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Sample records for pellet injection experiments

  1. Impurity pellet injection experiments at TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Marmar, E.S.

    1992-01-01

    Impurity (Li and C) pellet injection experiments on TFTR have produced a number of new and significant results. (1) We observe reproducible improvements of TFTR supershots after wall-conditioning by Li pellet injection ( lithiumization'). (2) We have made accurate measurements of the pitch angle profiles of the internal magnetic field using two novel techniques. The first measures the internal field pitch from the polarization angles of Li[sup +] line emission from the pellet ablation cloud, while the second measures the pitch angle profiles by observing the tilt of the cigar-shaped Li[sup +] emission region of the ablation cloud. (3) Extensive measurements of impurity pellet penetration into plasmas with central temperatures ranging from [approximately]0.3 to [approximately]7 keV have been made and compared with available theoretical models. Other aspects of pellet cloud physics have been investigated. (4) Using pellets as a well defined perturbation has allowed study of transport phenomena. In the case of small pellet perturbations, the characteristics of the background plasmas are probed, while with large pellets, pellet induced effects are clearly observed. These main results are discussed in more detail in this paper.

  2. Impurity pellet injection experiments at TFTR. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Marmar, E.S.

    1992-12-01

    Impurity (Li and C) pellet injection experiments on TFTR have produced a number of new and significant results. (1) We observe reproducible improvements of TFTR supershots after wall-conditioning by Li pellet injection (`lithiumization`). (2) We have made accurate measurements of the pitch angle profiles of the internal magnetic field using two novel techniques. The first measures the internal field pitch from the polarization angles of Li{sup +} line emission from the pellet ablation cloud, while the second measures the pitch angle profiles by observing the tilt of the cigar-shaped Li{sup +} emission region of the ablation cloud. (3) Extensive measurements of impurity pellet penetration into plasmas with central temperatures ranging from {approximately}0.3 to {approximately}7 keV have been made and compared with available theoretical models. Other aspects of pellet cloud physics have been investigated. (4) Using pellets as a well defined perturbation has allowed study of transport phenomena. In the case of small pellet perturbations, the characteristics of the background plasmas are probed, while with large pellets, pellet induced effects are clearly observed. These main results are discussed in more detail in this paper.

  3. Particle balance studies in TEXTOR during experiments of pellet injection, helium injection, and ICR-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banno, T.; Noda, N.; Finken, K. H.; Gray, D. S.; Winter, J.; Alt-Ii Team; Textor Team

    1995-04-01

    Analysis based on the particle conservation law has been carried out to observe the global fuelling process in tokamak discharges. The response of the net recycling flux from the first wall is investigated in the tokamak TEXTOR, using calibrated signals of the gas feed rate, the neutral gas pressure in the vessel, the total amount of electrons, and the particle removal rates by the ALT-II belt-pump limiter and by a main pump unit. Net absorption (pumping) of hydrogen by the wall is observed for almost all tokamak discharges since a new wall conditioning technique called siliconisation is employed. The net absorption or fuelling depending on the discharge condition influenced by injection of pellets, by helium gas injection combined with neutral beam injection, and by rf heating can be interpreted in terms of the particle-induced desorption effect with depth profile taken into consideration.

  4. Analysis of D pellet injection experiments in the W7-AS Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, J.F.; Baylor, L.R.; Baldzuhn, J.; Fiedler, S.; Hirsch, M.; Kuehner, G.; Weller, A.

    1997-07-01

    A centrifugal injector was used to inject deuterium pellets (with 3--5 x 10{sup 19} atoms) at approx. equal 600 m/s into current-less, nearly shear-less plasmas in the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator. The D pellet was injected horizontally at a location where the non-circular and non-axisymmetric plasma cross section is nearly triangular. Visible-light TV pictures usually showed the pellet as a single ablating mass in the plasma, although the pellet occasionally broke in two or splintered into a cloud of small particles. The density evolution following pellet injection and the effect of pellet injection on energy confinement and fluctuations are discussed.

  5. Initial NSTX Lithium Pellet Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugel, H. W.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Biewer, T.; Gates, D.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Leblanc, B.; Paul, S.; Samtaney, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Raman, R.; Bush, C.; Maingi, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Nishino, N.; Lee, K. C.; Stutman, D.

    2004-11-01

    A cartridge style Lithium Pellet Injector was installed on NSTX for midplane radial injection. Deuterium gas was used to propel a Li pellet-bearing cartridge down a barrel to a cartridge stop, and the pellet continued into the NSTX plasma at about 150 m/s. 16 lithium pellets, about 2 mg each were injected into LSN and DND, NBI-heated, H-mode plasmas, and into L-mode LSN Ohmic plasmas, and were observed with a Li I filtered Plasma-TV. Li pellets injected into NBI-heated LSN and DND plasmas appeared to ablate in the outer boundary. The pellets injected into OH plasmas exhibited good penetration to the HFS region. Lastly, a NBI preheat was added prior to pellet arrival, and the penetration depth was found to be very sensitive to the NBI turn-off time relative to pellet arrival. As this work progressed, Li luminosity started to be observed from the very initiation of discharges, due to depositions from preceding discharges. Initial modeling results will be presented.

  6. Lithium pellet injection experiments on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, Darren Thomas

    1996-06-01

    A pellet enhanced performance mode, showing significantly reduced core transport, is regularly obtained after the injection of deeply penetrating lithium pellets into Alcator C-Mod discharges. These transient modes, which typically persist about two energy confinement times, are characterized by a steep pressure gradient (ℓp ℓ a/5) in the inner third of the plasma, indicating the presence of an internal transport barrier. Inside this barrier, particle and energy diffusivities are greatly reduced, with ion thermal diffusivity dropping to near neoclassical values. Meanwhile, the global energy confinement time shows a 30% improvement over ITER89-P L-mode scaling. The addition of ICRF auxiliary heating shortly after the pellet injection leads to high fusion reactivity with neutron rates enhanced by an order of magnitude over L-mode discharges with similar input powers. A diagnostic system for measuring equilibrium current density profiles of tokamak plasmas, employing high speed lithium pellets, is also presented. Because ions are confined to move along field lines, imaging the Li+ emission from the toroidally extended pellet ablation cloud gives the direction of the magnetic field. To convert from temporal to radial measurements, the 3-D trajectory of the pellet is determined using a stereoscopic tracking system. These measurements, along with external magnetic measurements, are used to solve the Grad-Shafranov equation for the magnetic equilibrium of the plasma. This diagnostic is used to determine the current density profile of PEP modes by injection of a second pellet during the period of good confinement. This measurement indicates that a region of reversed magnetic shear exists at the plasma core. This current density profile is consistent with TRANSP calculations for the bootstrap current created by the pressure gradient. MHD stability analysis indicates that these plasmas are near the n = ∞ and the n = 1 marginal stability limits.

  7. Pellet injection into ATF plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wilgen, J.B.; Bell, J.D.; England, A.C.; Fisher, P.W.; Howe, H.C.; Murakami, M.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Richards, R.K.; Uckan, T.; Wing, W.R. ); Bell, G.L. ); Qualls, A.L. ); Sudo, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Based on the favorable empirical scaling of stellarator confinement with increasing electron density, pellet fueling is expected to result in significant performance improvement of the ATF plasma. With gas-puff fueling, NBI heated plasmas in ATF are limited by a thermal collapse. Pellet fueling provides a potential means to delay this effect and gain access to the favorable high density confinement regime. To provide flexibility for optimization and physics studies, eight different pellet sizes are available. To date, line average densities of up to 4 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} have been achieved with a single pellet injected into a 0.7 MW NBI plasma at 0.95 T; the results from optimization studies with up to 1.5 MW of NBI power at 2 T will be presented.

  8. Model for pneumatic pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.; Milora, S.L.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1983-07-01

    A hydrodynamic code has been developed to model the performance of pneumatic pellet injection systems. The code describes one dimensional, unsteady compressible gas dynamics, including gas friction and heat transfer to the walls in a system with variable area. The mass, momentum, and energy equations are solved with an iterated Lax-Wendroff scheme with additional numerical viscosity. The code is described and comparisons with experimental data are presented.

  9. Tritium pellet injection sequences for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Attenberger, S.E.; Singer, C.E.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    Tritium pellet injection into neutral deuterium, beam heated deuterium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is shown to be an attractive means of (1) minimizing tritium use per tritium discharge and over a sequence of tritium discharges; (2) greatly reducing the tritium load in the walls, limiters, getters, and cryopanels; (3) maintaining or improving instantaneous neutron production (Q); (4) reducing or eliminating deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron production in non-optimized discharges; and (5) generally adding flexibility to the experimental sequences leading to optimal Q operation. Transport analyses of both compression and full-bore TFTR plasmas are used to support the above observations and to provide the basis for a proposed eight-pellet gas gun injector for the 1986 tritium experiments.

  10. Pellet injector development and experiments at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.; Argo, B.E.; Barber, G.C.; Combs, S.K.; Cole, M.J.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Jernigan, T.C.; Langley, R.A.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Schechter, D.E.; Sparks, D.O.; Tsai, C.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Whealton, J.H.

    1993-11-01

    The development of pellet injectors for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion experiments has been under way at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the past 15 years. Recently, ORNL provided a tritium-compatible four-shot pneumatic injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) based on the in situ condensation technique that features three single-stage gas guns and an advanced two-stage light gas gun driver. In another application, ORNL supplied the Tore Supra tokamak with a centrifuge pellet injector in 1989 for pellet fueling experiments that has achieved record numbers of injected pellets into a discharge. Work is progressing on an upgrade to that injector to extend the number of pellets to 400 and improve pellet repeatability. In a new application, the ORNL three barrel repeating pneumatic injector has been returned from JET and is being readied for installation on the DIII-D device for fueling and enhanced plasma performance experiments. In addition to these experimental applications, ORNL is developing advanced injector technologies, including high-velocity pellet injectors, tritium pellet injectors, and long-pulse feed systems. The two-stage light gas gun and electron-beam-driven rocket are the acceleration techniques under investigation for achieving high velocity. A tritium proof-of-principle (TPOP) experiment has demonstrated the feasibility of tritium pellet production and acceleration. A new tritium-compatible, extruder-based, repeating pneumatic injector is being fabricated to replace the pipe gun in the TPOP experiment and will explore issues related to the extrudability of tritium and acceleration of large tritium pellets. The tritium pellet formation experiments and development of long-pulse pellet feed systems are especially relevant to the International Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER).

  11. Current generation by phased injection of pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.

    1983-08-01

    By phasing the injection of frozen pellets into a tokamak plasma, it is possible to generate current. The current occurs when the electron flux to individual members of an array of pellets is asymmetric with respect to the magnetic field. The utility of this method for tokamak reactors, however, is unclear; the current, even though free in a pellet-fueled reactor, may not be large enough to be worth the trouble. Uncertainty as to the utility of this method is, in part, due to uncertainty as to proper modeling of the one-pellet problem.

  12. A Comparison of Fueling with Deuterium Pellet Injection from Different Locations on the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Gohil, P.; Houlberg, W.A.; Hsieh, C.; Jernigan, T.C.; Parks, P.B.

    1999-06-14

    Initial pellet injection experiments on DIII-D with high field side (HFS) injection have demonstrated that deeper pellet fuel deposition is possible even with HFS injected pellets that are significantly slower than pellets injected from the low field side (LFS) (outer midplane) location. A radial displacement of the pellet mass shortly after or during the ablation process is consistent with the observed mass deposition profiles measured shortly after injection. Vertical injection inside the magnetic axis shows some improvement in fueling efficiency over LFS injection and may provide an optimal injection location for fueling with high speed pellets.

  13. A Compact Flexible Pellet Injection System for Fueling Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Fehling, D. T.; Fisher, P. W.; Foust, C. R.; Gouge, M. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2000-10-01

    A compact pellet injection system is being designed and built at ORNL to provide a flexible pellet fueling system for studies in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The system known as a ``pellet injector in a suitcase (PIS)'' is a pipe gun device with four barrels that uses a cryocooler for in-situ hydrogenic pellet formation. The system is being built to provide a flexible, low-cost fueling system that can be used on a number of plasma confinement experiments with minimal installation and operation costs. components in the system. It will use both propellant gas and a mechanical punch to accelerate the 1 - 4 mm size pellets to 100-1500 m/s. With the mechanical punch alone a low speed pellet, useful for curved guide tube applications, can be produced with minimal gas load eliminating the need for a large ballast volume. can be independently fired. diagnose the injector. The PIS is a flexible tool for fueling alternative concept devices such as MST and NSTX and for specialized studies in mainline tokamak experiments such as DIII-D and JET. The small size makes installation on such devices more feasible. of the system design and the expected performance will be presented.

  14. Results of hydrogen pellet injection into ISX-B

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.; Foster, C.A.; Thomas, C.E.

    1980-09-01

    High speed pellet fueling experiments have been performed on the ISX-B device in a new regime characterized by large global density rise in both ohmic and neutral beam heated discharges. Hydrogen pellets of 1 mm in diameter were injected in the plasma midplane at velocities exceeding 1 km/s. In low temperature ohmic discharges, pellets penetrate beyond the magnetic axis, and in such cases a sharp decrease in ablation is observed as the pellet passes the plasma center. Density increases of approx. 300% have been observed without degrading plasma stability or confinement. Energy confinement time increases in agreement with the empirical scaling tau/sub E/ approx. n/sub e/ and central ion temperature increases as a result of improved ion-electron coupling. Laser-Thomson scattering and radiometer measurements indicate that the pellet interaction with the plasma is adiabatic. Penetration to r/a approx. 0.15 is optimal, in which case large amplitude sawtooth oscillations are observed and the density remains elevated. Gross plasma stability is dependent roughly on the amount of pellet penetration and can be correlated with the expected temporal evolution of the current density profile.

  15. Development of a Tritium Extruder for ITER Pellet Injection

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Gouge; P.W. Fisher

    1998-09-01

    As part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) plasma fueling development program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has fabricated a pellet injection system to test the mechanical and thermal properties of extruded tritium. Hydrogenic pellets will be used in ITER to sustain the fusion power in the plasma core and may be crucial in reducing first-wall tritium inventories by a process of "isotopic fueling" in which tritium-rich pellets fuel the burning plasma core and deuterium gas fuels the edge. This repeating single-stage pneumatic pellet injector, called the Tritium-Proof-of-Principle Phase II (TPOP-II) Pellet Injector, has a piston-driven mechanical extruder and is designed to extrude and accelerate hydrogenic pellets sized for the ITER device. The TPOP-II program has the following development goals: evaluate the feasibility of extruding tritium and deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures for use in future pellet injection systems; determine the mechanical and thermal properties of tritium and D-T extrusions; integrate, test, and evaluate the extruder in a repeating, single-stage light gas gun that is sized for the ITER application (pellet diameter -7 to 8 mm); evaluate options for recycling propellant and extruder exhaust gas; and evaluate operability and reliability of ITER prototypical fueling systems in an environment of significant tritium inventory that requires secondary and room containment systems. In tests with deuterium feed at ORNL, up to 13 pellets per extrusion have been extruded at rates up to 1 Hz and accelerated to speeds of 1.0 to 1.1 km/s, using hydrogen propellant gas at a supply pressure of 65 bar. Initially, deuterium pellets 7.5 mm in diameter and 11 mm in length were produced-the largest cryogenic pellets produced by the fusion program to date. These pellets represent about a 10% density perturbation to ITER. Subsequently, the extruder nozzle was modified to produce pellets that are almost 7.5-mm right circular

  16. New Pellet Injection Schemes on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.M.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Foust, C.R.; Jernigan, T.C.; Robinson, J.I.

    1999-11-13

    The pellet fueling system on DIII-D has been modified for injection of deuterium pellets from two vertical ports and two inner wall locations on the magnetic high-field side (HFS) of the tokamak. The HFS pellet injection technique was first employed on ASDEX-Upgrade with significant improvements reported in both pellet penetration and fueling efficiency. The new pellet injection schemes on DIII-D required the installation of new guide tubes. These lines are {approx_equal}12.5 m in total length and are made up of complex bends and turns (''roller coaster'' like) to route pellets from the injector to the plasma, including sections inside the torus. The pellet speed at which intact pellets can survive through the curved guide tubes is limited ({approx_equal}200-300 m/s for HFS injection schemes). Thus, one of the three gas guns on the injector was modified to provide pellets in a lower speed regime than the original guns (normal speed range {approx_equal}500 to 1000 m/s). The guide tube installations and gun modifications are described along with the injector operating parameters, and the latest test results are highlighted.

  17. A new centrifuge pellet injector for fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andelfinger, C.; Buchelt, E.; Cierpka, P.; Kollotzek, H.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Prausner, G.; Söldner, F. X.; Ulrich, M.; Weber, G.

    1993-04-01

    This paper reports on the new pellet injection system for refueling the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak with cubic H2 or D2 pellets having alternative side lengths of 1.5, 1.75, and 2.0 mm and optional Ne doping. The system delivers series of about 100 pellets at a maximum repetition rate of more than 40 Hz. The pellets are accelerated by means of a centrifuge with an optimized straight acceleration arm. This configuration minimizes the compulsive force acting on the pellet during the acceleration process. Since this also minimizes stresses inside the pellet, high velocities—a maximum of 1211 m/s being achieved—are possible without destroying the hydrogen cubes. A special pellet feed-in technique based on a static stop cylinder interrupting the acceleration path successfully reduced the horizontal scattering angle to values of less than ±4°; a high efficiency, with more than 90% of the pellets arriving within the acceptance angle, was thus achieved. The whole system was found to work very reliably and reproducibly during the whole test operation period, covering about 105 pellet shots, and is now being integrated into the ASDEX upgrade experiment.

  18. Achieving temporary divertor plasma detachment with MARFE events by pellet injection in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guozhong, Deng; Liang, Wang; Xiaoju, Liu; Yanmin, Duan; Jiansheng, Hu; Changzheng, Li; Ling, Zhang; Shaocheng, Liu; Huiqian, Wang; Liang, Chen; Jichan, Xu; Wei, Feng; Jianbin, Liu; Huan, Liu; Guosheng, Xu; Houyang, Guo; Xiang, Gao; the EAST Team

    2017-01-01

    A new pellet injection system has been equipped on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) in the 2012 campaign, with a pellet size of ϕ 2 mm × 2 mm, a frequency of 1 Hz-10 Hz and velocity of 150 m s-1-300 m s-1. The deuterium pellet is well-known for plasma fuelling as well as for triggering the edge localized mode (ELM). In the 2012 campaign, pellet injection experiments were successfully carried out on EAST. Temporary plasma detachment achieved by deuterium pellets has been observed in a double null (DN) divertor configuration, with multi-pellet injections at a repetition frequency of 2 Hz. The partial detachment of the outer divertors and complete detachment of the inner divertors was achieved after 35 ms of each pellet injection, which have a duration of 30-60 ms with the maximum degree of detachment (DOD) reaching 3.5 and 37, respectively. Meanwhile, the multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edge (MARFE) phenomena was also observed at the high field side (HFS) near both the lower and upper X-points with radiation loss suddenly increased to about 15%-70%, which may be the main cause of divertor plasma detachment. The temporary detachment induced by pellet injection may act as a new way to study divertor detachment behaviors.

  19. Lithium wall conditioning by high frequency pellet injection in RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocente, P.; Mansfield, D. K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Agostini, M.; Barison, S.; Canton, A.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; De Masi, G.; Fassina, A.; Fiameni, S.; Grando, L.; Rais, B.; Rossetto, F.; Scarin, P.

    2015-08-01

    In the RFX-mod reversed field pinch experiment, lithium wall conditioning has been tested with multiple scopes: to improve density control, to reduce impurities and to increase energy and particle confinement time. Large single lithium pellet injection, lithium capillary-pore system and lithium evaporation has been used for lithiumization. The last two methods, which presently provide the best results in tokamak devices, have limited applicability in the RFX-mod device due to the magnetic field characteristics and geometrical constraints. On the other side, the first mentioned technique did not allow injecting large amount of lithium. To improve the deposition, recently in RFX-mod small lithium multi-pellets injection has been tested. In this paper we compare lithium multi-pellets injection to the other techniques. Multi-pellets gave more uniform Li deposition than evaporator, but provided similar effects on plasma parameters, showing that further optimizations are required.

  20. Potential safe termination by injection of polypropylene pellets in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.L.; Ali-Arshad, S.; Bartlett, D.

    1995-10-01

    Thermal energy and the magnetic field energy associated with the plasma current must be dissipated safely when a tokamak discharge is terminated in a disruption. Magnetic energy can be dissipated by impurity radiation if position control is maintained. Prior to the dissipation of magnetic energy, thermal energy is usually conducted to the plasma contact points on a 1ms time scale in a thermal quench. A resistive, highly radiating plasma formed prior to the thermal quench, might dissipate both the thermal and magnetic energy by radiation minimizing damage due to local deposition. High speed injection of a low Z material can produce a resistive, highly radiating plasma on a 1ms time scale. Neon has recently been used in such an application on JT60-U. A large carbon pellet producing dilution temperatures < 1 keV is a possible alternative. This paper summarizes the results of an initial experiment performed in JET using carbon injected at high speed, as a 6mm polypropylene pellet, to investigate this potential approach to a safe plasma termination.

  1. Overview of Recent Developments in Pellet Injection for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Baylor, Larry R; Meitner, Steven J; Caughman, John B; Rasmussen, David A; Maruyama, So

    2012-01-01

    Pellet injection is the primary fueling technique planned for core fueling of ITER burning plasmas. Also, the injection of relatively small pellets to purposely trigger rapid small edge localized modes (ELMs) has been proposed as a possible solution to the heat flux damage from larger natural ELMs likely to be an issue on the ITER divertor surfaces. The ITER pellet injection system is designed to inject pellets into the plasma through both inner and outer wall guide tubes. The inner wall guide tubes will provide high throughput pellet fueling while the outerwall guide tubes will be used primarily to trigger ELMs at a high frequency (>15 Hz). The pellet fueling rate ofeach injector is to be up to 120 Pa-m3/s, which will require the formation of solid D-T at a volumetric rate of ~1500 mm3/s. Two injectors are to be provided for ITER at the startup with a provision for up to six injectorsduring the D-T phase. The required throughput of each injector is greater than that of any injector built to date, and a novel twin-screw continuous extrusion system is being developed to meet the challenging design parameters. Status of the development activities will be presented, highlighting recent progress.

  2. Particle transport after pellet injection in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, J. L.; McCarthy, K. J.; Panadero, N.; Satake, S.; López-Bruna, D.; Alonso, A.; Calvo, I.; Dinklage, A.; Estrada, T.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Hernández, J.; García, R.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.; Pastor, I.; Perfilov, S.; Sánchez, E.; Soleto, A.; Van Milligen, B. Ph; Zhezhera, A.; the TJ-II Team

    2016-08-01

    We study radial particle transport in stellarator plasmas using cryogenic pellet injection. By means of perturbative experiments, we estimate the experimental particle flux and compare it with neoclassical simulations. Experimental evidence is obtained of the fact that core depletion in helical devices can be slowed-down even by pellets that do not reach the core region. This phenomenon is well captured by neoclassical predictions with DKES and FORTEC-3D.

  3. Plasma gun pellet acceleration modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Modifications to the electrothermal plasma gun SIRENS have been completed to allow for acceleration experiments using plastic pellets. Modifications have been implemented to the 1-D, time dependent code ODIN to include pellet friction, momentum, and kinetic energy with options of variable barrel length. The code results in the new version, POSEIDON, compare favorably with experimental data and with code results from ODIN. Predicted values show an increased pellet velocity along the barrel length, achieving 2 km/s exit velocity. Measured velocity, at three locations along the barrel length, showed good correlation with predicted values. The code has also been used to investigate the effectiveness of longer pulse length on pellet velocity using simulated ramp up and down currents with flat top, and triangular current pulses with early and late peaking. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  4. A New Four-Barrel Pellet Injection System for the TJ-II Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Foust, Charles R; McGill, James M; Baylor, Larry R; Caughman, John B; Fehling, Dan T; Harris, Jeffrey H; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A; McCarthy, K. J.; Chamorro, M.; Garcia, R.; Hildago, C.; Medrano, M.; Unamuno, R.

    2011-01-01

    A new pellet injection system for the TJ-II stellarator has been developed/constructed as part of a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Centro de Investigaciones Energ ticas, Medioambientales y Tecnol gicas (CIEMAT). ORNL is providing most of the injector hardware and instrumentation, the pellet diagnostics, and the pellet transport tubes; CIEMAT is responsible for the injector stand/interface to the stellarator, cryogenic refrigerator, vacuum pumps/ballast volumes, gas manifolds, remote operations, plasma diagnostics, and data acquisition. The pellet injector design is an upgraded version of that used for the ORNL injector installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). It is a four-barrel system equipped with a cryogenic refrigerator for in situ hydrogen pellet formation and a combined mechanical punch/propellant valve system for pellet acceleration (speeds ~100 to 1000 m/s). On TJ-II, it will be used as an active diagnostic and for fueling. To accommodate the plasma experiments planned for TJ-II, pellet sizes significantly smaller than those typically used for the MST application are required. The system will initially be equipped with four different pellet sizes, with the gun barrel bores ranging between ~0.5 to 1.0 mm. The new system is almost complete and is described briefly here, highlighting the new features added since the original MST injector was constructed. Also, the future installation on TJ-II is reviewed.

  5. Tracer-Encapsulated Solid Pellet (TESPEL) injection system for the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, N.; McCarthy, K. J.; Hayashi, H.; Combs, S. K.; Foust, C.; García, R.; Panadero, N.; Pawelec, E.; Hernández Sánchez, J.; Navarro, M.; Soleto, A.

    2016-11-01

    A tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) injection system for the TJ-II stellarator was recently developed. In order to reduce the time and cost for the development, we combined a TESPEL injector provided by National Institute for Fusion Science with an existing TJ-II cryogenic pellet injection system. Consequently, the TESPEL injection into the TJ-II plasma was successfully achieved, which was confirmed by several pellet diagnostics including a normal-incidence spectrometer for monitoring a tracer impurity behavior.

  6. Tracer-Encapsulated Solid Pellet (TESPEL) Injection System for the TJ-II Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, N.; McCarthy, K. J.; Hayashi, H.; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Foust, Charles R; Garcia, R.; Panadero, N.; Pawelec, E.; Sanchez, J. Hernandez; Navarro, M.; Soleto, A.

    2016-01-01

    A tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) injection system for the TJ-II stellarator was recently developed. In order to reduce the time and cost for the development, we combined a TESPEL injector provided by National Institute for Fusion Science with an existing TJ-II cryogenic pellet injection system. Consequently, the TESPEL injection into the TJ-II plasma was successfully achieved, which was confirmed by several pellet diagnostics including a normal-incidence spectrometer for monitoring a tracer impurity behavior.

  7. Internal transport barrier simulation with pellet injection in tokamak and helical reactor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiyama, Y.; Yamazaki, K.; Garcia, J.; Arimoto, H.; Shoji, T.

    2008-07-01

    In the future fusion reactor, the plasma density peaking is important for the increase in the fusion power gain. The density control and the internal transport barrier (ITB) formation due to the pellet injection have been simulated in tokamak and helical reactors using the toroidal transport linkage code TOTAL. Firstly, the pellet injection simulation is carried out including the neutral gas shielding model and the mass relocation model in the TOTAL code, and the effectiveness of the high field side (HFS) pellet injection is clarified. Secondly, the ITB simulation with the pellet injection is carried out with the confinement improvement model based on the E×B shear effects, and it is found that the deep pellet penetration is helpful for the ITB formation as well as the plasma core fuelling in the reversed shear tokamak reactor, but the deep pellet penetration is not effective in the helical reactor.

  8. Control of magnetic islands by pellet injection in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.; Houlberg, W. A.; Peng, M.

    2007-07-15

    The appearance of magnetic islands in tokamaks degrades plasma confinement. It is therefore important to control or eliminate the growth of the islands to improve the performance of a tokamak. A theory is developed to control magnetic islands using the localized pressure gradient driven bootstrap current by injecting pellets at the O-point of the island to create a peaked plasma pressure profile inside the island. This localized bootstrap current replenishes the missing equilibrium bootstrap current density that causes the island to grow in the first place. It is shown that the effect of the localized bootstrap current tends to reduce or eliminate the original drive for the growth of the island in the island evolution equation. The theory is also valid for the localized bootstrap current created by localized heating, but with much less effectiveness. A possibility of eliminating the island by controlling the equilibrium profiles is also discussed.

  9. Controls of Magnetic Islands by Pellet Injection in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.; Houlberg, Wayne A; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of magnetic islands in tokamaks degrades plasma confinement. It is therefore important to control or eliminate the growth of the islands to improve the performance of a tokamak. A theory is developed to control magnetic islands using the localized pressure gradient driven bootstrap current by injecting pellets at the O-point of the island to create a peaked plasma pressure profile inside the island. This localized bootstrap current replenishes the missing equilibrium bootstrap current density that causes the island to grow in the first place. It is shown that the effect of the localized bootstrap current tends to reduce or eliminate the original drive for the growth of the island in the island evolution equation. The theory is also valid for the localized bootstrap current created by localized heating, but with much less effectiveness. A possibility of eliminating the island by controlling the equilibrium profiles is also discussed.

  10. Control of magnetic islands by pellet injection in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.; Rome, James A; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of magnetic islands in tokamaks degrades plasma confinement. It is therefore important to control or eliminate the growth of the islands to improve the performance of a tokamak. A theory is developed to control magnetic islands using the localized pressure gradient driven bootstrap current by injecting pellets at the O-point of the island to create a peaked plasma pressure profile inside the island. This localized bootstrap current replenishes the missing equilibrium bootstrap current density that causes the island to grow in the first place. It is shown that the effect of the localized bootstrap current tends to reduce or eliminate the original drive for the growth of the island in the island evolution equation. The theory is also valid for the localized bootstrap current created by localized heating, but with much less effectiveness. A possibility of eliminating the island by controlling the equilibrium profiles is also discussed. (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor fueling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Zhang, J.

    1992-01-01

    Three separate papers are included which report research progress during this period: (1) A new railgun configuration with perforated sidewalls, (2) development of a fuseless small-bore railgun for injection of high-speed hydrogen pellets into magnetically confined plasmas, and (3) controls and diagnostics on a fuseless railgun for solid hydrogen pellet injection.

  12. A fuel pellet injector for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, S.M.; Allen, S.L.; Petersen, D.E.; Sewall, N.R.

    1990-09-01

    Unlike other fueling systems for magnetically confined fusion plasmas, a pellet injector can deliver many fuel gas particles to the core of the plasma, enhancing plasma confinement. We installed a new pellet injector on the MTX (formerly Alcator-O) to provide a plasma with a high core density for experiments both with and without ultrahigh-power microwave heating. Its four-barrel pellet generator is the first to be designed and built at LLNL. Based on pipe-gun'' technology originated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), it incorporates our structural and thermal engineering innovations and a unique control system. The pellet transport, differential vacuum-pumping stages, and fast-opening propellant valves are reused parts of the Impurity Study EXperiment (ISX) pellet injector built by ORNL. We tailored designs of all other systems and components to the MTX. Our injector launches pellets of frozen hydrogen or deuterium into the MTX, either singly or in timed bursts of up to four pellets at velocities of up to 1000 m/s. Pellet diameters range from 1.02 to 2.08 mm. A diagnostic stage measures pellet velocities and allows us to photograph the pellets in flight. We are striving to improve the injector's performance, but its operations is already very consistent and reliable.

  13. Simulation of peeling-ballooning modes with pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. Y.; Huang, J.; Sun, T. T.; Tang, C. J.; Wang, Z. H.

    2014-11-15

    The influence of pellet ablation on the evolution of peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes is studied with BOUT++ code. The atoms coming from pellet ablation can significantly reshape the plasma pressure profile, so the behaviors of P-B modes and edge localized mode (ELM) are modified dramatically. This paper shows that the energy loss associated with an ELM increases substantially over that without the pellet, if the pellet is deposited at the top of the pedestal. On the contrary, for pellet deposition in the middle of the pedestal region the ELM energy loss can be less.

  14. Turbulent fluctuations during pellet injection into a dipole confined plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, D. T.; Mauel, M. E.; Roberts, T. M.; Kesner, J.; Woskov, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report measurements of the turbulent evolution of the plasma density profile following the fast injection of lithium pellets into the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) [Boxer et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 207 (2010)]. As the pellet passes through the plasma, it provides a significant internal particle source and allows investigation of density profile evolution, turbulent relaxation, and turbulent fluctuations. The total electron number within the dipole plasma torus increases by more than a factor of three, and the central density increases by more than a factor of five. During these large changes in density, the shape of the density profile is nearly "stationary" such that the gradient of the particle number within tubes of equal magnetic flux vanishes. In comparison to the usual case, when the particle source is neutral gas at the plasma edge, the internal source from the pellet causes the toroidal phase velocity of the fluctuations to reverse and changes the average particle flux at the plasma edge. An edge particle source creates an inward turbulent pinch, but an internal particle source increases the outward turbulent particle flux. Statistical properties of the turbulence are measured by multiple microwave interferometers and by an array of probes at the edge. The spatial structures of the largest amplitude modes have long radial and toroidal wavelengths. Estimates of the local and toroidally averaged turbulent particle flux show intermittency and a non-Gaussian probability distribution function. The measured fluctuations, both before and during pellet injection, have frequency and wavenumber dispersion consistent with theoretical expectations for interchange and entropy modes excited within a dipole plasma torus having warm electrons and cool ions.

  15. Rapid Inward Impurity Transport during Impurity Pellet Injection on the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.E.; Hyatt, A.W.; Lee, R.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Parks, P.B.; Stockdale, R.; Taylor, P.L.; Whyte, D.G.; Jernigan, T.C.

    1998-11-01

    Neon killer pellets are injected into the DIII-D tokamak plasma in order to radiatively quench the plasma{close_quote}s stored energy and mitigate disruption effects. Inward radial transport on the time scale of the pellet ablation ({le}1 ms) results in central deposition of the neon inside the ablation penetration radius of the pellet, causing effective radiative energy dissipation. This result is in contrast to the radially outward deposition measured for fueling (hydrogenic) pellets. The observed magnitudes of magnetic fluctuations ({delta}B/B{approximately}0.2{percent}) are shown to be capable of causing the radial transport. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  16. Dissipation of post-disruption runaway electron plateaus by shattered pellet injection in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, D.; Commaux, N.; Baylor, L. R.; Cooper, C. M.; Eidietis, N. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.

    2016-10-01

    Effective runaway electron (RE) mitigation strategies are essential for protecting ITER from the potential damage of a first wall strike. In DIII-D, shattered pellet injection (SPI) with large Ne pellets demonstrates the dissipation of post-disruption RE plateaus by collisions with high-Z impurities, while equivalently sized D2 pellets lead to a reduction of the impurity content of the background plasma, reducing RE dissipation. Varying the relative quantities of Ne /D2 in mixed species pellets shows that the effect of D2 may be dominant in determining the RE/pellet interaction. Compared with injection of the same quantity of Ne by massive gas injection, SPI achieves a similar initial RE current decay rate, but residual RE current remains after SPI. This may be due to the effects of a small quantity of D2 (used as a ``shell'' for firing of the Ne pellets) displacing high-Z impurities. These results will help guide the optimization of injection schemes and pellet compositions for the RE mitigation system in ITER. Work supported by the U.S. DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  17. Reduction of edge localized mode intensity on DIII-D by on-demand triggering with high frequency pellet injection and implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, S. K.; Isler, R. C.; Unterberg, E. A.; Brooks, N. H.; Evans, T. E.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Snyder, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Futatani, S.

    2013-08-15

    The injection of small deuterium pellets at high repetition rates up to 12× the natural edge localized mode (ELM) frequency has been used to trigger high-frequency ELMs in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The resulting pellet-triggered ELMs result in up to 12× lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed with pellets injected from the low field side pellet in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized β operation with input heating power just above the H-mode power threshold. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the injected pellets show that destabilization of ballooning modes by a local pressure perturbation is responsible for the pellet ELM triggering. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  18. Reduction of Edge Localized Mode Intensity on DIII-D by On-demand triggering with High Frequency Pellet Injection and Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, Steven J; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Isler, Ralph C; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Brooks, N. H.; Evans, T. E.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Snyder, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G. T.A.; Futantani, S.

    2013-01-01

    The injection of small deuterium pellets at high repetition rates up to 12 the natural edge localized mode (ELM) frequency has been used to trigger high-frequency ELMs in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The resulting pellet-triggered ELMs result in up to 12 lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed with pellets injected from the low field side pellet in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized operation with input heating power just above the H-mode power threshold. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the injected pellets show that destabilization of ballooning modes by a local pressure perturbation is responsible for the pellet ELM triggering. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  19. Experimental Demonstration of High Frequency ELM Pacing by Pellet Injection on DIII-D and Extrapolation to ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Jernigan, Thomas C; Meitner, Steven J; Brooks, N. H.; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R.A.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Loarte, A.

    2012-01-01

    . The injection of high repetition rate deuterium pellets is shown to trigger high-frequency edge localized modes (ELMs) in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak. The resulting triggered ELMs have significantly lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized operation with input power just above the H-mode power threshold. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  20. 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Pellet Injection in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    R. Samtaney; S.C. Jardin; P. Colella; D.F. Martin

    2003-10-20

    We present results of Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulations of the pellet injection process, a proven method of refueling tokamaks. AMR is a computationally efficient way to provide the resolution required to simulate realistic pellet sizes relative to device dimensions. The mathematical model comprises of single-fluid MHD equations with source terms in the continuity equation along with a pellet ablation rate model. The numerical method developed is an explicit unsplit upwinding treatment of the 8-wave formulation, coupled with a MAC projection method to enforce the solenoidal property of the magnetic field. The Chombo framework is used for AMR. The role of the E x B drift in mass redistribution during inside and outside pellet injections is emphasized.

  1. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Honig, J.

    1984-09-01

    Design, construction, testing, and performance evaluation of a small-bore plasma-arc-driven electromagnetic railgun system are described. The railgun system, which is intended for injecting high-velocity hydrogen pellets into the magnetic fusion devices for the purpose of refueling, has two acceleration stages. One consists of a gas gun preaccelerator and the other a railgun booster accelerator. The plasma-arc armature is formed behind the pellet by electrically discharging the propellant gas following the pellet into the railgun from the gas gun.

  2. Snake perturbation during pellet injection in the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xingjia; Hu, Jiansheng; Xu, Liqing; Xu, Zong; Chen, Yue; Li, Changzheng; Liu, Haiqing; Zhao, Hailing; Duan, Yanmin; Shi, Tonghui; Shen, Wei; EAST Team

    2016-11-01

    The pellet-induced snake oscillation was observed by soft x-ray (SXR) diagnostic in EAST for the first time after a fueling-sized pellet penetrated the q  =  1 surface. The snake phenomenon has a long lifetime with a helicity of m  =  1 and n  =  1. Basic behaviors of the snake, including the triggering condition, interaction with the sawtooth and snake rotation frequency, were discussed in detail by multiple core diagnostics. The snake location was also analyzed through observation of the vertical SXR arrays and raw SXR brightness profiles. It is clear that the snake resided in a broad region between the magnetic axis and the q  =  1 surface derived from equilibrium reconstruction. This investigation is beneficial for the understanding of the snake formation for EAST and future devices, like ITER and DEMO.

  3. Operation and reliability of a pneumatic hydrogen pellet injection system on the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Jernigan, T.C.; Baylor, L.R.; Milora, S.L.; Foust, C.R.; Kupschus, P.; Gadeberg, M.; Bailey, W.; Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon . JET Joint Undertaking)

    1989-01-01

    A pneumatic-based, hydrogen isotope pellet injector that was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the plasma fueling application on the Joint European Torus (JET) was described at the last Symposium on Fusion Engineering (1987). The injector was installed on JET during 1987 and has since been used in plasma fueling experiments. The injector consists of three independent machine-gun-like mechanisms (nominal pellet sizes of 2.7, 4.0, and 6.0 mm in diameter), and it features repetitive operation (1-5 Hz) for quasi-steady-state conditions (>10 s). An extensive set of injector diagnostics permits evaluation of parameters for each pellet shot, including speed, mass, and integrity. Pellet speeds can be varied but typically range from 1.0 to 1.5 km/s. Over 5000 pellets have been fired with the equipment at JET, including about 2000 pellets shot for plasma fueling experiments. In recent experiments, the system performance has been outstanding, including excellent reproducibility in pellet speed and mass and a reliability of >98% in delivery of pellets to the plasma. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Design and performance of a punch mechanism based pellet injector for alternative injection in the large helical device.

    PubMed

    Mishra, J S; Sakamoto, R; Motojima, G; Matsuyama, A; Yamada, H

    2011-02-01

    A low speed single barrel pellet injector, using a mechanical punch device has been developed for alternative injection in the large helical device. A pellet is injected by the combined operation of a mechanical punch and a pneumatic propellant system. The pellet shape is cylindrical, 3 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length. Using this technique the speed of the pellet can be controlled flexibly in the range of 100-450 m/s, and a higher speed can be feasible for a higher gas pressure. The injector is equipped with a guide tube selector to direct the pellet to different injection locations. Pellets are exposed to several curved parts with the curvature radii R(c) = 0.8 and 0.3 m when they are transferred in guided tubes to the respective injection locations. Pellet speed variation with pressure at different pellet formation temperatures has been observed. Pellet intactness tests through these guide tubes show a variation in the intact speed limit over a range of pellet formation temperatures from 6.5 to 9.8 K. Pellet speed reduction of less than 6% has been observed after the pellet moves through the curved guide tubes.

  5. Design and performance of a punch mechanism based pellet injector for alternative injection in the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, J. S.; Sakamoto, R.; Motojima, G.; Matsuyama, A.; Yamada, H.

    2011-02-15

    A low speed single barrel pellet injector, using a mechanical punch device has been developed for alternative injection in the large helical device. A pellet is injected by the combined operation of a mechanical punch and a pneumatic propellant system. The pellet shape is cylindrical, 3 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length. Using this technique the speed of the pellet can be controlled flexibly in the range of 100-450 m/s, and a higher speed can be feasible for a higher gas pressure. The injector is equipped with a guide tube selector to direct the pellet to different injection locations. Pellets are exposed to several curved parts with the curvature radii R{sub c}= 0.8 and 0.3 m when they are transferred in guided tubes to the respective injection locations. Pellet speed variation with pressure at different pellet formation temperatures has been observed. Pellet intactness tests through these guide tubes show a variation in the intact speed limit over a range of pellet formation temperatures from 6.5 to 9.8 K. Pellet speed reduction of less than 6% has been observed after the pellet moves through the curved guide tubes.

  6. First demonstration of laser engagement of 1-Hz-injected flying pellets and neutron generation

    PubMed Central

    Komeda, Osamu; Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Mori, Yoshitaka; Hanayama, Ryohei; Ishii, Katsuhiro; Nakayama, Suisei; Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Sekine, Takashi; Sato, Nakahiro; Kurita, Takashi; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Kan, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Naoki; Kondo, Takuya; Fujine, Manabu; Azuma, Hirozumi; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi; Hioki, Tatsumi; Kakeno, Mitsutaka; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Miura, Eisuke

    2013-01-01

    Pellet injection and repetitive laser illumination are key technologies for realizing inertial fusion energy. Numerous studies have been conducted on target suppliers, injectors, and tracking systems for flying pellet engagement. Here we for the first time demonstrate the pellet injection, counter laser beams' engagement and neutron generation. Deuterated polystyrene (CD) bead pellets, after free-falling for a distance of 18 cm at 1 Hz, are successfully engaged by two counter laser beams from a diode-pumped, ultra-intense laser HAMA. The laser energy, pulse duration, wavelength, and the intensity are 0.63 J per beam, 104 fs, and 811 nm, 4.7 × 1018 W/cm2, respectively. The irradiated pellets produce D(d,n)3He-reacted neutrons with a maximum yield of 9.5 × 104/4π sr/shot. Moreover, the laser is found out to bore a straight channel with 10 μm-diameter through the 1-mm-diameter beads. The results indicate potentially useful technologies and findings for the next step in realizing inertial fusion energy. PMID:24008696

  7. Analysis of an arc-driven railgun for fusion fuel pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Azzerboni, B. ); Cardelli, E.; Raugi, M.; Tellini, A. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper the behavior of an arc-driven railgun for hydrogen pellet injection is examined. Launch of saboted and unsaboted pellets is considered, and the arc mass influence on the behavior of the accelerating system is analyzed in both cases. The characteristic quantities of the hydrogen plasma armature are evaluated by means of an a dimensional model. The efficiency of the system is investigated as to whether or not the recovery of the energy remaining in the railgun at the time of launch is performed.

  8. Improvement of Plasma Performance Using Carbon Pellet Injection in Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigeru, Morita; Motoshi, Goto; Kenichi, Nagaoka; Chunfeng, Dong; Hangyu, Zhou; Zhengying, Cui; Yunbo, Dong; Xiang, Gao; Katsumi, Ida; Katsunori, Ikeda; Osamu, Kaneko; Shiyao, Lin; Haruhisa, Nakano; Masaki, Osakabe; Ryuichi, Sakamoto; Yasuhiko, Takeiri; Ang, Ti; Katsuyoshi, Tsumori; Mikiro, Yoshinuma; LHD experiment Group

    2011-06-01

    A cylindrical carbon pellet with a size of 1.2L × 1.2varphi mm to 1.8L × 1.8varphi mm and a velocity of 100 m/s to 300 m/s was injected into large helical device (LHD) for an efficient fueling based on its deeper deposition instead of hydrogen gas puffing and ice pellet injection. Electron density increment of Δne = 1014 cm-3 is successfully obtained by single carbon pellet injection without plasma collapse. Typical density and temperature of the ablation plasma of the carbon pellet, e.g., 6.5 × 1016 cm-3 and 2.5 eV for CII, are examined respectively by spectroscopic method. A confinement improvement up to 50% compared to ISS-95 stellarator scaling is clearly observed in a relatively low-density regime of ne = 2×1013 cm-3 to 4×1013 cm-3, and high ion temperature Ti(0) of about 6 keV is also observed with an internal transport barrier at ne = 1.2×1013 cm-3. In particular, the improvement in the ion temperature largely exceeds that observed in hydrogen gas-puffed discharges, which typically ranges below 3 keV.

  9. Interaction of Impurity (Li, Be, B and C) and Hydrogen Isotope Pellet Injection with Reactor-relevant Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Baiquan; J, P. Allain; Peng, Lilin; Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Zhi; Yan, Jiancheng

    2005-02-01

    Based on the two-dimensional kinetic ablation theory of the hydrogen pellet ablation developed by Kuteev [B.V. Kuteev, Nuclear Fusion, 35 (1995) 431], an algorithm of erosion speed and ablation rate calculations for Li, Be, and B impurity pellets in reactor-relevant plasma has been derived. Results show compatibilities of lithium pellet injection used in α-particle diagnostics are positive in comparison with other solid impurity pellets (e.g. Be, B and C). Using the 2-D Kuteev lentil model, including kinetic effects, we find that currently existing pellet injection techniques will not meet core-fueling requirements for ITER-FEAT. A pressure as high as 254 MPa must be applied to a pellet accelerator with a 200 cm-long single-stage pneumatic gun, in order to accelerate a pellet with a radius rp0 = 0.5 cm to a velocity of νp0, 24 × 105 cm/s penetrating 100 cm into the ITER plasma core. Comparisons of pellet velocity- and radius-dependent penetration depth between the Neutral Gas Shielding and the Kuteev's models are made. However, we find that the isotopic effects can lead to a 33% lower pellet speed for solid DT, compared to an identical H2 pellet penetrating the same length in ITER-FEAT plasma, and our calculations show that HFS injection will much improve core fueling efficiency.

  10. Development of advanced compact railguns for injection of hypervelocity hydrogen pellets into magnetic fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, M.W.; Anderson, M.A.; Kim, K.; Feng, Q.; Zhang, J.; King, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have designed, fabricated, and tested a number of compact railguns utilizing a variety of gun geometries, augmentation schemes, and state-of-the-art rail and insulator materials in order to develop an injector that can accelerate pellets of hydrogen isotopes to very high velocities ({approximately}10 km/s) continuously and at high repetition rates for refueling magnetically confined fusion plasmas. These advanced guns are designed to achieve two goals: to minimize or eliminate gunwall erosion and to produce the maximum possible pellet acceleration. These closely related goals assure long gun lifetimes. Using an advanced transaugmented compact gun with an acceleration length of only 45-cm, they have recently achieved hydrogen pellet velocities as high as 2.2 km/s with a time-averaged pellet acceleration of 4.7 {times} 10{sup 6} m/s{sup 2} at a modest rail current of 10 kA. This paper includes a brief overview of the railgun control and diagnostic systems and discusses recent results of the railgun experiments using both plexiglass and cryogenic hydrogen pellets.

  11. Development of a Twin-Screw D-2 Extruder for the ITER Pellet Injection System

    SciTech Connect

    Meitner, Steven J; Baylor, Larry R; Carbajo, Juan J; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Fehling, Dan T; Foust, Charles R; McFee, Marshall T; McGill, James M; Rasmussen, David A; Sitterson, R G; Sparks, Dennis O; Qualls, A L

    2009-07-01

    A twin-screw extruder for the ITER pellet injection system is under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The extruder will provide a stream of solid hydrogen isotopes to a secondary section, where pellets are cut and accelerated with single-stage gas gun into the plasma. A one-fifth ITER scale prototype extruder has been built to produce a continuous solid deuterium extrusion. Deuterium gas is precooled and liquefied before being introduced into the extruder. The precooler consists of a copper vessel containing liquid nitrogen surrounded by a deuterium gas filled copper coil. The liquefier is comprised of a copper cylinder connected to a Cryomech AL330 cryocooler, which is surrounded by a copper coil that the precooled deuterium flows through. The lower extruder barrel is connected to a Cryomech GB-37 cryocooler to solidify the deuterium (at approximate to 15 K) before it is forced through the extruder nozzle. A viewport located below the extruder nozzle provides a direct view of the extrusion. A camera is used to document the extrusion quality and duration. A data acquisition system records the extruder temperatures, torque, and speed, upstream, and downstream pressures. This paper will describe the prototype twin-screw extruder and initial extrusion results.

  12. Coaxial pellets for metallic impurity injection on the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X. L. Zhang, H. M.; Morita, S.; Oishi, T.; Goto, M.

    2014-11-15

    Two coaxial pellets with tungsten inserted into graphite carbon and polyethylene (PE) tubes are compared for tungsten spectroscopic study in the Large Helical Device. The tungsten pellet with carbon tube causes plasma collapse, while that with PE tube smoothly ablates without collapse. The deposition profile of the pellets is analyzed with a help of pellet ablation spectroscopy. It is found that the tungsten pellet with carbon tube can significantly penetrate into the core plasma and leads to the plasma collapse. A tungsten spectrum with radial profile is successfully observed when the tungsten pellet with PE tube is used.

  13. Thermal quench mitigation and current quench control by injection of mixed species shattered pellets in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraki, D.; Commaux, N.; Baylor, L. R.; Eidietis, N. W.; Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Lasnier, C. J.

    2016-06-15

    Injection of large shattered pellets composed of variable quantities of the main ion species (deuterium) and high-Z impurities (neon) in the DIII-D tokamak demonstrates control of thermal quench (TQ) and current quench (CQ) properties in mitigated disruptions. As the pellet composition is varied, TQ radiation fractions increase continuously with the quantity of radiating impurity in the pellet, with a corresponding decrease in divertor heating. Post-TQ plasma resistivities increase as a result of the higher radiation fraction, allowing control of current decay timescales based on the pellet composition. Magnetic reconstructions during the CQ show that control of the current decay rate allows continuous variation of the minimum safety factor during the vertically unstable disruption, reducing the halo current fraction and resulting vessel displacement. Both TQ and CQ characteristics are observed to saturate at relatively low quantities of neon, indicating that effective mitigation of disruption loads by shattered pellet injection (SPI) can be achieved with modest impurity quantities, within injection quantities anticipated for ITER. This mixed species SPI technique provides a possible approach for tuning disruption properties to remain within the limited ranges allowed in the ITER design.

  14. Thermal quench mitigation and current quench control by injection of mixed species shattered pellets in DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Shiraki, D.; Commaux, N.; Baylor, L. R.; ...

    2016-06-27

    Injection of large shattered pellets composed of variable quantities of the main ion species (deuterium) and high-Z impurities (neon) in the DIII-D tokamak demonstrate control of thermal quench (TQ) and current quench (CQ) properties in mitigated disruptions. As the pellet composition is varied, TQ radiation fractions increase continuously with the quantity of radiating impurity in the pellet, with a corresponding decrease in divertor heating. Post-TQ plasma resistivities increase as a result of the higher radiation fraction, allowing control of current decay timescales based on the pellet composition. Magnetic reconstructions during the CQ show that control of the current decay ratemore » allows continuous variation of the minimum safety factor during the vertically unstable disruption, reducing the halo current fraction and resulting vessel displacement. Both TQ and CQ characteristics are observed to saturate at relatively low quantities of neon, indicating that effective mitigation of disruption loads by shattered pellet injection (SPI) can be achieved with modest impurity quantities, within injection quantities anticipated for ITER. In conclusion, this mixed species SPI technique provides apossible approach for tuning disruption properties to remain within the limited ranges allowed in the ITER design.« less

  15. Thermal quench mitigation and current quench control by injection of mixed species shattered pellets in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraki, D.; Commaux, N.; Baylor, L. R.; Eidietis, N. W.; Hollmann, E. M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.

    2016-06-27

    Injection of large shattered pellets composed of variable quantities of the main ion species (deuterium) and high-Z impurities (neon) in the DIII-D tokamak demonstrate control of thermal quench (TQ) and current quench (CQ) properties in mitigated disruptions. As the pellet composition is varied, TQ radiation fractions increase continuously with the quantity of radiating impurity in the pellet, with a corresponding decrease in divertor heating. Post-TQ plasma resistivities increase as a result of the higher radiation fraction, allowing control of current decay timescales based on the pellet composition. Magnetic reconstructions during the CQ show that control of the current decay rate allows continuous variation of the minimum safety factor during the vertically unstable disruption, reducing the halo current fraction and resulting vessel displacement. Both TQ and CQ characteristics are observed to saturate at relatively low quantities of neon, indicating that effective mitigation of disruption loads by shattered pellet injection (SPI) can be achieved with modest impurity quantities, within injection quantities anticipated for ITER. In conclusion, this mixed species SPI technique provides apossible approach for tuning disruption properties to remain within the limited ranges allowed in the ITER design.

  16. A new method on recycling coefficient measurement using impurity pellet injection in a large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Nozato, Hideaki; Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi

    2005-07-15

    Recycling coefficients of carbon, aluminum, and titanium were evaluated using a new technique combining impurity pellet injection with high-spatial resolution bremsstrahlung measurement in hydrogen and helium plasmas on the large helical device. The recycling coefficient of impurities was investigated by measuring absolute intensities with the visible bremsstrahlung array. The time evolution of the bremsstrahlung signals was modeled by an impurity transport code adjusting the diffusion coefficient, convective velocity, and recycling coefficient. As a result, a finite value of the recycling coefficient was required in the case of carbon, whereas aluminum and titanium were explained as nonrecycled particles. It was also clarified that the recycling coefficient of carbon had a larger value in hydrogen plasmas (R=0.5-0.65) than in helium plasmas (R=0-0.2), suggesting the formation of hydrogen molecules.

  17. Development of a fuseless small-bore railgun for injection of high-speed hydrogen pellets into magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Zhang, J.; King, T.L.; Manns, W.C.; Haywood, R.G. )

    1993-01-01

    The most effective known way of refueling a tokamak fusion reactor is to inject high-speed pellets composed of fusion fuel (i.e., isotopes of hydrogen) at a controlled rate and velocity. To effect such a fueling scheme, in particular for contemporary and future large tokamaks, pellet speeds as high as 10 km/s and injection rates as high a 10 Hz may very well be required. Also, to prevent the onset of plasma instabilities pellet sizes need to be maintained below 3 to 4 mm in diameter. These requirements, plus the fact that the yield strength of frozen hydrogen is extremely low ([approximately]2 atmospheres) make the task of developing in ideal pellet injection scheme a challenge. In an attempt to meet this challenge, a fuseless small-bore railgun has been under development at the University of Illinois during the past several years. Some of the unique features of this railgun system are: (1) it is a two-stage accelerator with the first stage consisting of a combination of a hydrogen pellet generator and a gas gun, and the second stage a railgun, (2) it is a fuseless railgun in that the plasma armature is formed by electrically breaking down the propellant gas immediately behind the pellet, (3) it is a smallbore railgun with the bore size in the range of a few millimeters in diameter. This report presents a brief review of some of the existing hydrogen pellet acceleration techniques, an overview of the University of Illinois railgun program, the results to date, and the future plan.

  18. Color measurement of plastics - From compounding via pelletizing, up to injection molding and extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botos, J.; Murail, N.; Heidemeyer, P.; Kretschmer, K.; Ulmer, B.; Zentgraf, T.; Bastian, M.; Hochrein, T.

    2014-05-01

    The typical offline color measurement on injection molded or pressed specimens is a very expensive and time-consuming process. In order to optimize the productivity and quality, it is desirable to measure the color already during the production. Therefore several systems have been developed to monitor the color e.g. on melts, strands, pellets, the extrudate or injection molded part already during the process. Different kinds of inline, online and atline methods with their respective advantages and disadvantages will be compared. The criteria are e.g. the testing time, which ranges from real-time to some minutes, the required calibration procedure, the spectral resolution and the final measuring precision. The latter ranges between 0.05 to 0.5 in the CIE L*a*b* system depending on the particular measurement system. Due to the high temperatures in typical plastics processes thermochromism of polymers and dyes has to be taken into account. This effect can influence the color value in the magnitude of some 10% and is barely understood so far. Different suitable methods to compensate thermochromic effects during compounding or injection molding by using calibration curves or artificial neural networks are presented. Furthermore it is even possible to control the color during extrusion and compounding almost in real-time. The goal is a specific developed software for adjusting the color recipe automatically with the final objective of a closed-loop control.

  19. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor fueling. Progress report, August 16, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Zhang, J.

    1992-12-01

    Three separate papers are included which report research progress during this period: (1) A new railgun configuration with perforated sidewalls, (2) development of a fuseless small-bore railgun for injection of high-speed hydrogen pellets into magnetically confined plasmas, and (3) controls and diagnostics on a fuseless railgun for solid hydrogen pellet injection.

  20. SNS Injection Foil Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Sarah M; Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Ladd, Peter; Luck, Chris; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom; Shaw, Robert W; Macek, Robert James; Raparia, Deepak; Plum, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.4 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the H0 excited states created during the H charge exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming H beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we will detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms, and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  1. Repetitive Solid Spherical Pellet Injection and Irradiation toward the Repetitive-mode Fast-Ignition Fusion miniReactor CANDY.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HANAYAMA, Ryohei; KOMEDA, Osamu; NISHIMURA, Yasuhiko; MORI, Yoshitaka; ISHII, Katsuhiro; NAKAYAMA, Suisei; OKIHARA, Shinichiro; FUJITA, Kazuhisa; SEKINE, Takashi; SATO, Nakahiro; KURITA, Takashi; KAWASHIMA, Toshiyuki; KAN, Hirofumi; NAKAMURA, Naoki; KONDO, Takuya; FUJINE, Manabu; AZUMA, Hirozumi; HIOKI, Tatsumi; KAKENO, Mitsutaka; MOTOHIRO, Tomoyoshi; SUNAHARA, Atsushi; SENTOKU, Yasuhiko; MIURA, Eisuke; KITAGAWA, Yoneyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Pellet injection and repetitive laser illumination are key technologies for realizing inertial fusion energy[1-4]. Neutron generator using lasers also requires a repeating pellet target supplier. Here we present the first demonstration of target injection and neutron generation[5]. We injected more than 1300 spherical deuterated polystyrene(C8D8) bead pellet targets during 23 minutes at 1 Hz(Fig. 1). After the pellet targets fell for a distance of 18 cm, we applied the synchronized laser-diode-pumped ultra-intense laser HAMA. The laser intensity at the focal point is 5 x 1018 W/cm2, which is high enough to generate neutrons. As a result of the irradiation, we produced 2.45-MeV DD neutrons. Figure 2 shows the neutron time-of-flight signals detected by plastic scintillators coupled to photomultipliers. The neutron energy was calculated by the time-of-flight method. The maximum neutron yield was 9.5 x 104/4π sr. The result is a step toward fusion power and also suggests possible industrial neutron sources.

  2. First demonstration of rapid shutdown using neon shattered pellet injection for thermal quench mitigation on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commaux, N.; Shiraki, D.; Baylor, L. R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, S. K.; Foust, C. R.

    2016-04-01

    Shattered pellet injection (SPI) is one of the prime candidates for the ITER disruption mitigation system because of its deeper penetration and larger particle flux than massive gas injection (MGI) (Taylor et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 1872) using deuterium (Commaux et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 112001, Combs et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 38 400, Baylor et al 2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 085013). The ITER disruption mitigation system will likely use mostly high Z species such as neon because of more effective thermal mitigation and pumping constraints on the maximum amount of deuterium or helium that could be injected. An upgrade of the SPI on DIII-D enables ITER relevant injection characteristics in terms of quantities and gas species. This upgraded SPI system was used on DIII-D for the first time in 2014 for a direct comparison with MGI using identical quantities of neon. This comparison enabled the measurements of density perturbations during the thermal quench (TQ) and radiated power and heat loads to the divertor. It showed that SPI using similar quantities of neon provided a faster and stronger density perturbation and neon assimilation, which resulted in a lower conducted energy to the divertor and a faster TQ onset. Radiated power data analysis shows that this was probably due to the much deeper penetration of the neon in the plasma inducing a higher core radiation than in the MGI case. This experiment shows also that the MHD activity during an SPI shutdown (especially during the TQ) is quite different compared to MGI. This favorable TQ energy dissipation was obtained while keeping the current quench (CQ) duration within acceptable limits when scaled to ITER.

  3. First demonstration of rapid shutdown using neon shattered pellet injection for thermal quench mitigation on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Commaux, Nicolas J. C.; Shiraki, Daisuke; Baylor, Larry R.; ...

