Science.gov

Sample records for pellet injection experiments

  1. Lithium pellet injection experiments on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, D.T.

    1996-06-01

    A pellet enhanced performance mode, showing significantly reduced core transport, is regularly obtained after the injection of deeply penetrating lithium pellets into Alcator C-Mod discharges. These transient modes, which typically persist about two energy confinement times, are characterized by a steep pressure gradient ({ell}{sub p} {le} a/5) in the inner third of the plasma, indicating the presence of an internal transport barrier. Inside this barrier, particle and energy diffusivities are greatly reduced, with ion thermal diffusivity dropping to near neoclassical values. Meanwhile, the global energy confinement time shows a 30% improvement over ITER89-P L-mode scaling. The addition of ICRF auxiliary heating shortly after the pellet injection leads to high fusion reactivity with neutron rates enhanced by an order of magnitude over L-mode discharges with similar input powers. A diagnostic system for measuring equilibrium current density profiles of tokamak plasmas, employing high speed lithium pellets, is also presented. Because ions are confined to move along field lines, imaging the Li{sup +} emission from the toroidally extended pellet ablation cloud gives the direction of the magnetic field. To convert from temporal to radial measurements, the 3-D trajectory of the pellet is determined using a stereoscopic tracking system. These measurements, along with external magnetic measurements, are used to solve the Grad-Shafranov equation for the magnetic equilibrium of the plasma. This diagnostic is used to determine the current density profile of PEP modes by injection of a second pellet during the period of good confinement. This measurement indicates that a region of reversed magnetic shear exists at the plasma core. This current density profile is consistent with TRANSP calculations for the bootstrap current created by the pressure gradient. MHD stability analysis indicates that these plasmas are near the n = {infinity} and the n = 1 marginal stability limits.

  2. Pellet Injection into MST RFP Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, M. D.; Chapman, B. E.; Craig, D.; Ennis, D. A.; O'Connell, R.; Oliva, S. P.; Prager, S. C.; Reardon, J. C.; Sarff, J. S.; Combs, S. K.; Baylor, L. R.; Fehling, D. T.; Fisher, P. W.; Foust, C. R.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Wilgen, J. B.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2002-11-01

    A four-barrel cryogenic pellet injector, designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been installed on MST. The injector is a pipe gun utilizing high-pressure hydrogen gas for acceleration of pellets. Presently, the two barrels in use accommodate deuterium pellets with diameters of 1.0 mm and 1.8 mm and lengths ranging from 1.5 mm to 2.7 mm which are injected radially into MST. Pellet speeds of 1300 m/s have been achieved in initial experiments, and many pellets cross the plasma diameter without completely ablating. The pellets rapidly increase the central density and peak the density profile, something not possible with gas puffing alone. Pellet injection into improved-confinement plasmas has allowed the achievement of line-averaged densities 10-20% larger than the usual limit, above which edge-resonant MHD instability is triggered, and confinement is degraded. Mechanical punches will soon be installed to allow slower pellet speeds. Work supported by U.S.D.O.E.

  3. Model for pneumatic pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.; Milora, S.L.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1983-07-01

    A hydrodynamic code has been developed to model the performance of pneumatic pellet injection systems. The code describes one dimensional, unsteady compressible gas dynamics, including gas friction and heat transfer to the walls in a system with variable area. The mass, momentum, and energy equations are solved with an iterated Lax-Wendroff scheme with additional numerical viscosity. The code is described and comparisons with experimental data are presented.

  4. Performance characterization of pneumatic single pellet injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Schuresko, D.D.; Milora, S.L.; Hogan, J.T.; Foster, C.A.; Combs, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory single-shot pellet injector, which has been used in plasma fueling experiments on ISX and PDX, has been upgraded and extensively instrumented in order to study the gas dynamics of pneumatic pellet injection. An improved pellet transport line was developed which utilizes a 0.3-cm-diam by 100-cm-long guide tube. Pellet gun performance was characterized by measurements of breech and muzzle dynamic pressures and by pellet velocity and mass determinations. Velocities up to 1.4 km/s were achieved for intact hydrogen pellets using hydrogen propellant at 5-MPa breech pressure. These data have been compared with new pellet acceleration calculations which include the effects of propellant friction, heat transfer, time-dependent boundary conditions, and finite gun geometry. These results provide a basis for the extrapolation of present-day pneumatic injection system performance to velocities in excess of 2 km/s.

  5. Tritium pellet injection sequences for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Attenberger, S.E.; Singer, C.E.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    Tritium pellet injection into neutral deuterium, beam heated deuterium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is shown to be an attractive means of (1) minimizing tritium use per tritium discharge and over a sequence of tritium discharges; (2) greatly reducing the tritium load in the walls, limiters, getters, and cryopanels; (3) maintaining or improving instantaneous neutron production (Q); (4) reducing or eliminating deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron production in non-optimized discharges; and (5) generally adding flexibility to the experimental sequences leading to optimal Q operation. Transport analyses of both compression and full-bore TFTR plasmas are used to support the above observations and to provide the basis for a proposed eight-pellet gas gun injector for the 1986 tritium experiments.

  6. Pellet injector development and experiments at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.; Argo, B.E.; Barber, G.C.; Combs, S.K.; Cole, M.J.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Jernigan, T.C.; Langley, R.A.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Schechter, D.E.; Sparks, D.O.; Tsai, C.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Whealton, J.H.

    1993-11-01

    The development of pellet injectors for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion experiments has been under way at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the past 15 years. Recently, ORNL provided a tritium-compatible four-shot pneumatic injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) based on the in situ condensation technique that features three single-stage gas guns and an advanced two-stage light gas gun driver. In another application, ORNL supplied the Tore Supra tokamak with a centrifuge pellet injector in 1989 for pellet fueling experiments that has achieved record numbers of injected pellets into a discharge. Work is progressing on an upgrade to that injector to extend the number of pellets to 400 and improve pellet repeatability. In a new application, the ORNL three barrel repeating pneumatic injector has been returned from JET and is being readied for installation on the DIII-D device for fueling and enhanced plasma performance experiments. In addition to these experimental applications, ORNL is developing advanced injector technologies, including high-velocity pellet injectors, tritium pellet injectors, and long-pulse feed systems. The two-stage light gas gun and electron-beam-driven rocket are the acceleration techniques under investigation for achieving high velocity. A tritium proof-of-principle (TPOP) experiment has demonstrated the feasibility of tritium pellet production and acceleration. A new tritium-compatible, extruder-based, repeating pneumatic injector is being fabricated to replace the pipe gun in the TPOP experiment and will explore issues related to the extrudability of tritium and acceleration of large tritium pellets. The tritium pellet formation experiments and development of long-pulse pellet feed systems are especially relevant to the International Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER).

  7. Second jet workshop on pellet injection: pellet fueling program in the United States. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    S. Milora described the US programme on pellet injection. It has four parts: (1) a confinement experimental program; (2) pellet injector development; (3) theoretical support; and (4) tritium pellet study for TFTR.

  8. A Comparison of Fueling with Deuterium Pellet Injection from Different Locations on the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Gohil, P.; Houlberg, W.A.; Hsieh, C.; Jernigan, T.C.; Parks, P.B.

    1999-06-14

    Initial pellet injection experiments on DIII-D with high field side (HFS) injection have demonstrated that deeper pellet fuel deposition is possible even with HFS injected pellets that are significantly slower than pellets injected from the low field side (LFS) (outer midplane) location. A radial displacement of the pellet mass shortly after or during the ablation process is consistent with the observed mass deposition profiles measured shortly after injection. Vertical injection inside the magnetic axis shows some improvement in fueling efficiency over LFS injection and may provide an optimal injection location for fueling with high speed pellets.

  9. A Compact Flexible Pellet Injection System for Fueling Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Fehling, D. T.; Fisher, P. W.; Foust, C. R.; Gouge, M. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2000-10-01

    A compact pellet injection system is being designed and built at ORNL to provide a flexible pellet fueling system for studies in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The system known as a ``pellet injector in a suitcase (PIS)'' is a pipe gun device with four barrels that uses a cryocooler for in-situ hydrogenic pellet formation. The system is being built to provide a flexible, low-cost fueling system that can be used on a number of plasma confinement experiments with minimal installation and operation costs. components in the system. It will use both propellant gas and a mechanical punch to accelerate the 1 - 4 mm size pellets to 100-1500 m/s. With the mechanical punch alone a low speed pellet, useful for curved guide tube applications, can be produced with minimal gas load eliminating the need for a large ballast volume. can be independently fired. diagnose the injector. The PIS is a flexible tool for fueling alternative concept devices such as MST and NSTX and for specialized studies in mainline tokamak experiments such as DIII-D and JET. The small size makes installation on such devices more feasible. of the system design and the expected performance will be presented.

  10. Development of a Tritium Extruder for ITER Pellet Injection

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Gouge; P.W. Fisher

    1998-09-01

    As part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) plasma fueling development program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has fabricated a pellet injection system to test the mechanical and thermal properties of extruded tritium. Hydrogenic pellets will be used in ITER to sustain the fusion power in the plasma core and may be crucial in reducing first-wall tritium inventories by a process of "isotopic fueling" in which tritium-rich pellets fuel the burning plasma core and deuterium gas fuels the edge. This repeating single-stage pneumatic pellet injector, called the Tritium-Proof-of-Principle Phase II (TPOP-II) Pellet Injector, has a piston-driven mechanical extruder and is designed to extrude and accelerate hydrogenic pellets sized for the ITER device. The TPOP-II program has the following development goals: evaluate the feasibility of extruding tritium and deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures for use in future pellet injection systems; determine the mechanical and thermal properties of tritium and D-T extrusions; integrate, test, and evaluate the extruder in a repeating, single-stage light gas gun that is sized for the ITER application (pellet diameter -7 to 8 mm); evaluate options for recycling propellant and extruder exhaust gas; and evaluate operability and reliability of ITER prototypical fueling systems in an environment of significant tritium inventory that requires secondary and room containment systems. In tests with deuterium feed at ORNL, up to 13 pellets per extrusion have been extruded at rates up to 1 Hz and accelerated to speeds of 1.0 to 1.1 km/s, using hydrogen propellant gas at a supply pressure of 65 bar. Initially, deuterium pellets 7.5 mm in diameter and 11 mm in length were produced-the largest cryogenic pellets produced by the fusion program to date. These pellets represent about a 10% density perturbation to ITER. Subsequently, the extruder nozzle was modified to produce pellets that are almost 7.5-mm right circular

  11. New Pellet Injection Schemes on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.M.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Foust, C.R.; Jernigan, T.C.; Robinson, J.I.

    1999-11-13

    The pellet fueling system on DIII-D has been modified for injection of deuterium pellets from two vertical ports and two inner wall locations on the magnetic high-field side (HFS) of the tokamak. The HFS pellet injection technique was first employed on ASDEX-Upgrade with significant improvements reported in both pellet penetration and fueling efficiency. The new pellet injection schemes on DIII-D required the installation of new guide tubes. These lines are {approx_equal}12.5 m in total length and are made up of complex bends and turns (''roller coaster'' like) to route pellets from the injector to the plasma, including sections inside the torus. The pellet speed at which intact pellets can survive through the curved guide tubes is limited ({approx_equal}200-300 m/s for HFS injection schemes). Thus, one of the three gas guns on the injector was modified to provide pellets in a lower speed regime than the original guns (normal speed range {approx_equal}500 to 1000 m/s). The guide tube installations and gun modifications are described along with the injector operating parameters, and the latest test results are highlighted.

  12. Energetic ion diagnostics using neutron flux measurements during pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron measurements during injection of deuterium pellets into deuterium plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) indicate that the fractional increase in neutron emission about 0.5 msec after pellet injection is proportional to the fraction of beam-plasma reactions to total fusion reactions in the unperturbed plasma. These observations suggest three diagnostic applications of neutron measurements during pellet injection: (1) measurement of the beam-plasma reaction rate in deuterium plasmas for use in determining the fusion Q in an equivalent deuterium-tritium plasma, (2) measurement of the radial profile of energetic beam ions by varying the pellet size and velocity, and (3) measurement of the ''temperature'' of ions accelerated during wave heating. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Lithium wall conditioning by high frequency pellet injection in RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocente, P.; Mansfield, D. K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Agostini, M.; Barison, S.; Canton, A.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; De Masi, G.; Fassina, A.; Fiameni, S.; Grando, L.; Rais, B.; Rossetto, F.; Scarin, P.

    2015-08-01

    In the RFX-mod reversed field pinch experiment, lithium wall conditioning has been tested with multiple scopes: to improve density control, to reduce impurities and to increase energy and particle confinement time. Large single lithium pellet injection, lithium capillary-pore system and lithium evaporation has been used for lithiumization. The last two methods, which presently provide the best results in tokamak devices, have limited applicability in the RFX-mod device due to the magnetic field characteristics and geometrical constraints. On the other side, the first mentioned technique did not allow injecting large amount of lithium. To improve the deposition, recently in RFX-mod small lithium multi-pellets injection has been tested. In this paper we compare lithium multi-pellets injection to the other techniques. Multi-pellets gave more uniform Li deposition than evaporator, but provided similar effects on plasma parameters, showing that further optimizations are required.

  14. Radiation analysis of the ITER pellet injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J. ); Gomes, I.C.; Gomes, L.T.; Stevens, P.N, )

    1991-03-01

    The results of neutronics calculations for the pellet injection system of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are described. Hands-on maintenance of components in the pellet injection room results in a considerable simplification of maintenance support equipment and in greater system availability. The basic configuration of the pellet injection system includes small-diameter guide tubes with which the pellet may have several small-angle collisions before reaching the plasma. The pellet injector port through which the guide tubes pass will be shared with ITER plasma diagnostics, so the calculation takes into account penetrations to accommodate numerous channels for a neutron spectrometer and neutron and gamma-ray cameras. The conservative assumption of steady-state operation of ITER for 1000 days was taken as the baseline for calculating the activation of components in the pellet injection room. The plasma configuration is based on the current ITER guidelines, the first wall configuration is based on the most recently updated configuration, and the blanket configuration is based on the US proposal for the blanket. The plasma, coils, and blanket regions were analyzed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The transport of neutrons through the penetrations was also performed with MCNP. The pellet injection room was modeled with the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DORT, which was also used for the transport of neutrons during operation and of gamma rays caused by activation. The activation calculations were carried out with the REBATE code. Results from this study indicate that restricted personnel access to the pellet injection room is possible, so limited hands-on maintenance can be performed on the majority of the components in the room.

  15. Pellet injection in the RFP (Reversed Field Pinch)

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A.; Weber, P.G.; Munson, C.P.; Cayton, T.E.; Bunting, C.A.; Carolan, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Observation of pellets injected into the ZT-40M Reversed Field Pinch has allowed a new twist on the usual tokamak ablation physics modeling. The RFP provides a strong ohmic heating regime with relatively high electron drift parameter (xi/sub drift/ /approximately/ 0.2), in the presence of a highly sheared magnetic field geometry. In situ photos of the pellet ablation cloud using a grated-intensified CCD camera, as well as two-view integrated photos of the pellet trajectory show substantial modification of the original pellet trajectory, in both direction and speed. Depending on the launch geometry, increases in the initial 500 m/s pellet speed by 50% have been observed, and a ski jump deflector plate in the launch port has been used to counteract strong poloidal curvature. In contrast to the tokamak, the D/sub ..cap alpha../ light signature is strongest near the edge, and weaker in the plasma center. Additional information on ion temperature response to pellet injection with 20 ..mu..sec time resolution has been obtained using a 5-channel neutral particle analyzer (NPA). The energy confinement is transiently degraded while the beta is largely unchanged. This may be indicative of pellet injection into a high-beta plasma operating at fixed beta. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Particle transport after pellet injection in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, J. L.; McCarthy, K. J.; Panadero, N.; Satake, S.; López-Bruna, D.; Alonso, A.; Calvo, I.; Dinklage, A.; Estrada, T.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Hernández, J.; García, R.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.; Pastor, I.; Perfilov, S.; Sánchez, E.; Soleto, A.; Van Milligen, B. Ph; Zhezhera, A.; the TJ-II Team

    2016-08-01

    We study radial particle transport in stellarator plasmas using cryogenic pellet injection. By means of perturbative experiments, we estimate the experimental particle flux and compare it with neoclassical simulations. Experimental evidence is obtained of the fact that core depletion in helical devices can be slowed-down even by pellets that do not reach the core region. This phenomenon is well captured by neoclassical predictions with DKES and FORTEC-3D.

  17. Plasma gun pellet acceleration modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Modifications to the electrothermal plasma gun SIRENS have been completed to allow for acceleration experiments using plastic pellets. Modifications have been implemented to the 1-D, time dependent code ODIN to include pellet friction, momentum, and kinetic energy with options of variable barrel length. The code results in the new version, POSEIDON, compare favorably with experimental data and with code results from ODIN. Predicted values show an increased pellet velocity along the barrel length, achieving 2 km/s exit velocity. Measured velocity, at three locations along the barrel length, showed good correlation with predicted values. The code has also been used to investigate the effectiveness of longer pulse length on pellet velocity using simulated ramp up and down currents with flat top, and triangular current pulses with early and late peaking. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Experiments with the Ignitor Pellet Injector (IPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattolillo, A.; Migliori, S.; Podda, S.; Bombarda, F.; Baylor, L. R.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Combs, S. K.; Foust, C.; Fehling, D.; McJill, J. M.; Meitner, S.; Roveta, G.

    2009-11-01

    The four barrel, two-stage pneumatic injector for the Ignitor experiment (IPI), built by ENEA and ORNL, has been tested in the course of three esperimental campaigns. The optimal shaping of the propellant pressure pulse to improve pellet acceleration is provided by specially designed Pulse Shaping Valves. These have been modified and tested on a new facility that allows operating pellet injector components in conditions close to those at which they will have to operate on the IPI. Fast closing (< 10 ms) valves drastically reduce the expansion volumes needed to remove the propellant gas at the end of the guiding tube. The four barrel (2.1, 2.2, 3.0 and 4.6 mm bores) pipe-gun cryostat is cooled down by a closed cycle refrigerator, and pellet diagnostics for measuring speed and mass of the pellets, as well as for capturing in-flight pictures of all four pellets were developed for this application. The final impact target is equipped with a shock accelerometer. The injector is designed to deliver pellets with velocities up to 4 km/s (2 km/s already achieved): the results of the latest experimental campaign will be reported.

  19. A New Four-Barrel Pellet Injection System for the TJ-II Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Foust, Charles R; McGill, James M; Baylor, Larry R; Caughman, John B; Fehling, Dan T; Harris, Jeffrey H; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A; McCarthy, K. J.; Chamorro, M.; Garcia, R.; Hildago, C.; Medrano, M.; Unamuno, R.

    2011-01-01

    A new pellet injection system for the TJ-II stellarator has been developed/constructed as part of a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Centro de Investigaciones Energ ticas, Medioambientales y Tecnol gicas (CIEMAT). ORNL is providing most of the injector hardware and instrumentation, the pellet diagnostics, and the pellet transport tubes; CIEMAT is responsible for the injector stand/interface to the stellarator, cryogenic refrigerator, vacuum pumps/ballast volumes, gas manifolds, remote operations, plasma diagnostics, and data acquisition. The pellet injector design is an upgraded version of that used for the ORNL injector installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). It is a four-barrel system equipped with a cryogenic refrigerator for in situ hydrogen pellet formation and a combined mechanical punch/propellant valve system for pellet acceleration (speeds ~100 to 1000 m/s). On TJ-II, it will be used as an active diagnostic and for fueling. To accommodate the plasma experiments planned for TJ-II, pellet sizes significantly smaller than those typically used for the MST application are required. The system will initially be equipped with four different pellet sizes, with the gun barrel bores ranging between ~0.5 to 1.0 mm. The new system is almost complete and is described briefly here, highlighting the new features added since the original MST injector was constructed. Also, the future installation on TJ-II is reviewed.

  20. The New High Speed Pellet Injector for the Ignitor Experiment^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, S.; Baylor, L. R.; Roveta, G.

    2005-10-01

    A four barrel, two-stage pellet injector for the Ignitor experiment is under construction in collaboration between the ENEA Laboratory at Frascati and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goal is to reach pellet velocities of about 4 km/s, capable of penetrating near the center of the plasma column when injected from the low field side, in order to control the density profile, especially during the crucial phase of the initial current ramp, and as a possible method to fuel the discharge or to provide fast burn control during the ignited phase. The innovative concepts at the basis of the injector design are the proper shaping of the propulsion gas pressure front and the use of fast valves to considerably reduce the requirements on the expansion volumes necessary to prevent the propulsion gas to reach the plasma chamber. The complete propelling and gas removal systems have been built and tested at CRIOTEC. ORNL is responsible for the design, construction, and testing of the pellet injector vacuum chamber, the cryogenic systems, the gun barrels, and pellet diagnostics. Integrated testing at high pellet speeds with a wide range of operating parameters explored is also going to be carried out at ORNL.

  1. Demonstration of ELM pacing by Pellet Injection on DIII-D and Extrapolation to ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Jernigan, Thomas C; Parks, P. B.; Evans, T.E.; Osborne, T. H.; Strait, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R.A.; Yu, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    Demonstration of ELM pacing by pellet injection on DIII-D and extrapolation to ITER<#_ftn1>* L.R. Baylor1, N. Commaux1, T.C. Jernigan1, P.B. Parks2, T.E. Evans2, T.H. Osborne2, E.J. Strait2, M.E. Fenstermacher3, C.J. Lasnier3, R.A. Moyer4, J.H. Yu4 1Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA 2General Atomics, San Diego, CA, USA 3 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA 4University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA Deuterium pellet injection has been used in experiments on the DIII-D tokamak to investigate the possibility of triggering small rapid edge localized modes (ELMs) in reactor relevant plasma regimes. ELMs have been observed to be triggered from small 1.8 mm pellets injected from all available locations and under all H-mode operating scenarios in DIII-D. Experimental details have shown that the ELMs are triggered before the pellets reach the top of the H-mode pedestal, implying that very small shallow penetrating pellets are sufficient to trigger ELMs. Fast camera images of the pellet entering the plasma from the low field side show a single plasma filament becoming visible near the pellet cloud and striking the outer vessel wall within 200 ms. Additional ejected filaments are then observed to subsequently reach the wall. The plasma stored energy loss from the pellet triggered ELMs is a function of the elapsed time after a previous ELM. Pellet ELM pacing has been proposed as a method to prevent large ELMs that can damage the ITER plasma facing components [1]. A demonstration of pacing of ELMs on DIII-D was made by injecting slow 14 Hz pellets on the low field side in an ITER shape plasma with low natural ELM frequency and a normalized b of 1.8. The non-pellet discharge natural ELM frequency was ~5 Hz with ELM energy losses up to 85 kJ (>10% of total stored energy) while the case with pellets was able to demonstrate >20 Hz ELMs with an average ELM energy loss less than 22 kJ (<3% of the total). The resulting ELM frequency

  2. Non-axisymmetric Perturbations of the LDX Laboratory Magnetosphere by Lithium Pellet Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, D.; Mauel, M.; Kesner, J.

    2014-10-01

    In most toroidal magnetic plasma confinement systems, transport within helical flux surfaces serve to symmetrize the plasma temperature and density. In contrast, a plasma torus confined by a dipole field lacks a rotational transform and therefore the confined plasma is not necessarily axisymmetric. The plasma, however, self organizes into a time-averaged symmetric state through particle drifts and turbulent transport. Recent experiments in the LDX laboratory magnetosphere have been conducted to study large non axisymmetric perturbations of the dipole confined plasma. A high speed gas gun was used to inject lithium pellets tangentially through the peak of the plasma density profile. High speed video shows the pellet ablating as it traverses the bulk plasma. As the pellets approach the mid plane they encounter the deeply trapped energetic electron ring (formed during ECH) and absorb energy deeply into pellet. This causes a rapid ablation fracturing of the pellet into multiple droplets; the exploding pellets will vaporize and then ionize leading to a tripling of the line integrated density. Similar processes occur when objects enter the Van Allen belts. The high density plasma presents an improved target for ICRF heating. We will present recent experimental results. Supported by the NSF-DOE Partnership in Plasma Science Grants DE-FG02-00ER54585 and PHY-1201896.

  3. Tracer-Encapsulated Solid Pellet (TESPEL) injection system for the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, N.; McCarthy, K. J.; Hayashi, H.; Combs, S. K.; Foust, C.; García, R.; Panadero, N.; Pawelec, E.; Hernández Sánchez, J.; Navarro, M.; Soleto, A.

    2016-11-01

    A tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) injection system for the TJ-II stellarator was recently developed. In order to reduce the time and cost for the development, we combined a TESPEL injector provided by National Institute for Fusion Science with an existing TJ-II cryogenic pellet injection system. Consequently, the TESPEL injection into the TJ-II plasma was successfully achieved, which was confirmed by several pellet diagnostics including a normal-incidence spectrometer for monitoring a tracer impurity behavior.

  4. Tracer-Encapsulated Solid Pellet (TESPEL) Injection System for the TJ-II Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, N.; McCarthy, K. J.; Hayashi, H.; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Foust, Charles R; Garcia, R.; Panadero, N.; Pawelec, E.; Sanchez, J. Hernandez; Navarro, M.; Soleto, A.

    2016-01-01

    A tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) injection system for the TJ-II stellarator was recently developed. In order to reduce the time and cost for the development, we combined a TESPEL injector provided by National Institute for Fusion Science with an existing TJ-II cryogenic pellet injection system. Consequently, the TESPEL injection into the TJ-II plasma was successfully achieved, which was confirmed by several pellet diagnostics including a normal-incidence spectrometer for monitoring a tracer impurity behavior.

  5. Controls of Magnetic Islands by Pellet Injection in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.; Houlberg, Wayne A; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of magnetic islands in tokamaks degrades plasma confinement. It is therefore important to control or eliminate the growth of the islands to improve the performance of a tokamak. A theory is developed to control magnetic islands using the localized pressure gradient driven bootstrap current by injecting pellets at the O-point of the island to create a peaked plasma pressure profile inside the island. This localized bootstrap current replenishes the missing equilibrium bootstrap current density that causes the island to grow in the first place. It is shown that the effect of the localized bootstrap current tends to reduce or eliminate the original drive for the growth of the island in the island evolution equation. The theory is also valid for the localized bootstrap current created by localized heating, but with much less effectiveness. A possibility of eliminating the island by controlling the equilibrium profiles is also discussed.

  6. Control of magnetic islands by pellet injection in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.; Houlberg, W. A.; Peng, M.

