Ne diagnostic.

  8. Managing crises through organisational development: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Carole

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of the guiding principles in crisis management in accordance with the four configurational imperatives (strategy, structure, leadership and environment) defined by Miller (1987) and outlines interventions in organisational development (OD) that may contribute to their achievement. The aim is to build a conceptual framework at the intersection of these two fields that could help to strengthen the resilient capabilities of individuals, organisations and communities to face crises. This incursion into the field of OD--to generate more efficient configurations of practices in crisis management--seems particularly fruitful considering the system-wide application of OD, based on open-systems theory (Burke, 2008). Various interventions proposed by OD in terms of human processes, structural designs and human resource management, as well as strategy, may help leaders, members of organisations and civil society apply effectively, and in a more sustainable way, the crisis management guiding principles defined by researchers.

  9. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K(M) and V(max) values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K(i) value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation. PMID:26676512

  10. Effect of Alcohols and Their Interaction with Ethylene on the Ripening of Epidermal Pericarp Discs of Tomato Fruit 1

    PubMed Central

    Saltveit, Mikal E.

    1989-01-01

    Ethanol concentrations that were induced in pericarp discs of mature-green tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill, cv Castlemart) either by anaerobic metabolism or by exposure to ethanol vapor inhibited ripening without increasing the rate of ion leakage. Inhibition of ripening (i.e. lycopene synthesis) of excised tomato pericarp tissue by ethanol vapor was reversed by increasing concentrations of the plant hormone ethylene. A Lineweaver-Burk plot indicated noncompetitive interaction between ethanol and ethylene. Methanol and n-propanol also inhibited lycopene synthesis without significantly increasing ion leakage. The similar inhibitory effects of methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol at concentrations which did not stimulate ion leakage, and the relationship between activity and lipophilia of the alcohols suggest that their mode of action was through disruption of membranes associated with ethylene action. PMID:16666729

  11. Electronic structure study of TiB{sub 2} and Ti{sub 2}B

    SciTech Connect

    Vashistha, M. Vyas, V.; Kabra, K.; Sharma, G.

    2015-06-24

    In this paper, the electronic properties of TiB{sub 2} and Ti{sub 2}B are computed within the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT) based on Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals (LCAO) method. In the present calculations, the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) proposed by Perdew-Burke-Erenzerhof (PBE) and Becke’s scheme are considered to treat the correlation and exchange effects respectively. TiB{sub 2} crystallizes in the hexagonal AlB{sub 2} type structure which is designated as C32 with the space group P6/mmm. While the crystal structure of Ti{sub 2}B described in this paper is isomorphous to the body centered tetragonal (Al{sub 2}Cu - type) structure with space group I4/mcm.

  12. Forchlorfenuron detection based on its inhibitory effect towards catalase immobilized on boron nitride substrate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Cai, Lijuan; Zhao, Huijie; Tang, Jiaqian; Shen, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoya; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-01-15

    An enzymatic procedure based on a catalase biosensor for the detection of forchlorfenuron (CPPU) has been reported in this work. Catalase was immobilized on boron nitride (BN) sheets dispersed in chitosan by adsorption. The immobilized catalase exhibited direct electron transfer character and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 reduction. After introducing CPPU into the H2O2 containing phosphate buffer solution, the catalase-catalyzed H2O2 reduction current decreased. By measuring the current decrease, CPPU can be determined in the range of 0.5-10.0 µM with the detection limit of 0.07 μM. The non-competitive inhibition behavior of CPPU towards catalase was verified by the Lineweaver-Burk plots. Long stability character has been ascribed to this biosensor. Possible use of this biosensor in flow systems is illustrated. The proposed biosensor has been successfully applied to CPPU determination in fruits samples with satisfactory results. PMID:25108110

  13. Polymorphism of resorcinol explored by complementary vibrational spectroscopy (FT-RS, THz-TDS, INS) and first-principles solid-state computations (plane-wave DFT).

    PubMed

    Drużbicki, Kacper; Mikuli, Edward; Pałka, Norbert; Zalewski, Sławomir; Ossowska-Chruściel, Mirosława D

    2015-01-29

    The polymorphism of resorcinol has been complementary studied by combining Raman, time-domain terahertz, and inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy with modern solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The spectral differences, emerging from the temperature-induced structural phase transition, have been successfully interpreted with an emphasis on the low-wavenumber range. The given interpretation is based on the plane-wave DFT computations, providing an excellent overall reproduction of both wavenumbers and intensities and revealing the source of the observed spectral differences. The performance of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals in prediction of the structural parameters and the vibrational spectra of the normal-pressure polymorphs of resorcinol has been extensively examined. The results show that the standard Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE) approach along with its "hard" revised form tends to be superior if compared to the "soft" GGA approximation. PMID:25564699

  14. Density functional study of bisphenol-A polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, Barbara; Ballone, Pietro; Jones, R. O.

    1998-03-01

    The optimum structure of a crystalline analog of bisphenol-A polycarbonate (BPA-PC) has been determined using density functional (DF) calculations. We have compared the results given by the local density (LD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy with those obtained with two different gradient-corrected functionals: the Becke-Perdew (BP) functional and the one due to Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (PBE). In all cases the measured geometries are very well reproduced if the unit cell is constrained to have the experimental dimensions, whereas the results for the equilibrium volumes differ. The dynamical properties of two different crystalline modifications have been also investigated using the combination of DF and molecular dynamics (MD) scheme. In particular, we have calculated the energy barriers of the most significant dynamical features measured by NMR: the phenyl ring π-flips and the rotation of the methyl groups.

  15. A novel angiotensin-І converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide from gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate of silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein: Biochemical characterization and molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiongying; Jia, Junqiang; Yan, Hui; Du, Jinjuan; Gui, Zhongzheng

    2015-06-01

    Silkworm pupa (Bombyx mori) protein was hydrolyzed using gastrointestinal endopeptidases (pepsin, trypsin and α-chymotrypsin). Then, the hydrolysate was purified sequentially by ultrafiltration, gel filtration chromatography and RP-HPLC. A novel ACE inhibitory peptide, Ala-Ser-Leu, with the IC50 value of 102.15μM, was identified by IT-MS/MS. This is the first report of Ala-Ser-Leu from natural protein. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggest that the peptide is a competitive inhibitor against ACE. The molecular docking studies revealed that the ACE inhibition of Ala-Ser-Leu is mainly attributed to forming very strong hydrogen bonds with the S1 pocket (Ala354) and the S2 pocket (Gln281 and His353). The results indicate that silkworm pupa (B. mori) protein or its gastrointestinal protease hydrolysate could be used as a functional ingredient in auxiliary therapeutic foods against hypertension.

  16. Statistical theory and methodology for remote sensing data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    A model is developed for the evaluation of acreages (proportions) of different crop-types over a geographical area using a classification approach and methods for estimating the crop acreages are given. In estimating the acreages of a specific croptype such as wheat, it is suggested to treat the problem as a two-crop problem: wheat vs. nonwheat, since this simplifies the estimation problem considerably. The error analysis and the sample size problem is investigated for the two-crop approach. Certain numerical results for sample sizes are given for a JSC-ERTS-1 data example on wheat identification performance in Hill County, Montana and Burke County, North Dakota. Lastly, for a large area crop acreages inventory a sampling scheme is suggested for acquiring sample data and the problem of crop acreage estimation and the error analysis is discussed.

  17. Assessment of a long-range corrected hybrid functional

    SciTech Connect

    Vydrov, Oleg A.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2006-12-21

    Common approximate exchange-correlation functionals suffer from self-interaction error, and as a result, their corresponding potentials have incorrect asymptotic behavior. The exact asymptote can be imposed by introducing range separation into the exchange component and replacing the long-range portion of the approximate exchange by the Hartree-Fock counterpart. The authors show that this long-range correction works particularly well in combination with the short-range variant of the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange functional. This long-range-corrected hybrid, here denoted LC-{omega}PBE, is remarkably accurate for a broad range of molecular properties, such as thermochemistry, barrier heights of chemical reactions, bond lengths, and most notably, description of processes involving long-range charge transfer.

  18. New directions in the use of virtual reality for food shopping: marketing and education perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Barb

    2011-03-01

    Virtual reality is used in marketing research to shape food selection and purchase decisions. Could it be used to counteract the marketing of less-nutritious foods and teach healthier food selection? This article presents interviews with Raymond Burke, Ph.D., of Indiana University Bloomington, and Rachel Jones, M.P.H., of the University of Utah College of Health. Topics covered include new marketing research technologies, including virtual reality simulations; retailing and shopper behavior; and the use of virtual grocery stores to help students explore quality of diet and food/nutrient relationships. The interviewees discuss how the technologies they have developed fit into research and behavior change related to obesity and diabetes. PMID:21527099

  19. Atomistic explanation of shear-induced amorphous band formation in boron carbide.

    PubMed

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-29

    Boron carbide (B4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (0111)/<1101> slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon bond between neighboring icosahedral clusters breaks to form a carbon lone pair (Lewis base) on the C within the icosahedron. Further shear then leads this Lewis base C to form a new bond with the Lewis acidic B in the middle of a CBC chain. This then initiates destruction of this icosahedron. The result is the amorphous structure observed experimentally. We suggest how this insight could be used to strengthen B4C.

  20. Dihydroasparagusic acid: antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory activities and improved synthesis.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Alessandro; Mandrone, Manuela; Serrilli, Anna Maria; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Iannello, Carmelina; Poli, Ferruccio; Antognoni, Fabiana

    2013-07-17

    Dihydroasparagusic acid (DHAA) is the reduced form of asparagusic acid, a sulfur-containing flavor component produced by Asparagus plants. In this work, DHAA was synthetically produced by modifying some published protocols, and the synthesized molecule was tested in several in vitro assays (DPPH, ABTS, FRAP-ferrozine, BCB, deoxyribose assays) to evaluate its radical scavenging activity. Results show that DHAA is endowed with a significant in vitro antioxidant activity, comparable to that of Trolox. DHAA was also evaluated for its inhibitory activity toward tyrosinase, an enzyme involved, among others, in melanogenesis and in browning processes of plant-derived foods. DHAA was shown to exert an inhibitory effect on tyrosinase activity, and the inhibitor kinetics, analyzed by a Lineweaver-Burk plot, exhibited a competitive mechanism. Taken together, these results suggest that DHAA may be considered as a potentially active molecule for use in various fields of application, such as pharmaceutical, cosmetics, agronomic and food. PMID:23790134

  1. Ab-initio study of structural, electronic, and transport properties of zigzag GaP nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anurag; Jain, Sumit Kumar; Khare, Purnima Swarup

    2014-03-01

    Stability and electronic properties of zigzag (3 ≤ n ≤ 16) gallium phosphide nanotubes (GaP NTs) have been analyzed by employing a systematic ab-intio approach based on density functional theory using generalized gradient approximation with revised Perdew Burke Ernzerhoff type parameterization. Diameter dependence of bond length, buckling, binding energy, and band gap has been investigated and the analysis shows that the bond length and buckling decreases with increasing diameter of the tube, highest binding energy of (16, 0) confirms this as the most stable amongst all the NTs taken into consideration. The present GaP NTs shows direct band gap and it increases with diameter of the tubes. Using a two probe model for (4, 0) NT the I-V relationship shows an exponential increase in current on applying bias voltage beyond 1.73 volt.

  2. Benchmarking the External Surrogate Ratio Method using the (alpha,alpha' f) reaction at STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lesher, S R; Bernstein, L A; Ai, H; Beausang, C W; Bleuel, D; Burke, J T; Clark, R M; Fallon, P; Gibelin, J; Lee, I Y; Lyles, B F; Macchiavelli, A O; McMahan, M A; Moody, K J; Norman, E B; Phair, L; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E; Wiedeking, M

    2008-01-09

    We measured the ratio of the fission probabilities of {sup 234}U* relative to {sup 236}U* formed via an ({alpha},{alpha}{prime}) direct reactions using the STARS array at the 88-inch cyclotron at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This ratio has a shape similar to the ratio of neutron capture probabilities from {sup 233}U(n; f) and {sup 235}U(n; f), indicating the alpha reactions likely formed a compound nucleus. This result indicates that the ratios of fission exit channel probabilities for two actinide nuclei populated via ({alpha}, {alpha}{prime}) can be used to determine an unknown fission cross section relative to a known one. The validity of the External Surrogate Ratio Method (ESRM) is tested and the results support the conclusions of Burke et al. [1].

  3. Salicylic acid inhibits enzymatic browning of fresh-cut Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) by competitively inhibiting polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Li, Lin; Wu, Yanwen; Fan, Junfeng; Ouyang, Jie

    2015-03-15

    The inhibitory effect and associated mechanisms of salicylic acid (SA) on the browning of fresh-cut Chinese chestnut were investigated. Shelled and sliced chestnuts were immersed in different concentrations of an SA solution, and the browning of the chestnut surface and interior were inhibited. The activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) extracted from chestnuts were measured in the presence and absence of SA. SA at concentrations higher than 0.3g/L delayed chestnut browning by significantly inhibiting the PPO activity (P<0.01), and the POD activity was not significantly affected (P>0.05). The binding and inhibition modes of SA with PPO and POD, determined by AUTODOCK 4.2 and Lineweaver-Burk plots, respectively, established SA as a competitive inhibitor of PPO. PMID:25308637

  4. Essential oil yield and chemical composition changes during leaf ontogeny of palmarosa (Cymbopogon martinii var. motia).

    PubMed

    Rao, Bhaskaruni R Rajeswara; Rajput, Dharmendra K; Patel, Rajendra P; Purnanand, Somasi

    2010-12-01

    Changes in leaf biomass yield, essential oil yield, and chemical composition were investigated during leaf ontogeny of palmarosa {Cymbopogon martinii (Roxb.) Wats. var. motia Burk., family Poaceae}. Eleven leaves representing different developmental stages, serially numbered from the apex to the base of the plant were utilized for the study. Leaf biomass yield increased up to the eighth leaf. Essential oil recovery increased up to the third leaf; thereafter it decreased. Minimum essential oil recovery was observed in the eleventh leaf. Essential oil yield/leaf increased up to the sixth leaf. Essential oil yield and concentrations of linalool, alpha-terpineol, geranyl isobutyrate and geraniol were relatively higher in the essential oils of mature, older leaves. Essential oil recovery, and percentages of myrcene, beta-caryophyllene, geranyl acetate, (E,Z) farnesol and geranyl hexanoate were higher in the essential oils of young, expanding leaves. PMID:21299128

  5. Mad Men as health communication: health-related themes in the hit AMC television series.

    PubMed

    Baglia, Jay; Foster, Elissa

    2015-01-01

    As a popular contemporary text, the appeal of cable television's Mad Men (AMC) lies in its capacity to highlight the differences between 1960s sensibilities and 21st-century assumptions. Viewers can enjoy a sense of superiority by recognizing the "folly" of the beliefs and actions of the characters with the benefit of historic hindsight, as well as noting the evolution of technology, philosophy, and human rights. Health-related scenes and themes in the series are a particularly interesting focus for analysis. We employ Burke's four master tropes as an analytical lens and argue that the dominant dramatic technique of irony, particularly in the form that we call strategic anachronism-derived from an audience's enjoyment of historical hindsight-highlights the racism, sexism, homophobia, and overall conservatism of the early 1960s while simultaneously serving to obfuscate the ways in which we still have much to critique in the delivery of contemporary health care and other body politics.

  6. Benchmarking exchange-correlation functionals for hydrogen at high pressures using quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Clay, Raymond C.; Mcminis, Jeremy; McMahon, Jeffrey M.; Pierleoni, Carlo; Ceperley, David M.; Morales, Miguel A.

    2014-05-01

    The ab initio phase diagram of dense hydrogen is very sensitive to errors in the treatment of electronic correlation. Recently, it has been shown that the choice of the density functional has a large effect on the predicted location of both the liquid-liquid phase transition and the solid insulator-to-metal transition in dense hydrogen. To identify the most accurate functional for dense hydrogen applications, we systematically benchmark some of the most commonly used functionals using quantum Monte Carlo. By considering several measures of functional accuracy, we conclude that the van der Waals and hybrid functionals significantly outperform local density approximation and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof. We support these conclusions by analyzing the impact of functional choice on structural optimization in the molecular solid, and on the location of the liquid-liquid phase transition.

  7. Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation for Writer's Cramp

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chul Bum; Park, Hae Kwan; Rha, Hyoung Kyun

    2009-01-01

    Writer's cramp is a type of idiopathic focal hand dystonia characterized by muscle cramps that accompany execution of the writing task specifically. There has been renewed interest in neurosurgical procedures for the treatment of dystonia over the past several years. In particular, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has received increasing attention as a therapeutic option for patients with dystonia. However, to date, limited reporters made investigations into DBS in relation to the Writer's cramp. In this case, unilateral Ventro-oralis complex (Vo) DBS resulted in a major improvement in patient's focal dystonic movement disorders. Her post-operative Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating (BFMDR) scale demonstrated 1 compared with pre-operative BFMDR scale 4. We conclude that thalamic Vo complex DBS may be an important neurosurgical therapeutic option for Writer's cramp. PMID:19707494

  8. Sensitive Training Through Body Awareness to Improve the Writing of Patients with Writer’s Cramp

    PubMed Central

    Waissman, Flavia Quadros Boisson; Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Leite, Marco Antônio A.; Pereira, João Santos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate if body awareness is important to improve the writing ability before using the splints. Twelve patients with writer’s cramp were evaluated by a specialist in movement disorders. The Burke-Fahn-Marsden Scale (BFM), the Jedynak Protocol and the Analog Pain Scale were used. The rehabilitation training was administered over an eight-week period, in two phases of four weeks each, twice a week. Each session would last 60 minutes. A significant improvement was shown, not only in the motor, but also in the pain perception, through the BFM scale, the Jedynak Protocol and the Analog Pain Scale. Therefore, we conclude that the motor training, thanks to the body awareness and immobilization by splints of the affected dystonic musculature, led to an important improvement in the writer’s cramp writing. PMID:24416488

  9. Diagnostic Categories in Autobiographical Accounts of Illness.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Working within frameworks drawn from the writings of Immanuel Kant, Alfred Schutz, and Kenneth Burke, this article examines the role that diagnostic categories play in autobiographical accounts of illness, with a special focus on chronic disease. Four lay diagnostic categories, each with different connections to formal medical diagnostic categories, serve as typifications to make sense of the way the lifeworld changes over the course of chronic illness. These diagnostic categories are used in conjunction with another set of typifications: lay epidemiologies, lay etiologies, lay prognostics, and lay therapeutics. Together these serve to construct and reconstruct the self at the center of the lifeworld. Embedded within the lay diagnostic categories are narratives of progression, regression, or stability, forms of typification derived from literary and storytelling genres. These narratives are developed by the self in autobiographical accounts of illness. PMID:26657684

  10. High energy Compton spectroscopy and electronic structure of Laves phase ZrFe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Samir; Kumar, Kishor; Arora, Gunjan; Bapna, Komal; Ahuja, B. L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first-ever experimental Compton profile of Laves phase ZrFe2 using indigenous 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer. To annotate the experimental electron momentum density, we have calculated the theoretical Compton profiles using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. The spin-polarized energy bands and density of states are computed using LCAO and full potential-linearized augmented plane wave methods. The revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional (for solids) based theoretical profile gives a marginally better agreement with the experimental profile as compared to other approximations considered in the present work. The Fermi surface topology of ZrFe2 is explained in terms of majority- and minority-spin energy bands.

  11. Report of the Working Design Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The engineering study group in the LOUISA workshop was responsible for producing a preliminary general design for an optical synthetic aperture telescope on the Moon. This design is intended to be a test case for focusing continuing design studies. The scope of the design included consideration of the array geometry, individual telescopes, metrology, site attributes, and construction. However, no attempt was made to go into further depth in the design than to cover the essential characteristics of the instrument. The starting point for the array design was the lunar optical array discussed by Burke (1985). His array geometry followed the design and correlation procedure of the 27-element Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescopes near Socorro, New Mexico.

  12. Diagnostic Categories in Autobiographical Accounts of Illness.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Working within frameworks drawn from the writings of Immanuel Kant, Alfred Schutz, and Kenneth Burke, this article examines the role that diagnostic categories play in autobiographical accounts of illness, with a special focus on chronic disease. Four lay diagnostic categories, each with different connections to formal medical diagnostic categories, serve as typifications to make sense of the way the lifeworld changes over the course of chronic illness. These diagnostic categories are used in conjunction with another set of typifications: lay epidemiologies, lay etiologies, lay prognostics, and lay therapeutics. Together these serve to construct and reconstruct the self at the center of the lifeworld. Embedded within the lay diagnostic categories are narratives of progression, regression, or stability, forms of typification derived from literary and storytelling genres. These narratives are developed by the self in autobiographical accounts of illness.

  13. Comparison of HfCl4, HfI4, TEMA-Hf, and TDMA-Hf as precursors in early growing stages of HfO2 films deposited by ALD: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez-Valadez, M.; Fierro, C.; Farias-Mancilla, J. R.; Vargas-Ortiz, A.; Flores-Acosta, M.; Ramírez-Bon, R.; Enriquez-Carrejo, J. L.; Soubervielle-Montalvo, C.; Mani-Gonzalez, P. G.

    2016-06-01

    The final structure of HfO2 films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) after reaction with OH- ions has been analyzed by DFT (density functional theory). The interaction of the precursors: HfCl4 (hafnium tetrachloride), HfI4 (hafnium tetraiodide), TEMA-Hf (tetrakis-ethylmethylamino hafnium), and TDMA-Hf (tetrakis-dimethylamino hafnium) with HO-H was studied employing the B3LYP (Becke 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr) hybrid functional and the PBE (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) generalized gradient functional. The structural evolution at the Si(100) surface has been analyzed by LDA (local density approximation). The structural parameters: bond length and bond angle, and the vibrational parameters for the optimized structures are also reported. The presence of hafnium silicate at the interface was detected. The infrared spectra and structural parameters obtained in this work agree with previously reported experimental results.

  14. A novel strategy with standardized reference extract qualification and single compound quantitative evaluation for quality control of Panax notoginseng used as a functional food.

    PubMed

    Li, S P; Qiao, C F; Chen, Y W; Zhao, J; Cui, X M; Zhang, Q W; Liu, X M; Hu, D J

    2013-10-25

    Root of Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F.H. Chen (Sanqi in Chinese) is one of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) based functional food. Saponins are the major bioactive components. The shortage of reference compounds or chemical standards is one of the main bottlenecks for quality control of TCMs. A novel strategy, i.e. standardized reference extract based qualification and single calibrated components directly quantitative estimation of multiple analytes, was proposed to easily and effectively control the quality of natural functional foods such as Sanqi. The feasibility and credibility of this methodology were also assessed with a developed fast HPLC method. Five saponins, including ginsenoside Rg1, Re, Rb1, Rd and notoginsenoside R1 were rapidly separated using a conventional HPLC in 20 min. The quantification method was also compared with individual calibration curve method. The strategy is feasible and credible, which is easily and effectively adapted for improving the quality control of natural functional foods such as Sanqi.

  15. Analysis of the electronic structure of ZrO{sub 2} by Compton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahammad, F. M.; Mahammed, S. F.; Kumar, R.; Vijay, Y. K.; Sharma, B. K.; Sharma, G.

    2013-07-15

    The electronic structure of ZrO{sub 2} is studied using the Compton scattering technique. The first-ever Compton profile measurement on polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} was obtained using 59.54 keV gamma-rays emanating from the {sup 241}Am radioisotope. To explain the experimental data, we compute theoretical Compton profile values using the method of linear combination of atomic orbitals in the framework of density functional theory. The correlation scheme proposed by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and the exchange scheme of Becke are considered. The ionic-model-based calculations for a number of configurations, i.e., Zr{sup +x}(O{sup -x/2}){sub 2} (0 {<=} x {<=} 2), are also performed to estimate the charge transfer on compound formation, and the study supports transfer of 1.5 electrons from Zr to O atoms.

  16. Effects of non-unity Lewis numbers in diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linan, A.; Orlandi, P.; Verzicco, R.; Higuera, F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to carry out direct numerical simulations of diffusion controlled combustion with non-unity Lewis numbers for the reactants and products, thus accounting for the differential diffusion effects of the temperature and concentration fields. We use a formulation based on combining the conservation equations in a way to eliminate the reaction terms similar to the method used by Burke and Schumann (1928) for unity Lewis numbers. We present calculations for an axisymmetric fuel jet and for a planar, time evolving mixing layer, leaving out the effects of thermal expansion and variations of the transport coefficients due to the heat release. Our results show that the front of the flame shifts toward the fuel or oxygen sides owing to the effect of the differential diffusion and that the location of maximum temperature may not coincide with the flame. The dependence of the distribution of the reaction products on their Lewis number has been investigated.

  17. Salicylic acid inhibits enzymatic browning of fresh-cut Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) by competitively inhibiting polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Li, Lin; Wu, Yanwen; Fan, Junfeng; Ouyang, Jie

    2015-03-15

    The inhibitory effect and associated mechanisms of salicylic acid (SA) on the browning of fresh-cut Chinese chestnut were investigated. Shelled and sliced chestnuts were immersed in different concentrations of an SA solution, and the browning of the chestnut surface and interior were inhibited. The activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) extracted from chestnuts were measured in the presence and absence of SA. SA at concentrations higher than 0.3g/L delayed chestnut browning by significantly inhibiting the PPO activity (P<0.01), and the POD activity was not significantly affected (P>0.05). The binding and inhibition modes of SA with PPO and POD, determined by AUTODOCK 4.2 and Lineweaver-Burk plots, respectively, established SA as a competitive inhibitor of PPO.