    2016-03-02

    Shattered pellet injection (SPI) is one of the prime candidates for the ITER disruption mitigation system because of its deeper penetration and larger particle flux than massive gas injection (MGI) (Taylor et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 1872) using deuterium (Commaux et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 112001, Combs et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 38 400, Baylor et al 2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 085013). The ITER disruption mitigation system will likely use mostly high Z species such as neon because of more effective thermal mitigation and pumping constraints on the maximum amount of deuterium or helium that couldmore » be injected. An upgrade of the SPI on DIII-D enables ITER relevant injection characteristics in terms of quantities and gas species. This upgraded SPI system was used on DIII-D for the first time in 2014 for a direct comparison with MGI using identical quantities of neon. This comparison enabled the measurements of density perturbations during the thermal quench (TQ) and radiated power and heat loads to the divertor. It showed that SPI using similar quantities of neon provided a faster and stronger density perturbation and neon assimilation, which resulted in a lower conducted energy to the divertor and a faster TQ onset. Radiated power data analysis shows that this was probably due to the much deeper penetration of the neon in the plasma inducing a higher core radiation than in the MGI case. This experiment shows also that the MHD activity during an SPI shutdown (especially during the TQ) is quite different compared to MGI. Furthermore, this favorable TQ energy dissipation was obtained while keeping the current quench (CQ) duration within acceptable limits when scaled to ITER.« less

  4. High throughput ultrasoft x-ray polychromator for embedded impurity pellet injection studies

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Tritz, K.; Tamura, N.; Kalinina, D.; Matsubara, A.; Sato, K.; Sudo, S.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype ultrasoft x-ray polychromator has been developed for local particle transport measurements in magnetic fusion devices using the H{sub {alpha}} charge exchange emission from low-Z impurity pellets. High throughput together with few cm radial resolution in the plasma are achieved using a toroidally aligned grid collimator, while a few A spectral bandpass together with strong background rejection are obtained using planar multilayer mirrors and foil filters. As high sensitivity detectors we use a new type of compact, efficient and high-gain multichannel plates. The prototype instrument has been evaluated in the laboratory and tested on the Large Helical Device in Japan. In addition to transport studies, this type of device is of interest for next step experiments, where high beam energy and strong attenuation will make visible charge exchange recombination spectroscopy difficult.

  5. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1986-11-10

    A detailed experimental study successfully demonstrates the acceleration of frozen hydrogen pellets by means of a fuseless two-stage electromagnetic railgun system. This system consists of a pneumatic hydrogen pellet injector, which freezes and pneumatically pre-accelerates (with high-pressure helium as the propellant gas) cylindrical 1.6-mm-dia by 2.15-mm-long hydrogen pellets, and a 60-cm-long, 1.6-mm-dia circular-bore electromagnetic railgun. The pellet is introduced into the railgun by means of a coupling piece, and a plasma-arc armature is created from the propellant gas by means of a very unique, fuseless, arc-initiation scheme. Railgun-accelerated hydrogen pellet velocities in excess of 1.6 km/s are achieved from pneumatically accelerated injection velocities of 800 m/s. Streak-camera and current-probe data show that the plasma-arc armature moves at a velocity proportional to the railgun current, I. Insight to this I-dependence is gained through the use of streak photography and current probes for varying bore geometries and gas pressures.

  6. Fault injection experiments using FIAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, James H.; Czeck, Edward W.; Segall, Zary Z.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.

    1990-01-01

    The results of several experiments conducted using the fault-injection-based automated testing (FIAT) system are presented. FIAT is capable of emulating a variety of distributed system architectures, and it provides the capabilities to monitor system behavior and inject faults for the purpose of experimental characterization and validation of a system's dependability. The experiments consist of exhaustively injecting three separate fault types into various locations, encompassing both the code and data portions of memory images, of two distinct applications executed with several different data values and sizes. Fault types are variations of memory bit faults. The results show that there are a limited number of system-level fault manifestations. These manifestations follow a normal distribution for each fault type. Error detection latencies are found to be normally distributed. The methodology can be used to predict the system-level fault responses during the system design stage.

  7. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyekyoon

    1987-12-01

    This paper discusses the use of a railgun accelerator to inject hydrogen pellets into a magnetic fusion reactor for refueling purposes. Specific studies in this paper include: 1.5 mm-diameter two-stage fuseless plasma-arc-driven electromagnetic railgun, construction and testing of a 3.2 mm-diameter two-stage railgun and a theoretical analysis of the behavior of a railgun plasma-arc armature inside a railgun. (LSP)

  8. Injection barrel with a tapered structure for a low speed and small size cryogenic hydrogen pellet in medium-sized plasma fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motojima, G.; Sakamoto, R.; Okada, H.; Nagasaki, K.; Yamada, H.; Nakamura, Y.; Kado, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Konoshima, S.; Minami, T.; Ohshima, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Mizuuchi, T.; Mutoh, T.

    2016-10-01

    An injection barrel was designed and fabricated for a small size 0.8 mm cryogenic pellet with a low speed of 200-300 m/s in medium-sized plasma fusion devices. Pellet injection with pneumatic acceleration was examined using a conventional in situ technique. A tapered structure was applied in the downstream side of the injection barrel to satisfy the requirement of pellet speed reduction by expansion of the propellant gas. Shadowgraph and light gate measurements show that the intact pellets have speeds of 260 ± 30 m/s and a typical size of 1.1-1.2 mm. The pellet ablation code based on a neutral gas shielding model shows that the penetration depth of the measured pellet parameters does not cross the plasma center, even in medium-sized plasma devices such as the Heliotron J helical device. The injection barrel with a tapered structure developed in this study is feasible for low speed pellet injection.

  9. Injection barrel with a tapered structure for a low speed and small size cryogenic hydrogen pellet in medium-sized plasma fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Motojima, G; Sakamoto, R; Okada, H; Nagasaki, K; Yamada, H; Nakamura, Y; Kado, S; Kobayashi, S; Konoshima, S; Minami, T; Ohshima, S; Yamamoto, S; Mizuuchi, T; Mutoh, T

    2016-10-01

    An injection barrel was designed and fabricated for a small size 0.8 mm cryogenic pellet with a low speed of 200-300 m/s in medium-sized plasma fusion devices. Pellet injection with pneumatic acceleration was examined using a conventional in situ technique. A tapered structure was applied in the downstream side of the injection barrel to satisfy the requirement of pellet speed reduction by expansion of the propellant gas. Shadowgraph and light gate measurements show that the intact pellets have speeds of 260 ± 30 m/s and a typical size of 1.1-1.2 mm. The pellet ablation code based on a neutral gas shielding model shows that the penetration depth of the measured pellet parameters does not cross the plasma center, even in medium-sized plasma devices such as the Heliotron J helical device. The injection barrel with a tapered structure developed in this study is feasible for low speed pellet injection.

  10. Experiments on torrefied wood pellet: study by gasification and characterization for waste biomass to energy applications

    PubMed Central

    Rollinson, Andrew N.; Williams, Orla

    2016-01-01

    Samples of torrefied wood pellet produced by low-temperature microwave pyrolysis were tested through a series of experiments relevant to present and near future waste to energy conversion technologies. Operational performance was assessed using a modern small-scale downdraft gasifier. Owing to the pellet's shape and surface hardness, excellent flow characteristics were observed. The torrefied pellet had a high energy density, and although a beneficial property, this highlighted the present inflexibility of downdraft gasifiers in respect of feedstock tolerance due to the inability to contain very high temperatures inside the reactor during operation. Analyses indicated that the torrefaction process had not significantly altered inherent kinetic properties to a great extent; however, both activation energy and pre-exponential factor were slightly higher than virgin biomass from which the pellet was derived. Thermogravimetric analysis-derived reaction kinetics (CO2 gasification), bomb calorimetry, proximate and ultimate analyses, and the Bond Work Index grindability test provided a more comprehensive characterization of the torrefied pellet's suitability as a fuel for gasification and also other combustion applications. It exhibited significant improvements in grindability energy demand and particle size control compared to other non-treated and thermally treated biomass pellets, along with a high calorific value, and excellent resistance to water. PMID:27293776

  11. Experiments on torrefied wood pellet: study by gasification and characterization for waste biomass to energy applications.

    PubMed

    Rollinson, Andrew N; Williams, Orla

    2016-05-01

    Samples of torrefied wood pellet produced by low-temperature microwave pyrolysis were tested through a series of experiments relevant to present and near future waste to energy conversion technologies. Operational performance was assessed using a modern small-scale downdraft gasifier. Owing to the pellet's shape and surface hardness, excellent flow characteristics were observed. The torrefied pellet had a high energy density, and although a beneficial property, this highlighted the present inflexibility of downdraft gasifiers in respect of feedstock tolerance due to the inability to contain very high temperatures inside the reactor during operation. Analyses indicated that the torrefaction process had not significantly altered inherent kinetic properties to a great extent; however, both activation energy and pre-exponential factor were slightly higher than virgin biomass from which the pellet was derived. Thermogravimetric analysis-derived reaction kinetics (CO2 gasification), bomb calorimetry, proximate and ultimate analyses, and the Bond Work Index grindability test provided a more comprehensive characterization of the torrefied pellet's suitability as a fuel for gasification and also other combustion applications. It exhibited significant improvements in grindability energy demand and particle size control compared to other non-treated and thermally treated biomass pellets, along with a high calorific value, and excellent resistance to water.

  12. Experiments on torrefied wood pellet: study by gasification and characterization for waste biomass to energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinson, Andrew N.; Williams, Orla

    2016-05-01

    Samples of torrefied wood pellet produced by low-temperature microwave pyrolysis were tested through a series of experiments relevant to present and near future waste to energy conversion technologies. Operational performance was assessed using a modern small-scale downdraft gasifier. Owing to the pellet's shape and surface hardness, excellent flow characteristics were observed. The torrefied pellet had a high energy density, and although a beneficial property, this highlighted the present inflexibility of downdraft gasifiers in respect of feedstock tolerance due to the inability to contain very high temperatures inside the reactor during operation. Analyses indicated that the torrefaction process had not significantly altered inherent kinetic properties to a great extent; however, both activation energy and pre-exponential factor were slightly higher than virgin biomass from which the pellet was derived. Thermogravimetric analysis-derived reaction kinetics (CO2 gasification), bomb calorimetry, proximate and ultimate analyses, and the Bond Work Index grindability test provided a more comprehensive characterization of the torrefied pellet's suitability as a fuel for gasification and also other combustion applications. It exhibited significant improvements in grindability energy demand and particle size control compared to other non-treated and thermally treated biomass pellets, along with a high calorific value, and excellent resistance to water.

  13. Transport simulations of ohmic pellet experiments on the TFTR, ASDEX, and ALCATOR-C tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Tang, W.M.; Owens, D.K.; Greenwald, M.; Gruber, O.; Kaufmann, M.

    1988-07-01

    Transport simulations of ohmic gas-fuelled and pellet-fuelled experiments have been carried out to test a microinstability-based, profile-consistent model of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Predictions for experiments on the TFTR, ASDEX, and ALCATOR-C tokamaks were found consistent with the observed confinement and temperature measurements. 26 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Pellet ablation and temperature profile measurements in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, D.K.; Schmidt, G.L.; Cavallo, A.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.; Johnson, D.; Mansfield, D.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.; Taylor, G.

    1988-01-01

    Single and multiple deuterium pellets have been injected into a variety of TFTR plasmas, including ohmically heated plasmas with wide range of electron temperatures, neutral beam heated plasmas at several NBI powers and high T/sub e/, post NBI plasmas. Pellet penetration into these plasmas was determined by measuring the pellet speed and duration of the H/sub ..cap alpha..//D/sub ..cap alpha../ light emission during pellet ablation in the plasma. These penetration measurements are compared to the predicted penetration computed using the ablation model developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The plasma density profiles before and after pellet injection are used to estimate the number of particles deposited in the plasma. The plasma particle increase compared to the estimated number of atoms in the pellet yields a measure of the fueling efficiency of pellets in TFTR. The ablation cloud parameters are discussed based on polychromater measurements of the H/sub ..cap alpha..//D/sub ..cap alpha../ line emission from the neutral cloud surrounding the pellet. The electron temperature profile evolution after pellet injection is examined for the case of multiple pellet injection into an ohmically heated plasma. The ORNL pellet ablation code was used to compare measured pellet penetration depths with a theoretical model. The measured input parameters to the model are the electron density and temperature profiles, the neutral beam heating profile, the neutral density profile, the pellet size, pellet speed and pellet composition. The free parameter in the model is the thickness of the neutral cloud surrounding the pellet. This parameter is adjusted to arrive at a reasonable agreement between measured and calculated pellet penetration depths. The output of the model which is directly comparable to experiment is the calculated ablation rate. It is assumed that the broad-band H/sub ..cap alpha..//D/sub ..cap alpha../ emission is proportional to the ablation rate.

  15. Pellet injector research at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Schuresko, D.D.; Milora, S.L.; Combs, S.K.; Foster, C.A.; Fisher, P.W.; Argo, B.E.; Barber, G.C.; Foust, C.R.; Gethers, F.E.; Gouge, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Several advanced plasma fueling systems are under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for present and future magnetic confinement devices. These include multishot and repeating pneumatic pellet injectors, centrifuge accelerators, electrothermal guns, a Tritium Proof-of-Principle experiment, and an ultrahigh velocity mass ablation driven accelerator. A new eight-shot pneumatic injector capable of delivering 3.0 mm, 3.5 mm, and 4.0 mm diameter pellets at speeds up to 1500 m/s into a single discharge has been commissioned recently on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor. The so-called Deuterium Pellet Injector (DPI) is a prototype of a Tritium Pellet Injector (TPI) scheduled for use on TFTR in 1990. Construction of the TPI will be preceded by a test of tritium pellet fabrication and acceleration using a 4 mm bore ''pipe gun'' apparatus. A new repeating pneumatic pellet injector capable of 2.7 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm operation is being installed on the Joint European Torus to be used in ORNL/JET collaborative pellet injection studies. A 1.5 m centrifuge injector is being developed for application on the Tore Supra experiment in 1988. The new device, which is a 50% upgrade of the prototype centrifuge used on D-III, features a pellet feed mechanism capable of producing variable-size pellets (1.5 to 3.0 mm diameter) optimally shaped to survive acceleration stresses. Accelerating pellets to velocities in excess of 2 km/s is being pursued through two new development undertakings. A hydrogen plasma electrothermal gun is operational at 2 km/s with 10 mg hydrogen pellets; this facility has recently been equipped with a pulsed power supply capable of delivering 1.7 kJ millisecond pulses to low impedence arc loads.

  16. Divertor load footprint of ELMs in pellet triggering and pacing experiments at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigione, D.; Garzotti, L.; Lennholm, M.; Alper, B.; Artaserse, G.; Bennett, P.; Giovannozzi, E.; Eich, T.; Kocsis, G.; Lang, P. T.; Maddaluno, G.; Mooney, R.; Rack, M.; Sips, G.; Tvalashvili, G.; Viola, B.; Wilkes, D.

    2015-08-01

    An investigation of pellet pacing and triggering of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) was carried out in the frame of ELM mitigation studies aimed at reducing their damaging effects on the plasma-facing components (PFCs). The divertor power load footprint of triggered ELMs was compared with gas puffing controlled ELMs. Small pellets, corresponding to a few per cent of the target plasma particle inventory, were used to minimize the fueling effect and the total particle throughput. There is no evidence that pellets can reduce the divertor power load with respect to gas fueling when operating at the same ELM frequency. The line average density and the energy confinement time remained constant when the gas was progressively substituted by pellets. The launch from the Vertical High Field Side (VHFS) confirmed to be more efficient in ELM triggering than from the Low Field Side (LFS) while the power load footprint remained the same both in time evolution and in spatial distribution when changing the injection geometry.

  17. Study of a transaugmented two-stage small circular-bore railgun for injection of hypervelocity hydrogen pellets as a fusion reactor refueling mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, M.W.; Anderson, M.A.; Feng, Q.; Zhang, J.; Kim, K.

    1997-01-01

    Injection of hypervelocity hydrogen pellets has become widely accepted as the most effective means of refueling magnetically confined fusion reactors. Pellet velocities on the order of 10 km/s are desired and hydrogen pellet erosion during acceleration must be minimized. It is important to maintain uniform bore surfaces during repetitive shots, implying that, if a railgun is to be used to accelerate the pellets, damage to the sidewalls and rails of the railgun due to local heating must be limited. In order to reduce the amount of power dissipated within the bore and increase the propulsive force generated by the plasma-arc armature while minimizing losses due to pellet, rail, and sidewall ablation, the authors have employed a magnetic field transaugmentation mechanism consisting of a two-turn pulsed electromagnet. The two-stage gun consists of a light-gas gun which accelerates a 4- to 5-mg pellet to a speed around 1.2 km/s and injects it into the plasma-arc armature railgun. Currently, they have achieved a final output velocity for a hydrogen pellet of 2.11 km/s with a time-averaged acceleration of 4,850 km/s{sup 2} using a 58-cm railgun pulsed with a peak rail current of 9.2 kA and 28.0 kA of transaugmentation current. This paper will present a description of the hydrogen-pellet-injector railgun system, a discussion of the data on hydrogen pellet acceleration, and projections for future systems.

  18. Mitigation of divertor heat flux by high-frequency ELM pacing with non-fuel pellet injection in DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; ...

    2017-03-23

    Experiments have been conducted on DIII-D investigating high repetition rate injection of non-fuel pellets as a tool for pacing Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and mitigating their transient divertor heat loads. Effective ELM pacing was obtained with injection of Li granules in different H-mode scenarios, at frequencies 3–5 times larger than the natural ELM frequency, with subsequent reduction of strike-point heat flux. However, in scenarios with high pedestal density (~6 × 1019 m–3), the magnitude of granule triggered ELMs shows a broad distribution, in terms of stored energy loss and peak heat flux, challenging the effectiveness of ELM mitigation. Furthermore, transientmore » heat-flux deposition correlated with granule injections was observed far from the strike-points. As a result, field line tracing suggest this phenomenon to be consistent with particle loss into the mid-plane far scrape-off layer, at toroidal location of the granule injection.« less

  19. Studies on Pellet Fueling of ITER-Like Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kamelander, Gerald; Weimann, Geert; Garzotti, Luca; Litaudon, Xavier; Moreau, Didier; Pegourie, Bernard

    2004-06-15

    The paper reports on simulation of pellet-fueled plasmas in a fusion reactor. The simulations have been performed by means of the ASTRA transport code. We have studied physical modeling of pellet injection as well as the numerical conditions to resolve pellet injection correctly. As a first step the essential mechanisms for density control have been studied based on simplified assumptions with a generic source of additional heating. The experience gained has been used to simulate advanced scenarios including internal transport barriers. It has been confirmed that it is possible to drive the plasma of a next-generation tokamak into a high-Q regime and to maintain it in a steady-state regime. Nevertheless, the pellet injection parameters required are rather demanding and imply a significant technological improvement of pellet injectors. Those investigations represent an improvement of simulations done earlier with a control of the central density at constant profile.

  20. Formulation Optimization of Hot Melt Extruded Abuse Deterrent Pellet Dosage Form Utilizing Design of Experiments (DOE)

    PubMed Central

    Maddineni, Sindhuri; Battu, Sunil Kumar; Morott, Joe; Majumdar, Soumyajit; Repka, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop techniques for an abuse-deterrent (AD) platform utilizing hot melt extrusion (HME) process. Formulation optimization was accomplished by utilizing Box-Behnken design of experiments to determine the effect of the three formulation factors: PolyOx™ WSR301, Benecel™ K15M, and Carbopol 71G; each of which was studied at three levels on TR attributes of the produced melt extruded pellets. A response surface methodology was utilized to identify the optimized formulation. Lidocaine Hydrochloride was used as a model drug, and suitable formulation ingredients were employed as carrier matrices and processing aids. All of the formulations were evaluated for the TR attributes such as particle size post-milling, gelling, percentage of drug extraction in water and alcohol. All of the DOE formulations demonstrated sufficient hardness and elasticity, and could not be reduced into fine particles (<150µm), which is a desirable feature to prevent snorting. In addition, all of the formulations exhibited good gelling tendency in water with minimal extraction of drug in the aqueous medium. Moreover, Benecel™ K15M in combination with PolyOx™ WSR301 could be utilized to produce pellets with TR potential. HME has been demonstrated to be a viable technique with a potential to develop novel abuse-deterrent formulations. PMID:24433429

  1. Pellet injectors for the tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    The repeating pneumatic injector is a device from the ORNL development program. A new eight-shot deuterium pellet injector has been designed and constructed specifically for the TFTR application and is scheduled to replace the repeating injector this year. The new device combines a cryogenic extruder and a cold wheel rotary mechanism to form and chamber eight pellets in a batch operation; the eight pellets can then be delivered in any time sequence. Another unique feature of the device is the variable pellet size with three pellets each of 3.0 and 3.5 mm diam and two each of 4.0 mm diam. The experience and technology that have been developed on previous injectors at ORNL have been utilized in the design of this latest pellet injection system.

  2. Development of a new tracer-encapsulated solid pellet injection system for more precise control of tracer-impurity-deposit location in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, N.; Shoji, M.; Suzuki, C.; Funaba, H.; Hayashi, H.; Maeno, H.; Yokota, M.; Ogawa, H.; Sudo, S.

    2016-11-01

    A new tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) injection system has been developed additionally for the LHD heliotron. This system has three-dimensionally bended guide tubes, which allows us to inject the TESPEL obliquely on a poloidal cross-section of the LHD plasma. Consequently, this system enables us to control a tracer-impurity-deposited location more precisely. Moreover, this system can make it possible for the tracer impurity to be deposited even only inside the ergodic region (outside a last closed flux surface of the LHD plasma). A stereoscopic fast camera system has been also developed for capturing a three-dimensional TESPEL trajectory.

  3. Volume measurement of cryogenic deuterium pellets by Bayesian analysis of single shadowgraphy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szepesi, T.; Kálvin, S.; Kocsis, G.; Lang, P. T.; Wittmann, C.

    2008-03-01

    In situ commissioning of the Blower-gun injector for launching cryogenic deuterium pellets at ASDEX Upgrade tokamak was performed. This injector is designed for high repetitive launch of small pellets for edge localised modes pacing experiments. During the investigation the final injection geometry was simulated with pellets passing to the torus through a 5.5m long guiding tube. For investigation of pellet quality at launch and after tube passage laser flash camera shadowgraphy diagnostic units before and after the tube were installed. As indicator of pellet quality we adopted the pellet mass represented by the volume of the main remaining pellet fragment. Since only two-dimensional (2D) shadow images were obtained, a reconstruction of the full three-dimensional pellet body had to be performed. For this the image was first converted into a 1-bit version prescribing an exact 2D contour. From this contour the expected value of the volume was calculated by Bayesian analysis taking into account the likely cylindrical shape of the pellet. Under appropriate injection conditions sound pellets with more than half of their nominal mass are detected after acceleration; the passage causes in average an additional loss of about 40% to the launched mass. Analyzing pellets arriving at tube exit allowed for deriving the injector's optimized operational conditions. For these more than 90% of the pellets were arriving with sound quality when operating in the frequency range 5-50Hz.

  4. [Pittsburgh experience with botulinum toxin A injection].

    PubMed

    de Miguel, F; Chancellor, M B

    2006-03-01

    We report one institution's six-year experience using botulinum toxin A (BONT-A) in the bladder and urethra in 110 patients for a variety of lower urinary tract dysfunction. 110 patients (age 19-82) were injected with BONT-A into the bladder (n=42) or urethra (n=68), 35 M, 75 F. Voiding dysfunction included: neurogenic detrusor overactivity and/or detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, overactive bladder (OAB), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), bladder neck obstruction (BNO) and interstitial cystitis (IC). Currently, 27 patients have undergone further injections (up to 6) at intervals > 6 months. All the patients with bladder BONT-A injection had preoperative evidence of involuntary detrusor contractions during urodynamic testing. Analysis of the 110 patients indicates that 67.3% reported a decrease or absence of incontinence. Diaries indicate a decrease in both day and night voiding symptoms. Efficacy occurred within 7 days and lasted for at least 6 months. Condition specific QOL symptom scores also demonstrated improvement. There have been no long-term complications. Two MS women with mild baseline stress urinary incontinence reported increased leakage with stress after BONT-A external sphincter injection. One MS woman who had a bladder injection had an increased residual urine from 78 to 155 ml. She did not have to perform intermittent catheterization. BONT-A injection is a safe and promising treatment modality for a variety of lower urinary tract dysfunctions for both skeletal and smooth muscle dysfunction. In our series, BONT-A is equally effective in women as it is in men. Bladder injections with BONT-A are effective for not only neurogenic detrusor overactivity but also overactive bladder. BONT-A can even be considered for IC.

  5. Application of the design of experiments in optimization of drug layering of pellets with an insight into drug polymer interactions.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Jovana; Ibric, Svetlana; Djuris, Jelena; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2016-06-15

    This study consists of two experimental designs. Within the first one, suitable technique for application of model drug onto inactive pellets was evaluated and formulation and process parameters with greatest impact to process efficency and useful yield were determined. Results of experiments showed that formulation characteristics were the ones with the greatest impact on coating efficiency and that suspension layering technique was significantly better for drug application onto inactive pellets in comparison to solution layering during which pronounced agglomeration of pellets occurred. Analysis of drug-polymer interactions by differential scanning calorimetry was performed to explain the results of experiments. The reason for agglomeration of pellets during solution layering was formation of low Tg amorphous form of model drug. The second set of experiments was performed according to central composite design experimental plan in order to optimize level of binder and concentration of solids in the coating liquid which were found to have greatest positive impact on process efficiency and useful yield in the screening study. Statistically significant models were obtained by response surface methodology and it was possible to use them to define optimal levels of excipients in the formulation.

  6. Runaway electron production in DIII-D killer pellet experiments, calculated with the CQL3D/KPRAD model

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.; Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Evans, T. E.; Rosenbluth, M. N.; Whyte, D. G.

    2000-11-01

    Runaway electrons are calculated to be produced during the rapid plasma cooling resulting from ''killer pellet'' injection experiments, in general agreement with observations in the DIII-D [J. L. Luxon , Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159] tokamak. The time-dependent dynamics of the kinetic runaway distributions are obtained with the CQL3D [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, ''The CQL3D Code,'' in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Numerical Modeling, Montreal, 1992 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1992), p. 489] collisional Fokker--Planck code, including the effect of small and large angle collisions and stochastic magnetic field transport losses. The background density, temperature, and Z{sub eff} are evolved according to the KPRAD [D. G. Whyte and T. E. Evans , in Proceedings of the 24th European Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics, Berchtesgaden, Germany (European Physical Society, Petit-Lancy, 1997), Vol. 21A, p. 1137] deposition and radiation model of pellet--plasma interactions. Three distinct runway mechanisms are apparent: (1) prompt ''hot-tail runaways'' due to the residual hot electron tail remaining from the pre-cooling phase, (2) ''knock-on'' runaways produced by large-angle Coulomb collisions on existing high energy electrons, and (3) Dreicer ''drizzle'' runaway electrons due to diffusion of electrons up to the critical velocity for electron runaway. For electron densities below {approx}1x10{sup 15}cm{sup -3}, the hot-tail runaways dominate the early time evolution, and provide the seed population for late time knock-on runaway avalanche. For small enough stochastic magnetic field transport losses, the knock-on production of electrons balances the losses at late times. For losses due to radial magnetic field perturbations in excess of {approx}0.1% of the background field, i.e., {delta}B{sub r}/B{>=}0.001, the losses

  7. Lithium Pellet Injector Development for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    G. Gettelfinger; J. Dong; R. Gernhardt; H. Kugel; P. Sichta; J. Timberlake

    2003-12-04

    A pellet injector suitable for the injection of lithium and other low-Z pellets of varying mass into plasmas at precise velocities from 5 to 500 m/s is being developed for use on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment). The ability to inject low-Z impurities will significantly expand NSTX experimental capability for a broad range of diagnostic and operational applications. The architecture employs a pellet-carrying cartridge propelled through a guide tube by deuterium gas. Abrupt deceleration of the cartridge at the end of the guide tube results in the pellet continuing along its intended path, thereby giving controlled reproducible velocities for a variety of pellets materials and a reduced gas load to the torus. The planned injector assembly has four hundred guide tubes contained in a rotating magazine with eight tubes provided for injection into plasmas. A PC-based control system is being developed as well and will be described elsewhere in these Proceedings. The development path and mechanical performance of the injector will be described.

  8. Drug release from MCC- and carrageenan-based pellets: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Kranz, H; Jürgens, K; Pinier, M; Siepmann, J

    2009-10-01

    Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) is a well-established pelletisation aid. However, MCC pellets generally do not disintegrate, resulting in prolonged drug release, especially in the case of drugs with poor/low aqueous solubility. The major objectives of this study were (i) to modify the prolonged matrix-type drug release from MCC pellets by addition of a disintegrant (croscarmellose Na) or pore former (PEG 6000), (ii) to evaluate carrageenan as potential alternative pelletisation aid for manufacturing high-dose immediate release pellets, and (iii) to better understand the underlying drug release mechanisms. Pellets containing 77-90% drug with poor/low aqueous solubility (vatalanib succinate, SAG/ZK, or theophylline) were prepared by extrusion-spheronisation. All batches showed acceptable yields, aspect ratios, tensile strengths, and porosities. Drug release from MCC pellets was predominantly controlled by pure diffusion and limited drug solubility and could be quantitatively described using Fick's law. Importantly, the apparent drug diffusivity could effectively be adjusted by adding small amounts of a disintegrant or pore former, allowing for release periods ranging from a few minutes to several hours. The drug diffusion coefficients varied between 0.36 and 29 x 10(-6)cm(2)/s. In contrast, carrageenan-based pellets very rapidly disintegrated upon contact with aqueous media and released high doses of drugs with poor/low aqueous solubility within a few minutes.

  9. Modeling pellet impact drilling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalyov, A. V.; Ryabchikov, S. Ya; Isaev, Ye D.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes pellet impact drilling which could be used to increase the drilling speed and the rate of penetration when drilling hard rocks. Pellet impact drilling implies rock destruction by metal pellets with high kinetic energy in the immediate vicinity of the earth formation encountered. The pellets are circulated in the bottom hole by a high velocity fluid jet, which is the principle component of the ejector pellet impact drill bit. The experiments conducted has allowed modeling the process of pellet impact drilling, which creates the scientific and methodological basis for engineering design of drilling operations under different geo-technical conditions.

  10. Swelling under irradiation of MgO pellets containing americium oxide: The ECRIX-H irradiation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, J.; Béjaoui, S.; Hanifi, K.; Valot, Ch.; Loubet, L.

    2011-06-01

    The ECRIX-H irradiation experiment studied the behaviour of pellets containing americium dispersed in MgO. The purpose of the irradiation was to demonstrate the capacity of magnesia to provide an efficient support matrix. After fabrication, the sintered pellets contained 16.65 wt.% of Am microdispersed in the inert matrix. The ECRIX-H pellets were irradiated under a locally moderated neutron flux in the Phénix sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) for 318 Effective Full Power Days (EFPD). Post-test calculations indicated that the fission and transmutation rates of americium at the maximum flux plane reached 33.9% and 92.6% respectively at the end of the irradiation phase. The results of the post-irradiation examinations - both non-destructive and destructive - are discussed in this paper. These results indicate a satisfactory behaviour of the MgO matrix. Particularly, a moderate swelling occurs in the pellets under irradiation even with significant quantities of helium generated and at high transmutation rate.

  11. Computer simulations of the noise injection experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.W.; Hale, J.R.; Schultz, J.H.; Pillsbury, R.D. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    An objective of the Noise Injection Experiment (NIE) is to calibrate the numerical methods used to estimate the noise level in the proposed internal, cowound voltage sensors to be used in the superconducting magnets, such as those in ITER and TPX. A time-varying magnetic field is applied to the sample windings and the pick-up signals in the parallel and helical sensors (some are internally terminated) are measured. A computer model is developed to predict the results, and the measurements are compared with the computer simulations.

  12. Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.K

    1986-01-08

    Using a tungsten-needle arc initiator in conjunction with Paschen curves characteristics hydrogen pellets have been accelerated with a two-stage electromagnetic railgun system. This scheme produced velocities on the order of 1.6 km/s. The effects on performance of the bore size have been studied. Questions of pretriggering, misfiring, plasma-arc stalling, railgun geometry, and railgun currents have been addressed. 1 tab. (WRF)

  13. BWR fuel experience with zinc injection

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, H.A.; Garcia, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    In 1982 a correlation between low primary recirculation system dose rates in BWR`s and the presence of ionic zinc in reactor water was identified. The source of the zinc was primarily from Admiralty brass condensers. Plants with brass condensers are called ``natural zinc`` plants. Brass condensers were also a source of copper that was implicated in crude induced localized corrosion (CILC) fuel failures. In 1986 the first BWR intentionally injected zinc for the benefits of dose rate control. Although zinc alone was never implicated in fuel degradation of failures, a comprehensive fuel surveillance program was initiated to monitor fuel performance. Currently there are 14 plants that are injecting zinc. Six of these plants are also on hydrogen water chemistry. This paper describes the effect on both Zircaloy corrosion and the cruding characteristics as a result of these changes in water chemistry. Fuel rod corrosion was found to be independent of the specific water chemistry of the plants. The corrosion behavior was the same with the additions of zinc alone or zinc plus hydrogen and well within the operating experience for fuel without either of these additions. No change was observed in the amounts of crude deposited on the fuel rods, both for the adherent and loosely held deposits. One of the effects of the zinc addition was the trend to form more of the zinc rich iron spinel in the fuel deposits rather than the hematite deposits that are predominantly formed with non additive water chemistry.

  14. Owl Pellets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Craig D.

    1987-01-01

    Provides complete Project WILD lesson plans for 20-45-minute experiential science learning activity for grades 3-7 students. Describes how students construct a simple food chain through examination of owl pellets. Includes lesson objective, method, background information, materials, procedure, evaluation, and sources of owl pellets and posters.…

  15. Owl Pellets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Craig D.

    1987-01-01

    Provides complete Project WILD lesson plans for 20-45-minute experiential science learning activity for grades 3-7 students. Describes how students construct a simple food chain through examination of owl pellets. Includes lesson objective, method, background information, materials, procedure, evaluation, and sources of owl pellets and posters.…

  16. Pelletizing lignite

    DOEpatents

    Goksel, Mehmet A.

    1983-11-01

    Lignite is formed into high strength pellets having a calorific value of at least 9,500 Btu/lb by blending a sufficient amount of an aqueous base bituminous emulsion with finely-divided raw lignite containing its inherent moisture to form a moistened green mixture containing at least 3 weight % of the bituminous material, based on the total dry weight of the solids, pelletizing the green mixture into discrete green pellets of a predetermined average diameter and drying the green pellets to a predetermined moisture content, preferrably no less than about 5 weight %. Lignite char and mixture of raw lignite and lignite char can be formed into high strength pellets in the same general manner.

  17. Steam torrefaction of Eucalyptus globulus for producing black pellets: A pilot-scale experience.

    PubMed

    Arteaga-Pérez, Luis E; Grandón, Héctor; Flores, Mauricio; Segura, Cristina; Kelley, Stephen S

    2017-08-01

    Steam torrefaction of Eucalyptus globulus was performed at temperatures between 245°C and 265°C in a 100kg/h pilot plant. Torrefied biomass was then pelletized in a 300kg/h unit and the pellets were subject to durability, density and combustion tests. The structural changes measured with FTIR were studied along with the combustion behavior of the materials. Compositional analysis showed that increasing the torrefaction temperature reduced both hemicellulose fraction and overall mass yield (MY). Furthermore, there was a linear relationship between the energy yield (EY) and mass yield (EY=[1.04-0.9(1-MY)]) for these samples. The ignition and comprehensive indexes confirmed that the stability of the torrefied biomass in a combustion environment was higher than for untreated biomass. Finally, pellets showed high durability (98%), and had an energy density (13-14GJ/m(3)), which is comparable to low-rank coals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Restoration of segmental bone defect by calcium sulfate pellet: experiment with rabbit].

    PubMed

    Cui, Xu; Zhang, Bo-xun; Zhao, De-wei

    2009-03-24

    To compare the effects of different calcium sulfate pellets made by different methods in treating segmental defect of bone. Eighty New Zealand white rabbits underwent cutting off a segment in the middle part of radius so as to establish models of radial segmental defect, and than were divided into 4 groups: Group A as control group, Group B with calcium sulfate pellet made by routine method implanted into the defect, Group C with chitosan coated pressed calcium sulfate pellet implanted into the defect, and Group D with chitosan coated pressed calcium sulfate pellet combined with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2 implanted into the defect: X-ray photography was done every 4 weeks to observe the new bone formation. Four, 8, and 12 weeks 5 rabbits from each group were killed. The defect segments with parts of normal bone at both ends were cut off to undergo fluorescence microscopy and biomechanic three point bending test. X-ray photography and histological examination showed that new bone formation of cortex and reconstruction of marrow cavity were seen in Groups D and C, especially in Group D. The new bone mineralization rate of Group D was significantly higher than that of Group C (P<0.05) which was significantly higher than that of Group B (P<0.01). The anti-bending strength ratio of Group D was (47.5%+/-2.1%, significantly higher than that of Group C [(39.6+/-1.7)%, F=125.3, P<0.01], and the anti-bending strength ratios of Groups D and C were both significantly higher than those of Groups B and A [(23.6+/-3.3)% and (21.3+/-2.7)%]. Chitosan coated pressed calcium sulfate pellet shows relatively higher anti-bending strength and slightly slower resorption that closely coincide with the growth rate of new bone. It can be used to restore segmental bone defect, and particularly when combined with rhBMP-2.

  19. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plöckl, B.; Lang, P. T.

    2013-10-01

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios.

  20. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher.

    PubMed

    Plöckl, B; Lang, P T

    2013-10-01

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios.

  1. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Plöckl, B.; Lang, P. T.

    2013-10-15

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios.

  2. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L. ); Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G. )

    1992-01-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  3. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L.; Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G.

    1992-11-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  4. Study of Advanced Railgun Hydrogen Pellet Injectors for Fusion Reactor Refueling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Tony Levone

    An advanced railgun system has been developed to assess its feasibility as a hypervelocity hydrogen pellet injector for magnetically confined plasmas. It consists of a pellet generator/gas gun assembly for freezing hydrogen pellets and injecting them into the railgun at velocities as high as 1.5 km/s. A plasma armature is formed by ionizing the low-Z propellant gas behind the pellet and firing the railgun. This fuseless operation prevents high-Z impurities from entering the reactor during pellet injection. The railgun system has several features that distinguish it from its predecessors, including: (1) a more compact, versatile pellet generator, (2) a new gas gun configuration that produces significantly higher pellet speeds, (3) a perforated coupling piece between the gas gun and railgun to prevent spurious arcing, and (4) ablation-resistant sidewalls, perforated sidewalls and transaugmentation to reduce inertial and viscous drag, the primary obstacles to achieving hypervelocity. A unique system of sophisticated controls and diagnostics has been assembled to operate the railgun system and assess its performance, including fully automated pellet freezing and gas gun operation, an automatic timing circuit that is immune to mistriggering caused by pellet fragmentation or electromagnetic interference, a streak camera, photostations, light gates, current trans formers, B-dot probes, laser interferometry and optical spectroscopy. Free-arc and hydrogen pellet experiments were conducted to evaluate various railgun designs. Transaugmented and simple railguns 1.2 and 2 m long were tested. The performances of railguns using Mullite, solid Lexan and perforated Lexan sidewalls were compared. The railgun theory of operation and anticipated losses are also examined. The theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The advanced railgun system has set several world records for bare hydrogen pellet velocity, including a 3.3 km/s shot on

  5. Pellet Puzzlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoots, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Presents information on owl's taxonomy, characteristics, and influences on man. Describes owl pellets, which are digestive discards, and explains how they can be used to determine the owl's diet as a science activity. (PR)

  6. Pellet Puzzlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoots, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Presents information on owl's taxonomy, characteristics, and influences on man. Describes owl pellets, which are digestive discards, and explains how they can be used to determine the owl's diet as a science activity. (PR)

  7. Speed limit of frozen pellets (H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and Ne) through single-loop and multiloop tubes and implications for fusion plasma research

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S. K.; Griffith, A. E.; Foust, C. R.

    2001-01-01

    Frozen pellets (H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and Ne at 8 K) of nominal 2.7 mm diam were shot through a coiled tube (single loop of {approx}0.6 m diam and 8.5 mm bore), and the speed limit for survival was recorded for each pellet type. Intact H{sub 2} pellets were observed at speeds approaching 500 m/s; but neon pellets could not survive much more than 100 m/s. The speed limit for D{sub 2} pellets fell in the middle at {approx}300 m/s. Some D{sub 2} pellets were also shot through a 30 m coiled tube consisting of 11 loops (average loop diameter of {approx}0.8 m), and a speed limit of {approx}100 m/s was observed. Injection of frozen H{sub 2} or D{sub 2} pellets is commonly used for core fueling of magnetically confined plasmas, and frozen neon pellets are sometimes used for impurity transport studies in similar experiments. The results from these tests add to a pellet database for injection lines with single- and complex multiple-curved guide tubes. All of the information to date suggests that frozen pellets can be delivered reliably from a pellet source to any accessible plasma location on a fusion device via ''roller-coaster'' tubes as long as the pellet speed is maintained below a threshold limit.

  8. Natural attenuation of xenobiotic compounds: Anaerobic field injection experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruegge, K.; Bjerg, P.L.; Mosbaek, H.; Christensen, T.H.

    1995-12-31

    Currently, a continuous field injection experiment is being performed in the anaerobic part of a pollution plume downgradient of the Grindsted Landfill in Denmark. This natural gradient experiment includes an injection of 18 different xenobiotic compounds with bromide as a tracer. The injection is taking place under methanogenic/sulfate-reducing conditions and the compounds will, as they migrate with the groundwater, pass through a zone where the redox conditions have been determined as iron-reducing.

  9. Pellet interaction with runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    James, A. N.; Hollmann, E. M.; Yu, J.H.; Austin, M. E.; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Evans, T.E.; Humphrey, D. A.; Jernigan, T. C.; Parks, P. B.; Putvinski, S.; Strait, E. J.; Tynan, G. R.; Wesley, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe results from recent experiments studying interaction of solid polystyrene pellets with a runaway electron current channel generated after cryogenic argon pellet rapid shutdown of DIII-D. Fast camera imaging shows the pellet trajectory and continuum emission from the subsequent explosion, with geometric calibration providing detailed explosion analysis and runaway energy. Electron cyclotron emission also occurs, associated with knock-on electrons broken free from the pellet by RE which then accelerate and runaway, and also with a short lived hot plasma blown off the pellet surface. In addition, we compare heating and explosion times from observations and a model of pellet heating and breakdown by runaway interaction. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  10. Numerical modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Enedy, S.

    1993-01-01

    Data from injection experiments in the southeast Geysers are presented that show strong interference (both negative and positive) with a neighboring production well. Conceptual and numerical models are developed that explain the negative interference (decline of production rate) in terms of heat transfer limitations and water-vapor relative permeability effects. Recovery and over-recovery following injection shut-in are attributed to boiling of injected fluid, with heat of vaporization provided by the reservoir rocks.

  11. Numerical modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; Enedy, Steve

    1993-01-28

    Data from injection experiments in the southeast Geysers are presented that show strong interference (both negative and positive) with a neighboring production well. Conceptual and numerical models are developed that explain the negative interference (decline of production rate) in terms of heat transfer limitations and water-vapor relative permeability effects. Recovery and overrecovery following injection shut-in are attributed to boiling of injected fluid, with heat of vaporization provided by the reservoir rocks.

  12. Twenty barrel in situ pipe gun type solid hydrogen pellet injector for the Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Motojima, Gen; Hayashi, Hiromi; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko; Ogawa, Hideki; Takami, Shigeyuki; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    A 20 barrel solid hydrogen pellet injector, which is able to inject 20 cylindrical pellets with a diameter and length of between 3.0 and 3.8 mm at the velocity of 1200 m/s, has been developed for the purpose of direct core fueling in LHD (Large Helical Device). The in situ pipe gun concept with the use of compact cryo-coolers enables stable operation as a fundamental facility in plasma experiments. The combination of the two types of pellet injection timing control modes, i.e., pre-programing mode and real-time control mode, allows the build-up and sustainment of high density plasma around the density limit. The pellet injector has demonstrated stable operation characteristics during the past three years of LHD experiments.

  13. Electrothermal plasma gun as a pellet injector

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.

    1994-11-01

    The NCSU electrothermal plasma gun SIRENS has been used to accelerate plastic (Lexan polycarbonate) pellets, to determine the feasibility of the use of electrothermal guns as pellet injectors. The use of an electrothermal gun to inject frozen hydrogenic pellets requires a mechanism to provide protective shells (sabots) for shielding the pellet from ablation during acceleration into and through the barrel of the gun. The gun has been modified to accommodate acceleration of the plastic pellets using special acceleration barrels equipped with diagnostics for velocity and position of the pellet, and targets to absorb the pellet`s energy on impact. The length of the acceleration path could be varied between 15 and 45 cm. The discharge energy of the electrothermal gun ranged from 2 to 6 kJ. The pellet velocities have been measured via a set of break wires. Pellet masses were varied between 0.5 and 1.0 grams. Preliminary results on 0.5 and 1.0 g pellets show that the exit velocity reaches 0.9 km/s at 6 kJ input energy to the source. Higher velocities of 1.5 and 2.7 km/s have been achieved using 0.5 and 1.0 gm pellets in 30 cm long barrel, without cleaning the barrel between the shots.

  14. Control System for the NSTX Lithium Pellet Injector

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sichta; J. Dong; R. Gernhardt; G. Gettelfinger; H. Kugel

    2003-10-27

    The Lithium Pellet Injector (LPI) is being developed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The LPI will inject ''pellets'' of various composition into the plasma in order to study wall conditioning, edge impurity transport, liquid limiter simulations, and other areas of research. The control system for the NSTX LPI has incorporated widely used advanced technologies, such as LabVIEW and PCI bus I/O boards, to create a low-cost control system which is fully integrated into the NSTX computing environment. This paper will present the hardware and software design of the computer control system for the LPI.

  15. Operation of the repeating pneumatic injector on TFTR and design of an 8-shot deuterium pellet injector

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Foust, C.R.; Baylor, L.R.; Burris, R.D.; Fisher, P.W.; Lunsford, R.V.; Sparks, D.O.; Stewart, K.A.; Wysor, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    The repeating pneumatic hydrogen pellet injector, which was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has been installed and operated on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The injector combines high-speed extruder and pneumatic acceleration technologies to propel frozen hydrogen isotope pellets repetitively at high speeds. The pellets are transported to the plasma in an injection line that also serves to minimize the gas loading on the torus; the injection line incorporates a fast shutter valve and two stages of guide tubes with intermediate vacuum pumping stations. A remote, stand-alone control and data acquisition system is used for injector and vacuum system operation. In early pellet fueling experiments on TFTR, the injector has been used to deliver deuterium pellets at speeds ranging from 1.0 to 1.5 km/s into plasma discharges. First, single large (nominal 4-mm-dia) pellets provided high densities in TFTR (1.8 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ on axis); after conversion to smaller (nominal 2.7-mm-dia) pellets, up to five pellets were injected at 0.25-s intervals into a plasma discharge, giving a line-averaged density of 1 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. Operating characteristics and performance of the injector in initial tests on TFTR are presented.

  16. Cryogenic pellet launcher adapted for controlling of tokamak plasma edge instabilities.

    PubMed

    Lang, P T; Cierpka, P; Harhausen, J; Neuhauser, J; Wittmann, C; Gál, K; Kálvin, S; Kocsis, G; Sárközi, J; Szepesi, T; Dorner, C; Kauke, G

    2007-02-01

    One of the main challenges posed recently on pellet launcher systems in fusion-oriented plasma physics is the control of the plasma edge region. Strong energy bursts ejected from the plasma due to edge localized modes (ELMs) can form a severe threat for in-vessel components but can be mitigated by sufficiently frequent triggering of the underlying instabilities using hydrogen isotope pellet injection. However, pellet injection systems developed mainly for the task of ELM control, keeping the unwanted pellet fueling minimized, are still missing. Here, we report on a novel system developed under the premise of its suitability for control and mitigation of plasma edge instabilities. The system is based on the blower gun principle and is capable of combining high repetition rates up to 143 Hz with low pellet velocities. Thus, the flexibility of the accessible injection geometry can be maximized and the pellet size kept low. As a result the new system allows for an enhancement in the tokamak operation as well as for more sophisticated experiments investigating the underlying physics of the plasma edge instabilities. This article reports on the design of the new system, its main operational characteristics as determined in extensive test bed runs, and also its first test at the tokamak experiment ASDEX Upgrade.

  17. Tritium pellet injector for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Cole, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foust, C.R.; Langley, R.A.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Wilgen, J.B.; Schmidt, G.L.; Barnes, G.W.; Persing, R.G.

    1992-06-01

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) phase. The existing TFTR deuterium pellet injector (DPI) has been modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed to provide pellets ranging from 3.3 to 4.5 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller. The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed, and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellet. Results of the limited testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI is being installed on TFTR to support the D-D run period in 1992. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and secondary tritium containment systems and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability.

  18. Tritium pellet injector for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Cole, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foust, C.R.; Langley, R.A.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Wilgen, J.B. ); Schmidt, G.L.; Barnes, G.W.; Persing, R.G. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) phase. The existing TFTR deuterium pellet injector (DPI) has been modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed to provide pellets ranging from 3.3 to 4.5 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller. The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed, and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellet. Results of the limited testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI is being installed on TFTR to support the D-D run period in 1992. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and secondary tritium containment systems and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability.

  19. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  20. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  1. Flux-Level Transit Injection Experiments with NASA Pleiades Supercomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Burke, Christopher J.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Seader, Shawn; Haas, Michael R.; Batalha, Natalie; Henze, Christopher; Christiansen, Jessie; Kepler Project, NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division

    2016-06-01

    Flux-Level Transit Injection (FLTI) experiments are executed with NASA's Pleiades supercomputer for the Kepler Mission. The latest release (9.3, January 2016) of the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline is used in the FLTI experiments. Their purpose is to validate the Analytic Completeness Model (ACM), which can be computed for all Kepler target stars, thereby enabling exoplanet occurrence rate studies. Pleiades, a facility of NASA's Advanced Supercomputing Division, is one of the world's most powerful supercomputers and represents NASA's state-of-the-art technology. We discuss the details of implementing the FLTI experiments on the Pleiades supercomputer. For example, taking into account that ~16 injections are generated by one core of the Pleiades processors in an hour, the “shallow” FLTI experiment, in which ~2000 injections are required per target star, can be done for 16% of all Kepler target stars in about 200 hours. Stripping down the transit search to bare bones, i.e. only searching adjacent high/low periods at high/low pulse durations, makes the computationally intensive FLTI experiments affordable. The design of the FLTI experiments and the analysis of the resulting data are presented in “Validating an Analytic Completeness Model for Kepler Target Stars Based on Flux-level Transit Injection Experiments” by Catanzarite et al. (#2494058).Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for the Kepler Mission has been provided by the NASA Science Mission Directorate.

  2. Solid deuterium centrifuge pellet injector

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Pellet injectors are needed to fuel long pulse tokamak plasmas and other magnetic confinement devices. For this purpose, an apparatus has been developed that forms 1.3-mm-diam pellets of frozen deuterium at a rate of 40 pellets per second and accelerates them to a speed of 1 km/s. Pellets are formed by extruding a billet of solidified deuterium through a 1.3-mm-diam nozzle at a speed of 5 cm/s. The extruding deuterium is chopped with a razor knife, forming 1.3-mm right circular cylinders of solid deuterium. The pellets are accelerated by synchronously injecting them into a high speed rotating arbor containing a guide track, which carries them from a point near the center of rotation to the periphery. The pellets leave the wheel after 150/sup 0/ of rotation at double the tip speed. The centrifuge is formed in the shape of a centrifugal catenary and is constructed of high strength KEVLAR/epoxy composite. This arbon has been spin-tested to a tip speed of 1 km/s.

  3. Experimental investigation of solid hydrogen pellet ablation in high-temperature plasmas using holographic interferometry and other diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jr., C. E.

    1981-03-01

    The technology currently most favored for the refueling of fusion reactors is the high-velocity injection of solid hydrogen pellets. Design details are presented for a holographic interferometer/shadowgraph used to study the microscopic characteristics of a solid hydrogen pellet ablating in an approx. 1-keV plasma. Experimental data are presented for two sets of experiments in which the interferometer/shadowgraph was used to study approx. 1-mm-diam solid hydrogen pellets injected into the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at velocities of 1000 m/s. In addition to the use of the holographic interferometer, the pellet ablation process is diagnosed by studying the emission of Balmer-alpha photons and by using the available tokamak diagnostics (Thomson scattering, microwave/far-infrared interferometer, pyroelectric radiometer, hard x-ray detector).

  4. Use of Ar pellet ablation rate to estimate initial runaway electron seed population in DIII-D rapid shutdown experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollmann, E. M.; Commaux, N.; Moyer, R. A.; Parks, P. B.; Austin, M. E.; Bykov, I.; Cooper, C.; Eidietis, N. W.; O'Mullane, M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Rudakov, D. L.; Shiraki, D.

    2017-01-01

    Small (2-3 mm, 0.9-2 Pa · m3) argon pellets are used in the DIII-D tokamak to cause rapid shutdown (disruption) of discharges. The Ar pellet ablation is typically found to be much larger than expected from the thermal plasma electron temperature alone; the additional ablation is interpreted as being due to non-thermal runaway electrons (REs) formed during the pellet-induced temperature collapse. Simple estimates of the RE seed current using the enhanced ablation rate give values of order 1-10 kA, roughly consistent with estimates based on avalanche theory. Analytic estimates of the RE seed current based on the Dreicer formula tend to significantly underestimate it, while estimates based on the hot tail model significantly overestimate it.

  5. Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options

    SciTech Connect

    Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

    1984-09-01

    The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

  6. Experiments on Plume Spreading by Engineered Injection and Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, D. C.; Jones, M.; Tigera, R. G.; Neupauer, R.

    2014-12-01

    The notion that groundwater remediation is transport-limited emphasizes the coupling between physical (i.e., hydrodynamic), geochemical, and microbiological processes in the subsurface. Here we leverage this coupling to promote groundwater remediation using the approach of engineered injection and extraction. In this approach, inspired by the literature on chaotic advection, uncontaminated groundwater is injected and extracted through a manifold of wells surrounding the contaminated plume. The potential of this approach lies in its ability to actively manipulate the velocity field near the contaminated plume, generating plume spreading above and beyond that resulting from aquifer heterogeneity. Plume spreading, in turn, promotes mixing and reaction by chemical and biological processes. Simulations have predicted that engineered injection and extraction generates (1) chaotic advection whose characteristics depend on aquifer heterogeneity, and (2) faster rates and increased extent of groundwater remediation. This presentation focuses on a complimentary effort to experimentally demonstrate these predictions experimentally. In preparation for future work using refractive index matched (RIM) porous media, the experiments reported here use a Hele-Shaw apparatus containing silicone oil. Engineered injection and extraction is used to manipulate the geometry of an initially circular plume of black pigment, and photographs record the plume geometry after each step of injection of extraction. Image analysis, using complimentary Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches, reveals the thickness and variability of the dispersion zone surrounding the deformed plume of black pigment. The size, shape, and evolution of this dispersion zone provides insight into the interplay between engineered injection and extraction, which generates plume structure, and dispersion (here Taylor dispersion), which destroys plume structure. These experiments lay the groundwork for application of engineered

  7. Particle transport in pellet fueled JET (Jet European Torus) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    Pellet fueling experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak with a multi-pellet injector. The pellets are injected at speeds approaching 1400 m/s and penetrate deep into the JET plasma. Highly peaked electron density profiles are achieved when penetration of the pellets approaches or goes beyond the magnetic axis, and these peaked profiles persist for more than two seconds in ohmic discharges and over one second in ICRF heated discharges. In this dissertation, analysis of electron particle transport in multi-pellet fueled JET limiter plasmas under a variety of heating conditions is described. The analysis is carried out with a one and one-half dimensional radial particle transport code to model the experimental density evolution with various particle transport coefficients. These analyses are carried out in plasmas with ohmic heating, ICRF heating, and neural beam heating, in limiter configurations. Peaked density profile cases are generally characterized by diffusion coefficients with a central (r/a < 0.5) diffusivity {approximately}0.1 m{sup 2}/s that increases rapidly to {approximately}0.3 m{sup 2}/s at r/a = 0.6 and then increases out to the plasma edge as (r/a){sup 2}. These discharges can be satisfactorily modeled without any anomalous convective (pinch) flux. 79 refs., 60 figs.

  8. Injection of calcium phosphate pastes: prediction of injection force and comparison with experiments.

    PubMed

    Fatimi, Ahmed; Tassin, Jean-François; Bosco, Julia; Deterre, Rémi; Axelos, Monique A V; Weiss, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics suspensions (ICPCS) are used in bone and dental surgery as injectable bone substitutes. This ICPCS biomaterial associates biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) granules with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) polymer. Different ICPCS were prepared and their rheological properties were evaluated in parallel disks geometry as a function of the BCP weight ratio (35, 40, 45 and 50 %). The suspensions show a strongly increased viscosity as compared to the suspending fluid and the high shear rate part of the flow curve can be fitted with a power law model (Ostwald-de Waele model). The fitting parameters depend on the composition of the suspension. A simple device has been used to characterize extrusion of the paste using a disposable syringe fitted with a needle. The injection pressure of four ICPCS formulations was studied under various conditions (needle length and radius and volumetric flow rate), yielding an important set of data. A theoretical approach based on the capillary flow of non-Newtonian fluids was used to predict the necessary pressure for injection, on the basis of flow curves and extrusion conditions. The extrusion pressure calculated from rheological data shows a quantitative agreement with the experimental one for model fluids (Newtonian and HPMC solution) but also for the suspension, when needles with sufficiently large diameters as compared to the size of particles, are used. Depletion and possibly wall slip is encountered in the suspensions when narrower diameters are used, so that the injection pressure is less than that anticipated. However a constant proportionality factor exists between theory and injection experiments. The approach developed in this study can be used to correlate the rheological parameters to the necessary pressure for injection and defines the pertinent experimental conditions to obtain a quantitative agreement between theory and experiments.

  9. DE-1/Siple VLF wave-injection experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inan, U. S.

    1985-01-01

    Results of Siple/DE-1 VLF wave-injection/reception experiments indicate that the injected signals, while propagating in the magnetosphere in the non-ducted mode, are on occasion amplified, generate sidebands and trigger VLF emissions. The propagation paths include direct non-ducted paths as well as reflected modes involving propagation initially in a 'duct' followed by a reflected non-ducted path up to the satellite. Calibrated measurements of the wave magnetic and electric intensities are used to estimate the local refractive index.

  10. The Effects of BOTOX® Injections on Emotional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joshua Ian; Senghas, Ann; Brandt, Fredric; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2010-01-01

    Although it was proposed over a century ago that feedback from facial expressions influence emotional experience, tests of this hypothesis have been equivocal. Here we directly tested this facial feedback hypothesis (FFH) by comparing the impact on self-reported emotional experience of BOTOX injections (which paralyze muscles of facial expression) and a control Restylane injection (which is a cosmetic filler that does not affect facial muscles). When examined alone, BOTOX participants showed no pre- to post-treatment changes in emotional responses to our most positive and negative video clips. Between-groups comparisons, however, showed that relative to controls, BOTOX participants exhibited an overall significant decrease in the strength of emotional experience. This result was attributable to a) a pre- vs. post decrease in responses to mildly positive clips in the BOTOX group and b) an unexpected increase in responses to negative clips in the Restylane control group. These data suggest that feedback from facial expressions is not necessary for emotional experience, but may influence emotional experience in some circumstances. These findings point to specific directions for future work clarifying the expression-experience relationship. PMID:20515231

  11. A fault injection experiment using the AIRLAB Diagnostic Emulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Robert; Mangum, Scott; Scheper, Charlotte

    1988-01-01

    The preparation for, conduct of, and results of a simulation based fault injection experiment conducted using the AIRLAB Diagnostic Emulation facilities is described. An objective of this experiment was to determine the effectiveness of the diagnostic self-test sequences used to uncover latent faults in a logic network providing the key fault tolerance features for a flight control computer. Another objective was to develop methods, tools, and techniques for conducting the experiment. More than 1600 faults were injected into a logic gate level model of the Data Communicator/Interstage (C/I). For each fault injected, diagnostic self-test sequences consisting of over 300 test vectors were supplied to the C/I model as inputs. For each test vector within a test sequence, the outputs from the C/I model were compared to the outputs of a fault free C/I. If the outputs differed, the fault was considered detectable for the given test vector. These results were then analyzed to determine the effectiveness of some test sequences. The results established coverage of selt-test diagnostics, identified areas in the C/I logic where the tests did not locate faults, and suggest fault latency reduction opportunities.

  12. [Experience in scaling up the film coating process for theophylline sustained-release pellets in mass production].

    PubMed

    Grunenberg, P; Lorck, C; Jünger, H; Laicher, A

    1998-05-01

    The scale-up of the film coating process for the production of Bronchoretard pellets (theophylline, CAS 58-55-9) is an example for the successful setup of a modern production technology designed to meet the increasing GMP requirements while taking into consideration ecological and economical aspects. This technology provides a reduction in polymer losses on drying from approx. 20% to under 5% and a distinct improvement in the reproducibility of the in vitro dissolution profiles. Double batch sizes and higher spray rates allow for a substantially higher batch turnover. A production line installed exclusively for Bronchoretard pellets and specific process optimization measures resulted in considerably lower lag-times of the equipment.

  13. Gas-injection experiments on a dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Barnouin, O.; Javedani, J.; Del Medico, S.; Miley, G.H.; Bromley, B.

    1994-12-31

    Rockford Technology Associates, Inc. (RTA) has been doing experiments on the Dense Plasma focus (DPF) device at the Fusion Studies Laboratory of the University of Illinois. This DPF consists of four racks of five 2-{mu}F capacitors whose charge is switched onto the inner electrode of a plasma focus by four Trigatron spark gaps. The stored energy is 12.5 kJ at 25 kV. The bank is usually discharged in a static fill of H{sub 2} at {approx} 6 torr. Preliminary experiments aimed at exploring the potential of the DPF device as a magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and as an x-ray source for lithography have investigated various alternative ways of injecting gas between the electrodes. One of those approaches consists of injecting gas from the tip of the inner electrode at a steady rate. In this operation, the DPF chamber pressure was held constant by running the vacuum pump at full throttle. This operation simulated simultaneous pulsed injection at the base insulator and electrode tip. Hydrogen was fed through a 1/16th-inch hole at a flow rate of {approx} 90 cm/s. Pulsing was then performed at 23 kV, and the corresponding variations of the current were observed using a Rogowski coil. It is found that the plasma collapses into a pinch at the same time as in conventional experiments using a static fill. The singularity in the current waveform is slightly smaller with tip injection, but its size and shape are easily reproducible. Further details and comparison of this operation with conventional pulsing will be presented.

  14. First neutral beam injection experiments on KSTAR tokamak.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S H; Chang, D H; Kim, T S; In, S R; Lee, K W; Jin, J T; Chang, D S; Oh, B H; Bae, Y S; Kim, J S; Park, H T; Watanabe, K; Inoue, T; Kashiwagi, M; Dairaku, M; Tobari, H; Hanada, M

    2012-02-01

    The first neutral beam (NB) injection system of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak was partially completed in 2010 with only 1∕3 of its full design capability, and NB heating experiments were carried out during the 2010 KSTAR operation campaign. The ion source is composed of a JAEA bucket plasma generator and a KAERI large multi-aperture accelerator assembly, which is designed to deliver a 1.5 MW, NB power of deuterium at 95 keV. Before the beam injection experiments, discharge, and beam extraction characteristics of the ion source were investigated. The ion source has good beam optics in a broad range of beam perveance. The optimum perveance is 1.1-1.3 μP, and the minimum beam divergence angle measured by the Doppler shift spectroscopy is 0.8°. The ion species ratio is D(+):D(2)(+):D(3)(+) = 75:20:5 at beam current density of 85 mA/cm(2). The arc efficiency is more than 1.0 A∕kW. In the 2010 KSTAR campaign, a deuterium NB power of 0.7-1.5 MW was successfully injected into the KSTAR plasma with a beam energy of 70-90 keV. L-H transitions were observed within a wide range of beam powers relative to a threshold value. The edge pedestal formation in the T(i) and T(e) profiles was verified through CES and electron cyclotron emission diagnostics. In every deuterium NB injection, a burst of D-D neutrons was recorded, and increases in the ion temperature and plasma stored energy were found.