    2007-07-15

    The appearance of magnetic islands in tokamaks degrades plasma confinement. It is therefore important to control or eliminate the growth of the islands to improve the performance of a tokamak. A theory is developed to control magnetic islands using the localized pressure gradient driven bootstrap current by injecting pellets at the O-point of the island to create a peaked plasma pressure profile inside the island. This localized bootstrap current replenishes the missing equilibrium bootstrap current density that causes the island to grow in the first place. It is shown that the effect of the localized bootstrap current tends to reduce or eliminate the original drive for the growth of the island in the island evolution equation. The theory is also valid for the localized bootstrap current created by localized heating, but with much less effectiveness. A possibility of eliminating the island by controlling the equilibrium profiles is also discussed.

  7. Control of magnetic islands by pellet injection in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.; Rome, James A; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of magnetic islands in tokamaks degrades plasma confinement. It is therefore important to control or eliminate the growth of the islands to improve the performance of a tokamak. A theory is developed to control magnetic islands using the localized pressure gradient driven bootstrap current by injecting pellets at the O-point of the island to create a peaked plasma pressure profile inside the island. This localized bootstrap current replenishes the missing equilibrium bootstrap current density that causes the island to grow in the first place. It is shown that the effect of the localized bootstrap current tends to reduce or eliminate the original drive for the growth of the island in the island evolution equation. The theory is also valid for the localized bootstrap current created by localized heating, but with much less effectiveness. A possibility of eliminating the island by controlling the equilibrium profiles is also discussed. (c) 2007 American Institute of Physics.

  8. A fuel pellet injector for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, S.M.; Allen, S.L.; Petersen, D.E.; Sewall, N.R.

    1990-09-01

    Unlike other fueling systems for magnetically confined fusion plasmas, a pellet injector can deliver many fuel gas particles to the core of the plasma, enhancing plasma confinement. We installed a new pellet injector on the MTX (formerly Alcator-O) to provide a plasma with a high core density for experiments both with and without ultrahigh-power microwave heating. Its four-barrel pellet generator is the first to be designed and built at LLNL. Based on pipe-gun'' technology originated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), it incorporates our structural and thermal engineering innovations and a unique control system. The pellet transport, differential vacuum-pumping stages, and fast-opening propellant valves are reused parts of the Impurity Study EXperiment (ISX) pellet injector built by ORNL. We tailored designs of all other systems and components to the MTX. Our injector launches pellets of frozen hydrogen or deuterium into the MTX, either singly or in timed bursts of up to four pellets at velocities of up to 1000 m/s. Pellet diameters range from 1.02 to 2.08 mm. A diagnostic stage measures pellet velocities and allows us to photograph the pellets in flight. We are striving to improve the injector's performance, but its operations is already very consistent and reliable.

  9. Simulation of peeling-ballooning modes with pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. Y.; Huang, J.; Sun, T. T.; Tang, C. J.; Wang, Z. H.

    2014-11-15

    The influence of pellet ablation on the evolution of peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes is studied with BOUT++ code. The atoms coming from pellet ablation can significantly reshape the plasma pressure profile, so the behaviors of P-B modes and edge localized mode (ELM) are modified dramatically. This paper shows that the energy loss associated with an ELM increases substantially over that without the pellet, if the pellet is deposited at the top of the pedestal. On the contrary, for pellet deposition in the middle of the pedestal region the ELM energy loss can be less.

  10. Rapid Inward Impurity Transport during Impurity Pellet Injection on the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.E.; Hyatt, A.W.; Lee, R.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Parks, P.B.; Stockdale, R.; Taylor, P.L.; Whyte, D.G.; Jernigan, T.C.

    1998-11-01

    Neon killer pellets are injected into the DIII-D tokamak plasma in order to radiatively quench the plasma{close_quote}s stored energy and mitigate disruption effects. Inward radial transport on the time scale of the pellet ablation ({le}1 ms) results in central deposition of the neon inside the ablation penetration radius of the pellet, causing effective radiative energy dissipation. This result is in contrast to the radially outward deposition measured for fueling (hydrogenic) pellets. The observed magnitudes of magnetic fluctuations ({delta}B/B{approximately}0.2{percent}) are shown to be capable of causing the radial transport. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  11. A Technique for Producing Large Dual-Layer Pellets in Support of Disruption Mitigation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Leachman, J. W.; Meitner, Steven J; Baylor, Larry R; Foust, Charles R; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Jernigan, Thomas C

    2011-01-01

    A special single-shot pellet injection system that produces and accelerates large cryogenic pellets (~16 mm diameter and composed of D2 or Ne) to relatively high speeds (>300 and 600 m/s, respectively) was previously developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Subsequently, a similar system was installed on DIII-D and used successfully in disruption mitigation experiments. To circumvent some operational issues with injecting the large Ne pellets, a technique has been developed in which a relatively thin layer (0.1 to 1.0 mm) of D2 is frozen on the inner wall of the pipe-gun barrel, followed by filling the core with solid Ne. The technique and the initial laboratory tests are described, as well as the implementation and operational issues for fusion experiments.

  12. Reduction of Edge Localized Mode Intensity on DIII-D by On-demand triggering with High Frequency Pellet Injection and Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, Steven J; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Isler, Ralph C; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Brooks, N. H.; Evans, T. E.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Snyder, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G. T.A.; Futantani, S.

    2013-01-01

    The injection of small deuterium pellets at high repetition rates up to 12 the natural edge localized mode (ELM) frequency has been used to trigger high-frequency ELMs in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The resulting pellet-triggered ELMs result in up to 12 lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed with pellets injected from the low field side pellet in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized operation with input heating power just above the H-mode power threshold. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the injected pellets show that destabilization of ballooning modes by a local pressure perturbation is responsible for the pellet ELM triggering. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  13. Reduction of edge localized mode intensity on DIII-D by on-demand triggering with high frequency pellet injection and implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, S. K.; Isler, R. C.; Unterberg, E. A.; Brooks, N. H.; Evans, T. E.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Snyder, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Loarte, A.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Futatani, S.

    2013-08-15

    The injection of small deuterium pellets at high repetition rates up to 12× the natural edge localized mode (ELM) frequency has been used to trigger high-frequency ELMs in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The resulting pellet-triggered ELMs result in up to 12× lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed with pellets injected from the low field side pellet in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized β operation with input heating power just above the H-mode power threshold. Nonlinear MHD simulations of the injected pellets show that destabilization of ballooning modes by a local pressure perturbation is responsible for the pellet ELM triggering. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  14. Experimental Demonstration of High Frequency ELM Pacing by Pellet Injection on DIII-D and Extrapolation to ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Jernigan, Thomas C; Meitner, Steven J; Brooks, N. H.; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R.A.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Loarte, A.

    2012-01-01

    . The injection of high repetition rate deuterium pellets is shown to trigger high-frequency edge localized modes (ELMs) in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak. The resulting triggered ELMs have significantly lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized operation with input power just above the H-mode power threshold. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  15. 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Pellet Injection in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    R. Samtaney; S.C. Jardin; P. Colella; D.F. Martin

    2003-10-20

    We present results of Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulations of the pellet injection process, a proven method of refueling tokamaks. AMR is a computationally efficient way to provide the resolution required to simulate realistic pellet sizes relative to device dimensions. The mathematical model comprises of single-fluid MHD equations with source terms in the continuity equation along with a pellet ablation rate model. The numerical method developed is an explicit unsplit upwinding treatment of the 8-wave formulation, coupled with a MAC projection method to enforce the solenoidal property of the magnetic field. The Chombo framework is used for AMR. The role of the E x B drift in mass redistribution during inside and outside pellet injections is emphasized.

  16. Snake perturbation during pellet injection in the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xingjia; Hu, Jiansheng; Xu, Liqing; Xu, Zong; Chen, Yue; Li, Changzheng; Liu, Haiqing; Zhao, Hailing; Duan, Yanmin; Shi, Tonghui; Shen, Wei; EAST Team

    2016-11-01

    The pellet-induced snake oscillation was observed by soft x-ray (SXR) diagnostic in EAST for the first time after a fueling-sized pellet penetrated the q  =  1 surface. The snake phenomenon has a long lifetime with a helicity of m  =  1 and n  =  1. Basic behaviors of the snake, including the triggering condition, interaction with the sawtooth and snake rotation frequency, were discussed in detail by multiple core diagnostics. The snake location was also analyzed through observation of the vertical SXR arrays and raw SXR brightness profiles. It is clear that the snake resided in a broad region between the magnetic axis and the q  =  1 surface derived from equilibrium reconstruction. This investigation is beneficial for the understanding of the snake formation for EAST and future devices, like ITER and DEMO.

  17. Review of hydrogen pellet injection technology for plasma fueling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.

    1989-05-01

    In the past several years, steady progress has been made worldwide in the development of high-speed hydrogen pellet injectors for fueling magnetically confined plasmas. Several fueling systems based on the conventional pneumatic and centrifuge acceleration concepts have been put into practice on a wide variety of toroidal plasma confinement devices. Long-pulse fueling has been demonstrated in the parameter range 0.8--1.3 km/s, for pellets up to 6 mm in diameter, and at delivery rates up to 40 Hz. Conventional systems have demonstrated the technology to speeds approaching 2 km/s, and several more exotic accelerator concepts are under development to meet the more demanding requirements of the next generation of reactor-grade plasmas. These include a gas gun that can operate in tritium, the two-stage light gas gun, electrothermal guns, electromagnetic rail guns, and an electron-beam-driven thruster. Although these devices are in various stages of development, velocities of 3.8 km/s have already been achieved with two-stage light gas guns, and the prospects for attaining 5 km/s in the near future appear good.

  18. Development of advanced compact railguns for injection of hypervelocity hydrogen pellets into magnetic fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, M.W.; Anderson, M.A.; Kim, K.; Feng, Q.; Zhang, J.; King, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have designed, fabricated, and tested a number of compact railguns utilizing a variety of gun geometries, augmentation schemes, and state-of-the-art rail and insulator materials in order to develop an injector that can accelerate pellets of hydrogen isotopes to very high velocities ({approximately}10 km/s) continuously and at high repetition rates for refueling magnetically confined fusion plasmas. These advanced guns are designed to achieve two goals: to minimize or eliminate gunwall erosion and to produce the maximum possible pellet acceleration. These closely related goals assure long gun lifetimes. Using an advanced transaugmented compact gun with an acceleration length of only 45-cm, they have recently achieved hydrogen pellet velocities as high as 2.2 km/s with a time-averaged pellet acceleration of 4.7 {times} 10{sup 6} m/s{sup 2} at a modest rail current of 10 kA. This paper includes a brief overview of the railgun control and diagnostic systems and discusses recent results of the railgun experiments using both plexiglass and cryogenic hydrogen pellets.

  19. Demonstration of rapid shutdown using large shattered deuterium pellet injection in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Commaux, Nicolas JC; Baylor, Larry R; Jernigan, Thomas C; Hollmann, E. M.; Parks, P. B.; Humphreys, D A; Wesley, J. C.; Yu, J.H.

    2010-11-01

    A severe consequence of a disruption on large tokamaks such as ITER could be the generation of multi-megaelectronvolt electron beams that could damage the vacuum vessel and the structures of the machine if they hit the wall unmitigated. The mitigation of runaway electron beams is thus a key requirement for reliable operation of ITER. In order to achieve reliable disruption mitigation, a new fast shutdown technique has been developed: the injection of a large shattered cryogenic pellet in the plasma, which is expected to increase the electron density up to levels where the beam generation processes are mitigated by collisional losses. This technique has been implemented and tested for the first time ever on DIII-D. The first tests show evidence of an almost instantaneous deposition of more than 260 Pa m(3) of deuterium deep in the core. Record local densities during the thermal quench were observed for each injection with a very high reliability. Pellet mass and plasma energy content scans show an improvement of the assimilation of the particles for higher plasma energy and larger pellet mass.

  20. Demonstration of Rapid Shutdown Using Large Shattered Deuterium Pellet Injection in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Commaux, Nicolas JC; Baylor, Larry R; Jernigan, Thomas C; Hollmann, E. M.; Parks, P. B.; Humphrey, D. A.; Wesley, J. C.; Yu, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    A severe consequence of a disruption on large tokamaks such as ITER could be the generation of multi-megaelectronvolt electron beams that could damage the vacuum vessel and the structures of the machine if they hit the wall unmitigated. The mitigation of runaway electron beams is thus a key requirement for reliable operation of ITER. In order to achieve reliable disruption mitigation, a new fast shutdown technique has been developed: the injection of a large shattered cryogenic pellet in the plasma, which is expected to increase the electron density up to levels where the beam generation processes are mitigated by collisional losses. This technique has been implemented and tested for the first time ever on DIII-D. The first tests show evidence of an almost instantaneous deposition of more than 260 Pa m3 of deuterium deep in the core. Record local densities during the thermal quench were observed for each injection with a very high reliability. Pellet mass and plasma energy content scans show an improvement of the assimilation of the particles for higher plasma energy and larger pellet mass.

  1. SNS Injection Foil Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Sarah M; Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Ladd, Peter; Luck, Chris; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom; Shaw, Robert W; Macek, Robert James; Raparia, Deepak; Plum, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.4 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the H0 excited states created during the H charge exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming H beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we will detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms, and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  2. Coaxial pellets for metallic impurity injection on the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X. L. Zhang, H. M.; Morita, S.; Oishi, T.; Goto, M.

    2014-11-15

    Two coaxial pellets with tungsten inserted into graphite carbon and polyethylene (PE) tubes are compared for tungsten spectroscopic study in the Large Helical Device. The tungsten pellet with carbon tube causes plasma collapse, while that with PE tube smoothly ablates without collapse. The deposition profile of the pellets is analyzed with a help of pellet ablation spectroscopy. It is found that the tungsten pellet with carbon tube can significantly penetrate into the core plasma and leads to the plasma collapse. A tungsten spectrum with radial profile is successfully observed when the tungsten pellet with PE tube is used.

  3. Reduction of edge-localized mode intensity using high-repetition-rate pellet injection in tokamak H-mode plasmas.

    PubMed

    Baylor, L R; Commaux, N; Jernigan, T C; Brooks, N H; Combs, S K; Evans, T E; Fenstermacher, M E; Isler, R C; Lasnier, C J; Meitner, S J; Moyer, R A; Osborne, T H; Parks, P B; Snyder, P B; Strait, E J; Unterberg, E A; Loarte, A

    2013-06-14

    High repetition rate injection of deuterium pellets from the low-field side (LFS) of the DIII-D tokamak is shown to trigger high-frequency edge-localized modes (ELMs) at up to 12× the low natural ELM frequency in H-mode deuterium plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape, normalized beta, and input power just above the H-mode threshold. The pellet size, velocity, and injection location were chosen to limit penetration to the outer 10% of the plasma. The resulting perturbations to the plasma density and energy confinement time are thus minimal (<10%). The triggered ELMs occur at much lower normalized pedestal pressure than the natural ELMs, suggesting that the pellet injection excites a localized high-n instability. Triggered ELMs produce up to 12× lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor, and result in a strong decrease in plasma core impurity density. These results show for the first time that shallow, LFS pellet injection can dramatically accelerate the ELM cycle and reduce ELM energy fluxes on plasma facing components, and is a viable technique for real-time control of ELMs in ITER.

  4. Comparison of the Effects of Testosterone Gels, Injections, and Pellets on Serum Hormones, Erythrocytosis, Lipids, and Prostate-Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszak, Alexander W; Gomez, Lissette P; Scovell, Jason M; Khera, Mohit; Lamb, Dolores J; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Numerous testosterone (T) formulations are available, each with differing effects on serum parameters. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the long-term effects of topical, injectable, and implantable pellet T formulations in hypogonadal men. Methods Retrospective review of hypogonadal men treated with a single T formulation was performed: 47 men on T gels, 57 on injectable T, and 74 on T pellets were identified. Total T (TT), calculated free T (FT), estradiol (E), hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrit (Hct), prostate-specific antigen (PSA), total cholesterol (Tchol), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were evaluated at baseline and every 3–6 months for 3 years. Serum parameters were compared using a mixed model linear regression for repeated measures. Main Outcome Measures Effects of topical, injectable, and pellet T formulations on serum hormone levels, Hgb, Hct, lipid parameters and PSA. Results Men in the injectable T group were younger (42.5 ± 12.3 years) than in the gel (54.1 ± 9.8 years) or pellet groups (53.8 ± 13.0 years), and baseline FT, Hgb, and Hct were higher in the injectable T group than in gel or pellet groups. Increases in TT and FT were observed throughout follow-up in all groups. Increases in E were observed at in all T groups and throughout follow-up in injectable and gel groups. No PSA increases were observed. Erythrocytosis (Hct > 50%) was more common with injectable T (66.7%) than with T gels (12.8%) or pellets (35.1%, P < 0.0001). Transient changes in cholesterol, TG, and LDL were observed, and no significant changes were seen in HDL for any group. Conclusions All T formulations increase serum T and FT. More significant increases in E occur with injectable T and T gels. Changes in Hgb and Hct are most significant with injectable T, and effects on lipids are variable and inconsistent. Selection of T formulations must account for individual

  5. First demonstration of rapid shutdown using neon shattered pellet injection for thermal quench mitigation on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commaux, N.; Shiraki, D.; Baylor, L. R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, S. K.; Foust, C. R.

    2016-04-01

    Shattered pellet injection (SPI) is one of the prime candidates for the ITER disruption mitigation system because of its deeper penetration and larger particle flux than massive gas injection (MGI) (Taylor et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 1872) using deuterium (Commaux et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 112001, Combs et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 38 400, Baylor et al 2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 085013). The ITER disruption mitigation system will likely use mostly high Z species such as neon because of more effective thermal mitigation and pumping constraints on the maximum amount of deuterium or helium that could be injected. An upgrade of the SPI on DIII-D enables ITER relevant injection characteristics in terms of quantities and gas species. This upgraded SPI system was used on DIII-D for the first time in 2014 for a direct comparison with MGI using identical quantities of neon. This comparison enabled the measurements of density perturbations during the thermal quench (TQ) and radiated power and heat loads to the divertor. It showed that SPI using similar quantities of neon provided a faster and stronger density perturbation and neon assimilation, which resulted in a lower conducted energy to the divertor and a faster TQ onset. Radiated power data analysis shows that this was probably due to the much deeper penetration of the neon in the plasma inducing a higher core radiation than in the MGI case. This experiment shows also that the MHD activity during an SPI shutdown (especially during the TQ) is quite different compared to MGI. This favorable TQ energy dissipation was obtained while keeping the current quench (CQ) duration within acceptable limits when scaled to ITER.

  6. First demonstration of rapid shutdown using neon shattered pellet injection for thermal quench mitigation on DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Commaux, Nicolas J. C.; Shiraki, Daisuke; Baylor, Larry R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, Stephen Kirk; et al

    2016-03-02

    Shattered pellet injection (SPI) is one of the prime candidates for the ITER disruption mitigation system because of its deeper penetration and larger particle flux than massive gas injection (MGI) (Taylor et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 1872) using deuterium (Commaux et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 112001, Combs et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 38 400, Baylor et al 2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 085013). The ITER disruption mitigation system will likely use mostly high Z species such as neon because of more effective thermal mitigation and pumping constraints on the maximum amount of deuterium or helium that couldmore » be injected. An upgrade of the SPI on DIII-D enables ITER relevant injection characteristics in terms of quantities and gas species. This upgraded SPI system was used on DIII-D for the first time in 2014 for a direct comparison with MGI using identical quantities of neon. This comparison enabled the measurements of density perturbations during the thermal quench (TQ) and radiated power and heat loads to the divertor. It showed that SPI using similar quantities of neon provided a faster and stronger density perturbation and neon assimilation, which resulted in a lower conducted energy to the divertor and a faster TQ onset. Radiated power data analysis shows that this was probably due to the much deeper penetration of the neon in the plasma inducing a higher core radiation than in the MGI case. This experiment shows also that the MHD activity during an SPI shutdown (especially during the TQ) is quite different compared to MGI. Furthermore, this favorable TQ energy dissipation was obtained while keeping the current quench (CQ) duration within acceptable limits when scaled to ITER.« less

  7. Repetitive Solid Spherical Pellet Injection and Irradiation toward the Repetitive-mode Fast-Ignition Fusion miniReactor CANDY.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HANAYAMA, Ryohei; KOMEDA, Osamu; NISHIMURA, Yasuhiko; MORI, Yoshitaka; ISHII, Katsuhiro; NAKAYAMA, Suisei; OKIHARA, Shinichiro; FUJITA, Kazuhisa; SEKINE, Takashi; SATO, Nakahiro; KURITA, Takashi; KAWASHIMA, Toshiyuki; KAN, Hirofumi; NAKAMURA, Naoki; KONDO, Takuya; FUJINE, Manabu; AZUMA, Hirozumi; HIOKI, Tatsumi; KAKENO, Mitsutaka; MOTOHIRO, Tomoyoshi; SUNAHARA, Atsushi; SENTOKU, Yasuhiko; MIURA, Eisuke; KITAGAWA, Yoneyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Pellet injection and repetitive laser illumination are key technologies for realizing inertial fusion energy[1-4]. Neutron generator using lasers also requires a repeating pellet target supplier. Here we present the first demonstration of target injection and neutron generation[5]. We injected more than 1300 spherical deuterated polystyrene(C8D8) bead pellet targets during 23 minutes at 1 Hz(Fig. 1). After the pellet targets fell for a distance of 18 cm, we applied the synchronized laser-diode-pumped ultra-intense laser HAMA. The laser intensity at the focal point is 5 x 1018 W/cm2, which is high enough to generate neutrons. As a result of the irradiation, we produced 2.45-MeV DD neutrons. Figure 2 shows the neutron time-of-flight signals detected by plastic scintillators coupled to photomultipliers. The neutron energy was calculated by the time-of-flight method. The maximum neutron yield was 9.5 x 104/4π sr. The result is a step toward fusion power and also suggests possible industrial neutron sources.

  8. Injection barrel with a tapered structure for a low speed and small size cryogenic hydrogen pellet in medium-sized plasma fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motojima, G.; Sakamoto, R.; Okada, H.; Nagasaki, K.; Yamada, H.; Nakamura, Y.; Kado, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Konoshima, S.; Minami, T.; Ohshima, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Mizuuchi, T.; Mutoh, T.

    2016-10-01

    An injection barrel was designed and fabricated for a small size 0.8 mm cryogenic pellet with a low speed of 200-300 m/s in medium-sized plasma fusion devices. Pellet injection with pneumatic acceleration was examined using a conventional in situ technique. A tapered structure was applied in the downstream side of the injection barrel to satisfy the requirement of pellet speed reduction by expansion of the propellant gas. Shadowgraph and light gate measurements show that the intact pellets have speeds of 260 ± 30 m/s and a typical size of 1.1-1.2 mm. The pellet ablation code based on a neutral gas shielding model shows that the penetration depth of the measured pellet parameters does not cross the plasma center, even in medium-sized plasma devices such as the Heliotron J helical device. The injection barrel with a tapered structure developed in this study is feasible for low speed pellet injection.

  9. Experiments on torrefied wood pellet: study by gasification and characterization for waste biomass to energy applications

    PubMed Central

    Rollinson, Andrew N.; Williams, Orla

    2016-01-01

    Samples of torrefied wood pellet produced by low-temperature microwave pyrolysis were tested through a series of experiments relevant to present and near future waste to energy conversion technologies. Operational performance was assessed using a modern small-scale downdraft gasifier. Owing to the pellet's shape and surface hardness, excellent flow characteristics were observed. The torrefied pellet had a high energy density, and although a beneficial property, this highlighted the present inflexibility of downdraft gasifiers in respect of feedstock tolerance due to the inability to contain very high temperatures inside the reactor during operation. Analyses indicated that the torrefaction process had not significantly altered inherent kinetic properties to a great extent; however, both activation energy and pre-exponential factor were slightly higher than virgin biomass from which the pellet was derived. Thermogravimetric analysis-derived reaction kinetics (CO2 gasification), bomb calorimetry, proximate and ultimate analyses, and the Bond Work Index grindability test provided a more comprehensive characterization of the torrefied pellet's suitability as a fuel for gasification and also other combustion applications. It exhibited significant improvements in grindability energy demand and particle size control compared to other non-treated and thermally treated biomass pellets, along with a high calorific value, and excellent resistance to water. PMID:27293776

  10. Experiments on torrefied wood pellet: study by gasification and characterization for waste biomass to energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinson, Andrew N.; Williams, Orla

    2016-05-01

    Samples of torrefied wood pellet produced by low-temperature microwave pyrolysis were tested through a series of experiments relevant to present and near future waste to energy conversion technologies. Operational performance was assessed using a modern small-scale downdraft gasifier. Owing to the pellet's shape and surface hardness, excellent flow characteristics were observed. The torrefied pellet had a high energy density, and although a beneficial property, this highlighted the present inflexibility of downdraft gasifiers in respect of feedstock tolerance due to the inability to contain very high temperatures inside the reactor during operation. Analyses indicated that the torrefaction process had not significantly altered inherent kinetic properties to a great extent; however, both activation energy and pre-exponential factor were slightly higher than virgin biomass from which the pellet was derived. Thermogravimetric analysis-derived reaction kinetics (CO2 gasification), bomb calorimetry, proximate and ultimate analyses, and the Bond Work Index grindability test provided a more comprehensive characterization of the torrefied pellet's suitability as a fuel for gasification and also other combustion applications. It exhibited significant improvements in grindability energy demand and particle size control compared to other non-treated and thermally treated biomass pellets, along with a high calorific value, and excellent resistance to water.

  11. Experiments on torrefied wood pellet: study by gasification and characterization for waste biomass to energy applications.

    PubMed

    Rollinson, Andrew N; Williams, Orla

    2016-05-01

    Samples of torrefied wood pellet produced by low-temperature microwave pyrolysis were tested through a series of experiments relevant to present and near future waste to energy conversion technologies. Operational performance was assessed using a modern small-scale downdraft gasifier. Owing to the pellet's shape and surface hardness, excellent flow characteristics were observed. The torrefied pellet had a high energy density, and although a beneficial property, this highlighted the present inflexibility of downdraft gasifiers in respect of feedstock tolerance due to the inability to contain very high temperatures inside the reactor during operation. Analyses indicated that the torrefaction process had not significantly altered inherent kinetic properties to a great extent; however, both activation energy and pre-exponential factor were slightly higher than virgin biomass from which the pellet was derived. Thermogravimetric analysis-derived reaction kinetics (CO2 gasification), bomb calorimetry, proximate and ultimate analyses, and the Bond Work Index grindability test provided a more comprehensive characterization of the torrefied pellet's suitability as a fuel for gasification and also other combustion applications. It exhibited significant improvements in grindability energy demand and particle size control compared to other non-treated and thermally treated biomass pellets, along with a high calorific value, and excellent resistance to water.

  12. Experiments on torrefied wood pellet: study by gasification and characterization for waste biomass to energy applications.