  18. Potent inhibitory effects of N-aryl S-alkylthiocarbamate derivatives on the dopa oxidase activity of mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun Ho; Koketsu, Mamoru; Choi, Sang Yoon; Lee, Kang Jin; Lee, Pyeongjae; Ishihara, Hideharu; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2005-07-01

    This study reports the potent inhibitory effect of N-aryl S-alkylthiocarbamate derivatives on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) activity. N-Aryl S-alkylthiocarbamate derivatives were found to exhibit a potent inhibitory effect on the dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) oxidase activity of mushroom tyrosinase. Most of the N-aryl S-alkylthiocarbamate derivatives (compounds from A to J) exhibited higher inhibitory effects than kojic acid (IC50=318 microM), a well known tyrosinase inhibitor. Tyrosinase was the most inhibited by S-phenetyl N-phenylthiocarbamate (compound E, IC50=7.25 microM), and this inhibition was 44 times stronger than that of kojic acid. Compound E exhibited 95.0% of inhibition at 100 microM. A kinetic study of MT inhibition by compound E using the Lineweaver-Burk plots analysis was performed. And the kinetics profiles observed suggest that compound E competitively inhibits MT.

  19. Curious afterlives: the enduring appeal of the criminal corpse

    PubMed Central

    Tarlow, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Not only did the criminal corpse have actual medicinal and magical power for Europeans, it also had social and cultural meaning as an object, a curio or secular relic. This paper considers the appeal of notorious bodies. From books bound in the skin of a criminal, to preserved and exhibited heads, from fragments of the hangman’s rope to the exhibition of the skeleton, the story of the afterlife of criminal bodies and the material culture most immediately associated with them begins with the collection and exchange of bodies and moves into contemporary preoccupations with authenticity. This paper considers the bodies of three notorious criminals of the eighteenth century: Eugene Aram, William Burke and William Corder. It ends with some reflections on the glamour of the authentic body of a notorious or celebrated individual – using the response to the discovery of the body of Richard III as an example. PMID:27366110

  20. Maps of upper Mississippi embayment Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dart, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    The Mississippi Embayment regional seismic hazard (Fuller, 1912; Nuttli, 1973, 1982, 1983), associated with the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) is attributed to displacement on seismogenic structures primarily within the failed Reelfoot rift (Burke and Dewey, 1973; Ervin and McGinnis, 1975; Hildenbrand, 1977; Johnston and Shedlock, 1992). Hildenbrand and others (1977) and Hildenbrand (1985) used potential field data to show the northeast trend of the buried rift and the existence of related intrusive bodies. The Mississippi Valley graben (Hildenbrand and others, 1977; Kane and others, 1981; Hildenbrand, 1985; Wheeler and others, 1993), also referred to as the Reelfoot graben (Hildenbrand and Hendricks, 1995), is here considered to be the structural expression of the Reelfoot rift at the Precambrian basement surface.

  1. DFT investigations of structural and electronic properties of gallium arsenide (GaAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anua, N. Najwa; Ahmed, R.; Saeed, M. A.; Shaari, A.; Haq, Bakhtiar Ul

    2012-09-01

    First principles calculations for structural and electronic properties of GaAs have been reported using a full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) scheme of calculations developed within density functional theory (DFT). We use in this study local density approximation (LDA), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof parameterized generalized gradient approximation (PBE-GGA), Wu-Cohen parameterized GGA (WC-GGA) executed in WIEN2k code. In addition, to calculate band structure with high accuracy we used modified Becke-Johnson exchange potential (MBJ) + LDA approach. Our calculated lattice constant with GGA-WC is in good agreement to experimental value than LDA and PBE-GGA. Whereas our calculations for the band structure show that MBJ+ LDA approach gives much better results for band gap value as compared to other exchange correlation approaches.

  2. Stable half-metallic monolayers of FeCl{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, E. Sahin, H.; Singh, S. K.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-05-11

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of single layers of Iron Dichloride (FeCl{sub 2}) were calculated using first principles calculations. We found that the 1T phase of the single layer FeCl{sub 2} is 0.17 eV/unit cell more favorable than its 1H phase. The structural stability is confirmed by phonon calculations. We found that 1T-FeCl{sub 2} possess three Raman-active (130, 179, and 237 cm{sup −1}) and one infrared-active (279 cm{sup −1}) phonon branches. The electronic band dispersion of the 1T-FeCl{sub 2} is calculated using both gradient approximation of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and DFT-HSE06 functionals. Both functionals reveal that the 1T-FeCl{sub 2} has a half-metallic ground state with a Curie temperature of 17 K.

  3. Finding the Big Bang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, P. James E.; Page, Lyman A., Jr.; Partridge, R. Bruce

    2009-03-01

    1. Introduction; 2. A guide to modern cosmology; 3. Origins of the cosmology of the 1960s; 4. Recollections of the 1960s Dave Hogg, Neville Woolf, George B. Field, Patrick Thaddeus, Donald E. Osterbrock, Yuri Nikolaevich Smirnov, Igor Dmitriyevich Novikov, Andrei Georgievich Doroshkevich, Rashid Alievich Sunyaev, Malcolm S. Longair, Arno Penzias, Robert W. Wilson, Bernard F. Burke, Kenneth C. Turner, P. James E. Peebles, David T. Wilkinson, Peter G. Roll, R. Bruce Partridge, Malcolm S. Longair, John Faulkner, Robert V. Wagoner, Martin Rees, Geoffrey R. Burbidge, Jayant V. Narlikar, David Layzer, Michele Kaufman, Jasper V. Wall, John Shakeshaft, William Welch, Kazimir S. Stankevich, Paul Boynton, Robert A. Stokes, Martin Harwit, Judith L. Pipher, Kandiah Shivanandan, Rainer Weiss, Jer-tsang Yu, Rainer K. Sachs, Arthur M. Wolfe, Joe Silk, George F. R. Ellis, Ronald N. Bracewell, Edward K. Conklin, Stephen Boughn, Karl C. Davis, Paul S. Henry; 5. Cosmology and the CMBR since the 1960s Dick Bond; Appendixes; Glossary; References; Index.

  4. Hydrogen isotope fractionation by Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus in coculture and pure culture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Sakata, Susumu; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2008-06-01

    We grew a hydrogen-utilizing methanogen, Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus strain ΔH, in coculture and pure culture conditions to evaluate the hydrogen isotope fractionation associated with carbonate reduction under low (< several tens of μM; coculture) and high (>6 mM; pure culture) concentrations of H 2 in the headspace. In the cocultures, which were grown at 55 °C with a thermophilic butyrate-oxidizing syntroph, the hydrogen isotopic relationship between methane and water was well represented by the following equation: δD=0.725(±0.003)·δDO-275(±3), in which the hydrogen isotope fractionation factor ( αH) was 0.725 ± 0.003. The relationship was consistent with the isotopic data on methane and water from terrestrial fields (a peat bog in Washington State, USA, and a sandy aquifer in Denmark), where carbonate reduction was reported to be the dominant pathway of methanogenesis. In the pure cultures, grown at 55 and 65 °C, the αH values were 0.755 ± 0.014 and 0.749 ± 0.014, respectively. Dependence of αH on growth temperature was not observed. The αH value at 55 °C in the pure culture was slightly higher than that in the coculture, a finding that disagrees with a hypothesis proposed by Burke [Burke, Jr. R. A. (1993) Possible influence of hydrogen concentration on microbial methane stable hydrogen isotopic composition. Chemosphere26, 55-67] that hydrogen isotope fractionation between methane and water increases (and αH decreases) with increasing H 2 concentration.

  5. Final report for confinement vessel analysis: Task 1, Correlation of new vessel data with finite element results

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, B.B.

    1993-11-30

    Los Alamos performed tests of a modified confinement vessel in November 1992 to gain a better understanding of the response of the confinement vessel. The first test was meant to duplicate, with additional instrumentation, tests done previously for correlation with analysis. Task 1 of Subcontract Number 9-XH3-0607K-1 was the correlation of this new vessel test data with the results of finite element analyses. The authors also examined the data for the other test, which was for optical port development. The tests were numbered H-1573 and H-1562 and were fired on November 9 and 10, 1992, respectively. Test H-1573 was identical to the previous 40 lb tests except that a Burke tube was used to support the explosive charge while the explosive was freely suspended in the earlier tests. The second test, H-1562, was for development of the optical port. In addition to the Burke tube, this test also had additional components on the inside of the ports to protect the windows. The following are conclusions and recommendations drawn from assessment and correlation of tests H-1573 and H-1562: (1) yielding was measured at the bottom of the vessel for these tests; (2) the presence of a support tube in the vessel may have caused focusing of the pressure at the bottom, obscuring the response mechanism thought to have caused yielding in earlier tests; (3) the frequencies predicted using the finite element analysis correlated fairly well with the test results, but the analysis did not predict the yielding measured at the {minus}73 degrees locations; (4) excellent pressure measurements were obtained; (5) better methods of obtaining acceleration data for the windows need to be developed; and (6) the authors believe that the window damage is caused by response of the vessel.

  6. Modeling the Thermosphere As a Driven-Dissipative Thermodynamic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, W.; Lin, C. S.; Acebal, A. O.; Garvin, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    Thermospheric density impacts satellite position and lifetime through atmospheric drag. More accurate specification of thermospheric temperature, a key input to current models such as the High Accuracy Satellite Drag Model, can decrease model density errors. This paper improves the model of Burke et al. (2009) to model thermospheric temperatures using the magnetospheric convective electric field as a driver. In better alignment with Air Force satellite tracking operations, we model the arithmetic mean temperature, T1/2, defined by the Jacchia (1977) model as the mean of the daytime maximum and nighttime minimum exospheric temperatures occurring in opposite hemispheres at a given time, instead of the exospheric temperature used by Burke et al. (2009). Two methods of treating the solar ultraviolet (UV) contribution to T1/2 are tested. Two model parameters, the coupling and relaxation constants, are optimized for 38 storms from 2002 to 2008. Observed T1/2 values are derived from densities and heights measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellite. The coupling and relaxation constants were found to vary over the solar cycle and are fit as functions of F10.7a, the 162 day average of the F10.7 index. Model results show that allowing temporal UV variation decreased model T1/2 errors for storms with decreasing UV over the storm period but increased T1/2errors for storms with increasing UV. Model accuracy was found to be improved by separating storms by type (coronal mass ejection or co-rotating interaction region). The model parameter fits established will be useful for improving satellite drag forecasts.

  7. Penetration Electric Fields and Inner Magnetosphere Dynamics: A Model and Data Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nelson C.

    1998-01-01

    Significant progress has been made on the analysis of the June, 1991 storm. We have completed the analysis of the CRRES and DMSP data sets. We have been able to follow the evolution during the storm of the inner edge of the electric field patterns in the dusk sector and its relation to electron boundaries, ion boundaries and the ring current. Whereas the CRRES data provide radial cuts out through the plasmasphere every I 0 hours, DMSP provides snapshots every orbit of the potential and particle boundaries. Electric field and energetic particle measurements from CRRES and ion drifts and energetic particle measurements from DMSP provide the principal data sets. The combined data set provides high resolution definition of the boundary motions over the phases of the storm. L shell differences between the DMSP and CRRES particle boundaries are easily explained by inflation of the dusk sector by the ring current. The electric field boundaries are typically associated with the ion boundary and the inner edge of the ring current except during rapid increases in the cross-polar cap potential. A significant fraction of the dusk cell potential is found inside the plasmasheet electron inner edge. Twice during the storm this potential exceeded 60 kV. A paper (copy attached) has been prepared (Burke et al., 1998) and submitted to JGR. An invited paper will be presented by Burke at the spring AGU meeting. An abstract has also been submitted to the COSPAR meeting for presentation by Maynard. New simulations have been carried out with the Rice Convection Model for the magnetic storm of June 4-5, 1991, and comparisons have been made with CRRES and DMSP data.

  8. The influence of the self-consistent mode structure on the Coriolis pinch effect

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, A. G.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.; Hornsby, W. A.; Snodin, A. P.; Angioni, C.; Strintzi, D.

    2009-06-15

    This paper discusses the effect of the mode structure on the Coriolis pinch effect [A. G. Peeters, C. Angioni, and D. Strintzi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. It is shown that the Coriolis drift effect can be compensated for by a finite parallel wave vector, resulting in a reduced momentum pinch velocity. Gyrokinetic simulations in full toroidal geometry reveal that parallel dynamics effectively removes the Coriolis pinch for the case of adiabatic electrons, while the compensation due to the parallel dynamics is incomplete for the case of kinetic electrons, resulting in a finite pinch velocity. The finite flux in the case of kinetic electrons is interpreted to be related to the electron trapping, which prevents a strong asymmetry in the electrostatic potential with respect to the low field side position. The physics picture developed here leads to the discovery and explanation of two unexpected effects: First the pinch velocity scales with the trapped particle fraction (root of the inverse aspect ratio), and second there is no strong collisionality dependence. The latter is related to the role of the trapped electrons, which retain some symmetry in the eigenmode, but play no role in the perturbed parallel velocity.

  9. Influence of the centrifugal force and parallel dynamics on the toroidal momentum transport due to small scale turbulence in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, A. G.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.; Hornsby, W. A.; Snodin, A. P.; Strintzi, D.; Angioni, C.

    2009-04-15

    The paper derives the gyro-kinetic equation in the comoving frame of a toroidally rotating plasma, including both the Coriolis drift effect [A. G. Peeters et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)] as well as the centrifugal force. The relation with the laboratory frame is discussed. A low field side gyro-fluid model is derived from the gyro-kinetic equation and applied to the description of parallel momentum transport. The model includes the effects of the Coriolis and centrifugal force as well as the parallel dynamics. The latter physics effect allows for a consistent description of both the Coriolis drift effect as well as the ExB shear effect [R. R. Dominguez and G. M. Staebler, Phys. Fluids B 5, 3876 (1993)] on the momentum transport. Strong plasma rotation as well as parallel dynamics reduce the Coriolis (inward) pinch of momentum and can lead to a sign reversal generating an outward pinch velocity. Also, the ExB shear effect is, in a similar manner, reduced by the parallel dynamics and stronger rotation.

  10. Gyrokinetic theory and simulation of angular momentum transport

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Candy, J.; Hinton, F. L.

    2007-12-15

    A gyrokinetic theory of turbulent toroidal angular momentum transport as well as modifications to neoclassical poloidal rotation from turbulence is formulated starting from the fundamental six-dimensional kinetic equation. The gyro-Bohm scaled transport is evaluated from toroidal delta-f gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [Candy and Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The simulations recover two pinch mechanisms in the radial transport of toroidal angular momentum: The slab geometry ExB shear pinch [Dominguez and Staebler, Phys. Fluids B 5, 387 (1993)] and the toroidal geometry 'Coriolis' pinch [Peeters, Angioni, and Strintzi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. The pinches allow the steady state null stress (or angular momentum transport flow) condition required to understand intrinsic (or spontaneous) toroidal rotation in heated tokamak without an internal source of torque [Staebler, Kinsey, and Waltz, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 46, 221 (2001)]. A predicted turbulent shift in the neoclassical poloidal rotation [Staebler, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1064 (2004)] appears to be small at the finite relative gyroradius (rho-star) of current experiments.

  11. Frequency bands of strongly nonlinear homogeneous granular systems.

    PubMed

    Lydon, Joseph; Jayaprakash, K R; Ngo, Duc; Starosvetsky, Yuli; Vakakis, Alexander F; Daraio, Chiara

    2013-07-01

    Recent numerical studies on an infinite number of identical spherical beads in Hertzian contact showed the presence of frequency bands [Jayaprakash, Starosvetsky, Vakakis, Peeters, and Kerschen, Nonlinear Dyn. 63, 359 (2011)]. These bands, denoted here as propagation and attenuation bands (PBs and ABs), are typically present in linear or weakly nonlinear periodic media; however, their counterparts are not intuitive in essentially nonlinear periodic media where there is a complete lack of classical linear acoustics, i.e., in "sonic vacua." Here, we study the effects of PBs and ABs on the forced dynamics of ordered, uncompressed granular systems. Through numerical and experimental techniques, we find that the dynamics of these systems depends critically on the frequency and amplitude of the applied harmonic excitation. For fixed forcing amplitude, at lower frequencies, the oscillations are large in amplitude and governed by strongly nonlinear and nonsmooth dynamics, indicating PB behavior. At higher frequencies the dynamics is weakly nonlinear and smooth, in the form of compressed low-amplitude oscillations, indicating AB behavior. At the boundary between the PB and the AB large-amplitude oscillations due to resonance occur, giving rise to collisions between beads and chaotic dynamics; this renders the forced dynamics sensitive to initial and forcing conditions, and hence unpredictable. Finally, we study asymptotically the near field standing wave dynamics occurring for high frequencies, well inside the AB. PMID:23944453

  12. Purification of rat liver particulate neutral ribonuclease and comparison of properties with pancreas and serum ribonucleases.

    PubMed Central

    Bartholeyns, J; Baudhuin, P

    1977-01-01

    Rat liver particulate neutral ribonuclease (EC 3.1.4.22) was extensively purified (up to 40000-fold). It is shown to be an endonuclease, specific for pyrimidine bases, hydrolysing 5'-phosphate ester bonds. The enzyme specificity, Km, pH optimum, stability in acid medium and thermal stability at high temperature are the same as those of rat pancreatic and serum ribonucleases. Like pancreatic and serum neutral ribonucleases, the hepatic enzyme is sensitive to the liver natural inhibitor. This inhibitor was purified 8000-fold; its association with ribonuclease follows zero-order kinetics. These identical properties for ribonuclease of rat liver, pancreas and serum support the hypothesis [Bartholeyns, Peeters-Joris & Baudhuin (1975) Eur. J. Biochem. 60, 385-393] of an extrahepatic origin for the liver enzyme, the plasma ribonuclease of pancreatic origin being taken up by endocytosis in the liver. Neutral ribonuclease activity was detected in all rat organs investigated; its distribution among tissues is different from the distribution of the natural ribonuclear inhibitor. PMID:19011

  13. Diphthongs in the repopulated vowel space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogacka, Anna

    2005-04-01

    The study examined 8 British English diphthongs produced by Polish learners of English, testing the diphthongs' quality, duration, nasalization, and occurrence of glottal stops before the diphthongs. There were twelve conditions in which the diphthongs were tested: word-initial, word-final, before a voiced obstruent, before a voiceless obstruent, before a nasal consonant, and before a nasal consonant followed by a fricative, and each of these conditions was tested in a stressed and unstressed position. The diphthongs were tested in real words, embedded in sentences, controlled for the stress position, rhythmic units, and length. The sentences were read by 8 female and 8 male Polish learners of English and control subjects. The aim of the phonetic analysis done with Praat, and employing the methodologies used by Flege (1995) for SLA and Peeters (1991) and Jacewicz, Fujimara, and Fox (2003) for diphthongs, is to examine the shape of the restructured vowel space (Liljencrants and Lindblom 1972; Stevens 1989). The approach taken here is termed Vowel Space Repopulation to emphasize that the vowel space of Polish speakers of English is re-structured by new categories in complex ways which are not adequately captured by traditional notions such as ``transfer,'' ``interference,'' or ``interlanguage.''

  14. Multiscale Informatics for Low-Temperature Propane Oxidation: Further Complexities in Studies of Complex Reactions.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael P; Goldsmith, C Franklin; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Welz, Oliver; Huang, Haifeng; Antonov, Ivan O; Savee, John D; Osborn, David L; Zádor, Judit; Taatjes, Craig A; Sheps, Leonid

    2015-07-16

    The present paper describes further development of the multiscale informatics approach to kinetic model formulation of Burke et al. (Burke, M. P.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B. Proc. Combust. Inst. 2013, 34, 547-555) that directly incorporates elementary kinetic theories as a means to provide reliable, physics-based extrapolation of kinetic models to unexplored conditions. Here, we extend and generalize the multiscale informatics strategy to treat systems of considerable complexity-involving multiwell reactions, potentially missing reactions, nonstatistical product branching ratios, and non-Boltzmann (i.e., nonthermal) reactant distributions. The methodology is demonstrated here for a subsystem of low-temperature propane oxidation, as a representative system for low-temperature fuel oxidation. A multiscale model is assembled and informed by a wide variety of targets that include ab initio calculations of molecular properties, rate constant measurements of isolated reactions, and complex systems measurements. Active model parameters are chosen to accommodate both "parametric" and "structural" uncertainties. Theoretical parameters (e.g., barrier heights) are included as active model parameters to account for parametric uncertainties in the theoretical treatment; experimental parameters (e.g., initial temperatures) are included to account for parametric uncertainties in the physical models of the experiments. RMG software is used to assess potential structural uncertainties due to missing reactions. Additionally, branching ratios among product channels are included as active model parameters to account for structural uncertainties related to difficulties in modeling sequences of multiple chemically activated steps. The approach is demonstrated here for interpreting time-resolved measurements of OH, HO2, n-propyl, i-propyl, propene, oxetane, and methyloxirane from photolysis-initiated low-temperature oxidation of propane at pressures from 4 to 60 Torr and

  15. Antimalarial evaluation of copper(II) nanohybrid solids: inhibition of plasmepsin II, a hemoglobin-degrading malarial aspartic protease from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Subash Chandra; Tiwari, Hemandra Kumar; Singla, Manisha; Rathi, Brijesh; Sharma, Arun; Mahiya, Kuldeep; Kumar, Mukesh; Sinha, Saket; Chauhan, Shyam Singh

    2010-03-01

    A new class of copper(II) nanohybrid solids, LCu(CH(3)COO)(2) and LCuCl(2), have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and IR spectroscopy, and have been found to be capped by a bis(benzimidazole) diamide ligand (L). The particle sizes of these nanohybrid solids were found to be in the ranges 5-10 and 60-70 nm, respectively. These nanohybrid solids were evaluated for their in vitro antimalarial activity against a chloroquine-sensitive isolate of Plasmodium falciparum (MRC 2). The interactions between these nanohybrid solids and plasmepsin II (an aspartic protease and a plausible novel target for antimalarial drug development), which is believed to be essential for hemoglobin degradation by the parasite, have been assayed by UV-vis spectroscopy and inhibition kinetics using Lineweaver-Burk plots. Our results suggest that these two compounds have antimalarial activities, and the IC(50) values (0.025-0.032 microg/ml) are similar to the IC(50) value of the standard drug chloroquine used in the bioassay. Lineweaver-Burk plots for inhibition of plasmepsin II by LCu(CH(3)COO)(2) and LCuCl(2) show that the inhibition is competitive with respect to the substrate. The inhibition constants of LCu(CH(3)COO)(2) and LCuCl(2) were found to be 10 and 13 microM, respectively. The IC(50) values for inhibition of plasmepsin II by LCu(CH(3)COO)(2) and LCuCl(2) were found to be 14 and 17 microM, respectively. Copper(II) metal capped by a benzimidazole group, which resembles the histidine group of copper proteins (galactose oxidase, beta-hydroxylase), could provide a suitable anchoring site on the nanosurface and thus could be useful for inhibition of target enzymes via binding to the S1/S3 pocket of the enzyme hydrophobically. Both copper(II) nanohybrid solids were found to be nontoxic against human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and were highly selective for plasmepsin II versus human cathepsin D. The pivotal mechanism of

  16. Studies on salinization in Haryana soils on free-living nitrogen-fixing bacterial populations and their activity.

    PubMed

    Kayasth, Monika; Gera, Rajesh; Dudeja, Surjit Singh; Sharma, Parveen Kumar; Kumar, Varun

    2014-03-01

    A total of 26 soil samples from saline soils of Haryana were collected. Based on their electrical conductivity (EC) values, which varied from 1.04 to 21.00 dS m(-1), the soils were categorized into non-saline soils (EC 0-2 dS m(-1)), weakly saline soils (EC 2-4 dS m(-1)), saline soils (EC 4-8 dS m(-1)), strongly saline soils (EC 8-16 dS m(-1)), and very strongly saline soils (EC >16 dS m(-1)). The pH values of these soil samples ranged from 6.03 to 8.62, while organic C, total N, and available P were in the range of 0.06-0.94%, 0.07-0.15%, and 0.11-0.29 μg g(-1) soil, respectively. As a measure of the impact of salinity on free-living N(2) fixers and their activity, the total bacterial populations on four media (Jensen's nitrogen-free medium, malate medium, Burk's medium, and soil extract agar medium) decreased from 6.12 to 3.70 log CFU g(-1) soil with increasing salinity level. PCR amplification of the nifH region of the DNA from 234 selected morphotypes from all the media showed the presence of nifH in 71 isolates. Out of these, 37% of the isolates were obtained using Jensen's medium; 35, 28, and 21% of the isolates were obtained using soil extract medium, Burk's medium, and malate medium, respectively. The majority of the free-living N(2) fixers (67%) were Gram negative. Apart from the acetylene reduction assay (ARA) activity in these isolates, other beneficial traits like ammonia excretion and indole acetic acid (IAA) production were also present. A decreasing trend in the activities was observed with increasing salinity levels. Isolates JN6, BP8, and MJ4 showed the highest ARA activity, ammonia excretion, and IAA production. The performance of isolates like BNC2 with good ARA activity, ammonia excretion, and IAA production and isolated from a very strongly saline soil should be further evaluated under high-saline conditions. PMID:23553356

  17. Kinetics of Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase Using Curcumin and Ellagic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Dharmendra Kumar; Juvekar, Archana Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcumin and ellagic are the natural polyphenols having a wide range of pharmacological actions. They have been reported to have their use in various neurological disorders. Objective: This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of curcumin and ellagic acid on the activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO), the enzyme responsible for metabolism of monoamine neurotransmitters which are pivotal for neuronal development and function. Materials and Methods: The in vitro effects of these selected polyphenols on MAO activities in mitochondria isolated from rat brains were examined. Brain mitochondria were assayed for MAO type-B (MAO-B) using benzylamine as substrates. Rat brain mitochondrial MAO preparation was used to study the kinetics of enzyme inhibition using double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plot. Results: MAO activity was inhibited by curcumin and ellagic acid; however, higher half maximal inhibitory concentrations of curcumin (500.46 nM) and ellagic acid (412.24 nM) were required compared to the known MAO-B inhibitor selegiline. It is observed that the curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the MAO activity with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Conclusions: Curcumin and ellagic acid can be considered a possible source of MAO inhibitor used in the treatment of Parkinson's and other neurological disorders. SUMMARY Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is involved in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD)Curcumin and ellagic acid inhibit the monoamine oxidase activityEllagic acid revealed more potent MAO type-B (MAO-B) inhibitory activity than curcuminKinetic studies of MAO inhibition using different concentrations of curcumin and ellagic acid were plotted as double reciprocal Lineweaver–Burk plotThe mode of inhibition of both compounds toward MAO-B is mixed (competitive and uncompetitive) type of inhibition with both the competitive and noncompetitive type of inhibitions. Abbreviations used: MAO: Monoamine oxidase

  18. Studies on salinization in Haryana soils on free-living nitrogen-fixing bacterial populations and their activity.

    PubMed

    Kayasth, Monika; Gera, Rajesh; Dudeja, Surjit Singh; Sharma, Parveen Kumar; Kumar, Varun

    2014-03-01

    A total of 26 soil samples from saline soils of Haryana were collected. Based on their electrical conductivity (EC) values, which varied from 1.04 to 21.00 dS m(-1), the soils were categorized into non-saline soils (EC 0-2 dS m(-1)), weakly saline soils (EC 2-4 dS m(-1)), saline soils (EC 4-8 dS m(-1)), strongly saline soils (EC 8-16 dS m(-1)), and very strongly saline soils (EC >16 dS m(-1)). The pH values of these soil samples ranged from 6.03 to 8.62, while organic C, total N, and available P were in the range of 0.06-0.94%, 0.07-0.15%, and 0.11-0.29 μg g(-1) soil, respectively. As a measure of the impact of salinity on free-living N(2) fixers and their activity, the total bacterial populations on four media (Jensen's nitrogen-free medium, malate medium, Burk's medium, and soil extract agar medium) decreased from 6.12 to 3.70 log CFU g(-1) soil with increasing salinity level. PCR amplification of the nifH region of the DNA from 234 selected morphotypes from all the media showed the presence of nifH in 71 isolates. Out of these, 37% of the isolates were obtained using Jensen's medium; 35, 28, and 21% of the isolates were obtained using soil extract medium, Burk's medium, and malate medium, respectively. The majority of the free-living N(2) fixers (67%) were Gram negative. Apart from the acetylene reduction assay (ARA) activity in these isolates, other beneficial traits like ammonia excretion and indole acetic acid (IAA) production were also present. A decreasing trend in the activities was observed with increasing salinity levels. Isolates JN6, BP8, and MJ4 showed the highest ARA activity, ammonia excretion, and IAA production. The performance of isolates like BNC2 with good ARA activity, ammonia excretion, and IAA production and isolated from a very strongly saline soil should be further evaluated under high-saline conditions.