  15. The Skylab barium plasma injection experiments. I - Convection observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Peek, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Two barium-plasma injection experiments were carried out during magnetically active periods in conjunction with the Skylab 3 mission. The high-explosive shaped charges were launched near dawn on November 27 and December 4, 1973, UT. In both cases, the AE index was near 400 gammas, and extensive pulsating auroras covered the sky. The first experiment, Skylab Alpha, occurred in the waning phase of a 1000-gamma substorm, and the second, Skylab Beta, occurred in the expansive phase of an 800-gamma substorm. In both, the convection was generally magnetically eastward, with 100-km-level electric fields near 40 mV/m. However, in the Alpha experiment the observed orientation of the barium flux tube fit theoretical field lines having no parallel current, but the Beta flux-tube orientation indicated a substantial upward parallel sheet current.

  16. Enhanced Performance of Electrothermal Plasma Sources as Fusion Pellet Injection Drivers and Space Based Mini-Thrusters via Extension of a Flattop Discharge Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh Winfrey, A.; Abd Al-Halim, Mohamed A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Gilligan, John G.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2013-06-01

    Electrothermal plasma sources have been introduced as a method to propel frozen hydrogenic pellets for fueling of future magnetic fusion reactors. These sources are also useful as mini-thrusters in space shuttles, pre-injectors in hypervelocity launchers and igniters in electrothermal-chemical Guns. The source is a capillary discharge that generates the plasma from the ablation of a liner in an ablation-dominated regime, or from the flow of gas into the capillary in an ablation-free regime. Most electrothermal plasma sources uses pulse power delivery system with a pulse length in the range of 100 μs with FWHM of 50 μs. This research is a computational study on the effect of extending the top of the discharge current pulse to the range of 1,000 μs on the source exit parameter to achieve higher pressures and better exit velocities. Calculations using 0.4 cm diameter, 9.0 cm length Lexan polycarbonate capillary source, using ideal and nonideal plasma models, show that extended flattop pulses at fixed amplitude produce more ablated mass which scales linearly with increased pulse length, however, other plasma parameters remain almost constant. Results suggest that quasi-steady state operation of an electrothermal plasma source may provide constant exit pressure and velocity for pellet injectors for future magnetic fusion reactors deep fueling.

  17. The Ignitor Fast Pellet Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattolillo, A.; Migliori, S.; Bombarda, F.; Milora, S. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.

    2004-11-01

    A collaboration between the ENEA Laboratory at Frascati and the Fusion Technology Group of Oak Ridge for the development of a fast pellet injector for the Ignitor ignition experiment has been established. The program aims at the construction of a 4 barrel, double stage gun able to reach speeds up to 4 km/s and thus penetrate to the core of the plasma column. The compact size of the Ignitor machine favors the injection from the low field side, for which very positive results have been obtained on the FTU machine [1], in terms of density profile peaking and good energy confinement. The ongoing activities include the procurement of all the hardware for the criocooler, diagnostics and control electronics, from the ORNL side, and the design and construction of the gun by ENEA. A new fast valve has been developed that considerably reduces the requirements on the expansion volumes necessary to prevent the propulsion gas to reach the plasma chamber. [1] D. Frigione, et al., Nuclear Fusion 41, 1613 (2001).

  18. Modeling of Carbon Migration During JET Injection Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J. D.; Likonen, J.; Coad, P.; Rubel, M.; Widdowson, A.; Airila, M.; Andrew, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Corrigan, G.; Esser, H. G.; Jachmich, S.; Kallenbach, A.; Kirschner, A.; Kreter, A.; Matthews, G. F.; Philipps, V.; Pitts, R. A.; Spence, J.; Stamp, M.; Wiesen, S.

    2008-10-15

    JET has performed two dedicated carbon migration experiments on the final run day of separate campaigns (2001 and 2004) using {sup 13}CH{sub 4} methane injected into repeated discharges. The EDGE2D/NIMBUS code modelled the carbon migration in both experiments. This paper describes this modelling and identifies a number of important migration pathways: (1) deposition and erosion near the injection location, (2) migration through the main chamber SOL, (3) migration through the private flux region aided by E x B drifts, and (4) neutral migration originating near the strike points. In H-Mode, type I ELMs are calculated to influence the migration by enhancing erosion during the ELM peak and increasing the long-range migration immediately following the ELM. The erosion/re-deposition cycle along the outer target leads to a multistep migration of {sup 13}C towards the separatrix which is called 'walking'. This walking created carbon neutrals at the outer strike point and led to {sup 13}C deposition in the private flux region. Although several migration pathways have been identified, quantitative analyses are hindered by experimental uncertainty in divertor leakage, and the lack of measurements at locations such as gaps and shadowed regions.

  19. The HAARP Magnetospheric Wave Injection Experiment: Conditions and Dependencies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkowski, M.

    2009-12-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) ionospheric heating facility in Alaska (L = 4.9) is able to generate electromagnetic radiation in the 500 Hz - 10 kHz (ELF/VLF) frequency range. In an on-going experiment the HAARP facility is used to inject ELF/VLF waves into the magnetosphere to trigger wave-particle interactions with radiation belt electrons that result in the non-linear amplification of the wave, known as the coherent whistler mode instability. The conditions associated with observations of magnetospherically amplified signals known as ‘echoes’ are examined. Conditions enabling the propagation of the HAARP generated ELF/VLF signals along field aligned paths are found to be key dependencies. The assessment is based on geomagnetic indices and experiments involving ELF/VLF generation using different HF beam positions. Since HAARP signals are found to be injected primarily very close to the heating facility, the position of the plasmapause is a key parameter in echo observations.

  20. DE 1 VLF observations during Activny wave injection experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.; Helliwell, R. A.; Molchanov, O. A.; Green, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    We report on coordinated high-altitude satellite observations in support of one of the first space-based very low frequency (VLF) wave injection experiments, namely the USSR Aktivny mission. The Aktivny satellite (A) was designed to carry a VLF transmitter (nominal frequency approximately 10 kHz, transmitter power approximately 10 kW) coupled to a 20-m-diameter loop antenna in a nearly polar orbit (83 deg inclination, apogee approximately 2500 km, perigee approximately 500 km). We focus our attention on conjunction experiments between the Aktivny and DE 1 satellites. Because of problems in the deployment of the loop antenna, the radiated power capability of the antenna was significantly reduced. Although this substantially reduced the expectation of receiving detectable signal levels on the satellite, the DE 1/Aktivny conjunction experiments were nevertheless carried out as a means of possibly placing an upper limit on the radiated power. During the period November 1989 through April 1990, a total of 10 DE 1/Aktivny wave injection sessions were conducted. During each session the Aktivny transmitter operated at 10.537 kHz with 1 s On - 1 s Off format, for a period of 6 min centered around the conjunction time. During three conjunction periods (December 12, 26, and 27, 1989) both DE 1 and Aktivny were in the southern hemisphere, and DE 1 was at relatively low altitudes (ranging from 6211 to 14,810 km), thus providing the best conjunction possibilities according to the ray tracing criteria developed above. On most days, Omega transmitter signals as well as commonly occuring natural wave phenomena such as whistlers (0(+)) and hiss were clearly seen well above the background level, but there was no evidence of the Aktivny 1 s On/ 1 s Off pattern. Though no Aktivny signals were detected by the LWR on the DE 1 satellite, the experimental constraints allow us to place an upper limit on the total power radiated by the Aktivny transmitter in the whistler-mode. Using

  1. Cryogenic pellet production developments for long-pulse plasma operation

    SciTech Connect

    Meitner, S. J.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Fehling, D. T.; McGill, J. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; McGinnis, W. D.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-01-29

    Long pulse plasma operation on large magnetic fusion devices require multiple forms of cryogenically formed pellets for plasma fueling, on-demand edge localized mode (ELM) triggering, radiative cooling of the divertor, and impurity transport studies. The solid deuterium fueling and ELM triggering pellets can be formed by extrusions created by helium cooled, twin-screw extruder based injection system that freezes deuterium in the screw section. A solenoid actuated cutter mechanism is activated to cut the pellets from the extrusion, inserting them into the barrel, and then fired by the pneumatic valve pulse of high pressure gas. Fuel pellets are injected at a rate up to 10 Hz, and ELM triggering pellets are injected at rates up to 20 Hz. The radiative cooling and impurity transport study pellets are produced by introducing impurity gas into a helium cooled section of a pipe gun where it deposits in-situ. A pneumatic valve is opened and propellant gas is released downstream where it encounters a passive punch which initially accelerates the pellet before the gas flow around the finishes the pellet acceleration. This paper discusses the various cryogenic pellet production techniques based on the twin-screw extruder, pipe gun, and pellet punch designs.

  2. A Bichromator for High Time Resolution Measurements of Stark Broadened Pellet Ablation Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, G. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Fehling, D. T.; Jernigan, T. C.; Brooks, N. H.; Parks, P. B.

    2004-11-01

    Details of the pellet/plasma interaction are important for modeling of local pellet source rates and cross field transport of pellet mass. Understanding these processes is critical for projection of current fueling experiments to future devices such as ITER. Measurement of the Stark broadened deuterium emission lines provides the electron density and temperature of the pellet cloud for comparison with modeling details. Stark broadening measurements on JET for low field launch pellets at moderate time resolution indicate a slow variation in the cloud parameters. Observations of ablation light suggest changes in cloud parameters may occur on faster time scales. We report on the possible application of a multiple interference filter technique[1]to allow monitoring of cloud parameters at time resolution sufficient to study both the slow and rapid variations in cloud parameters. Application of the bichromator to line widths and temporal evolution typical of DIII-D pellet injection cases will be discussed.[1]McNeill,D.H.,RSI 73 (2002) 3193.

  3. The Tordo 1 polar cusp barium plasma injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Jeffries, R. A.; Roach, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In January 1975, two barium plasma injection experiments were carried out with rockets launched into the upper atmosphere where field lines from the dayside cusp region intersect the ionosphere. The Tordo 1 experiment took place near the beginning of a worldwide magnetic storm. It became a polar cap experiment almost immediately as convection perpendicular to the magnetic field moved the fluorescent plasma jet away from the cusp across the polar cap in an antisunward direction. Convection across the polar cap with an average velocity of more than 1 km/s was observed for nearly 40 min until the barium flux tubes encountered large electron fields associated with a poleward bulge of the auroral oval near Greenland. Prior to the encounter with the aurora near Greenland there is evidence of upward acceleration of the barium ions while they were in the polar cap. The three-dimensional observations of the plasma orientation and motion give an insight into convection from the cusp region across the polar cap, the orientation of the polar cap magnetic field lines out to several earth radii, the causes of polar cap magnetic perturbations, and parallel acceleration processes.

  4. Optical injection using colliding laser pulses: experiments at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, W. P.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, C.; Faure, J.; van Tilborg, J.; Marcelis, B.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Fubiani, G.; Shadwick, B. A.; Dugan, G.; Cary, J.; Giacone, R.

    2002-11-01

    Laser driven acceleration in plasmas has succeeded in producing electron beams containing multi-nC's of charge, with some fraction of the electrons having energies in excess of 10's of MeV's but 100 % energy spread. One of the current challenges is to produce electron beams with much reduced energy spread. We report on experimental progress in the laser triggered injection of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator using the colliding pulse method (E. Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997).), (C.B. Schroeder et al., Phys. Rev. E 59, 6037 (1999).). The experiments use the l'OASIS multi-beam 10 Hz high power Ti:Al_2O3 laser system (W.P. Leemans et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2510 (2001).). In the present experiments, two counter propagating beams (30^rc angle) are focused onto a high density gas jet. Preliminary results indicate that electron beam properties are affected by the second beam. Details of the experiments will be shown as well as comparisons with simulations.

  5. ELM mitigation with pellet ELM triggering and implications for PFCs and plasma performance in ITER

    DOE PAGES

    Baylor, Larry R.; Lang, P. T.; Allen, Steve L.; ...

    2014-10-05

    The triggering of rapid small edge localized modes (ELMs) by high frequency pellet injection has been proposed as a method to prevent large naturally occurring ELMs that can erode the ITER plasma facing components. Deuterium pellet injection has been used to successfully demonstrate the on-demand triggering of edge localized modes (ELMs) at much higher rates and with much smaller intensity than natural ELMs. The proposed hypothesis for the triggering mechanism of ELMs by pellets is the local pressure perturbation resulting from reheating of the pellet cloud that can exceed the local high-n ballooning mode threshold where the pellet is injected.more » Nonlinear MHD simulations of the pellet ELM triggering show destabilization of high-n ballooning modes by such a local pressure perturbation. A review of the recent pellet ELM triggering results from ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), DIII-D, and JET reveals that a number of uncertainties about this ELM mitigation technique still remain. These include the heat flux impact pattern on the divertor and wall from pellet triggered and natural ELMs, the necessary pellet size and injection location to reliably trigger ELMs, and the level of fueling to be expected from ELM triggering pellets and synergy with larger fueling pellets. The implications of these issues for pellet ELM mitigation in ITER and its impact on the PFCs are presented along with the design features of the pellet injection system for ITER.« less

  6. ELM mitigation with pellet ELM triggering and implications for PFCs and plasma performance in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R.; Lang, P. T.; Allen, Steve L.; Combs, S. K.; Commaux, N.; Evans, Todd E.; Fenstermacher, Max E.; Huijsmans, G.; Jernigan, T. C.; Lasnier, Charles J.; Leonard, Anthony W.; Loarte, Alberto; Maingi, Rajesh; Maruyama, S.; Meitner, S. J.; Moyer, Richard A.; Osborne, Thomas H.

    2014-10-05

    The triggering of rapid small edge localized modes (ELMs) by high frequency pellet injection has been proposed as a method to prevent large naturally occurring ELMs that can erode the ITER plasma facing components. Deuterium pellet injection has been used to successfully demonstrate the on-demand triggering of edge localized modes (ELMs) at much higher rates and with much smaller intensity than natural ELMs. The proposed hypothesis for the triggering mechanism of ELMs by pellets is the local pressure perturbation resulting from reheating of the pellet cloud that can exceed the local high-n ballooning mode threshold where the pellet is injected. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the pellet ELM triggering show destabilization of high-n ballooning modes by such a local pressure perturbation. A review of the recent pellet ELM triggering results from ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), DIII-D, and JET reveals that a number of uncertainties about this ELM mitigation technique still remain. These include the heat flux impact pattern on the divertor and wall from pellet triggered and natural ELMs, the necessary pellet size and injection location to reliably trigger ELMs, and the level of fueling to be expected from ELM triggering pellets and synergy with larger fueling pellets. The implications of these issues for pellet ELM mitigation in ITER and its impact on the PFCs are presented along with the design features of the pellet injection system for ITER.

  7. Development and study of a 3. 2-mm-diameter, 1. 2-m-long two-stage plasma-arc-driven railgun for hypervelocity hydrogen pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Kim, K.

    1988-12-01

    A detailed description of a prototype, fuseless, plasma-arc-driven, two-stage railgun system with a 1.2-m-long railgun barrel and a 3.2-mm-diameter circular bore is presented, along with the preliminary results indicating its capabilities and limitations. A hydrogen pellet generator, which has a straight-tube configuration and which is also operated as a gas gun, is employed as the first stage of the two-stage acceleration system. The design details of this preacceleration system and the results illustrating its performance are first presented. The second-stage accelerator which acts as a booster accelerator, is a fuseless plasma-arc-driven railgun, and constitutes the core of the entire two-stage acceleration scheme. Details of its design, ancillary systems, operation, and performance are described next in this report. The experimental data included herein represent only the preliminary data, and the system modifications that led to the improvements are described in the accompanying two other progress reports that precede this. 19 refs.

  8. A high-altitude barium radial injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Deehr, C. S.; Romick, G. J.; Olson, J. V.; Roederer, J. G.; Sydora, R.

    1980-01-01

    A rocket launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, carried a new type of high-explosive barium shaped charge to 571 km, where detonation injected a thin disk of barium vapor with high velocity nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. The TV images of the injection are spectacular, revealing three major regimes of expanding plasma which showed early instabilities in the neutral gas. The most unusual effect of the injection is a peculiar rayed barium-ion structure lying in the injection plane and centered on a 5 km 'black hole' surrounding the injection point. Preliminary electrostatic computer simulations show a similar rayed development.

  9. Computer modeling of a three-dimensional steam injection experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S.; Castanier, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    The experimental results and CT scans obtained during a steam-flooding experiment with the SUPRI 3-D steam injection laboratory model are compared with the results obtained from a numerical simulator for the same experiment. Simulation studies were carried out using the STARS (Steam and Additives Reservoir Simulator) compositional simulator. The saturation and temperature distributions obtained and heat-loss rates measured in the experimental model at different stages of steam-flooding were compared with those calculated from the numerical simulator. There is a fairly good agreement between the experimental results and the simulator output. However, the experimental scans show a greater degree of gravity override than that obtained with the simulator for the same heat-loss rates. Symmetric sides of the experimental 5-spot show asymmetric heat-loss rates contrary to theory and simulator results. Some utility programs have been written for extracting, processing and outputting the required grid data from the STARS simulator. These are general in nature and can be useful for other STARS users.

  10. Electromagnetic railgun hydrogen pellet injector: Progress and prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyekyoon

    1988-12-01

    A two-stage, fuseless, plasma-arc-driven electromagnetic railgun system suitable for hydrogen pellet acceleration has been developed and successfully tested. The first stage is a combination of a hydrogen pellet generator and a gas gun, which is responsible for injecting a medium-velocity hydrogen pellet into the second-stage railgun through a coupling piece. As the pellet enters the railgun, a specially designed arc-initiation scheme electrically breaks down the propellant gas which has followed the pellet from the gas gun into the railgun, thus forming a conducting plasma-arc armature immediately behind the pellet. This arc formation event coincides with the triggering of the main railgun current and allows the plasma-arc armature to subsequently propel the hydrogen pellet to a high velocity. Using this two-stage acceleration scheme with a 1-m-long railgun barrel, solid hydrogen pellet velocities in excess of 2.2 km/s have been achieved for a pellet 3.2 mm in diameter and 4 mm in length. The objectives of this paper are two-fold: first, a critical review of the achievements thus far on the railgun hydrogen-pellet injector and second, a description of the most recent technological developments and their implications for future work, in particular, the prospect of employing a railgun pellet injector for future large devices. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. [Experiences with botulinum toxin injections against spasticity in children].

    PubMed

    Ramstad, Kjersti; Karstensen, Anne Bergsjø; Risberg, Knut; Bergsaker, David Kristian; Sommer, Finn Fredrik

    2006-02-09

    Botulinum toxin injection is one of the newer options in the treatment of spasticity. Treatment with botulinum toxin is always combined with physiotherapy and often with casting. We show the extent to which botulinum toxin treatment has been taken into use in our department and discuss advantages and disadvantages of giving botulinum toxin injections at local hospitals. 88 children with cerebral palsy aged 14 months to 16 years were treated with botulinum toxin between March 2000 and Dec. 2004. Injections were given in an outpatient setting, usually with the patient sedated with midazolam. Clinical examination after injection included assessment of spasticity and range of movement of joints. Motor function was videotaped. Side effects were continuously supervised. We performed 278 treatments; during the last year (2004) 7 treatments a month on average. 59 children were injected in lower limbs only, 14 were injected in upper limbs only, and 15 were injected in both upper and lower limbs. No serious side effects were recorded, neither from the botulinum toxin itself nor related to the injection procedure. Assessment of indications for the use of botulinum toxin is now part of the medical follow up for children with spastic cerebral palsy. Treatment can safely be given at the paediatrics department in a local hospital. Injection in superficial muscles of the lower limbs is an easy task, while injection in small muscles and deep-seated muscles requires more special skills.

  12. New algorithm for computing the ablation of hydrogenic pellets in hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.

    1983-04-01

    A method is presented for calculating the evaporation rate of hydrogenic pellets immersed in an unmagnetized plasma with a suprathermal particle component of arbitrary distribution function. The computational procedure is based on hydrodynamic solutions for the expansion of the gaseous cloud, obtained in a previous treatment that considered the effects of thermal particles only. The appropriate heat source terms, derived from the stopping power of the gaseous shield, are worked out for energetic ions produced by neutral beam injection heating. The model predicts 27-cm penetration in a Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) plasma, compared with experimentally measured values in the range of 29 to 32 cm. An application to the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) gives an estimated 21-cm penetration for a 2.5-mm-diam tritium pellet injection at 2000 m/s into a 55-cm-bore plasma heated to a central electron temperature of 4 keV by 34 MW of neutral injection.

  13. Deuterium pellet injector gun design

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, R.V.; Wysor, R.B.; Bryan, W.E.; Shipley, W.D.; Combs, S.K.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.; Fisher, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Deuterium Pellet Injector (DPI), an eight-pellet pneumatic injector, is being designed and fabricated for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). It will accelerate eight pellets, 4 by 4 mm maximum, to greater than 1500 m/s. It utilizes a unique pellet-forming mechanism, a cooled pellet storage wheel, and improved propellant gas scavenging.

  14. Pellet inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wilks, Robert S.; Taleff, Alexander; Sturges, Jr., Robert H.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for inspecting nuclear fuel pellets in a sealed container for diameter, flaws, length and weight. The apparatus includes, in an array, a pellet pick-up station, four pellet inspection stations and a pellet sorting station. The pellets are delivered one at a time to the pick-up station by a vibrating bowl through a vibrating linear conveyor. Grippers each associated with a successive pair of the stations are reciprocable together to pick up a pellet at the upstream station of each pair and to deposit the pellet at the corresponding downstream station. The gripper jaws are opened selectively depending on the state of the pellets at the stations and the particular cycle in which the apparatus is operating. Inspection for diameter, flaws and length is effected in each case by a laser beam projected on the pellets by a precise optical system while each pellet is rotated by rollers. Each laser and its optical system are mounted in a container which is free standing on a precise surface and is provided with locating buttons which engage locating holes in the surface so that each laser and its optical system is precisely set. The roller stands are likewise free standing and are similarly precisely positioned. The diameter optical system projects a thin beam of light which scans across the top of each pellet and is projected on a diode array. The fl GOVERNMENT CONTRACT CLAUSE The invention herein described was made in the course of or under a contract or subcontract thereunder with the Department of Energy bearing No. EY-67-14-C-2170.

  15. Overdose experiences among injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although previous studies have identified high levels of drug-related harm in Thailand, little is known about illicit drug overdose experiences among Thai drug users. We sought to investigate non-fatal overdose experiences and responses to overdose among a community-recruited sample of injection drug users (IDU) in Bangkok, Thailand. Methods Data for these analyses came from IDU participating in the Mit Sampan Community Research Project. The primary outcome of interest was a self-reported history of non-fatal overdose. We calculated the prevalence of past overdose and estimated its relationship with individual, drug-using, social, and structural factors using multivariate logistic regression. We also assessed the prevalence of ever witnessing an overdose and patterns of response to overdose. Results These analyses included 252 individuals; their median age was 36.5 years (IQR: 29.0 - 44.0) and 66 (26.2%) were female. A history of non-fatal overdose was reported by 75 (29.8%) participants. In a multivariate model, reporting a history of overdose was independently associated with a history of incarceration (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 3.83, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.52 - 9.65, p = 0.004) and reporting use of drugs in combination (AOR = 2.48, 95% CI: 1.16 - 5.33, p = 0.019). A majority (67.9%) reported a history of witnessing an overdose; most reported responding to the most recent overdose using first aid (79.5%). Conclusions Experiencing and witnessing an overdose were common in this sample of Thai IDU. These findings support the need for increased provision of evidence-based responses to overdose including peer-based overdose interventions. PMID:20465842

  16. Overdose experiences among injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Milloy, M-J; Fairbairn, Nadia; Hayashi, Kanna; Suwannawong, Paisan; Kaplan, Karyn; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2010-05-13

    Although previous studies have identified high levels of drug-related harm in Thailand, little is known about illicit drug overdose experiences among Thai drug users. We sought to investigate non-fatal overdose experiences and responses to overdose among a community-recruited sample of injection drug users (IDU) in Bangkok, Thailand. Data for these analyses came from IDU participating in the Mit Sampan Community Research Project. The primary outcome of interest was a self-reported history of non-fatal overdose. We calculated the prevalence of past overdose and estimated its relationship with individual, drug-using, social, and structural factors using multivariate logistic regression. We also assessed the prevalence of ever witnessing an overdose and patterns of response to overdose. These analyses included 252 individuals; their median age was 36.5 years (IQR: 29.0 - 44.0) and 66 (26.2%) were female. A history of non-fatal overdose was reported by 75 (29.8%) participants. In a multivariate model, reporting a history of overdose was independently associated with a history of incarceration (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 3.83, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.52 - 9.65, p = 0.004) and reporting use of drugs in combination (AOR = 2.48, 95% CI: 1.16 - 5.33, p = 0.019). A majority (67.9%) reported a history of witnessing an overdose; most reported responding to the most recent overdose using first aid (79.5%). Experiencing and witnessing an overdose were common in this sample of Thai IDU. These findings support the need for increased provision of evidence-based responses to overdose including peer-based overdose interventions.

  17. Carbonaceous pellets and method of pelletizing

    SciTech Connect

    Dondelewski, M.A.

    1982-11-02

    A method is claimed for pelletizing carbonaceous materials including bonding coal fines and lignite coal with a polymeric hydrocarbon binder having reactive sites thereon. For example, with tall oil pitch and the like, in the case of coal, the binder is applied by slurrying the fine coal with the pitch. In the case of lignite, the binder is directly applied to the pulverized material. By action of rolling and tumbling, for example, large agglomerates are formed. With drying and heating, strong water-resistant pellets are formed which have the extremely desirable property of being easily repulverized.

  18. Reciprocating pellet press

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Charles W.

    1981-04-07

    A machine for pressing loose powder into pellets using a series of reciprocating motions has an interchangeable punch and die as its only accurately machines parts. The machine reciprocates horizontally between powder receiving and pressing positions. It reciprocates vertically to press, strip and release a pellet.

  19. Tangential and Vertical Compact Torus Injection Experiments on the STOR-M Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chijin; D, Liu; S, Livingstone; A, K. Singh; E, Zhang; A, Hirose

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes the setup and results of compact torus (CT) injection experiments on the STOR-M tokamak. Tangential CT injection into STOR-M induced H-mode-like phenomena including doubling the electron density, reduction in the Hα radiation level, suppression of the floating potential fluctuations, suppression of the m = 2 Mirnov oscillations, and increase in the global energy confinement time. Experimental setup, bench-test results, and some preliminary injection data for vertical CT injection experiments on STOR-M will be shown. In addition, numerical simulations of the CT trajectories in tokamak discharges for both tangential and vertical injection geometries will be discussed.

  20. Effect of injection angle on artificial cavitation using the design of experiment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahr-e-Babaki, M. Ghorbani; Keikha, A. Jamali; Mehr, A. Behzad

    2017-06-01

    Using the supercavitation phenomenon is necessary to reach high velocities underwater. Supercavitation can be achieved in two ways: natural and artificial. In this article, the simulation of flows around a torpedo was studied naturally and artificially. The validity of simulation using theoretical and practical data in the natural and artificial phases was evaluated. Results showed that the simulations were consistent with the laboratory results. The results in different injection coefficient rates, injection angles, and cavitation numbers were studied. The obtained results showed the importance of cavitation number, injection rate coefficient, and injection angle in cavity shape. At the final level, determining the performance conditions using the Design of Experiment (DOE) method was emphasized, and the performance of cavitation number, injection rate coefficient, and injection angle in drag and lift coefficient was studied. The increase in injection angle in the low injection rate coefficient resulted in a diminished drag coefficient and that in the high injection rate coefficient resulted in an enhanced drag coefficient.

  1. Experience of intravitreal injections in a tertiary Hospital in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hinai, Ahmed S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To find out statistical data regarding intravitreal injections in an outpatient department setup at a tertiary center in Oman. Design: Retrospective chart review. Methods: Data collection of patients who underwent intravitreal injections from November 2009 to May 2013 at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Results: Throughout a period of 42 months, a total of 711 intravitreal injections were performed. That included 214 patients (275 eyes). Around one-third of the eyes received two injections or more. The injected agents were bevacizumab (59.8%), ranibizumab (32.3%), triamcinolone (7.5%), and very few patients with endophthalmitis received intravitreal antibiotics and antifungal agents. The three most common indications for the injection therapy were diabetic macular edema (50.9%), choroidal neovascularization (24.3%), and retinal vein occlusive diseases (11.5%). Serious adverse events were rare, and they occurred as ocular (0.9% per patient) and systemic (3.3% per patient). There were 42 eyes received intravitreal triamcinolone, and 24% of them developed intraocular hypertension that required only medical treatment. Conclusion: Different intravitreal agents are currently used to treat many ocular diseases. Currently, therapy with intravitreal agents is very popular, and it carries a promising outcome with more efficiency and safety. PMID:26903722

  2. Injection safety for immunisation--Andhra Pradesh experience.

    PubMed

    Kaipilyawar, Satish B; Rao, R Gopal Krishna

    2005-04-01

    Injection safety is one component of a major immunisation project being implemented in partnership with Government of Andhra Pradesh and PATH, an international NGO. Prior to the project wrong and dangerous injection giving practices were present among the staff which needed immediate attention. It was decided to introduce auto disable syringes along with safety boxes with high quality training to staff and make all these available to all districts along with hepatitis B introduction in the routine immunisation. The State of Andhra Pradesh became the first to implement 'bundling' concept in the immunisation project. Implementation was planned to be done in a phased manner to cover all the 23 districts over a five-year period. For routine immunisation sessions, smaller locally produced boxes may be more acceptable. The Government of India made a decision on 21st July, 2004 on implementing injection safety. Injection safety and proper disposal of used needles and syringes can be successfully advocated if medical associations, paediatric associations, key governmental bodies and international agencies come together. PATH established a group and holds the secretariat for the India injection safety coalition on similar basis as the Safe Injection Global Network of WHO (SIGN). Description of AP system for safe disposal of needles and syringes using manual needle-cutters and plastics recycling has been depicted in this article.

  3. Pellet plant energy simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, D.; Vasquez Pulido, T.; Nielsen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Pellet Plant energy simulator is a software based on advanced algorithms which has the main purpose to see the response of a pellet plant regarding certain location conditions. It combines energy provided by a combined heat and power, and/or by a combustion chamber with the energy consumption of the pellet factory and information regarding weather conditions in order to predict the biomass consumption of the pellet factory together with the combined heat and power, and/or with the biomass consumption of the combustion chamber. The user of the software will not only be able to plan smart the biomass acquisition and estimate its cost, but also to plan smart the preventive maintenance (charcoal cleaning in case of a gasification plant) and use the pellet plant at the maximum output regarding weather conditions and biomass moisture. The software can also be used in order to execute a more precise feasibility study for a pellet plant in a certain location. The paper outlines the algorithm that supports the Pellet Plant Energy Simulator idea and presents preliminary tests results that supports the discussion and implementation of the system

  4. Features of spontaneous and pellet-induced ELMs on the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Liu, C. H.; Nie, L.; Feng, Z.; Ji, X. Q.; Yao, K.; Zhu, G. L.; Liu, Yi; Cui, Z. Y.; Yan, L. W.; Wang, Q. M.; Yang, Q. W.; Ding, X. T.; Dong, J. Q.; Duan, X. R.

    2012-11-01

    The pellet pacing ELM mitigation concept is being tested in some tokamaks such as ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JET. By increasing the ELM frequency, the ELM size can be reduced and eventually suppressed to meet the lifetime requirements on ITER target plates. In the HL-2A tokamak, ELMy H-mode operation is routinely performed and small type-III ELMs with a high repetition rate and some type-I (or possibly large type-III) ELM events are observed. Large ELMs are often preceded by strong coherent magnetic oscillations, and produce obvious perturbations on plasma current Ip, electron density \\bar {n}_{edge} at the edge, stored energy WE, etc. The coherent magnetic oscillations before an ELM crash or during the ELM are measured by toroidal and poloidal Mirnov coils and analysed by the wavelet technique to study the spectral characteristics of the short time ELM events. Pellet injection experiments are performed in type-III ELMy H-mode plasmas and ELM-free H-mode plasmas to study the physics of pellet triggering ELM. The analyses of pellet-induced ELMs and spontaneous ELMs are presented. Because the pellet size is relatively large, it induces magnetic oscillations lasting longer than that of a natural ELM.

  5. Lignite pellets and methods of agglomerating or pelletizing

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Albert F.; Blaustein, Eric W.; Deurbrouck, Albert W.; Garvin, John P.; McKeever, Robert E.

    1981-01-01

    The specification discloses lignite pellets which are relatively hard, dust resistant, of generally uniform size and free from spontaneous ignition and general degradation. Also disclosed are methods for making such pellets which involve crushing as mined lignite, mixing said lignite with a binder such as asphalt, forming the lignite binder mixture into pellets, and drying the pellets.

  6. Pellet acceleration study with a railgun for magnetic fusion reactor refueling

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, J.; Kim, K.

    1984-04-01

    Design, construction, and preliminary testing of a two-stage pellet injection system capable of achieving hydrogen pellet velocities of 5--10 km/s are described. The system, which is intended for the refueling of magnetic fusion devices, combines a gas gun with a small-bore, plasma-arc-driven electromagnetic railgun. The gas gun uses hydrogen gas as the propellant and injects a medium-velocity pellet into the railgun. Once inside the railgun, the propellant gas following the pellet is electrically broken down forming a plasma arc armature. The propulsive force of this plasma arc armature further accelerates the pellet to higher velocities.

  7. Imaging polychromator for density measurements of polystyrene pellet cloud on the Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Sharov, I A; Sergeev, V Yu; Miroshnikov, I V; Tamura, N; Kuteev, B V; Sudo, S

    2015-04-01

    Experimental data on spatial distributions of a pellet cloud electron density are necessary for the development of many applications of pellet injection, namely, plasma fuelling, discharge control, and plasma diagnostics. An improved approach of electron density measurements inside the cloud of a polystyrene pellet ablating in hot plasma of the large helical device is described. Density values of (1-30) × 10(16) cm(-3) depending on the background plasma parameters and distance from the solid pellet were measured.

  8. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  9. Radation shielding pellets

    DOEpatents

    Coomes, Edmund P.; Luksic, Andrzej T.

    1988-12-06

    Radiation pellets having an outer shell, preferably, of Mo, W or depleted U nd an inner filling of lithium hydride wherein the outer shell material has a greater melting point than does the inner filling material.

  10. Pneumatic Pellet-Transporting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George; Pugsley, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Pneumatic system transports food pellets to confined animals. Flow of air into venturi assembly entrains round pellets, drawing them from reservoir into venturi for transport by airflow. Pneumatic pellet-transporting system includes venturi assembly, which creates flow of air that draws pellets into system.

  11. Pneumatic Pellet-Transporting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George; Pugsley, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    Pneumatic system transports food pellets to confined animals. Flow of air into venturi assembly entrains round pellets, drawing them from reservoir into venturi for transport by airflow. Pneumatic pellet-transporting system includes venturi assembly, which creates flow of air that draws pellets into system.

  12. Pneumatic pellet injector research at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.; Combs, S.K.; Foster, C.A.; Schuresko, D.D.; Gouge, M.J.; Fisher, P.W.; Argo, B.E.; Barber, G.C.; Fehling, D.T.; Foust, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced pneumatic-injector-based pellet fueling systems are under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for fueling magnetically confined plasmas. The general approach is that of producing and accelerating frozen hydrogen isotope pellets at speeds in the range from 1 to 2 km/s and higher. Recently, ORNL provided pneumatic-based pellet fueling systems for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET), and a new simplified eight-shot injector has been developed for use on the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX) and the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). These long-pulse devices operate reliably at up to 1.5 km/s with pellet sizes ranging between 1 and 6 mm. In addition to these activities, ORNL is pursuing advanced technologies such as the electrothermal gun and the two-stage light-gas gun to achieve pellet velocities significantly in excess of 2 km/s and is carrying out a tritium proof-of-principle (TPOP) experiment in which the fabrication and acceleration of tritium pellets to 1.4 km/s were recently demonstrated. 27 refs., 10 figs.

  13. LABORATORY MICROCOSM EXPERIMENTS OF OXIDATION PROCESSES AFTER STEAM INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aggressive thermal methods such as steam injection or resistive heating are known to be effective for the recovery of many types of volatile and semivolatile compounds. It has been suggested that oxidation or other chemical reactions that occur at remediation temperatures can ai...

  14. The Asian Wood Pellet Markets

    Treesearch

    Joseph A. Roos; Allen Brackley

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the three major wood pellet markets in Asia: China, Japan, and South Korea. In contrast to the United States, where most wood pellets are used for residential heating with pellet stoves, a majority of the wood pellets in Asia are used for co-firing at coal-fired power plants. Our analysis indicated that Japan is the largest importer of wood pellets...

  15. Tritium proof-of-principle pellet injector: Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, P. W.; Gouge, M. J.

    1995-03-01

    As part of the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) plasma fueling development program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has fabricated a pellet injection system to test the mechanical and thermal properties of extruded tritium. This repeating, single-stage, pneumatic injector, called the Tritium-Proof-of-Principle Phase-2 (TPOP-2) Pellet Injector, has a piston-driven mechanical extruder and is designed to extrude hydrogenic pellets sized for the ITER device. The TPOP-II program has the following development goals: evaluate the feasibility of extruding tritium and DT mixtures for use in future pellet injection systems; determine the mechanical and thermal properties of tritium and DT extrusions; integrate, test and evaluate the extruder in a repeating, single-stage light gas gun sized for the ITER application (pellet diameter approximately 7-8 mm); evaluate options for recycling propellant and extruder exhaust gas; evaluate operability and reliability of ITER prototypical fueling systems in an environment of significant tritium inventory requiring secondary and room containment systems. In initial tests with deuterium feed at ORNL, up to thirteen pellets have been extruded at rates up to 1 Hz and accelerated to speeds of order 1.0-1.1 km/s using hydrogen propellant gas at a supply pressure of 65 bar. The pellets are typically 7.4 mm in diameter and up to 11 mm in length and are the largest cryogenic pellets produced by the fusion program to date. These pellets represent about a 11% density perturbation to ITER. Hydrogenic pellets will be used in ITER to sustain the fusion power in the plasma core and may be crucial in reducing first wall tritium inventories by a process called isotopic fueling where tritium-rich pellets fuel the burning plasma core and deuterium gas fuels the edge.

  16. Simulations of pulsed electron beam injection during active experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations are used to investigate the characteristics of the spacecraft charging, particle acceleration, and wave emissions during beam injection, turnoff and subsequent pulsing of the beam. It is shown that, during beam injection, the beam current is neutralized by a spatially separate return current region extending several tens of meters from the beam region, with the currents being closed across the field lines by the perpendicular acceleration of ambient plasma ions into the beam region. After beam turnoff, this current system reverses after a time lag of about an ion plasma period. The current reversal is accompanied by prolonged electron collection by the spacecraft near the beam region, preferential ion collection by sections of the spacecraft magnetically connected to the initial return current regions, and the creation of hot plasma extending well into the return current regions. Because of the time lag, the currents induced in the plasma during periodic beam injection can be strongly modified from the imposed beam current.

  17. High-speed multishot pellet injector prototype for the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattolillo, A.; Migliori, S.; Scaramuzzi, F.; Angelone, G.; Baldarelli, M.; Capobianchi, M.; Cardoni, P.; Domma, C.; Mori, L.; Ronci, G.

    1998-07-01

    The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) may require multiple high-speed pellet injection in order to achieve quasi-steady-state conditions. A research and development program was thus being pursued at ENEA Frascati, aimed at developing a multishot two-stage pellet injector (MPI), featuring eight "pipe gun" barrels and eight small two-stage pneumatic guns. According to FTU requirements, the final goal is to simultaneously produce up to eight D2 pellets, and then deliver them during a plasma pulse (1 s) with any time schedule, at speeds in the 1-2.5 km/s range. A prototype was constructed and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept, and optimize pellet formation and firing sequences. This laboratory facility was automatically operated by means of a programmable logic controller (PLC), and had a full eight-shot capability. However, it was equipped as a first approach with only four two-stage guns. In this article we will describe in detail the guidelines of the MPI prototype design, which were strongly influenced by some external constraints. We will also report on the results of the experimental campaign, during which the feasibility of such a two-stage MPI was demonstrated. Sequences of four intact D2 pellets in the 1.2-1.6 mm size range, fired at time intervals of a few tens up to a few hundreds of ms, were routinely delivered in a laboratory experiment at injection speeds above 2.5 km/s, with good reproducibility and satisfactory aiming dispersion. Some preliminary effort to address the problem of propellant gas handling, based on an innovative approach, gave encouraging results, and work is in progress to carry out an experiment to definitely test the feasibility of this concept.

  18. A compact lithium pellet injector for tokamak pedestal studies in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo Parra, R.; Moreno Quicios, R.; Ploeckl, B.; Birkenmeier, G.; Herrmann, A.; Kocsis, G.; Laggner, F. M.; Lang, P. T.; Lunt, T.; Macian-Juan, R.; Rohde, V.; Sellmair, G.; Szepesi, T.; Wolfrum, E.; Zeidner, W.; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments have been performed at ASDEX Upgrade, aiming to investigate the impact of lithium in an all-metal-wall tokamak and attempting to enhance the pedestal operational space. For this purpose, a lithium pellet injector has been developed, capable of injecting pellets carrying a particle content ranging from 1.82 × 1019 atoms (0.21 mg) to 1.64 × 1020 atoms (1.89 mg). The maximum repetition rate is about 2 Hz. Free flight launch from the torus outboard side without a guiding tube was realized. In such a configuration, angular dispersion and speed scatter are low, and a transfer efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved in the test bed. Pellets are accelerated in a gas gun; hence special care was taken to avoid deleterious effects by the propellant gas pulse. Therefore, the main plasma gas species was applied as propellant gas, leading to speeds ranging from 420 m/s to 700 m/s. In order to minimize the residual amount of gas to be introduced into the plasma vessel, a large expansion volume equipped with a cryopump was added into the flight path. In view of the experiments, an optimal propellant gas pressure of 50 bars was chosen for operation, since at this pressure maximum efficiency and low propellant gas flux coincide. This led to pellet speeds of 585 m/s ± 32 m/s. Lithium injection has been achieved at ASDEX Upgrade, showing deep pellet penetration into the plasma, though pedestal broadening has not been observed yet.

  19. A compact lithium pellet injector for tokamak pedestal studies in ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Arredondo Parra, R; Moreno Quicios, R; Ploeckl, B; Birkenmeier, G; Herrmann, A; Kocsis, G; Laggner, F M; Lang, P T; Lunt, T; Macian-Juan, R; Rohde, V; Sellmair, G; Szepesi, T; Wolfrum, E; Zeidner, W; Neu, R

    2016-02-01

    Experiments have been performed at ASDEX Upgrade, aiming to investigate the impact of lithium in an all-metal-wall tokamak and attempting to enhance the pedestal operational space. For this purpose, a lithium pellet injector has been developed, capable of injecting pellets carrying a particle content ranging from 1.82 × 10(19) atoms (0.21 mg) to 1.64 × 10(20) atoms (1.89 mg). The maximum repetition rate is about 2 Hz. Free flight launch from the torus outboard side without a guiding tube was realized. In such a configuration, angular dispersion and speed scatter are low, and a transfer efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved in the test bed. Pellets are accelerated in a gas gun; hence special care was taken to avoid deleterious effects by the propellant gas pulse. Therefore, the main plasma gas species was applied as propellant gas, leading to speeds ranging from 420 m/s to 700 m/s. In order to minimize the residual amount of gas to be introduced into the plasma vessel, a large expansion volume equipped with a cryopump was added into the flight path. In view of the experiments, an optimal propellant gas pressure of 50 bars was chosen for operation, since at this pressure maximum efficiency and low propellant gas flux coincide. This led to pellet speeds of 585 m/s ± 32 m/s. Lithium injection has been achieved at ASDEX Upgrade, showing deep pellet penetration into the plasma, though pedestal broadening has not been observed yet.

  20. Joint and soft tissue injections in the community: questionnaire survey of general practitioners' experiences and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Gormley, G J; Corrigan, M; Steele, W K; Stevenson, M; Taggart, A J

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the numbers and types of joint and soft tissue injections performed by general practitioners (GPs) and to explore attitudes to training in joint and soft tissue injection and perceived barriers to performing injections. A self administered questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 410 (30%) of 1367 GPs in Northern Ireland. Two mailings were used to increase the response rate. Questions explored the GPs' demographic characteristics, types and numbers of injections performed, previous training experience, attitudes towards training, and perceived barriers. The overall response rate was 75%. Practitioners who were men, worked in a "rural" or "mixed" locality, and had had a previous post in rheumatology, orthopaedics, or sports medicine were more likely to perform joint and soft tissue injections. Forty six per cent of GPs did not currently perform any injections; 5% of GPs performed most of the injections in the community. Injections into the shoulder, knee, and lateral epicondylitis were found to be the most commonly performed injections. The GPs preferred to train on "real patients" rather than "mannequin models". Those GPs who had trained on "real patients" were more likely to perform injections. The main perceived barrier to performing joint and soft tissue injections in the community was the "inability to maintain injection skills". Postgraduate training, methods of training, and the ability to maintain injection skills seemed to be determinants affecting GP confidence and the amount of joint and soft tissue injections that they performed. Most injections were performed by a few GPs in the community. These findings may have implications for the developing role of GP specialists in primary care trusts.

  1. Hydrothermal injection experiments at the Raft River KGRA, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, W.F.; McAtee, R.E.; Capuano, R.M.; Sill, W.

    1982-12-14

    The optimal development and management of a geothermal resource requires a knowledge of the hydrological characteristics of the reservoir. Reservoir engineering analysis techniques for permeable aquifers have been undergoing development for several decades but little attention has been paid to fracture-dominated systems. A program to test the ability of Huff-Puff tests to help characterize a fracture-dominated reservoir is presented. Several series of these injection (Huff)-backflow (Puff) tests were conducted at the Raft River KGRA in Southern Idaho. These test series are described and preliminary results and interpretations are discussed.

  2. Permeability of wood pellets in the presence of fines.

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanah, F; Sokhansanj, S; Lau, A K; Lim, C J; Bi, X; Melin, S; Afzal, M

    2010-07-01

    Broken pellets and fines are produced when pellets are handled. The resistance to air flow was measured for clean pellets and for pellets mixed with 1-20% broken pellets (fines). A pellet diameter was 6mm. The lengths ranged from 6 to 12 mm. Clean pellets were defined as particles that remained on a 4mm screen. A typical sieve analysis showed 30% of the mass of particles that passed through the 4mm screen was smaller than 1mm. The airflow rates used in the experiment ranged from 0.004 to 0.357 ms(-1). The corresponding pressure drop ranged from 1.9 to 271 Pam(-1) for clean pellets, from 4.8 to 1100 Pam(-1) for 10% fines content, and from 7.9 to 1800 Pam(-1) for 20% fines content. Coefficients of Hukill and Ives' equation were estimated for clean pellets and a multiplier was defined to calculate pressure drop for pellets mixed with fines.

  3. A discrete-choice experiment to determine patient preferences for injectable multiple sclerosis treatments in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Poulos, Christine; Kinter, Elizabeth; Yang, Jui-Chen; Bridges, John F. P.; Posner, Joshua; Gleißner, Erika; Mühlbacher, Axel; Kieseier, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the relative importance of features of a hypothetical injectable disease-modifying treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis using a discrete-choice experiment. Methods: German residents at least 18 years of age with a self-reported physician diagnosis of multiple sclerosis completed a 25–30 minute online discrete-choice experiment. Patients were asked to choose one of two hypothetical injectable treatments for multiple sclerosis, defined by different levels of six attributes (disability progression, the number of relapses in the next 4 years, injection time, frequency of injections, presence of flu-like symptoms, and presence of injection-site reactions). The data were analyzed using a random-parameters logit model. Results: Of 202 adults who completed the survey, results from 189 were used in the analysis. Approximately 50% of all patients reported a diagnosis of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, and 31% reported secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Approximately 71% of patients had current or prior experience with injectable multiple sclerosis medication. Approximately 53% had experienced flu-like symptoms caused by their medication, and 47% had experienced mild injection-site reactions. At least one significant difference was seen between levels in all attributes, except injection time. The greatest change in relative importance between levels of an attribute was years until symptoms get worse from 1 to 4 years. The magnitude of this difference was about twice that of relapses in the next 4 years, frequency of injections, and flu-like symptoms. Conclusions: Most attributes examined in this experiment had an influence on patient preference. Patients placed a significant value on improvements in the frequency of dosing and disability progression. Results suggest that changes in injection frequency can be as important as changes in efficacy and safety attributes. Understanding which attributes of

  4. A discrete-choice experiment to determine patient preferences for injectable multiple sclerosis treatments in Germany.

    PubMed

    Poulos, Christine; Kinter, Elizabeth; Yang, Jui-Chen; Bridges, John F P; Posner, Joshua; Gleißner, Erika; Mühlbacher, Axel; Kieseier, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relative importance of features of a hypothetical injectable disease-modifying treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis using a discrete-choice experiment. German residents at least 18 years of age with a self-reported physician diagnosis of multiple sclerosis completed a 25-30 minute online discrete-choice experiment. Patients were asked to choose one of two hypothetical injectable treatments for multiple sclerosis, defined by different levels of six attributes (disability progression, the number of relapses in the next 4 years, injection time, frequency of injections, presence of flu-like symptoms, and presence of injection-site reactions). The data were analyzed using a random-parameters logit model. Of 202 adults who completed the survey, results from 189 were used in the analysis. Approximately 50% of all patients reported a diagnosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and 31% reported secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Approximately 71% of patients had current or prior experience with injectable multiple sclerosis medication. Approximately 53% had experienced flu-like symptoms caused by their medication, and 47% had experienced mild injection-site reactions. At least one significant difference was seen between levels in all attributes, except injection time. The greatest change in relative importance between levels of an attribute was years until symptoms get worse from 1 to 4 years. The magnitude of this difference was about twice that of relapses in the next 4 years, frequency of injections, and flu-like symptoms. Most attributes examined in this experiment had an influence on patient preference. Patients placed a significant value on improvements in the frequency of dosing and disability progression. Results suggest that changes in injection frequency can be as important as changes in efficacy and safety attributes. Understanding which attributes of injectable therapies influence patient

  5. Transport and MHD simulations of intrinsic and pellet induced ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Min; Na, Yong-Su; Yi, Sumin; Kim, Hyunseok; Kim, Jin Yong

    2010-11-01

    Verification of ELM mechanism and demonstration of ELM control are important issues in current fusion researches targeting ITER and DEMO. This work investigates the physics and operational characteristics of intrinsic and pellet induced ELMs throughout transport simulations using 1.5 D transport codes (C1.5/ASTRA) and MHD simulations using M3D code. Transport simulations are focused on prediction of the global parameters such as ELM energy loss in the type-I ELMy H-mode discharges with and without pellet pace making to examine an applicability of pellet injection for ELM mitigation in KSTAR and ITER. On the other hand, MHD simulations are conducted to explore the physics of intrinsic and pellet induced ELMs by applying the artificial free energy sources of velocity stream and density perturbations on the marginally stable equilibrium, respectively. Similarities and differences of triggering phenomena between intrinsic and pellet induced ELMs are discussed from the MHD approach.

  6. Production of zinc pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.

    1996-11-26

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

  7. Production of zinc pellets

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    1996-01-01

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries.

  8. Production of zinc pellets

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.F.

    1996-11-26

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

  9. Physics of forced magnetic reconnection in coaxial helicity injection experiments in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahimi, F.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Raman, R.; Hooper, E. B.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2014-05-15

    We numerically examine the physics of fast flux closure in transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) experiments in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). By performing resistive Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with poloidal injector coil currents held constant in time, we find that closed flux surfaces are formed through forced magnetic reconnection. Through a local Sweet-Parker type reconnection with an elongated current sheet in the injector region, closed flux surfaces expand in the NSTX global domain. Simulations demonstrate outflows approaching poloidally Alfvénic flows and reconnection times consistent with the Sweet-Parker model. Critical requirements for magnetic reconnection and flux closure are studied in detail. These primary effects, which are magnetic diffusivity, injector flux, injector flux footprint width, and rate of injector voltage reduction, are simulated for transient CHI experiments. The relevant time scales for effective reconnection are τ{sub V}<τ{sub rec}≈τ{sub A}√(S)(1+Pm){sup 1/4}<τ{sub R}, where τ{sub V} is the time for the injector voltage reduction, τ{sub A} is the poloidal Alfvén transit time, τ{sub R} is the global resistive diffusion time, and Pm and S are Prandtl and Lundquist numbers.

  10. Deportation Experiences of Women Who Inject Drugs in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Angela M.; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Burgos, José Luis; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Rangel, Gudelia; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2013-01-01

    Deportation from the United States for drug offenses is common, yet the consequences of deportation for women drug users are poorly documented. In 2008, in Tijuana, Mexico, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study of migration, deportation, and drug abuse by interviewing 12 Mexican injection-drug-using women reporting U.S. deportation. Women reported heavy drug use before and after deportation, but greater financial instability and physical danger following deportation than when in the United States. We identified an unmet need for health and social services among deported drug-using women, including HIV prevention, drug treatment, physical and mental health services, and vocational training. Binational coordination is needed to help deported women resettle in Mexico. PMID:21917563

  11. Deportation experiences of women who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Angela M; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Burgos, José Luis; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Rangel, Gudelia; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2012-04-01

    Deportation from the United States for drug offenses is common, yet the consequences of deportation for women drug users are poorly documented. In 2008, in Tijuana, Mexico, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study of migration, deportation, and drug abuse by interviewing 12 Mexican injection-drug-using women reporting U.S. deportation. Women reported heavy drug use before and after deportation, but greater financial instability and physical danger following deportation than when in the United States. We identified an unmet need for health and social services among deported drug-using women, including HIV prevention, drug treatment, physical and mental health services, and vocational training. Binational coordination is needed to help deported women resettle in Mexico.

  12. Settling behaviour of pellet flocs in pelleting flocculation process: analysis through operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Gang, Zhang; Ting-lin, Huang; Chi, Tan; Zhan-peng, Li; Wen-jie, He; Hong-da, Han; Chen, Li

    2010-01-01

    Pellet flocs' settling velocity is an important parameter in the pelleting flocculation blanket (PFB) process, hence, it is necessary to investigate flocs' settling behaviour to achieve the optimum operation parameters of the process. To investigate the settling behaviour of pellets under different operational conditions, a dynamic experiment was carried out to concentrate ferric flocs sludge by pelleting flocculation blanket (PFB) process with the scale of 0.5-1.2 m3/h. Under different operating conditions such as raw water concentration, polyacrylamide (PAM) dosage, up-flow rate, and agitation speed, pellet particles were sampled from different locations of the blanket in various operating stages to analyze pellet size, setting velocity, and porosity. Experimental results indicated that, when the PAM dosage increased from 0.59 mg/L to 1.18 mg/L, pellets size would flocculated from 2.25 mm to 3.52 mm with the settling velocity accelerated from 3.28 mm/s to 7.37 mm/s, while under the same up-flow rate, agitation intensity and PAM dosage, accompany with the raw water concentration increased from 216 mg/L to 840 mg/L, pellets settling velocity would improved from 6.03 mm/s to 13.6 mm/s. Under the experimental condition, along with the up-flow rate increased from 13.3 m/h to 40 m/h, pellets settling velocity would decreased from 4.39 mm/s to 3.42 mm/s due to its lower density.

  13. Competing atomic processes in Ba and Sr injection critical velocity experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, P. T.; Torbert, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect requires a superthermal electron population to ionize through collisional impact. Such superthermal electrons can however lose energy to competing atomic processes, as well as to ionization, thus limiting the efficiency of the effect. Considering Ba and Sr magnetospheric injection experiments designed to test the CIV theory, it is found that in both cases roughly 60 percent of the superthermal electron energy is lost on exciting line radiation. Moreover, energy loss to background neutral oxygen places a strict limit on the injected cloud densities for which critical velocity effects are possible; a finding which explains the consistently negative results in radial injection experiments.

  14. Competing atomic processes in Ba and Sr injection critical velocity experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, P. T.; Torbert, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect requires a superthermal electron population to ionize through collisional impact. Such superthermal electrons can however lose energy to competing atomic processes, as well as to ionization, thus limiting the efficiency of the effect. Considering Ba and Sr magnetospheric injection experiments designed to test the CIV theory, it is found that in both cases roughly 60 percent of the superthermal electron energy is lost on exciting line radiation. Moreover, energy loss to background neutral oxygen places a strict limit on the injected cloud densities for which critical velocity effects are possible; a finding which explains the consistently negative results in radial injection experiments.

  15. Intertrial Pellets Influence the Acquisition and Expression of Timed Appetitive Responding in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Douglas A.; Lussier, April L.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments examined temporally based changes in the conditioned magazine-entries of rats when a target food pellet arrived at a fixed time before the termination of a conditioned stimulus. Both experiments found that increasing the rate of intertrial pellets systematically interfered with the rate of acquisition. When intertrial pellets were…

  16. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S K; Baylor, L R; Foust, C R; Lyttle, M S; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A

    2014-11-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  17. Fast Imaging of Intact and Shattered Cryogenic Neon Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Baylor, Larry R; Foust, Charles R; Lyttle, Mark S; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A

    2014-01-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100- m- and sub- s-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of m to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  18. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S. K.; Baylor, L. R.; Foust, C. R.; Lyttle, M. S.; Meitner, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  19. Current drive experiments in the Helicity Injected Torus - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamp, W. T.; Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Mueller, D.

    2006-10-01

    The HIT-II spherical torus (ST) device has demonstrated four toroidal plasma current drive configurations to form and sustain a tokamak: 1) inductive (ohmic) current drive, 2) coaxial helicity injection (CHI) current drive, 3) CHI initiated plasmas with ohmic sustainment (CHI+OH), and 4) ohmically initiated plasmas with CHI edge current drive (OH+ECD). CHI discharges with a sufficiently high ratio of injector current to toroidal field current form a closed flux core, and amplify the injector poloidal flux through magnetic reconnection. CHI+OH plasmas are more robust than unassisted ohmic discharges, with a wider operating space and more efficient use of the transformer Volt-seconds. Finally, edge CHI can enhance the plasma current of an ohmic discharge without significantly degrading the quality of the discharge. Results will be presented for each HIT-II operating regime, including empirical performance scalings, applicable parametric operating spaces, and requirements to produce these discharges. Thomson scattering measurements and EFIT simulations are used to evaluate confinement in several representative plasmas. Finally, we outline extensions to the HIT-II CHI studies that could be performed with NSTX, SUNIST, or other ST devices.

  20. Owl Pellet Paleontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Lisa K.

    2013-01-01

    In this activity for the beginning of a high school Biology 1 evolution unit, students are challenged to reconstruct organisms found in an owl pellet as a model for fossil reconstruction. They work in groups to develop hypotheses about what animal they have found, what environment it inhabited, and what niche it filled. At the end of the activity,…

  1. Owl Pellet Paleontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Lisa K.

    2013-01-01

    In this activity for the beginning of a high school Biology 1 evolution unit, students are challenged to reconstruct organisms found in an owl pellet as a model for fossil reconstruction. They work in groups to develop hypotheses about what animal they have found, what environment it inhabited, and what niche it filled. At the end of the activity,…

  2. Active experiments in space in conjunction with Skylab. [barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two papers are presented which relate to the Skylab barium shaped charge experiments. The first describes the L=6.6 OOSIK barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972. Rocket payload, instrumentation, data reduction methods, geophysical environment at the time of the experiment, and results are given. The second paper presents the observation of an auroral Birkeland current which developed from the distortion of a barium plasma jet during the above experiment.

  3. Formation of particulate matter monitoring during combustion of wood pellete with additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacka, Matej; Holubčík, Michal; Vician, Peter; Jandačka, Jozef

    2016-06-01

    Application additives into the material for the production of wood pellets achieve an improvement in some properties such as pellets ash flow temperature and abrasion resistance. Additives their properties influence the course of combustion, and have an impact on the results of issuance. The experiment were selected additives corn starch and dolomite. Wood pellets were produced in the pelleting press and pelletizing with the additives. Selected samples were tested for the production of particulate matter (PM) during their direct burn. The paper analyzing a process of producing wood pellets and his effect on the final properties.

  4. Micromorphology of pelletized soil conditioners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Florian; Dietrich, Nils; Knoop, Christine; Raab, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Soil conditioners produced by anaerobic digestion and subsequent composting of organic household waste, bear the potential to improve unproductive farmland together with a reduced input risk of unwanted pollutants into the soils. Within the VeNGA project (http://www.biogas-network.de/venga), soil conditioners from anaerobically digested organic household waste are tested for their potential to increase plant growth in glasshouse and field experiments. Because the production techniques of these soil conditioners may influence their physical and chemical behaviour in the soil, two different techniques for pelletizing the soil conditioners where applied. We present findings from a pot experiment with cereal that has been sampled after two months for micromorphological analyses. We visualize the decomposition and the physical behaviour of the soil conditioners. Pellets produced in an agglomeration mixer result in dense balls, that are only slightly decomposed after the trial. But the soil conditioners created under pressure in a screw extruder are rich in voids and have the potential of retaining more soil water.

  5. Soil remediation by heat injection: Experiments and numerical modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, C.; Emmert, M.; Faerber, A.

    1995-03-01

    In order to understand physical processes of thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction methods in porous media the isothermal, multiphase formulation for the numerical model MUFTE will be extended by a non-isothermal, multiphase-multicomponent formulation. In order to verify the numerical model, comparison with analytical solutions for well defined problems will be carried out. To identify relevant processes and their interactions, the results of the simulation will be compared with well controlled experiments with sophisticated measurement equipment in three different scales. The aim is to compare the different numerical solution techniques namely Finite Element versus Integral Finite Difference technique as implemented in MUFTE and TOUGH2 [9] respectively.

  6. Injecting learning experience into geoethics for human and natural sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crookall, David

    2016-04-01

    Our early life experience has a strong influence on our actions in later life. Humans today are just starting to re-learn, collectively, how to treat Earth with the respect that it deserves and that is needed for our offspring to inherit a decent home. However, we still have a long way to go to instill in people at large the ethics, knowledge and skills necessary to ensure a healthy journey for humanity on spaceship. The experience of early upbringing, of schooling and of everyday life is probably the only path strong enough to develop in people a strong desire for ethical behaviour towards their environment. The problem is that the measures taken today to ensure the development of ethical behaviours in the population at large are woefully inadequate. At best, western school programmes contain a few lessons devoted to the environment, and even then they usually just pay lip service to the basics of the environment; they rarely aim to instill skills and knowledge in order to understand and care deeply for the environment. My presentation will suggest some practical ways to help communities build ethical frameworks and strategies to guide and generate tools, methods and activities that guide young people (pupils, students, scholars, researchers) to toward more ethical behaviours regarding their environment and their communities. Examples might include: - Developing geoethical dimensions of internships, in all areas; - Designing, testing and running simulation/games+debriefing providing a rich affective-cognitive context for grappling with geoethical problems- eg, FISH BANKS, KEEP COOL. - Pressuring governments to make geoethics, environmental care and climate change understanding central components of (almost) all educational programmes (in, eg, history, language, business, law, medicine, etc). - Subsidizing environmental-care summer schools for families and teachers at all levels. - Etc. One of my actions is founding a academic journal in the area, maybe with the

  7. Drug release, preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetics relationships of alginate pellets prepared by melt technology.