    PubMed

    Rollinson, Andrew N; Williams, Orla

    2016-05-01

    Samples of torrefied wood pellet produced by low-temperature microwave pyrolysis were tested through a series of experiments relevant to present and near future waste to energy conversion technologies. Operational performance was assessed using a modern small-scale downdraft gasifier. Owing to the pellet's shape and surface hardness, excellent flow characteristics were observed. The torrefied pellet had a high energy density, and although a beneficial property, this highlighted the present inflexibility of downdraft gasifiers in respect of feedstock tolerance due to the inability to contain very high temperatures inside the reactor during operation. Analyses indicated that the torrefaction process had not significantly altered inherent kinetic properties to a great extent; however, both activation energy and pre-exponential factor were slightly higher than virgin biomass from which the pellet was derived. Thermogravimetric analysis-derived reaction kinetics (CO2 gasification), bomb calorimetry, proximate and ultimate analyses, and the Bond Work Index grindability test provided a more comprehensive characterization of the torrefied pellet's suitability as a fuel for gasification and also other combustion applications. It exhibited significant improvements in grindability energy demand and particle size control compared to other non-treated and thermally treated biomass pellets, along with a high calorific value, and excellent resistance to water. PMID:27293776

  13. Pellet injector research at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Schuresko, D.D.; Milora, S.L.; Combs, S.K.; Foster, C.A.; Fisher, P.W.; Argo, B.E.; Barber, G.C.; Foust, C.R.; Gethers, F.E.; Gouge, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Several advanced plasma fueling systems are under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for present and future magnetic confinement devices. These include multishot and repeating pneumatic pellet injectors, centrifuge accelerators, electrothermal guns, a Tritium Proof-of-Principle experiment, and an ultrahigh velocity mass ablation driven accelerator. A new eight-shot pneumatic injector capable of delivering 3.0 mm, 3.5 mm, and 4.0 mm diameter pellets at speeds up to 1500 m/s into a single discharge has been commissioned recently on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor. The so-called Deuterium Pellet Injector (DPI) is a prototype of a Tritium Pellet Injector (TPI) scheduled for use on TFTR in 1990. Construction of the TPI will be preceded by a test of tritium pellet fabrication and acceleration using a 4 mm bore ''pipe gun'' apparatus. A new repeating pneumatic pellet injector capable of 2.7 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm operation is being installed on the Joint European Torus to be used in ORNL/JET collaborative pellet injection studies. A 1.5 m centrifuge injector is being developed for application on the Tore Supra experiment in 1988. The new device, which is a 50% upgrade of the prototype centrifuge used on D-III, features a pellet feed mechanism capable of producing variable-size pellets (1.5 to 3.0 mm diameter) optimally shaped to survive acceleration stresses. Accelerating pellets to velocities in excess of 2 km/s is being pursued through two new development undertakings. A hydrogen plasma electrothermal gun is operational at 2 km/s with 10 mg hydrogen pellets; this facility has recently been equipped with a pulsed power supply capable of delivering 1.7 kJ millisecond pulses to low impedence arc loads.

  14. Study of a transaugmented two-stage small circular-bore railgun for injection of hypervelocity hydrogen pellets as a fusion reactor refueling mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, M.W.; Anderson, M.A.; Feng, Q.; Zhang, J.; Kim, K.

    1997-01-01

    Injection of hypervelocity hydrogen pellets has become widely accepted as the most effective means of refueling magnetically confined fusion reactors. Pellet velocities on the order of 10 km/s are desired and hydrogen pellet erosion during acceleration must be minimized. It is important to maintain uniform bore surfaces during repetitive shots, implying that, if a railgun is to be used to accelerate the pellets, damage to the sidewalls and rails of the railgun due to local heating must be limited. In order to reduce the amount of power dissipated within the bore and increase the propulsive force generated by the plasma-arc armature while minimizing losses due to pellet, rail, and sidewall ablation, the authors have employed a magnetic field transaugmentation mechanism consisting of a two-turn pulsed electromagnet. The two-stage gun consists of a light-gas gun which accelerates a 4- to 5-mg pellet to a speed around 1.2 km/s and injects it into the plasma-arc armature railgun. Currently, they have achieved a final output velocity for a hydrogen pellet of 2.11 km/s with a time-averaged acceleration of 4,850 km/s{sup 2} using a 58-cm railgun pulsed with a peak rail current of 9.2 kA and 28.0 kA of transaugmentation current. This paper will present a description of the hydrogen-pellet-injector railgun system, a discussion of the data on hydrogen pellet acceleration, and projections for future systems.

  15. Flux Tube Dynamics Following Pellet Release Experi- ments in Laboratory Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, D.; Davis, M.; Mauel, M.; Roberts, M.; Worstell, M.; Chilenski, M.; Kesner, J.; Woskov, P.

    2013-10-01

    The rapid release of particles in the magnetosphere has allowed study of a wide range of space plasma dynamics including particle transport, magnetic bubble formation, and rapid flux-tube dynamics. We report new experiments using the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) (http://www.psfc.mit.edu/ldx/) where we explore the high-speed plasma dynamics following the release of 0.2 mm polystyrene pellets. The pellets are released into high-beta steady-state plasmas containing significant population of quasi-relativistic electrons. Similiar experiments, conducted in a smaller, mechanically-supported, laboratory magnetosphere show pellet ``explosions,'' electron precipitation, ``blob'' formation, and rapid changes of plasma density. A variety of diagnostics are available, including microwave reflectometry, high-speed videography, multi-tip probe arrays, and accurate magnetic reconstruction. Results and analyses will be reported along with plans for futher efforts to increase plasma density and conduct a variety of controlled physics experiments associated with magnetospheric events. Supported by the NSF-DOE Partnership in Plasma Science.

  16. Tritium assay of Li sub 2 O pellets in the LBM/LOTUS experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Quanci, J.; Azam, S.; Bertone, P.

    1986-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Lithium Blanket Module (LBM) program is to test the ability of advanced neutronics codes to model the tritium breeding characteristics of a fusion blanket exposed to a toroidal fusion neutron source. The LBM consists of over 20,000 cylindrical lithium oxide pellets and numerous diagnostic pellets and wafers. The LBM has been irradiated at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) LOTUS facility with a Haefely sealed neutron generator that gives a point deuterium-tritium neutron source up to 5 {times} 10{sup 12} 14-MeV n/s. Both Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPL) and EPFL assayed the tritium bred at various positions in the LBM. EPFL employed a dissolution technique while PPL recovered the tritium by a thermal extraction method. EPFL uses 0.38-g, 75% TD, lithium oxide diagnostic wafers to evaluate the tritium bred in the LBM. PPPL employs a thermal extraction method to determine the tritium bred in lithium oxide samples. In the initial experiments, diagnostic pellets and wafers were placed at five locations in the LBM central removable test rod at distances of 3, 9, 21, 36, and 48 cm from the front face of the module. The two sets of data for the tritium bred in the LBM along its centerline as a function of distance from the front face of the module were compared with each other, and with the predictions of two-dimensional neutronics codes. 1 ref.

  17. Active VLF wave injection experiments with DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inan, U.

    The comprehensive suite of electromagnetic wave receivers as well as the highly sensitive energetic electron detector on DEMETER provide outstanding opportunities for a range of ELF VLF wave-injection experiments These experiments are aimed at understanding physical mechanisms of wave-growth amplification and emission triggering and the loss of energetic radiation belt particles by injected coherent signals of known characteristics One class of experiments involves the use of the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program HAARP HF ionospheric heating facility located in Gakona Alaska which is used to inject signals in the frequency range of few tens of Hz to few kHz for detection on DEMETER during its overpasses of either HAARP or its geomagnetically conjugate region HAARP is the only controlled signal source which can inject signals in the frequency range below 1 2 kHz so that all six components of the injected signals can be simultaneously measured A second class of experiments is carried out with the 21 4 kHz NPM transmitter facility in Hawaii which operates at a radiated power of 464 kW injecting signals of intensity in the several tens of pT in situ over the range of L-shells of 1 5 to 2 0 Using specialized ON OFF patterns to modulate the amplitude of the injected signals the NPM-induced precipitation is detected with the DEMETER IDP instrument both in terms of its temporal and energy spectral signatures Several examples of direct observations of NPM-induced precipitation has been observed so far with the

  18. Development of Advanced Pellet Injector Systems for Plasma Fueling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Yamada, Hiroshi; LHD Experimental Group

    Two types of solid hydrogen pellet injection systems have been developed, and plasma refueling experiments have been performed using these pellet injectors. One is an in-situ pipe-gun type pellet injector, which has the simplest design of all pellet injectors. This in-situ pipe-gun injector has 10 injection barrels, each of which can independently inject cylindrical solid hydrogen pellets (3.4 and 3.8 mm in diameter and length, respectively) at velocities up to 1,200 m/s. The other is a repetitive pellet injector with a screw extruder, which can form a 3.0 mmφ solid hydrogen rod continuously at extrusion rates up to 55 mm/s. This extruder allows consecutive pellet injection up to 11 Hz without time limit. Both of these pellet injectors employ compact cryo-coolers to solidify hydrogen; therefore, they can be operated using only electrical input instead of a complicated liquid helium supply system. In particular, using a combination of the repetitive pellet injector with cryo-coolers provides a steady-state capability with minimum maintenance.

  19. Dense Plasma Injection Experiment at MCX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun-Kaymak, I.; Messer, S.; Bomgardner, R.; Case, A.; Clary, R.; Ellis, R.; Elton, R.; Hassam, A.; Teodorescu, C.; Witherspoon, D.; Young, W.

    2009-09-01

    We present preliminary results of the High Density Plasma Injection Experiment at the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX). HyperV Technologies Corp. has designed, built, and installed a prototype coaxial gun to drive rotation in MCX. This gun has been designed to avoid the blow-by instability via a combination of electrode shaping and a tailored plasma armature. An array of diagnostics indicates the gun is capable of plasma jets with a mass of 160 μg at 70 km/s with an average plasma density above 1015 cm-3. Preliminary measurements are underway at MCX to understand the penetration of the plasma jet through the MCX magnetic field and the momentum transfer from the jet to the MCX plasma. Data will be presented for a wide range of MCX field parameters, and the prospects for future injection experiments will be evaluated.

  20. Formulation Optimization of Hot Melt Extruded Abuse Deterrent Pellet Dosage Form Utilizing Design of Experiments (DOE)

    PubMed Central

    Maddineni, Sindhuri; Battu, Sunil Kumar; Morott, Joe; Majumdar, Soumyajit; Repka, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop techniques for an abuse-deterrent (AD) platform utilizing hot melt extrusion (HME) process. Formulation optimization was accomplished by utilizing Box-Behnken design of experiments to determine the effect of the three formulation factors: PolyOx™ WSR301, Benecel™ K15M, and Carbopol 71G; each of which was studied at three levels on TR attributes of the produced melt extruded pellets. A response surface methodology was utilized to identify the optimized formulation. Lidocaine Hydrochloride was used as a model drug, and suitable formulation ingredients were employed as carrier matrices and processing aids. All of the formulations were evaluated for the TR attributes such as particle size post-milling, gelling, percentage of drug extraction in water and alcohol. All of the DOE formulations demonstrated sufficient hardness and elasticity, and could not be reduced into fine particles (<150µm), which is a desirable feature to prevent snorting. In addition, all of the formulations exhibited good gelling tendency in water with minimal extraction of drug in the aqueous medium. Moreover, Benecel™ K15M in combination with PolyOx™ WSR301 could be utilized to produce pellets with TR potential. HME has been demonstrated to be a viable technique with a potential to develop novel abuse-deterrent formulations. PMID:24433429

  1. Development of a new tracer-encapsulated solid pellet injection system for more precise control of tracer-impurity-deposit location in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, N.; Shoji, M.; Suzuki, C.; Funaba, H.; Hayashi, H.; Maeno, H.; Yokota, M.; Ogawa, H.; Sudo, S.

    2016-11-01

    A new tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) injection system has been developed additionally for the LHD heliotron. This system has three-dimensionally bended guide tubes, which allows us to inject the TESPEL obliquely on a poloidal cross-section of the LHD plasma. Consequently, this system enables us to control a tracer-impurity-deposited location more precisely. Moreover, this system can make it possible for the tracer impurity to be deposited even only inside the ergodic region (outside a last closed flux surface of the LHD plasma). A stereoscopic fast camera system has been also developed for capturing a three-dimensional TESPEL trajectory.

  2. Fuel Performance Experience, Analysis and Modeling: Deformations, Fission Gas Release and Pellet-Clad Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, G.; Hallstadius, L.; Helmersson, S.; Massih, A.R.; Schrire, D.; Kaellstroem, R.; Wikmark, G.; Hellwig, C.

    2007-07-01

    Some basic attributes of light water reactor fuel performance, determined by measurements, are evaluated. In particular, data on fuel volume swelling, cladding creep/growth, fission product gas release and cladding deformation due to pellet-clad mechanical interaction of rods irradiated in power reactors to rod burnups up to about 70 MWd/kgU are presented and appraised. A thermal fuel matrix swelling caused by fission products shows a linear increase in the fuel volume fraction with burnup up to 70 MWd/kgU with a mean rate of 0.76% per 10 MWd/kgU at a best-estimate level. Cladding hoop strain data due to in-reactor creep as a function of burnup from 15 to 70 MWd/kgU for pressurized water reactor (PWR) rods and from 5 to 50 MWd/kgU for boiling water reactor (BWR) rods are presented. The maximum measured cladding creep-down hoop strain in the considered BWR rods is {epsilon}{sub {theta}} {approx_equal} -0.5% and in the PWR rods {epsilon}{sub {theta}} {approx_equal} -1.25%. Rod growth data on BWR and PWR rods as a function of burnup are presented and discussed. Rod internal free volume data, measured and calculated as a function of burnup, are presented. Recent high burnup (52-70 MWd/kgU) fission product gas release data obtained by destructive methods are evaluated with the STAV7 computer code. Finally, slow power ramp experiments conducted at the Studsvik R2 reactor are simulated with the STAV7 code and it is observed that by accounting the contribution of fuel thermal gaseous swelling, the code describes the clad diameter increase due to pellet-clad mechanical interaction under the power bump satisfactorily. (authors)

  3. Application of the design of experiments in optimization of drug layering of pellets with an insight into drug polymer interactions.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Jovana; Ibric, Svetlana; Djuris, Jelena; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2016-06-15

    This study consists of two experimental designs. Within the first one, suitable technique for application of model drug onto inactive pellets was evaluated and formulation and process parameters with greatest impact to process efficency and useful yield were determined. Results of experiments showed that formulation characteristics were the ones with the greatest impact on coating efficiency and that suspension layering technique was significantly better for drug application onto inactive pellets in comparison to solution layering during which pronounced agglomeration of pellets occurred. Analysis of drug-polymer interactions by differential scanning calorimetry was performed to explain the results of experiments. The reason for agglomeration of pellets during solution layering was formation of low Tg amorphous form of model drug. The second set of experiments was performed according to central composite design experimental plan in order to optimize level of binder and concentration of solids in the coating liquid which were found to have greatest positive impact on process efficiency and useful yield in the screening study. Statistically significant models were obtained by response surface methodology and it was possible to use them to define optimal levels of excipients in the formulation. PMID:27094356

  4. Runaway electron production in DIII-D killer pellet experiments, calculated with the CQL3D/KPRAD model

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.; Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Evans, T. E.; Rosenbluth, M. N.; Whyte, D. G.

    2000-11-01

    Runaway electrons are calculated to be produced during the rapid plasma cooling resulting from ''killer pellet'' injection experiments, in general agreement with observations in the DIII-D [J. L. Luxon , Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159] tokamak. The time-dependent dynamics of the kinetic runaway distributions are obtained with the CQL3D [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, ''The CQL3D Code,'' in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Numerical Modeling, Montreal, 1992 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1992), p. 489] collisional Fokker--Planck code, including the effect of small and large angle collisions and stochastic magnetic field transport losses. The background density, temperature, and Z{sub eff} are evolved according to the KPRAD [D. G. Whyte and T. E. Evans , in Proceedings of the 24th European Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics, Berchtesgaden, Germany (European Physical Society, Petit-Lancy, 1997), Vol. 21A, p. 1137] deposition and radiation model of pellet--plasma interactions. Three distinct runway mechanisms are apparent: (1) prompt ''hot-tail runaways'' due to the residual hot electron tail remaining from the pre-cooling phase, (2) ''knock-on'' runaways produced by large-angle Coulomb collisions on existing high energy electrons, and (3) Dreicer ''drizzle'' runaway electrons due to diffusion of electrons up to the critical velocity for electron runaway. For electron densities below {approx}1x10{sup 15}cm{sup -3}, the hot-tail runaways dominate the early time evolution, and provide the seed population for late time knock-on runaway avalanche. For small enough stochastic magnetic field transport losses, the knock-on production of electrons balances the losses at late times. For losses due to radial magnetic field perturbations in excess of {approx}0.1% of the background field, i.e., {delta}B{sub r}/B{>=}0.001, the losses

  5. Lithium Pellet Injector Development for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    G. Gettelfinger; J. Dong; R. Gernhardt; H. Kugel; P. Sichta; J. Timberlake

    2003-12-04

    A pellet injector suitable for the injection of lithium and other low-Z pellets of varying mass into plasmas at precise velocities from 5 to 500 m/s is being developed for use on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment). The ability to inject low-Z impurities will significantly expand NSTX experimental capability for a broad range of diagnostic and operational applications. The architecture employs a pellet-carrying cartridge propelled through a guide tube by deuterium gas. Abrupt deceleration of the cartridge at the end of the guide tube results in the pellet continuing along its intended path, thereby giving controlled reproducible velocities for a variety of pellets materials and a reduced gas load to the torus. The planned injector assembly has four hundred guide tubes contained in a rotating magazine with eight tubes provided for injection into plasmas. A PC-based control system is being developed as well and will be described elsewhere in these Proceedings. The development path and mechanical performance of the injector will be described.

  6. Swelling under irradiation of MgO pellets containing americium oxide: The ECRIX-H irradiation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, J.; Béjaoui, S.; Hanifi, K.; Valot, Ch.; Loubet, L.

    2011-06-01

    The ECRIX-H irradiation experiment studied the behaviour of pellets containing americium dispersed in MgO. The purpose of the irradiation was to demonstrate the capacity of magnesia to provide an efficient support matrix. After fabrication, the sintered pellets contained 16.65 wt.% of Am microdispersed in the inert matrix. The ECRIX-H pellets were irradiated under a locally moderated neutron flux in the Phénix sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) for 318 Effective Full Power Days (EFPD). Post-test calculations indicated that the fission and transmutation rates of americium at the maximum flux plane reached 33.9% and 92.6% respectively at the end of the irradiation phase. The results of the post-irradiation examinations - both non-destructive and destructive - are discussed in this paper. These results indicate a satisfactory behaviour of the MgO matrix. Particularly, a moderate swelling occurs in the pellets under irradiation even with significant quantities of helium generated and at high transmutation rate.

  7. Infiltration and Injection Sites and Example Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Rockhold

    2007-04-19

    The objectives of this paper are: (1) design a characterization and monitoring strategy for vadose zone infiltration and aquifer injection sites; and (2) track spatial and temporal evolution of water and reactive chemicals through vadose zone and aquifer.

  8. Owl Pellets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Craig D.

    1987-01-01

    Provides complete Project WILD lesson plans for 20-45-minute experiential science learning activity for grades 3-7 students. Describes how students construct a simple food chain through examination of owl pellets. Includes lesson objective, method, background information, materials, procedure, evaluation, and sources of owl pellets and posters.…

  9. Pelletizing lignite

    DOEpatents

    Goksel, Mehmet A.

    1983-11-01

    Lignite is formed into high strength pellets having a calorific value of at least 9,500 Btu/lb by blending a sufficient amount of an aqueous base bituminous emulsion with finely-divided raw lignite containing its inherent moisture to form a moistened green mixture containing at least 3 weight % of the bituminous material, based on the total dry weight of the solids, pelletizing the green mixture into discrete green pellets of a predetermined average diameter and drying the green pellets to a predetermined moisture content, preferrably no less than about 5 weight %. Lignite char and mixture of raw lignite and lignite char can be formed into high strength pellets in the same general manner.

  10. A three-barrel repeating pneumatic pellet injector for plasma fueling of the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Baylor, L.R.; Foust, C.R.; Gethers, F.E.; Sparks, D.O.

    1987-01-01

    Pellet fueling, the injection of frozen hydrogen isotope pellets at high velocity, has been used to improve plasma performance in various tokamak experiments. In one recent experiment, the repeating pneumatic hydrogen pellet injector was used on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). This machine gun-like device, which was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with an objective of steady-state fueling applications, was characterized by a fixed pellet size and a maximum repetition rate of 4 to 6 Hz for several seconds. It was used to deliver deuterium pellets at speeds ranging from 1.0 to 1.5 km/s into TFTR plasma discharges. In the first experiments, injection of single, large (nominal 4-mm-diam) pellets provided high plasma densities in TFTR (1.8 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ on axis). After a conversion to smaller (nominal 2.7-mm-diam) pellets, the pellet injector was operated in the repeating mode to gradually increase the plasma density, injecting up to five pellets on a single machine pulse. This resulted in central plasma densities approaching 4 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ and n tau values of 1.4 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/s. For plasma fueling applications on the Joint European Torus (JET), a pellet injector fashioned after the prototype repeating pneumatic design has been developed. The versatile injector features three repeating guns in a common vacuum enclosure; the guns provide pellets that are 2.7, 4.0, and 6.0 mm in diameter and can operate independently at repetition rates of 5, 2.5, and 1 Hz, respectively. The injector has been installed on JET. A description of the equipment is presented, emphasizing the differences from the original repeating device. Performance characteristics of the three pneumatic guns are also included.

  11. Numerical modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Enedy, S.

    1993-01-01

    Data from injection experiments in the southeast Geysers are presented that show strong interference (both negative and positive) with a neighboring production well. Conceptual and numerical models are developed that explain the negative interference (decline of production rate) in terms of heat transfer limitations and water-vapor relative permeability effects. Recovery and over-recovery following injection shut-in are attributed to boiling of injected fluid, with heat of vaporization provided by the reservoir rocks.

  12. Numerical modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; Enedy, Steve

    1993-01-28

    Data from injection experiments in the southeast Geysers are presented that show strong interference (both negative and positive) with a neighboring production well. Conceptual and numerical models are developed that explain the negative interference (decline of production rate) in terms of heat transfer limitations and water-vapor relative permeability effects. Recovery and overrecovery following injection shut-in are attributed to boiling of injected fluid, with heat of vaporization provided by the reservoir rocks.

  13. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Plöckl, B.; Lang, P. T.

    2013-10-15

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios.

  14. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plöckl, B.; Lang, P. T.

    2013-10-01

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios.

  15. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L. ); Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G. )

    1992-01-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  16. ORNL centrifuge pellet fueling system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Grapperhaus, M.J.; Milora, S.L.; Drawin, H.; Geraud, A.; Chatelier, M.; Gros, G.

    1992-11-01

    A centrifuge pellet injecter designed and built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is in operation on Tore Supra. This injector has the capability of injecting up to 100 pellets at speeds up to 800 M/s. The solid deuterium pellets can be formed with a variable mass from 3 to 10 torr-L and are fired at a rate of up to 10 pellets per second. The experimental program that is under way combines repetitive pellet fueling with the ergodic divertor and pump limiters to establish and understand long-pulse plasmas in which the pellet fuel source is in balance with the particle exhaust. With lower hybrid current drive, pulse lengths of up to 2 min might be achieved. To prepare for these extended pulse lengths, the pellet source on the centrifuge will be extended to provide a 300- to 500-pellet capability. A similar system extended to steady-state pellet fabrication technology and designed for a radiation and tritium environment would be a candidate for a fueling system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Analysis of pellet-fueled ITER discharges using the WHIST code shows the potential for controlling the radial fuel deposition point to achieve the desired core density while maintaining the edge density and temperatures so as to minimize the diverter plate erosion. A centrifuge fueling system would have the capability of taking the D-T exhaust directly from the cryopumping systems, recondensing and purifying the fuel, and injecting the reconstituted pellets into the plasma, thereby minimizing the tritium inventory.

  17. The Fast Pellet Injector Program for Ignitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattolillo, A.; Migliori, S.; Bombarda, F.; Milora, S. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.

    2003-10-01

    The characteristics of a fast pellet injector for the Ignitor ignition experiment have been identified. In order to produce sufficiently peaked density profiles during the initial phase of the current ramp and to sustain them along the flat top phase, a multiple injector capable of shooting pellets of variable sizes will be developed. The program involves the collaboration of the ENEA Laboratory at Frascati and the Fusion Technology Group of Oak Ridge. The initial activities will be devoted to the development of a 4 barrel, double stage gun able to reach speeds up to 4 km/s. The compact size of the Ignitor machine makes injection from the high field side unpractical, while it is unclear that a vertical injection close to the magnetic axis will be beneficial. Simulations performed with the PELLET code(W.A. Houlberg, et al., Nuclear Fusion) 28, 595 (1988), on the other hand, indicate that pellet speeds of 3-4 km/s would allow a sufficient particle penetration from the low field side, particularly during the initial current ramp up phase, when the plasma temperature is still relatively low and good control of the density profile is most desirable.

  18. Pellet Puzzlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoots, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Presents information on owl's taxonomy, characteristics, and influences on man. Describes owl pellets, which are digestive discards, and explains how they can be used to determine the owl's diet as a science activity. (PR)

  19. Pellet interaction with runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    James, A. N.; Hollmann, E. M.; Yu, J.H.; Austin, M. E.; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Evans, T.E.; Humphrey, D. A.; Jernigan, T. C.; Parks, P. B.; Putvinski, S.; Strait, E. J.; Tynan, G. R.; Wesley, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe results from recent experiments studying interaction of solid polystyrene pellets with a runaway electron current channel generated after cryogenic argon pellet rapid shutdown of DIII-D. Fast camera imaging shows the pellet trajectory and continuum emission from the subsequent explosion, with geometric calibration providing detailed explosion analysis and runaway energy. Electron cyclotron emission also occurs, associated with knock-on electrons broken free from the pellet by RE which then accelerate and runaway, and also with a short lived hot plasma blown off the pellet surface. In addition, we compare heating and explosion times from observations and a model of pellet heating and breakdown by runaway interaction. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  20. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  1. Flux-Level Transit Injection Experiments with NASA Pleiades Supercomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Burke, Christopher J.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Seader, Shawn; Haas, Michael R.; Batalha, Natalie; Henze, Christopher; Christiansen, Jessie; Kepler Project, NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division

    2016-06-01

    Flux-Level Transit Injection (FLTI) experiments are executed with NASA's Pleiades supercomputer for the Kepler Mission. The latest release (9.3, January 2016) of the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline is used in the FLTI experiments. Their purpose is to validate the Analytic Completeness Model (ACM), which can be computed for all Kepler target stars, thereby enabling exoplanet occurrence rate studies. Pleiades, a facility of NASA's Advanced Supercomputing Division, is one of the world's most powerful supercomputers and represents NASA's state-of-the-art technology. We discuss the details of implementing the FLTI experiments on the Pleiades supercomputer. For example, taking into account that ~16 injections are generated by one core of the Pleiades processors in an hour, the “shallow” FLTI experiment, in which ~2000 injections are required per target star, can be done for 16% of all Kepler target stars in about 200 hours. Stripping down the transit search to bare bones, i.e. only searching adjacent high/low periods at high/low pulse durations, makes the computationally intensive FLTI experiments affordable. The design of the FLTI experiments and the analysis of the resulting data are presented in “Validating an Analytic Completeness Model for Kepler Target Stars Based on Flux-level Transit Injection Experiments” by Catanzarite et al. (#2494058).Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for the Kepler Mission has been provided by the NASA Science Mission Directorate.