  19. Visible Dayglows of the CO2 Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Kalogerakis, K.; Romanescu, C.; Lee, L. C.; Ahmed, M.; Wilson, K. R.

    2009-12-01

    Spacecraft instrumentation typically favors the UV and IR portions of the optical spectrum over the visible. As a result, there are questions that have not been answered about excited state production in various environments, including the atmospheres of the CO2 planets. For example, there are almost no oxygen green and red line measurements of Mars and Venus, and in particular, the possibility of CO emission in the Martian dayglow has not been investigated. The same holds for Venus, but dayglow Venus measurements are very difficult because of solar scattering from the clouds. CO2 photodissociation below 108 nm leads to production of the CO(a-X) Cameron bands, a well-known feature of the Mars dayglow, seen by the Mariner spacecraft [Barth et al., 1971] and by SPICAM on Mars Express [Simon et al., 2009]. However, there are three nearby CO triplet states that lie somewhat higher than the CO(a) state, the upper level of the Cameron bands, and these have fully allowed visible and IR transitions that can populate CO(a). Thus, the observed Cameron bands are the sum of the emission from the direct photodissociation process and the cascading emission [Judge and Lee, 1973]. In order to evaluate the relative contributions of each, we have performed laboratory experiments on CO2 photodissociation in the appropriate spectral region, utilizing synchrotron radiation from the Berkeley Advanced Light Source (ALS) in the 11-14 eV range. We measured the Cameron band emission at 180 260 nm, and the visible/IR emission from the triplet transitions. We could only make measurements down to 850 nm in the IR, but fortunately were able to avail ourselves of other data [Burke et al., 1996] to extend the useful range to 1.4 microns. This is very important, because the strongest bands lie in the IR. Spectra of the UV dayglow of Mars were first obtained by the Mariner probes, and it was determined [Conway, 1981] that the Cameron bands have an extremely high rotational temperature, several

  20. Laboratory Experiments Related to the Dayglows of the CO2 Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, Tom G.; Kalogerakis, K. S.; Romanescu, C.; Lee, L. C.; Ahmed, M.; Wilson, K. R.

    2008-09-01

    Spectra of the UV dayglow of Mars were first obtained by the Mariner probes in the 1960's, and only with ESA's Mars Express mission has this topic been revisited. The UV dayglow at 190-300 nm is composed of the CO(a-X) Cameron bands, the CO2+(B-X) 0-0 band, and the 297.2 nm O(1S-3P) line. Due to strong solar scattering from the cloud deck, analogous observations from Venus Express have not yet been successful, although the same emissions are expected, with higher intensity. From the Mariner spectra, it was determined [Conway, 1981] that the Cameron bands have an extremely high rotational temperature] - several thousand K - and our analysis of the Mars Express spectra leads to the same conclusion. In the visible spectral region, there are no dayglow observations of any kind, but laboratory experiments on EUV photodissociation of CO2 can be used to deduce what will be seen when spectra become available, at least in relation to that fraction of the emissions originating with photoabsorption. The principal visible dayglow emission will be composed of the 7-8.5 eV CO(d-a, a'-a) band systems. Laboratory experiments dating back more than three decades [Judge and Lee, 1973] show that these visible cascading CO systems represent a substantial fractional source of the total Cameron band intensity. The emissions extend into the IR, with intensity peaking at the CO(a'-a) 2-0 Asundi band at 1.08 microns. The results of experiments on the 12-14 eV photodissociation of CO2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) will be presented, as will relevant experiments in flow discharges [Burke et al., 1996]. This research was supported by the NASA Outer Planets program. Burke, M.L. et al. J. Phys. Chem. 100, 138, 1996. Conway, R.R., J. Geophys. Res. 86, 4767, 1981. Judge, D.L. and L.C. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 58, 104, 1973.

  1. Dystonia in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation: outcome of bilateral pallidal stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pauls, K. A. M.; Wieland, K.; Jech, R.; Kurlemann, G.; Sharma, N.; Gill, S. S.; Haenggeli, C. A.; Hayflick, S. J.; Hogarth, P.; Leenders, K. L.; Limousin, P.; Malanga, C. J.; Moro, E.; Ostrem, J. L.; Revilla, F. J.; Santens, P.; Schnitzler, A.; Tisch, S.; Valldeoriola, F.; Vesper, J.; Volkmann, J.; Woitalla,, D.; Peker, S.

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation encompasses a heterogeneous group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by iron accumulation in the brain. Severe generalized dystonia is frequently a prominent symptom and can be very disabling, causing gait impairment, difficulty with speech and swallowing, pain and respiratory distress. Several case reports and one case series have been published concerning therapeutic outcome of pallidal deep brain stimulation in dystonia caused by neurodegeneration with brain iron degeneration, reporting mostly favourable outcomes. However, with case studies, there may be a reporting bias towards favourable outcome. Thus, we undertook this multi-centre retrospective study to gather worldwide experiences with bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. A total of 16 centres contributed 23 patients with confirmed neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation and bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation. Patient details including gender, age at onset, age at operation, genetic status, magnetic resonance imaging status, history and clinical findings were requested. Data on severity of dystonia (Burke Fahn Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale—Motor Scale, Barry Albright Dystonia Scale), disability (Burke Fahn Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale—Disability Scale), quality of life (subjective global rating from 1 to 10 obtained retrospectively from patient and caregiver) as well as data on supportive therapy, concurrent pharmacotherapy, stimulation settings, adverse events and side effects were collected. Data were collected once preoperatively and at 2–6 and 9–15 months postoperatively. The primary outcome measure was change in severity of dystonia. The mean improvement in severity of dystonia was 28.5% at 2–6 months and 25.7% at 9–15 months. At 9–15 months postoperatively, 66.7% of patients showed an improvement of 20% or more in severity of dystonia

  2. Eruption Sites of LIPs of the Past 250 My With Respect to the slow/fast D" Boundary in Four Improved Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsvik, T. H.; Smethurst, M. A.; Burke, K.; Steinberger, B.

    2005-05-01

    We have shown (Burke and Torsvik 2004) that nearly all of the Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) erupted on the Earth's surface during the past 250 My rose, at the time of their eruption, from the base of the mantle close to the 1 percent slow S-wave delta V contour of the D" zone. Here we report on the use of (1) Improved plate-circuitry (among PAC-ANT-AUS-MADAGAS-IND-SOAM-AFR) and (2) upgraded paleomagnetic data-sets to confirm and refine our results. In an attempt to establish whether rotation of LIPs to their sites at eruption can be used to learn something about mantle and core behavior over the past 250 My we have performed rotations on assumptions of: (1) a persistent geocentric axial magnetic dipole field, (2) a time-dependent non-dipole (octopole) magnetic field contribution (Torsvik and Van der Voo (2002), (3) a mantle wind contribution to mantle flow (Steinberger et al. 2004) and (4) a revised (new timescale) fixed hot-spot (no mantle wind) reference frame. Our test consisted of estimating how closely radials dropped from rotated LIP sets based on these four assumptions plotted to the 1 percent slow contour derived from seismic tomography. We compared S-wave tomographic models at the CMB and opted to use the SMEAN model (Becker and Boschi 2002) recognizing that other models are similar and that all have similar limitations. The mean deviation of the projected rotated LIPs from the 1 percent slow contour is 6 degrees at the CMB. The four different assumptions yield results between 6.5 and 5.5 degrees which seems unlikely to be a significant difference. Our conclusion is that it is not yet possible to discriminate among the four models of mantle and core behavior using our procedure. Becker, T.W and Boschi, L. 2002: A comparison of tomographic and geodynamic mantle models. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 3, 2001GC000168. Burke, K. and Torsvik, T.H. 2004: Derivation of large igneous provinces of the past 200 million years from long-term heterogeneities in

  3. Appendix: Limits on the use of heterodyning and amplification in optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Bernard F.

    1992-11-01

    The development of optical fibers, lasers, and mixers at optical frequencies has offered the hope that active methods can contribute to optical interferometry. Heterodyning, in particular, looks attractive, even though bandwidths are narrower than one would like at present; one might expect this limitation to lessen as technology develops. That expectation, unfortunately, is not likely to benefit interferometry at optical wavelengths because of the intervention of quantum mechanics and the second law of thermodynamics, as Burke (1985a) pointed out. So much 'second quantization' noise is generated that only at infrared frequencies, somewhere in the 10-100 micron range, can one look forward to heterodyning in any realistic sense. The reason is easily understood. Every amplifier, in the quantum limit, works by stimulated emission, even though this basic truth is not obvious at radio frequencies. This means that there must be spontaneous emission occurring within every amplifier, and Strandberg (1957) showed that this implied a limiting noise temperature, TN = h nu/k, for any amplifier. Burke (1969) used this result to demonstrate that, if it were not for this quantum noise, the VLBI method would allow one to tell which slit a photon went through before forming an interference pattern, thus violating basic tenants of quantum mechanics. In essence, the second quantization condition Delta N Delta phi greater than or = 1 saves one from paradox. One can state the conclusion simply: any amplifier produces approximately one photon per Hertz of bandwidth. In optical interferometry, one will certainly want bandwidth in the 1012 to 1014 Hz range, and that implies an intolerable cacophony of noise photons. Only at infrared frequencies can one tolerate the quantum noise, where the natural noise background may be high and the mixers are not as efficient as one would hope for. The crossover at present is about 10 or 20 microns, but the boundary will shift to longer wavelengths as

  4. Time-asymmetric structure of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Luc

    1993-05-01

    Gravitational radiation reaction effects in the dynamics of an isolated system arise from the use of retarded potentials for the radiation field, satisfying time-asymmetric boundary conditions imposed at past-null infinity. Part one of this paper investigates the ``antisymmetric'' component, a solution of the wave equation of the type retarded minus advanced, of the linearized gravitational field generated by an isolated system in the exterior region of the system. At linearized order such a component is well defined and is ``time odd'' in the usual post-Newtonian (PN) sense. We introduce a new linearized coordinate system which generalizes the Burke and Thorne coordinate system both in its space-time domain of validity, which is no longer limited to the near zone of the source, and in the post-Newtonian smallness of the linear antisymmetric (``time-odd'') component of the metric, for all multipolarities of antisymmetric waves. These waves (as viewed in the near zone) define a generalized radiation reaction four-tensor potential Vαβreact of the linear theory. At the 2.5 post-Newtonian approximation, the tensor potential reduces to the standard Burke-Thorne scalar potential of the lowest-order local radiation reaction force. At the 3.5 PN approximation, the potential involves scalar (V00react) and vector (V0ireact) components which are associated with subdominant radiation reaction effects such as the recoil effect. At the higher-order PN approximations, the potential is intrinsically tensorial. A nonlinear exterior metric is iteratively constructed from the new linearized metric by the method of a previous work. Part two of this paper is devoted to the near-zone reexpansion of the nonlinear iterations of the exterior metric. We use a very convenient decomposition of the integral of the retarded potentials into a particular solution involving only ``instantaneous'' potentials, and a homogeneous solution of the antisymmetric type. The former particular solution is

  5. Independent Confirmation and Refined Parameters of the Hot Jupiter XO-5b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál, A.; Bakos, G. Á.; Fernandez, J.; Sipőcz, B.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, Géza; Noyes, R. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Butler, R. P.; Sasselov, D. D.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Shporer, A.; Mazeh, T.; Stefanik, R. P.; Isaacson, H.

    2009-07-01

    We present HATNet observations of XO-5b, confirming its planetary nature based on evidence beyond that described in the announcement of Burke et al., namely, the lack of significant correlation between spectral bisector variations and orbital phase. In addition, using extensive spectroscopic measurements spanning multiple seasons, we investigate the relatively large scatter in the spectral line bisectors. We also examine possible blended stellar configurations (hierarchical triples, chance alignments) that can mimic the planet signals, and we are able to show that none are consistent with the sum of all the data. The analysis of the S activity index shows no significant stellar activity. Our results for the planet parameters are consistent with values in Burke et al., and we refine both the stellar and the planetary parameters using our data. XO-5b orbits a slightly evolved, late G type star with mass M sstarf = 0.88 ± 0.03 M sun, radius R sstarf = 1.08 ± 0.04 R sun, and metallicity close to solar. The planetary mass and radius are 1.059 ± 0.028 M J and 1.109 ± 0.050 R J, respectively, corresponding to a mean density of 0.96_{-0.11}^{+0.14} g cm^{-3}. The ephemeris for the orbit is P = 4.187757 ± 0.000011 days, E = 2454552.67168 ± 0.00029 (BJD) with transit duration of 0.1307 ± 0.0013 days. By measuring four individual transit centers, we found no signs for transit timing variations. The planet XO-5b is notable for its anomalously high Safronov number and has a high surface gravity when compared to other transiting exoplanets with similar period. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NOAO and NASA (programs N162Hr, N128Hr, and A264Hr).

  6. BSR: B-spline atomic R-matrix codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg

    2006-02-01

    BSR is a general program to calculate atomic continuum processes using the B-spline R-matrix method, including electron-atom and electron-ion scattering, and radiative processes such as bound-bound transitions, photoionization and polarizabilities. The calculations can be performed in LS-coupling or in an intermediate-coupling scheme by including terms of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. New version program summaryTitle of program: BSR Catalogue identifier: ADWY Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWY Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computers on which the program has been tested: Microway Beowulf cluster; Compaq Beowulf cluster; DEC Alpha workstation; DELL PC Operating systems under which the new version has been tested: UNIX, Windows XP Programming language used: FORTRAN 95 Memory required to execute with typical data: Typically 256-512 Mwords. Since all the principal dimensions are allocatable, the available memory defines the maximum complexity of the problem No. of bits in a word: 8 No. of processors used: 1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: no No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 69 943 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 746 450 Peripherals used: scratch disk store; permanent disk store Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: This program uses the R-matrix method to calculate electron-atom and electron-ion collision processes, with options to calculate radiative data, photoionization, etc. The calculations can be performed in LS-coupling or in an intermediate-coupling scheme, with options to include Breit-Pauli terms in the Hamiltonian. Method of solution: The R-matrix method is used [P.G. Burke, K.A. Berrington, Atomic and Molecular Processes: An R-Matrix Approach, IOP Publishing, Bristol, 1993; P.G. Burke, W.D. Robb, Adv. At. Mol. Phys. 11 (1975) 143; K.A. Berrington, W.B. Eissner, P.H. Norrington, Comput

  7. PREFACE: 21st Latin American Symposium on Solid State Physics (SLAFES XXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, J. Albino

    2014-04-01

    Colombia e-mail: dalandinezt@unal.edu.co Professor Laura T Corredor Bohórquez Departamento de Física Universidade Federal de Pernambuco 50670-901 Recife PE Brazil e-mail: ltcorredorb@df.ufpe.br Professor Arkady Shanenko Departamento de Física Universidade Federal de Pernambuco 50670-901 Recife PE Brazil e-mail: arkadyshanenko@df.ufpe.br Professor Renato F Jardim Instituto de Física Universidade de S\\~ao Paulo CP 66318 S\\~ao Paulo SP Brazil e-mail: rjardim@if.usp.br Professor Francois Peeters Department Fysica Universiteit Antwerpen Groneneborgerlann 171 B-2020, Antwerpen Belgium e-mail: francois.peeters@uantwerpen.be Organizing committee ChairmanCarlos Arturo Parra Vargas Proceedings EditorJosé Albino Aguiar Program ChairJairo Roa-Rojas SecretaryAura Janeth Barón González TreasurerArmando Sarmiento Santos Speaker ChairRafael González Hernández Fernando Naranjo Mayorga David A Landínez Téllez Jesús Oswaldo Morán José Sierra Ortega

  8. Decadal- to biennial scale variability of planktic foraminifera in the northeastern Arabian Sea during the last two millennia: evidence for winter monsoon forcing mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munz, Philipp; Lückge, Andreas; Siccha, Michael; Kucera, Michal; Schulz, Hartmut

    2015-04-01

    The Asian monsoon system is controlling the hydrologic cycle, and thus the agricultural and economic prosperity of the worlds most densely populated region. Strong and moisture-laden winds from the southwest induce upwelling and significant productivity in the western Arabian Sea during boreal summer. During boreal winter, weaker dry and cold surface winds from the northeast nourish ocean productivity mainly in the northeastern Arabian Sea. Instrumental records spanning the last century are too short to understand how the monsoon system reacts to external forcing mechanisms and to accurately determine its natural variability. Compared to the summer monsoon component, the dynamics of the winter monsoon are virtually unknown, due to the lack of adequate archives that are affected only by winter conditions. Here we present a decadal- to biennial-scale resolution record of past winter monsoon variability over the last two millennia, based on census counts of planktic foraminifera from two laminated sediment cores collected offshore Pakistan. One shorter box core (SO90-39KG) spans the last 250 years with an average ~2-year resolution, whereas the longer piston core (SO130-275KL) spans the last 2,100 years with a 10-year resolution. We use Globigerina falconensis as a faunal indicator for winter conditions, a species that is most abundant during winter in the NE Arabian Sea (Peeters and Brummer, 2002; Schulz et al., 2002). Our results show that during the past 2,100 years G. falconensis varied with significant periodicities centered on ˜ 60, ˜ 53, ˜ 40, ˜ 34 and ˜ 29 years per cycle. Some of these periods closely match cycles that are known from proxy records of solar irradiance, suggesting a solar forcing on winter monsoon variability. During the past 250 years G. falconensis varied in correlation with the (11-year) Schwabe and the (22-year) Hale solar cycles. Furthermore, a significant ˜ 7 year cyclicity could indicate a teleconnection to the El Niño Southern

  9. The sensitivity of laser induced fluorescence instruments at low pressure to RO2 radicals and the use of this detection method to determine the yield of HO2 during OH-initiated isoprene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, D. E.; Whalley, L. K.; Blitz, M. A.; Seakins, P. W.

    2011-12-01

    a dry air flow at variable positions along the flow-tube; Isoprene was added downstream of the lamp. Theoretical studies (Peeters et al., 2009) suggest an HO2 yield of 0.7 on a time-scale of a few seconds. Results from the recent laboratory studies will be discussed. Fuchs, H., Bohn, B., Hofzumahaus, A., Holland, F., Lu, K., Nehr, S., Rohrer, F., and Wahner, A.: Detection of HO2 by laser-induced fluorescence: Calibration and interferences from RO2 radicals, Atmos Meas Tech Discuss, 4, 1255-1302, 2011. Heard, D. E., and Pilling, M. J.: Measurement of OH and HO2 in the troposphere, Chem Rev, 103, 5163-5198, 2003. Peeters, J., Nguyen, T. L., and Vereecken, L.: HOx radical regeneration in the oxidation of isoprene, Phys Chem Chem Phys, 11, 5935-5939, 2009.

  10. Hydrophysical and hydrochemical features of Lake Issyk-Kul (Kyrgyzstan) as revealed by field survey of June, 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavialov, Peter; Makkaveev, Petr; Rimskiy-Korsakov, Nikolay; Alymkulov, Salmor; Izhitskiy, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    cycle. However, the vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen indicated that the most intense photosynthetic activity took place in the intermediate layers, while in the surface layer it was suppressed, hypothetically, by excessive insolation. The ionic salt content of the Issyk-Kul waters was essentially uniform throughout the water column, which points towards efficient mixing in the cold period. In summer season, temperature stratification was sufficiently strong to provide for significant reduction of dissolved oxygen and increase of nutrients in the bottom layer. Samples collected and analyzed for dissolved methane generally yielded low concentrations below 0.5 μl/l at the surface and 0.2 μl/l in the bottom layer, however, values as high as to 3.9 μl/l were documented in some samples corresponding to near-shore stations at depths of about 70 m. We also used a towed side-looking sonar to obtain detailed maps of bathymetric features, including the channels formed by ancient beds of the Tyup and the Dzhergalan Rivers. These channels are believed to represent important pathways for ventilated water and terrigenic substances penetrating into the deep central part of the lake following seasonal differential cooling on the eastern shelf (Peeters et al., 2003). Quantitative assessment of this plausible mechanism is subject to future work. References Oberhansli, H., and P. Molnar (2012) Climate evolution in Central Asia during the past few million years: A case study from Issyk-Kul. Scientific Drilling, 13, doi: 10.2204/iodp/sd.13.09.2011 Peeters F, Finger D, Hofer M, Brennwald M, Livingstone DM, Kipfer R (2003) Deep-water renewal in Lake Issyk-Kul driven by differential cooling. Limnol. and Oceanogr. 48: 1419- 1431.