    PubMed

    Bose, Anirbandeep; Harjoh, Nurulaini; Pal, Tapan Kumar; Dan, Shubhasis; Wong, Tin Wui

    2016-01-01

    Alginate pellets prepared by the aqueous agglomeration technique experience fast drug dissolution due to the porous pre-formed calcium alginate microstructure. This study investigated in vitro drug release, preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetics relationships of intestinal-specific calcium acetate-alginate pellets against calcium-free and calcium carbonate-alginate pellets. Alginate pellets were prepared by solvent-free melt pelletization instead of aqueous agglomeration technique using chlorpheniramine maleate as model drug. A fast in situ calcium acetate dissolution in pellets resulted in rapid pellet breakup, soluble Ca(2+) crosslinking of alginate fragments and drug dissolution retardation at pH 1.2, which were not found in other pellet types. The preclinical drug absorption rate was lower with calcium acetate loaded than calcium-free alginate pellets. In human subjects, however, the extent and the rate of drug absorption were higher from calcium acetate-loaded pellets than calcium-free alginate pellets. The fine, dispersible and weakly gastric mucoadhesive calcium alginate pellets underwent fast human gastrointestinal transit. They released the drug at a greater rate than calcium-free pellets in the intestine, thereby promoting drug bioavailability. Calcium acetate was required as a disintegrant more than as a crosslinking agent clinically to promote pellet fragmentation, fast gastrointestinal transit and drug release in intestinal medium, and intestinal-specific drug bioavailability.

  8. Pellet impact drilling operational parameters: experimental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalyov, A. V.; Ryabchikov, S. Ya; Isaev, Ye D.; Aliev, F. R.; Gorbenko, M. V.; Baranova, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The article deals with the study of particle-impact drilling that is designed to enhance the rate-of-penetration function in hard and tough drilling environments. It contains the experimental results on relation between drilling parameters and drilling efficiency, the experiments being conducted by means of a specially designed laboratory model. To interpret the results properly a high-speed camera was used to capture the pellet motion. These results can be used to choose optimal parameters, as well as to develop enhanced design of ejector pellet impact drill bits.

  9. Thermal Properties of Lignocellulose Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, Igor; Hirle, Siegfried; Balog, Karol

    2017-06-01

    This article deals with the characterization of biomass pellets using Differential Scanning Calorimetry. We used three types of industrially produced and commercially available pellets as samples: wood pellets containing grass, wood pellet containing bark and wood pellets without bark. Each of the samples were examined using the DSC method. Based on the measurements in atmosphere of air and nitrogen temperature, the changes caused by thermal degradation of various kinds of test fuels were observed. Subsequently, limits of exothermic processes, reaction enthalpy changes and the temperature at which exothermic reactions reached peaks were determined.

  10. An Ion-Selective Electrode/Flow-Injection Analysis Experiment: Determination of Potassium in Serum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Kovach, Paul M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a low-cost, senior-level, instrumental analysis experiment in which a home-made potassium tubular flow-through electrode is constructed and incorporated into a flow injection analysis system (FIA). Also describes experiments for evaluating the electrode's response properties, examining basic FIA concepts, and determining potassium in…

  11. An Ion-Selective Electrode/Flow-Injection Analysis Experiment: Determination of Potassium in Serum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Kovach, Paul M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a low-cost, senior-level, instrumental analysis experiment in which a home-made potassium tubular flow-through electrode is constructed and incorporated into a flow injection analysis system (FIA). Also describes experiments for evaluating the electrode's response properties, examining basic FIA concepts, and determining potassium in…

  12. External-injection Experiment at SPARC_LAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A. R.; Bacci, A.; Belleveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Maroli, C.; Mostacci, A.; Petrillo, V.; Serafini, L.; Tomassini, P.; Vaccarezza, C.

    At the SPARC_LAB facility of INFN-LNF we are installing two transport lines for ultra-short electron bunches and an ultra- intense laser pulses, generated by the SPARC photo-injector and by the FLAME laser in a synchronized fashion at the tens of f s level, to co-propagate inside a hydrogen filled glass capillary, in order to perform acceleration of the electron bunch by a plasma wave driven by the laser pulse. The main aim of this experiment is to demonstrate that a high brightness electron beam can be accelerated by a plasma wave without any significant degradation of its quality. Motivations of the technical choices made and expected performances are reported.

  13. Pellet imaging techniques on ASDEX

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A. ); Buechl, K.; Hofmann, J.; Lang, R.; Loch, R.; Rudyj, A.; Sandmann, W. )

    1990-01-01

    As part of a USDOE/ASDEX collaboration, a detailed examination of pellet ablation in ASDEX with a variety of diagnostics has allowed a better understanding of a number of features of hydrogen ice pellet ablation in a plasma. In particular, fast gated photos with an intensified Xybion CCD video camera allow in-situ velocity measurements of the pellet as it penetrates the plasma. With time resolution of typically 100 nanoseconds and exposures every 50 microseconds, the evolution of each pellet in a multi-pellet ASDEX tokamak plasma discharge can be followed. When the pellet cloud track has striations, the light intensity profile through the cloud is hollow (dark near the pellet), whereas at the beginning or near the end of the pellet trajectory the track is typically smooth (without striations) and has a gaussian-peaked light emission profile. New, single pellet Stark broadened D{sub {alpha}}D{sub {beta}}, and D{sub {gamma}} spectra, obtained with a tangentially viewing scanning mirror/spectrometer with Reticon array readout, are consistent with cloud densities of 2 {times} 10{sup 17}cm{sup {minus}3} or higher in the regions of strongest light emission. A spatially resolved array of D{sub {alpha}} detectors shows that the light variations during the pellet ablation are not caused solely by a modulation of the incoming energy flux as the pellet crosses rational q-surfaces, but instead are a result of a dynamic, non-stationary, ablation process. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  14. An enhancement of plasma density by neutral gas injection observed in SEPAC Spacelab-1 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Kubota, S.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Williamson, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    An enhancement of plasma density observed during a neutral gas injection in Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators by the Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 is presented. When a plume of nitrogen gas was injected from the orbiter into space, a large amount of plasma was detected by an onboard plasma probe. The observed density often increased beyond the background plasma density and was strongly dependent on the attitude of the orbiter with respect to the velocity vector. This effect has been explained by a collisional interaction between the injected gas molecules and the ionospheric ions relatively drifting at the orbital speed.

  15. Tritium pellet injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma phase. An existing deuterium pellet injector (DPI) was modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed for frozen pellets ranging in size from 3 to 4 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at tritium pellet speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller (PLC). The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were also made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellets. Results of the testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI has been installed and operated on TFTR in support of the CY-92 deuterium plasma run period. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and tritium gloveboxes and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability.

  16. Tritium pellet injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.

    1992-11-01

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma phase. An existing deuterium pellet injector (DPI) was modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed for frozen pellets ranging in size from 3 to 4 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at tritium pellet speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller (PLC). The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were also made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellets. Results of the testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI has been installed and operated on TFTR in support of the CY-92 deuterium plasma run period. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and tritium gloveboxes and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability.

  17. Design and operation of the pellet charge exchange diagnostic for measurement of energetic confined alphas and tritons on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Duong, H.H.; Fisher, R.K.

    1996-05-01

    Radially-resolved energy and density distributions of the energetic confined alpha particles in D-T experiments on TFTR are being measured by active neutral particle analysis using low-Z impurity pellet injection. When injected into a high temperature plasma, an impurity pellet (e.g. Lithium or Boron) rapidly ablates forming an elongated cloud which is aligned with the magnetic field and moves with the pellet. This ablation cloud provides a dense target with which the alpha particles produced in D-T fusion reactions can charge exchange. A small fraction of the alpha particles incident on the pellet ablation cloud will be converted to helium neutrals whose energy is essentially unchanged by the charge transfer process. By measuring the resultant helium neutrals escaping from the plasma using a mass and energy resolving charge exchange analyzer, this technique offers a direct measurement of the energy distribution of the incident high-energy alpha particles. Other energetic ion species can be detected as well, such as tritons generated in D-D plasmas and H or He{sup 3} RF-driven minority ion tails. The diagnostic technique and its application on TFTR are described in detail.

  18. From serpentinization to carbonation: New insights from a CO2 injection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Frieder; McCollom, Thomas M.

    2013-10-01

    We injected a CO2-rich hydrous fluid of seawater chlorinity into an ongoing, mildly reducing (H2(aq)≈3 mmol/kg) serpentinization experiment at 230 °C and 35 MPa to examine the changes in fluid chemistry and mineralogy during mineral carbonation. The chemistry of 11 fluid samples was measured, speciated, and compared with MgO-SiO2-H2O-CO2 (MSHC) phase equilibria to approximate the reaction pathway from serpentinization to carbonation. Although the overall system was in apparent disequilibrium, the speciated activities of dissolved silica (aSiO2(aq)) and carbon dioxide (aCO2(aq)) evolved roughly along MSHC equilibrium phase boundaries, indicative of 4 distinct mineral assemblages over time: (1) serpentine-brucite (± magnesite) before the injection, to (2) serpentine-talc-magnesite 2 h after the injection, to (3) quartz-magnesite (48 h after injection), and (4) metastable olivine-magnesite (623 h after injection) until the experiment was terminated. Inspection of the solid reaction products revealed the presence of serpentine, magnesite, minor talc, and magnetite, in addition to relict olivine. Although quartz was saturated over a short segment of the experiment, it was not found in the solid reaction products. A marked and rapid change in fluid chemistry suggests that serpentinization ceased and precipitation of magnesite initiated immediately after the injection. A sharp decrease in pH after the injection promoted the dissolution of brucite and olivine, which liberated SiO2(aq) and dissolved Mg. Dissolved Mg was efficiently removed from the solution via magnesite precipitation, whereas the formation of talc was relatively sluggish. This process accounts for an increase in aSiO2(aq) to quartz saturation shortly after the injection of the CO2-rich fluid. Molecular dihydrogen (H2(aq)) was generated during serpentinization of olivine by oxidation of ferrous iron before the injection; however, no additional H2(aq) was generated after the injection. Speciation

  19. Impacts of Humic Injection Experiments on the South Oyster Field Research Site

    SciTech Connect

    John F. McCarthy

    2004-04-27

    A closure plan for the South Oyster Focus Area (SOFA) is being implemented to assess the impacts of a series of experimental injections of microorganisms, tracers and chemical amendments on the chemical and physical properties of the aquifer. The proposed research addresses environmental monitoring of humic substances injected into the aquifer, as described in the Site Closure Plan for the South Oyster Field Research Site. The goal of the research is to demonstrate that the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the groundwater at and downgradient from the injection site has returned to a pre-injection �baseline� conditions with respect to either the concentration or chemical composition of the DOM. For clarity, the humic solution injected during the experiment will be referred to as �humic injectate.� The term �DOM� will refer to the organic material recovered in the groundwater, which includes the autochthonous groundwater DOM as well as any of the humic injectate remaining in the groundwater. Specific objectives include: � Estimate the amount of humic material remaining in the aquifer at the completion of the push-pull experiment and the potential for environmental impacts due to release of humics retained on the sediments. � Monitor the DOM concentrations in groundwater over time at the injection well and at sampling locations within the potential downgradient plume of the injected tracers. � Evaluate the chemical composition of the DOM to determine whether the injection experiment had an impact of the chemical properties of the aquifer. The product of this research will be a contribution to the Site Closure Report documenting the impact of the humic experiments on the aquifer. Return of the aquifer to a �baseline� conditions will be achieved if the DOM concentrations in the groundwater are determined over the course of the research to have decreased to the pre-injection level, or if the chemical properties of

  20. Three-dimensional spiral injection scheme for the g-2/EDM experiment at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Hiromi; Nakayama, Hisayoshi; Oide, Katsunobu; Sasaki, Ken-ichi; Saito, Naohito; Mibe, Tsutomu; Abe, Mitsushi

    2016-10-01

    A newly developed three-dimensional spiral injection scheme for beam insertion into a solenoidal storage ring is reported. A new planned muon g-2/EDM experiment at J-PARC aims to measure g - 2 to a factor of 5 better statistical precision and a factor of 100 better sensitivity for the electric dipole moment (EDM) measurement compared to previous experiments. The J-PARC experiment will use a 3-T MRI solenoid magnet as the muon storage ring with a 0.66 m diameter to achieve a 1-ppm level of local uniformity. The previous g - 2 injection scheme is not applicable for beam injection into a small ring. The new scheme provides a smooth injection utilizing a radial solenoidal fringe field, without causing an error field in the storage volume. The expected storage efficiency is 80% and over, which is to be compared to 3.5% for the previous g - 2 experiment. In addition, the ability to control the storage plane is important for the EDM measurement. In this paper, we introduce the conceptual design and required beam parameters in terms of Twiss functions and the expected injection efficiency.

  1. Results and analysis of the TMX electron-beam injection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, P.; Grubb, D.P.

    1980-08-01

    Electron beams (e-beams) were injected into the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) plasma in order to investigate the effect on the ion cyclotron fluctuations of the plasma. The power level of the e-beams was comparable to that of the injected neutral beams. It was found that injection of the e-beams produced no significant effect on the ion cyclotron fluctuations, the measured plasma parameters, or the particle and power flow of the plasma. The increase in bulk electron temperature and the production of mirror-confined electrons found in previous experiments in which e-beams were injected into a mirror-confined plasma were not observed in this experiment. Analysis of the regions and frequencies of wave creation and absorption within the plasma shows that the plasma density and magnetic field profiles through the plasma strongly affect the resonances encountered by the waves. The steep axial density profiles produced by neutral-beam injection in the TMX experiment are not conducive to efficient coupling of the e-beam energy to the plasma.

  2. Development and validation of a railgun hydrogen pellet injector model

    SciTech Connect

    King, T.L.; Zhang, J.; Kim, K.

    1995-12-31

    A railgun hydrogen pellet injector model is presented and its predictions are compared with the experimental data. High-speed hydrogenic ice injection is the dominant refueling method for magnetically confined plasmas used in controlled thermonuclear fusion research. As experimental devices approach the scale of power-producing fusion reactors, the fueling requirements become increasingly more difficult to meet since, due to the large size and the high electron densities and temperatures of the plasma, hypervelocity pellets of a substantial size will need to be injected into the plasma continuously and at high repetition rates. Advanced technologies, such as the railgun pellet injector, are being developed to address this demand. Despite the apparent potential of electromagnetic launchers to produce hypervelocity projectiles, physical effects that were neither anticipated nor well understood have made it difficult to realize this potential. Therefore, it is essential to understand not only the theory behind railgun operation, but the primary loss mechanisms, as well. Analytic tools have been used by many researchers to design and optimize railguns and analyze their performance. This has led to a greater understanding of railgun behavior and opened the door for further improvement. A railgun hydrogen pellet injector model has been developed. The model is based upon a pellet equation of motion that accounts for the dominant loss mechanisms, inertial and viscous drag. The model has been validated using railgun pellet injectors developed by the Fusion Technology Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  3. The experience of an increase in the injection of ethylphenidate in Lothian April 2014-March 2015.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, Con; Smith, Linda; Coull, Alison; Shanley, Jim

    2016-05-01

    New psychoactive substances are causing increasing harm across the UK but the use of new psychoactive substance by injecting has become a significant problem within Lothian since the beginning of 2014. Data indicate a rapid rise in the number of existing drug injectors, particularly heroin injectors, moving to new psychoactive substance injecting. This paper reports the experiences within Lothian of a sudden increase in injecting of ethylphenidate over one year. A temporary class drug order was placed on ethylphenidate on 10 April 2015, and as yet the effects of this are unknown. Data specifically relating to new psychoactive substance recorded during injecting equipment provision transactions conducted by the NHS are reported. A survey was utilised to gather more detailed data from new psychoactive substance injectors. Injection of new psychoactive substance, including ethylphenidate has had significant adverse effects on physical and mental health. Risky behaviour such as sharing of equipment is known, and there are risks of transmission of infections. The rapid increase in injecting ethylphenidate has had a major impact on injecting equipment provision services, health services and public health. More work is required to identify routes to recovery. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Designing Fault-Injection Experiments for the Reliability of Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Allan L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the long-standing problem of conducting fault-injections experiments to establish the ultra-reliability of embedded systems. There have been extensive efforts in fault injection, and this paper offers a partial summary of the efforts, but these previous efforts have focused on realism and efficiency. Fault injections have been used to examine diagnostics and to test algorithms, but the literature does not contain any framework that says how to conduct fault-injection experiments to establish ultra-reliability. A solution to this problem integrates field-data, arguments-from-design, and fault-injection into a seamless whole. The solution in this paper is to derive a model reduction theorem for a class of semi-Markov models suitable for describing ultra-reliable embedded systems. The derivation shows that a tight upper bound on the probability of system failure can be obtained using only the means of system-recovery times, thus reducing the experimental effort to estimating a reasonable number of easily-observed parameters. The paper includes an example of a system subject to both permanent and transient faults. There is a discussion of integrating fault-injection with field-data and arguments-from-design.

  5. A Gyrotron-Powered Pellet Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, F. W.; Parks, P. B.

    2005-10-01

    Plans for fuelling ITER call for accelerated pellets which propagate in guide-tubes. The tubes undergo 90 bends so that the pellets can enter the plasma along the high field-side of the separatrix. Both theory and experiment find that for V>= 500m/s, centrifugal force in the bends will fracture the pellets and elongate the cloud of debris. This contribution outlines the design of a plasma accelerator sufficiently flexible so that 90 bends can be avoided for the high-speed portions of the trajectory. The key element is to recognize that the guide tubes can also serve as a waveguide for millimeter waves. Operation proceeds as follows: A pellet is introduced into a guide tube of diameter 5mm at low velocity ˜10m/s and propagates until the remaining trajectory is straight and normal to separatrix. At this point, a 1 MW gyrotron is energized and power propagates until it encounters the pellet. The pellet has a 4-region structure and acts as a gun. The rear region (5mm) is diamond which passes the millimeter waves and provides inertia. Next is a 2mm region of frozen D doped with lithium which adsorbs the millimeter waves and vaporizes. The third region is a thin lithium layer which is several skin depths in extent and reflects millimeter waves. The 5 mm front region is a frozen DT bullet accelerated by the vaporized absorbing layer. The bullet now has a straight trajectory. 1D simulations of the gun will be presented.

  6. Treatment of rectal prolapse in children with cow milk injection sclerotherapy: 30-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Zganjer, Mirko; Cizmic, Ante; Cigit, Irenej; Zupancic, Bozidar; Bumci, Igor; Popovic, Ljiljana; Kljenak, Antun

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role and our experience of injection sclerotherapy with cow milk in the treatment of rectal prolapse in children. METHODS: In the last 30 years (1976-2006) we made 100 injections of sclerotherapy with cow milk in 86 children. In this study we included children who failed to respond to conservative treatment and we perform operative treatment. RESULTS: In our study we included 86 children and in all of the patients we perform cow milk injection sclerotherapy. In 95.3% (82 children) of patients sclerotherapy was successful. In 4 (4.7%) patients we had recurrent rectal prolapse where we performed operative treatment. Below 4 years we had 62 children (72%) and 24 older children (28%). In children who needed operative treatment we performed Thiersch operation and without any complications. CONCLUSION: Injection sclerotherapy with cow milk for treatment rectal prolapse in children is a simple and effective treatment for rectal prolapse with minimal complications. PMID:18205264

  7. Fabrication of very high density fuel pellets of thorium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiratori, Tetsuo; Fukuda, Kosaku

    1993-06-01

    Very high density ThO 2 pellets were prepared without binders and lubricants from the ThO 2 powder originated by the thorium oxalate, which was aimed to simplify the fabrication process by skipping a preheat treatment. The as-received ThO 2 powder with a surface area of 4.56 m 2/g was ball-milled up to about 9 m 2/g in order to increase the green pellet density as high as possible. Both of the single-sided and the double-sided pressing were tested in the range from 2 to 5 t/cm 2 in the green pellet formation. Sintering temperature was such low as 1550°C. The pellet prepared in this experiment had a very high density in the range from about 96 to 98% TD without any cracks, in which a difference of the pellet density was not recognized in the single-sided pressing methods.

  8. Simulation and experiment research on the proportional pressure control of water-assisted injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Chen, Yinglong; Zhang, Zengmeng; Yang, Huayong

    2012-05-01

    Water-assisted injection molding (WAIM), a newly developed fluid-assisted injection molding technology has drawn more and more attentions for the energy saving, short cooling circle time and high quality of products. Existing research for the process of WAIM has shown that the pressure control of the injecting water is mostly important for the WAIM. However, the proportional pressure control for the WAIM system is quite complex due to the existence of nonlinearities in the water hydraulic system. In order to achieve better pressure control performance of the injecting water to meet the requirements of the WAIM, the proportional pressure control of the WAIM system is investigated both numerically and experimentally. A newly designed water hydraulic system for WAIM is first modeled in AMEsim environment, the load characteristics and the nonlinearities of water hydraulic system are both considered, then the main factors affecting the injecting pressure and load flow rate are extensively studied. Meanwhile, an open-loop model-based compensation control strategy is employed to regulate the water injection pressure and a feedback proportional integrator controller is further adopted to achieve better control performance. In order to verify the AMEsim simulation results WAIM experiment for particular Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) parts is implemented and the measured experimental data including injecting pressure and flow rate results are compared with the simulation. The good coincidence between experiment and simulation shows that the AMEsim model is accurate, and the tracking performance of the load pressure indicates that the proposed control strategy is effective for the proportional pressure control of the nonlinear WAIM system. The proposed proportional pressure control strategy and the conclusions drawn from simulation and experiment contribute to the application of water hydraulic proportional control and WAIM technology.

  9. A physics-based temperature model for ultrasonic vibration-assisted pelleting of cellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoxu; Yu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Meng; Pei, Z J; Wang, Donghai

    2014-09-01

    Temperature in ultrasonic vibration-assisted (UV-A) pelleting of cellulosic biomass has a significant impact on pellet quality. However, there are no reports on temperature models for UV-A pelleting of cellulosic biomass. The development of a physics-based temperature model can help to explain experimentally determined relations between UV-A pelleting process variables and temperature, and provide guidelines to optimize these process variables in order to produce pellets of good quality. This paper presents such a model for UV-A pelleting of cellulosic biomass. Development of the model is described first. Then temperature distribution is investigated using the model, and temperature difference between the top and the bottom surfaces of a pellet is explained. Based on this model, relations between process variables (ultrasonic power and pelleting duration) and temperature are predicted. Experiments were conducted for model verification, and the results agreed well with model predictions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Automatic control system for uniformly paving iron ore pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bowen; Qian, Xiaolong

    2014-05-01

    In iron and steelmaking industry, iron ore pellet qualities are crucial to end-product properties, manufacturing costs and waste emissions. Uniform pellet pavements on the grate machine are a fundamental prerequisite to ensure even heat-transfer and pellet induration successively influences performance of the following metallurgical processes. This article presents an automatic control system for uniformly paving green pellets on the grate, via a mechanism mainly constituted of a mechanical linkage, a swinging belt, a conveyance belt and a grate. Mechanism analysis illustrates that uniform pellet pavements demand the frontend of the swinging belt oscillate at a constant angular velocity. Subsequently, kinetic models are formulated to relate oscillatory movements of the swinging belt's frontend to rotations of a crank link driven by a motor. On basis of kinetic analysis of the pellet feeding mechanism, a cubic B-spline model is built for numerically computing discrete frequencies to be modulated during a motor rotation. Subsequently, the pellet feeding control system is presented in terms of compositional hardware and software components, and their functional relationships. Finally, pellet feeding experiments are carried out to demonstrate that the control system is effective, reliable and superior to conventional methods.

  11. In situ water and gas injection experiments performed in the Hades Underground Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Volckaert, G.; Ortiz, L.; Put, M.

    1995-12-31

    The movement of water and gas through plastic clay is an important subject in the research at SCK-CEN on the possible disposal of high level radioactive waste in the Boom clay layer at Mol. Since the construction of the Hades underground research facility in 1983, SCK-CEN has developed and installed numerous piezometers for the geohydrologic characterization and for in situ radionuclide migration experiments. In situ gas and water injection experiments have been performed at two different locations in the underground laboratory. The first location is a multi filter piezometer installed vertically at the bottom of the shaft in 1986. The second location is a three dimensional configuration of four horizontal multi piezometers installed from the gallery. This piezometer configuration was designed for the MEGAS (Modelling and Experiments on GAS migration through argillaceous rocks) project and installed in 1992. It contains 29 filters at distances between 10 m and 15 m from the gallery in the clay. Gas injection experiments show that gas breakthrough occurs at a gas overpressure of about 0.6 MPa. The breakthrough occurs by the creation of gas pathways along the direction of lowest resistance i.e. the zone of low effective stress resulting from the drilling of the borehole. The water injections performed in a filter -- not used for gas injection -- show that the flow of water is also influenced by the mechanical stress conditions. Low effective stress leads to higher hydraulic conductivity. However, water overpressures up to 1.3 MPa did not cause hydrofracturing. Water injections performed in a filter previously used for gas injections, show that the occluded gas hinders the water flow and reduces the hydraulic conductivity by a factor two.

  12. Sequential-Injection Analysis: Principles, Instrument Construction, and Demonstration by a Simple Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economou, A.; Tzanavaras, P. D.; Themelis, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    The sequential-injection analysis (SIA) is an approach to sample handling that enables the automation of manual wet-chemistry procedures in a rapid, precise and efficient manner. The experiments using SIA fits well in the course of Instrumental Chemical Analysis and especially in the section of Automatic Methods of analysis provided by chemistry…

  13. Sequential-Injection Analysis: Principles, Instrument Construction, and Demonstration by a Simple Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economou, A.; Tzanavaras, P. D.; Themelis, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    The sequential-injection analysis (SIA) is an approach to sample handling that enables the automation of manual wet-chemistry procedures in a rapid, precise and efficient manner. The experiments using SIA fits well in the course of Instrumental Chemical Analysis and especially in the section of Automatic Methods of analysis provided by chemistry…

  14. Experiment of Injecting Phase Cal Ahead of the Feed: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, Dmitrij; Maslenikov, Anatolij; Vytnov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    For developing the Russian VLBI network of new generation, a few experiments of injecting the phase calibration signal ahead of the feed were carried out. In the experiments an external broadband phase calibration signal was emitted through a special feed to a receiver horn directly. Prototypes of the feed for a frequency range of 2-18 GHz were created. The first experiments on injection phase cal ahead of the feed were carried out at Svetloe Observatory of the QUASAR VLBI network. The phase cal signal was emitted by the broadband feed installed on the roof of a mirror cabin, reflected by the sub-reflector, and received by the horn of the receiving system. The results of these experiments are considered.

  15. Neutral Beam Injection Requirements and Design Issues for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel; H. Neilson; W. Reiersen; M. Zarnstorff

    2002-02-11

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) will require 6 MW of 50 keV neutral beam injection (NBI) with initial pulse lengths of 500 msec and upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 sec. This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues, and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M [Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification] NBI system.

  16. SAG injection in a North Sea stratified reservoir: Flow experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanssen, J.E.; Surguchev, L.M.; Svorstoel, I.

    1994-12-31

    This paper is a study of a novel recovery process for stratified reservoirs with large permeability contrasts. A slug of foaming surfactant is injected alternately with gas, thus by analogy with WAG making this a SAG injection process. A combined experimental and numerical evaluation demonstrating effective diversion by foam and significant recovery potential over WAG of the method is reported. An experiment with the new process was performed in a visual 2-D porous medium flow model approximately scaled to the conditions of a North Sea reservoir that is characterized by high permeability contrast and limited interlayer communication. The experiment showed poor performance of conventional WAG, which swept mainly the high-permeable layer. Placement of a surfactant slug and later foam generation in the swept layer was successfully demonstrated and gave efficient injectant diversion into the other layers, resulting in complete sweep of the reservoir model by continued WAG. In summary the results of this paper show experimentally and by simulation on the same system that SAG injection as implemented here is superior to WAG injection and that the rich observations made in the experimental ca be matched with reasonable accuracy using a commercial simulator with only empirical parameters.

  17. Pellet fueling technology development leading to efficient fueling of ITER burning plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Jernigan, T.C.; Houlberg, W.A.; Owen, L.W.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Maruyama, S.; Parks, P.B.

    2005-05-15

    Pellet injection is the primary fueling technique planned for core fueling of ITER [ITER Technical Basis 2002 ITER EDA Documentation Series (Vienna: IAEA)] burning plasmas. Efficient core plasma fueling with deuterium and tritium D-T is a requirement for achieving high fusion gain and it cannot be achieved with gas fueling. Injection of pellets from the inner wall has been shown on present day tokamaks to provide efficient fueling and is planned for use on ITER. Modeling of the fueling deposition from inner wall pellet injection using the Parks ExB drift model indicates that pellets have the capability to fuel well inside the separatrix. Gas fueling calculations show very poor neutral penetration due to the high density and wide scrape off layer. Isotopically mixed D-T pellets can provide efficient tritium fueling that will minimize tritium wall loading when compared to gas puffing. Currently the performance of the ITER inner wall guide tube design is under test with initial results indicating that pellet speeds in excess of 300 m/s will lead to fragmented pellets. The ITER pellet injection technology requirements and remaining development issues are discussed along with a plan to reach the design goal for employment on ITER.

  18. Assessment of self-injection experience in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: psychometric validation of the Self-Injection Assessment Questionnaire (SIAQ)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous self-injection of medication has benefits for the patient and healthcare system, but there are barriers such as dexterity problems and injection anxiety that can prevent self-injection being used effectively. An accurate method of evaluating patients' experiences with self-injection would enable assessment of their success in giving self-injections and the likelihood of them adhering to a self-injection regimen. The aim of this study was to develop a questionnaire to measure overall patient experience with subcutaneous self-injection (the Self-Injection Assessment Questionnaire [SIAQ]), and to investigate its psychometric properties. Methods The construct validity and reliability of the SIAQ were tested in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who volunteered to inject certolizumab pegol using a standard syringe during an open-label multinational extension trial of the long-term safety and efficacy of this drug. The SIAQ PRE module was self-completed before the first self-injection, and the POST module was self-completed following each of three fortnightly self-injections. Results Ninety-seven patients completed the SIAQ. All items correlated well with their respective domains in confirmatory factor analysis. As predicted, compared with other participants, patients with very low scores (less than 3 out of 10) in PRE causal domains (Feelings about injections and Self-confidence) were significantly less satisfied with their first self-injection, as were patients with a very low score in any POST causal domain (Self-confidence, Feelings about injections, Injection-site reactions and Ease of use), demonstrating known-groups validity. Causal domain scores generally correlated most strongly with the Satisfaction with self-injection domain, supporting convergent validity. The SIAQ demonstrated internal consistency and reproducibility; Cronbach's α and the test-retest coefficient were > 0.70 for all domains. Sensitivity and responsiveness were also

  19. Electron beam injection experiments - Replication of flight observations in a laboratory beam plasma discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, W.; Mcgarity, J. O.; Konradi, A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent electron beam injection experiments in the lower ionosphere have produced two perplexing results: (1) At altitudes from 140 km to 220 km, the beam associated 391.4 nm intensity is relatively independent of altitude despite the decreasing N2 abundance. (2) The radial extent of the perturbed region populated by beam associated energetic electrons significantly exceeds the nominal gyrodiameter for 90 deg injection. A series of laboratory measurements is described in which both of these flight results appear to have been closely reproduced. The laboratory results are reasonably consistent with the transition from a collision dominated to collisionless beam-plasma discharge configuration.

  20. Early results of microwave transmission experiments through an overly dense rectangular plasma sheet with microparticle injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gillman, Eric D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2014-06-15

    These experiments utilize a linear hollow cathode to create a dense, rectangular plasma sheet to simulate the plasma layer surrounding vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities within the Earth's atmosphere. Injection of fine dielectric microparticles significantly reduces the electron density and therefore lowers the electron plasma frequency by binding a significant portion of the bulk free electrons to the relatively massive microparticles. Measurements show that microwave transmission through this previously overly dense, impenetrable plasma layer increases with the injection of alumina microparticles approximately 60 μm in diameter. This method of electron depletion is a potential means of mitigating the radio communications blackout experienced by hypersonic vehicles.

  1. Simulation experiments to generate broadband chaos using dual-wavelength optically injected Fabry-Perot laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Hafiz Muhammad; Khawar Islam, Muhammad; Obaid Ullah, Muhammad

    2016-08-01

    Broadband chaos can be generated by beating two wavelengths in a hybrid arrangement of Fabry-Perot (FP) Laser and Fiber ring cavity by injecting dual wavelengths. The bandwidth of generated chaos can be controlled by detuning different modes of FP Laser for beating. The bandwidth of generated chaos increased to many folds depending upon the injected strength and wavelength spacing matched to FP laser modes. The bandwidth enhancement in different simulation experiments conducted is optimized by varying different parameters of FP laser and cavity. The waveforms are analyzed and Lyapunov exponents are calculated in order to validate the existence of high bandwidth non-pulsating chaos.

  2. Early results of microwave transmission experiments through an overly dense rectangular plasma sheet with microparticle injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillman, Eric D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2014-06-01

    These experiments utilize a linear hollow cathode to create a dense, rectangular plasma sheet to simulate the plasma layer surrounding vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities within the Earth's atmosphere. Injection of fine dielectric microparticles significantly reduces the electron density and therefore lowers the electron plasma frequency by binding a significant portion of the bulk free electrons to the relatively massive microparticles. Measurements show that microwave transmission through this previously overly dense, impenetrable plasma layer increases with the injection of alumina microparticles approximately 60 μm in diameter. This method of electron depletion is a potential means of mitigating the radio communications blackout experienced by hypersonic vehicles.

  3. Re-evaluation of a subsurface injection experiment for testing flow and transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Lewis, R.E.; Engelman, R.E.; Pearson, A.L.; Murray, C.J.; Smoot, J.L. Lu, A.H.; Randall, P.R.; Wegener, W.H.

    1995-12-01

    The current preferred method for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Hanford Site is to vitrify the wastes so they can be stored in a near-surface, shallow-land burial facility (Shord 1995). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) managed the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a disposal facility for the vitrified LLW. Vadose zone flow and transport models are recognized as necessary tools for baseline risk assessments of stored waste forms. The objective of the Controlled Field Testing task of the PVTD Project is to perform and analyze field experiments to demonstrate the appropriateness of conceptual models for the performance assessment. The most convincing way to demonstrate appropriateness is to show that the model can reproduce the movement of water and contaminants in the field. Before expensive new experiments are initiated, an injection experiment conducted at the Hanford Site in 1980 (designated the ``Sisson and the Lu experiment``) should be completely analyzed and understood. Briefly, in that test, a solution containing multiple tracers was injected at a single point into the subsurface sediments. The resulting spread of the water and tracers was monitored in wells surrounding the injection point. Given the advances in knowledge, computational capabilities, and models over the last 15 years, it is important to re-analyze the data before proceeding to other experiments and history-matching exercises.

  4. Owl Pellets and Crisis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Describes a press conference that was used as a "teachable moment" when owl pellets being used for instructional purposes were found to be contaminated with Salmonella. The incident highlighted the need for safe handling of owl pellets, having a crisis management plan, and the importance of conveying accurate information to concerned parents.…

  5. Owl Pellets and Crisis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Describes a press conference that was used as a "teachable moment" when owl pellets being used for instructional purposes were found to be contaminated with Salmonella. The incident highlighted the need for safe handling of owl pellets, having a crisis management plan, and the importance of conveying accurate information to concerned parents.…

  6. Pelletizing properties of torrefied spruce

    Treesearch

    Wolfgang Stelte; Craig Clemons; Jens K. Holm; Anand R. Sanadi; Jesper Ahrenfeldt; Lei Shang; Ulrik B. Henriksen

    2011-01-01

    Torrefaction is a thermo-chemical conversion process improving the handling, storage and combustion properties of wood. To save storage space and transportation costs, it can be compressed into fuel pellets of high physical and energetic density. The resulting pellets are relatively resistant to moisture uptake, microbiological decay and easy to comminute into small...

  7. Automated fuel pellet inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichauer, John C.; Zana, Larry J.

    1992-11-01

    In the nuclear fuels industry, a great deal of effort goes into ensuring that quality materials are produced. Of these materials, none receives more attention than the uranium-oxide nuclear fuel pellets. These cylindrically shaped pellets (approx. 1/2 inch L X 1/2 inch D) are carefully produced and then meticulously inspected for various defects (e.g., cracks, chips, etc.). The inspection process is designed to remove any defective pellets from each lot, assuring the end user a reliable, predictable, and safe product. The current (manual) inspection process is laborious and subjective in nature. The inspector also receives prolonged exposure to low-level radiation. For these reasons, automated inspection of nuclear fuel pellets has long been a goal of the industry. However, it is not a simple task, due to the many material handling and image processing challenges required to inspect pellets at production rates (greater than five per second). This paper describes an automated nuclear fuel pellet inspection system that has successfully met these challenges. Built around a set of modular, high-speed, pipelined image processing hardware, it inspects pellets at rates of up to seven pellets per second. Recent tests have shown better than 97% detection rates with less than 2% false reject rates. Image processing algorithms and solutions to design challenges are described.

  8. Operational experience of the upgraded LHC injection kicker magnets during Run 2 and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, M. J.; Adraktas, A.; Bregliozzi, G.; Goddard, B.; Ducimetière, L.; Salvant, B.; Sestak, J.; Vega Cid, L.; Weterings, W.; Vallgren, C. Yin

    2017-07-01

    During Run 1 of the LHC, one of the injection kicker magnets caused occasional operational delays due to beam induced heating with high bunch intensity and short bunch lengths. In addition, there were also sporadic issues with vacuum activity and electrical flashover of the injection kickers. An extensive program of studies was launched and significant upgrades were carried out during Long Shutdown 1 (LS 1). These upgrades included a new design of beam screen to reduce both beam coupling impedance of the kicker magnet and the electric field associated with the screen conductors, hence decreasing the probability of electrical breakdown in this region. This paper presents operational experience of the injection kicker magnets during the first years of Run 2 of the LHC, including a discussion of faults and kicker magnet issues that limited LHC operation. In addition, in light of these issues, plans for further upgrades are briefly discussed.

  9. Injection molded nanofluidic chips: fabrication method and functional tests using single-molecule DNA experiments.

    PubMed

    Utko, Pawel; Persson, Fredrik; Kristensen, Anders; Larsen, Niels B

    2011-01-21

    We demonstrate that fabrication of well-defined nanofluidic systems can be greatly simplified by injection molding of thermoplastic polymers. Chips featuring nanochannel arrays, microchannels and integrated interconnects are produced in a single processing step by injection molding. The resulting open channel structures are subsequently sealed by facile plasma-enhanced thermal bonding of a polymer film. This fast, inexpensive and industry-compatible method thus provides a single-use all-polymer platform for nanofluidic lab-on-a-chip applications. Its applicability for nanofluidics is demonstrated by DNA stretching experiments performed on individual double-stranded DNA molecules confined in the injection molded nanochannels. The obtained results are consistent with measurements performed in costly state-of-the-art silica nanochannels, for both straight and tapered channel geometries.

  10. Imaging polychromator for density measurements of polystyrene pellet cloud on the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Sharov, I. A. Sergeev, V. Yu.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-04-15

    Experimental data on spatial distributions of a pellet cloud electron density are necessary for the development of many applications of pellet injection, namely, plasma fuelling, discharge control, and plasma diagnostics. An improved approach of electron density measurements inside the cloud of a polystyrene pellet ablating in hot plasma of the large helical device is described. Density values of (1-30) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} depending on the background plasma parameters and distance from the solid pellet were measured.

  11. Discriminative and reinforcing properties of two types of food pellets1

    PubMed Central

    Cruse, Daniel B.; Vitulli, William; Dertke, Max

    1966-01-01

    In Experiment I some discriminative functions of food pellets were studied by developing a multiple schedule of reinforcement (mult FR 30 FI 3) in which the delivery of a standard laboratory food pellet as a reinforcer set the occasion for reinforcement on every 30th response (FR 30), and the delivery of a sucrose food pellet as a reinforcer set the occasion for reinforcement after a 3-min interval (FI 3). Discriminative stimulus control by the type of pellet was also demonstrated by reversing the operant discrimination and having the standard pellet control the FI 3 and the sucrose pellet control the FR 30. In Experiment II a mult FR 30 FR 30 with two bars was developed; a standard food pellet was followed by an FR 30 on Bar 1 and extinction (ext) on Bar 2, while a sucrose pellet was followed by an FR 30 on Bar 2 and ext on Bar 1. A control rat was placed, for comparison, on a mixed (mix) FR 30 FR 30 schedule with two bars, but neither bar correlated with the type of food pellet. In Experiments I and II the similarity between pellet controlled multiple schedules and multiple primed schedules was discussed, as was the comparability of transitions and effectiveness of control between pellet controlled multiple schedules and multiple schedules providing continuous exteroceptive stimuli. PMID:16811298

  12. Modeling Dynamic Fracture of Cryogenic Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Paul

    2016-06-30

    This work is part of an investigation with the long-range objective of predicting the size distribution function and velocity dispersion of shattered pellet fragments after a large cryogenic pellet impacts a solid surface at high velocity. The study is vitally important for the shattered pellet injection (SPI) technique, one of the leading technologies being implemented at ORNL for the mitigation of disruption damage on current tokamaks and ITER. The report contains three parts that are somewhat interwoven. In Part I we formulated a self-similar model for the expansion dynamics and velocity dispersion of the debris cloud following pellet impact against a thick (rigid) target plate. Also presented in Part I is an analytical fracture model that predicts the nominal or mean size of the fragments in the debris cloud and agrees well with known SPI data. The aim of Part II is to gain an understanding of the pellet fracturing process when a pellet is shattered inside a miter tube with a sharp bend. Because miter tubes have a thin stainless steel (SS) wall a permanent deformation (dishing) of the wall is produced at the site of the impact. A review of the literature indicates that most projectile impact on thin plates are those for which the target is deformed and the projectile is perfectly rigid. Such impacts result in “projectile embedding” where the projectile speed is reduced to zero during the interaction so that all the kinetic energy (KE) of the projectile goes into the energy stored in plastic deformation. Much of the literature deals with perforation of the target. The problem here is quite different; the softer pellet easily undergoes complete material failure causing only a small transfer of KE to stored energy of wall deformation. For the real miter tube, we derived a strain energy function for the wall deflection using a non-linear (plastic) stress-strain relation for 304 SS. Using a dishing profile identical to the linear Kirchkoff-Love profile (for lack

  13. Influence of apple pomace inclusion on the process of animal feed pelleting.

    PubMed

    Maslovarić, Marijana D; Vukmirović, Đuro; Pezo, Lato; Čolović, Radmilo; Jovanović, Rade; Spasevski, Nedeljka; Tolimir, Nataša

    2017-08-01

    Apple pomace (AP) is the main by-product of apple juice production. Large amounts of this material disposed into landfills can cause serious environmental problems. One of the solutions is to utilise AP as animal feed. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of dried AP inclusion into model mixtures made from conventional feedstuffs on pellet quality and pellet press performance. Three model mixtures, with different ratios of maize, sunflower meal and AP, were pelleted. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied when designing the experiment. The simultaneous and interactive effects of apple pomace share (APS) in the mixtures, die thickness (DT) of the pellet press and initial moisture content of the mixtures (M), on pellet quality and production parameters were investigated. Principal component analysis (PCA) and standard score (SS) analysis were applied for comprehensive analysis of the experimental data. The increase in APS led to an improvement of pellet quality parameters: pellet durability index (PDI), hardness (H) and proportion of fines in pellets. The increase in DT and M resulted in pellet quality improvement. The increase in DT and APS resulted in higher energy consumption of the pellet press. APS was the most influential variable for PDI and H calculation, while APS and DT were the most influential variables in the calculation of pellet press energy consumption. PCA showed that the first two principal components could be considered sufficient for data representation. In conclusion, addition of dried AP to feed model mixtures significantly improved the quality of the pellets.

  14. Fate of herbicides in a shallow aerobic aquifer: A continuous field injection experiment (Vejen, Denmark)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broholm, Mette M.; Rügge, Kirsten; Tuxen, Nina; HøJberg, Anker L.; MosbæK, Hans; Bjerg, Poul L.

    2001-12-01

    A continuous, natural gradient, field injection experiment, involving six herbicides and a tracer, was performed in a shallow aerobic aquifer near Vejen, Denmark. Bentazone, (±)-2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid (MCPP), dichlorprop, isoproturon, and the dichlobenil metabolite 2,6-dichlor-benzamide (BAM) were injected along with 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol (not discussed in this paper) and the tracer bromide. The injection lasted for 216 days and created a continuous plume in the aquifer. The plume was monitored in three dimensions in 96 multilevel samplers of 6-9 points each for 230 days, with selected individual points for a longer period. The bromide plume followed a complex path through the monitoring network downgradient of the injection wells. The plume movement was controlled by spatially varied hydraulic conductivities of the sand deposit and influenced by asynchronous seasonal variation in groundwater potentials. An average flow velocity of 0.5 m/d was observed, as depicted by bromide. Bentazone, BAM, MCPP, and dichlorprop retardation was negligible, and only slight retardation of isoproturon was observed in the continuous injection experiment and a preceding pulse experiment. No degradation of bentazone was observed in the aerobic aquifer during the monitoring period. BAM and isoproturon were not degraded within 5 m downgradient of the injection. The two phenoxy acids MCPP and dichlorprop were both degraded in the aerobic aquifer. Near the source a lag phase was observed followed by fast degradation of the phenoxy acids, indicating growth kinetics. The phenoxy acids were completely degraded within l m downgradient of the injection wells, resulting in the plumes being divided into small plumes at the injection wells and pulses farther downgradient. During the lag phase, phenoxy acids had spread beyond the 25 m long monitoring network. However, the mass of the phenoxy acids passing the 10-25 m fences never matched the corresponding bentazone or

  15. Nuclear fuel pellet transfer escalator

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, T.B. Sr.; Roberts, E.; Edmunds, M.O.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel pellet escalator for loading nuclear fuel pellets into a sintering boat. It comprises a generally horizontally-disposed pellet transfer conveyor for moving pellets in single file fashion from a receiving end to a discharge end thereof, the conveyor being mounted about an axis at its receiving end for pivotal movement to generally vertically move its discharge end toward and away from a sintering boat when placed below the discharge end of the conveyor, the conveyor including an elongated arm swingable vertically about the axis and having an elongated channel recessed below an upper side of the arm and extending between the receiving and discharge ends of the conveyor; a pellet dispensing chute mounted to the arm of the conveyor at the discharge end thereof and extending therebelow such that the chute is carried at the discharge end of the conveyor for generally vertical movement therewith toward and away from the sintering boat.

  16. Thomson Scattering Measurements During Local Helicity Injection in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Rodriguez Sanchez, C.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2016-10-01

    Local helicity injection (LHI) is a non-solenoidal startup technique currently being developed at the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment. In LHI, helicity is injected by compact, high-power current sources located in the plasma scrape off layer that drive bulk plasma current through magnetic reconnection. Investigations of the electron temperature and density evolution in LHI plasmas are being pursued using the multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic on Pegasus. It has been expanded to provide a total of 24 spatial channels using a set of three high-throughput transmission gratings and intensified CCD cameras. Measurements have been made in two separate helicity injector configurations: a low-field-side (outboard midplane) configuration; and a high-field-side (lower divertor) configuration. Initial observations during injection showed 50 injection methods yield peaked temperature profiles in the core; however, a more rapid rise in Te from the edge to the core was observed in the case of outboard injection. Further analysis of electron temperature and density profiles is required to understand the electron confinement scaling associated with LHI. These initial results suggest this startup technique is scalable to MA-class devices with relatively modest injector requirements. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  17. High-fidelity injection detectability experiments: a tool for evaluating syndromic surveillance systems.

    PubMed

    Wallstrom, Garrick L; Wagner, M; Hogan, W

    2005-08-26

    When public health surveillance systems are evaluated, CDC recommends that the expected sensitivity, specificity, and timeliness of surveillance systems be characterized for outbreaks of different sizes, etiologies, and geographic or demographic scopes. High-Fidelity Injection Detectability Experiments (HiFIDE) is a tool that health departments can use to compute these metrics for detection algorithms and surveillance data that they are using in their surveillance system. The objective of this study is to develop a tool that allows health departments to estimate the expected sensitivity, specificity, and timeliness of outbreak detection. HiFIDE extends existing semisynthetic injection methods by replacing geometrically shaped injects with injects derived from surveillance data collected during real outbreaks. These injects maintain the known relation between outbreak size and effect on surveillance data, which allows inferences to be made regarding the smallest outbreak that can be expected to be detectable. An example illustrates the use of HiFIDE to analyze detectability of a waterborne Cryptosporidium outbreak in Washington, DC. HiFIDE enables public health departments to perform system validations recommended by CDC. HiFIDE can be obtained for no charge for noncommercial use (http://www.hifide.org).

  18. High-Fidelity Injection Detectability Experiments: a Tool for Evaluating Syndromic Surveillance Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wallstrom, Garrick L.; Wagner, M.; Hogan, W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction When public health surveillance systems are evaluated, CDC recommends that the expected sensitivity, specificity, and timeliness of surveillance systems be characterized for outbreaks of different sizes, etiologies, and geographic or demographic scopes. High-Fidelity Injection Detectability Experiments (HiFIDE) is a tool that health departments can use to compute these metrics for detection algorithms and surveillance data that they are using in their surveillance system. Objective The objective of this study is to develop a tool that allows health departments to estimate the expected sensitivity, specificity, and timeliness of outbreak detection. Methods HiFIDE extends existing semisynthetic injection methods by replacing geometrically shaped injects with injects derived from surveillance data collected during real outbreaks. These injects maintain the known relation between outbreak size and effect on surveillance data, which allows inferences to be made regarding the smallest outbreak that can be expected to be detectable. Results An example illustrates the use of HiFIDE to analyze detectability of a waterborne Cryptosporidium outbreak in Washington, DC. Conclusion HiFIDE enables public health departments to perform system validations recommended by CDC. HiFIDE can be obtained for no charge for noncommercial use (http://www.hifide.org). PMID:16177698

  19. A Gyrotron-Powered Pellet Accelerator for Tokamak Fueling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Perkins, F. W.

    2006-04-01

    A novel pellet acceleration concept [1] using microwave power from MW gyrotron sources has been developed that could pave the way for high-speed >3 km/s inner-wall pellet injection on ITER-class tokamaks. The concept is based on the principal of a gun, where a high-pressure propellant gas drives the projectile down the barrel. In the proposed concept, the high gas pressure is created by evaporative explosion of a composite ``pusher'' medium attached behind the DT fuel pellet. The pusher consists of micron-sized conducting particles, (Li, Be, C) embedded uniformly in a D2 ice slug with <5% volume concentration, thus facilitating microwave energy absorption by dissipation of eddy currents flowing within the conducting particles only. Microwave power is delivered to the pusher along a waveguide, which also serves as the pellet launch tube. A scaling law predicts that a pellet of mass M accelerated over a distance L reaches a velocity v (PL/M)^1/3, where P is the gyrotron power.pard[1] P. Parks & F. Perkins, US patent application ``Microwave-Powered Pellet Accelerator,'' No. 11/256/662, October 21, 2005.

  20. Optimization of Porous Pellets for Phosphate Recovery ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The poster presents the preliminary adsorption experiment showing that phosphate concentration is decreasing over time as well as presenting the kinetics models that best fit the data collected over 25 days. The purpose of this project is to find a better material for adsorption of phosphate from water treatment facilities. The material is made into pellets which allow for adsorption and are easier to remove from the system when capacity is reached.

  1. Results from recent hydrogen pellet acceleration studies with a 2-m railgun

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Zhang, D.J.; King, T.; Haywood, R.; Manns, W.; Venneri, F.

    1989-12-01

    A new 3.2-mm-diameter, two-stage, fuseless, plasma-arc-driven electromagnetic railgun has been designed, constructed, and successfully operated to achieve a record velocity of 2.67 km/s({sup b}) for 3.2 mmD {times} 4 mmL solid hydrogen pellet. The first stage of this hydrogen pellet injector is a combination of a hydrogen pellet generator and a gas fun. The second stage is a 2-m-long railgun which serves as a booster accelerator. The gas fun accelerates a frozen hydrogen pellet to a medium velocity and injects it into the railgun through a perforated coupling piece, which also serves a pressure-relieving mechanism. An electrical breakdown of the propellant gas, which has followed the pellet from the gas fun into the railgun, forms a conducting plasma-arc armature immediately behind the pellet allowing for fuseless operation of the railgun. Study of the pressure profile and the behavior of the plasma-arc armature inside the railgun bore led to elimination of spurious arcing, which prevents operation of the railgun at high voltages (and, therefore, at high currents). A timing circuit that can automatically measure the pellet input velocity and allows for accurate control of arc initiation behind the pellet helps prevent pellet disintegration and mistriggering of the arc initiation circuit. Results from the recent cryogenic operation of the two-stage pellet acceleration system are reported. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Part weight verification between simulation and experiment of plastic part in injection moulding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amran, M. A. M.; Idayu, N.; Faizal, K. M.; Sanusi, M.; Izamshah, R.; Shahir, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the main objective is to determine the percentage difference of part weight between experimental and simulation work. The effect of process parameters on weight of plastic part is also investigated. The process parameters involved were mould temperature, melt temperature, injection time and cooling time. Autodesk Simulation Moldflow software was used to run the simulation of the plastic part. Taguchi method was selected as Design of Experiment to conduct the experiment. Then, the simulation result was validated with the experimental result. It was found that the minimum and maximum percentage of differential of part weight between simulation and experimental work are 0.35 % and 1.43 % respectively. In addition, the most significant parameter that affected part weight is the mould temperature, followed by melt temperature, injection time and cooling time.

  3. Studies of energetic confined alphas using the pellet charge exchange diadgnostic on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, M.P.; Budny, R.V.; Duong, H.H.

    1995-07-01

    Results from recent DT experiments on TFIR to measure the energy distribution and radial density profile of fast confined alphas with the use of Li pellets and neutral particle analysis are presented. When a pellet is injected into the plasma, a toroidally extended ablation cloud is formed that travels with the pellet. A small fraction of the fusion alphas incident on the cloud are converted to helium neutrals as a result of electron capture processes. The escaping energetic helium neutrals are analyzed and detected by the neutral particle analyzer. Radially resolved energy spectra of trapped confined alphas in 0.5-2 MeV range and radial alpha density profiles are presented in this paper. The experimental data are compared with modeling results obtained with the TRANSP Monte-Carlo Code and with a specially developed Fokker-Planck Post Processor (FPP) that uses the alpha source distribution produced by TRANSP. Comparison of the experimental data with TRANSP and FPP show that the alphas in the plasma core of sawtooth free discharges in TFIR are well confined and slow down classically. The energy and radial profiles distributions outside the plasma core show the influence of stochastic ripple losses on alphas. Measurements for sawtoothing plasmas show a significant outward radial transport of trapped alphas.

  4. Fracture propagation during fluid injection experiments in shale at elevated confining pressures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Mike; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Rutter, Ernest; Fauchille, Anne-Laure; Taylor, Rochelle; Lee, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing to recover shale-gas has focused attention upon the fundamental fracture properties of gas-bearing shales. Fracture propagation trajectories in these materials depend on the interaction between the anisotropic mechanical properties of the shale and the anisotropic in-situ stress field. However, there is a general paucity of available experimental data on their anisotropic mechanical, physical and fluid-flow properties, especially at elevated confining pressures. Here we report the results of laboratory-scale fluid injection experiments, for Whitby mudstone and Mancos shale (an interbedded silt and mudstone), as well as Pennant sandstone (a tight sandstone with permeability similar to shales), which is used an isotropic baseline and tight-gas sandstone analogue. Our injection experiments involved the pressurisation of a blind-ending central hole in an initially dry cylindrical sample. Pressurisation was conducted under constant volume-rate control, using silicone oils of various viscosities. The dependence of breakdown pressure on confining pressure was seen to be dependent on the rock strength, with the significantly stronger Pennant sandstone exhibiting much lower confining-pressure dependence of breakdown pressure than the weaker shales. In most experiments, a small drop in the injection pressure record was observed at what is taken to be fracture initiation, and in the Pennant sandstone this was accompanied by a small burst of acoustic energy. Breakdown was found to be rapid and uncontrollable after initiation if injection is continued, but can be limited to a slower (but still uncontrolled) rate by ceasing the injection of fluid after the breakdown initiation in experiments where it could be identified. A simplified 2-dimensional model for explaining these observations is presented in terms of the stress intensities at the tip of a pressurised crack. Additionally, we present a suite of supporting mechanical, flow and elastic

  5. New Generation of ELF/VLF Wave Injection Experiments for HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Reddy, A.; Watkins, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    We present a ray tracing study to investigate the feasibility of a new generation of wave injection experiments from HAARP transmitter (L 4.9). Highly successful whistler mode wave injection experiments from SIPLE station, Antarctica, have established the importance of such experiments to study magnetospheric wave-particle interactions, and for cold and hot plasma diagnostics [Helliwell and Katsufrakis, 1974; Carpenter and Miller, 1976; Sonwalkar et al., 1997]. Modulated heating experiments from HAARP have shown that it is possible to launch ELF/VLF waves into the magnetosphere that can be observed on the ground after one-, two-, and multi-hop ducted propagation [Inan et al., 2004]. Recent research has also shown that ionospheric heating experiments using HAARP can lead to the formation of magnetospheric ducts [e.g. Milikh et al., 2010; Fallen et al., 2011]. Collectively, these results indicate that the HAARP (or similar) transmitter can be used first to form ducts on nearby L shells, and then to inject and trap transmitter generated ELF/VLF waves in those ducts. Ray tracing studies using a model magnetosphere shows that ELF/VLF waves in a few kilohertz range can be trapped in ducts with L shells near the HAARP transmitter. For example, 1.5 kHz waves injected from L shell = 4.9 and altitude = 200 km can be trapped in ducts located within 0.3 L of the transmitter L-shell. The duct parameters needed for ray-trapping are typically duct width dL 0.1-0.3 and duct enhancement factor dNe/Ne 10-20% or more. The location of plasmapause with respect to transmitter plays a role in the nature of trapping. The duct locations and parameters required for trapping ELF/VLF waves inside the ducts are consistent with past observations of ducts generated by the HAARP transmitter. Ray tracing calculations provide trapped wave normal angles, time delays, resonant energetic electron energy, estimates of wave intensity inside the duct, on the ground, and on satellites such DEMETER, Van

  6. EXPERIMENTS ON THE EFFECTS OF INJECTION OF EGG-ALBUMEN AND SOME OTHER PROTEIDS

    PubMed Central

    Sollmann, Torald; Brown, E. D.

    1902-01-01

    degeneration of the hepatic epithelium, which are so acute as to be fully developed when death occurs in 1½ hours after injection. Doses of 0.35 grm. per kilo. do not produce this change. Chloretone did not cause the degeneration, but is followed by congestion of the abdominal viscera. 18. Native egg-albumen, injected into the femoral vein of a dog, was followed in one case by a fatal ending with convulsions and coma, after several intervening cases of good health. Further experiments demonstrated that there is no toxicity inherent in fresh egg-albumen, nor can it be developed by breeding the eggs in the shell. The cause of the above fatal issue must therefore be sought in some extraneous toxic agent which contaminated the solution. Muscle-extracts were also devoid of toxicity. Alkali-albumin produces no changes beyond those which may be attributed to the free alkali contained therein. PMID:19866971

  7. Interpretation of injection-withdrawal tracer experiments conducted between two wells in a large single fracture.

    PubMed

    Novakowski, K S; Bickerton, G; Lapcevic, P

    2004-09-01

    Tracer experiments conducted using a flow field established by injecting water into one borehole and withdrawing water from another are often used to establish connections and investigate dispersion in fractured rock. As a result of uncertainty in the uniqueness of existing models used for interpretation, this method has not been widely used to investigate more general transport processes including matrix diffusion or advective solute exchange between mobile and immobile zones of fluid. To explore the utility of the injection-withdrawal method as a general investigative tool and with the intent to resolve the transport processes in a discrete fracture, two tracer experiments were conducted using the injection-withdrawal configuration. The experiments were conducted in a fracture which has a large aperture (>500 microm) and horizontally pervades a dolostone formation. One experiment was conducted in the direction of the hydraulic gradient and the other in the direction opposite to the natural gradient. Two tracers having significantly different values of the free-water diffusion coefficient were used. To interpret the experiments, a hybrid numerical-analytical model was developed which accounts for the arcuate shape of the flow field, advection-dispersion in the fracture, diffusion into the matrix adjacent to the fracture, and the presence of natural flow in the fracture. The model was verified by comparison to a fully analytical solution and to a well-known finite-element model. Interpretation of the tracer experiments showed that when only one tracer, advection-dispersion, and matrix diffusion are considered, non-unique results were obtained. However, by using multiple tracers and by accounting for the presence of natural flow in the fracture, unique interpretations were obtained in which a single value of matrix porosity was estimated from the results of both experiments. The estimate of porosity agrees well with independent measurements of porosity obtained from

  8. Short-interval multi-laser Thomson scattering measurements of hydrogen pellet ablation in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuhara, R. Sakamoto, R.; Yamada, I.; Motojima, G.; Hayashi, H.

    2014-11-15

    Thomson scattering forms an important aspect of measuring the electron density and temperature profiles of plasmas. In this study, we demonstrate Thomson scattering measurements obtained over a short interval (<1 ms) by using an event triggering system with a multi-laser configuration. We attempt to use our system to obtain the electron temperature and density profiles before and immediately after pellet injection into the large helical device. The obtained profiles exhibit dramatic changes after pellet injection as per our shot-by-shot measurements. We believe that this measurement technique will contribute towards a better understanding of the physics of the pellet deposition.

  9. Tracer-encapsulated pellet injector for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Viniar, I.; Lukin, A.; Reznichenko, P.; Umov, A.

    2005-05-01

    An injector for making solid hydrogen pellets around impurity cores has been developed for plasma transport study in large helical device. A technique has been employed for automatic loading carbon or polystyrene cores of 0.2 mm diameter from a gun magazine to a light-gas gun barrel. The injector is equipped with a cryocooler and is able to form a 3.2 mm long and 3 mm diameter cylindrical solid hydrogen pellet at 7-8 K with an impurity core in its center within 6 min and to inject it in the light-gas gun up to 1 km/s.

  10. Tracer-encapsulated pellet injector for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, S.; Viniar, I.; Lukin, A.; Reznichenko, P.; Umov, A.