  2. Twenty barrel in situ pipe gun type solid hydrogen pellet injector for the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Motojima, Gen; Hayashi, Hiromi; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko; Ogawa, Hideki; Takami, Shigeyuki; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    A 20 barrel solid hydrogen pellet injector, which is able to inject 20 cylindrical pellets with a diameter and length of between 3.0 and 3.8 mm at the velocity of 1200 m/s, has been developed for the purpose of direct core fueling in LHD (Large Helical Device). The in situ pipe gun concept with the use of compact cryo-coolers enables stable operation as a fundamental facility in plasma experiments. The combination of the two types of pellet injection timing control modes, i.e., pre-programing mode and real-time control mode, allows the build-up and sustainment of high density plasma around the density limit. The pellet injector has demonstrated stable operation characteristics during the past three years of LHD experiments.

  3. Twenty barrel in situ pipe gun type solid hydrogen pellet injector for the Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Motojima, Gen; Hayashi, Hiromi; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko; Ogawa, Hideki; Takami, Shigeyuki; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    A 20 barrel solid hydrogen pellet injector, which is able to inject 20 cylindrical pellets with a diameter and length of between 3.0 and 3.8 mm at the velocity of 1200 m/s, has been developed for the purpose of direct core fueling in LHD (Large Helical Device). The in situ pipe gun concept with the use of compact cryo-coolers enables stable operation as a fundamental facility in plasma experiments. The combination of the two types of pellet injection timing control modes, i.e., pre-programing mode and real-time control mode, allows the build-up and sustainment of high density plasma around the density limit. The pellet injector has demonstrated stable operation characteristics during the past three years of LHD experiments.

  4. Pleasant Bayou area, Brazoria County, Texas, brine injection experience

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, C.F.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal brine disposal is one of the facets relating to the geopressured-geothermal energy problem. Subsurface brine disposal is a viable option and a good deal of information is available on brine disposal in the general Gulf Coast area. The specific information presented was developed in a DOE study of salt water disposal experience in Louisiana and Texas (Knutson and Boardman, 1977), an EPA study of large volume brine injection in Brazoria County, Texas (Knutson, 1980) and industrial brine injection experience, especially in Tertiary clastic sediments.

  5. Performance of the Ignitor Pellet Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattolillo, A.; Migliori, S.; Podda, S.; Bombarda, F.; Baylor, L. R.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Combs, S. K.; Foust, C.; Fehling, D.; McJill, J. M.; Meitner, S.; Roveta, G.

    2008-11-01

    ENEA and ORNL have built a four barrel, two-stage pneumatic injector for the Ignitor experiment featuring two innovative concepts: (i) an optimal shaping of the propellant pressure pulse to improve pellet acceleration, and (ii) the use of fast closing (< 10 ms) valves to drastically reduce the expansion volumes of the propellant gas removal system. The injector is designed to deliver pellets of different sizes with velocities up to 4 km/s, capable of penetrating near the center of the plasma column when injected from the low field side in Ignitor burning plasmas (n010^21 m-3, T011 keV). The ENEA sub-system, which includes the two-stage guns and pulse-shaping valves, the gas removal system, with associated controls and diagnostics, and the ORNL sub-system, consisting of the cryostat and pellet diagnostics, with related control and data acquisition system, have been assembled in Oak Ridge. Pellet speeds of 2 km/s have been achieved, despite the unfavorable configuration adopted in order to carry out some preliminary tests immediately after assembling the system, a very promising result. A second experimental campaign is planned for the 2008 Fall, when all four diagnostic channels should be complete.

  6. Control System for the NSTX Lithium Pellet Injector

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sichta; J. Dong; R. Gernhardt; G. Gettelfinger; H. Kugel

    2003-10-27

    The Lithium Pellet Injector (LPI) is being developed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The LPI will inject ''pellets'' of various composition into the plasma in order to study wall conditioning, edge impurity transport, liquid limiter simulations, and other areas of research. The control system for the NSTX LPI has incorporated widely used advanced technologies, such as LabVIEW and PCI bus I/O boards, to create a low-cost control system which is fully integrated into the NSTX computing environment. This paper will present the hardware and software design of the computer control system for the LPI.

  7. Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options

    SciTech Connect

    Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

    1984-09-01

    The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

  8. Experiments on Plume Spreading by Engineered Injection and Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, D. C.; Jones, M.; Tigera, R. G.; Neupauer, R.

    2014-12-01

    The notion that groundwater remediation is transport-limited emphasizes the coupling between physical (i.e., hydrodynamic), geochemical, and microbiological processes in the subsurface. Here we leverage this coupling to promote groundwater remediation using the approach of engineered injection and extraction. In this approach, inspired by the literature on chaotic advection, uncontaminated groundwater is injected and extracted through a manifold of wells surrounding the contaminated plume. The potential of this approach lies in its ability to actively manipulate the velocity field near the contaminated plume, generating plume spreading above and beyond that resulting from aquifer heterogeneity. Plume spreading, in turn, promotes mixing and reaction by chemical and biological processes. Simulations have predicted that engineered injection and extraction generates (1) chaotic advection whose characteristics depend on aquifer heterogeneity, and (2) faster rates and increased extent of groundwater remediation. This presentation focuses on a complimentary effort to experimentally demonstrate these predictions experimentally. In preparation for future work using refractive index matched (RIM) porous media, the experiments reported here use a Hele-Shaw apparatus containing silicone oil. Engineered injection and extraction is used to manipulate the geometry of an initially circular plume of black pigment, and photographs record the plume geometry after each step of injection of extraction. Image analysis, using complimentary Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches, reveals the thickness and variability of the dispersion zone surrounding the deformed plume of black pigment. The size, shape, and evolution of this dispersion zone provides insight into the interplay between engineered injection and extraction, which generates plume structure, and dispersion (here Taylor dispersion), which destroys plume structure. These experiments lay the groundwork for application of engineered

  9. Massive Pellet and Rupture Disk Testing for Disruption Mitigation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Meitner, Steven J; Baylor, Larry R; Caughman, John B; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Fehling, Dan T; Foust, Charles R; Jernigan, Thomas C; McGill, James M; Parks, P. B.; Rasmussen, David A

    2009-01-01

    Injection of massive quantities of noble gases or D2 has proven to be effective at mitigating some of the deleterious effects of disruptions in tokamaks. Two alternative methods that might offer some advantages over the present technique for massive gas injection are shattering massive pellets and employing close-coupled rupture disks. Laboratory testing has been carried out to evaluate their feasibility. For the study of massive pellets, a pipe gun pellet injector cooled with a cryogenic refrigerator was fitted with a relatively large barrel (16.5 mm bore), and D2 and Ne pellets were made and were accelerated to speeds of ~600 and 300 m/s, respectively. Based on the successful proof-of-principle testing with the injector and a special double-impact target to shatter pellets, a similar system has been prepared and installed on DIII-D and should be ready for experiments later this year. To study the applicability of rupture disks for disruption mitigation, a simple test apparatus was assembled in the lab. Commercially available rupture disks of 1 in. nominal diameter were tested at conditions relevant for the application on tokamaks, including tests with Ar and He gases and rupture pressures of ~54 bar. Some technical and practical issues of implementing this technique on a tokamak are discussed.

  10. Continuation of Lithium Aerosol Injection Experiments on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, D. K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Kugel, H.; Maingi, R.; Irby, J.; Wang, Z.

    2009-11-01

    During the 2008 run campaign, a Li powder dropper was installed on NSTX that successfully injected up to 35 mg/s of Li aerosol into the SOL. Initial improvements in the plasma performance from these initial experiments warranted the installation of a second Li dropper for the 2009 campaign. Design improvements in the dropper have resulted in accurate control of the flux of Li powder injected. The improved duel-dropper system has injected lithium fluxes of from 30 - 140 mg/s. At the highest flux, plasmas of 950 kA with 6 MW off NBI auxiliary heating have been successfully operated. This flux corresponds to 2.5 x106 - 5.8 x106 aerosol particles/s and is stoichiometrically equivalent 80 - 187 Torr L/s of D2. Operation of the Li dropper and the effects of the Li aerosol on the plasma performance will be discussed.

  11. Pellet injector development at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.; Argo, B.E.; Baylor, L.R.; Cole, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Jernigan, T.C.; Langley, R.A.; Qualls, A.L.; Schechter, D.E.; Sparks, D.O.; Tsai, C.C.; Whealton, J.H.; Wilgen, J.B.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1992-12-31

    Plasma fueling systems for magnetic confinement experiments are under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL has recently provided a four-shot tritium pellet injector with up to 4-mm-diam capability for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). This injector, which is based on the in situ condensation technique for pellet formation, features three single-stage gas guns that have been qualified in deuterium at up to 1.7 km/s and a two-stage light gas gun driver that has been operated at 2.8-km/s pellet speeds for deep penetration in the high-temperature TFTR supershot regime. Performance improvements to the centrifugal pellet injector for the Tore Supra tokamak are being made by modifying the storage-type pellet feed system, which has been redesigned to improve the reliability of delivery of pellets and to extend operation to longer pulse durations (up to 400 pellets). Two-stage light gas guns and electron-beam (e-beam) rocket accelerators for speeds in the range from 2 to 10 km/s are also under development. A repeating, two-stage light gas gun that has been developed can accelerate low-density plastic pellets at a 1-Hz repetition rate to speeds of 3 km/s. In a collaboration with ENEA-Frascati, a test facility has been prepared to study repetitive operation of a two-stage gas gun driver equipped with an extrusion-type deuterium pellet source. Extensive testing of the e-beam accelerator has demonstrated a parametric dependence of propellant burn velocity and pellet speed, in accordance with a model derived from the neutral gas shielding theory for pellet ablation in a magnetized plasma.

  12. Pellet injector development at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.; Argo, B.E.; Baylor, L.R.; Cole, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Jernigan, T.C.; Langley, R.A.; Qualls, A.L.; Schechter, D.E.; Sparks, D.O.; Tsai, C.C.; Whealton, J.H.; Wilgen, J.B. ); Schmidt, G.L. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    Plasma fueling systems for magnetic confinement experiments are under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL has recently provided a four-shot tritium pellet injector with up to 4-mm-diam capability for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). This injector, which is based on the in situ condensation technique for pellet formation, features three single-stage gas guns that have been qualified in deuterium at up to 1.7 km/s and a two-stage light gas gun driver that has been operated at 2.8-km/s pellet speeds for deep penetration in the high-temperature TFTR supershot regime. Performance improvements to the centrifugal pellet injector for the Tore Supra tokamak are being made by modifying the storage-type pellet feed system, which has been redesigned to improve the reliability of delivery of pellets and to extend operation to longer pulse durations (up to 400 pellets). Two-stage light gas guns and electron-beam (e-beam) rocket accelerators for speeds in the range from 2 to 10 km/s are also under development. A repeating, two-stage light gas gun that has been developed can accelerate low-density plastic pellets at a 1-Hz repetition rate to speeds of 3 km/s. In a collaboration with ENEA-Frascati, a test facility has been prepared to study repetitive operation of a two-stage gas gun driver equipped with an extrusion-type deuterium pellet source. Extensive testing of the e-beam accelerator has demonstrated a parametric dependence of propellant burn velocity and pellet speed, in accordance with a model derived from the neutral gas shielding theory for pellet ablation in a magnetized plasma.

  13. Observation and analysis of pellet material del B drift on MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Garzotti, L.; Baylor, Larry R; Kochi, F.; Pegourie, B.; Valovic, M; Axon, K. B.; Dowling, J.; Guri, C.; Maddison, G. P.; Nehme, H.; O'Gorman, T.; Patel, A.; Price, M.; Scannell, R.; Walsh, M.

    2010-01-01

    Pellet material deposited in a tokamak plasma experiences a drift towards the low field side of the torus induced by the magnetic field gradient. Plasma fuelling in ITER relies on the beneficial effect of this drift to increase the pellet deposition depth and fuelling efficiency. It is therefore important to analyse this phenomenon in present machines to improve the understanding of the del B induced drift and the accuracy of the predictions for ITER. This paper presents a detailed analysis of pellet material drift in MAST pellet injection experiments based on the unique diagnostic capabilities available on this machine and compares the observations with predictions of state-of-the-art ablation and deposition codes.

  14. Experimental investigation of solid hydrogen pellet ablation in high-temperature plasmas using holographic interferometry and other diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Jr., C. E.

    1981-03-01

    The technology currently most favored for the refueling of fusion reactors is the high-velocity injection of solid hydrogen pellets. Design details are presented for a holographic interferometer/shadowgraph used to study the microscopic characteristics of a solid hydrogen pellet ablating in an approx. 1-keV plasma. Experimental data are presented for two sets of experiments in which the interferometer/shadowgraph was used to study approx. 1-mm-diam solid hydrogen pellets injected into the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at velocities of 1000 m/s. In addition to the use of the holographic interferometer, the pellet ablation process is diagnosed by studying the emission of Balmer-alpha photons and by using the available tokamak diagnostics (Thomson scattering, microwave/far-infrared interferometer, pyroelectric radiometer, hard x-ray detector).

  15. First neutral beam injection experiments on KSTAR tokamaka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, S. H.; Chang, D. H.; Kim, T. S.; In, S. R.; Lee, K. W.; Jin, J. T.; Chang, D. S.; Oh, B. H.; Bae, Y. S.; Kim, J. S.; Park, H. T.; Watanabe, K.; Inoue, T.; Kashiwagi, M.; Dairaku, M.; Tobari, H.; Hanada, M.

    2012-02-01

    The first neutral beam (NB) injection system of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak was partially completed in 2010 with only 1/3 of its full design capability, and NB heating experiments were carried out during the 2010 KSTAR operation campaign. The ion source is composed of a JAEA bucket plasma generator and a KAERI large multi-aperture accelerator assembly, which is designed to deliver a 1.5 MW, NB power of deuterium at 95 keV. Before the beam injection experiments, discharge, and beam extraction characteristics of the ion source were investigated. The ion source has good beam optics in a broad range of beam perveance. The optimum perveance is 1.1-1.3 μP, and the minimum beam divergence angle measured by the Doppler shift spectroscopy is 0.8°. The ion species ratio is D+:D2+:D3+ = 75:20:5 at beam current density of 85 mA/cm2. The arc efficiency is more than 1.0 A/kW. In the 2010 KSTAR campaign, a deuterium NB power of 0.7-1.5 MW was successfully injected into the KSTAR plasma with a beam energy of 70-90 keV. L-H transitions were observed within a wide range of beam powers relative to a threshold value. The edge pedestal formation in the Ti and Te profiles was verified through CES and electron cyclotron emission diagnostics. In every deuterium NB injection, a burst of D-D neutrons was recorded, and increases in the ion temperature and plasma stored energy were found.

  16. First neutral beam injection experiments on KSTAR tokamak.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S H; Chang, D H; Kim, T S; In, S R; Lee, K W; Jin, J T; Chang, D S; Oh, B H; Bae, Y S; Kim, J S; Park, H T; Watanabe, K; Inoue, T; Kashiwagi, M; Dairaku, M; Tobari, H; Hanada, M

    2012-02-01

    The first neutral beam (NB) injection system of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak was partially completed in 2010 with only 1∕3 of its full design capability, and NB heating experiments were carried out during the 2010 KSTAR operation campaign. The ion source is composed of a JAEA bucket plasma generator and a KAERI large multi-aperture accelerator assembly, which is designed to deliver a 1.5 MW, NB power of deuterium at 95 keV. Before the beam injection experiments, discharge, and beam extraction characteristics of the ion source were investigated. The ion source has good beam optics in a broad range of beam perveance. The optimum perveance is 1.1-1.3 μP, and the minimum beam divergence angle measured by the Doppler shift spectroscopy is 0.8°. The ion species ratio is D(+):D(2)(+):D(3)(+) = 75:20:5 at beam current density of 85 mA/cm(2). The arc efficiency is more than 1.0 A∕kW. In the 2010 KSTAR campaign, a deuterium NB power of 0.7-1.5 MW was successfully injected into the KSTAR plasma with a beam energy of 70-90 keV. L-H transitions were observed within a wide range of beam powers relative to a threshold value. The edge pedestal formation in the T(i) and T(e) profiles was verified through CES and electron cyclotron emission diagnostics. In every deuterium NB injection, a burst of D-D neutrons was recorded, and increases in the ion temperature and plasma stored energy were found.

  17. The Skylab barium plasma injection experiments. I - Convection observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Peek, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Two barium-plasma injection experiments were carried out during magnetically active periods in conjunction with the Skylab 3 mission. The high-explosive shaped charges were launched near dawn on November 27 and December 4, 1973, UT. In both cases, the AE index was near 400 gammas, and extensive pulsating auroras covered the sky. The first experiment, Skylab Alpha, occurred in the waning phase of a 1000-gamma substorm, and the second, Skylab Beta, occurred in the expansive phase of an 800-gamma substorm. In both, the convection was generally magnetically eastward, with 100-km-level electric fields near 40 mV/m. However, in the Alpha experiment the observed orientation of the barium flux tube fit theoretical field lines having no parallel current, but the Beta flux-tube orientation indicated a substantial upward parallel sheet current.

  18. Particle transport in pellet fueled JET (Jet European Torus) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    Pellet fueling experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak with a multi-pellet injector. The pellets are injected at speeds approaching 1400 m/s and penetrate deep into the JET plasma. Highly peaked electron density profiles are achieved when penetration of the pellets approaches or goes beyond the magnetic axis, and these peaked profiles persist for more than two seconds in ohmic discharges and over one second in ICRF heated discharges. In this dissertation, analysis of electron particle transport in multi-pellet fueled JET limiter plasmas under a variety of heating conditions is described. The analysis is carried out with a one and one-half dimensional radial particle transport code to model the experimental density evolution with various particle transport coefficients. These analyses are carried out in plasmas with ohmic heating, ICRF heating, and neural beam heating, in limiter configurations. Peaked density profile cases are generally characterized by diffusion coefficients with a central (r/a < 0.5) diffusivity {approximately}0.1 m{sup 2}/s that increases rapidly to {approximately}0.3 m{sup 2}/s at r/a = 0.6 and then increases out to the plasma edge as (r/a){sup 2}. These discharges can be satisfactorily modeled without any anomalous convective (pinch) flux. 79 refs., 60 figs.

  19. Visualization experiments on steam injection in Hele-Shaw cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Xianli; Haghighi, M.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1992-03-01

    Flow visualization experiments have been successfully employed in reservoir engineering research for many years. They involve 2-D geometries in transparent Hele-Shaw cells and glass micromodels. Although much work has been done on immiscible flows (drainage or imbibition), visualization of steamfloods, which constitute a major part of current EOR methods, has not been attempted to data. In this paper, we present experimental results on steam injection in a transparent, pyrex glass Hele-Shaw cell. Both synthetic (Dutrex 739) and natural heavy oils were used under a variety of conditions, including effects of gravity.

  20. Electron ripple injection experiments on CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Hwang, Y.S.; Chang, C.S.

    1997-04-01

    The aim of electron ripple injection (ERI) is to create a radial electric field (E{sub r}) layer by external and non-intrusive means, using electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) and a localized magnetic ripple field. The ultimate goal is to use the generated E{sub r} layer as a tool for tokamak plasma transport modification. Motivated by semi-analytical analysis and numerical Monte-Carlo guiding-center simulation results [1], a series of experiments have been performed to elucidate the underlying key physics of the ERI concept. The experimental results are in reasonably good agreement with theoretical predictions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Electron ripple injection experiments on CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Hwang, Y. S.; Chang, C. S.

    1997-04-01

    The aim of electron ripple injection (ERI) is to create a radial electric field (Er) layer by external and non-intrusive means, using electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) and a localized magnetic ripple field. The ultimate goal is to use the generated Er layer as a tool for tokamak plasma transport modification. Motivated by semi-analytical analysis and numerical Monte-Carlo guiding-center simulation results [1], a series of experiments have been performed to elucidate the underlying key physics of the ERI concept. The experimental results are in reasonably good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  2. Modeling of Carbon Migration During JET Injection Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J. D.; Likonen, J.; Coad, P.; Rubel, M.; Widdowson, A.; Airila, M.; Andrew, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Corrigan, G.; Esser, H. G.; Jachmich, S.; Kallenbach, A.; Kirschner, A.; Kreter, A.; Matthews, G. F.; Philipps, V.; Pitts, R. A.; Spence, J.; Stamp, M.; Wiesen, S.

    2008-10-15

    JET has performed two dedicated carbon migration experiments on the final run day of separate campaigns (2001 and 2004) using {sup 13}CH{sub 4} methane injected into repeated discharges. The EDGE2D/NIMBUS code modelled the carbon migration in both experiments. This paper describes this modelling and identifies a number of important migration pathways: (1) deposition and erosion near the injection location, (2) migration through the main chamber SOL, (3) migration through the private flux region aided by E x B drifts, and (4) neutral migration originating near the strike points. In H-Mode, type I ELMs are calculated to influence the migration by enhancing erosion during the ELM peak and increasing the long-range migration immediately following the ELM. The erosion/re-deposition cycle along the outer target leads to a multistep migration of {sup 13}C towards the separatrix which is called 'walking'. This walking created carbon neutrals at the outer strike point and led to {sup 13}C deposition in the private flux region. Although several migration pathways have been identified, quantitative analyses are hindered by experimental uncertainty in divertor leakage, and the lack of measurements at locations such as gaps and shadowed regions.

  3. An Ultraviolet Survey of the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Elizabeth; Howard, Stephen; Horton, Robert; Hwang, David Q.; Evans, Russell; Brockington, Samuel; Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Light is emitted during the formation and acceleration of a compact toroid (CT) plasma in the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX). A low-resolution (35nm) survey in the 150 to 500 nm range of the ultraviolet spectrum of this light will be taken using a 1-meter Acton spectrometer using a 300 line/mm grating, on loan from the Electron-Beam Ion-Trap group at LLNL, with a 16-channel linear photodiode array. This survey will allow bright regions of the emitted spectrum to be identified for various diagnostic purposes. At moderate spectrometer resolution, line intensities may be used to infer plasma impurity content, while line ratios may be used to infer plasma temperatures. At high resolution, axial plasma velocity can be determined using Doppler shifts, while plasma temperature can be determined using Doppler broadening. Higher resolution experiments will be completed if time allows or continued by a future student.

  4. Pellet refuelling of particle loss due to ELM mitigation with RMPs in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak at low collisionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valovič, M.; Lang, P. T.; Kirk, A.; Suttrop, W.; Cavedon, M.; Cseh, G.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, L. R.; Garzotti, L.; Guimarais, L.; Kocsis, G.; Mlynek, A.; Plőckl, B.; Scannell, R.; Szepesi, T.; Tardini, G.; Thornton, A.; Viezzer, E.; Wolfrum, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-06-01

    The complete refuelling of the plasma density loss (pump-out) caused by mitigation of edge localised modes (ELMs) is demonstrated on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The plasma is refuelled by injection of frozen deuterium pellets and ELMs are mitigated by external resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). In this experiment relevant dimensionless parameters, such as relative pellet size, relative RMP amplitude and pedestal collisionality are kept at the ITER like values. Refuelling of density pump out of the size of Δ n/n∼ 30% requires a factor of two increase of nominal fuelling rate. Energy confinement and pedestal temperatures are not restored to pre-RMP values by pellet refuelling.

  5. Hydro-mechanical behaviour of bentonite pellet mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, C.; Alonso, E. E.; Romero, E.

    Granular mixtures made of high-density pellets of bentonite are being evaluated as an alternative buffer material for waste isolation. Ease of handling is an often-mentioned advantage. The paper described the experimental program performed to characterize the hydro-mechanical behaviour of compacted pellet’s mixtures used in the engineered barrier (EB) experiment. The material tested in the laboratory was based in the pellet’s mixtures actually used for the emplacement of the EB in situ experiment. Grain size distribution was adjusted to a maximum pellet size compatible with the specimen’s dimensions. Dry densities of statically compacted specimens varied in most of the cases in the range: 1.3-1.5 Mg/m 3. Pellets had a very high dry density, close to 2 Mg/m 3. The outstanding characteristic of these mixtures is its discontinuous porosity. Pore sizes of the compacted pellets vary around 10 nm. However the inter-pellet size of the pores is four to five orders of magnitude higher. This double porosity and the highly expansive nature of the pellets controlled all the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the mixture. Tests performed include infiltration tests using different water injection rates and mechanisms of water transfer (in liquid and vapour phases), suction controlled oedometer tests and swelling pressure tests. The interpretation of some of the tests performed required backanalysis procedures using a hydro-mechanical (HM) computer code. Material response was studied within the framework of the elastoplastic constitutive model proposed by Alonso et al. [Alonso, E.E., Gens, A., Josa, A., 1990. A constitutive model for partially saturated soils. Géotechnique 40 (3), 405-430] (Barcelona Basic Model, BBM). Parameters for the model were identified and also a set of hydraulic laws necessary to perform coupled HM analysis.

  6. Neutral Beam Injection in the JET Trace Tritium Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Surrey, E.; Ciric, D.; Cox, S. J.; Hackett, L.; Homfray, D.; Jenkins, I.; Jones, T.T.C.; Keeling, D.; King, R.; Young, A.; Whitehead, D.

    2005-07-15

    Operation of the JET Neutral Beam Injectors with tritium is described. Supplying the tritium feed via the special electrically grounded gas feed compromised the performance of the up-graded high current triode Positive Ion Neutral Injectors (PINI) due to gas starvation of the source and the methods adopted to ameliorate this effect are described. A total of 362 PINI beam pulses were requested, circulating a total of 4.73g tritium, of which 9.3mg was injected into the torus. Safety considerations required a continuous, cumulative total to be maintained of the mass of tritium adsorbed onto the cryo-pumping panel; a daily limit of 0.5g was adopted for the Trace Tritium Experiment (TTE). A subsequent clean up phase using 115keV deuterium beams completed the isotopic exchange of components in the beamline.