  11. Hydroxyl Radical Regeneration in Isoprene Oxidation: the Upgraded Mechanism LIM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, J.; Nguyen, S.; Nguyen, T.; Stavrakou, T.; Muller, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Measured hydroxyl radical concentrations in isoprene-rich areas are much higher than predicted by existing chemical models, to the extent that the global oxidizing capacity of our atmosphere should be significantly revised upwards. The OH regeneration that clearly occurs in isoprene oxidation at low/moderate NO is attributed in the Leuven Isoprene Mechanism to novel, theoretically characterized chemical pathways (LIM0: Peeters et al. 2009; Peeters and Muller 2010). The key new features of LIM0 are (i) thermal equilibration of the labile beta-OH- and delta-OH-isoprenylperoxy isomers; (ii) 1,6-H shift isomerisation of the Z-delta-OH-peroxy isomers to yield hydroperoxy-methyl-butenals (HPALDs); (iii) fast photolysis of the HPALDs resulting overall in several OH radicals per HPALD. The OH-regeneration through photolabile HPALDs has recently found experimental support, but the peroxy isomerisation rate, HPALD yield and the extent of OH recycling are still uncertain (Crounse et al. 2011; Wolfe et al. 2012). In this work, the upgraded LIM1 mechanism is presented. Based on better levels of theory, the crucial equilibrium ratio of the isomerising Z-delta-OH-peroxys over the majority beta-OH-isoprenylperoxys had to be reduced by a factor of about 5 compared to LIM0, while the isomerisation rate of the Z-delta-OH-peroxys adopted from Taraborrelli et al. (2012) is about 3 times lower than in LIM0. The chemistry following the 1,6-H shift of the Z-delta-OH-peroxys is much expanded and extended. Firstly, LIM1 introduces other pathways beside HPALD formation following the Z-delta-OH-peroxy isomerisation, resulting likewise in OH recycling. This, together with the revised Z-delta-OH- equilibrium and isomerisation data above, affords a close model-reproduction of the HPALD and other product yields observed by Crounse et al. (2011). Secondly, LIM1 proposes new fast reactions of HO2 with the alpha-oxoketene products from the peroxy isomerisation routes; these reactions are shown to

  12. Hydroxyl radical regeneration in isoprene oxidation: upgraded mechanism LIM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Jozef; Son Nguyen, Vinh; Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Stravrakou, Trissevgeni; Muller, Jean-Francois

    2013-04-01

    The OH regeneration known to occur in isoprene oxidation at low/moderate NO is attributed in the Leuven Isoprene Mechanism to novel, theoretically characterized chemical pathways (LIM0: Peeters et al. 2009; Peeters and Muller 2010). Its key new features are (i) quasi-equilibration of the thermally labile beta-OH- and delta-OH-isoprenylperoxy isomers; (ii) 1,6-H shift isomerisation of the Z-delta-OH-peroxy isomers to yield hydroperoxy-methyl-butenals (HPALDs); (iii) fast photolysis of the HPALDs resulting overall in several OH radicals per HPALD. The OH-regeneration through photolabile HPALDs has recently found experimental support, but the peroxy isomerisation rate, HPALD yield and extent of OH recycling are still uncertain (Crounse et al. 2011; Wolfe et al. 2012). In this work, the upgraded LIM1 mechanism is presented. Based on much higher levels of theory that fully account for dispersion effects, the crucial equilibrium ratio of the isomerising Z-delta-OH-peroxys over the majority beta-OH-isoprenylperoxys is reduced by a factor ≈5 and the isomerisation rate of the Z-delta-OH-peroxys by a factor ≈1.5 compared to LIM0. The chemistry following the 1,6-H shift of the Z-delta-OH-peroxys is also much expanded and extended. Firstly, LIM1 introduces other pathways beside HPALD formation following the Z-delta-OH-peroxy isomerisation, but resulting likewise in OH recycling. This, together with the revised Z-delta-OH- equilibrium and isomerisation data above, affords a fair model-reproduction of the HPALD and other product yields observed by Crounse et al. (2011). Secondly, LIM1 proposes new fast reactions of HO2 with the alpha-oxoketene products from the peroxy isomerisation routes; these reactions are shown to efficiently convert HO2 into OH and are prime candidates for the unknown X + HO2 → OH + ... hydroxyl-recycling routes invoked in recent studies (Hofzumahaus et al.2009; Whalley et al. 2011). Modeling results using the IMAGES global CTM will be presented on

  13. Hydroxyl radical recycling in isoprene oxidation driven by hydrogen bonding and hydrogen tunneling: the upgraded LIM1 mechanism.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Jozef; Müller, Jean-François; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Nguyen, Vinh Son

    2014-09-25

    The Leuven isoprene mechanism, proposed earlier to aid in rationalizing the unexpectedly high hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in isoprene-rich, low-nitric-oxide (NO) regions ( Peeters ; et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys . 2009 , 11 , 5935 ), is presented in an upgraded and extended version, LIM1. The kinetics of the crucial reactions in the proposed isoprene-peroxy radical interconversion and isomerization pathways are re-evaluated theoretically, on the basis of energy barriers computed at the much higher CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//QCISD/6-311G(d,p) level of theory, and using multiconformer partition functions obtained at the M06-2X/6-311++G(3df,2p) level that, different from the B3LYP level used in our earlier work, accounts for the crucial London dispersion effects in the H-bonded systems involved. The steady-state fraction of the specific Z-δ-OH-peroxy radical isomers/conformers that can isomerize by a 1,6-H shift is shown to be largely governed by hydrogen-bond strengths, whereas their isomerization itself is found to occur quasi-exclusively by hydrogen atom tunneling. The isomer-specific Z-δ-OH-peroxy 1,6-H-shift rate coefficients are predicted to be of the order of 1 s(-1) at 298 K, but the experimentally accessible bulk rate coefficients, which have to be clearly distinguished from the former, are 2 orders of magnitude lower due to the very low Z-δ-OH-peroxy steady-state fractions that are only around or below 0.01 at low to moderate NO and depend on the peroxy lifetime. Two pathways subsequent to the peroxy radical 1,6-H shift are identified, the earlier predicted route yielding the photolabile hydroperoxy-methylbutenals (HPALDs), and a second, about equally important path, to dihydroperoxy-carbonyl peroxy radicals (di-HPCARP). Taking this into account, our predicted bulk peroxy isomerization rate coefficients are about a factor 1.8 higher than the available experimental results for HPALD production ( Crounse ; et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2011 , 13 , 13607

  14. Pedagogy with babies: perspectives of eight nursery managers

    PubMed Central

    Elfer, Peter; Page, Jools

    2015-01-01

    The last 30 years have seen a significant increase in babies attending nursery, with corresponding questions about the aims and organisation of practice. Research broadly agrees on the importance of emotionally consistent, sensitive and responsive interactions between staff and babies. Policy objectives for nursery and expectations of parents and staff give rise to different and sometimes conflicting aims for such interactions; for example attachments to staff, peer interactions or early learning. Research shows marked variations of pedagogy aims and organisation with babies in nurseries in different national and cultural contexts. It also demonstrates variation between nurseries in similar contexts and between staff in their beliefs and values about work with babies. This paper reports on an exploratory study of the beliefs, aspirations and approaches of eight managers concerning pedagogy with babies in two similar English local authorities. These managers spoke of the importance of being responsive to the concerns and priorities of parents, whilst being sensitive to the demands of the work on their staff. The main finding was of the contradictions and confusions managers felt were inherent in the work, arising from both conflicting policy objectives and personal beliefs and aspirations; sometimes their own and sometimes those of individual staff and parents. Urban, Vandenbroeck, Van Laere, Lazzari, and Peeters' [(2012). Towards competent systems in early childhood education and care. Implications for policy and practice. European Journal of Education, 47(4), 508–526.] concept of the ‘competent system’ is used to recommend a grounded approach to the development of a more culturally, socially and individually responsive pedagogy with babies than appears to exist at present. PMID:26692633

  15. Large effect of irradiance on hydrogen isotope fractionation of alkenones in Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Benthien, Albert; French, Katherine L.; Epping, Eric; Zondervan, Ingrid; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bijma, Jelle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen isotopic (δD) composition of long-chain alkenones produced by certain haptophyte algae has been suggested as a potential proxy for reconstructing paleo sea surface salinity. However, environmental parameters other than salinity may also affect the δD of alkenones. We investigated the impact of the level of irradiance on hydrogen isotopic fractionation of alkenones versus growth water by cultivating two strains of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi at different light intensities. The hydrogen isotope fractionation decreased by approximately 40‰ when irradiance was increased from 15 to 200 μmol photons m-2 s-1 above which it was relatively constant. The response is likely a direct effect of photosystem I and II activity as the relationship of the fractionation factor α versus light intensity can be described by an Eilers-Peeters photosynthesis model. This irradiance effect is in agreement with published δD data of alkenones derived from suspended particulate matter collected from different depths in the photic zone of the Gulf of California and the eastern tropical North Pacific. However, haptophyte algae tend to bloom at relatively high light intensities (>500 μmol photons m-2 s-1) occurring at the sea surface, at which hydrogen isotope fractionation is relatively constant and not affected by changes in light intensity. Alkenones accumulating in the sediment are likely mostly derived from these surface water haptophyte blooms, when the largest amount of biomass is produced. Therefore, the observed irradiance effect is unlikely to affect the applicability of the hydrogen isotopic composition of sedimentary long chain alkenones as a proxy for paleosalinity.

  16. Half-metallic properties of the new Ti2YPb(Y = Co, Fe) Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Moaid K.; Gao, G. Y.; Yao, Kai-Lun

    2015-09-01

    The half-metallic properties of Ti2YPb(Y = Co, Fe) Heusler alloys with a CuHg2Ti-type structure were examined within the frame of the density functional theory and the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerh of generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Analysis of the electronic band structures and density of states for Ti2YPb(Y = Co, Fe) revealed that the spin-up bands are metallic, whereas the spin-down bands exhibit gaps of 0.73 and 0.70 eV, respectively. The magnetic moments calculated for the Ti2YPb(Y = Co, Fe) alloys were found to be equal to 3 μB/f.u. and 2 μB/f.u., values which both follows the Slater-Pauling rule of Mt = Zt - 18. The compounds’ negative enthalpy values should encourage their experimental realization in the future. The bandgap was elucidated to be mainly determined by the bonding and antibonding states created from the hybridizations of the d states between the Ti(1)-Ti(2) coupling and the Y = Co, Fe atom. The half-metallic properties of the Ti2YPb(Y = Co, Fe) compounds were found to be insensitive to lattice distortion, with full spin polarization achievable within a large range of lattice parameter values, making the alloys suitable for use in practical applications.

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics of solvation effects on reactivity at electrified interfaces.

    PubMed

    Herron, Jeffrey A; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2016-08-23

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics as implemented in periodic, self-consistent (generalized gradient approximation Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) density functional theory, we investigated the mechanism of methanol electrooxidation on Pt(111). We investigated the role of water solvation and electrode potential on the energetics of the first proton transfer step, methanol electrooxidation to methoxy (CH3O) or hydroxymethyl (CH2OH). The results show that solvation weakens the adsorption of methoxy to uncharged Pt(111), whereas the binding energies of methanol and hydroxymethyl are not significantly affected. The free energies of activation for breaking the C-H and O-H bonds in methanol were calculated through a Blue Moon Ensemble using constrained ab initio molecular dynamics. Calculated barriers for these elementary steps on unsolvated, uncharged Pt(111) are similar to results for climbing-image nudged elastic band calculations from the literature. Water solvation reduces the barriers for both C-H and O-H bond activation steps with respect to their vapor-phase values, although the effect is more pronounced for C-H bond activation, due to less disruption of the hydrogen bond network. The calculated activation energy barriers show that breaking the C-H bond of methanol is more facile than the O-H bond on solvated negatively biased or uncharged Pt(111). However, with positive bias, O-H bond activation is enhanced, becoming slightly more facile than C-H bond activation. PMID:27503889

  18. Geochemical constraints on the origin of dolomite in the Ordovician Trenton and Black River limestones, Albion-Scipio area, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Granath, V.C. )

    1991-03-01

    The Albion-Scipio and Stoney Point oil fields in south-central Michigan produce from porous, vuggy dolomite in long linear trends associated with faulting in otherwise tight limestones. {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios for undolomitized limestones (0.70796-0.70824) fall within the range for Middle Ordovician seawater given by the Burke curve and indicate they have undergone little alteration since deposition. {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios for the matrix and dolomite cements in the reservoir horizons (0.70834-0.70898) are more radiogenic and overlap the range in composition for Late Silurian seawater. Thus, dolomitization might have resulted from brines dominated by Silurian seawater components. Fluid inclusion geothermometry and oxygen isotope compositions of the dolomite indicate formation under maximum burial conditions. Average freezing temperatures are {minus}29C (n = 72) and {minus}36C (n=19), respectively, indicating fluids are calcium- and magnesium-rich brines. {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 2}H compositions of fluids in fluid inclusions are similar to data for Michigan basin brines and suggest some interaction with heavy oxygen probably from siliciclastics. These data indicate dolomitization in the Albion-Scipio area occurred under burial conditions from hot brines dominated by a Late Silurian seawater component. The brine may have been slightly modified either through mixture with another basinal fluid or interactions with siliciclastics during its circulation in the basin.

  19. Preliminary analysis of projected construction employment effects of building the defense waste processing facility at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Garey, R.B.; Blair, L.M.; Craig, R.L.; Stevenson, W.

    1981-09-01

    This study estimates the probable effects of constructing the DWPF on the surrounding labor markets. Analyses are based on data from the local and regional labor markets, information from experts on local construction activities, information on the labor requirements of the Vogtle Power Plant (two nuclear reactors) being built by Georgia Power Company in Burke County, Georgia, and an econometric model of the construction labor market, based on several surveys of workers building three Tennessee Valley Authority nuclear power plants. The results of this study are reported in three parts. In Part I, completed in May 1980, we describe the 1979 (base year) employment levels within the local and regional labor markets surrounding SRP, from which most DWPF construction workers are likely to be drawn. In Part II, completed in June 1980, we define the four local sources of construction employment that will compete for craftsmen when DWPF is built. Also in Part II, most of the projected impacts of the DWPF reference immobilization alternative (one of several alternatives that may be chosen) are reported. Several construction schedules and labor demand scenarios for the reference alternative are considered. In Part III, completed in January 1981, most of the estimated impacts of the DWPF alternative referred to as the staged process alternative are reported. Several construction schedules and labor demand scenarios for this alternative are considered.

  20. Mechanism of action of T-705 ribosyl triphosphate against influenza virus RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Sangawa, Hidehiro; Komeno, Takashi; Nishikawa, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kazumi; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Furuta, Yousuke

    2013-11-01

    T-705 (favipiravir; 6-fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxamide) selectively and strongly inhibits replication of the influenza virus in vitro and in vivo. T-705 has been shown to be converted to T-705-4-ribofuranosyl-5-triphosphate (T-705RTP) by intracellular enzymes and then functions as a nucleotide analog to selectively inhibit RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of the influenza virus. To elucidate these inhibitory mechanisms, we analyzed the enzyme kinetics of inhibition using Lineweaver-Burk plots of four natural nucleoside triphosphates and conducted polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the primer extension products initiated from (32)P-radiolabeled 5'Cap1 RNA. Enzyme kinetic analysis demonstrated that T-705RTP inhibited the incorporation of ATP and GTP in a competitive manner, which suggests that T-705RTP is recognized as a purine nucleotide by influenza virus RdRp and inhibited the incorporation of UTP and CTP in noncompetitive and mixed-type manners, respectively. Primer extension analysis demonstrated that a single molecule of T-705RTP was incorporated into the nascent RNA strand of the influenza virus and inhibited the subsequent incorporation of nucleotides. These results suggest that a single molecule of T-705RTP is incorporated into the nascent RNA strand as a purine nucleotide analog and inhibits strand extension, even though the natural ribose of T-705RTP has a 3'-OH group, which is essential for forming a covalent bond with the phosphate group.

  1. Two-dimensional boron nitride structures functionalization: first principles studies.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Pérez, R; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2016-09-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (2D hBN) structures functionalization with organic molecules. 2x2, 4x4 and 6x6 periodic 2D hBN layers have been considered to interact with acetylene. To deal with the exchange-correlation energy the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is invoked. The electron-ion interaction is treated with the pseudopotential method. The GGA with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) functionals together with van der Waals interactions are considered to deal with the composed systems. To investigate the functionalization two main configurations have been explored; in one case the molecule interacts with the boron atom and in the other with the nitrogen atom. Results of the adsorption energies indicate chemisorption in both cases. The total density of states (DOS) displays an energy gap in both cases. The projected DOS indicate that the B-p and N-p orbitals are those that make the most important contribution in the valence band and the H-s and C-p orbitals provide an important contribution in the conduction band to the DOS. Provided that the interactions of the acetylene with the 2D layer modify the structural and electronic properties of the hBN the possibility of structural functionalization using organic molecules may be concluded.

  2. Power generation response to readily biodegradable COD in single-chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hongsuck; Kim, Byunggoon; Yu, Jaecheul

    2015-06-01

    Single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) using domestic wastewater (DWW) and milk processing wastewater (MWW) were operated at different organic loading rates (OLRs). The maximum power density (PDmax) and OLR (readily biodegradable COD [RBCOD] and soluble COD [SCOD]) followed the Lineweaver-Burk equation in all influents. The coefficients of determination were 0.9209 and 0.9975 for SCOD and RBCOD, respectively. OLR based on RBCOD showed better power generation function than that based on SCOD. PDmax (2.9-12.2 W/m(3)) in DWW was lower than that (6.9-24.9 W/m(3)) in MWW but the net energy recovery (kWh/kg-SCOD(removed)) in DWW (0.542-1.108) was larger than that in MWW (0.322-0.602). This was attributed to the higher ratio of RBCOD/SCOD (0.44) and the lower values of RBCOD (40 mg/L) in DWW, compared to RBOCD/SCOD (0.11) and RBCOD (110 mg/L) in MWW. Therefore, RBCOD is an important indicator for estimating power generation.

  3. Recommendations for gross examination and sampling of surgical specimens of the spleen.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Dennis P; Louissaint, Abner; Vasef, Mohammad A; Auerbach, Aaron; Miranda, Roberto; Brynes, Russell K; Fedoriw, Yuri; Hudnall, S David

    2015-10-01

    This review examines handling and processing of spleen biopsies and splenectomy specimens with the aim of providing the pathologist with guidance in optimizing examination and diagnosis of splenic disorders. It also offers recommendations as to relevant reporting factors in gross examination, which may guide diagnostic workup. The role of splenic needle biopsies is discussed. The International Spleen Consortium is a group dedicated to promoting education and research on the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the spleen. In keeping with these goals, we have undertaken to provide guidelines for gross examination, sectioning, and sampling of spleen tissue to optimize diagnosis (Burke). The pathology of the spleen may be complicated in routine practice due to a number of factors. Among these are lack of familiarity with lesions, complex histopathology, mimicry within several types of lesions, and overall rarity. To optimize diagnosis, appropriate handling and processing of splenic tissue are crucial. The importance of complete and accurate clinical history cannot be overstated. In many cases, significant clinical history such as previous lymphoproliferative disorders, hematologic disorders, trauma, etc, can provide important information to guide the evaluation of spleen specimens. Clinical information helps plan for appropriate processing of the spleen specimen. The pathologist should encourage surgical colleagues, who typically provide the specimens, to include as much clinical information as possible.

  4. Purification and characterization of a novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptide derived from an enzymatic hydrolysate of duck skin byproducts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kim, Yon-Suk; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Park, Tae-Kyu; Kim, Bo Kyung; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Jeon, You-Jin; Ahn, Chang-Bum; Je, Jae-Young; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2012-10-10

    An angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptide was isolated and identified from hydrolysates of duck skin byproducts. Duck skin byproducts were hydrolyzed using nine proteases (Alcalase, Collagenase, Flavourzyme, Neutrase, papain, pepsin, Protamex, trypsin, and α-chymotrypsin) to produce an antihypertensive peptide. Of the various hydrolysates produced, the α-chymotrypsin hydrolysate exhibited the highest ACE inhibitory activity. The hydrolysate was purified using fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The amino acid sequence of the ACE inhibitory peptide was identified as a hexapeptide Trp-Tyr-Pro-Ala-Ala-Pro, with a molecular weight of 693.90 Da. The peptide had an IC50 value of 137 μM, and the inhibitory pattern of the purified ACE inhibitor from duck skin byproducts was determined to be competitive by Lineweaver-Burk plots. In addition, the peptide was synthesized and the ACE inhibitory activity was verified in vivo. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) exhibited significantly decreased blood pressure and heart rate after peptide injection. Taken together, the results suggest that Trp-Tyr-Pro-Ala-Ala-Pro may be useful as a new antihypertensive agent.

  5. Chronic sorrow and coping in families of children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hobdell, Elizabeth F; Grant, Mitzie L; Valencia, Ignacio; Mare, Jane; Kothare, Sanjeev V; Legido, Agustin; Khurana, Divya S

    2007-04-01

    Epilepsy, a common problem in child neurology, affects the entire family. There is a potential for such psychosocial consequences as parental chronic sorrow and alterations in coping. In this study, 67 parents completed brief questionnaires about their sorrow and coping styles. Results demonstrated chronic sorrow as measured by the Adapted Burke Questionnaire (10.45 +/- 7.9). Interestingly, the total score was not significantly different between parents of children with refractory and nonrefractory epilepsy or parents of children with comorbid or without comorbid conditions. Selection of the individual item disbelief, however, was significantly increased in parents of children with nonrefractory epilepsy, and selection of the item anger was significantly increased in parents of children with comorbid conditions. Parental coping styles were similar to those reported in the normative data for the instrument used, the Coping Health Inventory for Parents (CHIP). The correlation between chronic sorrow and coping was significant between the grief component of sorrow and Coping Pattern II of the CHIP. Implications for practice include earlier identification of parental feelings of sorrow and coping styles, which may contribute to a positive outcome. PMID:17477221

  6. Inhibition of aldose reductase by phenylethanoid glycoside isolated from the seeds of Paulownia coreana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Yeon Sil; Kim, Seon Ha; Bae, Young Soo; Lim, Soon Sung

    2011-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have considerable therapeutic potential against diabetic complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of the 70% acetone extract obtained from Paulownia coreana seeds, phenylpropanoid glycosides (compounds 1-4) and 5 phenolic compounds were isolated (compounds 5-9). Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and comparison with reported data. All the isolates were subjected to in vitro bioassays to evaluate their inhibitory activities against recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) and sorbitol formation in human erythrocytes. Phenylethanoid glycosides showed more effective than the phenolic compounds in inhibiting rhAR. Among the compounds, isocampneoside II (3) was found to significantly inhibit rhAR with an IC(50) value of 9.72 µM. In kinetic analyses performed using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/concentration of substrate, isocampneoside II (3) showed uncompetitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, it inhibited sorbitol formation in a rat lens incubated with a high concentration of glucose; this finding indicated that isocampneoside II (3) may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Thus, the P. coreana-derived phenylethanoid glycoside isocampneoside II (3) may have a potential therapeutics against diabetic complications. PMID:21212537

  7. LSST Site: Sky Brightness Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Jamison; Claver, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an upcoming robotic survey telescope. At the telescope site on Cerro Pachon in Chile there are currently three photodiodes and a Canon camera with a fisheye lens, and both the photodiodes and Canon monitor the night sky continuously. The NIST-calibrated photodiodes directly measure the flux from the sky, and the sky brightness can also be obtained from the Canon images via digital aperture photometry. Organizing and combining the two data sets gives nightly information of the development of sky brightness across a swath of the electromagnetic spectrum, from blue to near infrared light, and this is useful for accurately predicting the performance of the LSST. It also provides data for models of moonlight and twilight sky brightness. Code to accomplish this organization and combination was successfully written in Python, but due to the backlog of data not all of the nights were processed by the end of the summer.Burke was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  8. A novel glucose oxidase biosensor based on poly([2,2';5',2″]-terthiophene-3'-carbaldehyde) modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Guler, Muhammet; Turkoglu, Vedat; Kivrak, Arif

    2015-08-01

    In the study, the electrochemical behavior of glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized on poly([2,2';5',2″]-terthiophene-3'-carbaldehyde) (poly(TTP)) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was investigated. The biosensor (poly(TTP)/GOx/GCE) showed a pair of redox peaks in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) solution in the absence of oxygen the co-substrate of GOx. In here, Poly(TTP)/GOx/GCE biosensor acts as the co-substrate instead of oxygen. Upon the addition of glucose, the reduction and oxidation peak currents increased until the active site of GOx was fully saturated with glucose. The apparent m was estimated 26.13 mM from Lineweaver-Burk graph. The biosensor displayed a good stability and bioactivity. The biosensor showed a high sensitivity (56.1 nA/mM), a linear range (from 0.5 to 20.15 mM), and a good reproducibility with 3.6% of relative standard deviation. In addition, the interference currents of glycin, ascorbic acid, histidine, uric acid, dopamine, arginine, and fructose on GOx biosensor were investigated. All that substances exhibited an interference current under 10%. It was not shown a marked difference between GOx biosensor and spectrophotometric measurement of glucose in serum examples. UV-visible spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) experiments of the biosensor were also performed.

  9. Nitrate Uptake into Barley (Hordeum vulgare) Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Deane-Drummond, Celia E.; Glass, Anthony D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence is presented that chlorate is an extremely good analog for nitrate during nitrate uptake by intact barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Fergus) roots. The depletion of ClO3− or NO3− from uptake media over 2 to 6 hours by seedlings was found to be dependent on combined NO3− plus ClO3− concentrations, and total anion uptake was equivalent at different NO3−/ClO3− ratios. After loading barley seedlings with 36ClO3− for 6 hours, kinetic parameters were derived from the analysis of efflux of [36Cl] chlorate into unlabeled solution. On the basis of this analysis, the half times for exchange for the cytoplasmic and vacuolar phases were 17 minutes and 20 hours, respectively. Data pooled from a number of different experiments were used to calculate kinetic constants (Km and Vmax) for 36ClO3− influx into barley roots at different external ClO3−/NO3− ratios, using short (10 minutes) influx times. There appeared to be no discrimination by the root cells between ClO3− and NO3−. Lineweaver-Burk analysis of the interaction between nitrate and chlorate were characteristic of competitive inhibition at low nitrate concentrations (0-0.5 mm). At higher concentrations, in the range of >1 mm, similar interactions between these ions were evident. PMID:16662478

  10. Density Functional Theory Calculation of the Band Alignment of (101̅0) In(x)Ga(1-x)N/Water Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Meng, Andrew C; Cheng, Jun; Sprik, Michiel

    2016-03-01

    Conduction band edge (CBE) and valence band edge (VBE) positions of InxGa1-xN photoelectrodes were computed using density functional theory methods. The band edges of fully solvated GaN and InN model systems were aligned with respect to the standard hydrogen electrode using a molecular dynamics hydrogen electrode scheme applied earlier to TiO2/water interfaces. Similar to the findings for TiO2, we found that the Purdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) functional gives a VBE potential which is too negative by 1 V. This cathodic bias is largely corrected by application of the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE06) hybrid functional containing a fraction of Hartree-Fock exchange. The effect of a change of composition was investigated using simplified model systems consisting of vacuum slabs covered on both sides by one monolayer of H2O. The CBE was found to vary linearly with In content. The VBE, in comparison, is much less sensitive to composition. The data show that the band edges straddle the hydrogen and oxygen evolution potentials for In fractions less than 47%. The band gap was found to exceed 2 eV for an In fraction less than 54%.

  11. The use of lacZ marker in enumeration of Azotobacter chroococcum in carrier based inoculants.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Manu; Garg, Faquir C

    2014-01-01

    A transconjugant of Azotobacter chroococcum Mac 27 tagged with lac Z(A. chroococcum Mac27 L) was found to possess high levels of β-galactosidase activity constitutively. Further, the lac Z marker was found to be stably integrated into the chromosome of the A. chroococcum Mac 27 and did not have any adverse effect on growth, nitrogen fixation and excretion of ammonia. A quick method to determine the viable cell number in broth culture and carrier based inoculants has been developed on the basis of β-galactosidase assay. It was found that there was a direct relationship between the number of cell as determined by standard plate count and intensity of colour that developed upon degradation of ONPG due to β-galactosidase activity. The method was found to be sensitive enough to determine 1.7 × 10(6) CFU mL(-1) in broth culture as well as carrier based Azotobacter inoculants. Further, it was observed that when A. chroococcum Mac27 L was inoculated on Brassica campestris, it could be detected in the presence of other bacteria capable of growing on Burks agar medium containing X-gal on the basis of lac Z genetic marker.