    2005-05-15

    An injector for making solid hydrogen pellets around impurity cores has been developed for plasma transport study in large helical device. A technique has been employed for automatic loading carbon or polystyrene cores of 0.2 mm diameter from a gun magazine to a light-gas gun barrel. The injector is equipped with a cryocooler and is able to form a 3.2 mm long and 3 mm diameter cylindrical solid hydrogen pellet at 7-8 K with an impurity core in its center within 6 min and to inject it in the light-gas gun up to 1 km/s.

  11. Analysis of cavity pressure and warpage of polyoxymethylene thin walled injection molded parts: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrier, P.; Tosello, G.; Hattel, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    Process analysis and simulations on molding experiments of 3D thin shell parts have been conducted. Moldings were carried out with polyoxymethylene (POM). The moldings were performed with cavity pressure sensors in order to compare experimental process results with simulations. The warpage was characterized by measuring distances using a tactile coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Molding simulations have been executed taking into account actual processing conditions. Various aspects have been considered in the simulation: machine barrel geometry, injection speed profiles, cavity injection pressure, melt and mold temperatures, material rheological and pvT characterization. Factors investigated for comparisons were: injection pressure profile, short shots length, flow pattern, and warpage. A reliable molding experimental database was obtained, accurate simulations were conducted and a number of conclusions concerning improvements to simulation accuracy are presented regarding: pvT data, mesh, short shots, cavity pressure for process control validation as well as molding machine geometry modelling. Eventually, a methodology for improved molding simulations of cavity injection pressure, filling pattern and warpage was established.

  12. Probing RFP Density Limits and the Interaction of Pellet Fueling and NBI Heating on MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspary, K. J.; Chapman, B. E.; Anderson, J. K.; Limbach, S. T.; Oliva, S. P.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Combs, S. K.; Foust, C. R.

    2013-10-01

    Pellet fueling on MST has previously achieved Greenwald fractions of up to 1.5 in 200 kA improved confinement discharges. Additionally, pellet fueling to densities above the Greenwald limit in 200 kA standard discharges resulted in early termination of the plasma, but pellet size was insufficient to exceed the limit for higher current discharges. To this end, the pellet injector on MST has been upgraded to increase the maximum fueling capability by increasing the size of the pellet guide tubes, which constrain the lateral motion of the pellet in flight, to accommodate pellets of up to 4.0 mm in diameter. These 4.0 mm pellets are capable of triggering density limit terminations for MST's peak current of 600 kA. An unexpected improvement in the pellet speed and mass control was also observed compared to the smaller diameter pellets. Exploring the effect of increased density on NBI particle and heat deposition shows that for MST's 1 MW tangential NBI, core deposition of 25 keV neutrals is optimized for densities of 2-3 × 1019 m-3. This is key for beta limit studies in pellet fueled discharges with improved confinement where maximum NBI heating is desired. An observed toroidal deflection of pellets injected into NBI heated discharges is consistent with asymmetric ablation due to the fast ion population. In 200 kA improved confinement plasmas with NBI heating, pellet fueling has achieved a Greenwald fraction of 2.0. Work supported by US DoE.

  13. Field-scale gas tracing experiment in unsaturated fractured media: from deep injection to surface monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillon, S.; Pili, E.; Sabroux, J.; Sestier-Carlin, R.; Adler, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    For CO2 sequestration as for other applications, it is important to understand transfer mechanisms of gases in unsaturated fractured rocks from experiment and to develop modeling capabilities. We carried out a field-scale tracing experiment using SF6 with the aim to serve for a forthcoming experiment using CO2. The experimental site was well characterized (mineralogy and fracturation). Transport parameters were estimated from the field, especially permeability and dilution factor. We also evaluated methods to monitor tracer breakthrough at the surface. At the Roselend Natural Laboratory (French Alps), a tunnel provides access to the heart of unsaturated fractured crystalline rocks, at 55 m depth below ground surface. This underground research facility allows studying gas exchange between a 60 m3 chamber isolated at the dead-end of the tunnel and the surface. At the topographic surface, ten 10 meter-long vertical boreholes and one 60 meter-long subhorizontal borehole were used to monitor tracer breakthrough. Stereological analysis of fractures in the tunnel previously led to permeability estimation. Similar analysis of drilled cores (density and orientation of fractures) gave additional permeability estimates in the subsurface. Gas permeability was also determined from pneumatic injection tests in both the injection chamber and subsurface boreholes. Steady-state and transient experiments were analyzed by modeling in real geometry. Long-term continuous pressure monitoring in the isolated chamber and the packed-off boreholes were also used for permeability estimation. We found equivalent air permeability of the order of 10-12 m2 which compares well with previous estimations. Following baseline determination, SF6 was injected at 1000 ppmV in the isolated chamber that was then pressurized to 150 mbar above atmospheric pressure during 2 hours. During all the experiment SF6 concentration was continuously monitored inside the isolated chamber and in front of the isolation

  14. Hydroclast and Peperite generation: Experimental Results produced using the Silicate Melt Injection Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, W. S.; Mastin, L. G.; Spieler, O.; Kunzmann, T.; Shaw, C. S.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    The Silicate Melt Injection Laboratory Experiment (SMILE) allows for the effusive and explosive injection of molten glass into a variety of media - air, water, water spray, and wet sediments. Experiments have been preformed using the SMILE apparatus to evaluate the mechanisms of "turbulent shedding" during shallow submarine volcanic eruptions and magma/wet-sediment interactions. In these experiments, approximately 0.5 kg of basaltic melt with 5 wt.% Spectromelt (dilithium tetraborate) is produced in an internally heated autoclave at 1150° C and ambient pressure. The molten charge is ejected via the bursting of a rupture disc at 3.5 MPa into the reaction media, situated within the low pressure tank (atmospheric conditions). Preliminary experiments ejecting melt into a standing water column have yielded hydroclasts of basalt. SEM images of the clasts show ubiquitous discontinuous skins ("rinds") that are flaked, peeled, or smeared away in strips. Adhering to the clast surfaces are flakes, blocks, and blobs of detached material, up to 10 μm in size. The presence of partially detached rinds and rind debris likely reflects repeated bending, scraping, impact, and other disruption through turbulent velocity fluctuations. These textures are comparable to littoral explosive deposits at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, where lava tubes are torn apart by wave action, the lava is quenched, and thrown back on the beach as loose fragments (hyaloclastite). Preliminary experiments injecting melt into wet sediments show evidence of sediment ingestion and fluidal textures. These results support the interpretation that peperite generation can be driven by hydrodynamic mixing of a fuel and a coolant.

  15. Pelletization of fine coals. Technical progress report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1992-09-01

    The first step consisted of producing a batch of seed pellets (in the size range {minus}4.75+4.00 mm) by pelletizing of 200 g of ground coal with desired additives (surface active agents and binders) and moisture content for 800 revolutions. The seed pellets are obtained by sieving the output from the batch drum. The second step involved the production of finished size pellets by layering the seed pellets with stepwise addition of moist feed which is again produced with desired additives and moisture content. Specifically, 25 g of the {minus}4.75+4.00 mm seed pellets are placed in the drum and 20 g of moist fluffy feed is added every 80 revolutions for five times. After 400 revolutions the pellets are sieved on the 4.75 mm screen and the screen undersize which corresponds to new seeds generated during the layering cycles is discarded. Now, 30 g of moist fluffy feed is added every 50 revolutions for five more cycles. These layered pellets are sieved again and the {minus}9.5+8.00 mm pellets. Coal agglomerates produced by the above described technique are nice and spherical. With our past experience with iron ore pelletization we learnt that as long as sufficient fluffy feed is available for the consumption by the seed pellets, they generally grow by forming layers consuming the feed rather than grow by coalescence. This is found to be true in the case of coal also. Growth by coalescence of coal pellets is found to yield raspberry type uneven agglomerates. After ascertaining the possibility of producing nice spherical pellets, several experiments have been conducted to develop the above standard procedure for making pellets in a reproducible way and testing them for their quality.

  16. Simulation of Pellet Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Ishizaki, Ryuichi

    2000-10-01

    In order to clarify the structure of the ablation flow, 2D simulation is carried out with a fluid code solving temporal evolution of MHD equations. The code includes electrostatic sheath effect at the cloud interface.(P.B. Parks et al.), Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 38, 571 (1996). An Eulerian cylindrical coordinate system (r,z) is used with z in a spherical pellet. The code uses the Cubic-Interpolated Psudoparticle (CIP) method(H. Takewaki and T. Yabe, J. Comput. Phys. 70), 355 (1987). that divides the fluid equations into non-advection and advection phases. The most essential element of the CIP method is in calculation of the advection phase. In this phase, a cubic interpolated spatial profile is shifted in space according to the total derivative equations, similarly to a particle scheme. Since the profile is interpolated by using the value and the spatial derivative value at each grid point, there is no numerical oscillation in space, that often appears in conventional spline interpolation. A free boundary condition is used in the code. The possibility of a stationary shock will also be shown in the presentation because the supersonic ablation flow across the magnetic field is impeded.

  17. Electrons precipitation stimulated by plasma jets injection in FLUXUS and NORTH STAR active rocket experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, B.; Erlandson, R.; Lynch, K.; Meng, C.; Podgorny, I.; Pfaff, R.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.; Sobyanin, D.; Zetzer, J.

    In Russian-American active rocket experiments FLUXUS (49? N, 47? E, 1997) and NORTH STAR (70? N, 148? W, 1999) high-velocity plasma jets were injected along and across the geomagnetic field respectively. In the both experiments high- density plasma jets pushed out the magnetic field. Later, when the magnetic field penetrated into the plasma jet, plasma was polarized and E=-VxB/c electric field was registered. As a result, Alfvén waves, carrying the field-aligned currents, propagate along the magnetic field lines. If the current density is rather high, the field-aligned electric fields can appear, and electrons would be accelerated along the magnetic field lines. Electron fluxes with energy from several eV to 2 keV were revealed in the both experiments. During NORTH STAR experiment electron fluxes caused by auroral precipitation were also registered

  18. Results from the CDX-U Lithium Wall and NSTX Lithium Pallet Injection and Evaporation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Majeski, R; Kugel, H; Bell, M; Bell, R; Beiersdorfer, P; Bush, C; Doerner, R; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaita, R; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, R; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Sabbagh, S; Souskhanovskii, V; Spaleta, J; Stevenson, T; Timberlake, J; Zakharov, L

    2006-10-05

    CDX-U has been operated with the vacuum vessel wall and limiter surfaces nearly completely coated with lithium, producing dramatic improvements to plasma performance. Discharges achieved global energy confinement times up to 6 ms, exceeding previous CDX-U results by a factor of 5, and ITER98P(y,1) scaling by 2-3. Lithium wall coatings up to 1000 {angstrom} thick were applied between discharges by electron-beam-induced evaporation of a lithium-filled limiter and vapor deposition from a resistively heated oven. The e-beam power was modest (1.6 kW) but it produced up to 60 MW/m2 power density in a 0.3 cm{sup 2} spot; the duration was up to 300 s. Convective transport of heat away from the beam spot was so effective that the entire lithium inventory (140 g) was heated to evaporation (400-500 C) and there was no observable hot spot on the lithium surface within the beam footprint. These results are promising for use of lithium plasma-facing components in reactor scale devices. Lithium coating has also been applied to NSTX carbon plasma-facing surfaces, to control the density rise during long-duration H-modes for non-inductive current sustainment. First, lithium pellets were injected into sequences of Ohmically heated helium plasmas in both center stack limiter (CSL) and lower single-null divertor (LSND) configurations to deposit a total of 25-30 mg of lithium on the respective plasma contact areas. In both cases, the first subsequent L mode, deuterium discharge with NBI showed a reduction in the volume-average density by a factor {approx}3 compared to similar discharges before the lithium coating. Recently, a lithium evaporator was installed aimed toward the graphite tiles of the lower center stack and divertor. Twelve depositions, ranging from about 10 mg to 5 g of lithium, were performed. The effects on LSND L-mode, double-null divertor (DND) H-mode, and DND reversed-shear plasmas were variable but, immediately after coating, there were decreases in the density and

  19. Microorganisms as tracers in groundwater injection and recovery experiments: A review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Modern day injection and recovery techniques designed to examine the transport behavior of microorganisms in groundwater have evolved from experiments conducted in the late 1800s, in which bacteria that form red or yellow pigments were used to trace flow paths through karst and fractured- rock aquifers. A number of subsequent groundwater hydrology studies employed bacteriophage that can be injected into aquifers at very high concentrations (e g., 1013 phage ml-1) and monitored through many log units of dilution to follow groundwater flow paths for great distances, particularly in karst terrain. Starting in the 1930s, microbial indicators of fecal contamination (particularly coliform bacteria and their coliphages) were employed as tracers to determine potential migration of pathogens in groundwater. Several injection and recovery experiments performed in the 1990s employed indigenous groundwater microorganisms (both cultured and uncultured) that are better able to survive under in situ conditions. Better methods for labeling native bacteria (e.g by stable isotope labeling or inserting genetic markers; such as the ability to cause ice nucleation) are being developed that will not compromise the organisms' viability during the experimental time course.

  20. Microorganisms as tracers in groundwater injection and recovery experiments: a review.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R W

    1997-07-01

    Modern day injection and recovery techniques designed to examine the transport behavior of microorganisms in groundwater have evolved from experiments conducted in the late 1800s, in which bacteria that form red or yellow pigments were used to trace flow paths through karst and fractured-rock aquifers. A number of subsequent groundwater hydrology studies employed bacteriophage that can be injected into aquifers at very high concentrations (e.g., 10(13) phage ml-1) and monitored through many log units of dilution to follow groundwater flow paths for great distances, particularly in karst terrain. Starting in the 1930s, microbial indicators of fecal contamination (particularly coliform bacteria and their coliphages) were employed as tracers to determine potential migration of pathogens in groundwater. Several injection and recovery experiments performed in the 1990s employed indigenous groundwater microorganisms (both cultured and uncultured) that are better able to survive under in situ conditions. Better methods for labeling native bacteria (e.g. by stable isotope labeling or inserting genetic markers, such as the ability to cause ice nucleation) are being developed that will not compromise the organisms' viability during the experimental time course.

  1. North America's wood pellet sector

    Treesearch

    Henry Spelter; Daniel Toth

    2009-01-01

    The North American wood pellet sector is profiled in this paper. A small pellet industry has existed since the 1930s, but its main growth occurred in the wake of the energy crisis in the 1970s. Its current spurt is even greater, growing from is set to reach 6.2 million in 2009. Most plants are small, relying on sawmill residues for fiber and thus are limited to 100,000...

  2. Quantitative effects of pelleting on performance, gastrointestinal tract and behaviour of meat-type chickens.

    PubMed

    Nir, I; Twina, Y; Grossman, E; Nitsan, Z

    1994-09-01

    1. In an attempt to quantify the effects of "degree" of pelleting, two experiments were conducted. Diets were prepared by mixing together a mash composed mainly of maize (experiment 1) or sorghum (experiment 2) with soft pellets, or soft pellets mixed with hard pellets. 2. The pelleting degrees (PDs) were as follows: 0 mash; 0.5 mixture of soft pellets and mash 1 to 1; 1 soft pellets pelleted once; 1.5 mixture of soft and hard pellets 1 to 1; 2 hard pellets pelleted twice. 3. In experiment 2, the weight and length of the digestive organs were determined as well as digestive enzyme activities. In both experiments, the behaviour recorded was eating, standing, sitting and drinking. 4. Food intake and body weight gain were related to the degree of pelleting in a curvilinear manner. PD had a positive effect up to a peak (1 to 1.5 PD), after which its effect decreased. Food efficiency was not related to PD. In experiment 1, food efficiency of PDs 1 to 2 were superior to PDs 0 to 0.5 and in experiment 2, PDs 1.5 to 2 were superior to PD 0. 5. The relative weight of the gizzard was reduced by pelleting, whereas pelleting increased the relative weight of abdominal fat. The content of the crop was not affected by PD, whereas that of the proventriculus was lowest in the PD 2 group. Gizzard content was inversely related to PD. Pelleting reduced the length of the jejunum and ileum: which were shortened by about 15% with PDs 1 to 2, as compared to PD 0. The weight/length ratio of the jejunum and ileum tended to increase with increasing PD to a peak at PD 1.5, and to decrease thereafter. 6. Trypsin activity in the pancreas and amylase activity in the intestinal content were reduced by pelleting. 7. Chicks fed pelleted diets were less active: they 'sat' more and spent less time eating than their mash-fed counterparts.

  3. Numerical analysis of experiments with gas injection into liquid metal coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, E. V.; Lobanov, P. D.; Pribaturin, N. A.; Mosunova, N. A.; Chuhno, V. I.; Kutlimetov, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    Presented paper contains results of a numerical analysis of experiments with gas injection in water and liquid metal which have been performed at the Institute of Thermophysics Russian Academy of Science (IT RAS). Obtained experimental data are very important to predict processes that take place in the BREST-type reactor during the hypothetical accident with damage of the steam generator tubes, and may be used as a benchmark to validate thermo-hydraulic codes. Detailed description of models to simulate transport of gas phase in a vertical liquid column is presented in a current paper. Two-fluid model with closing relation for wall friction and interface friction coefficients was used to simulate processes which take place in a liquid during injection of gaseous phase. It has being shown that proposed models allow obtaining a good agreement between experimental data and calculation results.

  4. H.F. emission related to the Li+ ion beam injected into ionosphere - ``PLAZMA'' rocket experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klos, Z.; Zbyszynski, Z.; Agafonov, U. F.; Managadze, G. G.; Mayorov, A. D.

    1993-10-01

    The H.F. emission generated by artificial ion beam injected into ionosphere was observed either with a wave detector and ion gun attached to the rocket through out the flight, or when the gun was deployed on subpayload. Generally the observations show unstructured shape of the H.F. spectrum. In the PLAZMA active rocket experiment - when ionospheric plasma was perturbed by the operation of impulse ion gun, which injected 300 A, 8.3 eV Li+ions - the waves in the 0.1 - 10 MHz frequency range were observed. The results have shown, that when the wave detector and the ion gun are attached to the rocket the emission enhances in the lower as well as in the upper parts of the spectrum. On the other hand only the lower increase is maintained when ion gun is removing away on the subpayload. The observed sequence of H.F. spectra is presented.

  5. Prompt Loss of Energetic Ions during Early Neutral Beam Injection in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. Medley; D.S. Darrow; D. Liu; A.L. Roquemore

    2005-03-25

    Early neutral-beam injection is used in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to heat the electrons and slow current penetration which keeps q(0) elevated to avoid deleterious MHD activity and at the same time reduces Ohmic flux consumption, all of which aids long-pulse operation. However, the low plasma current (I{sub p} {approx} 0.5 MA) and electron density (n{sub e} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) attending early injection lead to elevated orbit and shine through losses. The inherent orbit losses are aggravated by large excursions in the outer gap width during current ramp-up. An investigation of this behavior using various energetic particle diagnostics on NSTX and TRANSP code analysis is presented.

  6. Single-Well Injection-Withdrawal Experiments for Ground Flow Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbecher, E.; Maier, F.

    2012-04-01

    We present a closer look on the Single-Well Injection-Withdrawal Experiment (SWIW) also known as Push-Pull Experiments and its ability to determine the groundwater velocity, as one of the major parameters concerning reservoir management. SWIW are tripartite. One starts with the tracer injection, followed by a quiescence period, where the tracer transport is dominated by the ambient flow field in the reservoir. The last phase is the withdrawal where the tracer break trough curve (BTC) is recorded. From the shape of the BTC, we are able to determine the groundwater velocity. The problem is numerically modeled using COMSOL Multiphysics. We compare with an advanced inversion scheme, based on analytical solutions and implemented in MATLAB. The results show that the BTC of a SWIW experiment is highly dependent on interaction between the parameters for groundwater velocity, pumping rates and the duration of the quiescence phase as well as the reservoir geometry. For the specific tracer applied in the model a minor influence is given by diffusion, dispersion and sorption processes. In dependence of the quiescence time and the groundwater velocity one can distinguish between three characteristic BTC types for the single tracer SWIW. These are given for tracers around the well, tracer between well and stagnation point and tracer beyond the stagnation point. The transition between these different cases is also discussed. The COMSOL Multiphysics model is used to investigate observations from a SWIW experiment performed recently in Japan. The latter is performed in cooperation with Technical University Berlin. Acknowledgements: Gebo, Logro

  7. A Cross-Hole, Multi-Year Tracer Injection Experiment in the Volcanic Ocean Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. T.; Neira, N. M.; Wheat, C. G.; Clark, J. F.; Becker, K.; Hsieh, C. C.; Rappe, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    We present preliminary results from the first cross-hole tracer injection experiment in the volcanic ocean crust. The test site is on 3.5 to 3.6 M.y. old seafloor on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Six borehole subseafloor observatories (CORKs) were installed during three scientific ocean drilling expeditions, five arrayed along a 1 km profile aligned with the strike of underlying abyssal hills (Holes 1026B, 1301A/B, and 1362A/B), and one offset 2.4 km to the east (1027C). Before installing the sixth CORK in Hole 1362B, in 2010, we injected a mixture of tracers (dissolved gas, metal salts, particles) during 24 hours into the upper ocean crust. Seafloor samplers connected CORKs, sampling from different locations in the crust, were recovered during servicing expeditions in 2011 and 2013; downhole samplers that contain records from the full four years following tracer injection will be recovered in Summer 2014. Analyses of dissolved gas tracers collected with wellhead samplers through 2013 suggest that the dominant flow direction in upper basement is south to north, as inferred from regional thermal data and the chemistry of geochemical (pore fluid and borehole) samples. The apparent tracer flow rate in upper basement is on the order of meters/day, but calculations are complicated by an incomplete CORK seal in Hole 1301A, which resulted in discharge from this system that also "pulled" water and tracer to the south. Samples were collected from the tracer injection borehole, Hole 1362B, and a sampling site 200 m to the north, Hole 1362A, beginning one year after tracer injection, after opening a large-diameter ball valve on the wellhead of Hole 1362B to initiate a long-term free flow experiment. Analyses of these samples suggest that much of the tracer injected in 2010 remained close to Hole 1362B rather than being advected and dispersed into the formation. It also appears that much of the tracer transport to Hole 1362A occurred within one or more

  8. Development Of A Methodology For The Application Of Synthetic DNA In Stream Tracer Injection Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foppen, J.; Bogaard, T.

    2013-12-01

    Stream tracer injection experiments are useful for characterizing hydrological and biogeochemical processes in streams. We used non-conservative synthetic DNA and conservative NaCl in six instantaneous tracer injection experiments in streams in the Benelux. The main aim was to compare the performance of injected synthetic DNA tracer 'T23' with NaCl. In all experiments, the shapes of the T23 and NaCl breakthrough curves (BTCs) were similar. Recovered T23 mass ranged from 2.9-52.6%, while recovered NaCl tracer mass ranged from 66.7% to complete mass recovery. In batch experiments, T23 decay was not detected. However, in those batches, we observed an unexplained initial T23 mass loss of 40-97%. In batches with sediment, T23 attachment rate coefficients ranged from close to zero to 0.2 hr-1. Advective and dispersive transport parameters of both NaCl and T23 fitted with STAMMT-L were similar. However, compared to T23, fitted storage zone areas of NaCl were 2-5 times larger, while storage zone exchange coefficients were two times larger. Fitted mass dilution factors of T23 ranged from 1.6-34.8. Together, these results pointed towards the disappearance of a part of the T23 mass due to both initial losses and attachment or sorption of T23 mass in those storage zone(s), while decay was not important. Our research demonstrated that artificial DNA can be a valuable tool to determine advective and dispersive transport in brooks, but not to assess solute mass exchange processes related to surface transient storage or hyporheic exchange.

  9. Incarceration experiences among a community-recruited sample of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kanna; Milloy, M-J; Fairbairn, Nadia; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Lai, Calvin; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2009-12-30

    Since 2003 Thailand has waged an aggressive "war on drugs" campaign focused on arresting and incarcerating suspected drug users and dealers. However, little is known about incarceration experiences among IDU in the wake of the recent war on drugs. Therefore, we sought to examine incarceration experiences among IDU in Bangkok, Thailand. We examined the prevalence of incarceration among community-recruited IDU participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with a self-reported history of incarceration. We also examined the prevalence of injection drug use and syringe sharing within prisons. 252 IDU were recruited in August 2008; 66 (26.2%) were female and the median age was 36.5 years. In total, 197 (78.2%) participants reported a history of incarceration. In multivariate analyses, reporting a history of incarceration was associated with a history of compulsory drug treatment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.93; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.95 - 12.48), non-fatal overdose (AOR = 3.69; 95%CI: 1.45 - 9.39), syringe sharing (AOR = 2.20; 95%CI: 1.12 - 4.32), and female gender (AOR = 0.41; 95%CI: 0.20 - 0.82). Among those who reported a history of incarceration, 59 (29.9%) reported injection drug use in prison, and 48 (81.4%) of these individuals reported sharing syringes in prison. Incarceration was not associated with the number of injections performed in the previous week (p = 0.202). Over three-quarters of the IDU participating in this study reported a history of incarceration, and 30% of these individuals reported injection drug use within prison. Further, an alarmingly high level of syringe sharing within prison was reported, and incarceration was not associated with reductions in drug use. These findings provide further evidence of the need for community diversion strategies, as well as harm reduction programs, in Thai prisons.

  10. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  11. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  12. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  13. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  14. 46 CFR 148.04-21 - Coconut meal pellets (also known as copra pellets).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coconut meal pellets (also known as copra pellets). 148.04-21 Section 148.04-21 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS... § 148.04-21 Coconut meal pellets (also known as copra pellets). (a) Coconut meal pellets; (1) Must...

  15. Injection Moulding of Wood Powder with Low Binder Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Tsunehisa; Takakura, Norio; Iizuka, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko; Imanishi, Hiroshi; Kanayama, Kouzou

    This study is aimed at exploring possibilities to improve the injectability of wood powder and the mechanical properties of the injected product while keeping the amount of binder to its minimum. In the preliminary experiment, injection moulding of Japanese cedar wood powder was conducted. The effects of binder content (PE; pellet-size) and nozzle temperature on the tensile strength and strain at break of the product were investigated. Results showed that under such conditions, injection moulding of wood powder only was not possible due to insufficient fluidity. Increasing the binder content and the nozzle temperature resulted to a decrease in the maximum injection pressure and improvement in the fluidity of the powder. Using the same PE content, increasing the temperature resulted to an increase in tensile strength of the injected product. However, the strain at break was decreased. Moreover, at PE content below 50%, the strength and strain decreased considerably.

  16. A self-injection acceleration test experiment for the FLAME laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labate, L.; Anelli, F.; Bacci, A.; Batani, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Benedetti, C.; Benocci, R.; Cacciotti, L.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Ciricosta, O.; Clozza, A.; Cultrera, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Drenska, N.; Faccini, R.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Gallo, S.; Fioravanti, S.; Gamucci, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Giulietti, A.; Giulietti, D.; Köster, P.; Levato, T.; Lollo, V.; Pace, E.; Pathak, N.; Rossi, A.; Serafini, L.; Turchetti, G.; Vaccarezza, C.; Valente, P.; Vicario, C.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2010-10-01

    A 250-TW laser system (FLAME - Frascati laser for acceleration and multidisciplinary experiments) is now in its commissioning phase in a new laboratory at LNF-INFN in the framework of the PLASMONX (Plasma acceleration and monochromatic X-ray generation) project. The laser will deliver<25 fs duration pulses with an energy up to 6 J, at a 10 Hz repetition rate. An ad hoc target area has also been designed and is currently being set up, allowing the first test experiments of electron laser wakefield acceleration to be carried out over the next few months in a safe, radiation-protected environment. An overview of the main features of the laser system and target area is given, along with a survey of the design and set-up of the self-injection test experiment, which is expected to reach the production of sub-GeV electron bunches.

  17. SPINS-IND: Pellet injector for fuelling of magnetically confined fusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangradey, R.; Mishra, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Panchal, P.; Nayak, P.; Agarwal, J.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2017-06-01

    Using a Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocooler based refrigeration system, a single barrel hydrogen pellet injection (SPINS-IND) system is indigenously developed at Institute for Plasma Research, India. The injector is based on a pipe gun concept, where a pellet formed in situ in the gun barrel is accelerated to high speed using high pressure light propellant gas. The pellet size is decided by considering the Greenwald density limit and its speed is decided by considering a neutral gas shielding model based scaling law. The pellet shape is cylindrical of dimension (1.6 mm ℓ × 1.8 mm φ). For pellet ejection and acceleration, a fast opening valve of short opening duration is installed at the breech of the barrel. A three-stage differential pumping system is used to restrict the flow of the propellant gas into the plasma vacuum vessel. Diagnostic systems such as light gate and fast imaging camera (240 000 frames/s) are employed to measure the pellet speed and size, respectively. A trigger circuit and a programmable logic controller based integrated control system developed on LabVIEW enables to control the pellet injector remotely. Using helium as a propellant gas, the pellet speed is varied in the range 650 m/s-800 m/s. The reliability of pellet formation and ejection is found to be more than 95%. This paper describes the details of SPINS-IND and its test results.

  18. Gyrokinetic simulations of particle transport in pellet fuelled JET discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegnered, D.; Oberparleiter, M.; Nordman, H.; Strand, P.; Garzotti, L.; Lupelli, I.; Roach, C. M.; Romanelli, M.; Valovič, M.; Contributors, JET

    2017-10-01

    Pellet injection is a likely fuelling method of reactor grade plasmas. When the pellet ablates, it will transiently perturb the density and temperature profiles of the plasma. This will in turn change dimensionless parameters such as a/{L}n,a/{L}T and plasma β. The microstability properties of the plasma then changes which influences the transport of heat and particles. In this paper, gyrokinetic simulations of a JET L-mode pellet fuelled discharge are performed. The ion temperature gradient/trapped electron mode turbulence is compared at the time point when the effect from the pellet is the most pronounced with a hollow density profile and when the profiles have relaxed again. Linear and nonlinear simulations are performed using the gyrokinetic code GENE including electromagnetic effects and collisions in a realistic geometry in local mode. Furthermore, global nonlinear simulations are performed in order to assess any nonlocal effects. It is found that the positive density gradient has a stabilizing effect that is partly counteracted by the increased temperature gradient in the this region. The effective diffusion coefficients are reduced in the positive density region region compared to the intra pellet time point. No major effect on the turbulent transport due to nonlocal effects are observed.

  19. Charge-carrier relaxation in disordered organic semiconductors studied by dark injection: Experiment and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesta, M.; Schaefer, C.; de Groot, J.; Cottaar, J.; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P. A.

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of stationary charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors has matured during recent years. However, charge-carrier relaxation in nonstationary situations is still poorly understood. Such relaxation can be studied in dark injection experiments, in which the bias applied over an unilluminated organic semiconductor device is abruptly increased. The resulting transient current reveals both charge-carrier transport and relaxation characteristics. We performed such experiments on hole-only devices of a polyfluorene-based organic semiconductor. Modeling the dark injection by solving a one-dimensional master equation using the equilibrium carrier mobility leads to a too-slow current transient, since this approach does not account for carrier relaxation. Modeling by solving a three-dimensional time-dependent master equation does take into account all carrier transport and relaxation effects. With this modeling, the time scale of the current transient is found to be in agreement with experiment. With a disorder strength somewhat smaller than extracted from the temperature-dependent stationary current-voltage characteristics, also the shape of the experimental transients is well described.

  20. The potential of active, in-situ, relativistic electron injection experiments for geospace research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolls, M. J.; Marshall, R. A.; Sanchez, E. R.

    2012-12-01

    Active, space-based particle injection experiments have enabled scientific investigations of space plasmas since at least the 1950s. However, these controlled experiments were mainly based on comparatively low energy electron beams (<40 keV) and higher energy experiments have not been undertaken, presumably due in major part to technological unfeasibility. It is now possible to generate relativistic electron beams (500 keV to ~10 MeV) with compact linear accelerators efficiently (~20% wall to beam efficiency is achievable) and with small devices (significant advances in high gradient acceleration have been achieved). We outline the scientific need and technological feasibility of controlled, relativistic, space-based electron beams. Potential scientific investigations include: (a) Atmospheric interactions, involving investigations of ionization and recombination processes, optical and x-ray emissions, modification of the atmosphere potential structure, and discharges; (b) Beam-plasma interactions, which include the interaction of injected relativistic electron beams with whistler waves and the potential generation of VLF signatures via cyclotron and Landau resonances; and (c) Magnetic mapping, including using electron beams as tracers of magnetic field geometry during variable geomagnetic conditions and the wave-particle interactions triggered by the propagation of relativistic electron beams along magnetic field lines.

  1. Effects of Water Injection into Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs: A Summary of Experience Worldwide

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, Roland N.

    1982-06-01

    Reinjection of water into fractured geothermal reservoirs holds potential both for improvement and degradation of total energy recovery. The replacement of reservoir fluid can mean support of placement of reservoir pressures and also more efficient thermal energy recovery, but at the same time the premature invasion of reinjected water back into production wells through high permeability fractures can reduce discharge enthalpy and hence deliverability and useful energy output. Increases in reservoir pressure and maintenance of field output have been observed in operating fields, but unfortunately so too have premature thermal breakthroughs. The design of reinjection schemes, therefore, requires careful investigation into the likely effects, using field experimentation. This paper summarizes field experience with reinjection around the world, with the intention of elucidating characteristics of possible problems. The results summarized in this paper fall into three categories of interest: permeability changes dye to injection (both increases and decreases); the path followed by injected water (as indicated by tracer tests); and the thermal and hydraulic influences of injection on the reinjection well itself and on surrounding producers. [DJE-2005

  2. I am just a 'maae' (mother): experiences of mothers injecting drugs in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Haritavorn, Niphattra

    2016-09-01

    Mothers who use drugs face much discriminatory action as society in general finds female drug users' modes of caring for their children unacceptable. In this article, I explore the ways in which Thai women's injecting practices revolve around the role of mother 'maae' and the ways they employ tactics to challenge the motherhood discourse. This article draws on in-depth interviews with 30 Thai mothers injecting drugs. Thai mothers injecting drugs struggled with stigma and self-blame. They internalise the values of the mother 'maae', that is, what the mother is supposed to be; attempting to combine their drug use with their parental responsibilities. Having a child is treated as a means for many women to manage the hostile social impacts of being an addict mother as well as anxieties about the future of their children. To maintain identity as a mother, as gender norms dictates, the mothers employ several tactics to defend that identity from the threats. In conclusion, the findings have implications for harm reduction and reproductive services for women using drugs in Thailand; health care providers need to appreciate the ramifications of the lived experiences of the women who take drugs. © 2016 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  3. Vas deferens occlusion by percutaneous injection of polyurethane elastomer plugs: clinical experience and reversibility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S C

    1990-05-01

    A non-incision method of vas occlusion based on the percutaneous injection of polyurethane elastomer solution to form plugs is described. The results are based on clinical experience in 12,000 men in which only 56 cases of minor complications were recorded. Follow-up of 500 men for up to 3 years demonstrated an azoospermia rate of 98%. Plugs have been removed from 86 men and, to date, 51 have made their wives pregnant. In those from which the plugs have been removed for more than 1 year (n = 31), the pregnancy rate is 100%.

  4. Complementary effects of torrefaction and co-pelletization: Energy consumption and characteristics of pellets.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liang; Yuan, Xingzhong; Li, Hui; Li, Changzhu; Xiao, Zhihua; Jiang, Longbo; Huang, Binbin; Xiao, Zhihong; Chen, Xiaohong; Wang, Hou; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-06-01

    In this study, complementary of torrefaction and co-pelletization for biomass pellets production was investigated. Two kinds of biomass materials were torrefied and mixed with oil cake for co-pelletization. The energy consumption during pelletization and pellet characteristics including moisture absorption, pellet density, pellet strength and combustion characteristic, were evaluated. It was shown that torrefaction improved the characteristics of pellets with high heating values, low moisture absorption and well combustion characteristic. Furthermore, co-pelletization between torrefied biomass and cater bean cake can reduce several negative effects of torrefaction such as high energy consumption, low pellet density and strength. The optimal conditions for energy consumption and pellet strength were torrefied at 270°C and a blending with 15% castor bean cake for both biomass materials. The present study indicated that compelmentary performances of the torrefaction and co-pelletization with castor bean cake provide a promising alternative for fuel production from biomass and oil cake.

  5. High pressure jet injection of viscous solutions for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD): first clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Pioche, Mathieu; Lépilliez, Vincent; Déprez, Pierre; Giovannini, Marc; Caillol, Fabrice; Piessevaux, Hubert; Rivory, Jérôme; Guillaud, Olivier; Ciocîrlan, Mihai; Salmon, Damien; Lienhart, Isabelle; Lafon, Cyril; Saurin, Jean-Christophe; Ponchon, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long lasting elevation is a key factor during endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and can be obtained by water jet injection of saline solution or by viscous macromolecular solutions. In a previous animal study, we assessed the Nestis Enki II system to combine jet injection and viscous solutions. In the present work, we used this combination in humans in different sites of the digestive tract. Methods: We retrospectively report all of the consecutive ESD procedures performed with jet injection of viscous solutions in four centers. Information was collected about the lesion, the procedure, the histological result, and the outcomes for the patient. Results: In total, 45 resections were completed by six operators: five experts and one beginner with only one previous experience in human ESD. Lesions were located in the esophagus (10), the stomach (11), the duodenum (1), the colon (1) and the rectum (22). Average maximal lesion diameter was 4.8 cm (SD 2.4, range 2 – 11 cm), average lesion surface area was 19.8 cm2 (SD 17.7, range 2.2 – 72 cm2), and average duration of procedure was 79.9 min (SD 50.3 min, range 19 – 225 min). ESD could be conducted while the endoscope was retroflexed at its maximum in 26 cases. Four adverse events were observed: two diminutive perforations and two delayed bleeding occurrences treated conservatively. The R0 resection rate was 91.1 %. The catheter was obstructed in six occurrences of bleeding. Conclusion: Endoscopic submucosal dissection using high pressure injection of viscous macromolecular solutions is safe and effective in different parts of the digestive tract. It does not impede working with the endoscope in the maximal retroflexed position. PMID:26356488

  6. Transient Changes in Shallow Groundwater Chemistry During the MSU-ZERT CO2 Injection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Apps, J. A.; Spycher, N.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Thordsen, J. J.; Kakouros, E.; Trautz, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    The Montana State University Zero Emission Research and Technology (MSU-ZERT) field experiment at Bozeman, Montana, is designed to evaluate atmospheric and near-surface monitoring and detection techniques applicable to the potential leakage of CO2 from deep storage reservoirs. However, the experiment also affords an excellent opportunity to investigate the transient changes in groundwater chemical composition in response to increasing CO2 partial pressures. Between July 9 and August 7, 2008, 300 kg/day of food-grade CO2 was injected into shallow groundwater through a horizontal perforated pipe about 2-2.3 m below the ground surface. Changes in groundwater quality were investigated through comprehensive chemical analyses of 80 water samples taken before, during and following CO2 injection from 10 shallow observation wells located 1-6 m from the injection pipe, and from two distant monitoring wells. Field and laboratory analyses suggest rapid and systematic changes in pH, alkalinity, and conductance, as well as increases in the aqueous concentrations of both major and trace element species. A principal component analysis and independent thermodynamic interpretation of the water quality analyses were conducted. Results were interpreted in conjunction with a mineralogical characterization of the shallow sediments and a review of historical records of the chemical composition of rainfall at neighboring monitoring sites. The interpretation permitted tentative identification of a complex array of adsorption/desorption, ion exchange, precipitation/dissolution, oxidation/reduction and infiltration processes that were operative during the test. Geochemical modeling was conducted using TOUGHREACT to test whether the observed water quality changes were consistent with the hypothesized processes, and very good agreement was obtained with respect to the behavior of both major and trace elements.

  7. Local mechanical properties of LFT injection molded parts: Numerical simulations versus experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desplentere, F.; Soete, K.; Bonte, H.; Debrabandere, E.

    2014-05-01

    In predictive engineering for polymer processes, the proper prediction of material microstructure from known processing conditions and constituent material properties is a critical step forward properly predicting bulk properties in the finished composite. Operating within the context of long-fiber thermoplastics (LFT, length < 15mm) this investigation concentrates on the prediction of the local mechanical properties of an injection molded part. To realize this, the Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight 2014 software has been used. In this software, a fiber breakage algorithm for the polymer flow inside the mold is available. Using well known micro mechanic formulas allow to combine the local fiber length with the local orientation into local mechanical properties. Different experiments were performed using a commercially available glass fiber filled compound to compare the measured data with the numerical simulation results. In this investigation, tensile tests and 3 point bending tests are considered. To characterize the fiber length distribution of the polymer melt entering the mold (necessary for the numerical simulations), air shots were performed. For those air shots, similar homogenization conditions were used as during the injection molding tests. The fiber length distribution is characterized using automated optical method on samples for which the matrix material is burned away. Using the appropriate settings for the different experiments, good predictions of the local mechanical properties are obtained.

  8. The electric field structure of auroral arcs as determined from barium plasma injection experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Barium plasma injection experiments have revealed a number of features of electric fields in and near auroral forms extending from a few hundred to many thousands of km in altitude. There is evidence for V-type potential structures over some auroras, but not in others. For some auroral arcs, large E fields are found at ionospheric altitudes outside the arc but the E field inside the arc is near zero. In a few other auroras, most recently one investigated in an experiment conducted from Poker Flat on March 22, 1980, large, rapidly fluctuating E fields were detected by barium plasma near 600 km altitude. These E fields suggest that the motion of auroral rays can be an effect of low-altitude electric fields, or that V-type potential structures may be found at low altitudes.

  9. Determination of physical properties in injection molded composites using the design of experiments method

    SciTech Connect

    Hawks, V.; Saunders, D.; Strong, A.B.; Cole, D. )

    1992-07-01

    The benefits of using Design of Experiments (DOE) for determining effects of critical factors are significantly greater than using one-at-a-time experimental techniques. The volume and validity of the information gained from DOE, especially for manufacturing processes, is very high due to the strong statistical basis of the method and highly organized nature of the results. The use of DOE is described in the case of injection molding of composites to improve and better understand the effects of critical factors on the physical properties of the finished parts. The factors, fiber length, fiber concentration, part temperature, and mold thickness, were tested using a full factorial experiment. The results demonstrated the significance of the factors and their interactions on tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and elongation.

  10. Can adult and juvenile European rabbits be differentiated by their pellet sizes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delibes-Mateos, Miguel; Rouco, Carlos; Villafuerte, Rafael

    2009-03-01

    Recently, a new method for differentiating juvenile and adult rabbits based on faecal pellet size was published. According to this method, pellets >6 mm diameter are inferred to be deposited by adults, while those <6 mm are inferred to be from juveniles or kittens. In this study, we designed a simple experiment to test the accuracy of this methodology. Twelve adult rabbits were housed in individual outdoor cages and their pellets were removed every day for 10 consecutive days. Pellets were separated using a sieve according to their size and counted. Results showed that adult rabbits produce pellets >6 mm diameter in the same proportion as those <6 mm. We also observed a strong influence of the individual rabbit on pellet size; some rabbits produce a high proportion of pellets >6 mm, whereas others deposit mostly pellets <6 mm in size. Our findings demonstrate that pellet size is unsuitable for aging wild rabbits. Field biologists should therefore be cautious when employing the pellet size method of age determination in other wild animals in the absence of validating studies.

  11. A mathematical model to predict the size of the pellets formed in freeze pelletization techniques: parameters affecting pellet size.

    PubMed

    Cheboyina, Sreekhar; O'Haver, John; Wyandt, Christy M

    2006-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed based on the theory of drop formation to predict the size of the pellets formed in the freeze pelletization process. Further the model was validated by studying the effect of various parameters on the pellet size such as viscosity of the pellet forming and column liquids, surface/interfacial tension, density difference between pellet forming and column liquids; size, shape, and material of construction of the needle tips and temperatures maintained in the columns. In this study, pellets were prepared from different matrices including polyethylene glycols and waxes. The column liquids studied were silicone oils and aqueous glycerol solutions. The surface/interfacial tension, density difference between pellet forming and column liquids and needle tip size were found to be the most important factors affecting pellet size. The viscosity of the column liquid was not found to significantly affect the size of the pellets. The size of the pellets was also not affected by the pellet forming liquids of low viscosities. An increase in the initial column temperature slightly decreased the pellet size. The mathematical model developed was found to successfully predict the size of the pellets with an average error of 3.32% for different matrices that were studied.

  12. Incarceration experiences among a community-recruited sample of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Since 2003 Thailand has waged an aggressive "war on drugs" campaign focused on arresting and incarcerating suspected drug users and dealers. However, little is known about incarceration experiences among IDU in the wake of the recent war on drugs. Therefore, we sought to examine incarceration experiences among IDU in Bangkok, Thailand. Methods We examined the prevalence of incarceration among community-recruited IDU participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with a self-reported history of incarceration. We also examined the prevalence of injection drug use and syringe sharing within prisons. Results 252 IDU were recruited in August 2008; 66 (26.2%) were female and the median age was 36.5 years. In total, 197 (78.2%) participants reported a history of incarceration. In multivariate analyses, reporting a history of incarceration was associated with a history of compulsory drug treatment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.93; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.95 - 12.48), non-fatal overdose (AOR = 3.69; 95%CI: 1.45 - 9.39), syringe sharing (AOR = 2.20; 95%CI: 1.12 - 4.32), and female gender (AOR = 0.41; 95%CI: 0.20 - 0.82). Among those who reported a history of incarceration, 59 (29.9%) reported injection drug use in prison, and 48 (81.4%) of these individuals reported sharing syringes in prison. Incarceration was not associated with the number of injections performed in the previous week (p = 0.202). Conclusion Over three-quarters of the IDU participating in this study reported a history of incarceration, and 30% of these individuals reported injection drug use within prison. Further, an alarmingly high level of syringe sharing within prison was reported, and incarceration was not associated with reductions in drug use. These findings provide further evidence of the need for community diversion strategies, as well as harm reduction programs, in Thai prisons. PMID:20042105

  13. Investigation of oil injection into brine for the strategic petroleum reserve : hydrodynamics experiments with simulant liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Shollenberger, Kim Ann; Torczynski, John Robert; Cote, Raymond O.; Barney, Jeremy; O'Hern, Timothy John

    2003-10-01

    An experimental program is being conducted to study a proposed approach for oil reintroduction in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The goal is to assess whether useful oil is rendered unusable through formation of a stable oil-brine emulsion during reintroduction of degassed oil into the brine layer in storage caverns. This report documents the first stage of the program, in which simulant liquids are used to characterize the buoyant plume that is produced when a jet of crude oil is injected downward from a tube into brine. The experiment consists of a large transparent vessel that is a scale model of the proposed oil injection process at the SPR. An oil layer is floated on top of a brine layer. Silicon oil (Dow Corning 200{reg_sign} Fluid, 5 cSt) is used as the simulant for crude oil to allow visualization of the flow and to avoid flammability and related concerns. Sodium nitrate solution is used as the simulant for brine because it is not corrosive and it can match the density ratio between brine and crude oil. The oil is injected downward through a tube into the brine at a prescribed depth below the oil-brine interface. Flow rates are determined by scaling to match the ratio of buoyancy to momentum between the experiment and the SPR. Initially, the momentum of the flow produces a downward jet of oil below the tube end. Subsequently, the oil breaks up into droplets due to shear forces, buoyancy dominates the flow, and a plume of oil droplets rises to the interface. The interface is deflected upward by the impinging oil-brine plume. Two different diameter injection tubes were used (1/2-inch and 1-inch OD) to vary the scaling. Use of the 1-inch injection tube also assured that turbulent pipe flow was achieved, which was questionable for lower flow rates in the 1/2-inch tube. In addition, a 1/2-inch J-tube was used to direct the buoyant jet upwards rather than downwards to determine whether flow redirection could substantially reduce the oil-plume size and the

  14. Researcher Examines Pellets for Micrometeorite Impact Studies

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-11-21

    A researcher at the NASA Lewis Research Center manipulates cartridge pellets and a strain gauge target as part of a study on the impact of micrometeorites striking space vehicles. Early in the space program NASA researchers were concerned that small micrometeorites would penetrate spacecraft, injure engines, or damage solar arrays. In response, researchers worked to develop stronger materials to withstand meteorite strikes and screens to block the objects. NASA launched a series of experimental spacecraft into orbit with foil shields that were used to determine the number of meteorite strikes. By the early 1960s the experiments and computer modelling efforts revealed that the micrometeoroid threat was lower than previously anticipated.

  15. Transport and micro-instability analysis of JET H-mode plasma during pellet fueling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaywittaphat, P.; Onjun, T.

    2017-02-01

    Transport and micro-instability analysis in a JET H-mode plasma discharge 53212 during the pellet fueling operation is carried out using the BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code with a combination of the NCLASS neoclassical transport model and an anomalous core transport model (either Mixed B/gB or MMM95 model). In this work, the evolution of plasma current, plasma density and temperature profiles is carried out and, consequently, the plasma’s behaviors during the pellet operation can be observed. The NGS pellet model with the Grad-B drift effect included is used to describe pellet ablation and its behaviors when a pellet is launched into hot plasma. The simulation shows that after each pellet enters the plasma, there is a strong perturbation on the plasma causing a sudden change of both thermal and particle profiles, as well as the thermal and particle transports. For the simulation using MMM95 transport model, the change of both thermal and particle transports during pellet injection are found to be dominated by the transport due to the resistive ballooning modes due to the increase of collisionality and resistivity near the plasma edge. For the simulation based on mixed B/gB transport model, it is found that the change of transport during the pellet injection is dominated by the Bohm term. Micro-instability analysis of the plasma during the time of pellet operation is also carried out for the simulations based on MMM95 transport model. It is found that the ion temperature gradient mode is destabilized due to an increase of temperature gradient in the pellet effective region, while the trapped electron mode is stabilized due to an increase of collisionality in that region.

  16. Is peer injecting a form of intimate partner abuse? A qualitative study of the experiences of women drug users.

    PubMed

    Wright, Nat M J; Tompkins, Charlotte N E; Sheard, Laura

    2007-09-01

    Women are over-represented as the recipients of injections of illicit drugs and are often injected by their intimate partners. This study used qualitative research to explore women drug users' experiences of abuse from intimate partners when being injected with illicit drugs. In-depth interviews were conducted with 45 women drug users in the city of Leeds and the area of North Nottinghamshire, UK. The practice of peer injecting illicit drugs places women recipients at risk of physical, economic and emotional abuse from their male intimate partner injectors. However, this was not a universal feature. In trusting, supportive intimate partner relationships peer injecting took place through reciprocal arrangements. Moving away from peer injecting was technically and emotionally difficult for women and rarely straightforward. The implications of the work are discussed as clinicians and wider drug service staff should be aware of the possibility of abuse and enquire about peer injecting when consulting with women injecting drug users. However, clinicians should avoid working within a simplistic clinical framework that views all peer injecting as intrinsically abusive. More research is needed to provide evidence for best practice. Until then, generic principles of best practice management of intimate partner abuse could apply, including enhancing women's motivation to effect change in an abusive situation.

  17. The Psychosocial Consequences of BOTOX Injections for Spasmodic Dysphonia: A Qualitative Study of Patients’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, Carolyn R.; Yorkston, Kathryn M.; Eadie, Tanya L.; Maronian, Nicole C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Objectives/Hypothesis The purpose of this study is to examine the psychosocial consequences of BOTOX® (Allergan, Inc. Irvine, CA) treatment for spasmodic dysphonia (SD). This article also explores how patients judge the success of treatment and make decisions about future treatment based on psychosocial issues relevant to them. Study Design This study follows the phenomenological tradition of qualitative inquiry in which the objective is to explore the lived experiences of a group of persons who share a common phenomenon, in this case receiving BOTOX injections for SD. Methods Six adults with SD who had been receiving BOTOX injections on a long-term basis participated in face-to-face interviews. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed according to phenomenological guidelines to identify consistent themes as well as differences among participants’ experiences. Results The results are summarized in three primary themes that suggest (1) participants’ experiences vary over time based on changes in factors such as lifestyle and personal priorities; (2) BOTOX has multidimensional psychosocial implications in physical, personal, and social domains; and (3) participants individualize their treatment regimens, taking into consideration the burden of treatment, scheduling priorities, and other strategies to maximize the benefits of BOTOX. Conclusions Based on this study, suggestions are provided for future research into a psychosocial outcome measurement, including longitudinal evaluations that accommodate changing patient priorities over time; multidimensional evaluations that incorporate physical, personal, and social issues; evaluations that include a measure of the burden of treatment; and evaluations that support a shared decision-making model with the voice clinicians. PMID:16564675

  18. Comparison of Subjective Experiences and Effectiveness of First-Generation Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics and Risperidone Long-Acting Injectables in Patients With Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Yin; Lin, Shih-Ku

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to compare the subjective experiences and clinical effects of first-generation long-acting injectable (FGA-LAI) antipsychotics with those of risperidone long-acting injectables (RIS-LAIs) in 434 schizophrenia patients. Compared with the RIS-LAI group, the patients treated with FGA-LAIs had a significantly longer duration of illness and LAI treatment and were older. Our results suggest that patients treated with FGA-LAI have more satisfactory subjective experiences compared with patients treated with RIS-LAI and that both FGA-LAI and RIS-LAI treatments can prevent relapses and hospitalization. Additional longitudinal studies determining the long-term benefits of RIS-LAI are warranted.

  19. Mechanisms controlling theophylline release from ethanol-resistant coated pellets.

    PubMed

    Rosiaux, Y; Velghe, C; Muschert, S; Chokshi, R; Leclercq, B; Siepmann, F; Siepmann, J

    2014-03-01

    To elucidate the mass transport mechanisms controlling drug release from recently proposed, ethanol-resistant, polymeric film coatings. Theophylline matrix pellets were coated with ethylcellulose: guar gum blends. Drug release from single pellets and ensembles of pellets was measured in various release media. Changes in the systems' morphology, composition and mechanical properties were monitored using SEM, gravimetrical analysis and a texture analyzer. Based on the obtained experimental results a mechanistically realistic mathematical model was identified and used to quantitatively predict drug release from coated pellets in ethanol-free and ethanol-containing bulk fluids. Drug diffusion though the intact polymeric film coatings is likely to be the dominant mass transport mechanism in the investigated systems, irrespective of the ethanol content in the surrounding environment. An appropriate solution of Fick's law could be used to quantitatively predict theophylline release from pellets coated with different ethylcellulose:guar gum blends at different coating levels. Importantly, independent experiments confirmed the theoretical predictions. In silico simulations can help facilitating the optimization of the novel ethanol-resistant polymeric film coatings, avoiding time-consuming and cost-intensive series of trial-and-error experiments. The presence/absence of ethanol does not affect the underlying drug release mechanisms.

  20. High density operation in H mode discharges by inboard launch pellet refuelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, P. T.; Gafert, J.; Gruber, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Lorenz, A.; Maraschek, M.; Mertens, V.; Neuhauser, J.; Salzmann, H.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2000-02-01

    Operating a tokamak at plasma densities near the empirical Greenwald limit bar neGw in H mode could yield significant advantages for a fusion reactor. Trying to avoid the strong confinement degradation observed with gas puff refuelling, pellet injection from the magnetic high field side was applied. Sufficient pellet particle flux was supplied to achieve persistent density rampup and to enable density control in H mode at a level beyond bar neGw for the first time. The pellet induced density increase decays in a fast phase with τ = 10 ms until about half of the latest pellet inventory remains, and decays thereafter to the base density on the particle confinement timescale with τ = 120 ms. The fast decay is the result of strong ELM events following each injected pellet, accompanied by a loss of energy, causing a transient reduction of the plasma energy content by convective heat flux. Recovery of the plasma energy after the ELM sequence takes place with τ = 25 ms, enabling transient operation at appropriately high densities without significant confinement degradation. To reach this scenario, however, confinement degradation caused by other factors must be inhibited. Other factors causing confinement degradation were found to be the increase of neutral gas pressure by pellet born gas puff at insufficient pumping speed or the occurrence of neoclassical tearing modes triggered by pellets when the temperatures close to rational surfaces were reduced too strongly.

  1. Differential experiences of Mexican policing by people who inject drugs residing in Tijuana and San Diego.

    PubMed

    Wood, Emily F; Werb, Dan; Beletsky, Leo; Rangel, Gudelia; Cuevas Mota, Jazmine; Garfein, Richard S; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Wagner, Karla D

    2017-03-01

    powerlessness. This was less common among San Diego-based participants, who mostly attempted to avoid contact with LEOs in Mexico while engaging in risky injection behavior. Experiences of discrimination and stigma were reported by a larger proportion of PWIDs living in Mexico, suggesting that they may be subject to greater health harms related to policing practices compared with those residing in the USA. Our findings reinforce the importance of efforts to curb abuse and align policing practices with public health goals in both the US and Mexico. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Changes in permeability of the Nojima fault damage zone inferred from repeated water injection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Yuichi; Kano, Yasuyuki

    2016-11-01

    In 1995, the Hyogoken-Nanbu earthquake ( M 7.3) ruptured the Nojima fault, Awaji Island, central Japan. To investigate the recovery process of a fault zone after a large earthquake, repeated water injection experiments have been conducted every few years in an 1800-m-long borehole near the Nojima fault since 1997. In addition, the groundwater discharge rate and pressure have been observed in an 800-m borehole. From the resulting data, the macroscopic permeability of the fault fracture zone was estimated to range roughly from 1 × 10-6 to 2 × 10-6 m/s. The macroscopic permeability of the fault fracture zone decreased until 2003, and then, it stabilized or increased slightly through 2006. These changes in permeability indicate that the fault fracture zone stabilized within 8 years after the occurrence of the earthquake.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Laser Blow-Off Impurity Injection Experiments at the HSX Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, C.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.; Zhai, K.; Lore, J.

    2011-10-01

    Experiments are under way to measure impurity transport in a quasisymmetric stellarator for the first time. A laser blow-off impurity injection system, which is capable of rapidly depositing a small, controlled quantity of a wide variety of solid impurities into the confinement volume, has been installed and successfully tested. AXUV photodiode arrays equipped with optional soft x-ray filters have also been installed on the machine. The arrays will take time-resolved measurements of the impurity radiation, which will be inverted into radial profile and then interpreted using the transport code, STRAHL and atomic data from ADAS to determine the transport coefficients within the paradigm of a diffusivity and convective velocity. Details of the system and first results will be presented along with PENTA calculations of the neoclassical predicted impurity transport Work supported by US DOE contracts DE-FG02-01ER54615 and DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  4. Transport simulations of the pre-thermal-quench phase in ASDEX Upgrade massive gas injection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fable, E.; Pautasso, G.; Lehnen, M.; Dux, R.; Bernert, M.; Mlynek, A.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-02-01

    The pre-thermal-quench (PTQ) phase of the massive gas injection (MGI) scenario to terminate the tokamak plasma discharge is studied by means of one-dimensional (1D) transport simulations. This phase is characterized by the cold-front penetration in the hot plasma after the gas has been released from the valves, and before the actual thermal quench takes place, with consequent plasma disruption at lower stored energy. The comparison between the simulations and the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) experiments allows to gain insight in the observed dependencies and time scales. Despite the genuine three-dimensional structure of the problem, it is shown that the 1D simulations are already giving experimentally relevant answers, the reason for which will be discussed in detail. Influence of unknown parameters and simplifying assumptions are also discussed.

  5. VUV spectroscopy in impurity injection experiments at KSTAR using prototype ITER VUV spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, C. R.; Hong, J. H.; Song, I.; Jang, J.; Lee, H. Y.; An, Y. H.; Kim, B. S.; Jeon, T. M.; Park, J. S.; Choe, W.; Lee, H. G.; Pak, S.; Cheon, M. S.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, H. S.; Biel, W.; Bernascolle, P.; Barnsley, R.

    2017-08-01

    The ITER vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) core survey spectrometer has been designed as a 5-channel spectral system so that the high spectral resolving power of 200-500 could be achieved in the wavelength range of 2.4-160 nm. To verify the design of the ITER VUV core survey spectrometer, a two-channel prototype spectrometer was developed. As a subsequent step of the prototype test, the prototype VUV spectrometer has been operated at KSTAR since the 2012 experimental campaign. From impurity injection experiments in the years 2015 and 2016, strong emission lines, such as Kr xxv 15.8 nm, Kr xxvi 17.9 nm, Ne vii 46.5 nm, Ne vi 40.2 nm, and an array of largely unresolved tungsten lines (14-32 nm) could be measured successfully, showing the typical photon number of 1013-1015 photons/cm2 s.

  6. Nalbuphine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your doctor may adjust your dose of nalbuphine injection during your treatment, depending on how well your pain is controlled and on the side effects that you experience. Talk to your doctor about how you are feeling ... nalbuphine injection.You may receive nalbuphine injection in a hospital, ...

  7. Meperidine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your doctor may adjust your dose of meperidine injection during your treatment, depending on how well your pain is controlled and on the side effects that you experience. Talk to your doctor about how you are feeling ... meperidine injection.If you have used meperidine injection for longer ...

  8. Morphine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your doctor may adjust your dose of morphine injection during your treatment, depending on how well your pain is controlled and on the side effects that you experience. Talk to your doctor about how you are feeling ... with morphine injection.If you have used morphine injection for longer ...

  9. Object-based inversion of crosswell radar tomography data to monitor vegetable oil injection experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, Jr., John W.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Casey, Clifton C.

    2004-01-01

    Crosswell radar methods can be used to dynamically image ground-water flow and mass transport associated with tracer tests, hydraulic tests, and natural physical processes, for improved characterization of preferential flow paths and complex aquifer heterogeneity. Unfortunately, because the raypath coverage of the interwell region is limited by the borehole geometry, the tomographic inverse problem is typically underdetermined, and tomograms may contain artifacts such as spurious blurring or streaking that confuse interpretation.We implement object-based inversion (using a constrained, non-linear, least-squares algorithm) to improve results from pixel-based inversion approaches that utilize regularization criteria, such as damping or smoothness. Our approach requires pre- and post-injection travel-time data. Parameterization of the image plane comprises a small number of objects rather than a large number of pixels, resulting in an overdetermined problem that reduces the need for prior information. The nature and geometry of the objects are based on hydrologic insight into aquifer characteristics, the nature of the experiment, and the planned use of the geophysical results.The object-based inversion is demonstrated using synthetic and crosswell radar field data acquired during vegetable-oil injection experiments at a site in Fridley, Minnesota. The region where oil has displaced ground water is discretized as a stack of rectangles of variable horizontal extents. The inversion provides the geometry of the affected region and an estimate of the radar slowness change for each rectangle. Applying petrophysical models to these results and porosity from neutron logs, we estimate the vegetable-oil emulsion saturation in various layers.Using synthetic- and field-data examples, object-based inversion is shown to be an effective strategy for inverting crosswell radar tomography data acquired to monitor the emplacement of vegetable-oil emulsions. A principal advantage of

  10. One, Two, and Three Dimensional Simulations of Laboratory Beam-Injection Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Oppenheim, M. M.; Wong, A. Y.; Cheung, P. Y.