  7. The Tordo 1 polar cusp barium plasma injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Jeffries, R. A.; Roach, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In January 1975, two barium plasma injection experiments were carried out with rockets launched into the upper atmosphere where field lines from the dayside cusp region intersect the ionosphere. The Tordo 1 experiment took place near the beginning of a worldwide magnetic storm. It became a polar cap experiment almost immediately as convection perpendicular to the magnetic field moved the fluorescent plasma jet away from the cusp across the polar cap in an antisunward direction. Convection across the polar cap with an average velocity of more than 1 km/s was observed for nearly 40 min until the barium flux tubes encountered large electron fields associated with a poleward bulge of the auroral oval near Greenland. Prior to the encounter with the aurora near Greenland there is evidence of upward acceleration of the barium ions while they were in the polar cap. The three-dimensional observations of the plasma orientation and motion give an insight into convection from the cusp region across the polar cap, the orientation of the polar cap magnetic field lines out to several earth radii, the causes of polar cap magnetic perturbations, and parallel acceleration processes.

  8. A high-altitude barium radial injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hallinan, T. J.; Deehr, C. S.; Romick, G. J.; Olson, J. V.; Roederer, J. G.; Sydora, R.

    1980-01-01

    A rocket launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, carried a new type of high-explosive barium shaped charge to 571 km, where detonation injected a thin disk of barium vapor with high velocity nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. The TV images of the injection are spectacular, revealing three major regimes of expanding plasma which showed early instabilities in the neutral gas. The most unusual effect of the injection is a peculiar rayed barium-ion structure lying in the injection plane and centered on a 5 km 'black hole' surrounding the injection point. Preliminary electrostatic computer simulations show a similar rayed development.

  9. Computer modeling of a three-dimensional steam injection experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S.; Castanier, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    The experimental results and CT scans obtained during a steam-flooding experiment with the SUPRI 3-D steam injection laboratory model are compared with the results obtained from a numerical simulator for the same experiment. Simulation studies were carried out using the STARS (Steam and Additives Reservoir Simulator) compositional simulator. The saturation and temperature distributions obtained and heat-loss rates measured in the experimental model at different stages of steam-flooding were compared with those calculated from the numerical simulator. There is a fairly good agreement between the experimental results and the simulator output. However, the experimental scans show a greater degree of gravity override than that obtained with the simulator for the same heat-loss rates. Symmetric sides of the experimental 5-spot show asymmetric heat-loss rates contrary to theory and simulator results. Some utility programs have been written for extracting, processing and outputting the required grid data from the STARS simulator. These are general in nature and can be useful for other STARS users.

  10. The Ignitor Fast Pellet Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattolillo, A.; Migliori, S.; Bombarda, F.; Milora, S. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.

    2004-11-01

    A collaboration between the ENEA Laboratory at Frascati and the Fusion Technology Group of Oak Ridge for the development of a fast pellet injector for the Ignitor ignition experiment has been established. The program aims at the construction of a 4 barrel, double stage gun able to reach speeds up to 4 km/s and thus penetrate to the core of the plasma column. The compact size of the Ignitor machine favors the injection from the low field side, for which very positive results have been obtained on the FTU machine [1], in terms of density profile peaking and good energy confinement. The ongoing activities include the procurement of all the hardware for the criocooler, diagnostics and control electronics, from the ORNL side, and the design and construction of the gun by ENEA. A new fast valve has been developed that considerably reduces the requirements on the expansion volumes necessary to prevent the propulsion gas to reach the plasma chamber. [1] D. Frigione, et al., Nuclear Fusion 41, 1613 (2001).

  11. Experiments on Plasma Injection into a Centrifugally Confined System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, S.; Bomgardner, R.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Uzun-Kaymak, I.; Elton, R.; Young, W.; Teodorescu, C.; Morales, C. H.; Ellis, R. F.

    2009-11-01

    We describe the cross-field injection of plasma into a centrifugally-confined system. Two different types of plasma railgun have been installed on the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) in an attempt to drive that plasma's rotation. The initial gun was a coaxial device designed to mitigate the blowby instability. The second one was a MiniRailgun with a rectangular bore oriented so that the MCX magnetic field augments the railgun's internal magnetic field. Tests at HyperV indicate this MiniRailgun reaches much higher densities than the original gun, although muzzle velocity is slightly reduced. We discuss the impact of these guns on MCX for various conditions. Initial results show that even for a 2 kG field, firing the MiniRailgun modifies oscillations of the MCX diamagnetic loops and can impact the core current and voltage. The gun also has a noticeable impact on MCX microwave emissions. These observations suggest plasma enters the MCX system. We also compare diagnostic data collected separately from MCX for these and other guns, focussing primarily on magnetic measurements.

  12. Overdose experiences among injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although previous studies have identified high levels of drug-related harm in Thailand, little is known about illicit drug overdose experiences among Thai drug users. We sought to investigate non-fatal overdose experiences and responses to overdose among a community-recruited sample of injection drug users (IDU) in Bangkok, Thailand. Methods Data for these analyses came from IDU participating in the Mit Sampan Community Research Project. The primary outcome of interest was a self-reported history of non-fatal overdose. We calculated the prevalence of past overdose and estimated its relationship with individual, drug-using, social, and structural factors using multivariate logistic regression. We also assessed the prevalence of ever witnessing an overdose and patterns of response to overdose. Results These analyses included 252 individuals; their median age was 36.5 years (IQR: 29.0 - 44.0) and 66 (26.2%) were female. A history of non-fatal overdose was reported by 75 (29.8%) participants. In a multivariate model, reporting a history of overdose was independently associated with a history of incarceration (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 3.83, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.52 - 9.65, p = 0.004) and reporting use of drugs in combination (AOR = 2.48, 95% CI: 1.16 - 5.33, p = 0.019). A majority (67.9%) reported a history of witnessing an overdose; most reported responding to the most recent overdose using first aid (79.5%). Conclusions Experiencing and witnessing an overdose were common in this sample of Thai IDU. These findings support the need for increased provision of evidence-based responses to overdose including peer-based overdose interventions. PMID:20465842

  13. Neutral injection experiments on the ISX-B tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described: (1) review of confinement scaling in ISX-B with strong neutral injection in clean plasmas, (2) discussion of observed energy confinement improvement in slightly contaminated discharges (factor less than or equal to 2), and (3) preliminary evaluation of confinement with balanced neutral beam injection. (MOW)

  14. Cryogenic pellet production developments for long-pulse plasma operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitner, S. J.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Fehling, D. T.; McGill, J. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; McGinnis, W. D.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Long pulse plasma operation on large magnetic fusion devices require multiple forms of cryogenically formed pellets for plasma fueling, on-demand edge localized mode (ELM) triggering, radiative cooling of the divertor, and impurity transport studies. The solid deuterium fueling and ELM triggering pellets can be formed by extrusions created by helium cooled, twin-screw extruder based injection system that freezes deuterium in the screw section. A solenoid actuated cutter mechanism is activated to cut the pellets from the extrusion, inserting them into the barrel, and then fired by the pneumatic valve pulse of high pressure gas. Fuel pellets are injected at a rate up to 10 Hz, and ELM triggering pellets are injected at rates up to 20 Hz. The radiative cooling and impurity transport study pellets are produced by introducing impurity gas into a helium cooled section of a pipe gun where it deposits in-situ. A pneumatic valve is opened and propellant gas is released downstream where it encounters a passive punch which initially accelerates the pellet before the gas flow around the finishes the pellet acceleration. This paper discusses the various cryogenic pellet production techniques based on the twin-screw extruder, pipe gun, and pellet punch designs.

  15. Cryogenic pellet production developments for long-pulse plasma operation

    SciTech Connect

    Meitner, S. J.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Fehling, D. T.; McGill, J. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; McGinnis, W. D.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-01-29

    Long pulse plasma operation on large magnetic fusion devices require multiple forms of cryogenically formed pellets for plasma fueling, on-demand edge localized mode (ELM) triggering, radiative cooling of the divertor, and impurity transport studies. The solid deuterium fueling and ELM triggering pellets can be formed by extrusions created by helium cooled, twin-screw extruder based injection system that freezes deuterium in the screw section. A solenoid actuated cutter mechanism is activated to cut the pellets from the extrusion, inserting them into the barrel, and then fired by the pneumatic valve pulse of high pressure gas. Fuel pellets are injected at a rate up to 10 Hz, and ELM triggering pellets are injected at rates up to 20 Hz. The radiative cooling and impurity transport study pellets are produced by introducing impurity gas into a helium cooled section of a pipe gun where it deposits in-situ. A pneumatic valve is opened and propellant gas is released downstream where it encounters a passive punch which initially accelerates the pellet before the gas flow around the finishes the pellet acceleration. This paper discusses the various cryogenic pellet production techniques based on the twin-screw extruder, pipe gun, and pellet punch designs.

  16. Tangential and Vertical Compact Torus Injection Experiments on the STOR-M Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chijin; D, Liu; S, Livingstone; A, K. Singh; E, Zhang; A, Hirose

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes the setup and results of compact torus (CT) injection experiments on the STOR-M tokamak. Tangential CT injection into STOR-M induced H-mode-like phenomena including doubling the electron density, reduction in the Hα radiation level, suppression of the floating potential fluctuations, suppression of the m = 2 Mirnov oscillations, and increase in the global energy confinement time. Experimental setup, bench-test results, and some preliminary injection data for vertical CT injection experiments on STOR-M will be shown. In addition, numerical simulations of the CT trajectories in tokamak discharges for both tangential and vertical injection geometries will be discussed.

  17. Fueling of magnetically confined plasmas by single- and two-stage repeating pneumatic pellet injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced plasma fueling systems for magnetic fusion confinement experiments are under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The general approach is that of producing and accelerating frozen hydrogenic pellets to speeds in the kilometer-per-second range using single shot and repetitive pneumatic (light-gas gun) pellet injectors. The millimeter-to-centimeter size pellets enter the plasma and continuously ablate because of the plasma electron heat flux, depositing fuel atoms along the pellet trajectory. This fueling method allows direct fueling in the interior of the hot plasma and is more efficient than the alternative method of injecting room temperature fuel gas at the wall of the plasma vacuum chamber. Single-stage pneumatic injectors based on the light-gas gun concept have provided hydrogenic fuel pellets in the speed range of 1--2 km/s in single-shot injector designs. Repetition rates up to 5 Hz have been demonstrated in repetitive injector designs. Future fusion reactor-scale devices may need higher pellet velocities because of the larger plasma size and higher plasma temperatures. Repetitive two-stage pneumatic injectors are under development at ORNL to provide long-pulse plasma fueling in the 3--5 km/s speed range. Recently, a repeating, two-stage light-gas gun achieved repetitive operation at 1 Hz with speeds in the range of 2--3 km/s.

  18. New algorithm for computing the ablation of hydrogenic pellets in hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.

    1983-04-01

    A method is presented for calculating the evaporation rate of hydrogenic pellets immersed in an unmagnetized plasma with a suprathermal particle component of arbitrary distribution function. The computational procedure is based on hydrodynamic solutions for the expansion of the gaseous cloud, obtained in a previous treatment that considered the effects of thermal particles only. The appropriate heat source terms, derived from the stopping power of the gaseous shield, are worked out for energetic ions produced by neutral beam injection heating. The model predicts 27-cm penetration in a Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) plasma, compared with experimentally measured values in the range of 29 to 32 cm. An application to the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) gives an estimated 21-cm penetration for a 2.5-mm-diam tritium pellet injection at 2000 m/s into a 55-cm-bore plasma heated to a central electron temperature of 4 keV by 34 MW of neutral injection.

  19. LABORATORY MICROCOSM EXPERIMENTS OF OXIDATION PROCESSES AFTER STEAM INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aggressive thermal methods such as steam injection or resistive heating are known to be effective for the recovery of many types of volatile and semivolatile compounds. It has been suggested that oxidation or other chemical reactions that occur at remediation temperatures can ai...

  20. Deuterium pellet injector gun design

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, R.V.; Wysor, R.B.; Bryan, W.E.; Shipley, W.D.; Combs, S.K.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.; Fisher, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Deuterium Pellet Injector (DPI), an eight-pellet pneumatic injector, is being designed and fabricated for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). It will accelerate eight pellets, 4 by 4 mm maximum, to greater than 1500 m/s. It utilizes a unique pellet-forming mechanism, a cooled pellet storage wheel, and improved propellant gas scavenging.

  1. Tritium proof-of-principle pellet injector

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.

    1991-07-01

    The tritium proof-of-principle (TPOP) experiment was designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the formation and acceleration of the world's first tritium pellets for fueling of future fusion reactors. The experiment was first used to produce hydrogen and deuterium pellets at ORNL. It was then moved to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the production of tritium pellets. The injector used in situ condensation to produce cylindrical pellets in a 1-m-long, 4-mm-ID barrel. A cryogenic {sup 3}He separator, which was an integral part of the gun assembly, was capable of lowering {sup 3}He levels in the feed gas to <0.005%. The experiment was housed to a glovebox for tritium containment. Nearly 1500 pellets were produced during the course of the experiment, and about a third of these were pure tritium or mixtures of deuterium and tritium. Over 100 kCi of tritium was processed through the experiment without incident. Tritium pellet velocities of 1400 m/s were achieved with high-pressure hydrogen propellant. The design, operation, and results of this experiment are summarized. 34 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Tritium proof-of-principle pellet injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, P. W.

    1991-07-01

    The tritium proof-of-principle (TPOP) experiment was designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the formation and acceleration of the world's first tritium pellets for fueling of future fusion reactors. The experiment was first used to produce hydrogen and deuterium pellets at ORNL. It was then moved to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the production of tritium pellets. The injector used in situ condensation to produce cylindrical pellets in a 1-m-long, 4-mm-ID barrel. A cryogenic He-3 separator, which was an integral part of the gun assembly, was capable of lowering He-3 levels in the feed gas to less than 0.005 percent. The experiment was housed to a glovebox for tritium containment. Nearly 1500 pellets were produced during the course of the experiment, and about a third of these were pure tritium or mixtures of deuterium and tritium. Over 100 kCi of tritium was processed through the experiment without incident. Tritium pellet velocities of 1400 m/s were achieved with high-pressure hydrogen propellant. The design, operation, and results of this experiment are summarized.

  3. Pellet inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wilks, Robert S.; Taleff, Alexander; Sturges, Jr., Robert H.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for inspecting nuclear fuel pellets in a sealed container for diameter, flaws, length and weight. The apparatus includes, in an array, a pellet pick-up station, four pellet inspection stations and a pellet sorting station. The pellets are delivered one at a time to the pick-up station by a vibrating bowl through a vibrating linear conveyor. Grippers each associated with a successive pair of the stations are reciprocable together to pick up a pellet at the upstream station of each pair and to deposit the pellet at the corresponding downstream station. The gripper jaws are opened selectively depending on the state of the pellets at the stations and the particular cycle in which the apparatus is operating. Inspection for diameter, flaws and length is effected in each case by a laser beam projected on the pellets by a precise optical system while each pellet is rotated by rollers. Each laser and its optical system are mounted in a container which is free standing on a precise surface and is provided with locating buttons which engage locating holes in the surface so that each laser and its optical system is precisely set. The roller stands are likewise free standing and are similarly precisely positioned. The diameter optical system projects a thin beam of light which scans across the top of each pellet and is projected on a diode array. The fl GOVERNMENT CONTRACT CLAUSE The invention herein described was made in the course of or under a contract or subcontract thereunder with the Department of Energy bearing No. EY-67-14-C-2170.

  4. [Controlled release of pseudoephedrine HCl from pellets].

    PubMed

    Vertommen, J

    1997-01-01

    This study describes the development work on a dosage form, which should release the drug pseudoephedrine HCl over twelve hours. Pellets were chosen as the dosage form. The pellets contained 20, respectively, 45 percent pseudoephedrine HCL and were produced using a high shear mixer-granulator. These pellets were coated in a fluidized bed and in a high shear mixer-granulator equipped with a microwave drying installation. The results of the experiments indicate that it is possible to produce pellets in a high shear mixer-granulator. Strong pellets with a narrow size distribution were obtained. A high shear mixer-granulator appears, therefore, to be a valuable alternative to the more commonly used pellet-forming technique of extrusion-sphere formation. The pellets could be coated as well in a fluidized bed as in a high shear mixer-granulator equipped with a microwave drying installation. A major advantage of the high shear mixer-granulator equipped with a microwave drying installation is the possibility to perform several unit operations such as mixing, pellet formation drying, and coating in one piece of equipment. With respect to the requirement of getting a release of pseudoephedrine HCl over twelve hours, the pellets containing 20 percent pseudoephedrine HCl fulfilled this requirement. For pellets containing 45 percent pseudoephedrine HCl it appears to be hard to obtain a sufficient delay in release using the commonly used coating formulations. This can be attributed to the very good solubility of pseudoephedrine HCl in water. Optimization of the coating formulation by changing the nature and concentration of the plasticizer may solve the problem. PMID:9543819

  5. Reciprocating pellet press

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Charles W.

    1981-04-07

    A machine for pressing loose powder into pellets using a series of reciprocating motions has an interchangeable punch and die as its only accurately machines parts. The machine reciprocates horizontally between powder receiving and pressing positions. It reciprocates vertically to press, strip and release a pellet.

  6. Choosing injectable implants according to treatment area: the European experience.

    PubMed

    Bergeret-Galley, Catherine

    2009-05-01

    There are now many injectable implants for face remodeling since the first product appeared in Europe in 1984. The treatment regions most in demand are the cheeks, jaws, lips, and the oval of the face. The aging process is due to fat resorption over the upper two thirds of the face, in addition to the loss of elasticity. Weakness in the skin and subcutaneous fascia becomes more apparent over the lower third of the face. The fat loss together with the slack skin gives the impression of gauntness and loss of volume under the eyes (i.e., the zygomatic and palpebral areas). Treating the zygomatic bone area and subcutaneous tissue by injecting filler products will increase volume around the zygomatic malar bone and subcutaneous area. To choose an implant, we must take into account the patient's wishes, hopes (whether temporary or long-lasting effects are required), age, skin type (dry, moist, greasy, thick, or thin), and the patient's medical history to prevent obvious contraindications in the choice of implant due to type of product, especially in the case of allergies, inflamed areas, or any suspicion of autoimmune disease or recent infection.

  7. D Helicity Injection Studies on the Current Drive Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrow, Douglass Sterling

    A tokamak-like plasma has been created and sustained in the CDX device solely by means of an electron beam. The poloidal field structure observed is that of a tokamak and the density and temperatures seen are larger than in previous types of plasmas generated in this device. A plasma current scaling consistent with the helicity balance equation is observed and about 40% of the injected helicity appears in the tokamak plasma. Rapid transport of current from the region of injection to the center produces a peaked current profile. Plasmas with beta in the neighborhood of the Troyon-Sykes limit may be generated by this technique. In high-beta plasmas, a coherent fluctuation is seen which has its largest amplitude in a region of unfavorable curvature. The mode is absent below a certain density and plasma current, corresponding to a threshold beta. When present, the mode has an m = 4 structure and it propagates in the ion diamagnetic direction. These properties identify it as a ballooning mode. A significant radial electric field alters the observed frequency and dispersion of the mode.

  8. A discrete-choice experiment to determine patient preferences for injectable multiple sclerosis treatments in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Poulos, Christine; Kinter, Elizabeth; Yang, Jui-Chen; Bridges, John F. P.; Posner, Joshua; Gleißner, Erika; Mühlbacher, Axel; Kieseier, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the relative importance of features of a hypothetical injectable disease-modifying treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis using a discrete-choice experiment. Methods: German residents at least 18 years of age with a self-reported physician diagnosis of multiple sclerosis completed a 25–30 minute online discrete-choice experiment. Patients were asked to choose one of two hypothetical injectable treatments for multiple sclerosis, defined by different levels of six attributes (disability progression, the number of relapses in the next 4 years, injection time, frequency of injections, presence of flu-like symptoms, and presence of injection-site reactions). The data were analyzed using a random-parameters logit model. Results: Of 202 adults who completed the survey, results from 189 were used in the analysis. Approximately 50% of all patients reported a diagnosis of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, and 31% reported secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Approximately 71% of patients had current or prior experience with injectable multiple sclerosis medication. Approximately 53% had experienced flu-like symptoms caused by their medication, and 47% had experienced mild injection-site reactions. At least one significant difference was seen between levels in all attributes, except injection time. The greatest change in relative importance between levels of an attribute was years until symptoms get worse from 1 to 4 years. The magnitude of this difference was about twice that of relapses in the next 4 years, frequency of injections, and flu-like symptoms. Conclusions: Most attributes examined in this experiment had an influence on patient preference. Patients placed a significant value on improvements in the frequency of dosing and disability progression. Results suggest that changes in injection frequency can be as important as changes in efficacy and safety attributes. Understanding which attributes of

  9. Physics of forced magnetic reconnection in coaxial helicity injection experiments in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahimi, F.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Raman, R.; Hooper, E. B.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2014-05-15

    We numerically examine the physics of fast flux closure in transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) experiments in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). By performing resistive Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with poloidal injector coil currents held constant in time, we find that closed flux surfaces are formed through forced magnetic reconnection. Through a local Sweet-Parker type reconnection with an elongated current sheet in the injector region, closed flux surfaces expand in the NSTX global domain. Simulations demonstrate outflows approaching poloidally Alfvénic flows and reconnection times consistent with the Sweet-Parker model. Critical requirements for magnetic reconnection and flux closure are studied in detail. These primary effects, which are magnetic diffusivity, injector flux, injector flux footprint width, and rate of injector voltage reduction, are simulated for transient CHI experiments. The relevant time scales for effective reconnection are τ{sub V}<τ{sub rec}≈τ{sub A}√(S)(1+Pm){sup 1/4}<τ{sub R}, where τ{sub V} is the time for the injector voltage reduction, τ{sub A} is the poloidal Alfvén transit time, τ{sub R} is the global resistive diffusion time, and Pm and S are Prandtl and Lundquist numbers.

  10. Microstability analysis of pellet fuelled discharges in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzotti, L.; Figueiredo, J.; Roach, C. M.; Valovič, M.; Dickinson, D.; Naylor, G.; Romanelli, M.; Scannell, R.; Szepesi, G.; the MAST Team

    2014-03-01

    Reactor grade plasmas are likely to be fuelled by pellet injection. This technique transiently perturbs the profiles, driving the density profile hollow and flattening the edge temperature profile. After the pellet perturbation, the density and temperature profiles relax towards their quasi-steady-state shape. Microinstabilities influence plasma confinement and will play a role in determining the evolution of the profiles in pellet fuelled plasmas. In this paper we present the microstability analysis of pellet fuelled H-mode MAST plasmas. Taking advantage of the unique capabilities of the MAST Thomson scattering system and the possibility of synchronizing the eight lasers with the pellet injection, we were able to measure the evolution of the post-pellet electron density and temperature profiles with high temporal and spatial resolution. These profiles, together with ion temperature profiles measured using a charge exchange diagnostic, were used to produce equilibria suitable for microstability analysis of the equilibrium changes induced by pellet injection. This analysis, carried out using the local gyrokinetic code GS2, reveals that the microstability properties are extremely sensitive to the rapid and large transient excursions of the density and temperature profiles, which also change collisionality and βe significantly in the region most strongly affected by the pellet ablation.

  11. Deportation experiences of women who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Angela M; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Burgos, José Luis; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Rangel, Gudelia; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2012-04-01

    Deportation from the United States for drug offenses is common, yet the consequences of deportation for women drug users are poorly documented. In 2008, in Tijuana, Mexico, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study of migration, deportation, and drug abuse by interviewing 12 Mexican injection-drug-using women reporting U.S. deportation. Women reported heavy drug use before and after deportation, but greater financial instability and physical danger following deportation than when in the United States. We identified an unmet need for health and social services among deported drug-using women, including HIV prevention, drug treatment, physical and mental health services, and vocational training. Binational coordination is needed to help deported women resettle in Mexico.

  12. Deportation Experiences of Women Who Inject Drugs in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Angela M.; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Burgos, José Luis; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Rangel, Gudelia; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2013-01-01

    Deportation from the United States for drug offenses is common, yet the consequences of deportation for women drug users are poorly documented. In 2008, in Tijuana, Mexico, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study of migration, deportation, and drug abuse by interviewing 12 Mexican injection-drug-using women reporting U.S. deportation. Women reported heavy drug use before and after deportation, but greater financial instability and physical danger following deportation than when in the United States. We identified an unmet need for health and social services among deported drug-using women, including HIV prevention, drug treatment, physical and mental health services, and vocational training. Binational coordination is needed to help deported women resettle in Mexico. PMID:21917563

  13. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection experiments using the mouse as a model.

    PubMed

    Yanagimachi, R

    1998-04-01

    Due to the existence of ample background information on its reproduction, embryology and genetics, the mouse is potentially an excellent animal model for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Normal fertile mouse offspring have been obtained by ICSI using not only mature (epididymal) and immature (testicular) spermatozoa, but also round spermatids and secondary spermatocytes. This suggests that genomic imprinting of male germ cells is complete before spermiogenesis. Mature mouse spermatozoa carry one or more factors that activate oocytes. This sperm-borne oocyte-activating factor is present in testicular spermatozoa, but not in round spermatids. Thus, at least in the mouse, it seems to appear (or become active) during spermiogenesis. Part of the factor seems to be associated with the perinuclear materials because, when freed from plasma and acrosomal membranes as well as all acrosome components, spermatozoa remain fully capable of activating oocytes by ICSI. Spermatozoa with grossly misshapen heads (e.g. those from the BALB/c mouse) are unable to fertilize oocytes under ordinary in-vivo and in-vitro conditions. However, by ICSI they can fertilize the oocytes, and the zygotes develop into fertile offspring. Inherently poorly motile spermatozoa (of male mice carrying two t haplotypes) are unable to fertilize, but through ICSI they can participate in normal fertilization and embryonic development. Examination of human sperm chromosomes after sperm injection into mouse oocytes revealed that spermatozoa with abnormal head morphology have a significantly higher incidence of chromosome abnormality than those with normal heads, yet the majority of the abnormal spermatozoa have normal chromosomal constitutions. These findings suggest that spermatozoa with aberrant morphology and/or motility are not necessarily genomically abnormal.

  14. Features of spontaneous and pellet-induced ELMs on the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Liu, C. H.; Nie, L.; Feng, Z.; Ji, X. Q.; Yao, K.; Zhu, G. L.; Liu, Yi; Cui, Z. Y.; Yan, L. W.; Wang, Q. M.; Yang, Q. W.; Ding, X. T.; Dong, J. Q.; Duan, X. R.