  12. Characterization of Thin Film Materials using SCAN MetaGGA, an Accurate Nonempirical Density Functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buda, Ioana-Gianina; Lane, Christopher; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P.; Bansil, Arun

    The exact ground-state properties of a material can be derived from the single-particle Kohn-Sham equations within the framework of the Density Functional Theory (DFT), provided the exact exchange-correlation potential is known. The simplest approximation is the local density approximation (LDA), but it usually leads to overbinding in molecules and solids. On the other hand, the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) introduces corrections that expand and soften bonds. The newly developed nonempirical SCAN (strongly-constrained and appropriately-normed) MetaGGA [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 036402] has been shown to be comparable in efficiency to LDA and GGA, and to significantly improve LDA and the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof version of the GGA for ground-state properties such as equilibrium geometry and lattice constants for a number of standard datasets for molecules and solids. Here we discuss the performance of SCAN MetaGGA for thin films and monolayers and demonstrate improvements of predicted ground-state properties. Examples include graphene, phosphorene and MoS2.

  13. Efficient method of evaluation for Gaussian Hartree-Fock exchange operator for Gau-PBE functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jong-Won; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2015-07-01

    We previously developed an efficient screened hybrid functional called Gaussian-Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (Gau-PBE) [Song et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 071103 (2011)] for large molecules and extended systems, which is characterized by the usage of a Gaussian function as a modified Coulomb potential for the Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange. We found that the adoption of a Gaussian HF exchange operator considerably decreases the calculation time cost of periodic systems while improving the reproducibility of the bandgaps of semiconductors. We present a distance-based screening scheme here that is tailored for the Gaussian HF exchange integral that utilizes multipole expansion for the Gaussian two-electron integrals. We found a new multipole screening scheme helps to save the time cost for the HF exchange integration by efficiently decreasing the number of integrals of, specifically, the near field region without incurring substantial changes in total energy. In our assessment on the periodic systems of seven semiconductors, the Gau-PBE hybrid functional with a new screening scheme has 1.56 times the time cost of a pure functional while the previous Gau-PBE was 1.84 times and HSE06 was 3.34 times.

  14. Identification in pituitary tissue of a peptide alpha-amidation activity that acts on glycine-extended peptides and requires molecular oxygen, copper, and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Eipper, B A; Mains, R E; Glembotski, C C

    1983-08-01

    An enzymatic activity capable of producing an alpha-amidated peptide product from its glycine-extended precursor has been identified in secretory granules of rat anterior, intermediate, and neural pituitary and bovine intermediate pituitary. High levels of endogenous inhibitors of this alpha-amidation activity have also been found in tissue homogenates. The alpha-amidation activity is totally inhibited by addition of divalent metal ion chelators such as diethyldithiocarbamate, o-phenanthroline, and EDTA; alpha-amidation activity is restored to above control levels upon addition of copper. The alpha-amidation reaction requires the presence of molecular oxygen. Of the various cofactors tested, ascorbic acid was the most potent stimulator of alpha-amidation. The alpha-amidation activity has a neutral pH optimum and is primarily soluble following several cycles of freezing and thawing. Kinetic studies with the bovine intermediate pituitary granule-associated activity demonstrated a linear Lineweaver-Burk plot when D-Tyr-Val-Gly was the varied substrate; the apparent Km and Vmax varied with the concentration of ascorbic acid. The substrate specificity of the alpha-amidation activity appears to be quite broad; the conversion of D-Tyr-Val-Gly into D-Tyr-Val-NH2 is inhibited by the addition of a variety of glycine-extended peptides.

  15. Sickness as cultural performance: drama, trajectory, and pilgrimage root metaphors and the making social of disease.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, R

    1986-01-01

    This paper examines the use of root metaphors in the description of social activity and especially the performance of sickness. It starts with a critical account of Susan Sontag's examination of the use of illness as metaphor in literature. There then follows a brief analysis of another account of society based on the discussion of creative literature-Kenneth Burke's "Dramatism," itself acknowledged as a source by Erving Goffman. Goffman's own expressed reservations about his supposed use of a dramatic metaphor are then extended to suggest that Goffman was more concerned with "performance" in a broader sense. The discussion of performative metaphors is then shifted by a critical consideration of Anselm Strauss and colleagues' view of sickness as manifold performances of work rather than drama, expressed in their metaphor of "trajectory." Sickness as a process compounded of many performances is further explored using ideas developed by the anthropologist Victor Turner toward the end of his life, in collaboration with his wife, Edith Turner. It is finally suggested that sickness as cultural performance enables us to understand the dialectical relationships between expressive and instrumental activities surrounding sickness. This in turn leaves room for the nonreductionist understanding, within a sociological framework, of individual idiosyncrasy, biological accident, and the discourse of healing.

  16. Production, purification, and characterization of an extracellular chitosanase from Streptomyces.

    PubMed Central

    Price, J S; Storck, R

    1975-01-01

    The synthesis by Streptomyces sp. no. 6 of an extracellular chitosanase was induced by glucosamine. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by Sephadex G-100, carboxymethyl-cellulose, and diethylaminoethyl-cellulose chromatography. The purified enzyme hydrolyzed chitosan (the beta-1,4-linked polymer of glucosamine) but not chitin nor carboxymethyl-cellulose. The only products of the hydrolysis detectable by paper chromatography were di- and triglucosamine. Sephadex G-100 chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the molecular weight of the enzyme was between 29,000 and 26,000. Acid hydrolysates of the enzyme contained no cysteic acid or glucosamine or other carbohydrate. At 25 C, maximum activity was obtained between pH 4.5 and 6.5. The enzymatic hydrolysis of chitosan occurred over a wide range of temperatures and was maximal at 60 C. The rate of the reaction was inhibited by concentrations of soluble chitosan higher than 0.5 g/liter. The apparent Km calculated from a Lineweaver-Burke plot was 0.688 g/liter at pH 5.5. The enzyme prevented spore germination and caused a significant decrease in the turbidity of germinated spore suspensions of the Mucor strains tested. Such a decrease was the result of a partial lysis of the cell wall. Images PMID:371

  17. Ab initio calculations of structural, electronic, optical and thermodynamic properties of alkaline earth tellurides BaxSr1-XTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahloul, B.; Bentabet, A.; Amirouche, L.; Bouhadda, Y.; Bounab, S.; Deghfel, B.; Fenineche, N.

    2014-03-01

    Structural, electronic and thermodynamic properties of SrTe and BaTe compounds and their ternary mixed crystals BaxSr1-xTe in the rock-salt structure have been studied with density functional theory (DFT), whereas the optical properties have been obtained by using empirical methods such as the modified Moss relation. The exchange-correlation potential was calculated using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) and the local density approximation (LDA) of Teter-Pade (TP). In the present work, we used the virtual-crystal approximation (VCA) to study the effect of composition (x). The calculated lattice parameters at equilibrium volume and the bulk modulus for x=0 and x=1 are in good agreement with the literature data. Furthermore, the BaxSr1-xTe alloys are found to be an indirect band gap semiconductor. In addition, we have also predicted the heat capacities (CV), the entropy(S), the internal energy (U) and the Helmholtz free energy (F) of the parent compounds SrTe and BaTe.

  18. Amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules affected by granule surface area.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Kong, B W; Kim, M J; Lee, S H

    2008-11-01

    Initial stage of hydrolysis of native starch granules with various amylolytic enzymes, alpha-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, glucoamylase I (GA-I) and II (GA-II) from Aspergillus niger, and beta-amylase from sweet potato showed that the reaction was apparently affected by a specific surface area of the starch granules. The ratios of the reciprocal of initial velocity of each amylolytic hydrolysis for native potato and maize starch to that for rice with the amylolytic enzymes were nearly equivalent to the ratio of surface area per mass of the 2 starch granules to that of rice, that is, 6.94 and 2.25, respectively. Thus, the reciprocal of initial velocity of each enzymatic hydrolysis as expressed in a Lineweaver-Burk plot was a linear function of the reciprocal of surface area for each starch granule. As a result, it is concluded that amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules is governed by the specific surface area, not by the mass concentration, of each granule. PMID:19021791

  19. Optical excitation energies, Stokes shift, and spin-splitting of C24H72Si14.

    PubMed

    Zope, Rajendra R; Baruah, Tunna; Richardson, Steven L; Pederson, Mark R; Dunlap, Brett I

    2010-07-21

    As an initial step toward the synthesis and characterization of sila-diamondoids, such as sila-adamantane (Si(10)H(16),T(d)), the synthesis of a fourfold silylated sila-adamantane molecule (C(24)H(72)Si(14),T(d)) has been reported in literature [Fischer et al., Science 310, 825 (2005)]. We present the electronic structure, ionization energies, quasiparticle gap, and the excitation energies for the Si(14)(CH(3))(24) and the exact silicon analog of adamantane Si(10)H(16) obtained at the all-electron level using the delta-self-consistent-field and transitional state methods within two different density functional models: (i) Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation and (ii) fully analytic density functional (ADFT) implementation with atom dependent potential. The ADFT is designed so that molecules separate into atoms having exact atomic energies. The calculations within the two models agree well, to within 0.25 eV for optical excitations. The effect of structural relaxation in the presence of electron-hole-pair excitations is examined to obtain its contribution to the luminescence Stokes shift. The spin-influence on exciton energies is also determined. Our calculations indicate overall decrease in the absorption, emission, quasiparticle, and highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gaps, ionization energies, Stokes shift, and exciton binding energy when passivating hydrogens in the Si(10)H(16) are replaced with electron donating groups such as methyl (Me) and trimehylsilyl (-Si(Me)(3)).

  20. Gas-Phase Folding of a Prototypical Protonated Pentapeptide: Spectroscopic Evidence for Formation of a Charge-Stabilized β-Hairpin.

    PubMed

    Burke, Nicole L; DeBlase, Andrew F; Redwine, James G; Hopkins, John R; McLuckey, Scott A; Zwier, Timothy S

    2016-03-01

    Ultraviolet and infrared-ultraviolet (IR-UV) double-resonance photofragment spectroscopy has been carried out in a tandem mass spectrometer to determine the three-dimensional structure of cryogenically cooled protonated C-terminally methyl esterified leucine enkephalin [YGGFL-OMe+H](+). By comparing the experimental IR spectrum of the dominant conformer with the predictions of DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) calculations, a backbone structure was assigned that is analogous to that previously assigned by our group for the unmodified peptide [ Burke, N.L.; et al. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2015 , 378 , 196 ], despite the loss of a C-terminal OH binding site that was thought to play an important role in its stabilization. Both structures are characterized by a type II' β-turn around Gly(3)-Phe(4) and a γ-turn around Gly(2), providing spectroscopic evidence for the formation of a β-hairpin hydrogen bonding pattern. Rather than disrupting the peptide backbone structure, the protonated N-terminus serves to stabilize the β-hairpin by positioning itself in a pocket above the turn where it can form H-bonds to the Gly(3) and C-terminus C═O groups. This β-hairpin type structure has been previously proposed as the biologically active conformation of leucine enkephalin and its methyl ester in the nonpolar cell membrane environment [ Naito, A.; Nishimura, K. Curr. Top. Med. Chem. 2004 , 4 , 135 - 143 ]. PMID:26853832

  1. Kinetic study approach of remazol black-B use for the development of two-stage anoxic-oxic reactor for decolorization/biodegradation of azo dyes by activated bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Dafale, Nishant; Wate, Satish; Meshram, Sudhir; Nandy, Tapas

    2008-11-30

    The laboratory-isolated strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Proteus mirabilis, Bacillus circulance, NAD 1 and NAD 6 were observed to be predominant in the bacterial consortium responsible for effective decolorization of the azo dyes. The kinetic characteristics of azo dye decolorization by bacterial consortium were determined quantitatively using reactive vinyl sulfonated diazo dye, remazol black-B (RB-B) as a model substrate. Effects of substrate (RB-B) concentration as well as different substrates (azo dyes), environmental parameters (temperature and pH), glucose and other electron donor/co-substrate on the rate of decolorization were investigated to reveal the key factor that determines the performance of dye decolorization. The activation energy (E(a)) and frequency factor (K(0)) based on the Arrhenius equation was calculated as 11.67 kcal mol(-1) and 1.57 x 10(7)mg lg MLSS(-1)h(-1), respectively. The Double-reciprocal or Lineweaver-Burk plot was used to evaluate V(max), 15.97 h(-1) and K(m), 85.66 mg l(-1). The two-stage anoxic-oxic reactor system has proved to be successful in achieving significant decolorization and degradation of azo dyes by specific developed bacterial consortium with a removal of 84% color and 80% COD for real textile effluents vis-à-vis >or=90% color and COD removal for synthetic dye solution.

  2. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Activity of Compounds from  Zea mays L.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1–7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8–12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC50, 4.78 μM). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  3. A study of the inhibition of catalase by dipotassium trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate K₂[B₃O₃F₄OH].

    PubMed

    Islamovic, Safija; Galic, Borivoj; Milos, Mladen

    2014-10-01

    In the development of boronic acid-based enzyme inhibitors as potential pharmaceutical drugs, dipotassium trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate K2[B3O3F4OH] was listed as a promising new therapeutic for treatment of these diseases. The catalase-mediated conversion of hydrogen peroxide, in the presence and absence of K2[B3O3F4OH] was studied. The kinetics conformed to the Michaelis-Menten model. Lineweaver-Burk plots were linear and plotted the family of straight lines intersected on the abscissa indicating non-competitive inhibition of the catalase. It appears that in the absence of inhibitor, catalase operates the best at conditions around pH 7.1 and in the presence of K2[B3O3F4OH] the optimum is around pH 6.2. The uncatalyzed reaction of hydrogen peroxide decomposition generally has a value of activation energy of 75 kJ mole(-1), whereas catalase, in the absence of inhibitor, lowers the value to 11.2 kJ mole(-1), while in the presence 69 mmoles L(-1) of K2[B3O3F4OH] it was 37.8 kJ mole(-1).

  4. Functional and structural changes of human erythrocyte catalase induced by cimetidine: proposed model of binding.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Jahngirvand, Mahboubeh; Almasirad, Ali; Mousavi, Zahra; Masoud, Masoudeh; Mollasalehi, Hamidreza

    2015-06-01

    In erythrocyte, catalase plays an important role to protect cells from hydrogen peroxide toxicity. Hydrogen peroxide is a byproduct compound which is produced during metabolic pathway of cells. Cimetidine, a histamine H2 receptor antagonist, is used for gastrointestinal tract diseases and prevents the extra release of gastric acid. In this study, the effect of cimetidine on the activity of human erythrocyte catalase was investigated. Erythrocytes were broken by hypotonic solution. The supernatant was used for catalase assay and kinetics study. Lineweaver-Burk plot was performed to determine the type of inhibition. The kinetics data revealed that cimetidine inhibited the catalase activity by mixed inhibition. The IC50 (1.54 μM) and Ki (0.45 μM) values of cimetidine determined that the drug was bound to the enzyme with high affinity. Circular dichroism and fluorescence measurement showed that the binding of cimetidine to the enzyme affected the content of secondary structure of the enzyme as well as its conformational changes. Docking studies were carried out to detect the site in which the drug was bound to the enzyme. Molecular modeling and energy calculation of the binding showed that the cyanoguanidine group of the drug connected to Asp59 via two hydrogen bonds, while the imidazole group of the drug interacted with Phe64 in the enzyme by a hydrophobic interaction. In conclusion, cimetidine could bind to human erythrocyte catalase, and its interaction caused functional and conformational changes in the enzyme.

  5. Investigation on binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase by absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Li; Zhu, Shuhua; Ma, Hongmei; Zhou, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been investigated by absorption spectrometry in 0.2 M anaerobic phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4). Based on this binding equilibrium, a model equation for evaluating the binding constant of nitric oxide to HRP is developed and the binding constant is calculated to be (1.55 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1, indicating that HRP can form a stable complex with nitric oxide. The type of inhibition by nitric oxide is validated on the basis of studying initial reaction rates of HRP-catalyzed oxidation of guaiacol in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide. The inhibition mechanism is found to follow an apparent non-competitive inhibition by Lineweaver-Burk method. Based on this kinetic mechanism, the binding constant is also calculated to be (5.22 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1. The values of the binding constant determined by the two methods are almost identical. The non-competitive inhibition model is also applicable to studying the effect of nitric oxide on other metalloenzymes, which catalyze the two-substrate reaction with the "ping-pong" mechanism.

  6. Energy band alignment and electronic states of amorphous carbon surfaces in vacuo and in aqueous environment

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, Miguel A.; Määttä, Jukka; Lopez-Acevedo, Olga; Laurila, Tomi

    2015-01-21

    In this paper, we obtain the energy band positions of amorphous carbon (a–C) surfaces in vacuum and in aqueous environment. The calculations are performed using a combination of (i) classical molecular dynamics (MD), (ii) Kohn-Sham density functional theory with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional, and (iii) the screened-exchange hybrid functional of Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE). PBE allows an accurate generation of a-C and the evaluation of the local electrostatic potential in the a-C/water system, HSE yields an improved description of energetic positions which is critical in this case, and classical MD enables a computationally affordable description of water. Our explicit calculation shows that, both in vacuo and in aqueous environment, the a-C electronic states available in the region comprised between the H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O levels of water correspond to both occupied and unoccupied states within the a-C pseudogap region. These are localized states associated to sp{sup 2} sites in a-C. The band realignment induces a shift of approximately 300 meV of the a-C energy band positions with respect to the redox levels of water.

  7. Effects of Pu-erh tea aqueous extract (PTAE) on blood lipid metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Yan, Jingna; Luo, Liyong; Zhang, Dongying

    2015-06-01

    Disorders of blood lipid metabolism are the primary risk factors for many diseases. Recently, the effect of Pu-erh tea on blood lipid metabolism has received increasing attention. However, the mechanism underlying its ability to regulate blood lipid metabolism is unclear. We set out to study this through assessing the effects of Pu-erh tea aqueous extract (PTAE) on the central enzymes of blood lipid metabolism, including lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) and pancreatic lipase (PL). We find that the Lp-PLA2, HMRG and PL activities are inhibited by PTAE in a dose-dependent manner and that the LCAT activity tends to increase with increasing PTAE concentrations. Lineweaver-Burk plot analyses reveal that PTAE acts as a competitive inhibitor for HMGR and PL and as a noncompetitive inhibitor for Lp-PLA2. Moreover, we determine that its active ingredients include catechins, gallic acid, caffeine, free amino acids, and soluble sugar. However, the effect of each ingredient and whether any of them have synergistic effects are still unknown. The results suggest that Pu-erh tea has a potent ability to regulate blood lipid metabolism and knowledge of the mechanisms provides insights into its potential therapeutic application as an alternative hypolipidemic drug.

  8. Framework for Understanding LENR Processes, Using Ordinary Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Scott

    2005-03-01

    As I have emphasizedootnotetextS.R. Chubb, Proc. ICCF10 (in press). Also, http://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/ChubbSRnutsandbol.pdf http://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/ChubbSRnutsandbol.pdf, S.R. Chubb, Trans. Amer. Nuc. Soc. 88 , 618 (2003)., in discussions of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions(LENRs), mainstream many-body physics ideas have been largely ignored. A key point is that in condensed matter, delocalized, wave-like effects can allow large amounts of momentum to be transferred instantly to distant locations, without any particular particle (or particles) acquiring high velocity through a Broken Gauge Symmetry. Explicit features in the electronic structure explain how this can occur^1 in finite size PdD crystals, with real boundaries. The essential physics^1 can be related to standard many-body techniquesootnotetextBurke,P.G. and K.A. Berrington, Atomic and Molecular Processes:an R matrix Approach (Bristol: IOP Publishing, 1993).. In the paper, I examine this relationship, the relationship of the theory^1 to other LENR theories, and the importance of certain features (for example, boundaries^1) that are not included in the other LENR theories.

  9. A "naturally sweet" definition: an analysis of the sugar association's definition of the natural as a terministic screen.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Sarah N

    2015-01-01

    The political nature of sugar as a cultural commodity can be traced back for centuries. While the issues surrounding sugar consumption have changed, power struggles still exist as stakeholders struggle to identify, make sense of, and manage the relationship between sugar and obesity. I explore the rhetorical contributions of the Sugar Association to public understandings of sweeteners. Specifically, I argue that the Sugar Association positioned sugar as the best choice for consumers by positioning their sweetener within a definition of the natural that the organization constructs. I draw on Burke's (1966) notion of terministic screens as a theoretical framework through which sugar was positioned as the best sweetener option and HFCS and artificial sweeteners were isolated as unnatural and, therefore, unwise choices for consumers. Then, I argue that the association's definition of "the natural" was strategically ambiguous, serving to distinguish sugar from other sweeteners. I conclude by evaluating the soundness and sustainability of the association's discursive contributions to public understandings of health and its implications for key stakeholders in the sweetener community.

  10. Corals of Madison Group (Mississippian), Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, D.L.; Holland, F.D. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    Coral faunas studied from subsurface cores of the Mississippian Madison Group in the Williston Basin of North Dakota indicate that Sando's coral zones for outcrops in western North America can be extended into the subsurface of North Dakota. Coral zones II and III are recognized as corresponding roughly to lower and upper Mission Canyon strata, respectively. These data were obtained from 12 wells along the northern border of North Dakota in Divide, Burke, Renville, and Bottineau Counties, and two wells near the center of Williston basin in Dunn and McKenzie Counties. Corals found in dark argillaceous crinoid-skeletal wackestones representing deeper waters are robust, and this may infer a hospitable environment for their growth. However, evidence from the coral and lithologic associations refute the pervading dogma that the occurrence of corals is strictly facies controlled. Abundant smaller corals have been found from buff-colored skeletal wackestones and algal mudstones which alternate with subaqueous anhydrites representing a marginal marine environment. In addition, corals have been found in buff-colored skeletal and peloidal grainstones of adjacent shoals and in brown pisolitic-oolitic packstones-wackestones of possible tidal ponds. These latter deposits may represent allochthonous accumulations, but the amount of time involved in transport of corals would not invalidate their usefulness as biostratigraphic tools.

  11. On the bonding nature of electron states for the Fe-Mo double perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Carvajal, E.; Cruz-Irisson, M.; Oviedo-Roa, R.; Navarro, O.

    2014-05-15

    The electronic transport as well as the effect of an external magnetic field has been investigated on manganese-based materials, spinels and perovskites. Potential applications of double perovskites go from magnetic sensors to electrodes in solid-oxide fuel cells; besides the practical interests, it is known that small changes in composition modify radically the physical properties of double perovskites. We have studied the Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} double perovskite compound (SFMO) using first-principles density functional theory. The calculations were done within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) scheme with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) functional. We have made a detailed analysis of each electronic state and the charge density maps around the Fermi level. For the electronic properties of SFMO it was used a primitive cell, for which we found the characteristic half-metallic behavior density of states composed by e{sub g} and t{sub 2g} electrons from Fe and Mo atoms. Those peaks were tagged as bonding or antibonding around the Fermi level at both, valence and conduction bands.

  12. Oxygen and nitrogen diffusion in α-hafnium from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, Andrew; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2014-05-26

    We use a combination of density functional theory and multistate diffusion formalism to analyze the diffusion of oxygen and nitrogen in technologically important hafnium metal. Comparing the local density approximation and the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof version of the generalized gradient approximation, we find that a better description of the hafnium lattice in the latter results in the correct sequence of stable and transition states for oxygen interstitials leading to essentially quantitative agreement with experiment. For oxygen diffusion, we find an isotropic temperature-dependent diffusion coefficient of D=0.082e{sup −2.04/k{sub B}T}cm{sup 2}s{sup −1} utilizing interstitial sites with hexahedral and octahedral coordination. For the diffusivity of nitrogen, we find that an additional stable interstitial site, the crowdion site, exists and that the diffusion coefficient is D=0.15e{sup −2.68/k{sub B}T}cm{sup 2}s{sup −1}. Our results also reproduce the experimental observation that nitrogen diffusivity is lower than that of oxygen in hafnium.

  13. Deep brain stimulation in childhood: an effective treatment for early onset idiopathic generalised dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Jeremy R; Green, Alex L; Joint, Carole; Andrew, Morag; Gregory, Ralph P; Scott, Richard B; McShane, Michael A; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2007-01-01

    Background Early onset idiopathic generalised dystonia is a progressive and profoundly disabling condition. Medical treatment may ameliorate symptoms. However, many children have profound, intractable disability including the loss of ambulation and speech, and difficulties with feeding. Following the failure of medical management, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) has emerged as an alternative treatment for the disorder. Methods We describe four children who presented with dystonia. Results Following the failure of a range of medical therapies, DBS systems were implanted in the GPi in an attempt to ameliorate the children's disabilities. All children found dystonic movements to be less disabling following surgery. Compared with preoperative Burke, Fahn and Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale scores, postoperative scores at 6 months were improved. Conclusions DBS is effective in improving symptoms and function in children with idiopathic dystonia refractory to medical treatment. Whilst surgery is complex and can be associated with intraoperative and postoperative complications, this intervention should be considered following the failure of medical therapy. PMID:17460025

  14. A "naturally sweet" definition: an analysis of the sugar association's definition of the natural as a terministic screen.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Sarah N

    2015-01-01

    The political nature of sugar as a cultural commodity can be traced back for centuries. While the issues surrounding sugar consumption have changed, power struggles still exist as stakeholders struggle to identify, make sense of, and manage the relationship between sugar and obesity. I explore the rhetorical contributions of the Sugar Association to public understandings of sweeteners. Specifically, I argue that the Sugar Association positioned sugar as the best choice for consumers by positioning their sweetener within a definition of the natural that the organization constructs. I draw on Burke's (1966) notion of terministic screens as a theoretical framework through which sugar was positioned as the best sweetener option and HFCS and artificial sweeteners were isolated as unnatural and, therefore, unwise choices for consumers. Then, I argue that the association's definition of "the natural" was strategically ambiguous, serving to distinguish sugar from other sweeteners. I conclude by evaluating the soundness and sustainability of the association's discursive contributions to public understandings of health and its implications for key stakeholders in the sweetener community. PMID:24972276

  15. First principles LDA + U and GGA + U study of protactinium and protactinium oxides: dependence on the effective U parameter.