    2000-10-01

    We present the results of three-dimensional fully kinetic simulations of UCLA laboratory experiments,(A. Y. Wong and P. Y. Cheung, Phys. Rev. Lett.), 52, 1222 (1984) which were the first experiments to show Langmuir-wave collapse in a beam-driven plasma. Our massively-parallel particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations model the continuous injection of a fast (v_b=20v_e), cold (Δ vb = Δ v_e), and weak (n_b/n_0=0.005) beam, which is comparable to that used in the laboratory experiments. By comparing the results of 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D simulations with one another and with laboratory measurements, we address the role of dimensionality on key phases of the evolution of beam-driven Langmuir turbulence. Of particular interest are the localization of intense Langmuir wave packets and the subsequent deepening of quasineutral density depressions due to the hydrodynamic response of ions to the ponderomotive force of the localized Langmuir waves. A variety of visualization tools will be employed in the analysis of the three-dimensional turbulence.

  11. Particle simulation of runaway electrons in rippled tokamaks with pellet suppression effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, D. A.; Carbajal Gomez, L.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Baylor, L.; Seal, S.

    2016-10-01

    Runaway electrons are of significant concern for large tokamak devices both due to gradual acceleration by the Ohmic heating field and the more rapid acceleration and avalanche production that can occur during major disruptions. We have developed a simulation model (KORCGC) that follows large number of runaway guiding center (GC) orbits, taking into account Coulomb collisions, impurities, synchrotron radiation, rippled (3D) fields, and electric field acceleration, including inductive effects. Applications to pellet suppression experiments have been made and show similar effects (current/energy decay rates) as the observations. The model uses a hybrid (MPI/OpenMP) design and shows excellent parallel scaling. The energy parameters of runaway pellet suppression and formation fit within the limits of the GC approximation and the longer timesteps allowed by GC facilitate modeling over relevant timescales. Simulations of impurity injection dissipation experiments on DIIID and ITER will be discussed. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy and by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR2.

  12. An analysis of the SCEX 3 ionospheric electron beam injection experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Goerke, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    The SCEX 3 experiment (Several Compatible EXperiments using a rocket-borne accelerator) was carried to ionospheric altitudes (375 km) by a Black Brant 11 rocket on February 1, 1990. The experiment was launched from Poker Flat Research Range (65.1 degree N, 147.5 degree W) at 1207 UT. The payload split into two parts (hereafter forward and aft payloads) 116 seconds after launch. The aft payload carried two electron accelerators as well as several diagnostic instruments. The forward payload was ejected at an angle of 6 degree with the magnetic field in a northwesterly direction. This payload carried a multiband plasma wave receiver and various particle detectors to make in situ measurements of the Beam Plasma Interaction (BPI) region. Two Throw Away Detectors (TAD's 1 and 2) were also ejected from the aft payload in the east and west directions respectively. TAD 1 also carried a multiband plasma wave receiver. Preceding the launch an auroral arch along the southern boundary of a diffuse auroral patch suddenly brightened, split into two separate arcs and moved to a position north of the rocket's trajectory. SCEX 3 was launched into an active breakup aurora consisting of tall rays and diffuse patches. The purpose of this experiment were (1) to observe injected electrons reflected from the naturally occurring parallel electric field structures which are thought to accelerate the auroral electron, (2) to observe a variety of plasma effects caused by the artificial electron beam and the associated spacecraft charging, and (3) study the natural phenomena associated with auroral activity. This work is a summary of the interesting observations made by the SCEX 3 experiment. These observations include VHF emissions produced by the electron beam via the Beam Plasma Discharge (BPD), Diffuse resonance emissions by the hot plasma region surrounding the electron beam and auroral Z-mode emissions.

  13. Phosphorus recovery using pelletized adsorptive materials ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Phosphorous (P) is one of the essential nutrients for growth and is generally the most limiting nutrient since, it cannot be fixed from the atmosphere. Methods for recovering phosphorous from water systems already exist, but advances are being made to find a more economic, efficient, effective and easy to use method that can allow for reuse of the recovered P. One area of study is in adsorption, which involves finding the best material for adsorption of phosphorous from water and for releasing it back into the environment through desorption or leaching. The goal of this research was to first optimize the capacity for a pelletized adsorptive material that was synthesized with varying amounts of a binder material from 0-20 % and then to study recovering the phosphate for reuse. The pelletized materials were studied through kinetics experiments as well as isotherm experiments to gain insight into the adsorption capacity and mechanism. Following successful adsorption, a simple leaching study was conducted to see how much phosphate would be released back into water without any added desorption aid. Desorption was then studied by changing the pH of solution. Presenting my thesis work with a poster at ACS.

  14. Formation and sustainment of a very low aspect ratio tokamak using coaxial helicity injection (the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT) experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarboe, T.R.; Nelson, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    In the paper we will detail the progress of the HIT experiment construction, including the following components: preliminary data and interpretation; diagnostic systems; vacuum vessel and pumping system; helicity source and power supplies; toroidal field coil and power supply; data acquisition system; collaboration with general atomics, with a brief summary given on each.

  15. Method for producing pellets for use in a cryoblasting process

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Christopher A.; Fisher, Paul W.

    1997-01-01

    A cryoblasting process having a centrifugal accelerator for accelerating frozen pellets of argon or carbon dioxide toward a target area utilizes an accelerator throw wheel designed to induce, during operation, the creation of a low-friction gas bearing within internal passages of the wheel which would otherwise retard acceleration of the pellets as they move through the passages. An associated system and method for removing paint from a surface with cryoblasting techniques involves the treating, such as a preheating, of the painted surface to soften the paint prior to the impacting of frozen pellets thereagainst to increase the rate of paint removal. A system and method for producing large quantities of frozen pellets from a liquid material, such as liquid argon or carbon dioxide, for use in a cryoblasting process utilizes a chamber into which the liquid material is introduced in the form of a jet which disintegrates into droplets. A non-condensible gas, such as inert helium or air, is injected into the chamber at a controlled rate so that the droplets freeze into bodies of relatively high density.

  16. The experience of initiating injection drug use and its social context: a qualitative systematic review and thematic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Guise, Andy; Horyniak, Danielle; Melo, Jason; McNeil, Ryan; Werb, Dan

    2017-07-22

    Understanding the experience of initiating injection drug use and its social contexts is crucial to inform efforts to prevent transitions into this mode of drug consumption and support harm reduction. We reviewed and synthesized existing qualitative scientific literature systematically to identify the socio-structural contexts for, and experiences of, the initiation of injection drug use. We searched six databases (Medline, Embase, PsychINFO, CINAHL, IBSS and SSCI) systematically, along with a manual search, including key journals and subject experts. Peer-reviewed studies were included if they qualitatively explored experiences of or socio-structural contexts for injection drug use initiation. A thematic synthesis approach was used to identify descriptive and analytical themes throughout studies. From 1731 initial results, 41 studies reporting data from 1996 participants were included. We developed eight descriptive themes and two analytical (higher-order) themes. The first analytical theme focused on injecting initiation resulting from a social process enabled and constrained by socio-structural factors: social networks and individual interactions, socialization into drug-using identities and choices enabled and constrained by social context all combine to produce processes of injection initiation. The second analytical theme addressed pathways that explore varying meanings attached to injection initiation and how they link to social context: seeking pleasure, responses to increasing tolerance to drugs, securing belonging and identity and coping with pain and trauma. Qualitative research shows that injection drug use initiation has varying and distinct meanings for individuals involved and is a dynamic process shaped by social and structural factors. Interventions should therefore respond to the socio-structural influences on injecting drug use initiation by seeking to modify the contexts for initiation, rather than solely prioritizing the reduction of individual

  17. Experiments and analysis of drainage displacement processes relevant to carbon dioxide injection.

    PubMed

    Aryana, Saman A; Kovscek, Anthony R

    2012-12-01

    The motivation for this work is a dramatically improved understanding of the fluid mechanics of drainage processes with applications such as CO_{2} storage in saline aquifers and water-alternating-gas injection as an enhanced oil recovery method. In this paper we present in situ distributions of wetting and nonwetting fluids obtained during core-scale two-phase immiscible drainage experiments. The ratio of the viscosity of the resident fluid to that of the invading fluid varies across a range of 0.43 to 150. Saturation distributions observed during dynamic displacement experiments are surprisingly smooth and do not display only one or a few dominant fingers, contrary to the indications of the current literature. The analysis of the saturation distribution using the fractal dimensions of the dynamic three-dimensional saturation distributions suggests that the constitutive relationships for porous media, namely, the relative permeability functions, are history dependent. Accordingly, it is suggested that the nonlinear, unstable flow regime is the regime where efforts to improve physical understanding must be focused.

  18. Design of an Experiment on Wakefield Acceleration on the VEPP-5 Injection Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Burdakov, A.V.; Kudryavtsev, A.M.; Logatchov, P.V.; Lotov, K.V.; Petrenko, A.V.; Skrinsky, A.N.

    2005-04-15

    Relativistic beams produced by the VEPP-5 injection complex (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Division, Russian Academy of Sciences) can be used to generate plasma waves with a longitudinal electric field of 1 GV/m. A part of the electron (or positron) driver bunch is accelerated by this field over a distance of up to 1 m. The main advantage of the proposed design over the previous wakefield acceleration experiments is the beam preparation system capable of compressing bunches to a length of {sigma}{sub z} 0.1 mm in the longitudinal direction and producing an optimal longitudinal profile of the beam density. The main parameters of the planned device are as follows: the electron energy at the entrance to the plasma is 510 MeV, the number of particles in the bunch is 2 x 10{sup 10}, the plasma density is up to 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, the number of accelerated particles is up to 3 x 10{sup 9}, and their energy spread is less than 10%. The physical project of the experiment is presented, and the results of computer simulations of the beam-plasma interaction are described.

  19. In Silico and In Vivo Experiments Reveal M-CSF Injections Accelerate Regeneration Following Muscle Laceration.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kyle S; Kegelman, Christopher D; Virgilio, Kelley M; Passipieri, Julianna A; Christ, George J; Blemker, Silvia S; Peirce, Shayn M

    2017-03-01

    Numerous studies have pharmacologically modulated the muscle milieu in the hopes of promoting muscle regeneration; however, the timing and duration of these interventions are difficult to determine. This study utilized a combination of in silico and in vivo experiments to investigate how inflammation manipulation improves muscle recovery following injury. First, we measured macrophage populations following laceration injury in the rat tibialis anterior (TA). Then we calibrated an agent-based model (ABM) of muscle injury to mimic the observed inflammation profiles. The calibrated ABM was used to simulate macrophage and satellite stem cell (SC) dynamics, and suggested that delivering macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) prior to injury would promote SC-mediated injury recovery. Next, we performed an experiment wherein 1 day prior to injury, we injected M-CSF into the rat TA muscle. M-CSF increased the number of macrophages during the first 4 days post-injury. Furthermore, treated muscles experienced a swifter increase in the appearance of PAX7(+) SCs and regenerating muscle fibers. Our study suggests that computational models of muscle injury provide novel insights into cellular dynamics during regeneration, and further, that pharmacologically altering inflammation dynamics prior to injury can accelerate the muscle regeneration process.

  20. Recent high-speed ballistics experiments at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing pellet injectors for plasma fueling experiments on magnetic confinement devices for almost 20 years. With these devices, pellets (1 to 8 mm in diameter) composed of hydrogen isotopes are formed (at temperatures <20 K) and typically accelerated to speeds of {approximately} 1.0 to 2.0 km/s for injection into plasmas of experimental fusion devices. A variety of pellet injector designs have been developed at ORNL, including repeating pneumatic injectors (single- and multiple-barrel light gas guns) that can inject up to hundreds of pellets for long-pulse plasma operation. The repeating pneumatic injectors are of particular importance because long-pulse fueling is required for present large experimental fusion devices, with steady-state operation the objective for future fusion reactors. In this paper, recent advancements in the development of repeating pneumatic injectors are described, including (1) a small-bore (1.8-mm), high-firing-rate (10-Hz) version of a single-stage light gas gun; (2) a repeating single-stage light gas gun for 8-mm-diam tritium pellets; (3) a repeating two-stage light gas gun for operation at higher pellet velocities; and (4) a steady-state hydrogen extruder feed system.

  1. A discrete choice experiment to determine patient preferences for injection devices in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shingler, S L; Swinburn, P; Ali, S; Perard, R; Lloyd, A J

    2013-08-01

    Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) is usually managed with disease modifying drugs (DMDs), most commonly administered via self-injection. The aim of this study was to estimate the influence that different treatment-related attributes have for MS patients on their choice of MS DMD device. By establishing the relative importance of these characteristics for patients it should be possible to better understand the acceptability of a given device and to optimize the development of future devices. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) survey was developed on the basis of a review of published literature. Attributes identified for inclusion in the survey were: ease of use; comfort of use; presence of additional functions, needle visibility; practicality and efficacy. Choice sets were presented as pairs of hypothetical treatments based upon a fractional factorial design. One-hundred device-using MS patients completed the survey online. Analysis was conducted using a mixed-logit approach. Analysis of the DCE data revealed that all attributes significantly predicted treatment choice. Efficacy exhibited the largest effect on treatment selection and this provided context for understanding the magnitude of impact for the other attributes. Reducing the discomfort associated with device use and eliminating the necessity for assembly or drug reconstitution were highly valued. The addition of reminder and time-stamping functions, improved needlestick injury prevention, and reduction in device size were secondary concerns but still deemed desirable. Efficacy is of primary importance to MS patients, but characteristics of drug delivery devices can play an important role in treatment decision-making. Not all device characteristics could be included, and results are based upon 100 participants only. Findings suggest there is significant potential value in developing self-injection devices that are not only efficacious but also convenient and comfortable to use. Reducing barriers

  2. Experiences with urine drug testing by police among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kanna; Ti, Lianping; Buxton, Jane A; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Thailand has relied on drug law enforcement in an effort to curb illicit drug use. While anecdotal reports suggest that Thai police frequently use urine toxicology to identify drug users, little is known about the prevalence or impacts of this practice among people who inject drugs (IDU). Therefore, we sought to examine experiences with urine drug testing by police among IDU in Bangkok. Data were derived from a community-recruited sample of IDU in Bangkok participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project between July and October 2011. We assessed the prevalence and correlates of being subjected to urine toxicology testing by police using multivariate Poisson regression. In total, 438 IDU participated in this study, with 293 (66.9%) participants reporting having been tested for illicit drugs by police. In multivariate analyses, reports of drug testing by police were independently and positively associated with younger age (adjusted prevalence ratio [APR]: 1.28), a history of methamphetamine injection (APR: 1.22), a history of incarceration (APR: 1.21), having been in compulsory drug detention (APR: 1.43), avoiding healthcare (APR: 1.15), and HIV seropositivity (APR: 1.19), and negatively associated with access to voluntary drug treatment (APR: 0.82) (all p<0.05). A high proportion of IDU in Bangkok were subjected to drug testing by police. Young people and methamphetamine injectors were more likely to have been tested. The findings indicate that drug testing by police is associated with the compulsory drug detention system and may be interfering with IDU's access to healthcare and voluntary drug treatment. These findings raise concern about the widespread practice of drug testing by police and its associated impacts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Solidification and Acceleration of Large Cryogenic Pellets Relevant for Plasma Disruption Mitigation

    DOE PAGES

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Meitner, S. J.; Gebhart, T. E.; ...

    2016-01-01

    The technology for producing, accelerating, and shattering large pellets (before injection into plasmas) for disruption mitigation has been under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for several years, including a system on DIII-D that has been used to provide some significant experimental results. The original proof-of-principle testing was carried out using a pipe gun injector cooled by a cryogenic refrig- erator (temperatures ~8-20 K) and equipped with a stainless steel tube to produce 16.5-mm pellets composed of either pure D2, pure Ne, or a dual layer with a thin outer shell of D2 and core of Ne. Recently, significantmore » progress has been made in the laboratory using that same pipe gun and a new injector that is an ITER test apparatus cooled with liquid helium. The new injector operates at ~5-8 K, which is similar to temperatures expected with cooling provided by the flow of supercritical helium on ITER. An alternative technique for producing/solidifying large pellets directly from a premixed gas has now been successfully tested in the laboratory. Also, two additional pellet sizes have been tested recently (nominal 24.4 and 34.0 mm diameters). With larger pellets, the number of injectors required for ITER disruption mitigation can be reduced, resulting in less cost and a smaller footprint for the hardware. An attractive option is longer pellets, and 24.4-mm pellets with a length/diameter ratio of ~3 have been successfully tested. Since pellet speed is the key parameter in determining the response time of a shattered pellet system to a plasma disruption event, recent tests have concentrated on documenting the speeds with different hardware configurations and operating parameters; speeds of ~100-800 m/s have been recorded. The data and results from laboratory testing are presented and discussed, and a simple model for the pellet solidification process is described.« less

  4. Solidification and Acceleration of Large Cryogenic Pellets Relevant for Plasma Disruption Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Meitner, S. J.; Gebhart, T. E.; Baylor, Larry R.; Caughman, John B.; Fehling, Dan T.; Foust, Charles R.; Ha, Tam T.; Lyttle, Mark S.; Fisher, J. T.; Younkin, T. R.

    2016-01-01

    The technology for producing, accelerating, and shattering large pellets (before injection into plasmas) for disruption mitigation has been under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for several years, including a system on DIII-D that has been used to provide some significant experimental results. The original proof-of-principle testing was carried out using a pipe gun injector cooled by a cryogenic refrig- erator (temperatures ~8-20 K) and equipped with a stainless steel tube to produce 16.5-mm pellets composed of either pure D2, pure Ne, or a dual layer with a thin outer shell of D2 and core of Ne. Recently, significant progress has been made in the laboratory using that same pipe gun and a new injector that is an ITER test apparatus cooled with liquid helium. The new injector operates at ~5-8 K, which is similar to temperatures expected with cooling provided by the flow of supercritical helium on ITER. An alternative technique for producing/solidifying large pellets directly from a premixed gas has now been successfully tested in the laboratory. Also, two additional pellet sizes have been tested recently (nominal 24.4 and 34.0 mm diameters). With larger pellets, the number of injectors required for ITER disruption mitigation can be reduced, resulting in less cost and a smaller footprint for the hardware. An attractive option is longer pellets, and 24.4-mm pellets with a length/diameter ratio of ~3 have been successfully tested. Since pellet speed is the key parameter in determining the response time of a shattered pellet system to a plasma disruption event, recent tests have concentrated on documenting the speeds with different hardware configurations and operating parameters; speeds of ~100-800 m/s have been recorded. The data and results from laboratory testing are presented and discussed, and a simple model for the pellet solidification process is described.

  5. Plasma fuelling with cryogenic pellets in the stellarator TJ-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Panadero, N.; Velasco, J. L.; Combs, S. K.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Foust, C.; García, R.; Hernández Sánchez, J.; Navarro, M.; Pastor, I.; Soleto, A.; the TJ-II Team

    2017-05-01

    Cryogenic pellet injection is a widely used technique for delivering fuel to the core of magnetically confined plasmas. Indeed, such systems are currently functioning on many tokamak, reversed field pinch and stellarator devices. A pipe-gun-type pellet injector is now operated on the TJ-II, a low-magnetic shear stellarator of the heliac type. Cryogenic hydrogen pellets, containing between 3  ×  1018 and 4  ×  1019 atoms, are injected at velocities between 800 and 1200 m s-1 from its low-field side into plasmas created and/or maintained in this device by electron cyclotron resonance and/or neutral beam injection heating. In this paper, the first systematic study of pellet ablation, particle deposition and fuelling efficiency is presented for TJ-II. From this, light-emission profiles from ablating pellets are found to be in reasonable agreement with simulated pellet ablation profiles (created using a neutral gas shielding-based code) for both heating scenarios. In addition, radial offsets between recorded light-emission profiles and particle deposition profiles provide evidence for rapid outward drifting of ablated material that leads to pellet particle loss from the plasma. Finally, fuelling efficiencies are documented for a range of target plasma densities (~4  ×  1018-  ~2  ×  1019 m-3). These range from ~20%-  ~85% and are determined to be sensitive to pellet penetration depth. Additional observations, such as enhanced core ablation, are discussed and planned future work is outlined.

  6. Treatment readiness, attitudes toward, and experiences with methadone and buprenorphine maintenance therapy among people who inject drugs in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Aishwarya; Bazazi, Alexander R; Yee, Ilias; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about attitudes toward and experiences with opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) among people who inject drugs in Malaysia, a country where people who inject drugs comprise 1.3% of the adult population. In 2010, 460 people who inject drugs in Greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were surveyed to evaluate attitudes toward and experiences with OMT and treatment readiness. Attitudes towards OMT with both methadone and buprenorphine were assessed using an opinions scale. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess correlates of treatment readiness, measured with the 19-item Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). All 460 participants used opioids and nearly all (99.1%) met criteria for opioid dependence. Few had had previous experience with methadone (9.3%) or buprenorphine (12.6%) maintenance therapy, yet many had used methadone (55.2%) or buprenorphine (51.7%) outside of treatment settings. Fifteen percent had injected buprenorphine in the past month, and of the few that were currently receiving buprenorphine maintenance therapy, almost all were injecting it. The majority of subjects exhibited a moderate level of treatment readiness and a preference for methadone over buprenorphine. Those with low treatment readiness scores were more likely to have previous experience with compulsory drug detention centers (p<0.01), needle/syringe exchange programs (p<0.005), or be of Indian ethnicity (p<0.001). Past use of methadone (p<0.01), older age (p<0.001), higher stress symptom severity (p<0.001), and sharing of needles or syringes (p<0.05) were associated with higher treatment readiness scores. There are suboptimal levels of OMT experience among people who inject drugs that may be improved by addressing factors that influence patient attitudes. Those individuals with moderate treatment readiness may be targeted by brief motivational and cognitive interventions in primary care, prisons or OMT clinics aimed at improving entry into and

  7. Treatment readiness, attitudes toward, and experiences with methadone and buprenorphine maintenance therapy among people who inject drugs in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Aishwarya; Bazazi, Alexander R.; Yee, Ilias; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about attitudes toward and experiences with opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) among people who inject drugs in Malaysia, a country where people who inject drugs comprise 1.3% of the adult population. Methods In 2010, 460 people who inject drugs in Greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were surveyed to evaluate attitudes toward and experience with OMT and treatment readiness. Attitudes towards OMT with both methadone and buprenorphine were assessed using an opinions scale. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess correlates of treatment readiness, measured with the 19-item Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Results All 460 participants used opioids and nearly all (99.1%) met criteria for opioid dependence. Few had had previous experience with methadone (9.3%) or buprenorphine (12.6%) maintenance therapy, yet many had used methadone (55.2%) or buprenorphine (51.7%) outside of treatment settings. Fifteen percent had injected buprenorphine in the past month, and of the few that were currently receiving buprenorphine maintenance therapy, almost all were injecting it. The majority of subjects exhibited a moderate level of treatment readiness and a preference for methadone over buprenorphine. Those with low treatment readiness scores were more likely to have previous experience with compulsory drug detention centers (p<0.01), needle/syringe exchange programs (p<0.005), or be of Indian ethnicity (p<0.001). Past use of methadone (p<0.01), older age (p<0.001), stress symptom severity (p<0.001), and sharing of needles or syringes (p<0.05) were associated with higher treatment readiness scores. Conclusion There are suboptimal levels of OMT experience among people who inject drugs that may be improved by addressing factors that influence patient attitudes. Those individuals with moderate treatment readiness may be targeted by brief motivational and cognitive interventions in primary care, prisons or OMT clinics

  8. Ultrasound-guided injection for the biceps brachii tendinitis: results and experience.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Ebraheim, Nabil; Lause, Gregory E

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the results of ultrasound-guided injection of corticosteroid for biceps brachii tendinitis. In this randomized and prospective study, we evaluated 45 patients who were treated by free-hand injection without ultrasound guidance (group A) and 53 patients who were treated by ultrasound-guided injection (group B). The mean age was 47 y (range, 28 to 72). The average follow-up was 33 weeks (range, 24 to 56). The visual analog scale score decreased from 7.1 ± 2.3 before injection to 4.2 ± 3.1 at follow-up in group A and from 6.9 ± 2.6 to 2.1 ± 1.9 in group B (p < 0.05). The Constant-Murley score improved from 31.4 ± 11.6 before injection to 73.5 ± 19.2 at follow-up in group A and from 32.5 ± 14.7 to 85.5 ± 10.3 (p < 0.01). The ultrasound-guided injection therefore demonstrated a statistically significantly greater degree of pain relief. However, the outcome of injection was not satisfactory for the patients who demonstrated severely frayed tendons at arthroscopy. There were no complications related to the injection in both groups. Corticosteroid injection under ultrasound guidance is a safe and well-tolerated procedure with a satisfactory rate of symptom relief in patients with biceps brachii tendinitis.

  9. Improvements in a Tracer-Encapsulated Solid Pellet and Its Injector for More Advanced Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Naoki; Sudo, Shigeru; Suzuki, Chihiro; Funaba, Hisamichi; Takagi, Masaru; Satoh, Nakahiro; Hayashi, Hiromi; Maeno, Hiroya; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Ogawa, Hideki

    2017-04-01

    A Tracer-Encapsulated Solid Pellet (TESPEL) has been developed for promoting a precise study of the impurity transport in a magnetically-confined high-temperature plasma. This paper gives a brief report of the recent improvements in the TESPEL and its injector for more advanced plasma diagnostics. The TESPEL can be considered as a double-layered impurity pellet. This structure enables us to produce a both poloidally and toroidally localized “tracer” impurity source in the plasma, and to specify the total amount of the tracer impurity deposited in the plasma precisely. Recent experiments on the Large Helical Device by using the TESPEL suggest that the importance of the impurity source location in the impurity transport study. Thus we have developed new-type TESPELs, which are greatly improved in regard to the above-mentioned unique features. In addition, we also developed a new TESPEL injector, which enables us to inject the TESPEL obliquely into the plasma. This injector can also contribute to a further shallower penetration of the TESPEL into the plasma.

  10. Neutral Beam Injection System for the C-2W Field Reversed Configuration Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunaevsky, Alexander; Ivanov, Alexander; Kolmogorov, Vyacheslav; Smirnov, Artem; Korepanov, Sergey; Binderbauer, Michl; TAE Team; BINP Team

    2016-10-01

    C-2U Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) experiment proved substantial reduction in turbulence-driven losses via tangential neutral beam injection (NBI) coupled with electrically biased plasma guns at the plasma ends. Under such conditions, highly reproducible, advanced beam-driven FRCs were produced and sustained for times significantly longer (more than 5 ms) than all characteristic plasma decay times without beams. To further improve FRC sustainment and demonstrate the FRC ramp-up, the C-2U experimental device is undergoing a major upgrade. The upgrade, C-2W, will have a new NBI system producing a record total hydrogen beam power of 20 + MW in a 30ms pulse. The NBI system consists of eight positive-ion based injectors featuring flexible, modular design. Four out of eight NBI injectors have a capability to switch the beam energy during a shot from the initial 15 keV to 40 keV at a constant beam current. This feature allows to increase the beam energy and thereby optimize the beam-plasma coupling during the magnetic field ramp up. This presentation provides an overview of the C-2W NBI system, including the design of the switchable energy injectors, layout of the power supply system, and results of the prototype testing.

  11. Electron beam injection experiments - The beam-plasma discharge at low pressures and magnetic field strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, W.; Leinbach, H.; Kellogg, P.; Monson, S.; Hallinan, T.; Garriott, O. K.; Konradi, A.; Mccoy, J.; Daly, P.; Baker, B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes electron beam injection experiments which clarify observational results obtained in rocket flights. A column of enhanced density plasma, exceeding the density expected from ionization by primary beam electrons, was observed in a large vacuum system at low magnetic fields (1 to 1.5 G) and low ambient pressures (10 to the minus 6 to 10 to the minus 5 torr). The peak luminosity of the discharge was about 10 times that of the beam alone, and the radius increased by a factor of three. In the absence of the discharge, RF emission is observed at 1.1 to 1.2 times the cyclotron frequency, and a strong band of RF noise with upper frequency cutoff at about the cyclotron frequency is observed in the discharge mode, along with higher frequency noise at or near the plasma frequency. The onset of the plasma discharge is critically dependent on beam current. The described results agree with observations obtained at much higher densities and magnetic fields in fusion research studies.

  12. Blood Trials: Transfusions, Injections, and Experiments in Africa, 1890–1920

    PubMed Central

    Sunseri, Thaddeus

    2016-01-01

    From about 1880 to 1920, a culture of medical experimentation promoted blood transfusion as a therapy for severe anemia in Europe, which was applied in German East Africa in 1892 for a case of blackwater fever, a complication of malaria afflicting mainly Europeans. This first case of blood transfusion in Africa, in which an African's blood was transfused into a German official, complicates the dominant narrative that blood transfusions in Africa came only after World War I. Medical researchers moreover experimented with blood serum therapies on human and animal subjects in Europe and Africa, injecting blood of different species, “races” and ethnicities into others to demonstrate parasite transmissibility and to discover vaccines for diseases such as malaria, sleeping sickness, and yellow fever. While research in German colonies is highlighted here, this was a transnational medical culture that crossed borders and oceans. This research is of interest as a possible early pathway for the epidemic spread of HIV and other zoonoses in Africa and the world, which biomedical researchers have identified as emerging in West-Central Africa sometime around the turn of the twentieth century. PMID:26514397

  13. Blood Trials: Transfusions, Injections, and Experiments in Africa, 1890-1920.

    PubMed

    Sunseri, Thaddeus

    2016-07-01

    From about 1880 to 1920, a culture of medical experimentation promoted blood transfusion as a therapy for severe anemia in Europe, which was applied in German East Africa in 1892 for a case of blackwater fever, a complication of malaria afflicting mainly Europeans. This first case of blood transfusion in Africa, in which an African's blood was transfused into a German official, complicates the dominant narrative that blood transfusions in Africa came only after World War I. Medical researchers moreover experimented with blood serum therapies on human and animal subjects in Europe and Africa, injecting blood of different species, "races" and ethnicities into others to demonstrate parasite transmissibility and to discover vaccines for diseases such as malaria, sleeping sickness, and yellow fever. While research in German colonies is highlighted here, this was a transnational medical culture that crossed borders and oceans. This research is of interest as a possible early pathway for the epidemic spread of HIV and other zoonoses in Africa and the world, which biomedical researchers have identified as emerging in West-Central Africa sometime around the turn of the twentieth century. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Laboratory experiments in the argon plasma perturbed by injections of the electronegative gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Cao, Jin-xiang; Liu, Yu; Yu, Peng-cheng; Zhang, Zhong-kai

    2016-07-01

    In this study, laboratory observations of the perturbations of the magnetic field are reported due to the injection of attachment chemicals (CF4, SF6, and CO2) into argon plasmas. Besides the well-known electron density reduction, we also observed magnetic field perturbation in the experiment. The measured induced voltage B ˙ , which is taken as a proxy of the time-changing electromagnetic field, fluctuates in the boundary layer between the ambient plasmas and negative ions plasmas. Perturbations of the magnetic field were investigated by changing the ambient pressure and ratio of attachment chemicals. The measured B ˙ keeps increasing in these lower pressures; but it no longer increases as the ambient pressure higher than a threshold, e.g., for CF4, SF6, and CO2, the transition pressure is 6Pa, 5Pa and 4Pa, respectively. The magnitude of the B ˙ increase with the change of the ratio of release flow until at higher ratios, e.g., 40%. We transformed these time-sampled data into the frequency domain and found coherent modes with fundamental frequencies lying in the lower hybrid range. In addition, these coherent frequencies show a frequency drift with the increase of the contents of the negative ions. These modes were suggested as the magnetic component of electron-ion hybrid mode. This work has an important application in the study of artificially-created ionospheric depletion which is usually generated by releasing of attachment chemicals in the upper atmosphere.

  15. Experiences with Policing among People Who Inject Drugs in Bangkok, Thailand: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kanna; Small, Will; Csete, Joanne; Hattirat, Sattara; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite Thailand's commitment to treating people who use drugs as “patients” not “criminals,” Thai authorities continue to emphasize criminal law enforcement for drug control. In 2003, Thailand's drug war received international criticism due to extensive human rights violations. However, few studies have since investigated the impact of policing on drug-using populations. Therefore, we sought to examine experiences with policing among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Bangkok, Thailand, between 2008 and 2012. Methods and Findings Between July 2011 and June 2012, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 42 community-recruited PWID participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Interviews explored PWID's encounters with police during the past three years. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim, and a thematic analysis was conducted to document the character of PWID's experiences with police. Respondents indicated that policing activities had noticeably intensified since rapid urine toxicology screening became available to police. Respondents reported various forms of police misconduct, including false accusations, coercion of confessions, excessive use of force, and extortion of money. However, respondents were reluctant to report misconduct to the authorities in the face of social and structural barriers to seeking justice. Respondents' strategies to avoid police impeded access to health care and facilitated transitions towards the misuse of prescribed pharmaceuticals. The study's limitations relate to the transferability of the findings, including the potential biases associated with the small convenience sample. Conclusions This study suggests that policing in Bangkok has involved injustices, human rights abuses, and corruption, and policing practices in this setting appeared to have increased PWID's vulnerability to poor health through various pathways. Novel to this study are findings

  16. Experiences with policing among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kanna; Small, Will; Csete, Joanne; Hattirat, Sattara; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Despite Thailand's commitment to treating people who use drugs as "patients" not "criminals," Thai authorities continue to emphasize criminal law enforcement for drug control. In 2003, Thailand's drug war received international criticism due to extensive human rights violations. However, few studies have since investigated the impact of policing on drug-using populations. Therefore, we sought to examine experiences with policing among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Bangkok, Thailand, between 2008 and 2012. Between July 2011 and June 2012, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 42 community-recruited PWID participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Interviews explored PWID's encounters with police during the past three years. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim, and a thematic analysis was conducted to document the character of PWID's experiences with police. Respondents indicated that policing activities had noticeably intensified since rapid urine toxicology screening became available to police. Respondents reported various forms of police misconduct, including false accusations, coercion of confessions, excessive use of force, and extortion of money. However, respondents were reluctant to report misconduct to the authorities in the face of social and structural barriers to seeking justice. Respondents' strategies to avoid police impeded access to health care and facilitated transitions towards the misuse of prescribed pharmaceuticals. The study's limitations relate to the transferability of the findings, including the potential biases associated with the small convenience sample. This study suggests that policing in Bangkok has involved injustices, human rights abuses, and corruption, and policing practices in this setting appeared to have increased PWID's vulnerability to poor health through various pathways. Novel to this study are findings pertaining to the use of urine drug testing by police

  17. A multi-institutional observational study of testosterone levels after testosterone pellet (Testopel(®)) insertion.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Andrew R; Khera, Mohit; Goldstein, Irwin; Hellstrom, Wayne J G; Morgentaler, Abraham; Levine, Laurence A

    2012-02-01

    Implantable testosterone pellets were approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1972 for the treatment of testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS). Clinical use of this testosterone delivery modality has been limited until its recent reintroduction (Testopel(®) , Slate Pharmaceuticals, Durham, NC, USA). Six academic institutions collaborated and combined their databases to more fully characterize serum testosterone levels after the pellet implantations. To assess the time-dependent serum testosterone levels after subcutaneous testosterone pellets in clinical practice for the treatment of TDS. Data were retrospectively pooled and analyzed from data in six academic institutions. Variables included patient age, total testosterone concentrations before and after implantation, the number of testosterone pellets implanted, and the time from implantation to measurement of serum testosterone concentrations. Three hundred eighty men undergoing 702 insertions were included for analysis using JMP (version 4.0.4; SAS Institute, Cary, NC, USA). Main outcome measures were postimplantation total testosterone levels and investigator-reported adverse events. Testosterone levels as a function of the number of pellets implanted and time from implantation were assessed. Implantation of six to ≥10 testosterone pellets (450 to ≥750 mg) increased total testosterone into the therapeutic range at 1 month postimplantation and sustained therapeutic levels (>300) for 4-6 months. Higher pellet numbers (10-12 pellets) were associated with higher, more consistent, and longer maintenance of testosterone levels within the therapeutic range. Four extrusions and three hematomas were reported early in our experience; other investigator-reported adverse events were generally mild to moderate in nature and transient in duration. No subjects required analgesics. Testosterone pellets (Testopel(®) , Slate Pharmaceuticals) provide sustained levels of testosterone for at least 4 months and up to 6

  18. Trap-assisted tunneling hole injection in SiO{sub 2}: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nasyrov, K. A.; Shaimeev, S. S.; Gritsenko, V. A.

    2009-11-15

    The injection of holes from silicon through silicon oxide (SiO{sub 2}) in a tantalum nitride-aluminum oxide-silicon nitride-silicon oxide-silicon (TANOS) structure has been studied experimentally. Using the high-permittivity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} insulator as a blocking one suppresses the parasitic injection of electrons from the conducting TaN contact. This allows the injection of holes from the substrate into nitride to be studied up to comparatively high electric fields. The experimental data are not described by the standard Fowler-Nordheim law with reasonable physical parameters. At the same time, these data are in good agreement with the model of trap-assisted tunneling hole injection in SiO{sub 2}. The developed theory shows that the traps in a narrow energy band make a major contribution to this process, i.e., this injection is resonant in nature.

  19. Prediction of the mechanical properties of zeolite pellets for aerospace molecular decontamination applications

    PubMed Central

    Rioland, Guillaume; Faye, Delphine; Patarin, Joël

    2016-01-01

    Zeolite pellets containing 5 wt % of binder (methylcellulose or sodium metasilicate) were formed with a hydraulic press. This paper describes a mathematical model to predict the mechanical properties (uniaxial and diametric compression) of these pellets for arbitrary dimensions (height and diameter) using a design of experiments (DOE) methodology. A second-degree polynomial equation including interactions was used to approximate the experimental results. This leads to an empirical model for the estimation of the mechanical properties of zeolite pellets with 5 wt % of binder. The model was verified by additional experimental tests including pellets of different dimensions created with different applied pressures. The optimum dimensions were found to be a diameter of 10–23 mm, a height of 1–3.5 mm and an applied pressure higher than 200 MPa. These pellets are promising for technological uses in molecular decontamination for aerospace-based applications. PMID:28144526

  20. Grate-kiln pelletization of Indian hematite fines and its industrial practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, De-qing; Zhang, Feng; Guo, Zheng-qi; Pan, Jian; Yu, Wei

    2017-05-01

    Indian hematite fines normally have a high iron grade and minor impurities; they are usually used as sinter fines for feeding into a blast furnace. In this work, the grindability properties of two kinds of Indian hematite fines and the roasting behaviors and induration characteristics of pellets made from these fines were revealed through experiments involving dry ball milling and small-scale and pilot-scale tests. In addition, the microstructures of the particles of ground India hematite fines and fired pellets were investigated using optical microscopy. On the basis of the results, a grate-kiln production line with an annual output of 1.2 Mt of oxidized pellets was established in India. This pellet plant operates stably and reliably, further confirming that preparing high-quality pellets with Indian hematite fines pretreated by dry ball milling is an industrially feasible process.

  1. Prediction of the mechanical properties of zeolite pellets for aerospace molecular decontamination applications.

    PubMed

    Rioland, Guillaume; Dutournié, Patrick; Faye, Delphine; Daou, T Jean; Patarin, Joël

    2016-01-01

    Zeolite pellets containing 5 wt % of binder (methylcellulose or sodium metasilicate) were formed with a hydraulic press. This paper describes a mathematical model to predict the mechanical properties (uniaxial and diametric compression) of these pellets for arbitrary dimensions (height and diameter) using a design of experiments (DOE) methodology. A second-degree polynomial equation including interactions was used to approximate the experimental results. This leads to an empirical model for the estimation of the mechanical properties of zeolite pellets with 5 wt % of binder. The model was verified by additional experimental tests including pellets of different dimensions created with different applied pressures. The optimum dimensions were found to be a diameter of 10-23 mm, a height of 1-3.5 mm and an applied pressure higher than 200 MPa. These pellets are promising for technological uses in molecular decontamination for aerospace-based applications.

  2. Repulsion of Meloidogyne incognita by Alginate Pellets Containing Hyphae of Monacrosporium cionopagum, M. ellipsosporum, or Hirsutella rhossiliensis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A F; Jaffee, B A

    1996-06-01

    The responses of second-stage juveniles (J2) of Meloidogyne incognita race 3 to calcium alginate pellets containing hyphae of the nematophagous fungi Monacrosporiura cionopagum, M. ellipsosporum, and Hirsutella rhossiliensis were examined using cylinders (38-mm-diam., 40 or 72 mm long) of sand (94% <250-mum particle size). Sand was wetted with a synthetic soil solution (10% moisture, 0.06 bar water potential). A layer of 10 or 20 pellets was placed 4 or 20 mm from one end of the cylinder. After 3, 5, or 13 days, J2 were put on both ends, on one end, or in the center; J2 were extracted from 8-ram-thick sections 1 or 2 days later. All three fungal pellets were repellent; pellets without fungi were not. Aqueous extracts of all pellets and of sand in which fungal pellets had been incubated were repellent, but acetone extracts redissolved in water were not. Injection of CO (20 mul/minute) into the pellet layer attracted J2 and increased fungal-induced mortality. In vials containing four randomly positioned pellets and 17 cm(3) of sand or loamy sand, the three fungi suppressed the invasion of cabbage roots by M. javanica J2. Counts of healthy and parasitized nematodes observed in roots or extracted from soil indicated that, in the vial assay, the failure of J2 to penetrate roots resulted primarily from parasitism rather than repulsion. Data were similar whether fungal inoculum consisted of pelletized hyphae or fungal-colonized Steinernema glaseri. Thus, the results indicate that nematode attractants and repellents can have major or negligible effects on the biological control efficacy of pelletized nematophagous fungi. Factors that might influence the importance of substances released by the pellets include the strength, geometry, and duration of gradients; pellet degradation by soil microflora; the nematode species involved; and attractants released by roots.

  3. Effects of pellet diameter during and after lactation on feed intake of piglets pre- and postweaning.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, H; Wamsteeker, D; Oostindjer, M; van Enckevort, L C M; van der Poel, A F B; Kemp, B; Bolhuis, J E

    2014-09-01

    Effects of 2 pellet diameters for piglets pre- and postweaning on feed intake, BW, and feed-related behavior were studied in 3 experiments. In Exp. 1, 19 litters were provided with pellets of 2 and 12 mm in diameter in a choice-feeding setup from d 4 of lactation onward. From d 4 to 18, piglets preferred the 12-mm diameter pellet over the 2-mm diameter pellet (519 vs. 168 g/pen; P < 0.001). In Exp. 2, 39 litters were provided with creep feed of either 2- or 10-mm diameter pellets. Feed intake from d 3 to 17 was higher in litters provided the 10-mm diameter pellet than the 2-mm diameter pellet (1,752 vs. 1,101 g/pen; P < 0.001). Piglet BW at weaning did not differ between treatments. Treatment × day of lactation interactions were found for time spent eating, interest in eating, and time spent suckling. Time spent eating and interest in eating increased with time. This increase was lower in the litters provided with the 10-mm diameter pellet. Time spent suckling remained the same in litters provided with 2-mm diameter pellets but decreased in time in litters provided the 10-mm diameter pellets. Experiment 3 was set up as a 2 × 2 factorial design with pellet diameter both pre- and postweaning as factors. During lactation, 18 litters were provided creep feed of either 2 or 12 mm in pellet diameter. At weaning, each litter was split into 2 comparable half litters and each half litter was provided with feed of 2 or 12 mm in diameter. Feed intake was higher in the 12-mm diameter pellet litters than in the 2-mm ones from d 4 to 11 of lactation (P < 0.01). Pellet diameter provided after weaning did not affect BW gain or feed intake. Piglets provided the 12-mm diameter pellet before weaning, however, had a higher BW gain (2,060 vs. 2,606 g/pig; P = 0.003) and feed intake (2,772 vs. 3,173 g/pig; P = 0.04) and a lower feed conversion ratio (P = 0.03) between d 0 and 10 after weaning than piglets provided the 2-mm diameter pellet before weaning. Postweaning pellet diameter

  4. Validating An Analytic Completeness Model for Kepler Target Stars Based on Flux-level Transit Injection Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzarite, Joseph; Burke, Christopher J.; Li, Jie; Seader, Shawn; Haas, Michael R.; Batalha, Natalie; Henze, Christopher; Christiansen, Jessie; Kepler Project, NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division

    2016-06-01

    The Kepler Mission is developing an Analytic Completeness Model (ACM) to estimate detection completeness contours as a function of exoplanet radius and period for each target star. Accurate completeness contours are necessary for robust estimation of exoplanet occurrence rates.The main components of the ACM for a target star are: detection efficiency as a function of SNR, the window function (WF) and the one-sigma depth function (OSDF). (Ref. Burke et al. 2015). The WF captures the falloff in transit detection probability at long periods that is determined by the observation window (the duration over which the target star has been observed). The OSDF is the transit depth (in parts per million) that yields SNR of unity for the full transit train. It is a function of period, and accounts for the time-varying properties of the noise and for missing or deweighted data.We are performing flux-level transit injection (FLTI) experiments on selected Kepler target stars with the goal of refining and validating the ACM. “Flux-level” injection machinery inserts exoplanet transit signatures directly into the flux time series, as opposed to “pixel-level” injection, which inserts transit signatures into the individual pixels using the pixel response function. See Jie Li's poster: ID #2493668, "Flux-level transit injection experiments with the NASA Pleiades Supercomputer" for details, including performance statistics.Since FLTI is affordable for only a small subset of the Kepler targets, the ACM is designed to apply to most Kepler target stars. We validate this model using “deep” FLTI experiments, with ~500,000 injection realizations on each of a small number of targets and “shallow” FLTI experiments with ~2000 injection realizations on each of many targets. From the results of these experiments, we identify anomalous targets, model their behavior and refine the ACM accordingly.In this presentation, we discuss progress in validating and refining the ACM, and we

  5. Oral bioavailability of silymarin phytocomplex formulated as self-emulsifying pellets.

    PubMed

    Iosio, T; Voinovich, D; Perissutti, B; Serdoz, F; Hasa, D; Grabnar, I; Acqua, S Dall'; Zara, G P; Muntoni, E; Pinto, J F

    2011-04-15

    The objective of this study was to develop new solid self-emulsifying pellets to deliver milk thistle extract (silymarin). These pellets were prepared via extrusion/spheronisation procedure, using a self-emulsifying system or SES (Akoline MCM®, Miglyol®, Tween 80®, soy lecithin and propylene glycol), microcrystalline cellulose and lactose monohydrate. To select the most suitable formulations for extrusion and spheronisation, an experimental design of experiences was adopted. The screening amongst formulations (13 different blends) was performed preparing pellets and evaluating extrusion profiles and quality of the spheronised extrudates. The pellets were characterised for size and shape, density, force required to crush them. Although more than one type of pellets demonstrated adequate morphological and technological characteristics, pellets prepared from formulation 7 revealed the best properties and were selected for further biopharmaceutical investigations, including in vitro dissolution and in vivo trials on rats to study serum and lymph levels after oral administration of the pellets. These preliminary technological and pharmacokinetic data demonstrated that extrusion/spheronisation is a viable technology to produce self-emulsifying pellets of good quality and able to improve in vivo oral bioavailability of main components of a phytotherapeutic extract of more than 100 times by enhancing the lymphatic route of absorption. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermionic plasma injection for the Lockheed Martin T4 Compact Fusion Reactor experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Jonathon

    2015-11-01

    Lockheed Martin's Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) concept relies on diamagnetic confinement in a magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp geometry. Plasma injection into cusp field configurations requires careful deliberation. Previous work has shown that axial injection via a plasma gun is capable of achieving high-beta conditions in cusp configurations. We present a pulsed, high power thermionic plasma source and the associated magnetic field topology for plasma injection into the caulked-cusp magnetic field. The resulting plasma fueling and cross-field diffusion is discussed.

  7. Heating system of pellet samples integrated with terahertz spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sterczewski, L. A. Grzelczak, M. P.; Plinski, E. F.

    2016-01-15

    This article describes automation of temperature-dependent terahertz spectroscopic experiments. The proposed dual-heater temperature controller based on a cascade proportional-integral-derivative algorithm provides smooth temperature changes in the polyethylene-based pharmaceutical pellet samples. The device has been integrated with a terahertz time-domain spectrometer. Thermodynamic experiments can now be performed without any probe inserted into the measured sample. Selected results of temperature-induced evolution in terahertz spectra are presented.

  8. Heating system of pellet samples integrated with terahertz spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterczewski, L. A.; Grzelczak, M. P.; Plinski, E. F.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes automation of temperature-dependent terahertz spectroscopic experiments. The proposed dual-heater temperature controller based on a cascade proportional-integral-derivative algorithm provides smooth temperature changes in the polyethylene-based pharmaceutical pellet samples. The device has been integrated with a terahertz time-domain spectrometer. Thermodynamic experiments can now be performed without any probe inserted into the measured sample. Selected results of temperature-induced evolution in terahertz spectra are presented.

  9. Design of a field experiment for injection of natural colloids in a sandy coastal plain aquifer, Belle W. Baruch Forest Science Institute, Georgetown, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Toran, L.E.; McCarthy, J.F. ); Williams, T.M. . Belle W. Baruch Forest Science Inst.)

    1990-06-01

    This report summarizes the design of field injection experiments that constitute one task in the larger project described in the report Experiments Using Natural Organics.'' In the experiment, we plan to inject a large volume of colloidal organic matter (COM) into a sandy, unconsolidated coastal aquifer and observe the migration of COM into the groundwater flow system. The report provides a brief overview of the research project, including hypotheses to be tested; describes the purpose of the field injection experiments; summarizes the site characterization preliminary to the experiments; and explains the design of the experiments. 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Pitch angle scattering by triggered emissions from the Siple Station wave injection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harid, V.; Golkowski, M.; Bell, T. F.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U. S.

    2012-12-01

    Nonlinear amplification of whistler mode waves in the Earth's magnetosphere , due to gyroresonance with energetic electrons, also known as the phenomena of VLF triggered emissions, has been investigated extensively with analytical formulations, experimental observations and computer simulations. However, the pitch angle scattering of typical triggered emission waveforms has not been specifically considered. Most authors consider particle scattering either in the presence of a monochromatic constant amplitude wave or a broadband incoherent but time-frequency homogenous emission. Although investigation of these two limiting cases has provided valuable insight into radiation belt dynamics, a large class of waves including triggered emissions and chorus do not fall under either of the two descriptions. The inherent symmetry of a constant amplitude monochromatic wave around the equator results in non-cumulative pitch angle change for a large population of electrons. Wave amplification generated during linear and nonlinear growth result in wave gradients that can have a more significant effect on particle pitch angle and energy. In addition, coherent frequency changing signals are capable of shifting the cyclotron resonance condition and significantly perturbing particle trajectories from their adiabatic motion. The wave-injection experiment at Siple Station, Antarctica was designed to study wave growth and triggering processes in the magnetosphere. Amplified signals from Siple Station often show both wave gradients as well advances in phase and frequency. Using a numerical test-particle simulation, we model the effect of typical Siple Station signals on pitch angle scattering and particle precipitation. Results show that triggered emission type wave forms are more efficient in producing large pitch angle changes in resonant particles.

  11. 25 years of pelletizing at CVRD

    SciTech Connect

    Bandeira de Mello, L.A.; Mourao, J.M.; Cunha, J.M.; Piccolo, A.L.; Klein, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the evolution of the iron ore pelletizing activities at Companhia Vale do Rio Doce (CVRD), since the start-up of the first plant in the Tubarao area (Brazil), in 1969. The main features of CVRD`s pelletizing activities are described, focusing on the development of different types of pellets for the blast furnace and direct reduction markets, on the actions taken to face the urging necessity of cutting down energetic costs and on the handling of several different types of raw material. The profile of process control, quality management and environmental control at CVRD`s pelletizing plants is also presented.

  12. Recent experience with and future directions of contraceptive implants and injectable contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sanchez, F; Brache, V; Faundes, A

    1993-12-01

    Subdermal implantable contraception has been the most important addition to contraceptive technology in the past 2 decades. The Norplant system is only the first of a new family of long acting methods of high effectiveness, high acceptability, and prompt reversibility. The main advantage of the second generation implant systems, to be available soon, is the reduction in the number of implants, which greatly facilitates insertion and removal. However, great improvement in bleeding control is not to be expected. Large and carefully designed epidemiological studies have contributed to clear the main objections to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) as an injectable contraceptive. New progestin-only, long acting injectables are being tested, but significant improvements over existing methods are difficult to foresee, although every alternative is welcome. Monthly combined injectables have been in great demand, at least in China and Latin America, because of better bleeding control. Improved combined monthly injectables, less estrogenic and more progestin dominated, have been developed and are being introduced in several countries and should soon replace the old monthly injectables. Contraceptive implants and injectables have shown to be an important addition to the contraceptive options available to women throughout both the developing and developed world.

  13. Clinical experience with repository corticotropin injection in patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing mood changes with intravenous methylprednisolone: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Stacey; Woo, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The elevated prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms and disorders among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is well recognized, as are potential neuropsychiatric side effects of treatment with corticosteroids. Both methylprednisolone (MP) and repository corticotropin injection (HP Acthar® gel) have demonstrated efficacy in reducing short-term disability after exacerbations of MS. Although historical data are limited, repository corticotropin injection has not generally been associated with detrimental neuropsychiatric effects. We describe six cases of patients with relapsing-remitting MS who had previously experienced detrimental mood changes with MP treatment. Some of these patients had previous histories of mood disorders or other neuropsychiatric symptoms prior to MS diagnosis. All six patients were subsequently treated with repository corticotropin injection for MS exacerbations and each demonstrated improvements in MS symptoms. This clinical experience suggests that repository corticotropin injection should be considered as an alternative for patients who do not tolerate corticosteroids or have difficulties associated with intravenous medication. Furthermore, the rate of neuropsychiatric side effects observed in these patients was low. These observations support repository corticotropin injection as a viable alternative for the treatment of acute exacerbations of MS, particularly in patients who have a history of neuropsychiatric disorders or symptoms either independently or in response to MP treatment. In reviewing both the published data and our own clinical experience regarding potential neuropsychiatric adverse events with treatment for MS exacerbations, we hope to stimulate further research into the potential efficacy and safety of repository corticotropin injection among patients with some form of neuropsychiatric complications that must be considered when establishing a treatment plan for MS. PMID:27134674

  14. Effects of pelleting conditioner retention time on nursery pig growth performance.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L L; Stark, C R; Fahrenholz, A C; Goncalves, M A D; DeRouchey, J M; Jones, C K

    2015-03-01

    A total of 180 nursery pigs (PIC 327 × 1050; initially 12.6 kg) were used in an 18-d study to determine the effects of pellet mill conditioning parameters and feed form on pig performance. All diets were similar, and different feed processing parameters were used to create experimental treatments. Factors considered were conditioning time (15, 30, or 60 s) and feed form (mash or pelleted). To remove the confounding factor of feed form, pelleted samples were reground to a similar particle size as the mash diet. Treatments included: 1) mash diet without thermal processing (negative control), 2) pelleted diet conditioned for 30 s (positive control), 3) pelleted diet conditioned for 15 s and reground, 4) pelleted diet conditioned for 30 s and reground, and 5) pelleted diet conditioned for 60 s and reground. Pigs were weaned and fed a common acclimation diet for 21 d before the start of the experiment. Growth and feed disappearance were then measured for 18 d. All diets had similar levels of percentage total starch, but thermally processed diets had a 1.67 to 1.87-fold increase in percentage gelatinized starch compared to the mash diet. Average daily gain and G:F did not differ between treatments overall, but pigs fed the positive control pelleted diet had decreased ADFI ( < 0.05) compared to pigs fed all other diets. Preplanned contrasts revealed that pigs fed mash diets tended to have greater ADG ( < 0.10) compared to those fed pelleted and reground diets. This suggests that processing may have had a negative influence on feed utilization, which is further supported by the finding that pigs fed mash diets tended to have greater ADG ( < 0.10) compared to those fed diets that were thermally processed, regardless of regrinding. Considering these results, it was not surprising that pigs fed mash diets had greater ADG and ADFI ( < 0.05) than those fed pelleted diets. When directly comparing diets conditioned at 60 rpm, fed either as whole pellets or reground to mash

  15. The influence of fish feed pellets on the stability of seabed sediment: A laboratory flume investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumeier, Urs; Friend, Patrick L.; Gangelhof, Uffe; Lunding, Jens; Lundkvist, Morten; Bergamasco, Alessandro; Amos, Carl L.; Flindt, Mogens

    2007-11-01

    Superfluous fish food settling below fish farms can have a negative impact on the seabed. To aid in the assessment of this impact a series of flume experiments, designed to mimic seabed conditions below a fish farm, was conducted with the aim of examining the effects of fish pellets on the stability of fine sediments. Artificial beds, with varying quantities of fish pellets incorporated both within the sediment matrix and lying on the sediment surface, were allowed to consolidate for different periods of time ranging from 1 to 10 days, and then subjected to erosion experiments. In flume experiments containing fish pellets, a bacterial biofilm developed at the sediment-water interface after a few days. In the control experiments (no fish pellets), a diatom biofilm caused extensive stabilisation of the surface sediment. The erosion experiments showed that the addition of fish pellets reduced the surface erosion threshold by more than 50%. The stability decrease was more pronounced in the experiments with greater amounts of pellets. Evidence of drag reduction due to high suspended sediment concentration was also observed. This phenomenon is discussed and a correction formula is proposed for the effective shear stress experienced by the bed.

  16. Injecting drug users' experiences of policing practices in two Mexican-U.S. border cities: public health perspectives.

    PubMed

    Miller, Cari L; Firestone, Michelle; Ramos, Rebeca; Burris, Scott; Ramos, Maria Elena; Case, Patricia; Brouwer, Kimberly C; Fraga, Miguel Angel; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2008-08-01

    Previous research has identified the impact of law enforcement practices on the behaviours and health of injection drug users (IDUs). We undertook a qualitative study of IDUs' experiences of policing practices in two Mexican cities on the U.S. border. In 2004, two teams of Mexican interviewers conducted in-depth interviews with IDUs residing in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez (Cd. Juarez), Mexico, who had injected drugs at least once in the prior month. Topics included types of drug used, injection settings, access to sterile needles and experiences with police. Field notes and transcribed interviews were analysed to identify emergent themes. Amongst the 43 participants, most reported that it is common for IDUs to be arrested and detained for 36h for carrying sterile or used syringes. Most reported that they or someone they knew had been beaten by police. Interviews suggested five key themes relating to police influence on the risk environment: (1) impact of policing practices on accessibility of sterile syringes, (2) influence of police on choice of places to inject drugs (e.g., shooting galleries), (3) police violence, (4) police corruption and (5) perceived changes in policing practices. Findings suggest that some behaviour of police officers in Tijuana and Cd. Juarez is inconsistent with legal norms and may be negatively influencing the risk of acquiring blood-borne infections amongst IDUs. Implementing a comprehensive and successful HIV prevention programme amongst IDUs requires interventions to influence the knowledge, attitudes and practices of law enforcement officers.

  17. INJECTING DRUG USERS’ EXPERIENCES OF POLICING PRACTICES IN TWO MEXICAN-U.S. BORDER CITIES: PUBLIC HEALTH PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cari L.; Firestone, Michelle; Ramos, Rebeca; Burris, Scott; Ramos, Maria Elena; Case, Patricia; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Fraga, Miguel Angel; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous research has identified the impact of law enforcement practices on the behaviors and health of injection drug users (IDUs). We undertook a qualitative study of IDUs’ experiences of policing practices in two Mexican cities on the U.S. border. Methods In 2004, two teams of Mexican interviewers conducted in-depth interviews with IDUs residing in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez (Cd. Juarez), Mexico who had injected drugs at least once in the prior month. Topics included types of drug used, injection settings, access to sterile needles and experiences with police. Field notes and transcribed interviews were analyzed to identify emergent themes. Results Among the 43 participants, most reported that it is common for IDUs to be arrested and detained for 36 hours for carrying sterile or used syringes. Most reported that they or someone they knew had been beaten by police. Interviews suggested 5 key themes relating to police influence on the risk environment: 1) impact of policing practices on accessibility of sterile syringes, 2) influence of police on choice of places to inject drugs (e.g., shooting galleries), 3) police violence, 4) police corruption, and 5) perceived changes in policing practices. Conclusion Findings suggest that some behavior of police officers in Tijuana and Cd. Juarez is inconsistent with legal norms and may be negatively influencing the risk of acquiring blood-borne infections among IDUs. Implementing a comprehensive and successful HIV prevention program among IDUs requires interventions to influence the knowledge, attitudes and practices of law enforcement officers. PMID:17997089

  18. The design and performance of a twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector for Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Urbahn, John A.

    1994-05-01

    A twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector has been designed, built and tested both in the laboratory and on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak at MIT. The injector functions by firing pellets of frozen hydrogen or deuterium deep into the plasma discharge for the purpose of fueling the plasma, modifying the density profile and increasing the global energy confinement time. The design goals of the injector are: (1) Operational flexibility, (2) High reliability, (3) Remote operation with minimal maintenance. These requirements have lead to a single stage, pipe gun design with twenty barrels. Pellets are formed by in- situ condensation of the fuel gas, thus avoiding moving parts at cryogenic temperatures. The injector is the first to dispense with the need for cryogenic fluids and instead uses a closed cycle refrigerator to cool the thermal system components. The twenty barrels of the injector produce pellets of four different size groups and allow for a high degree of flexibility in fueling experiments. Operation of the injector is under PLC control allowing for remote operation, interlocked safety features and automated pellet manufacturing. The injector has been extrusively tested and shown to produce pellets reliably with velocities up to 1400 m/sec. During the period from September to November of 1993, the injector was successfully used to fire pellets into over fifty plasma discharges. Experimental results include data on the pellet penetration into the plasma using an advanced pellet tracking diagnostic with improved time and spatial response. Data from the tracker indicates pellet penetrations were between 30 and 86 percent of the plasma minor radius.

  19. Incarceration, addiction and harm reduction: inmates experience injecting drugs in prison.

    PubMed

    Small, Will; Kain, S; Laliberte, Nancy; Schechter, Martin T; O'Shaughnessy, Michael V; Spittal, Patricia M

    2005-01-01

    Within Canadian prisons HIV/AIDS is becoming more common among inmates. While injection drug use in correctional facilities is documented to be a problem, qualitative research into the HIV risks faced by inmates is lacking. The goal of this research was to qualitatively examine HIV risk associated with injecting inside British Columbia prisons. A sample of 26 former male inmates who had recently used drugs within correctional facilities were recruited from a ongoing cohort study of injection drug users in Vancouver, Canada. Data for this study were collected through in-depth interviews conducted in 2001/2002. Analysis of these data involved identifying emergent themes and then exploring these central concepts in further interviews to confirm the accuracy of interpretation. The harms normally associated with drug addiction, and injection drug use are exacerbated in prison. Interpersonal relationships and the possession of exchangeable resources determine access to scarce syringes. The scarcity of syringes has resulted in patterns of sharing amongst large numbers of persons. Continual reuse of scarce syringes poses serious health hazards and bleach distribution is an inadequate solution. The findings of this study emphasize the need for effective harm reduction programs that provide an appropriate response to the problem of injection drug use among inmates.