    2012-11-01

    The pellet pacing ELM mitigation concept is being tested in some tokamaks such as ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JET. By increasing the ELM frequency, the ELM size can be reduced and eventually suppressed to meet the lifetime requirements on ITER target plates. In the HL-2A tokamak, ELMy H-mode operation is routinely performed and small type-III ELMs with a high repetition rate and some type-I (or possibly large type-III) ELM events are observed. Large ELMs are often preceded by strong coherent magnetic oscillations, and produce obvious perturbations on plasma current Ip, electron density \\bar {n}_{edge} at the edge, stored energy WE, etc. The coherent magnetic oscillations before an ELM crash or during the ELM are measured by toroidal and poloidal Mirnov coils and analysed by the wavelet technique to study the spectral characteristics of the short time ELM events. Pellet injection experiments are performed in type-III ELMy H-mode plasmas and ELM-free H-mode plasmas to study the physics of pellet triggering ELM. The analyses of pellet-induced ELMs and spontaneous ELMs are presented. Because the pellet size is relatively large, it induces magnetic oscillations lasting longer than that of a natural ELM.

  15. Towards an Explanation of Subjective Ketamine Experiences among Young Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    LANKENAU, STEPHEN E.; SANDERS, BILL; BLOOM, JENNIFER JACKSON; HATHAZI, DODI

    2008-01-01

    Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic with powerful sedative and hallucinogenic properties. Despite the wide variability in reported subjective experiences, no study has attempted to describe the particular factors that shape these experiences. This manuscript is based upon a sample of 213 young injection drug users recruited in New York, New Orleans, and Los Angeles with histories of ketamine use. Qualitative interviews focused on specific ketamine events, such as first injection of ketamine, most recent injection of ketamine, and most recent experience sniffing ketamine. Findings indicate that six factors impacted both positive and negative ketamine experiences: polydrug use, drug using history, mode of administration, quantity and quality of ketamine, user group, and setting. Most subjective experiences during any given ketamine event were shaped by a combination of these factors. Additionally, subjective ketamine experiences were particularly influenced by a lifestyle characterized by homelessness and traveling. PMID:18941540

  16. Pellet plant energy simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, D.; Vasquez Pulido, T.; Nielsen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Pellet Plant energy simulator is a software based on advanced algorithms which has the main purpose to see the response of a pellet plant regarding certain location conditions. It combines energy provided by a combined heat and power, and/or by a combustion chamber with the energy consumption of the pellet factory and information regarding weather conditions in order to predict the biomass consumption of the pellet factory together with the combined heat and power, and/or with the biomass consumption of the combustion chamber. The user of the software will not only be able to plan smart the biomass acquisition and estimate its cost, but also to plan smart the preventive maintenance (charcoal cleaning in case of a gasification plant) and use the pellet plant at the maximum output regarding weather conditions and biomass moisture. The software can also be used in order to execute a more precise feasibility study for a pellet plant in a certain location. The paper outlines the algorithm that supports the Pellet Plant Energy Simulator idea and presents preliminary tests results that supports the discussion and implementation of the system

  17. Current drive experiments in the Helicity Injected Torus - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamp, W. T.; Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Mueller, D.

    2006-10-01

    The HIT-II spherical torus (ST) device has demonstrated four toroidal plasma current drive configurations to form and sustain a tokamak: 1) inductive (ohmic) current drive, 2) coaxial helicity injection (CHI) current drive, 3) CHI initiated plasmas with ohmic sustainment (CHI+OH), and 4) ohmically initiated plasmas with CHI edge current drive (OH+ECD). CHI discharges with a sufficiently high ratio of injector current to toroidal field current form a closed flux core, and amplify the injector poloidal flux through magnetic reconnection. CHI+OH plasmas are more robust than unassisted ohmic discharges, with a wider operating space and more efficient use of the transformer Volt-seconds. Finally, edge CHI can enhance the plasma current of an ohmic discharge without significantly degrading the quality of the discharge. Results will be presented for each HIT-II operating regime, including empirical performance scalings, applicable parametric operating spaces, and requirements to produce these discharges. Thomson scattering measurements and EFIT simulations are used to evaluate confinement in several representative plasmas. Finally, we outline extensions to the HIT-II CHI studies that could be performed with NSTX, SUNIST, or other ST devices.

  18. Active experiments in space in conjunction with Skylab. [barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two papers are presented which relate to the Skylab barium shaped charge experiments. The first describes the L=6.6 OOSIK barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972. Rocket payload, instrumentation, data reduction methods, geophysical environment at the time of the experiment, and results are given. The second paper presents the observation of an auroral Birkeland current which developed from the distortion of a barium plasma jet during the above experiment.

  19. Lignite pellets and methods of agglomerating or pelletizing

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Albert F.; Blaustein, Eric W.; Deurbrouck, Albert W.; Garvin, John P.; McKeever, Robert E.

    1981-01-01

    The specification discloses lignite pellets which are relatively hard, dust resistant, of generally uniform size and free from spontaneous ignition and general degradation. Also disclosed are methods for making such pellets which involve crushing as mined lignite, mixing said lignite with a binder such as asphalt, forming the lignite binder mixture into pellets, and drying the pellets.

  20. Radation shielding pellets

    DOEpatents

    Coomes, Edmund P.; Luksic, Andrzej T.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation pellets having an outer shell, preferably, of Mo, W or depleted U nd an inner filling of lithium hydride wherein the outer shell material has a greater melting point than does the inner filling material.

  1. Radation shielding pellets

    DOEpatents

    Coomes, Edmund P.; Luksic, Andrzej T.

    1988-12-06

    Radiation pellets having an outer shell, preferably, of Mo, W or depleted U nd an inner filling of lithium hydride wherein the outer shell material has a greater melting point than does the inner filling material.

  2. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  3. Electron beam injection during active experiments. II - Collisional effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    During active beam experiments, the presence of high neutral densities at low altitudes and/or during thruster firings has been observed to modify the spacecraft charging and the properties of the beam. Two-dimensional (three-velocity) electromagnetic particle simulations with ionizing collisions incorporated are used to investigate the modification of the beam-plasma interaction as the neutral density is increased. It is shown that when the spacecraft is uniformly immersed in a neutral cloud, most of the ionization is produced by direct ionization by the beam and its secondaries, rather than via vehicle-induced or wave-induced ionization for the neutral densities considered.

  4. Injecting learning experience into geoethics for human and natural sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crookall, David

    2016-04-01

    Our early life experience has a strong influence on our actions in later life. Humans today are just starting to re-learn, collectively, how to treat Earth with the respect that it deserves and that is needed for our offspring to inherit a decent home. However, we still have a long way to go to instill in people at large the ethics, knowledge and skills necessary to ensure a healthy journey for humanity on spaceship. The experience of early upbringing, of schooling and of everyday life is probably the only path strong enough to develop in people a strong desire for ethical behaviour towards their environment. The problem is that the measures taken today to ensure the development of ethical behaviours in the population at large are woefully inadequate. At best, western school programmes contain a few lessons devoted to the environment, and even then they usually just pay lip service to the basics of the environment; they rarely aim to instill skills and knowledge in order to understand and care deeply for the environment. My presentation will suggest some practical ways to help communities build ethical frameworks and strategies to guide and generate tools, methods and activities that guide young people (pupils, students, scholars, researchers) to toward more ethical behaviours regarding their environment and their communities. Examples might include: - Developing geoethical dimensions of internships, in all areas; - Designing, testing and running simulation/games+debriefing providing a rich affective-cognitive context for grappling with geoethical problems- eg, FISH BANKS, KEEP COOL. - Pressuring governments to make geoethics, environmental care and climate change understanding central components of (almost) all educational programmes (in, eg, history, language, business, law, medicine, etc). - Subsidizing environmental-care summer schools for families and teachers at all levels. - Etc. One of my actions is founding a academic journal in the area, maybe with the

  5. Tritium proof-of-principle pellet injector: Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, P. W.; Gouge, M. J.

    1995-03-01

    As part of the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) plasma fueling development program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has fabricated a pellet injection system to test the mechanical and thermal properties of extruded tritium. This repeating, single-stage, pneumatic injector, called the Tritium-Proof-of-Principle Phase-2 (TPOP-2) Pellet Injector, has a piston-driven mechanical extruder and is designed to extrude hydrogenic pellets sized for the ITER device. The TPOP-II program has the following development goals: evaluate the feasibility of extruding tritium and DT mixtures for use in future pellet injection systems; determine the mechanical and thermal properties of tritium and DT extrusions; integrate, test and evaluate the extruder in a repeating, single-stage light gas gun sized for the ITER application (pellet diameter approximately 7-8 mm); evaluate options for recycling propellant and extruder exhaust gas; evaluate operability and reliability of ITER prototypical fueling systems in an environment of significant tritium inventory requiring secondary and room containment systems. In initial tests with deuterium feed at ORNL, up to thirteen pellets have been extruded at rates up to 1 Hz and accelerated to speeds of order 1.0-1.1 km/s using hydrogen propellant gas at a supply pressure of 65 bar. The pellets are typically 7.4 mm in diameter and up to 11 mm in length and are the largest cryogenic pellets produced by the fusion program to date. These pellets represent about a 11% density perturbation to ITER. Hydrogenic pellets will be used in ITER to sustain the fusion power in the plasma core and may be crucial in reducing first wall tritium inventories by a process called isotopic fueling where tritium-rich pellets fuel the burning plasma core and deuterium gas fuels the edge.

  6. An Ion-Selective Electrode/Flow-Injection Analysis Experiment: Determination of Potassium in Serum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Kovach, Paul M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a low-cost, senior-level, instrumental analysis experiment in which a home-made potassium tubular flow-through electrode is constructed and incorporated into a flow injection analysis system (FIA). Also describes experiments for evaluating the electrode's response properties, examining basic FIA concepts, and determining potassium in…

  7. An enhancement of plasma density by neutral gas injection observed in SEPAC Spacelab-1 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Kubota, S.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Williamson, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    An enhancement of plasma density observed during a neutral gas injection in Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators by the Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 is presented. When a plume of nitrogen gas was injected from the orbiter into space, a large amount of plasma was detected by an onboard plasma probe. The observed density often increased beyond the background plasma density and was strongly dependent on the attitude of the orbiter with respect to the velocity vector. This effect has been explained by a collisional interaction between the injected gas molecules and the ionospheric ions relatively drifting at the orbital speed.

  8. A compact lithium pellet injector for tokamak pedestal studies in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo Parra, R.; Moreno Quicios, R.; Ploeckl, B.; Birkenmeier, G.; Herrmann, A.; Kocsis, G.; Laggner, F. M.; Lang, P. T.; Lunt, T.; Macian-Juan, R.; Rohde, V.; Sellmair, G.; Szepesi, T.; Wolfrum, E.; Zeidner, W.; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    Experiments have been performed at ASDEX Upgrade, aiming to investigate the impact of lithium in an all-metal-wall tokamak and attempting to enhance the pedestal operational space. For this purpose, a lithium pellet injector has been developed, capable of injecting pellets carrying a particle content ranging from 1.82 × 1019 atoms (0.21 mg) to 1.64 × 1020 atoms (1.89 mg). The maximum repetition rate is about 2 Hz. Free flight launch from the torus outboard side without a guiding tube was realized. In such a configuration, angular dispersion and speed scatter are low, and a transfer efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved in the test bed. Pellets are accelerated in a gas gun; hence special care was taken to avoid deleterious effects by the propellant gas pulse. Therefore, the main plasma gas species was applied as propellant gas, leading to speeds ranging from 420 m/s to 700 m/s. In order to minimize the residual amount of gas to be introduced into the plasma vessel, a large expansion volume equipped with a cryopump was added into the flight path. In view of the experiments, an optimal propellant gas pressure of 50 bars was chosen for operation, since at this pressure maximum efficiency and low propellant gas flux coincide. This led to pellet speeds of 585 m/s ± 32 m/s. Lithium injection has been achieved at ASDEX Upgrade, showing deep pellet penetration into the plasma, though pedestal broadening has not been observed yet.

  9. A compact lithium pellet injector for tokamak pedestal studies in ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Arredondo Parra, R; Moreno Quicios, R; Ploeckl, B; Birkenmeier, G; Herrmann, A; Kocsis, G; Laggner, F M; Lang, P T; Lunt, T; Macian-Juan, R; Rohde, V; Sellmair, G; Szepesi, T; Wolfrum, E; Zeidner, W; Neu, R

    2016-02-01

    Experiments have been performed at ASDEX Upgrade, aiming to investigate the impact of lithium in an all-metal-wall tokamak and attempting to enhance the pedestal operational space. For this purpose, a lithium pellet injector has been developed, capable of injecting pellets carrying a particle content ranging from 1.82 × 10(19) atoms (0.21 mg) to 1.64 × 10(20) atoms (1.89 mg). The maximum repetition rate is about 2 Hz. Free flight launch from the torus outboard side without a guiding tube was realized. In such a configuration, angular dispersion and speed scatter are low, and a transfer efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved in the test bed. Pellets are accelerated in a gas gun; hence special care was taken to avoid deleterious effects by the propellant gas pulse. Therefore, the main plasma gas species was applied as propellant gas, leading to speeds ranging from 420 m/s to 700 m/s. In order to minimize the residual amount of gas to be introduced into the plasma vessel, a large expansion volume equipped with a cryopump was added into the flight path. In view of the experiments, an optimal propellant gas pressure of 50 bars was chosen for operation, since at this pressure maximum efficiency and low propellant gas flux coincide. This led to pellet speeds of 585 m/s ± 32 m/s. Lithium injection has been achieved at ASDEX Upgrade, showing deep pellet penetration into the plasma, though pedestal broadening has not been observed yet. PMID:26931850

  10. A compact lithium pellet injector for tokamak pedestal studies in ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Arredondo Parra, R; Moreno Quicios, R; Ploeckl, B; Birkenmeier, G; Herrmann, A; Kocsis, G; Laggner, F M; Lang, P T; Lunt, T; Macian-Juan, R; Rohde, V; Sellmair, G; Szepesi, T; Wolfrum, E; Zeidner, W; Neu, R

    2016-02-01

    Experiments have been performed at ASDEX Upgrade, aiming to investigate the impact of lithium in an all-metal-wall tokamak and attempting to enhance the pedestal operational space. For this purpose, a lithium pellet injector has been developed, capable of injecting pellets carrying a particle content ranging from 1.82 × 10(19) atoms (0.21 mg) to 1.64 × 10(20) atoms (1.89 mg). The maximum repetition rate is about 2 Hz. Free flight launch from the torus outboard side without a guiding tube was realized. In such a configuration, angular dispersion and speed scatter are low, and a transfer efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved in the test bed. Pellets are accelerated in a gas gun; hence special care was taken to avoid deleterious effects by the propellant gas pulse. Therefore, the main plasma gas species was applied as propellant gas, leading to speeds ranging from 420 m/s to 700 m/s. In order to minimize the residual amount of gas to be introduced into the plasma vessel, a large expansion volume equipped with a cryopump was added into the flight path. In view of the experiments, an optimal propellant gas pressure of 50 bars was chosen for operation, since at this pressure maximum efficiency and low propellant gas flux coincide. This led to pellet speeds of 585 m/s ± 32 m/s. Lithium injection has been achieved at ASDEX Upgrade, showing deep pellet penetration into the plasma, though pedestal broadening has not been observed yet.

  11. Common experience modifies the reinforcing properties of methamphetamine-injected cage mates but not morphine-injected cage mates in C57 mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether previous exposure to a drug affects the social facilitation of conditioned place preference (CPP) for a drug-injected cage mate. Twenty-two male C57/BL6J mice received drug injections (methamphetamine or morphine) and 22 male C57/BL6J mice received saline injections. All 44 mice then received CPP training, during which one compartment of a conventional CPP apparatus was associated with a drug-injected cage mate (stimulus mouse) and the other compartment was associated with a saline-injected cage mate (stimulus mouse). The subject mice did not receive any drug injection during this CPP training. Time spent in the compartment associated with the drug-injected cage mate was measured before and after training. Subject mice that had previously received methamphetamine injections showed an increase in the time spent in the compartment associated with the methamphetamine-injected cage mate after CPP training. This effect was not observed in subject mice that had previously received saline injections. Subject mice did not show an increase in the time spent in the compartment associated with the morphine-injected cage mate irrespective of whether they had previously received morphine or saline injections. Therefore, in agreement with previous reports, common experience with methamphetamine induced reinforcing properties, but that with morphine did not.

  12. From serpentinization to carbonation: New insights from a CO2 injection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Frieder; McCollom, Thomas M.

    2013-10-01

    We injected a CO2-rich hydrous fluid of seawater chlorinity into an ongoing, mildly reducing (H2(aq)≈3 mmol/kg) serpentinization experiment at 230 °C and 35 MPa to examine the changes in fluid chemistry and mineralogy during mineral carbonation. The chemistry of 11 fluid samples was measured, speciated, and compared with MgO-SiO2-H2O-CO2 (MSHC) phase equilibria to approximate the reaction pathway from serpentinization to carbonation. Although the overall system was in apparent disequilibrium, the speciated activities of dissolved silica (aSiO2(aq)) and carbon dioxide (aCO2(aq)) evolved roughly along MSHC equilibrium phase boundaries, indicative of 4 distinct mineral assemblages over time: (1) serpentine-brucite (± magnesite) before the injection, to (2) serpentine-talc-magnesite 2 h after the injection, to (3) quartz-magnesite (48 h after injection), and (4) metastable olivine-magnesite (623 h after injection) until the experiment was terminated. Inspection of the solid reaction products revealed the presence of serpentine, magnesite, minor talc, and magnetite, in addition to relict olivine. Although quartz was saturated over a short segment of the experiment, it was not found in the solid reaction products. A marked and rapid change in fluid chemistry suggests that serpentinization ceased and precipitation of magnesite initiated immediately after the injection. A sharp decrease in pH after the injection promoted the dissolution of brucite and olivine, which liberated SiO2(aq) and dissolved Mg. Dissolved Mg was efficiently removed from the solution via magnesite precipitation, whereas the formation of talc was relatively sluggish. This process accounts for an increase in aSiO2(aq) to quartz saturation shortly after the injection of the CO2-rich fluid. Molecular dihydrogen (H2(aq)) was generated during serpentinization of olivine by oxidation of ferrous iron before the injection; however, no additional H2(aq) was generated after the injection. Speciation

  13. Impacts of Humic Injection Experiments on the South Oyster Field Research Site

    SciTech Connect

    John F. McCarthy

    2004-04-27

    A closure plan for the South Oyster Focus Area (SOFA) is being implemented to assess the impacts of a series of experimental injections of microorganisms, tracers and chemical amendments on the chemical and physical properties of the aquifer. The proposed research addresses environmental monitoring of humic substances injected into the aquifer, as described in the Site Closure Plan for the South Oyster Field Research Site. The goal of the research is to demonstrate that the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the groundwater at and downgradient from the injection site has returned to a pre-injection �baseline� conditions with respect to either the concentration or chemical composition of the DOM. For clarity, the humic solution injected during the experiment will be referred to as �humic injectate.� The term �DOM� will refer to the organic material recovered in the groundwater, which includes the autochthonous groundwater DOM as well as any of the humic injectate remaining in the groundwater. Specific objectives include: � Estimate the amount of humic material remaining in the aquifer at the completion of the push-pull experiment and the potential for environmental impacts due to release of humics retained on the sediments. � Monitor the DOM concentrations in groundwater over time at the injection well and at sampling locations within the potential downgradient plume of the injected tracers. � Evaluate the chemical composition of the DOM to determine whether the injection experiment had an impact of the chemical properties of the aquifer. The product of this research will be a contribution to the Site Closure Report documenting the impact of the humic experiments on the aquifer. Return of the aquifer to a �baseline� conditions will be achieved if the DOM concentrations in the groundwater are determined over the course of the research to have decreased to the pre-injection level, or if the chemical properties of

  14. Three-dimensional spiral injection scheme for the g-2/EDM experiment at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Hiromi; Nakayama, Hisayoshi; Oide, Katsunobu; Sasaki, Ken-ichi; Saito, Naohito; Mibe, Tsutomu; Abe, Mitsushi

    2016-10-01

    A newly developed three-dimensional spiral injection scheme for beam insertion into a solenoidal storage ring is reported. A new planned muon g-2/EDM experiment at J-PARC aims to measure g - 2 to a factor of 5 better statistical precision and a factor of 100 better sensitivity for the electric dipole moment (EDM) measurement compared to previous experiments. The J-PARC experiment will use a 3-T MRI solenoid magnet as the muon storage ring with a 0.66 m diameter to achieve a 1-ppm level of local uniformity. The previous g - 2 injection scheme is not applicable for beam injection into a small ring. The new scheme provides a smooth injection utilizing a radial solenoidal fringe field, without causing an error field in the storage volume. The expected storage efficiency is 80% and over, which is to be compared to 3.5% for the previous g - 2 experiment. In addition, the ability to control the storage plane is important for the EDM measurement. In this paper, we introduce the conceptual design and required beam parameters in terms of Twiss functions and the expected injection efficiency.

  15. Designing Fault-Injection Experiments for the Reliability of Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Allan L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the long-standing problem of conducting fault-injections experiments to establish the ultra-reliability of embedded systems. There have been extensive efforts in fault injection, and this paper offers a partial summary of the efforts, but these previous efforts have focused on realism and efficiency. Fault injections have been used to examine diagnostics and to test algorithms, but the literature does not contain any framework that says how to conduct fault-injection experiments to establish ultra-reliability. A solution to this problem integrates field-data, arguments-from-design, and fault-injection into a seamless whole. The solution in this paper is to derive a model reduction theorem for a class of semi-Markov models suitable for describing ultra-reliable embedded systems. The derivation shows that a tight upper bound on the probability of system failure can be obtained using only the means of system-recovery times, thus reducing the experimental effort to estimating a reasonable number of easily-observed parameters. The paper includes an example of a system subject to both permanent and transient faults. There is a discussion of integrating fault-injection with field-data and arguments-from-design.

  16. Registration of ELF waves in rocket-satellite experiment with plasma injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobeinikov, V. G.; Oraevskii, V. N.; Ruzhin, Iu. Ia.; Sobolev, Ia. P.; Skomarovskii, V. S.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Namazov, C. A.; Pokhunkov, A. A.; Nesmeianov, V. I.

    1992-12-01

    Two rocket KOMBI-SAMA experiments with plasma injection at height 100-240 km were performed in August 1987 in the region of Brazilian magnetic anomaly (L = 1.25). The launching time of the rocket was determined so that plasma injection was at the time when COSMOS 1809 satellite passed as close as possible to magnetic tube of injection. Caesium plasma jet was produced during not less than 300 s by an electric plasma generator separated from the payload. When the satellite passed the geomagnetic tube intersecting the injection region an enhancement of ELF emission at 140 Hz, 450 Hz by a factor of 2 was registered on board the satellite. An enhancement of energetic particle flux by a factor of 4-5 was registered on board the rocket. Observed ELF emission below 100 Hz is interpreted as the generation of oblique electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves due to drift plasma instability at the front of the plasma jet.

  17. Production of zinc pellets

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    1996-01-01

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries.

  18. Production of zinc pellets

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, J.F.

    1996-11-26

    Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

  19. Simulation and experiment research on the proportional pressure control of water-assisted injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua; Chen, Yinglong; Zhang, Zengmeng; Yang, Huayong

    2012-05-01

    Water-assisted injection molding (WAIM), a newly developed fluid-assisted injection molding technology has drawn more and more attentions for the energy saving, short cooling circle time and high quality of products. Existing research for the process of WAIM has shown that the pressure control of the injecting water is mostly important for the WAIM. However, the proportional pressure control for the WAIM system is quite complex due to the existence of nonlinearities in the water hydraulic system. In order to achieve better pressure control performance of the injecting water to meet the requirements of the WAIM, the proportional pressure control of the WAIM system is investigated both numerically and experimentally. A newly designed water hydraulic system for WAIM is first modeled in AMEsim environment, the load characteristics and the nonlinearities of water hydraulic system are both considered, then the main factors affecting the injecting pressure and load flow rate are extensively studied. Meanwhile, an open-loop model-based compensation control strategy is employed to regulate the water injection pressure and a feedback proportional integrator controller is further adopted to achieve better control performance. In order to verify the AMEsim simulation results WAIM experiment for particular Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) parts is implemented and the measured experimental data including injecting pressure and flow rate results are compared with the simulation. The good coincidence between experiment and simulation shows that the AMEsim model is accurate, and the tracking performance of the load pressure indicates that the proposed control strategy is effective for the proportional pressure control of the nonlinear WAIM system. The proposed proportional pressure control strategy and the conclusions drawn from simulation and experiment contribute to the application of water hydraulic proportional control and WAIM technology.

  20. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Schechter, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    An electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator has been designed, built, assembled, and tested as a proof-of-principle (POP) apparatus. The main goal of accelerators based on this concept is to use intense electron-beam heating and ablation of a hydrogen propellant stick to accelerate deuterium and/or tritium pellets to ultrahigh speeds (10 to 20 km/s) for plasma fueling of next-generation fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER). The POP apparatus is described and initial results of pellet acceleration experiments are presented. Conceptual ultrahigh-speed pellet accelerators are discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Intertrial Pellets Influence the Acquisition and Expression of Timed Appetitive Responding in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Douglas A.; Lussier, April L.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments examined temporally based changes in the conditioned magazine-entries of rats when a target food pellet arrived at a fixed time before the termination of a conditioned stimulus. Both experiments found that increasing the rate of intertrial pellets systematically interfered with the rate of acquisition. When intertrial pellets were…

  2. Fast Imaging of Intact and Shattered Cryogenic Neon Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Baylor, Larry R; Foust, Charles R; Lyttle, Mark S; Meitner, Steven J; Rasmussen, David A

    2014-01-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100- m- and sub- s-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of m to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  3. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S. K.; Baylor, L. R.; Foust, C. R.; Lyttle, M. S.; Meitner, S. J.; Rasmussen, D. A.

    2014-11-15

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  4. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S K; Baylor, L R; Foust, C R; Lyttle, M S; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A

    2014-11-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development. PMID:25430370

  5. Fast imaging of intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhehui; Combs, S K; Baylor, L R; Foust, C R; Lyttle, M S; Meitner, S J; Rasmussen, D A

    2014-11-01

    Compact condensed-matter injection technologies are increasingly used in magnetic fusion. One recent application is in disruption mitigation. An imaging system with less-than-100-µm- and sub-µs-resolution is described and used to characterize intact and shattered cryogenic neon pellets. Shattered pellets contain fine particles ranging from tens of µm to about 7 mm. Time-of-flight analyses indicate that pellets could slow down if hitting the wall of the guide tube. Fast high-resolution imaging systems are thus useful to neon and other condensed-matter injector development.