    PubMed

    Obodo, K O; Chetty, N

    2013-04-10

    The electronic structure and properties of protactinium and its oxides (PaO and PaO2) have been studied within the framework of the local density approximation (LDA), the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation [GGA(PBE)], LDA + U and GGA(PBE) + U implementations of density functional theory. The dependence of selected observables of these materials on the effective U parameter has been investigated in detail. The examined properties include lattice constants, bulk moduli, the effect of charge density distributions, the hybridization of the 5f orbital and the energy of formation for PaO and PaO2. The LDA gives better agreement with experiment for the bulk modulus than the GGA for Pa but the GGA gives better structural properties. We found that PaO is metallic and PaO2 is a Mott-Hubbard insulator. This is consistent with observations for the other actinide oxides. We discover that GGA and LDA incorrectly give metallic behavior for PaO2. The GGA(PBE) + U calculated indirect band gap of 3.48 eV reported for PaO2 is a prediction and should stimulate further studies of this material.

  16. First principles LDA + U and GGA + U study of protactinium and protactinium oxides: dependence on the effective U parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obodo, K. O.; Chetty, N.

    2013-04-01

    The electronic structure and properties of protactinium and its oxides (PaO and PaO2) have been studied within the framework of the local density approximation (LDA), the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation [GGA(PBE)], LDA + U and GGA(PBE) + U implementations of density functional theory. The dependence of selected observables of these materials on the effective U parameter has been investigated in detail. The examined properties include lattice constants, bulk moduli, the effect of charge density distributions, the hybridization of the 5f orbital and the energy of formation for PaO and PaO2. The LDA gives better agreement with experiment for the bulk modulus than the GGA for Pa but the GGA gives better structural properties. We found that PaO is metallic and PaO2 is a Mott-Hubbard insulator. This is consistent with observations for the other actinide oxides. We discover that GGA and LDA incorrectly give metallic behavior for PaO2. The GGA(PBE) + U calculated indirect band gap of 3.48 eV reported for PaO2 is a prediction and should stimulate further studies of this material.

  17. Transcendence, ethics, and Mobil Oil: a rhetorical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1970 the Mobil Oil Corporation has been widely recognized as the self-appointed champion of corporate America's right to advocate. Corporate advocacy, as distinguished from other forms of external corporate communication, is concerned with the modification of corporate images and those social and political issues directly linked to the well-being of the corporation. Kenneth Burke's theory of transcendence serves as the central critical referent in the critique of Mobil's advocacy. By evoking elaborate transcendent frames of reference, Mobil seeks to identify its actions with higher syntheses that allow them to transcend the guilt produced by identifications with lesser orders. Mobil evokes two ultimate frames which are recurrent in their transcendent identifications: American energy independence and freedom of expression. In the latter part of this investigation, Sidney Hook's ethics of controversy was offered as an ethical referent. Two levels of analysis were conducted: first, three major types of arguments against Mobil's advocacy were evaluated; second, Mobil's discourse was evaluated. The conclusion was reached that Mobil's advocacy is largely an ethical form of American democratic discourse. In the final section of this investigation, the heuristic values of this critique were discussed.

  18. Enzymatic saccharification of solid residue of olive mill in a batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Abdi; Hamdache; Belhocine; Grib; Lounici; Piron; Mameri

    2000-12-01

    This paper describes the enzymatic hydrolysis of solid residue of olive mill (OMRS) in a batch reactor with the Trichoderma reesei enzyme. Before enzymatic saccharification, crude lignocellulosic material is submitted to alkaline pre-treatment with NaOH. Optimum conditions of the pre-treatment (temperature of T=100 degrees C and OMRS-NaOH concentration ratio of about R=20) were determined. The optimum enzymatic conditions determined were as follows: pH of about 5, temperature of T=50 degrees C and enzyme to mass substrate mass ratio E/S=0.1g enzyme (g OMRS)(-1). The maximum saccharification yield obtained at optimum experimental conditions was about 50%. The experimental results agree with Lineweaver Burk's formula for low substrate concentrations. At substrate concentrations greater than 40gdm(-3), inhibitory effects were encountered. The kinetic constants obtained for the batch reactor were K(m)=0.1gdm(-3)min(-1) and V(m)=800gdm(-3).

  19. Kinetics of Papain: An Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornely, Kathleen; Crespo, Eric; Earley, Michael; Kloter, Rachel; Levesque, Aime; Pickering, Mary

    1999-05-01

    Enzyme kinetics experiments are popular in the undergraduate laboratory. These experiments have pedagogic value because they reinforce the concepts of Michaelis-Menten kinetics covered in the lecture portion of the course and give students the experience of calculating kinetic constants from data they themselves have generated. In this experiment, we investigate the kinetics of the thiol protease papain. The source of the papain is commercially available papaya latex. A specific substrate, Na-benzoyl-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA), is used, which takes advantage of the fact that papain interacts with a phenylalanine residue two amino acids away from the peptide bond cleaved. Upon hydrolysis by papain, a bright yellow product is released, p-nitroaniline. This allows the reaction to be monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the rate of formation of the p-nitroaniline product as a function of the increase in absorbance of the solution at the lmax of p-nitroaniline (400 nm) over time at various substrate concentrations. These data are used to plot a Lineweaver-Burk plot from which the vmax and KM are obtained. If time permits, students carry out additional investigations in which e of p-nitroaniline is measured, the enzyme solution protein concentration is measured, the enzyme purity is evaluated by SDS-PAGE, and a pH-rate profile is constructed from experimental data.

  20. Towards an assessment of the accuracy of density functional theory for first principles simulations of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Jeffrey C.; Schwegler, Eric; Draeger, Erik W.; Gygi, François; Galli, Giulia

    2004-01-01

    A series of Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics simulations of water are presented, aimed at assessing the accuracy of density functional theory in describing the structural and dynamical properties of water at ambient conditions. We found negligible differences in structural properties obtained using the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof or the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr exchange and correlation energy functionals; we also found that size effects, although not fully negligible when using 32 molecule cells, are rather small. In addition, we identified a wide range of values of the fictitious electronic mass (μ) entering the CP Lagrangian for which the electronic ground state is accurately described, yielding trajectories and average properties that are independent of the value chosen. However, care must be exercised not to carry out simulations outside this range, where structural properties may artificially depend on μ. In the case of an accurate description of the electronic ground state, and in the absence of proton quantum effects, we obtained an oxygen-oxygen correlation function that is overstructured compared to experiment, and a diffusion coefficient which is approximately ten times smaller.

  1. Theoretical insight into the sensitive mechanism of multilayer-shaped cocrystal explosives: compression and slide.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-fei; Zhang, Shu-hai; Ren, Fu-de; Gou, Rui-jun; Han, Gang; Wu, Jing-bo; Ding, Xiong; Zhao, Wen-hu

    2016-05-01

    Multilayer-shaped compression and slide models were employed to investigate the complex sensitive mechanisms of cocrystal explosives in response to external mechanical stimuli. Here, density functional theory (DFT) calculations implementing the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) with the Tkatchenko-Scheffler (TS) dispersion correction were applied to a series of cocrystal explosives: diacetone diperoxide (DADP)/1,3,5-trichloro-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TCTNB), DADP/1,3,5-tribromo-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TBTNB) and DADP/1,3,5-triiodo-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TITNB). The results show that the GGA-PBE-TS method is suitable for calculating these cocrystal systems. Compression and slide models illustrate well the sensitive mechanism of layer-shaped cocrystals of DADP/TCTNB and DADP/TITNB, in accordance with the results from electrostatic potentials and free space per molecule in cocrystal lattice analyses. DADP/TCTNB and DADP/TBTNB prefer sliding along a diagonal direction on the a-c face and generating strong intermolecular repulsions, compared to DADP/TITNB, which slides parallel to the b-c face. The impact sensitivity of DADP/TBTNB is predicted to be the same as that of DADP/TCTNB, and the impact sensitivity of DADP/TBTNB may be slightly more insensitive than that of DADP and much more sensitive than that of TBTNB. PMID:27094730

  2. Deep brain stimulation and dantrolene for secondary dystonia in x-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    van Karnebeek, Clara; Horvath, Gabriella; Murphy, Tyler; Purtzki, Jacqueline; Bowden, Kristin; Sirrs, Sandra; Honey, Christopher R; Stockler, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used to treat secondary dystonias caused by inborn errors of metabolism with varying degrees of effectiveness. Here we report for the first time the application of DBS as treatment for secondary dystonia in a 22-year-old male with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). The disease manifested at age 6 with ADHD, tics, and dystonic gait, and deteriorated to loss of ambulation by age 11, and speech difficulties, seizures, and characteristic adrenal insufficiency by age 16. DBS in the globus pallidus internus was commenced at age 18. However, after 25 months, no improvement in dystonia was observed (Burke-Fahn-Marsden (BFM) scores of 65.5 and 62 and disability scores of 28 and 26, pre- and post-DBS, respectively) and the DBS device was removed. Treatment with dantrolene reduced skeletal muscle tone and improved movement (Global Dystonia Rating Scores from 5 to 1 and BFM score 42). Therefore, we conclude that DBS was a safe but ineffective intervention in our case with long-standing dystonia, whereas treatment of spasticity with dantrolene did improve the movement disorder in this young man with X-ALD.

  3. First principles LDA + U and GGA + U study of protactinium and protactinium oxides: dependence on the effective U parameter.

    PubMed

    Obodo, K O; Chetty, N

    2013-04-10

    The electronic structure and properties of protactinium and its oxides (PaO and PaO2) have been studied within the framework of the local density approximation (LDA), the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation [GGA(PBE)], LDA + U and GGA(PBE) + U implementations of density functional theory. The dependence of selected observables of these materials on the effective U parameter has been investigated in detail. The examined properties include lattice constants, bulk moduli, the effect of charge density distributions, the hybridization of the 5f orbital and the energy of formation for PaO and PaO2. The LDA gives better agreement with experiment for the bulk modulus than the GGA for Pa but the GGA gives better structural properties. We found that PaO is metallic and PaO2 is a Mott-Hubbard insulator. This is consistent with observations for the other actinide oxides. We discover that GGA and LDA incorrectly give metallic behavior for PaO2. The GGA(PBE) + U calculated indirect band gap of 3.48 eV reported for PaO2 is a prediction and should stimulate further studies of this material. PMID:23478314

  4. Clock Drawing Performance in Cognitively Normal Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Emily J; Santini, Veronica; Blankevoort, Christiaan G; Volkers, Karin M; Barrup, Melissa S; Byerly, Laura; Chaisson, Christine; Jefferson, Angela L; Kaplan, Edith; Green, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is a common neuropsychological measure sensitive to cognitive changes and functional skills (e.g., driving test performance) among older adults. However, normative data have not been adequately developed. We report the distribution of CDT scores using three common scoring systems (Mendez, Ala, and Underwood, 1992; Freund, Gravenstein, Ferris, Burke, & Shaheen, 2005; and Cahn, Salmon, Monsch, Butters, Wiederholt, & Corey-Bloom, 1996), among 207 cognitively normal elderly. The systems were well correlated, took little time to use, and had high inter-rater reliability. We found statistically significant differences in CDT scores based on age and WRAT-3 Reading score, a marker of education quality. We present means, standard deviations, and t- and z-scores based on these subgroups. We found that “normal” CDT performance includes a wider distribution of scores than previously reported. Our results may serve as useful comparisons for clinicians wishing to know whether their patients perform in the general range of cognitively normal elderly. PMID:18243644

  5. Investigation of pure and Co2+-doped ZnO quantum dot electronic structures using the density functional theory: choosing the right functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badaeva, Ekaterina; Feng, Yong; Gamelin, Daniel R.; Li, Xiaosong

    2008-05-01

    The electronic structures of pure and Co2+-doped ZnO quantum dots (QDs) with sizes up to 300 atoms were investigated using three different density functional theory approximations: local spin density approximation (LSDA), gradient-corrected Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) and the hybrid PBE1 functionals with LANL2DZ pseudo-potential and associated basis set. Qualitative agreement among the three methods is found for the pure ZnO nanostructures, but only the hybrid functional reproduces the correct bandgap energies quantitatively. For Co2+-doped ZnO QDs, both LSDA and PBE incorrectly model interactions between Co2+ d levels and the valence band of ZnO, which will strongly impair predictions of dopant-carrier magnetic exchange interactions based on such computational results. Experimental observations are reproduced well in calculations at the hybrid PBE1 level of theory, making this the method of choice for exploring the magnetism of transition metal ions in ZnO QDs computationally. The qualitative features of the Co2+ 3d levels do not change appreciably with changes in cluster size over the range examined, leading to size-dependent dopant-band edge energy differences. The results presented here thus provide an experimentally calibrated framework for future ab initio descriptions of dopant-carrier and dopant-dopant magnetic exchange interactions in diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) nanocrystals.

  6. Helping fluid teams work: A research agenda for effective team adaptation in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Bedwell, Wendy L; Ramsay, P Scott; Salas, Eduardo

    2012-12-01

    Although membership changes within teams are a common practice, research into this phenomenon is relatively nascent (Summers et al.; Acad Manag J 55:314-338, 2012). The small literature base, however, does provide insight into skills required for effective adaptation. The purpose of this effort is to provide a brief research synopsis, leading to research hypotheses about medical team training. By generalizing previous scientific findings regarding skills required for effective membership adaptation in different kinds of teams, we posit mechanisms whereby teamwork training might also support adaptation among medical teams (Burke et al.; Qual & Saf Health Care 13:i96-i104, 2004 and Salas et al.; Theor Issues Ergon Sci 8:381-394, 2007). We provide an overview of the membership change literature. Drawing upon literature from both within and outside of the medical domain, we suggest a framework and research propositions to aid in research efforts designed to determine the best content for helping to create adaptable medical teams through team training efforts. For effective adaptation, we suggest ad hoc teams should be trained on generalizable teamwork skills, to share just "enough" and the "right" information, to engage in shared leadership, and to shift from explicit to implicit coordination. Our overarching goal was to present what is known from the general research literature on successful team adaptation to membership changes, and to propose a research agenda to evaluate whether findings generalize to member changes in medical teams.

  7. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing.

  8. A novel luminescent terbium-3-carboxycoumarin probe for time-resolved fluorescence sensing of pesticides methomyl, aldicarb and prometryne.

    PubMed

    Azab, Hassan A; Duerkop, Axel; Saad, E M; Awad, F K; Abd El Aal, R M; Kamel, Rasha M

    2012-11-01

    The luminescence arising from lanthanide cations offers several advantages over organic fluorescent molecules: sharp, distinctive emission bands allow for easy resolution between multiple lanthanide signals; long emission lifetimes (μs-ms) make them excellent candidates for time-resolved measurements; and high resistance to photo bleaching allow for long or repeated experiments. A time-resolved (gated) luminescence-based method for determination of pesticides methomyl, aldicarb and prometryne in microtiterplate format using the long-lived terbium-3-carboxycoumarin in 1:3 metal:ligand ratio has been developed. The limit of detection is 1.20×10(6), 5.19×10(5) and 2.74×10(6)ng L(-1) for methomyl, prometryne and aldicarb, respectively. The quantum yield (QY=0.08) of Tb(III)-3-carboxycoumarin was determined using 3-(2-benzothiazolyl)-7-diethylamino-coumarin (coumarin 6). Stern-volmer studies at different temperatures indicate that collisional quenching dominates for methomyl, aldicarb and prometryne. Binding constants were determined at 303, 308 and 313 K by using Lineweaver-Burk equation. A thermodynamic analysis showed that the reaction is spontaneous with negative ΔG. Effect of some relevant interferents on the detection of pesticides has been investigated.

  9. Rhetorical analysis of Ronald Reagan's November 18, 1981, address on strategic arms reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, C.T. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ronald Reagan's addresses, news conferences, and statements on disarmament during his first term form the focus of this dissertation. The rhetoric of the Nuclear Freeze Campaign formed the background for the study of Reagan's response. A November 18, 1981, address before the National Press Club was selected as the representative anecdote for the disarmament rhetoric. Using Kenneth Burke's dramatistic method, the dissertation concludes that Reagan's effective choices in transformation, entitlement, and identification produced a disarmament drama that enabled many American listeners to cope with the arms race. The understandings created by this drama appealed to an audience that had been aroused by the freeze movement about the danger of nuclear war. Reagan's rhetorical choices included transforming the conflict of the people versus the arms race into a conflict between the people and the Soviet threat, entitling a nuclear buildup START to make it appear that reduction goes further than freezing weapons, and identifying with America's desire not to repeat past mistakes of history by promoting a need for a strong Alliance. Reagan reinforced the drama of an arms buildup as a road to peace. These choices, the constraints of freeze member's access to the media, and inconsistencies among freeze appeals, contributed significantly to the current lack of support for a nuclear freeze.

  10. Effects of Pu-erh tea aqueous extract (PTAE) on blood lipid metabolism enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Yan, Jingna; Luo, Liyong; Zhang, Dongying

    2015-06-01

    Disorders of blood lipid metabolism are the primary risk factors for many diseases. Recently, the effect of Pu-erh tea on blood lipid metabolism has received increasing attention. However, the mechanism underlying its ability to regulate blood lipid metabolism is unclear. We set out to study this through assessing the effects of Pu-erh tea aqueous extract (PTAE) on the central enzymes of blood lipid metabolism, including lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) and pancreatic lipase (PL). We find that the Lp-PLA2, HMRG and PL activities are inhibited by PTAE in a dose-dependent manner and that the LCAT activity tends to increase with increasing PTAE concentrations. Lineweaver-Burk plot analyses reveal that PTAE acts as a competitive inhibitor for HMGR and PL and as a noncompetitive inhibitor for Lp-PLA2. Moreover, we determine that its active ingredients include catechins, gallic acid, caffeine, free amino acids, and soluble sugar. However, the effect of each ingredient and whether any of them have synergistic effects are still unknown. The results suggest that Pu-erh tea has a potent ability to regulate blood lipid metabolism and knowledge of the mechanisms provides insights into its potential therapeutic application as an alternative hypolipidemic drug. PMID:26018873

  11. Two-dimensional boron nitride structures functionalization: first principles studies.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Pérez, R; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2016-09-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (2D hBN) structures functionalization with organic molecules. 2x2, 4x4 and 6x6 periodic 2D hBN layers have been considered to interact with acetylene. To deal with the exchange-correlation energy the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is invoked. The electron-ion interaction is treated with the pseudopotential method. The GGA with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhoff (PBE) functionals together with van der Waals interactions are considered to deal with the composed systems. To investigate the functionalization two main configurations have been explored; in one case the molecule interacts with the boron atom and in the other with the nitrogen atom. Results of the adsorption energies indicate chemisorption in both cases. The total density of states (DOS) displays an energy gap in both cases. The projected DOS indicate that the B-p and N-p orbitals are those that make the most important contribution in the valence band and the H-s and C-p orbitals provide an important contribution in the conduction band to the DOS. Provided that the interactions of the acetylene with the 2D layer modify the structural and electronic properties of the hBN the possibility of structural functionalization using organic molecules may be concluded. PMID:27566317

  12. NIMH during the tenure of Director Lewis L. Judd, M.D. (1987-1990): the decade of the brain and the four national research plans.

    PubMed

    Judd, L L

    1998-09-01

    My tenure at NIMH was an exhilarating, heady time of great satisfaction and achievement for all of us at the Institute. I have great affection and loyalty for NIMH, but my fondest memories are of the individuals who led and staffed the Institute's programs while I was there. One of the most gratifying aspects of my tenure was the opportunity to recruit and appoint people to new responsibilities and to interact with and support them as they grew into and beyond their positions of leadership within NIMH. When I left NIMH, I felt that the Institute's managers and staff were unparalleled in their creativity, competence, commitment, loyalty, and sheer hard work on behalf of the Institute and our field. My thanks and deep gratitude genuinely go out to the entire staff at NIMH during my tenure. However, a special debt of gratitude is owed to a group of colleagues and friends who, at my request, carried very heavy responsibilities and excelled in meeting them: Dr. Alan Leshner (Deputy Director of NIMH, now Director of NIDA); Dr. Stephen Koslow, Dr. Stephen Paul, Dr. Jack "Jay" Burke, Dr. David Segal, Dr. Ira Glick, Dr. Ellen Stover, Dr. Irene Levine, Dr. Daryl Kirsch, Dr. Rex Cowdry, Dr. Sam Keith, Dr. Delores Paron, Leroy Goldman, Richard Pine, William Fitzsimmons, Gordon Seidenberg, Lewis Steinberg, Gemma Weiblinger, George Halter, and my invaluable assistant, Margaret Shanley. PMID:9736861

  13. Design, synthesis and bioevaluation of novel umbelliferone analogues as potential mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Zaman; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Zaidi, Najam-Us-Sahar Sadaf

    2015-12-01

    A series of umbelliferone analogues were synthesized and their inhibitory effects on the DPPH and mushroom tyrosinase were evaluated. The results showed that some of the synthesized compounds exhibited significant mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activities. Especially, 2-oxo-2-[(2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl)oxy]ethyl-2,4-dihydroxybenzoate (4e) bearing 2,4-dihydroxy substituted phenyl ring exhibited the most potent tyrosinase inhibitory activity with IC50 value 8.96 µM and IC50 value of kojic acid is 16.69. The inhibition mechanism analyzed by Lineweaver-Burk plots revealed that the type of inhibition of compound 4e on tyrosinase was non-competitive. The docking study against tyrosinase enzyme was also performed to determine the binding affinity of the compounds. The compounds 4c and 4e showed the highest binding affinity with active binding site of tyrosinase. The initial structure activity relationships (SARs) analysis suggested that further development of such compounds might be of interest. The statistics of our results endorses that compounds 4c and 4e may serve as a structural template for the design and development of novel tyrosinase inhibitors.

  14. Mushroom tyrosinase inhibition activity of Aloe vera L. gel from different germplasms.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S Dutta; Masakapalli, S K

    2013-11-01

    In this study, lyophilized and methanolic extracts of aloe gel from different germplasms were evaluated for their potential to inhibit mushroom tyrosinase activity. The results showed potent inhibitory effect of Aloe vera gel extracts on L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) oxidation catalyzed by tyrosinase in a dose-dependent manner. Significant differences in % inhibition of tyrosinase among the extraction methods and the germplasms were observed. The relative performance of the germplasms was evaluated with the help of posthoc multicomparison test. The methanolic extract was more effective than the lyophilized crude gel in all the germplasms. The inhibitory effect of the lyophilized gel and methanolic extract tested from five germplasms followed the order: RM > TN > S24 > OR > RJN. The germplasm RM showed the highest tyrosinase inhibition, and the maximum % inhibition noted was 26.04% and 41.18%, respectively for the lyophilized and methanolic extracts at 6 mg · mL(-1) concentration. Lineweaver-Burk plots of the different concentrations of L-DOPA in the absence and presence of lyophilized gel extract showed competitive inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase in all the germplasms. This study suggests that the germplasm RM could potentially be used for the isolation and identification of the effective tyrosinase inhibitory component, and ascertains the critical role of selecting the best source of germplasm for natural product isolation and characterization.

  15. Kinetics of inhibitory effect of isoferulic acid on mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shengzhao; Yin, Meijuan; Yun, Zhimian

    2013-01-01

    A study on the kinetics of inhibitory effect of isoferulic acid on the monophenolase and diphenolase activity of mushroom tyrosinase was carried out using enzymological kinetic analysis method in a Na2HPO4-NaH2PO4 buffer solution (pH = 6.8) at 30°C. It was found that isoferulic acid efficiently inhibits both monophenolase and diphenolase activities of mushroom tyrosinase under experimental conditions. Concentrations of isoferulic acid leading to 50% rate inhibition (IC50) on monophenolase and diphenolase activity were calculated to be 0.13 mmol/L and 0.39 mmol/L, respectively, which are much lower than that of arbutin (IC50 = 5.3 mmol/L for diphenolase activity). The presence of isoferulic acid also prolongs the lag period in the oxidation process of l-tyrosine via tyrosinase-a 4.3-min lagging was observed with the presence of 0.20 mmol/L isoferulic acid-compared to a 1.1-min lagging in the absence of isoferulic acid. The Lineweaver-Burk plot demonstrates a competitive behavior of isoferulic acid in the tyrosinase oxidation of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, with maximum reaction rate (vm) and inhibition constant (KI) at 64.5 µM/min and 0.11 mmol/L, respectively.

  16. Density functional theory study on the magnetic properties of Co3O4 with normal spinel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic properties of Co3O4 with a normal spinel structure were investigated via the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method based on density functional theory (DFT). The exchange and correlation effects between electrons were treated with a standard generalized gradient approximation (GGA) from Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), as a function of the on-site Coulomb U term, the GGA-PBE+U method, and a B3PW91 hybrid functional with different Hartree-Fock exchange admixtures. Were calculated all of these exchange-correlation (XC) functionals both with and without spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The objective for these calculations was to predict the ground-state magnetic structure of Co3O4 crystal using different XC functionals and to investigate the influence that SOC had on these results. All of our calculations confirmed that the collinear antiferromagnetic (AFM) order was energetically more favorable than the ferromagnetic (FM) one, which agrees with experimental findings. This conclusion was not influenced by the XC functional type employed or whether the spin-orbit effect was used. Thus, the present work does not confirm the recent DFT plane wave pseudopotential results that when including spin-orbit effects, the calculations determined that the collinear FM state had lower energy than the AFM one.