  20. Pre-clinical results with Clariscan (NC100150 Injection); experience from different disease models.

    PubMed

    Bjørnerud, A; Johansson, L O; Ahlström, H K

    2001-05-01

    A superparamagnetic nanoparticle (NC100150 Injection) was investigated in two different animal models; renal perfusion in pigs and tumour imaging in mice. In the pig model, qualitative first-pass perfusion maps following a bolus injection of NC100150 Injection enabled good visualisation of hypoperfused regions of the renal cortex following partial ligation of the renal artery. High temporal resolution was found to be essential to accurately capture the first passage of the contrast agent through the kidney due to the very rapid blood flow in normal renal cortex. In the tumour model (LS174T cells implanted in nude mice), NC100150 Injection was found to cause a gradual (over 60 min) signal increase on T1-w images in part of the tumours which was attributed to contrast agent leakage from the vascular space to the extravascular space in areas of increased capillary permeability. This observation is consistent with previous reports on the molecular cut-off size for vascular extraction for this tumour cell line. The specific enhancement of tumour tissue suggest potential utility of NC100150 Injection as an angiogenesis marker.

  1. Active Flow Separation Control of a Stator Vane Using Surface Injection in a Multistage Compressor Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.; Prahst, Patricia S.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    2003-01-01

    Micro-flow control actuation embedded in a stator vane was used to successfully control separation and improve near stall performance in a multistage compressor rig at NASA Glenn. Using specially designed stator vanes configured with internal actuation to deliver pulsating air through slots along the suction surface, a research study was performed to identify performance benefits using this microflow control approach. Pressure profiles and unsteady pressure measurements along the blade surface and at the shroud provided a dynamic look at the compressor during microflow air injection. These pressure measurements lead to a tracking algorithm to identify the onset of separation. The testing included steady air injection at various slot locations along the vane. The research also examined the benefit of pulsed injection and actively controlled air injection along the stator vane. Two types of actuation schemes were studied, including an embedded actuator for on-blade control. Successful application of an online detection and flow control scheme will be discussed. Testing showed dramatic performance benefit for flow reattachment and subsequent improvement in diffusion through the use of pulsed controlled injection. The paper will discuss the experimental setup, the blade configurations, and preliminary CFD results which guided the slot location along the blade. The paper will also show the pressure profiles and unsteady pressure measurements used to track flow control enhancement, and will conclude with the tracking algorithm for adjusting the control.

  2. Investigation of oil injection into brine for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve : hydrodynamics and mixing experiments with SPR liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Cote, Raymond O.; Torczynski, John Robert; O'Hern, Timothy John

    2004-05-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study a proposed approach for oil reintroduction in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The goal was to assess whether useful oil is rendered unusable through formation of a stable oil-brine emulsion during reintroduction of degassed oil into the brine layer in storage caverns. An earlier report (O'Hern et al., 2003) documented the first stage of the program, in which simulant liquids were used to characterize the buoyant plume that is produced when a jet of crude oil is injected downward into brine. This report documents the final two test series. In the first, the plume hydrodynamics experiments were completed using SPR oil, brine, and sludge. In the second, oil reinjection into brine was run for approximately 6 hours, and sampling of oil, sludge, and brine was performed over the next 3 months so that the long-term effects of oil-sludge mixing could be assessed. For both series, the experiment consisted of a large transparent vessel that is a scale model of the proposed oil-injection process at the SPR. For the plume hydrodynamics experiments, an oil layer was floated on top of a brine layer in the first test series and on top of a sludge layer residing above the brine in the second test series. The oil was injected downward through a tube into the brine at a prescribed depth below the oil-brine or sludge-brine interface. Flow rates were determined by scaling to match the ratio of buoyancy to momentum between the experiment and the SPR. Initially, the momentum of the flow produces a downward jet of oil below the tube end. Subsequently, the oil breaks up into droplets due to shear forces, buoyancy dominates the flow, and a plume of oil droplets rises to the interface. The interface was deflected upward by the impinging oil-brine plume. Videos of this flow were recorded for scaled flow rates that bracket the equivalent pumping rates in an SPR cavern during injection of degassed oil. Image-processing analyses were

  3. Docetaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic to docetaxel injection or drugs made with polysorbate 80, an ingredient found in some medications. Ask ... if a medication you are allergic to contains polysorbate 80. If you experience any of the following ...

  4. Assessment of nitrification potential in ground water using short term, single-well injection experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Baumgartner, L.K.; Miller, D.N.; Repert, D.A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrification was measured within a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, using a series of single-well injection tests. The aquifer contained a wastewater-derived contaminant plume, the core of which was anoxic and contained ammonium. The study was conducted near the downgradient end of the ammonium zone, which was characterized by inversely trending vertical gradients of oxygen (270 to 0 μM) and ammonium (19 to 625 μM) and appeared to be a potentially active zone for nitrification. The tests were conducted by injecting a tracer solution (ambient ground water + added constituents) into selected locations within the gradients using multilevel samplers. After injection, the tracers moved by natural ground water flow and were sampled with time from the injection port. Rates of nitrification were determined from changes in nitrate and nitrite concentration relative to bromide. Initial tests were conducted with 15N-enriched ammonium; subsequent tests examined the effect of adding ammonium, nitrite, or oxygen above background concentrations and of adding difluoromethane, a nitrification inhibitor. In situ net nitrate production exceeded net nitrite production by 3- to 6- fold and production rates of both decreased in the presence of difluoromethane. Nitrification rates were 0.02–0.28 μmol (L aquifer)−1 h−1 with in situ oxygen concentrations and up to 0.81 μmol (L aquifer)−1 h−1 with non-limiting substrate concentrations. Geochemical considerations indicate that the rates derived from single-well injection tests yielded overestimates of in situ rates, possibly because the injections promoted small-scale mixing within a transport-limited reaction zone. Nonetheless, these tests were useful for characterizing ground water nitrification in situ and for comparing potential rates of activity when the tracer cloud included non-limiting ammonium and oxygen concentrations.

  5. Looking West at Line Two Pelletizing Line, Centering Furnaces and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking West at Line Two Pelletizing Line, Centering Furnaces and Dewaxers of First Floor of Pellet Plant - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Pellet Plant, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  6. Adverse childhood experience effects on opioid use initiation, injection drug use, and overdose among persons with opioid use disorder.

    PubMed

    Stein, Michael D; Conti, Micah T; Kenney, Shannon; Anderson, Bradley J; Flori, Jessica N; Risi, Megan M; Bailey, Genie L

    2017-10-01

    Adverse childhood experiences are associated with the development of substance use disorders. With opioid use disorder, a growing concern in the United States, we were interested in examining the relationship between adverse experiences and three landmarks of opioid use: age of opioid initiation, injection drug use, and lifetime overdose. Between May and December 2015, we interviewed consecutive persons seeking inpatient opioid detoxification. Participants were asked about age of opioid initiation, last month injection drug use, and lifetime history of overdose, and completed the ten-item Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE) questionnaire. Participants (n=457) averaged 32.2 (±8.64) years of age, 71.3% were male, and 82.5% were non-Hispanic White. The mean score on the ACE scale was 3.64 (±2.75). Mean age at time of initiating opioid use was 21.7 (±7.1) years, 68.7% had injected drugs within the past month, and 39.0% had overdosed. After adjusting for age, gender, and ethnicity, the ACE score was inversely associated with age of initiating opioid use (b=-0.50, 95% CI -0.70; -0.29, p<.001), and positively associated with recent injection drug use (OR=1.11, 95% CI 1.02; 1.20, p=0.014) and the likelihood of experiencing an overdose (OR=1.10, 95% CI 1.02; 1.20, p=0.015) in a graded dose response manner. Greater adverse childhood experiences are associated with three landmarks of opioid use risk. ACE screening may be useful in identifying high-risk subsets of opioid-using populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimating shot distance from limited pellets pattern.

    PubMed

    Plebe, Alessio; Compagnini, Domenico

    2012-10-10

    Several methods are available for shooting range estimation based on pellets pattern on the target that have a remarkable degree of accuracy. The task is usually approached working under the assumption that the entire distribution of pellets is available for examination. These methods fail, however, when the victim has been hit by a portion of the pattern only. The problem can be solved with reasonable accuracy when there are areas of void in the victim that are adjacent to the area struck by pellets. This study presents a method that can be used in precisely this type of situation, allowing the estimation of shot distance in cases of partial pellet patterns. It is based on collecting distributions in test shots at several distances, and taking samples in the targets, constrained by the shape of the void and the pellet hit areas. Statistical descriptors of patterns are extracted from such samples, and fed into a neural network classifier, estimating shot ranges of distance.

  8. On-line automatic detection of wood pellets in pneumatically conveyed wood dust flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Duo; Yan, Yong; Carter, Robert M.; Gao, Lingjun; Qian, Xiangchen; Lu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a piezoelectric transducer based system for on-line automatic detection of wood pellets in wood dust flow in pneumatic conveying pipelines. The piezoelectric transducer senses non-intrusively the collisions between wood pellets and the pipe wall. Wavelet-based denoising is adopted to eliminate environmental noise and recover the collision events. Then the wood pellets are identified by sliding a time window through the denoised signal with a suitable threshold. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory test rig and on an industrial pneumatic conveying pipeline to assess the effectiveness and operability of the system.

  9. New Experiences With Steam Injection From The MÜhlacker Field Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theurer, T.; Koschitzky, H.-P.; Färber, A.

    A thermally enhanced remediation scheme employing steam injection has been used at a former hazardous waste disposal site near the City of Mühlacker, Germany, to remove chlorinated solvents. Finding SVE (soil vapour extraction) to be ineffective in the unsaturated soil zone, a pilot-scale project was initiated in 1999 to employ steam injection in the highly contaminated unsaturated low permeable zone 7-15 meters be- low ground surface, limited on top and bottom by very low permeable layers. After completion of the project in September 2001, approximately 2.8 tons of chlorinated hydrocarbons had been removed from the 2500 m3 target area. This project served as a pilot site in the State of Baden-Württemberg EPA (Landesanstalt für Umweltschutz, LfU) site cleanup program, which was funded through the State's "Kommunaler Alt- lastenfonds". Detailed evaluation of SVE technology had indicated that the low permeability in this soil served as a limiting factor for "cold" SVE. As a result, alternative technologies were considered and thermally enhanced SVE by steam injection was selected in 1998 to address the unsaturated zone contaminants. A 20-meter diameter, egg-shaped test- ing area was constructed at the site for pilot-scale demonstration of the steam injection process. The testing area comprised one central injection well surrounded by six ex- traction wells that could be used simultaneously for vapor and liquid extraction. Ten monitoring lances with a total of 100 temperature sensors measured subsurface tem- peratures through the soil horizon. Using a gas-fired 100 kW generator, steam was injected at a rate of up to 100 kg/hour and a pressure of up to 2.5 bars. After ten months of steam injection, nearly complete heating of the target zone had been achieved. of the 2800 kg of TCE removed, approximately 95% was extracted in the gaseous phase and the remaining part as solute in condensed water from the capillary barrier on bottom of the soil horizon. This condensed

  10. Bilateral shotgun pellet pulmonary emboli

    PubMed Central

    Huebner, Stephen; Ali, Sayed

    2012-01-01

    Intravascular migration of bullets and other foreign bodies is a rare but known complication of penetrating trauma. Missile embolization can represent a diagnostic challenge because it may present in various and unexpected ways. We present the case of a 54-year-old female who sustained shotgun pellet emboli to the pulmonary arteries following a left upper extremity gunshot wound and related vascular surgery. The case illustrates bilateral embolization, and the embolic events occurred following surgery. Embolization should be considered in evaluating patients with gunshot wounds, particularly if there are anomalous symptoms or the projectile is not found in the original, or expected, location. Close attention to the location of the foreign bodies on serial radiographs may reveal the diagnosis of intravascular embolization. PMID:22690290

  11. Oklahoma experiences largest earthquake during ongoing regional wastewater injection hazard mitigation efforts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeck, William; Hayes, Gavin; McNamara, Daniel E.; Rubinstein, Justin L.; Barnhart, William; Earle, Paul; Benz, Harley M.

    2017-01-01

    The 3 September 2016, Mw 5.8 Pawnee earthquake was the largest recorded earthquake in the state of Oklahoma. Seismic and geodetic observations of the Pawnee sequence, including precise hypocenter locations and moment tensor modeling, shows that the Pawnee earthquake occurred on a previously unknown left-lateral strike-slip basement fault that intersects the mapped right-lateral Labette fault zone. The Pawnee earthquake is part of an unprecedented increase in the earthquake rate in Oklahoma that is largely considered the result of the deep injection of waste fluids from oil and gas production. If this is, indeed, the case for the M5.8 Pawnee earthquake, then this would be the largest event to have been induced by fluid injection. Since 2015, Oklahoma has undergone wide-scale mitigation efforts primarily aimed at reducing injection volumes. Thus far in 2016, the rate of M3 and greater earthquakes has decreased as compared to 2015, while the cumulative moment—or energy released from earthquakes—has increased. This highlights the difficulty in earthquake hazard mitigation efforts given the poorly understood long-term diffusive effects of wastewater injection and their connection to seismicity.

  12. Assessment of electrical conductivity as a surrogate measurement for water samples in a tracer injection experiment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The transport behavior of solutes in streams depends on chemical, physical, biological, and hydrodynamic processes. Although it is a very complex system, it is known that this behavior is greatly influenced by surface and subsurface flows. For this reason, tracer injection in the water flows is one ...

  13. Oklahoma experiences largest earthquake during ongoing regional wastewater injection hazard mitigation efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeck, W. L.; Hayes, G. P.; McNamara, D. E.; Rubinstein, J. L.; Barnhart, W. D.; Earle, P. S.; Benz, H. M.

    2017-01-01

    The 3 September 2016, Mw 5.8 Pawnee earthquake was the largest recorded earthquake in the state of Oklahoma. Seismic and geodetic observations of the Pawnee sequence, including precise hypocenter locations and moment tensor modeling, shows that the Pawnee earthquake occurred on a previously unknown left-lateral strike-slip basement fault that intersects the mapped right-lateral Labette fault zone. The Pawnee earthquake is part of an unprecedented increase in the earthquake rate in Oklahoma that is largely considered the result of the deep injection of waste fluids from oil and gas production. If this is, indeed, the case for the M5.8 Pawnee earthquake, then this would be the largest event to have been induced by fluid injection. Since 2015, Oklahoma has undergone wide-scale mitigation efforts primarily aimed at reducing injection volumes. Thus far in 2016, the rate of M3 and greater earthquakes has decreased as compared to 2015, while the cumulative moment—or energy released from earthquakes—has increased. This highlights the difficulty in earthquake hazard mitigation efforts given the poorly understood long-term diffusive effects of wastewater injection and their connection to seismicity.

  14. Effect of differently pelletized digestate on the plant growth of spring wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Nils; Knoop, Christine; Raab, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    In Germany, biowaste is used in more than 100 biogas plants and has increasing potential as a fermentation substrate. To optimise waste cycle management organic digestates should be redistributed and innovative products for soil amendment of agricultural areas could be developed. The BMBF-funded VeNGA project seeks to find answers on how to improve the properties of soil amendments produced from fermentation residues. Here, we report findings from our study that focuses on plant growth and soil development. Within a three-month rhizotron experiment, the influence of differently prepared fermentation residues on the root development of summer wheat was investigated. The four variants of the prepared digestate (rolled pellet, pressed pellet, shredded, loose) were tested under constant conditions in the greenhouse on two soils with different textures (sandy and loamy-sand). All fermentation residues originated from the same batch and were composted before the preparation to ensure adequate hygienisation. Depending on preparation type and soil substrate significant differences in root growth and root development have been observed. Plant growth was most intense in the rhizotron experiment with the loose digestate, indicating high nutrient availability due to the large surface area of the organic matter. Plant growth in the substrate with the rolled and pressed pellets was less pronounced, indicating a more persistent stability of the pellets. In rhizotrons applied with rolled and pressed pellets root growth into the mineral fabric was significantly lower in sandy substrate than in the loamy-sand. However, in the sandy substrate root growth within the rolled pellets was more intense than in the substrate with the pressed pellets. Obviously, the different production techniques of the pellets seem to have an influence on the rooting of the pellets and facilitate the long term stability of soil organic carbon. Furthermore, the comparison of the two different textures

  15. Effectiveness and safety of CEUS-guided haemostatic injection for blunt splenic trauma: an animal experiment.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Tang, J; Lv, F; Zhang, H; Zhang, S; An, L

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether complications occur after haemostatic agents are injected into blunt splenic injuries. After undergoing ultrasound (US), contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) examinations, dogs with grade III-IV injury received the minimally invasive therapy. After treatment, CEUS was performed to observe changes in the regions treated. In the immediate group, dogs underwent laparotomy 30 min after treatment to observe the haemostatic effect. In the survival group, animals underwent CEUS and CECT examinations to observe the short-term healing outcome and complications at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after the injection. After undergoing CEUS and CECT examinations, 12 dogs with grade III-IV injury received the minimally invasive therapy. Before injection, CEUS examinations showed anechoic and/or hypoechoic perfusion defects and active bleeding at the injury sites, and CECT showed traumatic lesions as low-density regions without enhancement. After treatment, CEUS demonstrated the disappearance of active bleeding, and hyperechoic spots emerged at the injury sites. Uneven density regions were displayed on CECT. Treated areas were covered by blood clots and glue membrane in the immediate-group animals. Three weeks later, CEUS showed a decrease of hyperechoic spots in the survival group, and the splenic parenchyma enhanced uniformly on CECT. Laparotomy showed that the greater omentum had moved upwards and partly covered the wound in four animals, and the injury sites had completely healed. Histopathological examination showed that fibrous connective tissue covered the splenic capsule and that the haemostatic glue had degraded. No complication occurred, such as delayed splenic haemorrhage, splenic abscesses, splenic pseudoaneurysms, intestinal obstruction or intestinal adhesions. CEUS-guided haemostatic injection is not only effective in stopping active bleeding immediately, but it is also safe in that no

  16. Looking Northeast Along Hallway between Pellet Plant and Oxide Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Northeast Along Hallway between Pellet Plant and Oxide Building, including Virgin Hopper Bins - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Pellet Plant, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  17. Radiation analysis of the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) pellet injector system and its impact on personnel access

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.; Stevens, P.N.; Gomes, I.C.; Gomes, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    The conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is nearing completion. The CIT is a short-pulse ignition experiment, which is planned to follow the operations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The high neutron wall loadings, 4--5 MW/m/sup 2/, associated with the operation of this device require that neutronics-related issues be considered in the overall system design. Radiation shielding is required for the protection of device components as well as personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure, and the entire experiment is housed in a circular test cell facility that has a radius of 12 m. The most critical radiation concerns in the CIT design process relate to the numerous penetrations in the device. This report discusses the impact of a major penetration on the design and operation of the pellet injection system in the CIT. The pellet injector is a major component, and it has a line-of-sight penetration through the igloo and test cell wall. All current options for maintenance of the injector require hands-on-access. A nuclear analysis has been performed to establish the feasibility of hands-on-access. A coupled Monte Carlo/discrete-ordinates methodology was used to perform the analysis. This problem is characterized by deep penetration and streaming with very large length-to-diameter ratios. Results from this study indicate that personnel access to the pellet injector glovebox is possible. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Access to harm reduction and HIV-related treatment services inside Indian prisons: experiences of formerly incarcerated injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Kamei, Ram; Kipgen, Hoineilam; Kh, Jayanta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The authors aimed to examine the incarceration experiences of injecting drug users in accessing harm reduction, and HIV-related services inside prisons in India. The authors conducted three focus groups with a purposive sample of 23 formerly incarcerated male IDUs and four key informant interviews with a former police official, a drug dealer and service providers. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Participants reported availability of alcohol and injectable or oral drugs such as heroin, dextropropoxyphene, and marijuana inside prisons. Inmates obtained drugs and clean syringes (one syringe bought for 2.5-4 USD) through prison staff, and collected used syringes and needles from the dustbins in prison sickrooms. Needles and syringes were reused and shared. Prisons did not have needle and syringe programmes, detoxification, overdose management or opioid substitution treatment. Drug-using prison inmates faced several challenges in accessing antiretroviral treatment and HIV testing. The authors' findings emphasize the need to protect the health of injection drug-using inmates by introducing harm reduction programmes and removing barriers to HIV testing and antiretroviral treatment. This study illustrates, for the first time, the contexts behind high risk injecting drug use behaviours among prison inmates in India. It also highlights the lack of availability of harm reduction services such as needle and syringe programmes, drug detoxification and opioid substitution treatment inside prisons. Further, it demonstrates the difficulties faced by HIV-positive prison inmates in getting timely and uninterrupted antiretroviral treatment.

  19. Direct alpha spectrometry for analysing leached ThO2 pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllykylä, E.; Koivula, L.; Tanhua-Tyrkkö, M.; Helariutta, K.; Lavonen, T.; Ollila, K.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.

    2017-09-01

    The next generation application of nuclear energy has shown an interest towards ThO2 or mixed oxides fuels. However, more knowledge is needed, for example, on the microstructural and matrix dissolution behaviour of ThO2. The objective of this study was to examine surface properties of thick ThO2 pellets by non-destructive alpha analysis method accompanied with Monte Carlo simulations before and after a leaching experiment. This study has been conducted to investigate the contents, and surface layer thickness of crystalline 232ThO2 pellet leached in aqueous solution with excess of 229Th tracer in the beginning of the experiment. The simulation results have suggested a maximum 0.1 μm concentrated layer of 229Th on the pellet surface. The presence of this layer suppresses further dissolution of the pellet.

  20. Overview of the HL-1M Tokamak Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yong; Wang Enyao; Ding Xuantong; Yan Longwen; Qian Shangjie; Yan Jiancheng

    2002-07-15

    Experimental progress with the HL-1M tokamak has been made in many areas including confinement improvement, auxiliary heating, plasma fueling, and wall conditionings. An H-mode induced by a biased electrode was obtained with the formation of an internal transport barrier at the region of r/a {approx} 0.4 to 0.5. Confinement improvement by lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) was extensively investigated. Confinement improvement seems to be related to the production of the radial electron field during LHCD. In off-axis electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), double sawteeth in soft X-ray radiation were observed, which implies that reversed magnetic shear could be formed during ECRH. At higher ECRH power, when the resonance position is near the q = 1 surface, fishbone instability was observed and investigated. An eight-shot pellet injector was used for the experiments. The pellet ablation process was investigated with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and an H{sub {alpha}} emission detector array. Clearly, asymmetry in the pellet cloud was observed in both the toroidal and poloidal directions. It has been found that the pellet velocity slows down clearly after the pellet enters the plasma. The density limit has been investigated on HL-1M at different wall conditionings with three kinds of fueling methods. It was found that a higher density limit could be achieved under the following conditions: (a) a strong reduction of the impurity content after siliconization and (b) a peaked density profile with pellet injection and/or supersonic molecular beam injection. With a neutral beam injection (NBI) system of 1 MW, preliminary results of NBI experiments were obtained with an increase of ion temperature from 450 to 700 eV.

  1. Automated fabrication, characterization and transport of ICF pellets. Final report, March 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, D W; Boyd, B A; Lilienkamp, R H

    1980-12-01

    The near-term objectives of the contract were threefold: (1) evaluate techniques for the production of frozen hydrogen microspheres and demonstrate concepts for coating them; (2) develop and demonstrate an optical characterization system which could lead to automated pellet inspection; and (3) develop and demonstrate a preliminary electrostatic pellet transport control system. This report describes the equipment assembled for these experiments and the results obtained.

  2. Temporal evolution of whistler growth in a cold plasma injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.; Fedder, J.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of whistler mode turbulence and particle participation in a cold plasma release are studied experimentally as part of the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracers Explorer (AMPTE) program. The investigation used a simple time dependent cold plasma density model, and an atypical ambient radiation belt was assumed. It is shown that a cold lithium injection in the AMPTE parameter range can give rise to whistler mode turbulence with significant gain to the wave amplitude in a single pass through a flux tube. Whistler mode growth results in the pitch angle diffusion of energetic electrons, which are in turn precipitated. The rate of power input into the ionosphere from these precipitating electrons is roughly estimated at 2 ergs per sq cm/s. It is found that this value of the precipitated power is large enough to continue producing a visible aurora until the injected plasma in the flux tube is lost or destroyed by magnetospheric convection or other processes.

  3. Analysis of ICRH antenna loading data in TEXTOR obtained during gas injection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, I.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Dumortier, P.; Koch, R.; Messiaen, A.; Vervier, M.

    2011-12-23

    The possibility of increasing the coupling of ICRH power to plasmas on TEXTOR by gas injection was investigated, for a given voltage applied at the input of an antenna pair. The antenna pair was operated in the conjugated T mode, D(H) heating was used. Modeling of the antenna by transmission line theory shows that load resilience is maintained in a broad range of independent resistance variation for each strap. It is found that the absolute value of the reflection coefficient can be maintained below 0.2 for typical values of resistance measured in plasma shots (2-10 {Omega}/m) in good matching conditions. During gas injection, the loading resistance showed a clear increase with increasing line average electron density measured close to the plasma edge. Evidence of fast wave eigenmodes was also found, as characteristic resonant behavior of loading resistance and antenna self-inductance, due to poor absorption in the plasma caused by high H minority concentration.

  4. Ion heating during magnetic relaxation in the helicity injected torus-II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, R.G.; Redd, A.J.; Hamp, W.T.; Smith, R.J.; Jarboe, T.R.

    2005-12-15

    Ion doppler spectroscopy (IDS) is applied to the helicity injected torus (HIT-II) spherical torus to measure impurity ion temperature and flows. [A. J. Redd et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2006 (2002)] The IDS instrument employs a 16-channel photomultiplier and can track temperature and velocity continuously through a discharge. Data for the coaxial helicity injection (CHI), transformer, and combined current drive configurations are presented. Ion temperatures for transformer-driven discharges are typically equal to or somewhat lower than electron temperatures measured by Thomson scattering. Internal reconnection events in transformer-driven discharges cause rapid ion heating. The CHI discharges exhibit anomalously high ion temperatures >250 eV, which are an order of magnitude higher than Thomson measurements, indicating ion heating through magnetic relaxation. The CHI discharges that exhibit current and poloidal flux buildup after bubble burst show sustained ion heating during current drive.

  5. Pelletization of fine coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1995-12-31

    Coal is one of the most abundant energy resources in the US with nearly 800 million tons of it being mined annually. Process and environmental demands for low-ash, low-sulfur coals and economic constraints for high productivity are leading the coal industry to use such modern mining methods as longwall mining and such newer coal processing techniques as froth flotation, oil agglomeration, chemical cleaning and synthetic fuel production. All these processes are faced with one common problem area--fine coals. Dealing effectively with these fine coals during handling, storage, transportation, and/or processing continues to be a challenge facing the industry. Agglomeration by the unit operation of pelletization consists of tumbling moist fines in drums or discs. Past experimental work and limited commercial practice have shown that pelletization can alleviate the problems associated with fine coals. However, it was recognized that there exists a serious need for delineating the fundamental principles of fine coal pelletization. Accordingly, a research program has been carried involving four specific topics: (i) experimental investigation of coal pelletization kinetics, (ii) understanding the surface principles of coal pelletization, (iii) modeling of coal pelletization processes, and (iv) simulation of fine coal pelletization circuits. This report summarizes the major findings and provides relevant details of the research effort.

  6. A centrifuge CO2 pellet cleaning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, C. A.; Fisher, P. W.; Nelson, W. D.; Schechter, D. E.

    1995-03-01

    An advanced turbine/CO2 pellet accelerator is being evaluated as a depaint technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The program, sponsored by Warner Robins Air Logistics Center (ALC), Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, has developed a robot-compatible apparatus that efficiently accelerates pellets of dry ice with a high-speed rotating wheel. In comparison to the more conventional compressed air 'sandblast' pellet accelerators, the turbine system can achieve higher pellet speeds, has precise speed control, and is more than ten times as efficient. A preliminary study of the apparatus as a depaint technology has been undertaken. Depaint rates of military epoxy/urethane paint systems on 2024 and 7075 aluminum panels as a function of pellet speed and throughput have been measured. In addition, methods of enhancing the strip rate by combining infra-red heat lamps with pellet blasting and by combining the use of environmentally benign solvents with the pellet blasting have also been studied. The design and operation of the apparatus will be discussed along with data obtained from the depaint studies.

  7. A centrifuge CO2 pellet cleaning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, C. A.; Fisher, P. W.; Nelson, W. D.; Schechter, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    An advanced turbine/CO2 pellet accelerator is being evaluated as a depaint technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The program, sponsored by Warner Robins Air Logistics Center (ALC), Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, has developed a robot-compatible apparatus that efficiently accelerates pellets of dry ice with a high-speed rotating wheel. In comparison to the more conventional compressed air 'sandblast' pellet accelerators, the turbine system can achieve higher pellet speeds, has precise speed control, and is more than ten times as efficient. A preliminary study of the apparatus as a depaint technology has been undertaken. Depaint rates of military epoxy/urethane paint systems on 2024 and 7075 aluminum panels as a function of pellet speed and throughput have been measured. In addition, methods of enhancing the strip rate by combining infra-red heat lamps with pellet blasting and by combining the use of environmentally benign solvents with the pellet blasting have also been studied. The design and operation of the apparatus will be discussed along with data obtained from the depaint studies.

  8. A Review of Pellets from Different Sources

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Teresa; Montero, Irene; Sepúlveda, Francisco José; Arranz, José Ignacio; Rojas, Carmen Victoria; Nogales, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The rise in pellet consumption has resulted in a wider variety of materials for pellet manufacture. Thus, pellet industry has started looking for alternative products, such as wastes from agricultural activities, forestry and related industries, along with the combination thereof, obtaining a broad range of these products. In addition, the entry into force of EN ISO 17225 standard makes wood pellet market (among other types) possible for industry and household purposes. Therefore, wastes that are suitable for biomass use have recently increased. In this study, the main characteristics of ten kinds of laboratory-made pellets from different raw materials were analyzed. Thus, we have focused on the most limiting factors of quality standards that determine the suitability for biomass market, depending on the kind of pellet. The results showed considerable differences among the analyzed pellets, exceeding the limits established by the standard in almost all cases, especially concerning ash content and N and S composition. The requirements of the studied standard, very demanding for certain factors, disable the entry of these densified wastes in greater added value markets. PMID:28788009

  9. A Review of Pellets from Different Sources.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Teresa; Montero, Irene; Sepúlveda, Francisco José; Arranz, José Ignacio; Rojas, Carmen Victoria; Nogales, Sergio

    2015-03-27

    The rise in pellet consumption has resulted in a wider variety of materials for pellet manufacture. Thus, pellet industry has started looking for alternative products, such as wastes from agricultural activities, forestry and related industries, along with the combination thereof, obtaining a broad range of these products. In addition, the entry into force of EN ISO 17225 standard makes wood pellet market (among other types) possible for industry and household purposes. Therefore, wastes that are suitable for biomass use have recently increased. In this study, the main characteristics of ten kinds of laboratory-made pellets from different raw materials were analyzed. Thus, we have focused on the most limiting factors of quality standards that determine the suitability for biomass market, depending on the kind of pellet. The results showed considerable differences among the analyzed pellets, exceeding the limits established by the standard in almost all cases, especially concerning ash content and N and S composition. The requirements of the studied standard, very demanding for certain factors, disable the entry of these densified wastes in greater added value markets.

  10. Identification of temperature-dependent water quality changes during a deep well injection experiment in a pyritic aquifer.

    PubMed

    Prommer, Henning; Stuyfzand, Pieter J

    2005-04-01

    Artificial recharge is a technique used increasingly to supplement drinking water supplies. To assess the potential water quality changes that occur during subsurface passage, a comprehensive deep-well injection experiment was carried out for a recharge scheme, where pretreated, aerobic surface water was injected at 300 m depth into an anaerobic aquifer. Water quality parameters were recorded over the 854-days long injection phase. The evolution of the major ion and redox chemistry was analyzed with a three-dimensional reactive multicomponent transport model. It was found that the oxidation of pyrite was the main driverforwater quality changes and that reaction rates depended significantly on the spatially/temporally varying groundwater temperature. With the temperature-dependency of the oxidation reactions incorporated into the model, the simulations give an accurate picture of the temporal and spatial evolution of the hydrochemical changes that occurred during the experiment. To delineate the influence of physical and chemical processes on local concentration changes the results of the reactive transport model simulations were compared with the corresponding results from nonreactive simulations. The study emphasizes the suitability of mechanistic multicomponent reactive transport modeling as an integrative tool for data analysis when physical transport and chemical processes interact.

  11. Road Maintenance Experience Using Polyurethane (PU) Foam Injection System and Geocrete Soil Stabilization as Ground Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhar, A. M. M.; Asmaniza, A.

    2016-07-01

    There are many types of ground rehabilation and improvement that can be consider and implement in engineering construction works for soil improvement in order to prevent road profile deformation in later stage. However, when comes to road maintenance especially on operated expressways, not all method can be apply directly as it must comply to opreation's working window and lane closure basis. Key factors that considering ideal proposal for ground rehabilitation are time, cost, quality and most importantly practicality. It should provide long lifespan structure in order to reduce continuous cycle of maintenance. Thus, this paper will present two approaches for ground rehabilitation, namely Polyurethane (PU) Foam Injection System and Geocrete Soil Stabilization. The first approach is an injection system which consists two-parts chemical grout of Isocynate and Polyol when mixed together within soil structure through injection will polymerized with volume expansion. The strong expansion of grouting causes significant compression and compacting of the surrounding soil and subsequently improve ground properties and uplift sunken structure. The later is a cold in-place recyclying whereby mixture process that combines in-situ soil materials, cement, white powder (alkaline) additive and water to produce hard yet flexible and durable ground layer that act as solid foundation with improved bearing capacity. The improvement of the mechanical behaviour of soil through these two systems is investigated by an extensive testing programme which includes in-situ and laboratory test in determining properties such as strength, stiffness, compressibility, bearing capacity, differential settlement and etc.

  12. Electron Temperature Evolution During Local Helicity Injection on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Barr, J. L.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Perry, J. M.; Reusch, J. A.; Rodriguez Sanchez, C.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the electron temperature (Te) evolution during local helicity injection (LHI) is critical for scaling up this non-solenoidal startup technique to MA-class devices. The first comprehensive Te measurements during LHI reveal centrally-peaked profiles with Te > 100 eV for plasma current Ip > 120 kA, toroidal field 0.15 T, and electron density ne 1019 m-3. Te rises and is sustained from just after magnetic relaxation through the plasma decoupling from edge-localized injectors. Results are presented for two injector edge locations: outboard midplane and inboard divertor. Outboard midplane injection couples LHI with inductive drive from poloidal field ramps and radial compression during inward plasma growth. Comparisons of Te at different LHI-to-inductive drive ratios show some profile flattening for higher LHI drive fraction. The latter, constant-shape discharges were necessarily lower performance, with Ip 50 kA and reduced Te , max. Inboard divertor injection achieves higher Ip using minimal inductive drive and thus isolates effects of LHI drive on Te. Initial results in this configuration show Te rising rapidly at the injector location as the discharge grows, settling to a roughly flat profile 100 eV. Thus far, both scenarios provide relatively stable discharges with moderate ne and high-Te, suitable for coupling to auxiliary current drive. Detailed studies of confinement dynamics and discharge optimization are planned for the near future. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  13. [Experiences with power-injectable port systems: complications, patient satisfaction and clinical benefit].

    PubMed

    Chang, D-H; Kabbasch, C; Bovenschulte, H; Libicher, M; Maintz, D; Bangard, C

    2013-05-01

    Evaluation of complications, patient satisfaction and clinical benefit of port systems with authorization for high pressure injection of contrast agent during CT/MR examinations. Ultrasound-guided insertions of central venous port catheters were performed through the lateral subclavian vein at a university teaching hospital. The radiological information system (HIS/RIS) was used to evaluate technical success and complication rates. Assessment of patient satisfaction and clinical benefit was carried out by a questionnaire during a telephone call 6 months after implantation of the port system. A total of 195 port systems in 193 patients were implanted. The catheter remained in place for a mean duration of 169 days (overall 29,210 catheter days). The technical success rate was 99.5 % and the overall complication rate was 17.4 % (24/138; 0.82 per 1000 catheter days). Follow-up revealed 13 early port explantations (9 %). Most of the patients reported high satisfaction in general (satisfied/very satisfied: 94 %). 34/209 contrast-enhanced CT/MRT scans (16 %) were performed using the port for contrast media injection. There were no complications during or after administration of contrast agent via the port system. The Powerport system is a safe alternative for peripheral i. v. contrast media injection during CT/MR scans, but has been infrequently used. Most patients reported high overall satisfaction with the port system. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Impact of CO2 injection protocol on fluid-solid reactivity: high-pressure and temperature microfluidic experiments in limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Porter, Mark; Carey, James; Guthrie, George; Viswanathan, Hari

    2017-04-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2 has been proposed in the last decades as a technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere and mitigate the global climate change. However, some questions such as the impact of the protocol of CO2 injection on the fluid-solid reactivity remain open. In our experiments, two different protocols of injection are compared at the same conditions (8.4 MPa and 45 C, and constant flow rate 0.06 ml/min): i) single phase injection, i.e., CO2-saturated brine; and ii) simultaneous injection of CO2-saturated brine and scCO2. For that purpose, we combine a unique high-pressure/temperature microfluidics experimental system, which allows reproducing geological reservoir conditions in geo-material substrates (i.e., limestone, Cisco Formation, Texas, US) and high resolution optical profilometry. Single and multiphase flow through etched fracture networks were optically recorded with a microscope, while processes of dissolution-precipitation in the etched channels were quantified by comparison of the initial and final topology of the limestone micromodels. Changes in hydraulic conductivity were quantified from pressure difference along the micromodel. The simultaneous injection of CO2-saturated brine and scCO2, reduced the brine-limestone contact area and also created a highly heterogeneous velocity field (i.e., low velocities regions or stagnation zones, and high velocity regions or preferential paths), reducing rock dissolution and enhancing calcite precipitation. The results illustrate the contrasting effects of single and multiphase flow on chemical reactivity and suggest that multiphase flow by isolating parts of the flow system can enhance CO2 mineralization.

  15. Directional borehole radar tests of an oil injection experiment at the Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abraham, Jared D.; Moulton, Craig; Brown, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    In October 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted borehole radar surveys of an oil injection experiment at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), in Golden Colorado using the prototype U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)-developed directional borehole radar system (DBOR). A explanation of the system can be found in Wright and others (2001). The USGS was invited to the CSM to deploy the prototype directional borehole radar system during an oil injection experiment conducted to investigate the applicability of radar to monitoring formation invasion from a horizontal borehole. This work was conducted by a student at the CSM and is summarized in Moita (2001). The purpose of this report is to release the data and to summarize the experiments conducted with the DBOR system. This report contains, (1) a description of the system as deployed in the experiments, (2) a description of the data collected and data parameters used, (3) a simple display of some of the data collected, and (4) a description of the DBOR data files.

  16. Microbiological survey of birds of prey pellets.

    PubMed

    Dipineto, Ludovico; Bossa, Luigi Maria De Luca; Pace, Antonino; Russo, Tamara Pasqualina; Gargiulo, Antonio; Ciccarelli, Francesca; Raia, Pasquale; Caputo, Vincenzo; Fioretti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    A microbiological survey of 73 pellets collected from different birds of prey species housed at the Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center of Napoli (southern Italy) was performed. Pellets were analyzed by culture and biochemical methods as well as by serotyping and polymerase chain reaction. We isolated a wide range of bacteria some of them also pathogens for humans (i.e. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, Campylobacter coli, Escherichia coli O serogroups). This study highlights the potential role of birds of prey as asymptomatic carriers of pathogenic bacteria which could be disseminated in the environment not only through the birds of prey feces but also through their pellets.

  17. Outcome of Dupuytren Contractures After Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection: A Single-institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Hwee, Yin Kan; Park, Daniel; Vinas, Marisa; Litts, Christopher; Friedman, David

    2017-08-01

    Collagenase clostridium histolyticum (CCH) injection is an alternative to surgery for patients with Dupuytren disease (DD) of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints. The success of surgical and nonsurgical treatment modalities for DD is reported to vary widely between 25% and 80% (J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1985;67:1439-1443; Plast Reconstr Surg. 2007;120:44e-54e; J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2007;89:189-198; J Hand Surg Am. 2011:36:936-942; J Hand Surg Am. 1990;15:755-761; J Hand Surg Br. 1996;21:797-800; J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2000;82:90-94; Plast Reconstr Surg. 2005;115:802-810; Ann Plast Surg. 2006;57:13-17). This study presents the outcomes of patients with DD contractures treated with CCH injections at a single institution. An institutional review board-approved retrospective study was conducted of patients with DD of the hand treated with CCH injections in a single institution from February 2010 to April 2015. All patients received the recommended dose of 0.58 mg of CCH and returned for joint manipulation the following day. Data for follow-up at 7 and 30 days postoperatively and up to 5 years for patients who returned seeking further therapy for recurrent symptoms were reviewed. One hundred thirteen patients with a total of 146 affected joints (72 MCP; 74 PIP) were treated with CCH injections (95 males; 18 females; age, 40-92 y). Successful CCH therapy occurred in 75% of injected joints (109/146 joints; 59 MCP; 50 PIP), as defined by less than 5 degrees of contracture after treatment. Twenty-three percent of treated joints had partial correction (34/146 joints; 13 MCP; 21 PIP), as defined by between 5 and 30 degrees of residual contracture after treatment. Three patients (2%) had a failure of treatment, as defined by unchanged or worsened contracture from pretreatment baseline measurements. Fifteen patients (13%) returned to the clinic seeking additional therapy for recurrent joint contracture symptoms in 17 joints over a span of 1

  18. Estimation of Sintering Kinetics of Oxidized Magnetite Pellet Using Optical Dilatometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep Kumar, T. K.; Viswanathan, Neelakantan Nurni; Ahmed, Hesham M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Björkman, Bo

    2015-04-01

    The quality of magnetite pellet is primarily determined by the physico-chemical changes the pellet undergoes as it makes excursion through the gaseous and thermal environment in the induration furnace. Among these physico-chemical processes, the oxidation of magnetite phase and the sintering of oxidized magnetite (hematite) and magnetite (non-oxidized) phases are vital. Rates of these processes not only depend on the thermal and gaseous environment the pellet gets exposed in the induration reactor but also interdependent on each other. Therefore, a systematic study should involve understanding these processes in isolation to the extent possible and quantify them seeking the physics. With this motivation, the present paper focusses on investigating the sintering kinetics of oxidized magnetite pellet. For the current investigation, sintering experiments were carried out on pellets containing more than 95 pct magnetite concentrate from LKAB's mine, dried and oxidized to completion at sufficiently low temperature to avoid sintering. The sintering behavior of this oxidized pellet is quantified through shrinkage captured by Optical Dilatometer. The extent of sintering characterized by sintering ratio found to follow a power law with time i.e., Kt n . The rate constant K for sintering was determined for different temperatures from isothermal experiments. The rate constant, K, varies with temperature as and the activation energy ( Q) and reaction rate constant ( K') are estimated. Further, the sintering kinetic equation was also extended to a non-isothermal environment and validated using laboratory experiments.

  19. Decomposition of oak leaf litter and millipede faecal pellets in soil under temperate mixed oak forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav; Háněl, Ladislav; Šantrůčková, Hana; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The millipedes Glomeris hexasticha (Diplopoda, Glomerida) were maintained under laboratory conditions and fed on oak leaf litter collected from a mixed oak forest (Abieto-Quercetum) in South Bohemia, Czech Republic. Every fourth day litter was changed and produced faecal pellets were separated and afterwards analysed. Content of organic carbon and C:N ratio lowered in faecal pellets as compared with consumed litter. Changes in content of chemical elements (P, K, Ca, Mg, Na) were recognised as those characteristic for the first stage of degradation of plant material. Samples of faecal pellets and oak leaf litter were then exposed in mesh bags between the F and H layers of forest soil for up to one year, subsequently harvested and analysed. A higher rate of decomposition of exposed litter than that of faecal pellets was found during the first two weeks. After 1-year exposure, the weight of litter was reduced to 51%, while that of pellets to 58% only, although the observed activity of present biotic components (algae, protozoans, nematodes; CO2 production, nitrogenase activity) in faecal pellets was higher as compared with litter. Different micro-morphological changes were observed in exposed litter and in pellets although these materials originated from the same initial sources. Comparing to intact leaf litter, another structural and functional processes occurred in pellets due to the fragmentation of plant material by millipedes. Both laboratory and field experiments showed that the millipede faecal pellets are not only a focal point of biodegradation activity in upper soil layers, but also confirmed that millipede feces undergo a slower decomposition than original leaf litter.

  20. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  1. Parameters of the luminous region surrounding deuterium pellets in the PLT tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, D.H.; Greene, G.J.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1985-08-01

    The luminous region of the plasma cloud surrounding deuterium pellets injected into a tokamak is studied spectroscopically. At the time of peak luminosity the average electron density is 2.4 x 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/ to within 30% and the temperature is at most 2.0 eV. The intensity ratio of the Balmer alpha and beta light from the pellets, the total number of emitted photons, and the apparent size of the radiating region are consistent with local thermodynamic equilibrium at this temperature and density.

  2. Hydrogen Uptake of DPB Getter Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Herberg, J L; Saab, A P; Weigle, J; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S; McLean II, W

    2008-05-30

    The physical and chemical properties of 1,4-diphenylbutadiyne (DPB) blended with carbon-supported Pd (DPB-Pd/C) in the form of pellets during hydrogenation were investigated. A thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) was employed to measure the kinetics of the hydrogen uptake by the DPB getter pellets. The kinetics obtained were then used to develop a semi-empirical model, based on gas diffusion into solids, to predict the performance of the getter pellets under various conditions. The accuracy of the prediction model was established by comparing the prediction models with independent experimental data on hydrogen pressure buildup in sealed systems containing DPB getter pellets and subjected to known rates of hydrogen input. The volatility of the hydrogenated DPB products and its effects on the hydrogen uptake kinetics were also analyzed.

  3. Modeling of a Hydrogenic Pellet Production System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leachman, J. W.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.; Nellis, G. F.

    2010-04-01

    Solid hydrogenic pellets are used as fuel for fusion energy machines like the ITER device. This paper discusses the numerical modeling of a Pellet Production System (PPS) that is used to generate these pellets. The PPS utilizes a source of supercritical helium to provide the cooling that is necessary to precool, liquefy, and solidify hydrogenic material that is ultimately extruded and cut into fuel pellets. The specific components within the PPS include a pre-cooling heat exchanger, a liquefier, and a twin-screw solidifying extruder. This paper presents numerical models of each component. These numerical models are used as design tools to predict the performance of the respective devices. The performance of the PPS is dominated by the heat transfer coefficient and viscous dissipation associated with the solidifying hydrogenic fluid in the twin-screw extruder. This observation motivates experimental efforts aimed at precise measurement of these quantities.

  4. Tritium recovery from lithium oxide pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, P.C.; Jassby, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    The TFTR Lithium Blanket Module is an assembly containing 650 kg of lithium oxide that will be used to test the ability of neutronics codes to model the tritium breeding characteristics of limited-coverage breeding zones in a tokamak. It is required that tritium concentrations as low as 0.1 nCi/g bred in both metallic lithium samples and lithium oxide pellets be measured with an uncertainty not exceeding +- 6%. A tritium assay technique for the metallic samples which meets this criterion has been developed. Two assay techniques for the lithium oxide pellets are being investigated. In one, the pellets are heated in a flowing stream of hydrogen, while in the other, the pellets are dissolved in 12 M hydrochloric acid.

  5. Biological improvement on combined mycelial pellet for aniline treatment by tourmaline in SBR process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si; Li, Ang; Cui, Di; Duan, Shuyue; Yang, Jixian; Ma, Fang; Shi, Shengnan; Ren, Nanqi

    2011-10-01

    As a biomass carrier, mycelial pellet of Aspergillus niger Y3 was used to immobilize the aniline-degrading bacterium Acinetobacter calcoaceticus JH-9 and the mix culture of the COD rapid degrading bacteria in this study. Tourmaline was added to this system in order to improve the aniline removal performance using combined mycelial pellet. Flask experiments were performed to investigate the promotion mechanism. The results showed that the start-up time was shorted from 7 cycles to only 1 cycle. The aniline and COD concentration in effluent were much lower in the tourmaline-adding system. It was suggested that tourmaline could enhance the number and activity of the aniline-degrading bacteria immobilized on the mycelial pellet. Therefore, the performance of mycelial pellet as a biomass carrier could be improved by tourmaline. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Study on the Structures of Two Booster Pellets Having High Initiation Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang-Qi, Hu; Hong-Rong, Liu; Li-shuang, Hu; Xiong, Cao; Xiang-Chao, Mi; Hai-Xia, Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Insensitive munitions (IM) improve the survivability of both weapons and their associated platforms, which can lead to a reduction in casualties, mission losses, and whole life costs. All weapon systems contain an explosive train that needs to meet IM criteria but reliably initiate a main charge explosive. To ensure that these diametrically opposed requirements can be achieved, new highly effective booster charge structures were designed. The initiation capacity of the two booster pellets was studied using varied composition and axial-steel-dent methods. The results showed that the two new booster pellets can initiate standard main charge pellets with less explosive mass than the ordinary cylindrical booster pellet. The numerical simulation results were in good agreement with the experiment results.

  7. Bulk and Surface Molecular Orientation Distribution in Injection-molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers: Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.; Burghardt, W; Bubeck, R; Burgard, S; Fischer, D

    2010-01-01

    Bulk and surface distributions of molecular orientation in injection-molded plaques of thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (TLCPs) have been studied using a combination of techniques, coordinated with process simulations using the Larson-Doi 'polydomain' model. Wide-angle X-ray scattering was used to map out the bulk orientation distribution. Fourier Transform Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) were utilized to probe the molecular orientation states to within about {approx}5 {micro}m and {approx}2 nm, respectively, of the sample surface. These noninvasive, surface-sensitive techniques yield reasonable self-consistency, providing complementary validation of the robustness of these methods. An analogy between Larson-Doi and fiber orientation models has allowed the first simulations of TLCP injection molding. The simulations capture many fine details in the bulk orientation distribution across the sample plaque. Direct simulation of surface orientation at the level probed by FTIR-ATR and NEXAFS was not possible due to the limited spatial resolution of the simulations. However, simulation results extracted from the shear-dominant skin region are found to provide a qualitatively accurate indicator of surface orientation. Finally, simulations capture the relation between bulk and surface orientation states across the different regions of the sample plaque.

  8. Transient changes in shallow groundwater chemistry during the MSU ZERT CO2 injection experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apps, J.A.; Zheng, Lingyun; Spycher, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Kharaka, Y.; Thordsen, J.; Kakouros, E.; Trautz, R.

    2011-01-01

    Food-grade CO2 was injected into a shallow aquifer through a perforated pipe placed horizontally 1-2 m below the water table at the Montana State University Zero Emission Research and Technology (MSU-ZERT) field site at Bozeman, Montana. The possible impact of elevated CO2 levels on groundwater quality was investigated by analyzing 80 water samples taken before, during, and following CO2 injection. Field determinations and laboratory analyses showed rapid and systematic changes in pH, alkalinity, and conductance, as well as increases in the aqueous concentrations of trace element species. The geochemical data were first evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA) in order to identify correlations between aqueous species. The PCA findings were then used in formulating a geochemical model to simulate the processes likely to be responsible for the observed increases in the concentrations of dissolved constituents. Modeling was conducted taking into account aqueous and surface complexation, cation exchange, and mineral precipitation and dissolution. Reasonable matches between measured data and model results suggest that: (1) CO2 dissolution in the groundwater causes calcite to dissolve. (2) Observed increases in the concentration of dissolved trace metals result likely from Ca+2-driven ion exchange with clays (smectites) and sorption/desorption reactions likely involving Fe (hydr)oxides. (3) Bicarbonate from CO2 dissolution appears to compete for sorption with anionic species such as HAsO4-2, potentially increasing dissolved As levels in groundwater. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. [Experiences with pain control during piglet castration in Switzerland Part 2: Injection anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Enz, A; Schüpbach-Regula, G; Bettschart, R; Fuschini, E; Bürgi, E; Sidler, X

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the practical implementation of the painless castration under injection anaesthesia in Switzerland. 30 swine farms were visited and 60 farmers answered a questionnaire. 34 % of the piglets showed movements during castration under injection anaesthesia and 17 % had excitations during recovery from anaesthesia. After 48 minutes half of the piglets were in sternal position and after 112 minutes half of them showed coordinated movements. The body temperature decreased by 3.1 °C until 60 minutes after castration, especially small piglets reached critical temperature levels. 38 % of the piglets showed strong bleeding after castration. The healing of the wound was good according to 82 % of the farmers. 83 % of the farmers reported piglet losses, especially at the beginning of the anaesthesia period. The anaesthesia may be improved by using butorphanol in addition to the combination of ketamine and azaperone. The recovery of the piglets should be in a warm place without any risk of injury by obstacles or the sow. Increased bleeding can be controlled by using an emasculator.

  10. Preferential heating of light ions during an ionospheric AR(+) injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, C. J.; Moore, T. E.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Kintner, P. M.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The ARCS 4 sounding rocket was launched northward into high altitude from Poker Flat Research Range on February 23, 1990. The vehicle crossed geomagnetic field lines containing discrete auroral activity. An instrumented subpayload released 100 ev and 200 ev Ar(+) ion beams sequentially, in a direction largely perpendicular to both the local geomagnetic field and the subpayload spin axis. The instrumented main payload was separated along field lines from the beam emitting subpayload by a distance which increased at a steady rate of approx. 2.4 m/s. Three-dimensional mass spectrometric ion observations of ambient H(+) and O(+) ions, obtained onboard the main payload, are presented. Main payload electric field observations in the frequency range 0-16 kHz, are also presented. These observations are presented to demonstrate the operation of transverse ion acceleration, that was differential with respect to ion mass, primarily during 100-ev beam operations. The preferential transverse acceleration of ambient H(+) ions, as compared with ambient O(+) ions during the second, third, fourth, and fifth 100-ev beam operations, is attributed to a resonance at the injected the beam drift velocity among the thermal H(+) ions and plasma waves generated by the injected beam and propagating at the beam drift speed. This work provides experimental support of processes predicted by previously published theory and simulations.

  11. Suppression of Alfvén Modes on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade with Outboard Beam Injection.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, E D; Belova, E V; Battaglia, D J; Bell, R E; Crocker, N A; Darrow, D S; Diallo, A; Gerhardt, S P; Gorelenkov, N N; LeBlanc, B P; Podestà, M; Nstx-U Team

    2017-06-30

    In this Letter we present data from experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade, where it is shown for the first time that small amounts of high pitch-angle beam ions can strongly suppress the counterpropagating global Alfvén eigenmodes (GAE). GAE have been implicated in the redistribution of fast ions and modification of the electron power balance in previous experiments on NSTX. The ability to predict the stability of Alfvén modes, and developing methods to control them, is important for fusion reactors like the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, which are heated by a large population of nonthermal, super-Alfvénic ions consisting of fusion generated α's and beam ions injected for current profile control. We present a qualitative interpretation of these observations using an analytic model of the Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron resonance drive responsible for GAE instability which has an important dependence on k_{⊥}ρ_{L}. A quantitative analysis of this data with the hym stability code predicts both the frequencies and instability of the GAE prior to, and suppression of the GAE after the injection of high pitch-angle beam ions.

  12. Suppression of Alfvén Modes on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade with Outboard Beam Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Belova, E. V.; Battaglia, D. J.; Bell, R. E.; Crocker, N. A.; Darrow, D. S.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podestà, M.; NSTX-U Team

    2017-06-01

    In this Letter we present data from experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade, where it is shown for the first time that small amounts of high pitch-angle beam ions can strongly suppress the counterpropagating global Alfvén eigenmodes (GAE). GAE have been implicated in the redistribution of fast ions and modification of the electron power balance in previous experiments on NSTX. The ability to predict the stability of Alfvén modes, and developing methods to control them, is important for fusion reactors like the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, which are heated by a large population of nonthermal, super-Alfvénic ions consisting of fusion generated α 's and beam ions injected for current profile control. We present a qualitative interpretation of these observations using an analytic model of the Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron resonance drive responsible for GAE instability which has an important dependence on k⊥ρL . A quantitative analysis of this data with the hym stability code predicts both the frequencies and instability of the GAE prior to, and suppression of the GAE after the injection of high pitch-angle beam ions.

  13. The effect of polycarbophil on the gastric emptying of pellets.

    PubMed

    Khosla, R; Davis, S S

    1987-01-01

    The influence of the putative bioadhesive, polycarbophil, on the gastric emptying of a pellet formulation, has been investigated in three fasted subjects. The pellets were radiolabelled with technetium-99m. Gastric emptying was measured using the technique of gamma scintigraphy. The pellets emptied from the stomach rapidly and in an exponential manner. Polycarbophil did not retard the gastric emptying of the pellets.

  14. Ciliates expel environmental Legionella-laden pellets to stockpile food.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Fuhito; Sato, Daisuke; Matsuo, Junji; Miyake, Masaki; Nakamura, Shinji; Kunichika, Miyuki; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Mitsutaka; Takahashi, Kaori; Takemura, Hiromu; Kamiya, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2012-08-01

    When Tetrahymena ciliates are cultured with Legionella pneumophila, the ciliates expel bacteria packaged in free spherical pellets. Why the ciliates expel these pellets remains unclear. Hence, we determined the optimal conditions for pellet expulsion and assessed whether pellet expulsion contributes to the maintenance of growth and the survival of ciliates. When incubated with environmental L. pneumophila, the ciliates expelled the pellets maximally at 2 days after infection. Heat-killed bacteria failed to produce pellets from ciliates, and there was no obvious difference in pellet production among the ciliates or bacterial strains. Morphological studies assessing lipid accumulation showed that pellets contained tightly packed bacteria with rapid lipid accumulation and were composed of the layers of membranes; bacterial culturability in the pellets rapidly decreased, in contrast to what was seen in ciliate-free culture, although the bacteria maintained membrane integrity in the pellets. Furthermore, ciliates newly cultured with pellets were maintained and grew vigorously compared with those without pellets. In contrast, a human L. pneumophila isolate killed ciliates 7 days postinfection in a Dot/Icm-dependent manner, and pellets harboring this strain did not support ciliate growth. Also, pellets harboring the human isolate were resuscitated by coculturing with amoebae, depending on Dot/Icm expression. Thus, while ciliates expel pellet-packaged environmental L. pneumophila for stockpiling food, the pellets packaging the human isolate are harmful to ciliate survival, which may be of clinical significance.

  15. Comparative Properties of Bamboo and Rice Straw Pellets

    Treesearch

    Xianmiao Liu; Zhijia Liu; Benhua Fei; Zhiyong Cai; Zehui Jiang; Xing' e Liu

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo is a potential major bio-energy resource. Tests were carried out to compare and evaluate the property of bamboo and rice straw pellets, rice straw being the other main source of biomass solid fuel in China. All physical properties of untreated bamboo pellets (UBP), untreated rice straw pellets (URP), carbonized bamboo pellets (CBP), and carbonized rice straw...

  16. Apparatus for feeding nuclear fuel pellets to a loading tray

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, T.B.

    1981-12-08

    Apparatus for feeding nuclear fuel pellets at a uniform, predetermined rate between pellet centering and grinding apparatus and a tray used for loading pellets into a nuclear fuel rod are described. Pellets discharged from the grinder are conveyed by a woven wire belt to a drive wheel which develops a force available to be applied to pellets preceding it on the belt. The pellets pass under the drive wheel which adds additional weight acting vertically on each pellet. This total weight of pellet and drive wheel coupled with wire belt linear movement acts to push a line of about 36 pellets onto a pellet dumping mechanism. As the dumping mechanism is actuated to dump the pellets on to a loading tray, the pellets moving toward the mechanism are clamped in a stationary position and the drive wheel simultaneously is lifted from its pellet contacting position until the pellet dumping process is completed. The clamping device is then lifted from its pellet and the drive wheel simultaneously is lowered into a pellet contacting position.

  17. Effect of calcium sulfate-chitosan composite: pellet on bone formation in bone defect.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung Chae; Kim, Tae Gyu; Yang, Jung Duk; Chung, Ho Yun; Park, Jae Woo; Kwon, Ick Chan; Roh, Kyung Ho; Chung, Hye Sun; Lee, Dong Sin; Park, Nang Un; Kim, In San

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to study the effects of chitosan, calcium sulfate, and calcium sulfate-chitosan composite pellet on the osteogenesis of defective tibia in rabbits. Eighty New Zealand white rabbits, each weighing approximately 3 to 3.5 kg, were used for this study. A 1-cm ostectomy was made on the middle of the tibia of each rabbit with the periosteum preserved. Nothing was implanted in the control group (group 1), and five chitosan pellets (60 mg/pellet) were implanted in group 1, three OsteoSet pellets (100 mg/pellet) in group 3, and four calcium sulfate-chitosan composite pellets (1 pellet, 80 mg; calcium sulfate 40 mg/pellet, chitosan 40 mg/pellet) in group 4. For each group, a radiographic study, bone mineral density test, three-point bending test, and histologic examination were performed in the second, fourth, and sixth weeks. In the radiologic study, in group 1, cortical bone was not formed even at 6 weeks. In group 2, it was observed at 6 weeks. In groups 3 and 4, cortical bone was partially seen around the fourth week. At 6 weeks, it was clearly observed on both sides, and the projection of the marrow cavity became distinctive, so bone consolidation was considered to be much progressed. The bone mineral density test and three-point bending test results appeared to be highly similar in groups 3 and 4 and in groups 2 and 1. Particularly at 6 weeks, the measures for groups 3 and 4 were statistically significant compared with those for groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.05). In histologic examination, new bone formation began to be seen at 2 weeks in all groups, but it was more active and faster in groups 3 and 4. At 6 weeks, fibrous connective tissue still remained at the center in groups 1 and 2; however, the fibrous connective tissue at the center was replaced with callus, the bony bridge was obvious, and lamellation of callus was observed more in groups 3 and 4. The results indicate that chitosan pellets, OsteoSet, and chitosan-calcium sulfate

  18. Semi-continuous treatment of recalcitrant anaerobic effluent from pulp and paper industry using hybrid pellets of Trametes versicolor.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Clemente, A; Ponce-Noyola, M T; Montes-Horcasitas, M C; Vicent, M T; Barrera-Cortés, J; Poggi-Varaldo, H M

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the semi-continuous post-treatment of anaerobically-pre-treated weak black liquor (anaerobic effluent, AnE) by aerobic post-treatment using hybrid pellets of Trametes versicolor. The latter consisted of fungus immobilized onto holm oak sawdust (mixed or double pellets) or a mixture of holm oak sawdust and powdered activated carbon (triple pellets). First, a semicontinuous experiment was run to compare the effectiveness of triple and mixed pellets in agitated flasks for 15 cycles of 7 days each. A second extended batch test was implemented with 500 mL AnE and triple pellets to give 400 mg fungal biomass; some units were spiked with protease inhibitor. In the first experiment, triple pellets displayed consistently higher removal efficiencies of pollutant parameters than double pellets (10 to 15% higher), although overall averages were moderate and no statistical significance to the difference could be set because of the noise of fluctuations. Periodic fluctuations of removal were characterized by three periods of approximately six cycles each with maximum removals occurring at cycles 3-4, 7-9, 13, and 14. Evaluating pooled removals of the latter cycles showed that triple pellets were significantly more effective than double pellets, with removal efficiencies as high as 47% of COD, colour, and absorbance at 254 nm (A254). In general, protease activity seemed to increase in the third period (last six cycles), whereas activities of MnP, LiP and Lac significantly decreased. In the second experiment, pollutant removals and enzymatic activities of triple pellets with protease inhibitor were significantly higher than those of units without added protease inhibitor. These results indicate that protease could be the main cause of periodic falls of pollutant removal efficiencies found in the first experiment.