  6. Sequential-Injection Analysis: Principles, Instrument Construction, and Demonstration by a Simple Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economou, A.; Tzanavaras, P. D.; Themelis, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    The sequential-injection analysis (SIA) is an approach to sample handling that enables the automation of manual wet-chemistry procedures in a rapid, precise and efficient manner. The experiments using SIA fits well in the course of Instrumental Chemical Analysis and especially in the section of Automatic Methods of analysis provided by chemistry…

  7. Neutral Beam Injection Requirements and Design Issues for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel; H. Neilson; W. Reiersen; M. Zarnstorff

    2002-02-11

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) will require 6 MW of 50 keV neutral beam injection (NBI) with initial pulse lengths of 500 msec and upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 sec. This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues, and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M [Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification] NBI system.

  8. Analysis of pellet induced perturbations in NSTX using soft X-ray techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, D.; Bell, R.; Levinton, F.; Sabbagh, S.

    2005-10-01

    A `multi-color' soft X-ray technique is being developed for perturbative transport studies on NSTX. The plasma is simultaneously viewed by soft X-ray arrays in different energy bands and modeling of the emission profiles used to propagate on fast time scale (<0.1 ms) the Te profile measured by laser scattering. Applied to Type-I ELM perturbations the technique shows good accuracy over tens of ms. The perturbed Te profile indicates fast `cold pulse' propagation in the outer plasma, with a marked slow down towards the axis. The incremental electron heat diffusivity has radial dependence quite opposite to that obtained from the power balance. The technique is further applied to perturbations produced by Li pellet injection. The pellet induced emission is recorded in three spectral ranges, with the range >0.1 keV providing an image of the pellet penetration, estimated to arise from C lines excited by charge exchange with Li neutrals. The higher energy profiles are used to estimate the Te and the electron times impurity density perturbation. The capabilities of this technique and initial results from pellet perturbative experiments will be discussed. Work supported by US DoE grant DE-FG02-99ER5452 at JHU

  9. Owl Pellet Paleontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Lisa K.

    2013-01-01

    In this activity for the beginning of a high school Biology 1 evolution unit, students are challenged to reconstruct organisms found in an owl pellet as a model for fossil reconstruction. They work in groups to develop hypotheses about what animal they have found, what environment it inhabited, and what niche it filled. At the end of the activity,…

  10. Viability of modelling gas transport in shallow injection-monitoring experiment field at Maguelone, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basirat, Farzad; Perroud, Hervé; Lofi, Johanna; Denchik, Nataliya; Lods, Gérard; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Sharma, Prabhakar; Pezard, Philippe; Niemi, Auli

    2015-04-01

    In this study, TOUGH2/EOS7CA model is used to simulate the shallow injection-monitoring experiment carried out at Maguelone, France, during 2012 and 2013. The possibility of CO2 leakage from storage reservoir to upper layers is one of the issues that need to be addressed in CCS projects. Developing reliable monitoring techniques to detect and characterize CO2 leakage is necessary for the safety of CO2 storage in reservoir formations. To test and cross-validate different monitoring techniques, a series of shallow gas injection-monitoring experiments (SIMEx) has been carried out at the Maguelone. The experimental site is documented in Lofi et al [2013]. At the site, a series of nitrogen and one CO2 injection experiment have been carried out during 2012-2013 and different monitoring techniques have been applied. The purpose of modelling is to acquire understanding of the system performance as well as to further develop and validate modelling approaches for gas transport in the shallow subsurface, against the well-controlled data sets. The preliminary simulation of the experiment including the simulation for the Nitrogen injection test in 2012 was presented in Basirat et al [2013]. In this work, the simulations represent the gaseous CO2 distribution and dissolved CO2 within range obtained by monitoring approaches. The Multiphase modelling in combination with geophysical monitoring can be used for process understanding of gas phase migration- and mass transfer processes resulting from gaseous CO2 injection. Basirat, F., A. Niemi, H. Perroud, J. Lofi, N. Denchik, G. Lods, P. Pezard, P. Sharma, and F. Fagerlund (2013), Modeling Gas Transport in the Shallow Subsurface in Maguelone Field Experiment, Energy Procedia, 40, 337-345. Lofi, J., P. Pezard, F. Bouchette, O. Raynal, P. Sabatier, N. Denchik, A. Levannier, L. Dezileau, and R. Certain (2013), Integrated Onshore-Offshore Investigation of a Mediterranean Layered Coastal Aquifer, Groundwater, 51(4), 550-561.

  11. Early results of microwave transmission experiments through an overly dense rectangular plasma sheet with microparticle injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gillman, Eric D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2014-06-15

    These experiments utilize a linear hollow cathode to create a dense, rectangular plasma sheet to simulate the plasma layer surrounding vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities within the Earth's atmosphere. Injection of fine dielectric microparticles significantly reduces the electron density and therefore lowers the electron plasma frequency by binding a significant portion of the bulk free electrons to the relatively massive microparticles. Measurements show that microwave transmission through this previously overly dense, impenetrable plasma layer increases with the injection of alumina microparticles approximately 60 μm in diameter. This method of electron depletion is a potential means of mitigating the radio communications blackout experienced by hypersonic vehicles.

  12. Early results of microwave transmission experiments through an overly dense rectangular plasma sheet with microparticle injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillman, Eric D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2014-06-01

    These experiments utilize a linear hollow cathode to create a dense, rectangular plasma sheet to simulate the plasma layer surrounding vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities within the Earth's atmosphere. Injection of fine dielectric microparticles significantly reduces the electron density and therefore lowers the electron plasma frequency by binding a significant portion of the bulk free electrons to the relatively massive microparticles. Measurements show that microwave transmission through this previously overly dense, impenetrable plasma layer increases with the injection of alumina microparticles approximately 60 μm in diameter. This method of electron depletion is a potential means of mitigating the radio communications blackout experienced by hypersonic vehicles.

  13. Simulation experiments to generate broadband chaos using dual-wavelength optically injected Fabry-Perot laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Hafiz Muhammad; Khawar Islam, Muhammad; Obaid Ullah, Muhammad

    2016-08-01

    Broadband chaos can be generated by beating two wavelengths in a hybrid arrangement of Fabry-Perot (FP) Laser and Fiber ring cavity by injecting dual wavelengths. The bandwidth of generated chaos can be controlled by detuning different modes of FP Laser for beating. The bandwidth of generated chaos increased to many folds depending upon the injected strength and wavelength spacing matched to FP laser modes. The bandwidth enhancement in different simulation experiments conducted is optimized by varying different parameters of FP laser and cavity. The waveforms are analyzed and Lyapunov exponents are calculated in order to validate the existence of high bandwidth non-pulsating chaos.

  14. Formation of particulate matter monitoring during combustion of wood pellete with additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacka, Matej; Holubčík, Michal; Vician, Peter; Jandačka, Jozef

    2016-06-01

    Application additives into the material for the production of wood pellets achieve an improvement in some properties such as pellets ash flow temperature and abrasion resistance. Additives their properties influence the course of combustion, and have an impact on the results of issuance. The experiment were selected additives corn starch and dolomite. Wood pellets were produced in the pelleting press and pelletizing with the additives. Selected samples were tested for the production of particulate matter (PM) during their direct burn. The paper analyzing a process of producing wood pellets and his effect on the final properties.

  15. New Results with the Ignitor Pellet Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattolillo, A.; Migliori, S.; Podda, S.; Bombarda, F.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Foust, C. R.; Meitner, S.; Fehling, D.; Roveta, G.

    2011-10-01

    The Ignitor Pellet Injector (IPI) has been developed in collaboration between ENEA and ORNL to provide greater control over the density time evolution and the density peaking in plasmas produced by the Ignitor device. The four barrel, two stage injector has been designed to reach speeds up to 4 km/s, for effective low field side injection into ignited plasmas (Te ≅Ti ≅ 11 keV). The present arrangement accomodates both a two-stage gun and a standard propellant valve on each barrel, allowing seamless switching between standard and high speed operation on any or all gun barrels. The cryostat is actively cooled by a pulse tube refrigerator, equipped with supplemental cooling from a liquid He dewar. The injector has shown very good repeatability; however, intact pellets were not observed over 2 km/s, possibly due to a spinning effect on the pellets at higher speed. The cross sections of the guiding tubes have been increased and other design improvements have been implemented, aimed in particular at reducing leak rates and reducing the dispersion of the pellet trajectories, in preparation of the experimental campaign reported here. Sponsored in part by ENEA of Italy, and by the U.S. D.O.E.

  16. Re-evaluation of a subsurface injection experiment for testing flow and transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Lewis, R.E.; Engelman, R.E.; Pearson, A.L.; Murray, C.J.; Smoot, J.L. Lu, A.H.; Randall, P.R.; Wegener, W.H.

    1995-12-01

    The current preferred method for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Hanford Site is to vitrify the wastes so they can be stored in a near-surface, shallow-land burial facility (Shord 1995). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) managed the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a disposal facility for the vitrified LLW. Vadose zone flow and transport models are recognized as necessary tools for baseline risk assessments of stored waste forms. The objective of the Controlled Field Testing task of the PVTD Project is to perform and analyze field experiments to demonstrate the appropriateness of conceptual models for the performance assessment. The most convincing way to demonstrate appropriateness is to show that the model can reproduce the movement of water and contaminants in the field. Before expensive new experiments are initiated, an injection experiment conducted at the Hanford Site in 1980 (designated the ``Sisson and the Lu experiment``) should be completely analyzed and understood. Briefly, in that test, a solution containing multiple tracers was injected at a single point into the subsurface sediments. The resulting spread of the water and tracers was monitored in wells surrounding the injection point. Given the advances in knowledge, computational capabilities, and models over the last 15 years, it is important to re-analyze the data before proceeding to other experiments and history-matching exercises.

  17. Effects of pellet stove on recovery from mental fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Yamada, Hiromi; Nakamura, Takayuki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Exposure to a warm environment has been reported to be effective for recovery from mental fatigue. However, there have been no reports examining the effects of a pellet stove on recovery from mental fatigue. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a pellet stove on recovery from mental fatigue. Material/Methods In this placebo-controlled, crossover experiment, 16 healthy volunteers were randomized into the pellet stove and control groups. After a 30-min fatigue-inducing mental task session, participants moved to a recovery room with (pellet stove condition) or without (control condition) a pellet stove to see the image of a pellet stove for 30 min. Results After the recovery session, the participants exposed to the pellet stove condition showed lower total error counts of a cognitive test, higher levels of subjective healing, comfort, and warmth, and sympathetic nerve activity and higher parasympathetic nerve activity as compared with the control condition. Conclusions These results provide evidence that improved cognitive function, subjective mental states, and balance of the autonomic nervous activities result from using a pellet stove during the recovery session. Hence, the pellet stove was effective for the recovery from mental fatigue. PMID:22367125

  18. Design and operation of the pellet charge exchange diagnostic for measurement of energetic confined alphas and tritons on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Duong, H.H.; Fisher, R.K.

    1996-05-01

    Radially-resolved energy and density distributions of the energetic confined alpha particles in D-T experiments on TFTR are being measured by active neutral particle analysis using low-Z impurity pellet injection. When injected into a high temperature plasma, an impurity pellet (e.g. Lithium or Boron) rapidly ablates forming an elongated cloud which is aligned with the magnetic field and moves with the pellet. This ablation cloud provides a dense target with which the alpha particles produced in D-T fusion reactions can charge exchange. A small fraction of the alpha particles incident on the pellet ablation cloud will be converted to helium neutrals whose energy is essentially unchanged by the charge transfer process. By measuring the resultant helium neutrals escaping from the plasma using a mass and energy resolving charge exchange analyzer, this technique offers a direct measurement of the energy distribution of the incident high-energy alpha particles. Other energetic ion species can be detected as well, such as tritons generated in D-D plasmas and H or He{sup 3} RF-driven minority ion tails. The diagnostic technique and its application on TFTR are described in detail.

  19. Pellet imaging techniques on ASDEX

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A. ); Buechl, K.; Hofmann, J.; Lang, R.; Loch, R.; Rudyj, A.; Sandmann, W. )

    1990-01-01

    As part of a USDOE/ASDEX collaboration, a detailed examination of pellet ablation in ASDEX with a variety of diagnostics has allowed a better understanding of a number of features of hydrogen ice pellet ablation in a plasma. In particular, fast gated photos with an intensified Xybion CCD video camera allow in-situ velocity measurements of the pellet as it penetrates the plasma. With time resolution of typically 100 nanoseconds and exposures every 50 microseconds, the evolution of each pellet in a multi-pellet ASDEX tokamak plasma discharge can be followed. When the pellet cloud track has striations, the light intensity profile through the cloud is hollow (dark near the pellet), whereas at the beginning or near the end of the pellet trajectory the track is typically smooth (without striations) and has a gaussian-peaked light emission profile. New, single pellet Stark broadened D{sub {alpha}}D{sub {beta}}, and D{sub {gamma}} spectra, obtained with a tangentially viewing scanning mirror/spectrometer with Reticon array readout, are consistent with cloud densities of 2 {times} 10{sup 17}cm{sup {minus}3} or higher in the regions of strongest light emission. A spatially resolved array of D{sub {alpha}} detectors shows that the light variations during the pellet ablation are not caused solely by a modulation of the incoming energy flux as the pellet crosses rational q-surfaces, but instead are a result of a dynamic, non-stationary, ablation process. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  20. 'Safer environment interventions': a qualitative synthesis of the experiences and perceptions of people who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Ryan; Small, Will

    2014-04-01

    There is growing acknowledgment that social, structural, and environmental forces produce vulnerability to health harms among people who inject drugs (PWID), and safer environment interventions (SEI) have been identified as critical to mitigating the impacts of these contextual forces on drug-related harm. To date, however, SEIs have been under-theorized in the literature, and how they minimize drug-related risks across intervention types and settings has not been adequately examined. This article presents findings from a systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative studies reporting PWID's experiences with three types of SEIs (syringe exchange programmes, supervised injection facilities and peer-based harm reduction interventions) published between 1997 and 2012. This meta-synthesis sought to develop a comprehensive understanding of SEIs informed by the experiences of PWID. Twenty-nine papers representing twenty-one unique studies that included an aggregate of more than 800 PWID were included in this meta-synthesis. This meta-synthesis found that SEIs fostered social and physical environments that mitigated drug-related harms and increased access to social and material resources. Specifically, SEIs: (1) provided refuge from street-based drug scenes; (2) enabled safer injecting by reshaping the social and environmental contexts of injection drug use; (3) mediated access to resources and health care services; and, (4) were constrained by drug prohibition and law enforcement activities. These findings indicate that it is critical to situate SEIs in relation to the lived experiences of PWID, and in particular provide broader environmental support to PWID. Given that existing drug laws limit the effectiveness of interventions, drug policy reforms are needed to enable public health, and specifically SEIs, to occupy a more prominent role in the response to injection drug use. PMID:24561777

  1. Progress in Non-solenoidal Startup via Local Helicity Injection in the Pegasus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonck, R. J.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Hinson, E. T.; Perry, J. M.; Redd, A. J.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Schoenbeck, N. L.; Shriwise, P. C.; Thome, K. E.

    2012-10-01

    The operating space for localized helicity injection for non-solenoidal startup is constrained by helicity input and dissipation rates and a geometric limit on plasma current set by Taylor relaxation. To test the understanding of dissipation mechanisms during helicity-driven startup, the helicity injection startup and growth is being expanded to ˜0.3 MA plasma currents and longer pulse lengths on the Pegasus experiment. Following initiation via active current sources, passive electrodes can be used to grow discharges for relatively long pulse lengths. Bursts of MHD activity are observed during helicity injection, and correlate with rapid equilibrium changes, including inward motion of the magnetic axis, redistribution of the toroidal current, and strong ion heating with ion temperatures ˜1 keV observed. The plasma arc injector impedance and the associated helicity injection rate appear to be constrained by a double-layer space charge limit at low currents and by the Alfv'en-Lawson limit for strong electron beams at high currents. Additions to the experiment include an expanded poloidal field coil system for added plasma control, new divertor coils, new plasma gun-electrode injector assemblies, expanded gas fueling techniques, and eventually a doubling of the toroidal field.

  2. The L equals 6.7 quiet time barium shaped charge injection experiment 'Chachalaca'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Rieger, E. P.; Peek, H. M.; Bottoms, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Near dawn on October 9, 1972, UT, a barium plasma injection experiment was carried out from Poker Flat, Alaska, during quiet magnetic conditions (Kp equals 1+). The visible plasma flux tube produced was more diffuse than the flux tubes in previous experiments, but it could be tracked for 30 min out to an altitude of 2.5 earth radii. The flux tube remained integral for about 20 min, when a single striation separated from the main streak. Comparisons of the observed flux tube orientation with theoretical field models show no significant deviations ascribable to field-aligned currents. Cross-field drift rates of the foot of the flux tube indicate an E field of approximately 7 mV/m at 200-km altitude. Although an attempt was made via a jet aircraft flight, barium ions were not detected in the southern conjugate region. No energetic particle precipitation phenomena were observed which could be ascribed to the barium plasma injection.

  3. Interpretation of injection-withdrawal tracer experiments conducted between two wells in a large single fracture.

    PubMed

    Novakowski, K S; Bickerton, G; Lapcevic, P

    2004-09-01

    Tracer experiments conducted using a flow field established by injecting water into one borehole and withdrawing water from another are often used to establish connections and investigate dispersion in fractured rock. As a result of uncertainty in the uniqueness of existing models used for interpretation, this method has not been widely used to investigate more general transport processes including matrix diffusion or advective solute exchange between mobile and immobile zones of fluid. To explore the utility of the injection-withdrawal method as a general investigative tool and with the intent to resolve the transport processes in a discrete fracture, two tracer experiments were conducted using the injection-withdrawal configuration. The experiments were conducted in a fracture which has a large aperture (>500 microm) and horizontally pervades a dolostone formation. One experiment was conducted in the direction of the hydraulic gradient and the other in the direction opposite to the natural gradient. Two tracers having significantly different values of the free-water diffusion coefficient were used. To interpret the experiments, a hybrid numerical-analytical model was developed which accounts for the arcuate shape of the flow field, advection-dispersion in the fracture, diffusion into the matrix adjacent to the fracture, and the presence of natural flow in the fracture. The model was verified by comparison to a fully analytical solution and to a well-known finite-element model. Interpretation of the tracer experiments showed that when only one tracer, advection-dispersion, and matrix diffusion are considered, non-unique results were obtained. However, by using multiple tracers and by accounting for the presence of natural flow in the fracture, unique interpretations were obtained in which a single value of matrix porosity was estimated from the results of both experiments. The estimate of porosity agrees well with independent measurements of porosity obtained from

  4. Interpretation of injection-withdrawal tracer experiments conducted between two wells in a large single fracture.

    PubMed

    Novakowski, K S; Bickerton, G; Lapcevic, P

    2004-09-01

    Tracer experiments conducted using a flow field established by injecting water into one borehole and withdrawing water from another are often used to establish connections and investigate dispersion in fractured rock. As a result of uncertainty in the uniqueness of existing models used for interpretation, this method has not been widely used to investigate more general transport processes including matrix diffusion or advective solute exchange between mobile and immobile zones of fluid. To explore the utility of the injection-withdrawal method as a general investigative tool and with the intent to resolve the transport processes in a discrete fracture, two tracer experiments were conducted using the injection-withdrawal configuration. The experiments were conducted in a fracture which has a large aperture (>500 microm) and horizontally pervades a dolostone formation. One experiment was conducted in the direction of the hydraulic gradient and the other in the direction opposite to the natural gradient. Two tracers having significantly different values of the free-water diffusion coefficient were used. To interpret the experiments, a hybrid numerical-analytical model was developed which accounts for the arcuate shape of the flow field, advection-dispersion in the fracture, diffusion into the matrix adjacent to the fracture, and the presence of natural flow in the fracture. The model was verified by comparison to a fully analytical solution and to a well-known finite-element model. Interpretation of the tracer experiments showed that when only one tracer, advection-dispersion, and matrix diffusion are considered, non-unique results were obtained. However, by using multiple tracers and by accounting for the presence of natural flow in the fracture, unique interpretations were obtained in which a single value of matrix porosity was estimated from the results of both experiments. The estimate of porosity agrees well with independent measurements of porosity obtained from

  5. Analysis of cavity pressure and warpage of polyoxymethylene thin walled injection molded parts: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrier, P.; Tosello, G.; Hattel, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    Process analysis and simulations on molding experiments of 3D thin shell parts have been conducted. Moldings were carried out with polyoxymethylene (POM). The moldings were performed with cavity pressure sensors in order to compare experimental process results with simulations. The warpage was characterized by measuring distances using a tactile coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Molding simulations have been executed taking into account actual processing conditions. Various aspects have been considered in the simulation: machine barrel geometry, injection speed profiles, cavity injection pressure, melt and mold temperatures, material rheological and pvT characterization. Factors investigated for comparisons were: injection pressure profile, short shots length, flow pattern, and warpage. A reliable molding experimental database was obtained, accurate simulations were conducted and a number of conclusions concerning improvements to simulation accuracy are presented regarding: pvT data, mesh, short shots, cavity pressure for process control validation as well as molding machine geometry modelling. Eventually, a methodology for improved molding simulations of cavity injection pressure, filling pattern and warpage was established.

  6. High-beta experiments with neutral-beam injection on PDX

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.; Bell, M.; Bitter, M.

    1983-01-01

    We report experimental investigations of high-beta plasmas produced in PDX with near perpendicular neutral-beam injection. Systematic power scans have been performed over a wide range of toroidal fields (0.7T < B/sub T/ < 2.2T) and plasma currents (200 kA < I/sub p/ < 500 kA). At high toroidal fields, the change in total stored energy due to beam injection increases linearly with input power and also increases with plasma current. At lower toroidal fields and low injection-power levels, the stored energy also increases with power and plasma current. However, at high power and low toroidal fields, a saturation in heating is observed. This result suggests the onset of a ..beta../sub T/ limit for circular cross-sectional tokamaks with near-perpendicular injection. Scaling experiments indicate that this ..beta../sub T/ limit increases with rising (1/q). Values of ..beta../sub T/ approx. = 3% at q/sub Psi/ = 1.8 have been achieved.

  7. Hydroclast and Peperite generation: Experimental Results produced using the Silicate Melt Injection Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, W. S.; Mastin, L. G.; Spieler, O.; Kunzmann, T.; Shaw, C. S.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    The Silicate Melt Injection Laboratory Experiment (SMILE) allows for the effusive and explosive injection of molten glass into a variety of media - air, water, water spray, and wet sediments. Experiments have been preformed using the SMILE apparatus to evaluate the mechanisms of "turbulent shedding" during shallow submarine volcanic eruptions and magma/wet-sediment interactions. In these experiments, approximately 0.5 kg of basaltic melt with 5 wt.% Spectromelt (dilithium tetraborate) is produced in an internally heated autoclave at 1150° C and ambient pressure. The molten charge is ejected via the bursting of a rupture disc at 3.5 MPa into the reaction media, situated within the low pressure tank (atmospheric conditions). Preliminary experiments ejecting melt into a standing water column have yielded hydroclasts of basalt. SEM images of the clasts show ubiquitous discontinuous skins ("rinds") that are flaked, peeled, or smeared away in strips. Adhering to the clast surfaces are flakes, blocks, and blobs of detached material, up to 10 μm in size. The presence of partially detached rinds and rind debris likely reflects repeated bending, scraping, impact, and other disruption through turbulent velocity fluctuations. These textures are comparable to littoral explosive deposits at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, where lava tubes are torn apart by wave action, the lava is quenched, and thrown back on the beach as loose fragments (hyaloclastite). Preliminary experiments injecting melt into wet sediments show evidence of sediment ingestion and fluidal textures. These results support the interpretation that peperite generation can be driven by hydrodynamic mixing of a fuel and a coolant.

  8. Microorganisms as tracers in groundwater injection and recovery experiments: A review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Modern day injection and recovery techniques designed to examine the transport behavior of microorganisms in groundwater have evolved from experiments conducted in the late 1800s, in which bacteria that form red or yellow pigments were used to trace flow paths through karst and fractured- rock aquifers. A number of subsequent groundwater hydrology studies employed bacteriophage that can be injected into aquifers at very high concentrations (e g., 1013 phage ml-1) and monitored through many log units of dilution to follow groundwater flow paths for great distances, particularly in karst terrain. Starting in the 1930s, microbial indicators of fecal contamination (particularly coliform bacteria and their coliphages) were employed as tracers to determine potential migration of pathogens in groundwater. Several injection and recovery experiments performed in the 1990s employed indigenous groundwater microorganisms (both cultured and uncultured) that are better able to survive under in situ conditions. Better methods for labeling native bacteria (e.g by stable isotope labeling or inserting genetic markers; such as the ability to cause ice nucleation) are being developed that will not compromise the organisms' viability during the experimental time course.

  9. Microorganisms as tracers in groundwater injection and recovery experiments: a review.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R W

    1997-07-01

    Modern day injection and recovery techniques designed to examine the transport behavior of microorganisms in groundwater have evolved from experiments conducted in the late 1800s, in which bacteria that form red or yellow pigments were used to trace flow paths through karst and fractured-rock aquifers. A number of subsequent groundwater hydrology studies employed bacteriophage that can be injected into aquifers at very high concentrations (e.g., 10(13) phage ml-1) and monitored through many log units of dilution to follow groundwater flow paths for great distances, particularly in karst terrain. Starting in the 1930s, microbial indicators of fecal contamination (particularly coliform bacteria and their coliphages) were employed as tracers to determine potential migration of pathogens in groundwater. Several injection and recovery experiments performed in the 1990s employed indigenous groundwater microorganisms (both cultured and uncultured) that are better able to survive under in situ conditions. Better methods for labeling native bacteria (e.g. by stable isotope labeling or inserting genetic markers, such as the ability to cause ice nucleation) are being developed that will not compromise the organisms' viability during the experimental time course.

  10. Automatic control system for uniformly paving iron ore pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bowen; Qian, Xiaolong

    2014-05-01

    In iron and steelmaking industry, iron ore pellet qualities are crucial to end-product properties, manufacturing costs and waste emissions. Uniform pellet pavements on the grate machine are a fundamental prerequisite to ensure even heat-transfer and pellet induration successively influences performance of the following metallurgical processes. This article presents an automatic control system for uniformly paving green pellets on the grate, via a mechanism mainly constituted of a mechanical linkage, a swinging belt, a conveyance belt and a grate. Mechanism analysis illustrates that uniform pellet pavements demand the frontend of the swinging belt oscillate at a constant angular velocity. Subsequently, kinetic models are formulated to relate oscillatory movements of the swinging belt's frontend to rotations of a crank link driven by a motor. On basis of kinetic analysis of the pellet feeding mechanism, a cubic B-spline model is built for numerically computing discrete frequencies to be modulated during a motor rotation. Subsequently, the pellet feeding control system is presented in terms of compositional hardware and software components, and their functional relationships. Finally, pellet feeding experiments are carried out to demonstrate that the control system is effective, reliable and superior to conventional methods.