  17. The Development of the George B. Pegram Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCay, Myron S.

    1997-11-01

    The George B. Pegram Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Physics was developed by a representative group of SESAPS members over a period of eight years with outstanding contributions as follows: Jesse Beams, APS President, with the advice of Mark Zemansky, AAPT, chose George B. Pegram as the honoree, in view of his excellent teaching career at Columbia University, his graduation from Trinity College--now Duke University, his long period of service as Treasurer of APS, and his active support of the special training program at ORAU; Earle Plyler with the assistance of Edward Burke, Jr., prepared the selection criteria for the recipients of the award; Walter Gordy coordinated the APS approval and initiated the financing of the program; Howard Carr raised the first funds and prepared the initial certificates; William G. Pollard joined the committee and completed the early funding, while preparing the formal certificate and medal; Dr. Vernet Eaton, AAPT President, stimulated the program when he urged the nomination of SESAPS members for the Oersted Award. After his lectures at the 1955 Gainesville meeting, Wendell Holladay instructed the committee to report its recommendations at the next SESAPS meeting. In 1969 SESAPS approved the George B. Pegram Award.

  18. SCF treatment of charge polarization effects in intermediate-energy electron scattering calculations with applications to N2. [Self Consistent Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onda, K.; Truhlar, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    Converged rotational close coupling calculations of differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections are obtained for seven model potentials for electron-N2 scattering at an impact energy of 30 eV. The model potentials involve a static potential calculated by the INDO/1s or INDOXI/1s method, and exchange potential calculated by the semiclassical exchange approximation from the INDO/1s or INDOXI/1s unperturbed electron density and a polarization potential. The polarization potentials used include the Buckley-Burke semiempirical one and various modifications of the INDOXI and INDO SCF (self-consistent-field) adiabatic polarization potentials. Without adjustment of parameters, good agreement is obtained with the angle dependence of the experimentally measured sum of the elastic and rotational excitation differential cross sections; however, the absolute value of the calculated cross sections is about 20-30% larger than the measured values in the best case, perhaps indicating that the model potentials are too strong or should have a nonzero imaginary part.

  19. Prediction model of band gap for inorganic compounds by combination of density functional theory calculations and machine learning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohwi; Seko, Atsuto; Shitara, Kazuki; Nakayama, Keita; Tanaka, Isao

    2016-03-01

    Machine learning techniques are applied to make prediction models of the G0W0 band gaps for 270 inorganic compounds using Kohn-Sham (KS) band gaps, cohesive energy, crystalline volume per atom, and other fundamental information of constituent elements as predictors. Ordinary least squares regression (OLSR), least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, and nonlinear support vector regression (SVR) methods are applied with two levels of predictor sets. When the KS band gap by generalized gradient approximation of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) or modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) is used as a single predictor, the OLSR model predicts the G0W0 band gap of randomly selected test data with the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 0.59 eV. When KS band gap by PBE and mBJ methods are used together with a set of predictors representing constituent elements and compounds, the RMSE decreases significantly. The best model by SVR yields the RMSE of 0.24 eV. Band gaps estimated in this way should be useful as predictors for virtual screening of a large set of materials.

  20. Microstructure and Crystallographic Texture Evolution During the Friction-Stir Processing of a Precipitation-Hardenable Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadammal, Naresh; Kailas, Satish V.; Szpunar, Jerzy; Suwas, Satyam

    2015-05-01

    Friction-stir processing (FSP) has been proven as a successful method for the grain refinement of high-strength aluminum alloys. The most important attributes of this process are the fine-grain microstructure and characteristic texture, which impart suitable properties in the as-processed material. In the current work, FSP of the precipitation-hardenable aluminum alloy 2219 has been carried out and the consequent evolution of microstructure and texture has been studied. The as-processed materials were characterized using electron back-scattered diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and electron probe microanalysis. Onion-ring formation was observed in the nugget zone, which has been found to be related to the precipitation response and crystallographic texture of the alloy. Texture development in the alloy has been attributed to the combined effect of shear deformation and dynamic recrystallization. The texture was found heterogeneous even within the nugget zone. A microtexture analysis revealed the dominance of shear texture components, with C component at the top of nugget zone and the B and A2* components in the middle and bottom. The bulk texture measurement in the nugget zone revealed a dominant C component. The development of a weaker texture along with the presence of some large particles in the nugget zone indicates particle-stimulated nucleation as the dominant nucleation mechanism during FSP. Grain growth follows the Burke and Turnbull mechanism and geometrical coalescence.

  1. The dual actions of Paederia scandens extract as a hypouricemic agent: xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity and uricosuric effect.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haiyan; Ma, Ying; Liu, Mei; Zhou, Lanlan

    2008-09-01

    Hyperuricemia is associated with a number of pathological conditions, such as gout. Lowering of elevated uric acid levels in the blood could be achieved by xanthine oxidase inhibitors and inhibitors of renal urate reabsorption. Some natural compounds isolated from herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine have been previously demonstrated to act as xanthine oxidase inhibitors. In the present investigation, Paederia scandens (Lour.) Merrill (Rubiaceae) extract (PSE; 4.5, 2.25, and 1.125 g/kg) orally for 14 days was demonstrated to possess in vivo potent hypouricemic activity in hyperuricemic rats pretreated with potassium oxonate. In addition, PSE was also demonstrated to be an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase. Lineweaver-Burk analysis of the enzyme kinetics indicated that the inhibition of PSE was of a mixed type. Using an oxonate-induced hyperuricemic rat model, PSE was indeed shown to exhibit uricosuric action in vivo, which could explain, at least in part, the observed hypouricemic effect of PSE in these rats. The potential application of this compound in the treatment of conditions associated with hyperuricemia is discussed.

  2. From Mind to Context, from Accuracy to Meaning. Exploring the Grammar of Remembering as a Socially Situated Act.

    PubMed

    Brescó de Luna, Ignacio

    2016-06-01

    This paper begins by addressing the so-called memory crisis, a crisis which, since the 90s, has problematized the traditional manner in which memory is studied and understood. Special attention is paid to the changing role attributed to accuracy and meaning when remembering the past. In light of this crisis, I comment on Smorti and Fioretti's paper (2015), focusing on the point that they make regarding how autobiographical narratives affect and change autobiographical memories. Complementing that view, according to which memories are transformed when they are externalized through a communicative act by means of narratives, this paper focuses on a more narrative and situated approach to memory, shifting from mind to social settings, from accuracy to meaning. Building on that approach, I briefly discuss the notion of event as a narrative construction. Finally, drawing on Burke's pentad model (1969), I put forward a framework for studying remembering as a situated activity. The pentad of elements are addressed as follows: 1) Agency, or the mediational means for the construction of past events; 2) Act, or remembering as a reconstructive activity; 3) Scene, or the social dynamics of remembering; 4) Agent, or subjective positionings when reconstructing the past; and 5) Purpose, or uses of the past in relation to the future.

  3. Lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of alkyl protocatechuates.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae Joung; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Kubo, Isao

    2014-09-15

    Alkyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoates (protocatechuates) inhibited linoleic acid peroxidation catalyzed by soybean lipoxygenase-1 (EC 1.13.11.12, Type 1). Their inhibitory activities displayed a parabolic function of their lipophilicity and maximized with alkyl chain lengths of between C11 and C14. Tetradecanyl protocatechuate exhibited the most potent inhibition with an IC50 of 0.05 μM, followed by dodecyl (lauryl) protocatechuate with an IC50 of 0.06 μM. However, their parent compound, protocatechuic acid, did not show this inhibitory activity up to 200 μM, indicating that the alkyl chain length is significantly related to the inhibition activity. The allosteric (or cooperative) inhibition of soybean lipoxygenase-1 of longer alkyl protocatechuates is reversible but in combination with their iron binding ability to disrupt the active site competitively and to interact with the hydrophobic portion surrounding near the active site (sequential action). In the case of dodecyl protocatechuate, the enzyme quickly binds this protocatechuate and then its dodecyl group undergoes a slow interaction with the hydrophobic domain in close proximity to the active site in the enzyme. The inhibition kinetics analyzed by Lineweaver-Burk plots indicates that octyl protocatechuate is a competitive inhibitor and the inhibition constant (Ki) was obtained as 0.23 μM but dodecyl protocatechuate is a slow binding inhibitor.

  4. Addition-fragmentation reaction of thionoesters compounds in free-radical polymerisation (methyl, cyanomethyl and styryl): a theoretical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, Douniazed; Ouddai, Nadia; Arotçaréna, Michel; Chermette, Henry

    2015-07-01

    A joint experimental and theoretical study has been carried out on reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerisation (RAFT). We have performed density functional theory calculations at the (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) PBE/triple zeta plus polarisation level to analyse the RAFT mechanisms corresponding to these compounds. Global and local reactivity indices have been calculated to investigate the effect of the addition of methyl, cyanomethyl and styryl radicals on the double bond C=S of thionoester compounds producing an adduct radical. This mechanism is shown to be difficult when the cyanomethyl is used contrarily to the methyl and styryl radicals, in agreement with experimental results. The activation barrier of fragmentation of adduct radicals does not correlate well with the length of fragmented bond (O-Cα). The bond topological analysis of radical adduct predicts that the distance between the oxygen and a critical point (O-CP) in the fragment bond is a good parameter to estimate the activation energy of the fragmentation mechanism. It is shown that the nature of the free radicals is more selective than that of the thionoester compounds. With an overall large agreement with experiments, these theoretical results afford an explanation of the efficiency for the RAFT mechanism.

  5. Many-Body Atomic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, J. J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    1998-09-01

    Preface; Contributors; Introduction; Part I. Atomic Structure: 1. Development of atomic many-body theory Ingvar Lindgren; 2. Relativistic MBPT for highly charged ions W. R. Johnson; 3. Parity nonconservation in atoms S. A. Blundell, W. R. Johnson, and J. Sapirstein; Part II. Photoionization of Atoms: 4. Single photoionization processes J. J. Boyle, and M. D. Kutzner; 5. Photoionization dominated by double excitation T. N. Chang; 6. Direct double photoionization in atoms Z. W. Liu; 7. Photoelectron angular distributions Steven T. Manson; Part III. A. Atomic Scattering - General Considerations: 8. The many-body approach to electron-atom collisions M. Ya Amusia; 9. Theoretical aspects of electron impact ionization P. L. Altick; Part III. B. Atomic Scattering - Low-Order Applications: 10. Perturbation series methods D. H. Madison; 11. Target dependence of the triply differential cross section Cheng Pan and Anthony F. Starace; 12. Overview of Thomas processes for fast mass transfer J. H. McGuire, Jack C. Straton and T. Ishihara; Part III. C. Atomic Scattering - All-Order Applications: 13. R-matrix Theory: Some Recent Applications Philip G. Burke: 14. Electron scattering: application of Dirac R-matrix theory Wasantha Wijesundera, Ian Grant and Patrick Norrington; 15. Close coupling and distorted-wave theory D. C. Griffin and M. S. Pindzola; Appendix: Units and notation; References; Index.

  6. Many-Body Atomic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, J. J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2005-11-01

    Preface; Contributors; Introduction; Part I. Atomic Structure: 1. Development of atomic many-body theory Ingvar Lindgren; 2. Relativistic MBPT for highly charged ions W. R. Johnson; 3. Parity nonconservation in atoms S. A. Blundell, W. R. Johnson, and J. Sapirstein; Part II. Photoionization of Atoms: 4. Single photoionization processes J. J. Boyle, and M. D. Kutzner; 5. Photoionization dominated by double excitation T. N. Chang; 6. Direct double photoionization in atoms Z. W. Liu; 7. Photoelectron angular distributions Steven T. Manson; Part III. A. Atomic Scattering - General Considerations: 8. The many-body approach to electron-atom collisions M. Ya Amusia; 9. Theoretical aspects of electron impact ionization P. L. Altick; Part III. B. Atomic Scattering - Low-Order Applications: 10. Perturbation series methods D. H. Madison; 11. Target dependence of the triply differential cross section Cheng Pan and Anthony F. Starace; 12. Overview of Thomas processes for fast mass transfer J. H. McGuire, Jack C. Straton and T. Ishihara; Part III. C. Atomic Scattering - All-Order Applications: 13. R-matrix Theory: Some Recent Applications Philip G. Burke: 14. Electron scattering: application of Dirac R-matrix theory Wasantha Wijesundera, Ian Grant and Patrick Norrington; 15. Close coupling and distorted-wave theory D. C. Griffin and M. S. Pindzola; Appendix: Units and notation; References; Index.

  7. Anti-diabetic potential of Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS): a review.

    PubMed

    Uzayisenga, Rosette; Ayeka, Peter Amwoga; Wang, Yi

    2014-04-01

    Herbal medicines have traditionally played a major role in the management of diabetes in Asian countries for centuries. Panax notoginseng (Burk) F. H. Chen (Araliaceae) known as Tiánqī or san qi is a well-known medicinal herb in Asia for its long history of use in Chinese medicine. Qualified as 'the miracle root for the preservation of life', it has been used in China for 600 years, for treatment of various diseases. Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) are the key active components. PNS have been widely used in China for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. However, scientific studies have shown a wide range of other pharmacological applications including anti-cancer, neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents, immunologic adjuvant and prevention of diabetes complications. Recently, hypoglycemic and anti-obesity properties of PNS have also been demonstrated. The present review highlights the effects of PNS on glucose production and absorption, and on inflammatory processes that seem to play an important role in the development of diabetes.

  8. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; T.J. Bornhorst; William B. Harrison; W. Quinlan

    2002-04-01

    The fault study continues to find more faults and develop new techniques to visualize them. Data from the Dundee Formation has been used to document 11 major faults in the Michigan Basin which have now been verified using data from other horizons. These faults control the locations of many of the large anticlinal structures in the Michigan Basin and likely controlled fluid movements as well. The surface geochemistry program is also moving along well with emphasis on measuring samples collected last sampling season. The new GC laboratory is now functional and has been fully staffed as of December. The annual project review was held March 7-9 in Tampa, Florida. Contracts are being prepared for drilling the Bower's prospects in Isabella County, Michigan, this spring or summer. A request was made to extend the scope of the project to include the Willison Basin. A demonstration well has been suggested in Burke County, N. Dakota, following a review of 2D seismic and surface geochem. A 3D seismic survey is scheduled for the prospect.

  9. Potentially superhard hcp Cr N2 compound studied at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhonglong; Bao, Kuo; Tian, Fubo; Duan, Defang; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by recent developments in nitrogen-rich transition-metal nitrides, the stability of chromium mononitride (CrN) and the possible formation of chromium dinitride (Cr N2 ) are studied using density functional theory (with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional within the generalized gradient approximation, local density approximation plus U, and Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid exchange-correlation potentials), ab initio evolutionary algorithm, as well as ab initio molecular dynamics. It is found that low-temperature orthorhombic CrN will transform into a hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structure at above 108 GPa. Two hcp Cr N2 , constructed by replacing the interstitial nitrogen in hcp CrN with nitrogen-nitrogen units, are predicted to be stable at above 7 GPa due to the physics of precompression. We show that the Cr-N bond length in hcp Cr N2 at 0 GPa is comparable to that of the CrN prototype at more than 45 GPa, and the electrons have been transformed from itinerant to localized, which results in unique metal-insulator transitions and a high hardness of 46 GPa. These results, therefore, provide crucial insights for designing covalence-dominated transition-metal compounds.

  10. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-07-01

    The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a strong anomaly in the Myrtle Beach area that would justify drilling by itself and even more so in conjunction with the structural interpretation from the 3D seismic data. The Myrtle Beach geochemical survey indicated a good to excellent prospect which was confirmed by drilling. Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Myrtle Beach area in Burke County, North Dakota. This case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and the two vertical wells that are part of this field demonstration, and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and is being used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.

  11. Chemical and Genetic Comparative Analysis of Gentiana crassicaulis and Gentiana macrophylla.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaping; Ahmad, Bashir; Duan, Baozhong; Zeng, Rui; Huang, Linfang

    2016-06-01

    Gentiana crassicaulis Duthie ex Burk. and Gentiana macrophylla Pall. are two main sources of Radix Gentianae Macrophyllae (Qinjiao) available in markets, which has a wide range of anti-inflammatory effects and has been extensively used for fighting rheumatoid arthritis. However, they vary in terms of chemical compositions, pharmacological activities, and biomass. In this study, a combined chemical and genetic (HPLC and DNA barcoding) approach was used to compare these two plants. Four predominant bioactive compounds, namely, gentiopicroside, loganic acid, swertiamarin, and sweroside, were used to assess the chemical variations. Based on chemical variations, 15 samples were clustered into two groups through PCA analyses. DNA barcoding utilizing the variable nuclear ITS2 regions were sequenced, aligned, and compared. Together with 61 sequences collected from GenBank, 76 batches of Qinjiao were clustered in two groups according to species origin. The genetic relationships indicated by the ITS2-based NJ tree were consistent with the chemical variations. Thus, the chemical profiles determined by HPLC and DNA profiles obtained from ITS2 region could be applied for the quality control of Qinjiao. PMID:27144464

  12. A novel glucose oxidase biosensor based on poly([2,2';5',2″]-terthiophene-3'-carbaldehyde) modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Guler, Muhammet; Turkoglu, Vedat; Kivrak, Arif

    2015-08-01

    In the study, the electrochemical behavior of glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilized on poly([2,2';5',2″]-terthiophene-3'-carbaldehyde) (poly(TTP)) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was investigated. The biosensor (poly(TTP)/GOx/GCE) showed a pair of redox peaks in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) solution in the absence of oxygen the co-substrate of GOx. In here, Poly(TTP)/GOx/GCE biosensor acts as the co-substrate instead of oxygen. Upon the addition of glucose, the reduction and oxidation peak currents increased until the active site of GOx was fully saturated with glucose. The apparent m was estimated 26.13 mM from Lineweaver-Burk graph. The biosensor displayed a good stability and bioactivity. The biosensor showed a high sensitivity (56.1 nA/mM), a linear range (from 0.5 to 20.15 mM), and a good reproducibility with 3.6% of relative standard deviation. In addition, the interference currents of glycin, ascorbic acid, histidine, uric acid, dopamine, arginine, and fructose on GOx biosensor were investigated. All that substances exhibited an interference current under 10%. It was not shown a marked difference between GOx biosensor and spectrophotometric measurement of glucose in serum examples. UV-visible spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) experiments of the biosensor were also performed. PMID:25934105

  13. Revisiting Brightest Cluster Galaxy Evolution with the Las Campanas Distant Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Amy E.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Dalcanton, Julianne J.

    2002-02-01

    We investigate the influence of environment on brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) evolution using a sample of 63 clusters at 0.3<=z<=0.9 drawn primarily from the Las Campanas Distant Cluster Survey and follow-up V, I, and K' photometry. The luminosity evolution of the entire BCG sample is not adequately described by a single evolutionary model. Using the integrated light from the cluster detection as a proxy for cluster LX and the suggestion by Burke, Collins, & Mann, we set LX=2×1044 ergs s-1 to be the division between high- and low-luminosity clusters. At high redshift (z>0.6) BCGs from low-LX clusters are fainter, on average, than those from high-LX clusters and are best modeled as having constant luminosity with redshift. The BCGs from high-LX clusters are best modeled as having a stellar population that formed at large redshift (zform>5) and is passively evolving. However, for the entire BCG population, the observed V-I and I-K' colors are well described by a single evolutionary model in which the stellar populations have zform>5 and subsequently passively evolve. We conclude that accretion is proportionally more significant for BCGs in lower mass clusters at these redshifts (a factor of 2-4 increase in mass since z~1 for the low-LX systems; Aragon-Salamanca and coworkers) and that the accreted matter is in the form of systems with evolved stellar populations.

  14. Detecting Extrasolar Asteroid Belts Through Their Microlensing Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Ethan; Zheng, Zheng; Dong, Subo

    2016-03-01

    We propose that extrasolar asteroid belts can be detected through their gravitational microlensing signatures and present a simple theoretical understanding of how asteroid belts behave as gravitational lenses. Asteroid belt + star lens systems create so-called ``pseudo-caustics'', which are regions in the source plane where the magnification of the source exhibits a discontinuous jump. Such a magnification change can be associated with either a change in image multiplicity or with a sudden change in the size of an image. The existence of pseudo-caustics and the complex interplay between them and the formal caustics (which possess formally infinite magnification) lead to several interesting consequences, such as the presence of open caustics and the violation of Burke's theorem. These features allow such systems to generate very distinctive microlensing light curves across a wide region of asteroid belt parameter space and possess remarkably large lensing cross-sections. By constructing simulated light curves for a range of asteroid belt parameters, we demonstrate that upcoming space-based microlensing surveys like WFIRST are well-poised to discover extrasolar asteroid belts with masses on the order of 0 . 1M⊕ .

  15. Astronomy and space science from the moon: Panel discussion and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.

    1994-06-01

    The COSPAR Symposium on 'Astronomy and Space Science from the Moon', held at the COSPAR/IAF World Space Congress in Washington (on 31 August-3 September 1992), ended with a session on 'Scenarios for lunar bases and observatories'. A panel discussion was organized to address specific topics: Precursor astronomy missions; Launch, landing and transportation systems, technologies; Site selection and emplacement, resource utilization, architectural considerations; Link with space stations, and Mars exploration programs; Human aspects, performance, protection, operations and activities; Protection of the lunar environment; and Biospheres on the Moon. The panel discussion, coordinated by B. H. Foing (F) included in particular contributions from Drs. Matogawa (Japan), R. M. Bonnet (ESA), H. Balsiger (CH and ESA representative), P. Bochsler (CH), S. Volonte (ESA), W. Mendell (NASA), W. Sadeh (USA), R. Manka (USA), B. Burke (USA), M. Rougeron (CNES), V. Bluem (Germany) and from the general participants. We give here a summary of these discussions. We also include additional information for assessing the perspectives for Lunar based activities after the COSPAR symposium.

  16. Electron scattering from HeII ions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.; Dahler, J. S.

    1997-04-01

    Electron collisional excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of HeII ions are of extreme interest in the modelling of astrophysical plasmas. They are required for reliable determination of the excitation and ionization in the solar corona, impulsive heating events in the solar transitions region, shock waves in the interstellar medium and in stellar atmospheres. Emission lines of HeII have been observed in a variety of solar and astrophysical objects at wavelengths below 350 ÅThe Extreme Ultra Violet Explorer (EUVE) spectra of Capella (HD 3402, G8 III + G0 III), the bright RS CVn binary system, is dominated by HeII (λ 303 Åand high ionization stages of iron. Accurate knowledge of the electron collisional excitation rates for the n = 2 and n = 3 levels of HeII are required in the modelling of the electron-ion equilibration in non-radiative shocks associated with SN 1006. Recently attention has focused on scattering at intermediate energies with emphasis on the n = 2 levels using the CCC formalism and the 2D-Rmatrix propagator method. In our work we have used the IERM approach of Burke, Scott and co-workers to obtain accurate cross sections for levels up to n = 3, as this has proved successful in dealing with electron - atomic hydrogen scattering at intermediate energies. A comprehensive set of results will be presented at the meeting.

  17. In Memoriam--Daniel Kirkwood--1814-1895

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Frank K.

    1995-12-01

    Daniel Kirkwood was Professor of Mathematics at Indiana University from 1856 to 1886. His name is still known at the end of the 20th century for his discovery in 1866 of the "Kirkwood gaps" in the orbits of the minor planets between Mars and Jupiter. This 25 minute videotape was orginally planned to celebrate the centennial of the Dedication of Kirkwood Hall on January 25, 1895, four and a half months before Kirkwood's death on June 11. The centerpiece is the reading by Professor Richard Burke of the speech given by the President of the I.U. Board of Trustees at the Dedication. Morton Lowengrub, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences speaks about Daniel Kirkwood at the beginning of the video. George Walker, Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School, describes the action of the Board of Trustees on June 14, 1895 to create the Department of Mechanics and Astronomy. (Mechanics was dropped from the name in 1915.) He says it is fitting that the Department is beginning its second century with the start of scheduled operation of the shared WIYN Telescope on Kitt Peak, and concludes with a statement about Daniel Kirkwood.

  18. Empirical Calibration of the P-Factor for Cepheid Radii Determined Using the IR Baade-Wesselink Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.; Laney, C. D.

    2012-05-01

    We have used 41 galactic Cepheids for which parallax or cluster/association distances are available, and for which pulsation parallaxes can be calculated, to calibrate the p-factor to be used in K-band Baade-Wesselink radius calculations. Our sample includes the 10 Cepheids from Benedict et al. (2007), and three additional Cepheids with Hipparcos parallaxes derived from van Leeuwen et al. (2007). Turner and Burke (2002) list cluster distances for 33 Cepheids for which radii have been or (in a few cases) can be calculated. Revised cluster distances from Turner (2010), Turner and Majaess (2008, 2012), and Majaess and Turner (2011, 2012a, 2012b) have been used where possible. Radii have been calculated using the methods described in Laney and Stobie (1995) and converted to K-band absolute magnitudes using the methods described in van Leeuwen et al. (2007), Feast et al. (2008), and Laney and Joner (2009). The resulting pulsation parallaxes have been used to estimate the p-factor for each Cepheid. These new results stand in contradiction to those derived by Storm et al. (2011), but are in good agreement with theoretical predictions by Nardetto et al. (2009) and with interferometric estimates of the p-factor, as summarized in Groenewegen (2007). We acknowledge the Brigham Young University College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences for continued support of research done using the facilities and personnel at the West Mountain Observatory. This support is connected with NSF/AST grant #0618209.