  19. Pelletization process of postproduction plant waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obidziński, S.

    2012-07-01

    The results of investigations on the influence of material, process, and construction parameters on the densification process and density of pellets received from different mixtures of tobacco and fine-grained waste of lemon balm are presented. The conducted research makes it possible to conclude that postproduction waste eg tobacco and lemon balm wastes can be successfully pelletized and used as an ecological, solid fuels.

  20. Single pellet crush strength testing of catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brienza, P.K. )

    1988-09-01

    ASTM D-32 Committee on Catalysts has developed a standard test method for single pellet crush strength for formed catalyst shapes. This standard was issued under the fixed designation D 4179. The method is applicable to regular catalyst shapes such as tablets and spheres. Extrudates, granular materials, and other irregular shapes are excluded. The committee continues to work on the development of a method for the single pellet crush testing of extrudates.

  1. New Electron Temperature Measurements During Local Helicity Injection and H-mode Plasmas at the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Bodner, G. M.; Fonck, R. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Winz, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    Extrapolation of non-solenoidal startup via local helicity injection (LHI) to larger devices depends critically on confinement during the injection process. To begin quantifying confinement regimes, the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Pegasus ST was upgraded to include 12 radial positions and high temperature (0.1 Experiments are underway to verify these unexpectedly high electron temperatures. If verified, these temperatures may reflect the dominance of high-energy electrons via fueling with LHI current streams with average energy ~1 keV. Further investigations will explore the dependence of the inferred electron distribution on fueling source, density, and electron injection potential. The upgraded Thomson scattering diagnostic will also be applied to Ohmic H-mode plasmas in Pegasus. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  2. Effect of pellet coatings on PETN porosity and slapper detonator efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kathryn E.; Monroe, Deirdre C.; Brown, Geoffrey W.

    2017-01-01

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is well known to have a high vapor pressure and to sublime and decompose when heated. Preliminary experiments conducted in 2014 suggest that at 80°C for 6 days, a 1.65 g/cm3 PETN pellet will develop crystals and a layer of increased porosity on the pellet surface, due to sublimation and re-deposition of PETN crystals in an equilibrium environment. This phenomenon may decrease the pressed PETN pellet's sensitivity to shock initiation in a slapper detonator. In this report, we detail preliminary attempts to mitigate sublimation and recrystallization by coating the flyer impact surface of pressed PETN pellets with 200 nm of gold. No crystallization occurred on the surface of the coated, heated surface, and firing thresholds for the coated pellets did not appreciably change with heating. Recent attempts to replicate the effects of heating bare PETN pellets contradict the 2014 experiments, and potential explanations include different PETN batches and different heating schemes. Current and future research directions, including coating with Parylene C, are also presented.

  3. Study of the influence of alkalizing components on matrix pellets prepared by extrusion/spheronization.

    PubMed

    Hamedelniel, Elnazeer I; Bajdik, János; Kása, Péter; Pintye-Hódi, Klára

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of alkalizing components and the nature of the wetting liquid on the properties of matrix pellets prepared by extrusion and spheronization. Atenolol was used as an active pharmaceutical ingredient, ethylcellulose as a matrix former, microcrystalline cellulose as a filler and disodium phosphate anhydrous and trisodium phosphate dodecahydrate as alkalizing materials. Water and a water-ethanol mixture served as granulation liquids. Pellet formation was evaluated via mechanical, dissolution and morphological studies. In order to enhance the dissolution of Atenolol from the pellets, alkalizing components were used and the influence of these components on the pH was tested. Investigations of the breaking hardness, the morphology and the dissolution revealed that the pellets containing trisodium phosphate dodecahydrate and prepared with a higher amount of water as binding liquid displayed the best physico-chemical parameters and uniform dissolution. In in vitro experiments, the dissolution release complied with the texture of the pellets and the effect of pH. The pellets have suitable shape and very good hardness for the coating process and are appropriate for subsequent in vivo experiments.

  4. An economical and market analysis of Canadian wood pellets.

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, J.

    2010-08-01

    This study systematically examined the current and future wood pellet market, estimated the cost of Canadian torrefied pellets, and compared the torrefied pellets with the conventional pellets based on literature and industrial data. The results showed that the wood pellet industry has been gaining significant momentum due to the European bioenergy incentives and the rising oil and natural gas prices. With the new bioenergy incentives in USA, the future pellets market may shift to North America, and Canada can potentially become the largest pellet production centre, supported by the abundant wood residues and mountain pine beetle (MPB) infested trees.

  5. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    DOE PAGES

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; ...

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challengingmore » due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.« less

  6. [Pellet guns: a persistent threat to eyes].

    PubMed

    Assaf, E; Emadisson, H; Bendeddouche, K; Forestier, F; Salvanet-Bouccara, A

    2003-11-01

    Following a recent case of bilateral perforating ocular trauma by multiple pellets, the authors reviewed pellet traumatisms treated in the Emergency Department and operated on in the Ophthalmology Department of the Villeneuve-St-Georges Hospital over the past 15 years. At close range, pellet weapon shootings can generate lid, conjunctiva, and powder cornea tattoos; in these cases, the lesions are often unilateral. Shooting at longer range does not result in corneodermic tattoos, but because pellets scatter, binocular lesions frequently occur. The different lesions caused by these nonmagnetic foreign bodies are often very serious. An early, even very early, traumatic cataract is sometimes very difficult to treat in these polytraumatized eyes. The visual prognosis is more reserved, as the impact zones often involve the posterior pole and the macular area. The best recovered visual acuity is 30-35/20, with visual field alterations, but the injury to the eyeball by multiple pellets can generate globe atrophy. The authors stress the gravity of these ocular traumas, fortunately rarer but not completely eradicated since the law of May 6, 1995, which restricted the possession of these pellet guns.

  7. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; Lau, A.; Bi, X. T.

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challenging due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.

  8. Compulsory drug detention center experiences among a community-based sample of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Csete, Joanne; Kaplan, Karyn; Hayashi, Kanna; Fairbairn, Nadia; Suwannawong, Paisan; Zhang, Ruth; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2011-10-20

    Despite Thailand's official reclassification of drug users as "patients" deserving care and not "criminals," the Thai government has continued to rely heavily on punitive responses to drug use such as "boot camp"-style compulsory "treatment" centers. There is very little research on experiences with compulsory treatment centers among people who use drugs. The work reported here is a first step toward filling that gap. We examined experiences of compulsory drug treatment among 252 Thai people who inject drugs (IDU) participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors independently associated with a history of compulsory treatment experience. In total, 80 (31.7%) participants reported a history of compulsory treatment. In multivariate analyses, compulsory drug detention experience was positively associated with current spending on drugs per day (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.86; 95%CI: 1.07 - 3.22) and reporting drug planting by police (AOR = 1.81; 95%CI: 1.04 - 3.15). Among those with compulsory treatment experience, 77 (96.3%) reported injecting in the past week, and no difference in intensity of drug use was observed between those with and without a history of compulsory detention. These findings raise concerns about the current approach to compulsory drug detention in Thailand. Exposure to compulsory drug detention was associated with police abuse and high rates of relapse into drug use, although additional research is needed to determine the precise impact of exposure to this form of detention on future drug use. More broadly, compulsory "treatment" based on a penal approach is not consistent with scientific evidence on addressing drug addiction and should be phased out in favor of evidence-based interventions.

  9. Compulsory drug detention center experiences among a community-based sample of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite Thailand's official reclassification of drug users as "patients" deserving care and not "criminals," the Thai government has continued to rely heavily on punitive responses to drug use such as "boot camp"-style compulsory "treatment" centers. There is very little research on experiences with compulsory treatment centers among people who use drugs. The work reported here is a first step toward filling that gap. Methods We examined experiences of compulsory drug treatment among 252 Thai people who inject drugs (IDU) participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors independently associated with a history of compulsory treatment experience. Results In total, 80 (31.7%) participants reported a history of compulsory treatment. In multivariate analyses, compulsory drug detention experience was positively associated with current spending on drugs per day (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.86; 95%CI: 1.07 - 3.22) and reporting drug planting by police (AOR = 1.81; 95%CI: 1.04 - 3.15). Among those with compulsory treatment experience, 77 (96.3%) reported injecting in the past week, and no difference in intensity of drug use was observed between those with and without a history of compulsory detention. Conclusion These findings raise concerns about the current approach to compulsory drug detention in Thailand. Exposure to compulsory drug detention was associated with police abuse and high rates of relapse into drug use, although additional research is needed to determine the precise impact of exposure to this form of detention on future drug use. More broadly, compulsory "treatment" based on a penal approach is not consistent with scientific evidence on addressing drug addiction and should be phased out in favor of evidence-based interventions. PMID:22014093

  10. Preliminary experience with precipitating hydrophobic injectable liquid in brain arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Koçer, Naci; Hanımoğlu, Hakan; Batur, Şebnem; Kandemirli, Sedat Giray; Kızılkılıç, Osman; Sanus, Zihni; Öz, Büge; Işlak, Civan; Kaynar, Mehmet Yaşar

    2016-01-01

    Advancement in microcatheter design and emergence of new embolic agents offer better results in endovascular treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Precipitating hydrophobic injectable liquid (PHIL) (Microvention) is a newly introduced dimethyl sulfoxide-based embolic agent for endovascular use. Herein, we present three patients who underwent endovascular treatment of brain AVMs with PHIL, followed by surgical resection. Endovascular features and same-day surgical handling of the new embolic agent PHIL are presented along with histopathologic changes in the acute stage in brain AVMs are presented, and its major differences from Onyx. In our series, PHIL had moderate inflammatory reaction in the acute stage without any associated angionecrosis that is different than Onyx which cause mild inflammatory reaction with angionecrosis. Smallest vessel containing PHIL was 2.9 μm compared to 5 μm with Onyx, which suggests better penetration. PMID:26782157

  11. Experience from a long-term carcinogenicity study with intraperitoneal injection of biosoluble synthetic mineral fibers.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Hans G; Bernstein, David M; Attia, Mahmoud; Richard, Jacques; De Reydellet, Aymon

    2002-08-01

    The carcinogenic potential in the intraperitoneal cavity of three newly developed biosoluble insulation glass wool fibers (M, P, and V) and one newly developed biosoluble insulation stone wool fiber (O) was investigated and compared to that of a previously developed soluble glass fiber (B). The in vitro dissolution coefficient of the three glass wool fibers ranged from 450 to 1037 ng/cm(2) x h and was 523 ng/cm(2) x h for the stone wool fiber. The in vitro dissolution coefficient of the B fiber was 580 ng/cm(2) x h. Groups of female Wistar rats (strain Crl: Wi BR) were exposed by repeated injections to doses of 0.5, 2, and 5 x 10(9) WHO fibers, which corresponds to between 41 mg to 724 mg fiber injected. In addition, 2 groups of crocidolite were used as positive controls at doses of 0.1 x 10(9) and 1 x 10(9) WHO fibers (0.5 and 5 mg). The in vitro dissolution coefficient of crocidolite is estimated to be approximately 1 ng/cm(2) x h. The protocol of the study and the size distribution of the test samples conformed to the European Commission Protocol EUR 18748 EN, and the study was executed under Good Laboratory Practice conditions. Two of the new insulation wools, fibers M and 0, showed no statistically significant tumorigenic response even at the very high dose of 5 x 10(9) WHO fibers injected. Fibers P and V showed a small tumorigenic response in the ip cavity similar in magnitude to the B fiber, which has been declared in the German fiber regulations as a noncarcinogenic fiber. The response to the soluble insulation fibers was notably different from that of the known carcinogen crocidolite, which produced 53% tumors at a comparatively low dose of 0.1 x 10(9) WHO fibers. The incidence of mesothelioma was found to be highly correlated to the incidence of intra-abdominal nodules and masses at different sites. The incidence of abdominal nodules and masses was highly correlated to the number of animals with ascites. The incidence of chronic peritonitis with fibrotic

  12. Initial Thomson Scattering Survey of Local Helicity Injection and Ohmic Plasmas at the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Winz, G. R.

    2014-10-01

    A multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic has recently been installed on the Pegasus ST. The system utilizes a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (λ0 ~ 532 nm), spectrometers with volume phase holographic gratings, and a gated, intensified CCD camera. It provides measurements of Te and ne at 8 spatial locations for each spectrometer once per discharge. A new multiple aperture and beam dump system has been implemented to mitigate interference from stray light. This system has provided initial measurements in the core region of plasmas initiated by local helicity injection (LHI), as well as conventional Ohmic L- and H-mode discharges. Multi-shot averages of low-density (ne ~ 3 ×1018 m-3) , Ip ~ 0 . 1 MA LHI discharges show central Te ~ 75 eV at the end of the helicity injection phase. Ip ~ 0 . 13 MA Ohmic plasmas at moderate densities (ne ~ 2 ×1019 m-3) have core Te ~ 150 eV in L-mode. Generally, these plasmas do not reach transport equilibrium in the short 25 ms pulse length available. After an L-H transition, strong spectral broadening indicates increasing Te, to values above the range of the present spectrometer system with a high-dispersion VPH grating. Near-term system upgrades will focus on deploying a second spectrometer, with a lower-dispersion grating capable of measuring the 0.1-1.0 keV range. The second spectrometer system will also increase the available number of spatial channels, enabling study of H-mode pedestal structure. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  13. [Experience of using injectable formulation of buprenorphine for the detoxification treatment of heroin dependence patients].

    PubMed

    Aso, Katsuro

    2009-06-01

    Forty-four heroin dependence patients took detoxification treatment in Fukko-kai Tarumi Hospital from October 1998 to April 2008 (total of 80 admissions). Injectable formulation of buprenorphine (0.2 mg) was used intramuscularly to relieve withdrawal symptoms from October 2002. In the initial phase, small dosage of buprenorphine (0.4 mg per day) was dispensed but obvious effects were not confirmed. Therefore, the dosage was increased to 0.6 mg (3 ampoules), possibly more for 27 patients (total of 53 admissions) from October 2005. While treatment was interrupted by various reasons in 6 patients (total of 10 admissions), the rest completed detoxification. Dosage of buprenorphine given to the patients varied from 0.6 mg (3 ampoules) to 1.6 mg (8 ampoules) per day, and only 4 patients required over 1.0 mg. While duration of administration ranged from 5 days to 15 days, it was between 7 days and 10 days in over the half cases. When sufficient amount of buprenorphine was administered, severity and duration of heroin withdrawal symptoms was distinctly reduced. Since the introduction of heroin detoxification with buprenorphine, number of patients who request the treatment voluntarily increased including those who relapsed, but the length of hospital stay was shortened. One patient rejected buprenorphine injection for unknown reason and one patient left the hospital because of insufficient effect due to insufficient amount of buprenorphine dose, serious adverse effect was not observed. Detoxification treatment with buprenorphine cannot ensure sustained abstinence but can motivate heroin-using patients to receive treatment and strive for abstinence.

  14. Asymptotic analysis soot model and experiment for a directed injection engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Pei, Pucheng; Xiong, Qinghui; Lu, Yong

    2012-09-01

    The existing soot models are either too complex and can not be applied to the internal combustion engine, or too simple to make calculation errors. Exploring the soot model becomes the pursuit of the goal of many researchers within the error range in the current computer speed. On the basis of the latest experimental results, TP (temperature phases) model is presented as a new soot model to carry out optimization calculation for a high-pressure common rail diesel engine. Temperature and excess air factor are the most important two parameters in this model. When zone temperature T<1 500 K and excess air factor Φ>0.6, only the soot precursors—polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(PAH) is created and there is no soot emission. When zone temperature T ⩾ 1 500 K and excess air factor Φ<0.6, PAHs and soot source terms (particle inception, surface growth, oxidation, coagulation) are calculated. The TP model is then implemented in KIVA code instead of original model to carry out optimizing. KIVA standard model and experimental data are analyzed for the results of cylinder pressures, the corresponding heat release rates, and soot with variation of injection time, variation of rail pressure and variation of speed among TP models. The experimental results indicate that the TP model can carry out optimization and computational fluid dynamics can be a tool to calculate for a high-pressure common rail directed injection diesel engine. The TP model result is closer than the use of the original KIVA-3V results of soot model accuracy by about 50% and TP model gives a new method for engine researchers.

  15. Laboratory simulations of the Viking Labeled Release experiment - Kinetics following second nutrient injection and the nature of the gaseous end product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, G. V.; Straat, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    Injection of (C-14)-labeled nutrient onto Mars soil produced an evolution of C-14 gas in the Viking Labeled Release (LR) experiment. However, a second injection of nutrient seven days later was followed by an abrupt diminution of the amount of radioactive gas in the test cell. Simulation experiments performed in the LR Test Standards Module (TSM) have yielded a plausible explanation for this diminution. Radioactive carbon gases were injected into the TSM test cell in the presence and absence of two Mars analog soils. After equilibration, water was injected and its effect observed. The results indicate that the flight data following second nutrient injection can be explained on a physico-chemical basis involving a carbon dioxide/water/soil equilibrium in the test cell. The results also suggest that the gaseous end product of the Labeled Release reaction on Mars is more likely carbon dioxide than carbon monoxide.

  16. Laboratory simulations of the Viking Labeled Release experiment - Kinetics following second nutrient injection and the nature of the gaseous end product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, G. V.; Straat, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    Injection of (C-14)-labeled nutrient onto Mars soil produced an evolution of C-14 gas in the Viking Labeled Release (LR) experiment. However, a second injection of nutrient seven days later was followed by an abrupt diminution of the amount of radioactive gas in the test cell. Simulation experiments performed in the LR Test Standards Module (TSM) have yielded a plausible explanation for this diminution. Radioactive carbon gases were injected into the TSM test cell in the presence and absence of two Mars analog soils. After equilibration, water was injected and its effect observed. The results indicate that the flight data following second nutrient injection can be explained on a physico-chemical basis involving a carbon dioxide/water/soil equilibrium in the test cell. The results also suggest that the gaseous end product of the Labeled Release reaction on Mars is more likely carbon dioxide than carbon monoxide.

  17. Simulation of reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Sabuj

    The primary motivation of this work is to evaluate a new alternative ironmaking process which involves the combination of a Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF) with an iron bath smelter. This work is concerned primarily, with the productivity of the RHF. It is known that the reduction in the RHF is controlled by chemical kinetics of the carbon oxidation and wustite reduction reactions as well as by heat transfer to the pellet surface and within the pellet. It is heat transfer to the pellet which limits the number of layers of pellets in the pellet bed in the RHF and thus, the overall productivity. Different types of carbon like graphite, coal-char and wood charcoal were examined. Part of the research was to investigate the chemical kinetics by de-coupling it from the influence of heat and mass transfer. This was accomplished by carrying out reduction experiments using small iron-oxide-carbon powder composite mixtures. The reaction rate constants were determined by fitting the experimental mass loss with a mixed reaction model. This model accounts for the carbon oxidation by CO2 and wustite reduction by CO, which are the primary rate controlling surface-chemical reactions in the composite system. The reaction rate constants have been obtained using wustite-coal-char powder mixtures and wustite-wood-charcoal mixtures. The wustite for these mixtures was obtained from two iron-oxide sources: artificial porous analytical hematite (PAH) and hematite ore tailings. In the next phase of this study, larger scale experiments were conducted in a RHF simulator using spherical composite pellets. Measurement of the reaction rates was accomplished using off-gas analysis. Different combinations of raw materials for the pellets were investigated. These included artificial ferric oxide as well as naturally existing hematite and taconite ores. Graphite, coal-char and wood-charcoal were the reductants. Experiments were conducted using a single layer, a double layer and a triple layer of

  18. Properties of melt extruded enteric matrix pellets.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Sandra U; Shah, Navnit H; Waseem Malick, A; McGinity, James W

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the properties of enteric matrix pellets that were prepared by hot-melt extrusion in a one-step, continuous process. Five polymers (Eudragit) L100-55, L100 and S100, Aqoat grades LF and HF) were investigated as possible matrix formers, and pellets prepared with Eudragit S100 demonstrated superior gastric protection and acceptable processibility. Extruded pellets containing Eudragit S100 and up to 40% theophylline released less than 10% drug over 2h in acid, however, the processibility and yields were compromised by the high amounts of the non-melting drug material in the formulation. Efficient plasticization of Eudragit S100 was necessary to reduce the polymer's glass transition temperature and melt viscosity. Five compounds including triethyl citrate, methylparaben, polyethylene glycol 8000, citric acid monohydrate and acetyltributyl citrate were investigated in terms of plasticization efficiency and preservation of the delayed drug release properties. The aqueous solubility of the plasticizer and its plasticization efficiency impacted the drug release rate from the matrix pellets. The use of water-soluble plasticizers resulted in a loss of gastric protection, whereas low drug release rates in acid were found for pellets containing insoluble plasticizers or no plasticizer, independent of the extent of Eudragit S100 plasticization. The release rate of theophylline in buffer pH 7.4 was faster for pellets that were prepared with efficient plasticizers. The microstructure and solid-state properties of plasticized pellets were further investigated by scanning electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. Pellets prepared with efficient plasticizers (TEC, methylparaben, PEG 8000) exhibited matrices of low porosity, and the drug was homogeneously dispersed in its original polymorphic form. Pellets containing ATBC or citric acid monohydrate had to be extruded at elevated temperature and showed physical instabilities in

  19. Ultrasonic vibration-assisted (UV-A) pelleting of wheat straw: a constitutive model for pellet density.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Meng; Pei, Z J; Wang, Donghai

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic vibration-assisted (UV-A) pelleting can increase cellulosic biomass density and reduce biomass handling and transportation costs in cellulosic biofuel manufacturing. Effects of input variables on pellet density in UV-A pelleting have been studied experimentally. However, there are no reports on modeling of pellet density in UV-A pelleting. Furthermore, in the literature, most reported density models in other pelleting methods of biomass are empirical. This paper presents a constitutive model to predict pellet density in UV-A pelleting. With the predictive model, relations between input variables (ultrasonic power and pelleting pressure) and pellet density are predicted. The predicted relations are compared with those determined experimentally in the literature. Model predictions agree well with reported experimental results.

  20. EMC3-EIRENE modelling of toroidally-localized divertor gas injection experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Lore, Jeremy D.; Reinke, M. L.; LaBombard, Brian; Lipschultz, B.; Churchill, R. M.; Pitts, R. A.; Feng, Y.

    2014-09-30

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod with toroidally and poloidally localized divertor nitrogen injection have been modeled using the three-dimensional edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE to elucidate the mechanisms driving measured toroidal asymmetries. In these experiments five toroidally distributed gas injectors in the private flux region were sequentially activated in separate discharges resulting in clear evidence of toroidal asymmetries in radiated power and nitrogen line emission as well as a ~50% toroidal modulation in electron pressure at the divertor target. The pressure modulation is qualitatively reproduced by the modelling, with the simulation yielding a toroidal asymmetry in the heat flow to the outer strike point. Finally, toroidal variation in impurity line emission is qualitatively matched in the scrape-off layer above the strike point, however kinetic corrections and cross-field drifts are likely required to quantitatively reproduce impurity behavior in the private flux region and electron temperatures and densities directly in front of the target.

  1. Control of particle and power exhaust in pellet fuelled ITER DT scenarios employing integrated models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesen, S.; Köchl, F.; Belo, P.; Kotov, V.; Loarte, A.; Parail, V.; Corrigan, G.; Garzotti, L.; Harting, D.

    2017-07-01

    The integrated model JINTRAC is employed to assess the dynamic density evolution of the ITER baseline scenario when fuelled by discrete pellets. The consequences on the core confinement properties, α-particle heating due to fusion and the effect on the ITER divertor operation, taking into account the material limitations on the target heat loads, are discussed within the integrated model. Using the model one can observe that stable but cyclical operational regimes can be achieved for a pellet-fuelled ITER ELMy H-mode scenario with Q  =  10 maintaining partially detached conditions in the divertor. It is shown that the level of divertor detachment is inversely correlated with the core plasma density due to α-particle heating, and thus depends on the density evolution cycle imposed by pellet ablations. The power crossing the separatrix to be dissipated depends on the enhancement of the transport in the pedestal region being linked with the pressure gradient evolution after pellet injection. The fuelling efficacy of the deposited pellet material is strongly dependent on the E  ×  B plasmoid drift. It is concluded that integrated models like JINTRAC, if validated and supported by realistic physics constraints, may help to establish suitable control schemes of particle and power exhaust in burning ITER DT-plasma scenarios.

  2. Impact of lithium pellets on plasma performance in the ASDEX Upgrade all-metal-wall tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, P. T.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; McDermott, R. M.; Neu, R.; Wolfrum, E.; Arredondo Parra, R.; Bernert, M.; Birkenmeier, G.; Diallo, A.; Dunne, M.; Fable, E.; Fischer, R.; Geiger, B.; Hakola, A.; Nikolaeva, V.; Kappatou, A.; Laggner, F.; Oberkofler, M.; Ploeckl, B.; Potzel, S.; Pütterich, T.; Sieglin, B.; Szepesi, T.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-01-01

    The impact of lithium (Li) on plasma performance was investigated at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, which features a full tungsten wall. Li pellets containing 1.6  ×  1020 Li atoms were launched with a speed of 600 m s-1 to achieve deep penetration into the plasma and minimize the impact on the first wall. Homogeneous transient Li concentrations in the plasma of up to 15% were established. The Li sustainment time in the plasma decreased with an increasing heating power from 150 to 40 ms. Due to the pellet rate being restricted to 2 Hz, no Li pile-up could take place. No significant positive impact on plasma properties, as reported from other tokamak devices, could be found; the Li pellets rather caused a small reduction in plasma energy, mainly due to enhanced radiation. Due to pellet injection, a short-lived Li layer was formed on the plasma-facing components, which lasted a few discharges and led to moderately beneficial effects during plasma start-up. Most pellets were found to trigger type-I ELMs, either by their direct local perturbation or indirectly by the altered edge conditions; however, reliability was less than 100%.

  3. Effect of observer experience in the differentiation between benign and malignant liver tumors after ultrasound contrast agent injection.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Alaimo, Valerio; Baratella, Elisa; Pizzolato, Riccardo; Cester, Giacomo; Medeot, Alessandro; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the observer level of experience on the diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging (CEUS) for differentiation between benign and malignant liver tumors. From a computerized search, we retrospectively identified 286 biopsy-proven liver tumors (105 hepatocellular carcinomas, 48 metastases, 7 intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas, 33 liver hemangiomas, and 93 nonhemangiomatous benign lesions) in 235 patients (140 male and 95 female; mean age +/- SD, 56 +/- 11 years) who underwent CEUS after sulfur hexafluoride-filled microbubble injection. The digital cine clips recorded during the arterial (10-35 seconds from injection), portal (50-120 seconds), and late (130-300 seconds) phases were analyzed by 6 independent observers without experience (group 1, observers 1-3) or with 2 to 10 years of experience in CEUS (group 2, observers 4-6). Specific training in the diagnostic and interpretative criteria was provided to the inexperienced observers. Each observer used a 5-point scale to grade diagnostic confidence: 1, definitely benign; 2, probably benign; 3, indeterminate; 4, probably malignant; or 5, definitely malignant on the basis of the enhancement pattern during the arterial phase and enhancement degree during the portal and late phases compared with the liver (hypoenhancement indicating malignant and isoenhancement to hyperenhancement indicating benign). The analysis of observer diagnostic confidence revealed higher intragroup (kappa = 0.63-0.83) than intergroup (kappa = 0.47-0.63) observer agreement. The experienced observers showed higher diagnostic performance in malignancy diagnosis than did inexperienced observers (overall accuracy: group 1, 63.3%-72.8%; group 2, 75.9%-93.1%; P < .05, chi(2) test). The diagnostic performance of CEUS in liver tumor characterization was dependant on the observer's level of experience.

  4. Geophysical monitoring of near surface CO2 injection at Svelvik - Learnings from the CO2FieldLab experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querendez, Etor; Romdhane, Anouar; Jordan, Michael; Eliasson, Peder; Grimstad, Alv-Arne

    2014-05-01

    A CO2 migration field laboratory for testing monitoring methods and tools has been established in the glaciofluvial-glaciomarine Holocene deposits of the Svelvik ridge, near Oslo (Norway). At the site, feasibility, sensitivity, acquisition geometry and usefulness of various surface and subsurface monitoring tools are investigated during controlled CO2 injection experiments. In a first stage, a shallow CO2 injection experiment was conducted in September 2011. Approximately 1700 kg of CO2 was injected at 18 m depth below surface in an unconsolidated sand formation. The objectives of this experiment were to (i) detect and, where possible, quantify migrated CO2 concentrations at the surface and very shallow subsurface, (ii) evaluate the sensitivity of the monitoring tools and (iii) study the impact of the vadose zone on observed measurements. Results showed that all deployed monitoring tools (for surface and near-surface gas monitoring, subsurface water monitoring and subsurface geophysical monitoring) where able to detect the presence of CO2 even though the CO2 plume did not migrate vertically as expected in what was thought to be an homogeneous unconsolidated sand structure. The upper part of the site revealed to be more heterogeneous than expected, mainly due to the highly variable lamination and channelling of the morainic sediments and to the presence of pebble and cobble beds sporadically showing throughout the deposits. Building on the learnings from the 18m depth injection experiment, a second experiment is being planned for a deeper injection, at a depth of 65m. Re-processing of the appraisal 2D multi-channel seismic with state-of-the-art processing techniques, like Linear Radon coherent and random noise attenuation and Full Waveform Inversion followed by pre-stack depth migration, corroborate the presence of heterogeneities at the near surface. Based on the re-interpreted seismic sections, a more realistic 3D geomodel, where the complex topography of the site

  5. A 400-pellet feed system for the ORNL centrifuge pellet injector

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Qualls, A.L.; Baylor, L.R.; Schechter, D.E.; Dyer, G.R.; Milora, S.L.

    1993-11-01

    An improved and extended pellet fabrication and feed mechanism is being developed for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) centrifuge pellet injector that is presently installed on Tore Supra. This upgrade will extend the number of pellets available for a single-plasma discharge from 100 to 400. In addition, a new pusher and delivery system is expected to improve the performance of the device. As in the original system, deuterium ice is deposited from the gas phase on a liquid-helium-cooled rotating disk, forming a rim of solid deuterium. The rim of ice is machined to a parabolic profile from which pellets are pushed. In the new device, a stack of four ice rims are formed simultaneously, thereby increasing the capacity from 100 to 400 pellets. An improved method of ice formation has also been developed that produces clear ice. The pellet pusher and delivery system utilizes a four-axis, brushless dc servo system to precisely cut and deliver the pellets from the ice rim to the entrance of the centrifuge wheel. Pellets can be formed with sizes ranging from 2.5- to 4-mm diam at a rate of up to 8 per second. The operation of the injector is fully automated by a computer control system. The design and test results of the device are reported.

  6. Preferential heating of light ions during an ionospheric Ar(+) injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, C. J.; Chandler, M. O.; Moore, T. E.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Kintner, P. M.; Chesney, S.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The Argon Release for Controlled Studies (ARCS) 4 sounding rocket was launched northward into high altitude from Poker Flat Research Range on February 23, 1990. The vehicle crossed geomagnetic field lines containing discrete auroral activity. An instrumented subpayload released 100-eV and 200-eV Ar(+) ion beams sequentially, in a direction largely perpendicular to both the local geomagnetic field and the subpayload spin axis. The instrumented main payload was separated along field lines from the beam emitting subpayload by a distance which increased at a steady rate of approximately 2.4 m/s. Three dimensional mass spectrometric ion observations of ambient H(+) and O(+) ions, obtained on board the main payload, are presented. Main payload electric field observations in the frequency range 0-16 kHz, are also presented. These observations are presented to demonstrate the operation of transverse ion acceleration, which was differential with respect to ion mass, primarily during 100-eV beam operations. The preferential transverse acceleration of ambient H(+) ions, as compared with ambient O(+) ions, during the second, third, fourth, and fifth 100-eV beam operations, is attributed to a resonance among the injected Ar(+) ions, beam-generated lower hybrid waves, and H(+) ions in the tail of the ambient thermal distribution. This work provides experimental support of processes predicted by previously published theory and simulations.

  7. Preferential heating of light ions during an ionospheric Ar(+) injection experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, C.J.; Chandler, M.O.; Moore, T.E.; Arnoldy, R.L.; Kintner, P.M.; Chesney, S.; Cahill, L.J. Jr.

    1995-08-01

    The Argon Release for Controlled Studies (ARCS) 4 sounding rocket was launched northward into high altitude from Poker Flat Research Range on February 23, 1990. The vehicle crossed geomagnetic field lines containing discrete auroral activity. An instrumented subpayload released 100-eV and 200-eV Ar(+) ion beams sequentially, in a direction largely perpendicular to both the local geomagnetic field and the subpayload spin axis. The instrumented main payload was separated along field lines from the beam emitting subpayload by a distance which increased at a steady rate of approximately 2.4 m/s. Three dimensional mass spectrometric ion observations of ambient H(+) and O(+) ions, obtained on board the main payload, are presented. Main payload electric field observations in the frequency range 0-16 kHz, are also presented. These observations are presented to demonstrate the operation of transverse ion acceleration, which was differential with respect to ion mass, primarily during 100-eV beam operations. The preferential transverse acceleration of ambient H(+) ions, as compared with ambient O(+) ions, during the second, third, fourth, and fifth 100-eV beam operations, is attributed to a resonance among the injected Ar(+) ions, beam-generated lower hybrid waves, and H(+) ions in the tail of the ambient thermal distribution. This work provides experimental support of processes predicted by previously published theory and simulations.

  8. The influence of formulation variables on the properties of pellets containing a self-emulsifying mixture.

    PubMed

    Newton, M; Petersson, J; Podczeck, F; Clarke, A; Booth, S

    2001-08-01

    A method of converting self-emulsifying drug delivery systems to a pellet form has been studied. Formulations with varied relative quantities of an oil/surfactant mixture, water, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and lactose were chosen in a statistical design after preliminary ranging experiments. Pellets were produced by extrusion/spheronization. The characteristics of the pellets were studied by sieving, disintegration testing, diametral compression, image analysis, non-contact laser profilometry, and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of the formulation variables on pellet properties were evaluated by analysis of variance. It was possible to relate the formulation variables to all the quantified pellet properties except the shape. The relative quantities of oil/surfactant and water had an effect on the amount of liquid and oil/surfactant that could be incorporated into the powder, extrusion force, median diameter, size spread, disintegration time, tensile strength, and surface roughness. The relative quantities of lactose and MCC had an effect on the amount of liquid and oil/surfactant that could be incorporated into the powder, tensile strength, and roughness only. Water was an essential element of the formulations. The maximum quantity of the specific oil/surfactant combination studied that can be incorporated was 42% of the dry pellet weight.

  9. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason Michael; Lessing, Paul Alan; Hoggan, Rita Elaine

    2015-06-21

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ±0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scaning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. As a result, pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.

  10. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Harp, Jason Michael; Lessing, Paul Alan; Hoggan, Rita Elaine

    2015-06-21

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinationsmore » that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ±0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scaning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. As a result, pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.« less

  11. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Jason M.; Lessing, Paul A.; Hoggan, Rita E.

    2015-11-01

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ± 0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. Pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.

  12. Effects of calcium hydroxide and calcium chloride addition to bentonite in iron ore pelletization.

    PubMed

    Tugrul, Nurcan; Derun, Emek Moroydor; Pişkin, Mehmet

    2006-10-01

    Pyrite ash is created as waste from the roasting of pyrite ores during the production of sulphuric acid. These processes generate great amounts of pyrite ash waste that is generally land filled. This creates serious environmental pollution due to the release of acids and toxic substances. Pyrite ash waste can be utilized in the iron production industry as a blast furnace feed to process this waste and prevent environmental pollution. The essential parameters affecting the pelletization process of pyrite ash were studied using bentonite as a binder. Experiments were then carried out using bentonite and a mixture of bentonite with calcium hydroxide and calcium chloride in order to make the bentonite more effective. The metallurgical properties of pyrite ash, bentonite, calcium hydroxide, calcium chloride, a mixture of these and sintered pellets were studied using X-ray analysis. The crushing strength tests were carried out to investigate the strength of pyrite ash waste pellets. The results of these analyses showed that pyrite ash can be agglomerated to pellets and used in the iron production industry as a blast furnace feed. The crushing strength of the pellets containing calcium hydroxide and calcium chloride in addition to bentonite was better than the strength of pellets prepared using only bentonite binder.

  13. Development of repetitive railgun pellet accelerator and steady-state pellet supply system

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Y.; Onozuka, M.; Azuma, K.; Kasai, S.; Hasegawa, K.

    1995-12-31

    A railgun system for repetitive high-speed pellet acceleration and steady-state pellet supply system has been developed and investigated. Using a 2m-long railgun system, the hydrogen pellet was accelerated to 2.6km/sec by the supplied energy of 1.7kJ. It is expected that the hydrogen pellet can be accelerated to 3km/sec using the present pneumatic pellet accelerator and a 2m-long augment railgun. Screw-driven hydrogen-isotope filament extruding system has been fabricated and will be tested to examine its applicability to the steady-state extrusion of the solid hydrogen-isotope filament.

  14. WHIST transport analysis of high neutron production, ICRH heated, pellet fueled jet plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Tolliver, J.S.; Phillips, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    The WHIST 1-1/2-D predictive transport code is used to model the particle and energy transport of JET pellet-fueled, ICRH-heated plasmas. Pellet injection during the current rise phase was used to produce strong central peaking of the particle density followed by central ICRH heating and led to transient period of enhanced confinement. The evolution of the density profile as well as the electron and ion temperature profiles and strong ICRH heating conditions are examined during this period of enhanced confinement in the context of models for particle and energy transport. Because WHIST is a predictive transport code, it requires models for particle and energy sources and transport coefficients. The analysis procedure thus consists of modeling the particle source terms (pellets, gas, and recycled neutrals), energy source terms (ohmic and ICRH heating), and energy loss terms (primarily radiation), and varying the transport models until the best qualitative and quantitative agreement is obtained between calculated and observed quantities. We find that plasma behavior is well described during the first second of ICRH heating following pellet injection by the same transport coefficients that describe the ohmic plasma. The distinction between electron and ion thermal losses depends on the relative heating rates of electrons and ions as determined by the ICRH model, as well as the radiation losses. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Low velocity boron micro-pellet injector for edge and core impurity transport measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugel, H. W.; Gorman, J.; Kaita, R.; Munsat, T.; Stutman, D.

    1999-01-01

    A simple low velocity boron micro-pellet injector has been under development for Current Drive Experiment Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus edge and core impurity transport measurements, and wall conditioning. The injector consists of 16 barrels on a rotatable turret. Each barrel can be loaded with boron powder particles of diameters ranging from 1 to 40 μm diameter in amounts ranging from less than 0.25 mg to more than 2 mg. A selected barrel is manually rotated into firing position using a vacuum precision rotary/linear motion feedthrough. A piezoelectric valve gas feed system triggered by CDX-U discharge timing is used to control H2 or D2 propellant gas at a cylinder pressure of 5.8×10-3 Pa (40 psi) or less. The injector barrel-to-CDX-U plasma edge distance is 0.47 m. Initial low mass injections of neutral boron beams were performed into CDX-U plasmas at a velocity of 23 m/s. Measurements were obtained with a filtered gated charge coupled device TV camera, bolometry, visible spectroscopy, and ultrasoft x-ray diagnostics. This work is in support of the present CDX-U research program and possible applications on National Spherical Torus Experiment.

  16. Eight-Year Experience With Botulinum Toxin Type-A Injections for the Treatment of Nonneurogenic Overactive Bladder: Are Repeated Injections Worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Kim, Shannon Hk; Habashy, David; Pathan, Sana; Tse, Vincent; Collins, Ruth; Chan, Lewis

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of repeated botulinum toxin type-A (BTX-A) injections for patients with drug-refractory nonneurogenic overactive bladder (NNOAB) and explore factors predictive of outcome. Data were collected from all patients receiving repeated BTX-A injections for drug-refractory NNOAB between 2004 and 2012. Trigone-sparing injections were administered under sedation with antibiotic prophylaxis. Patient characteristics including age, sex, preoperative urodynamics, injection number, BTX-A dose, complications, and patient global impression of improvement (PGI-I) scores were collected. Correlations between patient factors and outcomes were assessed by using Pearson's chi-square tests. Fifty-two patients with a mean age of 67.4 years (range, 26-93 years) received 140 BTX-A injections in total; 33 (64%), 15 (29%), and 4 patients (7%) received 2, 3 to 4, and 5 to 8 injections, respectively. Mean follow-up time was 49 months (range, 9-101 months). Nine patients developed urinary tract infection; additionally, 3 patients experienced transient urinary retention. Median PGI-I score was 2 out of 7 (interquartile range [IQR], 2). For 46 patients, the PGI-I score remained stable with the administration of each injection. Pearson chi-square tests revealed that male patients or reduced bladder compliance was associated with a higher (worse) PGI-I score. Median PGI-I scores for men and women were 3 (IQR, 1) and 2 (IQR, 1), respectively; additionally, median PGI-I scores for those with normal bladder compliance and those with reduced bladder compliance were 2 (IQR, 2) and 4.5 (IQR, 1), respectively. Median PGI-I scores and complication rates were the same in the older patient (≥70 years) and younger (<70 years) patient cohorts. Efficacy is maintained with repeated BTX-A injections. Patients including the elderly show a good degree of tolerability with a low complication rate. Male patients or reduced bladder compliance is associated with poorer outcomes.

  17. 'Tough love': The experiences of midwives giving women sterile water injections for the relief of back pain in labour.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nigel; Kildea, Sue; Stapleton, Helen

    2017-10-01

    To explore midwives' experiences of administering sterile water injections (SWI) to labouring women as analgesia for back pain in labour. A qualitative study, which generated data through semi-structured focus group interviews with midwives. Data were analysed thematically. Two metropolitan maternity units in Queensland, Australia. Eleven midwives who had administered SWI for back pain in labour in a randomised controlled trial. Three major themes were identified including: i. SWI, is it an intervention?; ii. Tough love, causing pain to relieve pain; iii. The analgesic effect of SWI and impact on midwifery practice. Whilst acknowledging the potential benefits of SWI as an analgesic the midwives in this study described a dilemma between inflicting pain to relieve pain and the challenges encountered in their discussions with women when offering SWI. Midwives also faced conflict when women requested SWI in the face of institutional resistance to its use. The procedural pain associated with SWI may discourage some midwives from offering women the procedure, providing women with accurate information regarding the intensity and the brevity of the injection pain and the expected degree of analgesic would assist in discussion about SWI with women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Injection of CO2-saturated water through a siliceous sandstone plug from the Hontomin test site (Spain): experiment and modeling.

    PubMed

    Canal, J; Delgado, J; Falcón, I; Yang, Q; Juncosa, R; Barrientos, V

    2013-01-02

    Massive chemical reactions are not expected when injecting CO(2) in siliceous sandstone reservoirs, but their performance can be challenged by small-scale reactions and other processes affecting their transport properties. We have conducted a core flooding test with a quartzarenite plug of Lower Cretaceous age representative of the secondary reservoir of the Hontomín test site. The sample, confined at high pressure, was successively injected with DIW and CO(2)-saturated DIW for 49 days while monitoring geophysical, chemical, and hydrodynamic parameters. The plug experienced little change, without evidence of secondary carbonation. However, permeability increased by a factor of 4 (0.022-0.085 mD), and the V(P)/V(S) ratio, whose change is related with microcracking, rose from ~1.68 to ~1.8. Porosity also increased (7.33-8.1%) from the beginning to the end of the experiment. Fluid/rock reactions were modeled with PHREEQC-2, and they are dominated by the dissolution of Mg-calcite. Mass balances show that ~4% of the initial carbonate was consumed. The results suggest that mineral dissolution and microcracking may have acted in a synergistic way at the beginning of the acidic flooding. However, dissolution processes concentrated in pore throats can better explain the permeability enhancement observed over longer periods of time.

  19. Paper 58714 - Exploring activated faults hydromechanical processes from semi-controled field injection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Nussbaum, C.

    2015-12-01

    The appreciation of the sensitivity of fractures and fault zones to fluid-induced-deformations in the subsurface is a key question in predicting the reservoir/caprock system integrity around fluid manipulations with applications to reservoir leakage and induced seismicity. It is also a question of interest in understanding earthquakes source, and recently the hydraulic behavior of clay faults under a potential reactivation around nuclear underground depository sites. Fault and fractures dynamics studies face two key problems (1) the up-scaling of laboratory determined properties and constitutive laws to the reservoir scale which is not straightforward when considering faults and fractures heterogeneities, (2) the difficulties to control both the induced seismicity and the stimulated zone geometry when a fault is reactivated. Using instruments dedicated to measuring coupled pore pressures and deformations downhole, we conducted field academic experiments to characterize fractures and fault zones hydromechanical properties as a function of their multi-scale architecture, and to monitor their dynamic behavior during the earthquake nucleation process. We show experiments on reservoir or cover rocks analogues in underground research laboratories where experimental conditions can be optimized. Key result of these experiments is to highlight how important the aseismic fault activation is compared to the induced seismicity. We show that about 80% of the fault kinematic moment is aseismic and discuss the complex associated fault friction coefficient variations. We identify that the slip stability and the slip velocity are mainly controlled by the rate of the permeability/porosity increase, and discuss the conditions for slip nucleation leading to seismic instability.

  20. The street/treatment barrier: treatment experiences of Puerto Rican injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Porter, J

    1999-12-01

    This study describes, through ethnographic interviews, the treatment experiences of Puerto Rican long-term heroin users who are at extremely high risk for HIV infection and the barriers they perceive to drug treatment. On the basis of this information we suggest policy recommendations for increasing drug treatment access for Puerto Rican long-term injectors of heroin. It is critical that Puerto Rican populations access drug treatment facilities given their risk factors for HIV infection and the high rate of poverty in Puerto Rican communities that exacerbates drug use.

  1. MREIT experiments with 200μA injected currents: a feasibility study using two reconstruction algorithms, SMM and Harmonic BZ

    PubMed Central

    Arpinar, V E; Hamamura, M J; Degirmenci, E; Muftuler, L T

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a technique that produces images of conductivity in tissues and phantoms. In this technique electrical currents are applied to an object and the resulting magnetic flux density is measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the conductivity distribution is reconstructed using these MRI data. Currently the technique is used in research environments, primarily studying phantoms and animals. In order to translate MREIT to clinical applications, strict safety standards need to be established, especially for safe current limits. However, there are currently no standards for safe current limits specific to MREIT. Until such standards are established, human MREIT applications need to conform to existing electrical safety standards in medical instrumentation, such as the IEC601. This protocol limits patient auxiliary currents to 100μA for low frequencies. However, published MREIT studies have utilized currents 10 to 400 times larger than this limit, bringing into question whether the clinical applications of MREIT are attainable under current standards. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of MREIT to accurately reconstruct the relative conductivity of a simple agarose phantom using 200μA total injected current and we tested the performance of two MREIT reconstruction algorithms. These reconstruction algorithms used are the iterative sensitivity matrix method (SMM) by Ider and Birgul in 1998 with Tikhonov regularization and the Harmonic BZ proposed by Oh et al in 2003. The reconstruction techniques were tested at both 200μA and 5mA injected currents to investigate their noise sensitivity at low and high current conditions. It should be noted that 200μA total injected current into a cylindrical phantom generates only 14.7μA current in imaging slice. Similarly, 5mA total injected current results in 367μA in imaging slice. Total acquisition time for 200μA and 5mA experiments were about one

  2. MREIT experiments with 200 µA injected currents: a feasibility study using two reconstruction algorithms, SMM and harmonic BZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpinar, V. E.; Hamamura, M. J.; Degirmenci, E.; Muftuler, L. T.

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a technique that produces images of conductivity in tissues and phantoms. In this technique, electrical currents are applied to an object and the resulting magnetic flux density is measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the conductivity distribution is reconstructed using these MRI data. Currently, the technique is used in research environments, primarily studying phantoms and animals. In order to translate MREIT to clinical applications, strict safety standards need to be established, especially for safe current limits. However, there are currently no standards for safe current limits specific to MREIT. Until such standards are established, human MREIT applications need to conform to existing electrical safety standards in medical instrumentation, such as IEC601. This protocol limits patient auxiliary currents to 100 µA for low frequencies. However, published MREIT studies have utilized currents 10-400 times larger than this limit, bringing into question whether the clinical applications of MREIT are attainable under current standards. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of MREIT to accurately reconstruct the relative conductivity of a simple agarose phantom using 200 µA total injected current and tested the performance of two MREIT reconstruction algorithms. These reconstruction algorithms used are the iterative sensitivity matrix method (SMM) by Ider and Birgul (1998 Elektrik 6 215-25) with Tikhonov regularization and the harmonic BZ proposed by Oh et al (2003 Magn. Reason. Med. 50 875-8). The reconstruction techniques were tested at both 200 µA and 5 mA injected currents to investigate their noise sensitivity at low and high current conditions. It should be noted that 200 µA total injected current into a cylindrical phantom generates only 14.7 µA current in imaging slice. Similarly, 5 mA total injected current results in 367 µA in imaging slice. Total acquisition time

  3. Red Light-enhanced Phytochrome Pelletability

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Lee H.; Marmé, Dieter

    1976-01-01

    Red light-enhanced pelletability of phytochrome was observed in extracts of all 11 plants tested: Avena sativa L., Secale cereale L., Zea mays L., Cucurbita pepo L., Sinapis alba L., Pisum sativum L., Helianthus anuus L., Raphanus sativus L., Glycine max (L.) Merr., Phaseolus vulgaris L., and Lupinus albus L. This enhanced pelletability was observed in all 11 plants following in situ irradiation (in vivo binding) but only in Sinapis and Cucurbita after irradiation of crude extracts (in vitro binding). In vivo binding was not strongly dependent upon pH and, with few exceptions, was not markedly sensitive to high salt concentration, whereas in vitro binding was completely reversed by both high pH and high salt concentration. However, both binding phenomena were observed only with a divalent cation in the extract buffer. In vivo binding was further characterized using Avena which showed an increase in pelletability from less than 10% in dark control extracts to more than 60% in extracts of red light-irradiated shoots. The half-life for binding was 40 seconds at 0.5 C and was strongly temperature-dependent, binding being complete within 5 to 10 sec at 22 C. If pelletable phytochrome in the far red-absorbing form was photoconverted back to the red-absorbing form in situ, phytochrome was released from the pelletable condition with a half-life of 25 minutes at 25 C and 100 minutes at both 13 C and 3 C. No cooperativity in red light-enhanced pelletability with respect to phytochrome-far red-absorbing form was observed. PMID:16659745

  4. Polarization Issues with High Power Injection and Low Power Emission in Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, T. P.; Felici, F.; Udintsev, V. S.

    2009-11-26

    All tokamak experiments using ECCD require setting of the beam elliptical polarization for proper coupling to the plasma. This is done either in the matching optics unit (MOU) at the output of the gyrotron, or in a couple of miter bends of the transmission line. Similarly, oblique ECE receivers require selection of the correct elliptical polarization to provide localized measurements. For the TCV tokamak at the CRPP, gyrotron and oblique-ECE polarizers are characterized during either high- or low- power testing of equipment: for the gyrotrons the behaviour is determined at a single frequency, but for the oblique-ECE the broadband response is needed. These characteristics are included in the calibration database and used during subsequent analysis of the power coupling to, or from, the sources (gyrotron, plasma, or low power transmitting antenna). A more detailed characterization has been carried out (at low power) with the MOU for the EU, 170 GHz, 2 MW, gyrotron prototype for ITER. This paper discusses the methodology and results of these measurements, as well as a review of nearly a decade's worth of experimental data from the 6 gyrotron, 3 MW, 82.6 GHz TCV system. In particular, the consistency between the calibrations and the subsequent data from tokamak experiments is analysed.

  5. Experiments on opposed lateral jets injected into swirling crossflow. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurry, C. B.; Lilley, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to obtain the time-mean and turbulent quantities of opposed lateral jets in a low speed, nonreacting flowfield. A jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of R = v sub J/u sub 0 = 4 was used throughout the experiments, with swirl vane angles of d = 0 (swirler removed), 45 and 70 deg used with the crossflow. Flow visualization techniques used were neutrally-buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles and multispark photography in order to obtain the gross flowfield characteristics. Measurements of time-mean and turbulent quantities were obtained utilizing a six-orientation single hot-wire technique. For the nonswirling case, the jets were found not to penetrate past the test-section centerline, in contrast to the single lateral jet with the same jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio. In the swirling cases, the crossflow remains in a narrow region near the wall of the test section. The opposed jets are swept from their vertical courses into spiral trajectories close to the confining walls. Extensive results are presented in r-x plane plots.

  6. Cement/caprock fracture healing experiments to assess the integrity of CO2 injection wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Frane, W. L.; Mason, H. E.; Walsh, S. D.; Ruddle, D. G.; Carroll, S.

    2012-12-01

    It has been speculated that fractures along wellbore cement/caprock interfaces may provide a path for release of carbon from both long-term sequestration-sites and CO2-based enhanced oil recovery operations. The goal of this study is to evaluate the potential for fracture growth and healing in the wellbore environment, and its impact on wellbore permeability. A series of flow-through experiments was conducted, in which sample cores containing a planar fracture between impermeable caprock (compacted quartz, from 13,927' depth in Kern County) and cement (Portland G cured by ATSM standards) were reacted with brine containing variable amounts of carbonic acid (pCO2 between 0 and 3 MPa). The initial fracture geometry was controlled by grinding the caprock and cement pieces flat, and then bead blasting topography into the cement surfaces. Runs lasted 4-8 days with cores and brine maintained at constant temperature (60 °C). Constant confining pressure (24.8 MPa) was applied to cores, while brine was flowed with constant rates (0.05-0.10 mL/min) and pore pressure (12.4 MPa). Geomechanical and geochemical responses of the fractures were monitored by in situ measurements of differential pressure, and by periodically sampling output brine to analyze compositional changes. In every experiment the total permeability of samples cores decreased substantially. For runs using brine with pCO2 = 3 MPa, sample permeability continually decreased by over a factor of 200. Sample permeability also decreased by a factor of 50 having stabilized after ~3 days in a run using brine without CO2 (pCO2 = 0 MPa). These reductions in permeability appear to be the result of chemically-induced changes to the mechanical properties of the cement surface. Prior to reaction, the cement-caprock samples had high strength and elastic response to changes in stress during loading. After the experiments, the samples were weaker, and showed inelastic response to changes in stress during unloading. All cement

  7. Demonstration of Tokamak ohmic flux saving by transient coaxial helicity injection in the national spherical torus experiment.

    PubMed

    Raman, R; Mueller, D; Nelson, B A; Jarboe, T R; Gerhardt, S; Kugel, H W; Leblanc, B; Maingi, R; Menard, J; Ono, M; Paul, S; Roquemore, L; Sabbagh, S; Soukhanovskii, V

    2010-03-05

    Transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) started discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have attained peak currents up to 300 kA and when coupled to induction, it has produced up to 200 kA additional current over inductive-only operation. CHI in NSTX has shown to be energetically quite efficient, producing a plasma current of about 10 A/J of capacitor bank energy. In addition, for the first time, the CHI-produced toroidal current that couples to induction continues to increase with the energy supplied by the CHI power supply at otherwise similar values of the injector flux, indicating the potential for substantial current generation capability by CHI in NSTX and in future toroidal devices.

  8. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs.

  9. International Trade of Wood Pellets (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-05-01

    The production of wood pellets has increased dramatically in recent years due in large part to aggressive emissions policy in the European Union; the main markets that currently supply the European market are North America and Russia. However, current market circumstances and trade dynamics could change depending on the development of emerging markets, foreign exchange rates, and the evolution of carbon policies. This fact sheet outlines the existing and potential participants in the wood pellets market, along with historical data on production, trade, and prices.

  10. CO{sub 2} pellet blasting studies

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    Initial tests with CO{sub 2} pellet blasting as a decontamination technique were completed in 1993 at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). During 1996, a number of additional CO{sub 2} pellet blasting studies with Alpheus Cleaning Technologies, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pennsylvania State University were conducted. After the testing with Alpheus was complete, an SDI-5 shaved CO{sub 2} blasting unit was purchased by the ICPP to test and determine its capabilities before using in ICPP decontamination efforts. Results of the 1996 testing will be presented in this report.

  11. Pesticide transport in an aerobic aquifer with variable pH—Modeling of a field scale injection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Højberg, Anker Lajer; Engesgaard, Peter; Bjerg, Poul L.

    2005-07-01

    Three-dimensional reactive transport simulations were undertaken to study the sorption and degradation dynamics of three herbicides in a shallow aerobic aquifer with spatially variable pH during a 216 days injection experiment. Sorption of two phenoxy acids [(±)-2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid] (MCPP) and [(±)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)propanoic acid] (dichlorprop) was found to be negligible. Degradation of the phenoxy acids was rapid after an initial lag phase. Degradation of the phenoxy acids could only be reproduced satisfactorily by growth-linked microbial degradation. The model fit to the field data was slightly improved if degradation was assumed to be influenced by the local pH that was observed to increase with depth (˜4.5-5.7). In the observed pH-range the nitroaromatic herbicide [2-Methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol] (DNOC) was partly dissociated (p Ka = 4.31) and present in both the neutral and ionized form. The model simulations demonstrated that most of the observed spatial variation in sorption of DNOC could be explained by assuming that only the neutral form of DNOC was subject to sorption. A varying flow field was observed during the injection experiment and the model simulations documented that this most likely resulted in different migration paths for DNOC and the non-sorbing solutes. The model simulations indicated that degradation of DNOC was an important process. The degradation rate of DNOC remained constant over time and was simulated adequately by first-order kinetics. Again, the model fit to field observation was slightly improved if local pH was assumed to influence the degradation rate. Only the maximum utilization rate was estimated from the field data, while the remaining degradation parameters where successfully transferred from the laboratory study.

  12. The resolution of reservoir dynamics with noise based technologies: A case study from the 2006 Basel injection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillers, Gregor; Husen, Stephan; Obermann, Anne; Planes, Thomas; Campillo, Michel; Larose, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We explore the applicability of noise-based monitoring and imaging techniques in the context of the 2006 Basel stimulation experiment using data from five borehole velocimeters and five surface accelerometers located around the injection site. We observe a significant perturbation of medium properties associated with the reservoir stimulation. The transient perturbation, with a duration of 20-30 days, reaches its maximum about 15 days after shut in, when microseismic activity has ceased; it is thus associated with aseismic deformation. Inverting relative velocity change and decorrelation observations using techniques developed and applied on laboratory and local to regional seismological scales, we can image the associated deformation pattern. We discuss limits of the the frequency- and lapse-time dependent resolution and suggestions for improvements considering the 3-D network geometry together with wave propagation models. The depth sensitivity of the analyzed wave field indicates resolution of perturbation in the shallow parts of the sedimentary layer above the stimulated deep volume located in the crystalline base layer. The deformation pattern is similar to InSAR/satellite observations associated with CO2 sequestration experiments, and indicates the transfer of deformation beyond scales associated with the instantaneously stimulated volume. Our detection and localization of delayed induced shallow aseismic transient deformation indicates that monitoring the evolution of reservoir properties using the ambient seismic field provides observables that complement information obtained with standard microseismic approaches. The results constitute a significant advance for the resolution of reservoir dynamics; the technology has the potential to provide critical constraints in related geotechnical situations associated with fluid injection, fracking, (nuclear) waste management, and carbon capture and storage.

  13. Tritium pellet injector design for tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Baylor, L.R.; Bryan, W.E.; Combs, S.K.; Easterly, C.E.; Lunsford, R.V.; Milora, S.L.; Schuresko, D.D.; White, J.A.; Williamson, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    A tritium pellet injector (TPI) system has been designed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Q approx. 1 phase of operation. The injector gun utilizes a radial design with eight independent barrels and a common extruder to minimize tritium inventory. The injection line contains guide tubes with intermediate vacuum pumping stations and fast valves to minimize propellant leakage to the torus. The vacuum system is designed for tritium compatibility. The entire injector system is contained in a glove box for secondary containment protection against tritium release. Failure modes and effects have been analyzed, and structural analysis has been performed for most intense predicted earthquake conditions. Details of the design and operation of this system are presented in this paper.

  14. High-speed repetitive pellet injector for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Foust, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    The projected fueling requirements of future magnetic confinement devices for controlled thermonuclear research [e.g., the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)] indicate that a flexible plasma fueling capability is required. This includes a mix of traditional gas puffing and low- and high-velocity deuterium-tritium pellets. Conventional pellet injectors (based on light gas guns or centrifugal accelerators) can reliably provide frozen hydrogen pellets (1- to 6-mm-diam sizes tested) up to {approximately}1.3-km/s velocity at the appropriate pellet fueling rates (1 to 10 Hz or greater). For long-pulse operation in a higher velocity regime (>2 km/s), an experiment in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ENEA Frascati is under way. This activity will be carried out in the framework of a collaborative agreement between the US Department of Energy and European Atomic Energy Community -- ENEA Association. In this experiment, an existing ORNL hydrogen extruder (equipped with a pellet chambering mechanism/gun barrel assembly) and a Frascati two-stage light gas gun driver have been combined on a test facility at ORNL. Initial testing has been carried out with single deuterium pellets accelerated up to 2.05 km/s with the two-stage driver; in addition, some preliminary repetitive testing (to commission the diagnostics) was performed at reduced speeds, including sequences at 0.5 to 1 Hz and 10 to 30 pellets. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate repetitive operation (up to {approximately}1 Hz) with speeds in the 2- to 3-km/s range. In addition, the strength of extruded hydrogen ice as opposed to that produced in situ by direct condensation in pipe guns can be investigated. The equipment and initial experimental results are described.

  15. Hydrogen pellet ablation and acceleration by current in high temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.

    1995-04-01

    Hydrogen pellet ablation and acceleration by current in high temperature plasmas are analysed. The present state of ablation theory and experiment is discussed and an ablation model is formulated. This model takes into account the energy distribution of the particles (both electrons and ions)participating in the ablation process, electrostatic effects of the cloud charging and changes of the pellet form during ablation. Without charging the pellet form tends to a shape resembling a lentil while it remains almost spherical if charged. A new algorithm for ablation rate calculations that can be used for an arbitrary initial form of the pellet is described. The results of this kinetic two dimensional approach differ from those of the Parks ablation scaling used in the ITER design by not more than 30%. Plasma shielding effects are not significant in the ablation if strong turbulence in the cloud is taken into account. Acceleration analysis is based on the Braginskii corrected electron distribution function. For the lentil mode of ablation, acceleration is higher than those for the charged mode by a