  19. Gravitational wave damping of neutron star wobble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Curt; Jones, David Ian

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the effect of gravitational wave (GW) back reaction on realistic neutron stars (NS's) undergoing torque-free precession. By ``realistic'' we mean that the NS is treated as a mostly fluid body with an elastic crust, as opposed to a rigid body. We find that GW's damp NS wobble on a time scale τθ~2×105 yr [10- 7/(ΔId/I0)]2(kHz/ νs)4, where νs is the spin frequency and ΔId is the piece of the NS's inertia tensor that ``follows'' the crust's principal axis (as opposed to its spin axis). We give two different derivations of this result: one based solely on energy and angular momentum balance, and another obtained by adding the Burke-Thorne radiation reaction force to the Newtonian equations of motion. This problem was treated long ago by Bertotti and Anile, but their claimed result is wrong. When we convert from their notation to ours, we find that their τθ is too short by a factor of ~105 for the typical cases of interest and even has the wrong sign for ΔId negative. We show where their calculation went astray.

  20. Gravitational radiation reaction and balance equations to post-Newtonian order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Luc

    1997-01-01

    Gravitational radiation reaction forces and balance equations are investigated to 3/2 post-Newtonian (1.5PN) order beyond the quadrupole approximation, corresponding to the 4PN order in the equations of motion of an isolated system. By matching a post-Newtonian solution for the gravitational field inside the system to a post-Minkowskian solution (obtained in a previous work) for the gravitational field exterior to the system, we determine the 1PN relativistic corrections to the ``Newtonian'' radiation reaction potential of Burke and Thorne. The 1PN reaction potential involves both scalar and vectorial components, with the scalar component depending on the mass-type quadrupole and octupole moments of the system, and the vectorial component depending in particular on the current-type quadrupole moment. In the case of binary systems, the 1PN radiation reaction potential has been shown elsewhere to yield consistent results for the 3.5PN approximation in the binary's equations of motion. Adding up the effects of tails, the radiation reaction is then written to 1.5PN order. In this paper, we establish the validity to 1.5PN order, for general systems, of the balance equations relating the losses of energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum in the system to the corresponding fluxes in the radiation field far from the system.

  1. Radio emissions from planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    2012-03-01

    Since the discovery of intense radio emissions from Jupiter by Burke and Franklin in 1955, it is now known that the magnetospheres of all the strongly magnetized planets emit intense non-thermal radio emissions. This talk will review the progress that has been made in understanding these radio emissions during the more than fifty years since their discovery. It is now known that two basic radio emission processes are involved: cyclotron maser radiation from precipitating auroral electrons, and mode conversion from electrostatic waves driven by the anisotropy of magnetically trapped magnetospheric electrons. Of these, the cyclotron maser radiation is by far the most intense. Since the gaseous outer planets have no visible surface and since the magnetic field which controls the motion of the electrons is linked to the deep interior, the rotational modulation of cyclotron maser radiation provides the primary method of determining the rotation rates of these planets. Cyclotron maser radiation has also been detected from certain strongly magnetized stars, and serious efforts are now underway to try to detect cyclotron maser radiation from extra-solar system planets.

  2. Dayside Thermospheric Upwelling Driven by Magnetospheric Energy Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. R.; Ober, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, accelerometer data from the Champ and GRACE satellites has illustrated that the thermospheric density at high latitudes can be highly structured in both space and time. The standard interpretation is that the thermosphere is responding to spatially and temporally structured energy inputs from the magnetosphere. In this presentation we report on our studies to test this hypothesis and determine whether the electromagnetic energy flux (Poynting) or precipitating particle energy flux is the main driver of thermospheric upwelling at high latitudes. To determine the magnetospheric energy input we use data from satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) which carry a suite of space environment sensors whose data can be used to quantify magnetospheric energy input to the upper atmosphere. These include (1) an ion/electron precipitation spectrometer (30 eV - 30 keV), (2) an ion retarding potential analyzer, (3) an ion driftmeter, and (4) a magnetometer. Data from the spectrometer can be used to quantify precipitating particle energy flux while measurements of plasma drifts and magnetic perturbations can be combined to find down-going Poynting flux. To determine the thermospheric response to this energy input we use densities derived from drag measurements made by the GRACE and Champ satellites. We use a method recently developed by Burke et al. [2009] to convert the thermospheric density increases into atmospheric energy gains in order to compare with the magnetospheric energy supplied.

  3. Overlooked Properties of the Cepheid Polaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. G.

    2004-05-01

    The North Star, Polaris, and the anonymous, poorly populated, previously-unnoticed, star cluster in which it lies, have been target objects in a newly initiated campaign of photometric observation using the Burke-Gaffney Observatory at Saint Mary's University. Polaris continues to pulsate with its familiar 4-day period, albeit at a very low level; its 2003 amplitude in V was 0.024, typical of recent observations. The star also exhibits a rapid rate of period change that has probably been underestimated by previous investigators. The declining light amplitude and rapid rate of evolution through the Cepheid instability strip raise questions about its evolutionary status and pulsation mode. The possibility is raised that Polaris is crossing the instability strip for the first time, and that its declining light amplitude is linked to a relatively narrow width of the instability strip for first crossers. Cluster main sequence fitting provides an estimate for its luminosity of MV = -3.37 ± 0.07, which differs from the value inferred from its Hipparcos parallax. The Cepheid may be an overtone pulsator.

  4. Globally averaged exospheric temperatures derived from CHAMP and GRACE accelerometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, J. O.; Burke, W. J.; Sutton, E. K.

    2012-04-01

    Neutral densities (ρ) inferred from accelerometer measurements on the polar-orbiting Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are used to compile exospheric temperatures (T∞) during extended periods in 2003 and 2004 when their orbital planes were nearly parallel and at quadrature, respectively. Exospheric temperatures were first estimated using ρ-h-T∞ relationships implicit within the Jacchia models, then averaged over individual orbits. We found good agreement between the orbital-averaged T∞ obtained from CHAMP and GRACE accelerometer data as well as with globally averaged exospheric temperatures derived from drag measurements from the constellation of satellites used in the High-Accuracy Satellite Drag Model. Our analysis corrects a critical conjecture by Burke (2008) that globally averaged T∞ is essentially the same as orbit-averaged values obtained by polar-orbiting satellites, independent of the local time of their orbital planes. Unlike the symmetric 0200-1400 LT distribution of T∞ minima and maxima found in early Jacchia models, presented data indicate that the minima are located closer to the dawn meridian. We also demonstrate that the averaging technique used to estimate T∞ affects the outcomes. Statistical analyses provide an empirical basis for improving estimates of the thermosphere's total energy budget.

  5. Evolution of brightest cluster galaxies in X-ray clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brough, S.; Collins, C. A.; Burke, D. J.; Mann, R. G.; Lynam, P. D.

    2002-01-01

    A recent paper presents the analysis of the K-band Hubble diagram of 76 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in X-ray clusters and shows that the properties of BCGs depend on the X-ray luminosity (LX) of their host clusters. Unfortunately, the low numbers of nearby clusters in this sample makes it difficult to constrain evolutionary trends. In this letter we extend the Hubble diagram of Burke, Collins & Mann to a total of 155 clusters using new data on 79 BCGs at z<=0.1 from the 2MASS extended source catalogue. We show that the major division between BCGs in high- and low-LX clusters disappears at z<=0.1, with BCGs having similar absolute magnitudes independent of the X-ray luminosity of their host clusters. At larger redshifts, the K-band light of BCGs in high-LX systems is consistent with little or no merging back to z~0.8, whereas BCGs in the low-LX systems have a different evolutionary history, with many increasing their mass by a factor >=4 since z~=1. This provides direct evidence of hierarchical merging in a galaxy population.

  6. Limits on the Magnetosphere/Stellar Wind Interactions for the Extrasolar Planet about Tau Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.; Lazio, T. J.; Bastian, T.; Zarka, P.

    Among the most impressive astronomical discoveries in the past decade are the observations of Jupiter-like planets in orbit around stars similar to our sun (Mayor and Queloz 1995; Marcy 1998). These extrasolar planets are detected primarily from optical signatures of the star's orbital perturbation about the star/planet center of mass. To date, over 80 massive planets have been discovered about sun-like stars, these stars located in the near-vicinity of our own solar system (< 100 pc). By analogy with the sun's gas giant planets, it has been predicted that these extrasolar planets will have electrically-active stellar-wind driven planetary magnetospheres possibly capable of emitting long-wavelength radio emission (Burke 1992; Farrell et al. 1999; Bastian et al. 2000; Zarka et al. 2001) consistent with radiometric Bode's laws known to apply in our solar system. In 1999 and in 2002, the Very Large Array (VLA) surveyed the region near Tau Bootes for long-wavelength radio emission from its extrasolar planet. This planet had been previously predicted to be a good candidate for coherent electron cyclotron radio emission in the 10's of MHz. While no obvious signal was detected at 74 MHz to a sensitivity of <0.12 Janskys, the results can be applied to place upper limits on the stellar winds and planetary magnetic field.

  7. A search for rotating radio transients and fast radio bursts in the Parkes high-latitude pulsar survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Bates, S. D.; McMann, N.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Rajwade, K.

    2016-01-01

    Discoveries of rotating radio transients and fast radio bursts (FRBs) in pulsar surveys suggest that more of such transient sources await discovery in archival data sets. Here we report on a single-pulse search for dispersed radio bursts over a wide range of Galactic latitudes (|b| < 60°) in data previously searched for periodic sources by Burgay et al. We re-detected 20 of the 42 pulsars reported by Burgay et al. and one rotating radio transient reported by Burke-Spolaor. No FRBs were discovered in this survey. Taking into account this result, and other recent surveys at Parkes, we corrected for detection sensitivities based on the search software used in the analyses and the different back-ends used in these surveys and find that the all-sky FRB event rate for sources with a fluence above 4.0 Jy ms at 1.4 GHz to be R = 4.4^{+5.2}_{-3.1} × 10^3 FRBs d-1 sky-1, where the uncertainties represent a 99 per cent confidence interval. While this rate is lower than inferred from previous studies, as we demonstrate, this combined event rate is consistent with the results of all systematic FRB searches at Parkes to date and does not require the need to postulate a dearth of FRBs at intermediate latitudes.

  8. The kinetic mechanism of ox liver glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of the allosteric effector ADP. The oxidative deamination of L-glutamate.

    PubMed

    Hornby, D P; Aitchison, M J; Engel, P C

    1984-10-01

    In steady-state kinetic studies of ox liver glutamate dehydrogenase in 0.11 M-potassium phosphate buffer, pH7, at 25 degrees C, the concentration of ADP was varied from 0.5 to 1000 microM. Inhibition was observed except when the concentrations of both glutamate and coenzyme were high, when activation was seen. With NAD+ or NADP+ as coenzyme, 200 microM-ADP was sufficient to saturate the enzyme with respect to the major effect of this nucleotide. In the presence of 210 microM-ADP, widely varied concentrations of coenzyme give linear Lineweaver-Burk plots, in marked contrast with results obtained previously for kinetics without ADP. This has allowed evaluation for the reaction with NAD+, NADP+ and acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide (315 microM-ADP in the last case) of all four initial rate parameters, i.e. the phi coefficients in the equation: (Formula: see text) where A is coenzyme and B is glutamate. The relative constancy of phi B and of phi AB/phi A with the different coenzymes point to a compulsory-order mechanism with glutamate as the leading substrate. This conclusion, though unexpected, agrees well with various previous observations on the binding of oxidized coenzyme.

  9. Production and optimization of L-glutaminase enzyme from Hypocrea jecorina pure culture.

    PubMed

    Bülbül, Dilara; Karakuş, Emine

    2013-01-01

    L-Glutaminase (L-glutamine amidohydrolase, EC 3.5.1.2) is the important enzyme that catalyzes the deamination of L-glutamine to L-glutamic acid and ammonium ions. Recently, L-glutaminase has received much attention with respect to its therapeutic and industrial applications. It acts as a potent antileukemic agent and shows flavor-enhancing capacity in the production of fermented foods. Glutaminase activity is widely distributed in plants, animal tissues, and microorganisms, including bacteria, yeasts, and fungi. This study presents microbial production of glutaminase enzyme from Hypocrea jecorina pure culture and determination of optimum conditions and calculation of kinetic parameters of the produced enzyme. The optimum values were determined by using sa Nesslerization reaction for our produced glutaminase enzyme. The optimum pH value was determined as 8.0 and optimum temperature as 50°C for the glutaminase enzyme. The Km and Vmax values, the kinetic parameters, of enzyme produced from Hypocrea jecorina, pure culture were determined as 0.491 mM for Km and 13.86 U/L for Vmax by plotted Lineweaver-Burk graphing, respectively. The glutaminase enzyme from H. jecorina microorganism has very high thermal and storage stability.

  10. Purification and some kinetic properties of catalase from parsley (Petroselinum hortense Hoffm., Apiaceae) leaves.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Lokman; Bülbül, Metin; Elmastas, Mahfuz; Ciftçi, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    In this study, catalase (CAT: EC 1.11.1.6) was purified from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves; analysis of the kinetic behavior and some properties of the enzyme were investigated. The purification consisted of three steps, including preparation of homogenate, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and fractionation by DEAE-Sephadex A50 ion exchange chromatography. The enzyme was obtained with a yield of 9.5% and had a specific activity of 1126 U (mg proteins)(-1). The overall purification was about 5.83-fold. A temperature of 4 degrees C was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was spectrophotometrically measured at 240 nm. In order to control the purification of the enzyme, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out in 4% and 10% acryl amide for stacking and running gel, respectively. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band for the enzyme. The molecular weight was found to be 183.29 kDa by Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography. The stable pH, optimum pH, and ionic strength were determined for phosphate and Tris-HCl buffer systems. In addition, K(M) and V(max) values for H(2)O(2), at optimum pH and 25 degrees C, were determined by means of Lineweaver-Burk plots.

  11. Crude Aloe vera Gel Shows Antioxidant Propensities and Inhibits Pancreatic Lipase and Glucose Movement In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Taukoorah, Urmeela; Mahomoodally, M. Fawzi

    2016-01-01

    Aloe vera gel (AVG) is traditionally used in the management of diabetes, obesity, and infectious diseases. The present study aimed to investigate the inhibitory potential of AVG against α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and pancreatic lipase activity in vitro. Enzyme kinetic studies using Michaelis-Menten (Km) and Lineweaver-Burk equations were used to establish the type of inhibition. The antioxidant capacity of AVG was evaluated for its ferric reducing power, 2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl hydrate scavenging ability, nitric oxide scavenging power, and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity. The glucose entrapment ability, antimicrobial activity, and total phenolic, flavonoid, tannin, and anthocyanin content were also determined. AVG showed a significantly higher percentage inhibition (85.56 ± 0.91) of pancreatic lipase compared to Orlistat. AVG was found to increase the Michaelis-Menten constant and decreased the maximal velocity (Vmax) of lipase, indicating mixed inhibition. AVG considerably inhibits glucose movement across dialysis tubes and was comparable to Arabic gum. AVG was ineffective against the tested microorganisms. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were 66.06 ± 1.14 (GAE)/mg and 60.95 ± 0.97 (RE)/mg, respectively. AVG also showed interesting antioxidant properties. The biological activity observed in this study tends to validate some of the traditional claims of AVG as a functional food. PMID:26880905

  12. Observing Ben Wyckoff: From Basic Research to Programmed Instruction and Social Issues

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Rogelio; Lattal, Kennon A

    2011-01-01

    L. Benjamin Wyckoff's seminal contributions to both psychological theory and application are the subject of this review. Wyckoff started his academic career as a graduate student at Indiana University, where he developed the observing-response procedure under the guidance of B. F. Skinner and C. J. Burke. At the University of Wisconsin–Madison, Wyckoff refined his mathematical theory of secondary reinforcement. This theory was the impetus for his creation of an electronic simulation of a rat running a T maze, one of the first “computer models” of learning. Wyckoff next went to Emory University, leaving there to help create two of the most successful companies dedicated to the advancement of programmed instruction and teaching machines: Teaching Machines, Inc. and the Human Development Institute. Wyckoff's involvement in these companies epitomizes the application of basic behavior-analytic principles in the development of technology to improve education and human relationships. The emergent picture of Wyckoff is that of a man who, through his research, professional work in educational applications of behavioral principles, and active involvement in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, was strongly committed to applying behavioral science to positively influence human behavior change. PMID:22532737

  13. First principle investigations of the physical properties of hydrogen-rich MgH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarshenas, Mohammed; Ahmed, R.; Benali Kanoun, Mohammed; Haq, Bakhtiar ul; Radzi Mat Isa, Ahmad; Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen being a cleaner energy carrier has increased the importance of hydrogen-containing light metal hydrides, in particular those with large gravimetric hydrogen density like magnesium hydride (MgH2). In this study, density functional and density functional perturbation theories are combined to investigate the structural, elastic, thermodynamic, electronic and optical properties of MgH2. Our structural parameters calculated with those proposed by Perdew, Burke and Ernzerof generalized gradient approximation (PBE-GGA) and Wu-Cohen GGA (WC-GGA) are in agreement with experimental measurements, however the underestimated band gap values calculated using PBE-GGA and WC-GGA were greatly improved with the GGA suggested by Engle and Vosko and the modified Becke-Johnson exchange correlation potential by Trans and Blaha. As for the thermodynamic properties the specific heat values at low temperatures were found to obey the T3 rule and at higher temperatures Dulong and Petit's law. Our analysis of the optical properties of MgH2 also points to its potential application in optoelectronics.

  14. Structure of continental margin off Mid-Atlantic states (Baltimore Canyon Trough)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlee, John Stevens; Behrendt, John Charles; Mattick, Robert E.; Taylor, P.T.

    1975-01-01

    Increasing interest in the Atlantic continental margin as a future petroleum province has resulted in several recent papers (Emmerich, 1974; Burk and Drake, 1974) that attempt to summarize the structure and stratigraphic framework of this area. Most papers tend to portray the margin as a wedge of Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediment that thins at the edge of the shelf over a "basement ridge" and then thickens again under the continental rise. Off the northeastern United States, the sediment wedge under the shelf attains a thickness of 8-11 km in the Georges Bank basin (Schultz and Glover, 1974; Mattick and others, 1974; Sheridan, 1974b; Behrendt and others, 1974) and 12 km in thickness in the Baltimore Canyon trough off the middle Atlantic states of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and New Jersey (fig. 1). Seaward of the continental shelf and its sediment prism, Emery and Uchupi (1972, figs. 133-135) infer slump deposits (eroded in some areas) covering a buried ridge thought to extend from the Laurentian Channel to Cape Hatteras, where it splits in two. The lower slope and continental rise are inferred by Drake and later investigators to be a thick prism of deep sea sediment (turbidites, hemipelagic clays, slump deposits) overlying oceanic basement in a welt that parallels the continental edge and reaches a maximum thickness of 6 km (Emery and Uchupi, 1972, fig. 188).

  15. Bordetella pertussis major outer membrane porin protein forms small, anion-selective channels in lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, S K; Parr, T R; Parker, C D; Hancock, R E

    1986-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein of molecular weight 40,000 (the 40K protein) of a virulent isolate of Bordetella pertussis was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified protein formed an oligomer band (of apparent molecular weight 90,000) on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after solubilization at low temperatures. The porin function of this protein was characterized by the black lipid bilayer method. The 40K protein formed channels smaller than all other constitutive major outer membrane porins studied to date. The average single-channel conductance in 1 M KCl was 0.56 nS. This was less than a third of the conductance previously observed for Escherichia coli porins. Zero-current potential measurements made of the porin to determine its ion selectivity revealed the porin to be more than 100-fold selective for anions over cations. The single-channel conductance was measured as a function of salt concentration. The data could be fitted to a Lineweaver-Burk plot suggesting an anion binding site with a Kd of 1.17 M Cl- and a maximum possible conductance through the channel of 1.28 nS. Images PMID:2420780

  16. A new affinity method for purification of bovine testicular hyaluronidase enzyme and an investigation of the effects of some compounds on this enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mustafa Oguzhan; Arslan, Oktay; Guler, Ozen Ozensoy

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new affinity gel for the purification of bovine testicular hyaluronidase (BTH) was synthesized. L-Tyrosine was added as the extension arm to the Sepharose-4B activated with cyanogen bromide. m-Anisidine is a specific inhibitor of BTH enzyme. m-Anisidine was clamped to the newly formed Sepharose-4B-L-tyrosine as a ligand. As a result, an affinity gel having the chemical structure of Sepharose-4B-L-tyrosine-m-anisidine was obtained. BTH purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and affinity chromatography was obtained with a 16.95% yield and 881.78 degree of purity. The kinetic constants K(M) and V(Max) for BTH were determined by using hyaluronic acid as a substrate. K(M) and V(Max) values obtained from the Lineweaver-Burk graph were found to be 2.23 mM and 19.85 U/mL, respectively. In vitro effects of some chemicals were determined on purified BTH enzyme. Some chemically active ingredients were 1,1-dimethyl piperidinium chloride, β-naphthoxyacetic acid and gibberellic acid. Gibberellic acid showed the best inhibition effect on BTH. PMID:25373501

  17. Optimization of the Preparation of Fish Protein Anti-Obesity Hydrolysates Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liyuan; Wang, Yanping; Peng, Chen; Wang, Jinju

    2013-01-01

    The enzymatic condition for producing the anti-obesity hydrolysates from fish water-soluble protein was optimized with the aid of response surface methodology, which also derived a statistical model for experimental validation. Compared with neutral protease, papain and protamex, the porcine pancreas lipase inhibitory rate of hydrolysates from fish water-soluble protein was higher with alkaline protease. Results showed that the model terms were significant, the terms of lack of fit were not significant, and the optimal conditions for the hydrolysis by alkaline protease were initial pH 11, temperature 39 °C, enzyme dosage 122 U/mL and 10 h of hydrolysis time. Under these conditions, the porcine pancreas lipase and the α-amylase inhibitory rate could reach 53.04% ± 1.32% and 20.03 ± 0.89%, while predicted value were 54.63% ± 1.75%, 21.22% ± 0.70%, respectively. In addition, Lineweaver-Burk plots showed noncompetitive inhibition. The Ki value calculated was 84.13 mg/mL. These results demonstrated that fish water-soluble protein could be used for obtaining anti-obesity hydrolysates. PMID:23377020

  18. Influence of a Simple Heat Loss Profile on a Pure Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Anjan; Wichman, Indrek S.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of soot on the fuel side of a diffusion flame results in significant radiative heat losses. The influence of a fuel side heat loss zone on a pure diffusion flame established between a fuel and an oxidizer wall is investigated by assuming a hypothetical sech(sup 2) heat loss profile. The intensity and width of the loss zone are parametrically varied. The loss zone is placed at different distances from the Burke-Schumann flame location. The migration of the temperature and reactivity peaks are examined for a variety of situations. For certain cases the reaction zone breaks through the loss zone and relocates itself on the fuel side of the loss zone. In all cases the temperature and reactivity peaks move toward the fuel side with increased heat losses. The flame structure reveals that the primary balance for the energy equation is between the reaction term and the diffusion term. Extinction plots are generated for a variety of situations. The heat transfer from the flame to the walls and the radiative fraction is also investigated, and an analytical correlation formula, derived in a previous study, is shown to produce excellent predictions of our numerical results when an O(l) numerical multiplicative constant is employed.

  19. Magnetostriction and magnetoelastic quantum oscillations in P-type lead telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. E.; Aron, P. R.; Chandrasekhar, B. S.; Langenberg, D. N.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed experimental and theoretical study of quantum oscillations in the magnetostriction and Young's modulus of p-PbTe is presented. The valance band of PbTe is approximated by a spheroidal, nonparabolic model in which the effects of strain on the valance band parameters are described by a deformation potential model. Using appropriate thermodynamic derivatives of the modified Lifshitz-Kosevich expression for the oscillatory parts of the electronic free energy, it is shown that both types of oscillations arise mainly from relative shifts of the valance band maxima due to shear strains, accompanied by intervalley charge transfer. Band parameters derived from the periods, phases, and spin splitting of the oscillations are in generally good agreement with values reported by other workers. A detailed comparison is made of the experimentally observed oscillation amplitudes with those predicted by theory, and satisfactory agreement is found. The ratio of the amplitudes of the two effects yields a value of the valance band deformation potential in good agreement with a value found from piezoresistance experiments by Burke.

  20. Ab initio molecular dynamics of solvation effects on reactivity at electrified interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, Jeffrey A.; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2016-08-01

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics as implemented in periodic, self-consistent (generalized gradient approximation Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) density functional theory, we investigated the mechanism of methanol electrooxidation on Pt(111). We investigated the role of water solvation and electrode potential on the energetics of the first proton transfer step, methanol electrooxidation to methoxy (CH3O) or hydroxymethyl (CH2OH). The results show that solvation weakens the adsorption of methoxy to uncharged Pt(111), whereas the binding energies of methanol and hydroxymethyl are not significantly affected. The free energies of activation for breaking the C-H and O-H bonds in methanol were calculated through a Blue Moon Ensemble using constrained ab initio molecular dynamics. Calculated barriers for these elementary steps on unsolvated, uncharged Pt(111) are similar to results for climbing-image nudged elastic band calculations from the literature. Water solvation reduces the barriers for both C-H and O-H bond activation steps with respect to their vapor-phase values, although the effect is more pronounced for C-H bond activation, due to less disruption of the hydrogen bond network. The calculated activation energy barriers show that breaking the C-H bond of methanol is more facile than the O-H bond on solvated negatively biased or uncharged Pt(111). However, with positive bias, O-H bond activation is enhanced, becoming slightly more facile than C-H bond activation.