  11. Influence of pellet size on rat's hoarding behavior.

    PubMed

    Charron, I; Cabanac, M

    2004-09-15

    The body weight threshold for hoarding behavior of rats is routinely used as a means to discern an animal's body weight regulation. We explored whether the size of food pellets would modify hoarding and the hoarding threshold. In Experiment 1, we offered the rats either large (ca. 5 g) or small (ca. 2 g) food pellets on alternate days while keeping their body weights within a narrow range when they were not in the hoarding sessions. The hoarding threshold was not influenced, by food size (312+/-32 g small and 298+/-13 g large pellets, N.S.). On the other hand, the relationship between hoarded food and body mass significantly differed between small and large pellets (ratio of 2.7). Because such a ratio was similar to that of the respective pellet weights, this suggests that the more the rat is deprived of food, the more willing it is, in a predetermined manner, to move about in search of food. Experiment 2 verified this hypothesis: instead of weighing the food hoarded, we counted the number of pellets hoarded. The slopes of the regression lines were similar in both cases, when the pellets were counted and when the hoarded food was weighed. Results showed no significant differences between these two approaches, suggesting that the weight of hoarded food is a good indicator of the number of trips from home to food in the hoarding experiment.

  12. Results from the CDX-U Lithium Wall and NSTX Lithium Pallet Injection and Evaporation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Majeski, R; Kugel, H; Bell, M; Bell, R; Beiersdorfer, P; Bush, C; Doerner, R; Gates, D; Gray, T; Kaita, R; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, R; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Sabbagh, S; Souskhanovskii, V; Spaleta, J; Stevenson, T; Timberlake, J; Zakharov, L

    2006-10-05

    CDX-U has been operated with the vacuum vessel wall and limiter surfaces nearly completely coated with lithium, producing dramatic improvements to plasma performance. Discharges achieved global energy confinement times up to 6 ms, exceeding previous CDX-U results by a factor of 5, and ITER98P(y,1) scaling by 2-3. Lithium wall coatings up to 1000 {angstrom} thick were applied between discharges by electron-beam-induced evaporation of a lithium-filled limiter and vapor deposition from a resistively heated oven. The e-beam power was modest (1.6 kW) but it produced up to 60 MW/m2 power density in a 0.3 cm{sup 2} spot; the duration was up to 300 s. Convective transport of heat away from the beam spot was so effective that the entire lithium inventory (140 g) was heated to evaporation (400-500 C) and there was no observable hot spot on the lithium surface within the beam footprint. These results are promising for use of lithium plasma-facing components in reactor scale devices. Lithium coating has also been applied to NSTX carbon plasma-facing surfaces, to control the density rise during long-duration H-modes for non-inductive current sustainment. First, lithium pellets were injected into sequences of Ohmically heated helium plasmas in both center stack limiter (CSL) and lower single-null divertor (LSND) configurations to deposit a total of 25-30 mg of lithium on the respective plasma contact areas. In both cases, the first subsequent L mode, deuterium discharge with NBI showed a reduction in the volume-average density by a factor {approx}3 compared to similar discharges before the lithium coating. Recently, a lithium evaporator was installed aimed toward the graphite tiles of the lower center stack and divertor. Twelve depositions, ranging from about 10 mg to 5 g of lithium, were performed. The effects on LSND L-mode, double-null divertor (DND) H-mode, and DND reversed-shear plasmas were variable but, immediately after coating, there were decreases in the density and

  13. A Cross-Hole, Multi-Year Tracer Injection Experiment in the Volcanic Ocean Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. T.; Neira, N. M.; Wheat, C. G.; Clark, J. F.; Becker, K.; Hsieh, C. C.; Rappe, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    We present preliminary results from the first cross-hole tracer injection experiment in the volcanic ocean crust. The test site is on 3.5 to 3.6 M.y. old seafloor on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Six borehole subseafloor observatories (CORKs) were installed during three scientific ocean drilling expeditions, five arrayed along a 1 km profile aligned with the strike of underlying abyssal hills (Holes 1026B, 1301A/B, and 1362A/B), and one offset 2.4 km to the east (1027C). Before installing the sixth CORK in Hole 1362B, in 2010, we injected a mixture of tracers (dissolved gas, metal salts, particles) during 24 hours into the upper ocean crust. Seafloor samplers connected CORKs, sampling from different locations in the crust, were recovered during servicing expeditions in 2011 and 2013; downhole samplers that contain records from the full four years following tracer injection will be recovered in Summer 2014. Analyses of dissolved gas tracers collected with wellhead samplers through 2013 suggest that the dominant flow direction in upper basement is south to north, as inferred from regional thermal data and the chemistry of geochemical (pore fluid and borehole) samples. The apparent tracer flow rate in upper basement is on the order of meters/day, but calculations are complicated by an incomplete CORK seal in Hole 1301A, which resulted in discharge from this system that also "pulled" water and tracer to the south. Samples were collected from the tracer injection borehole, Hole 1362B, and a sampling site 200 m to the north, Hole 1362A, beginning one year after tracer injection, after opening a large-diameter ball valve on the wellhead of Hole 1362B to initiate a long-term free flow experiment. Analyses of these samples suggest that much of the tracer injected in 2010 remained close to Hole 1362B rather than being advected and dispersed into the formation. It also appears that much of the tracer transport to Hole 1362A occurred within one or more

  14. Development of a methodology for the application of synthetic DNA in stream tracer injection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foppen, Jan Willem; Seopa, Judith; Bakobie, Noel; Bogaard, Thom

    2013-09-01

    Stream tracer injection experiments are useful for characterizing hydrological and biogeochemical processes in streams. We used nonconservative synthetic DNA and conservative NaCl in six instantaneous tracer injection experiments in streams in the Benelux. The main aim was to compare the performance of injected synthetic DNA tracer "T23" with NaCl. In all experiments, the shapes of the T23 and NaCl breakthrough curves (BTCs) were similar. Recovered T23 mass ranged from 2.9 to 52.6%, while recovered NaCl tracer mass ranged from 66.7% to complete mass recovery. In batch experiments, T23 decay was not detected. However, in those batches, we observed an unexplained initial T23 mass loss of 40-97%. In batches with sediment, T23 attachment rate coefficients ranged from close to zero to 0.2 hr-1. Advective and dispersive transport parameters of both NaCl and T23 fitted with STAMMT-L were similar. However, compared to T23, fitted storage zone areas of NaCl were 2-5 times larger, while storage zone exchange coefficients were two times larger. Fitted mass dilution factors of T23 ranged from 1.6 to 34.8. Together, these results pointed toward the disappearance of a part of the T23 mass due to both initial losses and attachment or sorption of T23 mass in those storage zone(s), while decay was not important. Our research demonstrated that artificial DNA can be a valuable tool to determine advective and dispersive transport in brooks, but not to assess solute mass exchange processes related to surface transient storage or hyporheic exchange.

  15. Development Of A Methodology For The Application Of Synthetic DNA In Stream Tracer Injection Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foppen, J.; Bogaard, T.

    2013-12-01

    Stream tracer injection experiments are useful for characterizing hydrological and biogeochemical processes in streams. We used non-conservative synthetic DNA and conservative NaCl in six instantaneous tracer injection experiments in streams in the Benelux. The main aim was to compare the performance of injected synthetic DNA tracer 'T23' with NaCl. In all experiments, the shapes of the T23 and NaCl breakthrough curves (BTCs) were similar. Recovered T23 mass ranged from 2.9-52.6%, while recovered NaCl tracer mass ranged from 66.7% to complete mass recovery. In batch experiments, T23 decay was not detected. However, in those batches, we observed an unexplained initial T23 mass loss of 40-97%. In batches with sediment, T23 attachment rate coefficients ranged from close to zero to 0.2 hr-1. Advective and dispersive transport parameters of both NaCl and T23 fitted with STAMMT-L were similar. However, compared to T23, fitted storage zone areas of NaCl were 2-5 times larger, while storage zone exchange coefficients were two times larger. Fitted mass dilution factors of T23 ranged from 1.6-34.8. Together, these results pointed towards the disappearance of a part of the T23 mass due to both initial losses and attachment or sorption of T23 mass in those storage zone(s), while decay was not important. Our research demonstrated that artificial DNA can be a valuable tool to determine advective and dispersive transport in brooks, but not to assess solute mass exchange processes related to surface transient storage or hyporheic exchange.

  16. Hoe Creek No. 3 - First long-term underground coal gasification experiment with oxygen-steam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    The paper describes the first long-term underground coal gasification experiment with oxygen-steam injection. In the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground experiment, linkage paths were established between the injection and production wells by drilling a horizontal borehole between them near the bottom of the coal seam. The drilled linkage hole was enlarged by reverse burning, and then the forward gasification process was started - first with air injection for one week, then with oxygen-steam injection for the remainder of the experiment. During the oxygen-steam injection period, about 3900 tons of coal were gasified in 47 days, at an average rate of 83 tons per day. The heating value of the dry product gas averaged 218 Btu/scf, suitable for input to a processing plant for upgrading to pipeline quality, which is about 900 Btu/scf.

  17. The lived experience of grieving for persons living with HIV who have used injection drugs.

    PubMed

    Cody, W K

    2000-01-01

    Parse's research method was used to investigate the lived experience of grieving for 10 persons self-identified as HIV-positive injection drug users. These individuals compose an understudied and poorly understood population, and their grief experiences have rarely been documented. The losses grieved by persons living with HIV infection include the loss of life, friends, family members, employment, energy, and sex. The lived experience of grieving was found to be "overwhelming anguish that shapes hopes and intentions as a wretched aloneness is punctuated with cherished uplifting engagements, while gratitude inspires courage in the midst of ambiguity." This new conceptualization of the grieving process is discussed in light of Parse's human becoming theory of nursing. PMID:10826306

  18. Effects of Water Injection into Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs: A Summary of Experience Worldwide

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, Roland N.

    1982-06-01

    Reinjection of water into fractured geothermal reservoirs holds potential both for improvement and degradation of total energy recovery. The replacement of reservoir fluid can mean support of placement of reservoir pressures and also more efficient thermal energy recovery, but at the same time the premature invasion of reinjected water back into production wells through high permeability fractures can reduce discharge enthalpy and hence deliverability and useful energy output. Increases in reservoir pressure and maintenance of field output have been observed in operating fields, but unfortunately so too have premature thermal breakthroughs. The design of reinjection schemes, therefore, requires careful investigation into the likely effects, using field experimentation. This paper summarizes field experience with reinjection around the world, with the intention of elucidating characteristics of possible problems. The results summarized in this paper fall into three categories of interest: permeability changes dye to injection (both increases and decreases); the path followed by injected water (as indicated by tracer tests); and the thermal and hydraulic influences of injection on the reinjection well itself and on surrounding producers. [DJE-2005

  19. In vitro experiments with an injection technique for cup fixation in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Somville, J M; Moldenaers, P F; Mulier, J C; Mewis, J J

    1987-01-01

    A new technique has been developed to position the cup rigidly into the acetabulum during total hip joint replacement. After positioning the flanged cup on the acetabulum by means of screws, a low-viscosity cement is injected through a hole in the rim of the cup. A comparison with the standard cementing technique was made on the basis of in vitro experiments. For this purpose a mold was constructed to produce castings simulating the human acetabulum. The distribution of the cement, the pressure developed in the acetabulum, and the penetration of the cement are compared for the two cementing techniques. PMID:3606358

  20. Imaging polychromator for density measurements of polystyrene pellet cloud on the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Sharov, I. A. Sergeev, V. Yu.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-04-15

    Experimental data on spatial distributions of a pellet cloud electron density are necessary for the development of many applications of pellet injection, namely, plasma fuelling, discharge control, and plasma diagnostics. An improved approach of electron density measurements inside the cloud of a polystyrene pellet ablating in hot plasma of the large helical device is described. Density values of (1-30) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} depending on the background plasma parameters and distance from the solid pellet were measured.

  1. High pressure jet injection of viscous solutions for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD): first clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Pioche, Mathieu; Lépilliez, Vincent; Déprez, Pierre; Giovannini, Marc; Caillol, Fabrice; Piessevaux, Hubert; Rivory, Jérôme; Guillaud, Olivier; Ciocîrlan, Mihai; Salmon, Damien; Lienhart, Isabelle; Lafon, Cyril; Saurin, Jean-Christophe; Ponchon, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long lasting elevation is a key factor during endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and can be obtained by water jet injection of saline solution or by viscous macromolecular solutions. In a previous animal study, we assessed the Nestis Enki II system to combine jet injection and viscous solutions. In the present work, we used this combination in humans in different sites of the digestive tract. Methods: We retrospectively report all of the consecutive ESD procedures performed with jet injection of viscous solutions in four centers. Information was collected about the lesion, the procedure, the histological result, and the outcomes for the patient. Results: In total, 45 resections were completed by six operators: five experts and one beginner with only one previous experience in human ESD. Lesions were located in the esophagus (10), the stomach (11), the duodenum (1), the colon (1) and the rectum (22). Average maximal lesion diameter was 4.8 cm (SD 2.4, range 2 – 11 cm), average lesion surface area was 19.8 cm2 (SD 17.7, range 2.2 – 72 cm2), and average duration of procedure was 79.9 min (SD 50.3 min, range 19 – 225 min). ESD could be conducted while the endoscope was retroflexed at its maximum in 26 cases. Four adverse events were observed: two diminutive perforations and two delayed bleeding occurrences treated conservatively. The R0 resection rate was 91.1 %. The catheter was obstructed in six occurrences of bleeding. Conclusion: Endoscopic submucosal dissection using high pressure injection of viscous macromolecular solutions is safe and effective in different parts of the digestive tract. It does not impede working with the endoscope in the maximal retroflexed position. PMID:26356488

  2. Owl Pellets and Crisis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Describes a press conference that was used as a "teachable moment" when owl pellets being used for instructional purposes were found to be contaminated with Salmonella. The incident highlighted the need for safe handling of owl pellets, having a crisis management plan, and the importance of conveying accurate information to concerned parents.…

  3. [Shotgun injury--multiple pellets].

    PubMed

    Hejna, P; Pleskot, J

    2009-01-01

    Both typical and less frequent features of gunshot wounds caused by shotguns are reported in the following article. The pattern of shotgun injury predominantly depends on gauge, choke, number and diameter of used pellets, muzzle-victim distance and on character of the afflicted area of the body. Characteristic ballistic properties of shotgun pellets, their wounding potential and significance in forensic patology are presented.

  4. A Analysis of the Scex 3 Ionospheric Electron Beam Injection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerke, Roger Theodore

    1992-09-01

    The SCEX 3 experiment (Several Compatible EXperiments using a rocket-borne accelerator) was carried to ionospheric altitudes (375 km) by a Black Brant 11 rocket on February 1, 1990. The experiment was launched from Poker Flat Research Range (65.1^circ N, 147.5 ^circ W) at 1207 UT. The payload split into two parts (hereafter forward and aft payloads) 116 seconds after launch. The aft payload carried two electron accelerators as well as several diagnostic instruments. The forward payload was ejected at an angle of 6^ circ with the magnetic field in a northwesterly direction. This payload carried a multiband plasma wave receiver and various particle detectors to make in situ measurements of the Beam Plasma Interaction (BPI) region. Two Throw Away Detectors (TADs 1 and 2) were also ejected from the aft payload in the east and west directions respectively. TAD 1 also carried a multiband plasma wave receiver. Preceding the launch an auroral arc along the southern boundary of a diffuse auroral patch suddenly brightened, split into two separate arcs and moved to a position north of the rocket's trajectory. SCEX 3 was launched into an active breakup aurora consisting of tall rays and diffuse patches. The purposes of this experiment were (1) to observe injected electrons reflected from the naturally occurring parallel electric field structures which are thought to accelerate the auroral electrons, (2) to observe a variety of plasma effects caused by the artificial electron beam and the associated spacecraft charging and (3) study the natural phenomena associated with auroral activity. This work is a summary of the interesting observations made by the SCEX 3 experiment. These observations include VHF emissions produced by the electron beam via the Beam Plasma Discharge (BPD), Diffuse resonance emissions by the hot plasma region surrounding the electron beam and auroral Z-mode emissions. The response of the plasma to the initiation of the electron beam injection will also be

  5. A Gyrotron-Powered Pellet Accelerator for Tokamak Fueling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Perkins, F. W.

    2006-04-01

    A novel pellet acceleration concept [1] using microwave power from MW gyrotron sources has been developed that could pave the way for high-speed >3 km/s inner-wall pellet injection on ITER-class tokamaks. The concept is based on the principal of a gun, where a high-pressure propellant gas drives the projectile down the barrel. In the proposed concept, the high gas pressure is created by evaporative explosion of a composite ``pusher'' medium attached behind the DT fuel pellet. The pusher consists of micron-sized conducting particles, (Li, Be, C) embedded uniformly in a D2 ice slug with <5% volume concentration, thus facilitating microwave energy absorption by dissipation of eddy currents flowing within the conducting particles only. Microwave power is delivered to the pusher along a waveguide, which also serves as the pellet launch tube. A scaling law predicts that a pellet of mass M accelerated over a distance L reaches a velocity v (PL/M)^1/3, where P is the gyrotron power.pard[1] P. Parks & F. Perkins, US patent application ``Microwave-Powered Pellet Accelerator,'' No. 11/256/662, October 21, 2005.

  6. Nuclear fuel pellet transfer escalator

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, T.B. Sr.; Roberts, E.; Edmunds, M.O.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel pellet escalator for loading nuclear fuel pellets into a sintering boat. It comprises a generally horizontally-disposed pellet transfer conveyor for moving pellets in single file fashion from a receiving end to a discharge end thereof, the conveyor being mounted about an axis at its receiving end for pivotal movement to generally vertically move its discharge end toward and away from a sintering boat when placed below the discharge end of the conveyor, the conveyor including an elongated arm swingable vertically about the axis and having an elongated channel recessed below an upper side of the arm and extending between the receiving and discharge ends of the conveyor; a pellet dispensing chute mounted to the arm of the conveyor at the discharge end thereof and extending therebelow such that the chute is carried at the discharge end of the conveyor for generally vertical movement therewith toward and away from the sintering boat.

  7. Progress with the High Speed Pellet Injector for Ignitor*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frattolillo, A.; Migliori, S.; Podda, S.; Bombarda, F.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Foust, C. R.; Meitner, S.; Fehling, D.; Coppi, B.; Roveta, G.

    2010-11-01

    The four barrel, two-stage Ignitor Pellet Injector (IPI) has been designed to reach speeds up to 4 km/s, for effective low field side injection into ignited plasmas (TeTi11 keV). The IPI has been developed in collaboration between ORNL and ENEA, who have built and tested two indipendent subsystems each. Previous experimental campaigns at ORNL verified that the equipments matched properly, while their respective control systems interfaced correctly. The injector performed outstandingly well, showing very good repeatability. However, the pellet diagnostics expressely developed for this device did not observe intact pellets over 2 km/s. Recently a new arrangement was successfully tested, accommodating both a two-stage gun and a standard propellant valve on each barrel, allowing seamless switching between standard and high speed operation on any or all gun barrels; the cryogenic system was also improved with supplemental cooling by liquid helium. Injection speeds up to 2.6 km/s were obtained, but pellets seldom remained intact above 2 km/s. Optimization of power levels of the upstream and downstream heaters, which up to date have been used sparingly, in the next campaign could help in attaining integral pellets at higher speeds. *Sponsored in part by ENEA and by the D.O.E.

  8. Transient Changes in Shallow Groundwater Chemistry During the MSU-ZERT CO2 Injection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Apps, J. A.; Spycher, N.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Thordsen, J. J.; Kakouros, E.; Trautz, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    The Montana State University Zero Emission Research and Technology (MSU-ZERT) field experiment at Bozeman, Montana, is designed to evaluate atmospheric and near-surface monitoring and detection techniques applicable to the potential leakage of CO2 from deep storage reservoirs. However, the experiment also affords an excellent opportunity to investigate the transient changes in groundwater chemical composition in response to increasing CO2 partial pressures. Between July 9 and August 7, 2008, 300 kg/day of food-grade CO2 was injected into shallow groundwater through a horizontal perforated pipe about 2-2.3 m below the ground surface. Changes in groundwater quality were investigated through comprehensive chemical analyses of 80 water samples taken before, during and following CO2 injection from 10 shallow observation wells located 1-6 m from the injection pipe, and from two distant monitoring wells. Field and laboratory analyses suggest rapid and systematic changes in pH, alkalinity, and conductance, as well as increases in the aqueous concentrations of both major and trace element species. A principal component analysis and independent thermodynamic interpretation of the water quality analyses were conducted. Results were interpreted in conjunction with a mineralogical characterization of the shallow sediments and a review of historical records of the chemical composition of rainfall at neighboring monitoring sites. The interpretation permitted tentative identification of a complex array of adsorption/desorption, ion exchange, precipitation/dissolution, oxidation/reduction and infiltration processes that were operative during the test. Geochemical modeling was conducted using TOUGHREACT to test whether the observed water quality changes were consistent with the hypothesized processes, and very good agreement was obtained with respect to the behavior of both major and trace elements.

  9. Determination of physical properties in injection molded composites using the design of experiments method

    SciTech Connect

    Hawks, V.; Saunders, D.; Strong, A.B.; Cole, D. )

    1992-07-01

    The benefits of using Design of Experiments (DOE) for determining effects of critical factors are significantly greater than using one-at-a-time experimental techniques. The volume and validity of the information gained from DOE, especially for manufacturing processes, is very high due to the strong statistical basis of the method and highly organized nature of the results. The use of DOE is described in the case of injection molding of composites to improve and better understand the effects of critical factors on the physical properties of the finished parts. The factors, fiber length, fiber concentration, part temperature, and mold thickness, were tested using a full factorial experiment. The results demonstrated the significance of the factors and their interactions on tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and elongation.

  10. The electric field structure of auroral arcs as determined from barium plasma injection experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Barium plasma injection experiments have revealed a number of features of electric fields in and near auroral forms extending from a few hundred to many thousands of km in altitude. There is evidence for V-type potential structures over some auroras, but not in others. For some auroral arcs, large E fields are found at ionospheric altitudes outside the arc but the E field inside the arc is near zero. In a few other auroras, most recently one investigated in an experiment conducted from Poker Flat on March 22, 1980, large, rapidly fluctuating E fields were detected by barium plasma near 600 km altitude. These E fields suggest that the motion of auroral rays can be an effect of low-altitude electric fields, or that V-type potential structures may be found at low altitudes.

  11. Radial Displacement of Pellet Ablation Fuel in Tokamaks Due to the grad-B Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.

    1999-11-01

    An apparent displacement of deposited pellet ablation substance toward the low-field or large-R side of the tokamak is observed during pellet injection from the low-field side, and it has been attributed to uncompensated nabla B and curvature drifts induced by the 1/R toroidal field variation. The effect was recently exploited in ASDEX-U during pellet injection from the high-field side in order to promote deeper fuel penetration. This presentation will discuss a self-consistent model that predicts the large-R velocity and transport distance. The particle source from an ablating pellet presents a significant disturbance to the plasma. Initially, an ablated ``cloudlet'' just separated from the pellet shadow is a toroidally localized, mildly diamagnetic (magnetic β_c<0.1) plasmoid, which will polarize and E× B drift towards the low-field side of the tokamak. Periodic cloud ``disruptions,'' related to the formation of striations, breed a sequence of 20 to 30 discrete cloudlets along the trajectory of the pellet, with each cloudlet carrying off the ablated mass contained in the pellet's ionized shielding channel at the moment of its birth. The cloudlets are assumed to have a cylindrical shape, with initial field-aligned profiles inherited from the shielding channel and sharp-boundary density and pressure profiles in the radial direction. The cloudlet expands along the field lines against the ambient backpressure, while it undergoes motion as a whole in the large-R direction. The rigid body motion is obtained from B\\cdotnabla× of the momentum equation, while a combination of the parallel component of the momentum equation and the energy balance equation, in one-dimensional Lagrangian coordinates, expresses the parallel dynamics. The internal heat source comes from a kinetic treatment for partial absorption of the parallel heat flux carried by incident plasma electrons streaming through the cloudlet. The nabla B drift drive enters into in the large-R motion in the

  12. Results from recent hydrogen pellet acceleration studies with a 2-m railgun

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Zhang, D.J.; King, T.; Haywood, R.; Manns, W.; Venneri, F.

    1989-12-01

    A new 3.2-mm-diameter, two-stage, fuseless, plasma-arc-driven electromagnetic railgun has been designed, constructed, and successfully operated to achieve a record velocity of 2.67 km/s({sup b}) for 3.2 mmD {times} 4 mmL solid hydrogen pellet. The first stage of this hydrogen pellet injector is a combination of a hydrogen pellet generator and a gas fun. The second stage is a 2-m-long railgun which serves as a booster accelerator. The gas fun accelerates a frozen hydrogen pellet to a medium velocity and injects it into the railgun through a perforated coupling piece, which also serves a pressure-relieving mechanism. An electrical breakdown of the propellant gas, which has followed the pellet from the gas fun into the railgun, forms a conducting plasma-arc armature immediately behind the pellet allowing for fuseless operation of the railgun. Study of the pressure profile and the behavior of the plasma-arc armature inside the railgun bore led to elimination of spurious arcing, which prevents operation of the railgun at high voltages (and, therefore, at high currents). A timing circuit that can automatically measure the pellet input velocity and allows for accurate control of arc initiation behind the pellet helps prevent pellet disintegration and mistriggering of the arc initiation circuit. Results from the recent cryogenic operation of the two-stage pellet acceleration system are reported. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Investigation of oil injection into brine for the strategic petroleum reserve : hydrodynamics experiments with simulant liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Shollenberger, Kim Ann; Torczynski, John Robert; Cote, Raymond O.; Barney, Jeremy; O'Hern, Timothy John

    2003-10-01

    An experimental program is being conducted to study a proposed approach for oil reintroduction in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The goal is to assess whether useful oil is rendered unusable through formation of a stable oil-brine emulsion during reintroduction of degassed oil into the brine layer in storage caverns. This report documents the first stage of the program, in which simulant liquids are used to characterize the buoyant plume that is produced when a jet of crude oil is injected downward from a tube into brine. The experiment consists of a large transparent vessel that is a scale model of the proposed oil injection process at the SPR. An oil layer is floated on top of a brine layer. Silicon oil (Dow Corning 200{reg_sign} Fluid, 5 cSt) is used as the simulant for crude oil to allow visualization of the flow and to avoid flammability and related concerns. Sodium nitrate solution is used as the simulant for brine because it is not corrosive and it can match the density ratio between brine and crude oil. The oil is injected downward through a tube into the brine at a prescribed depth below the oil-brine interface. Flow rates are determined by scaling to match the ratio of buoyancy to momentum between the experiment and the SPR. Initially, the momentum of the flow produces a downward jet of oil below the tube end. Subsequently, the oil breaks up into droplets due to shear forces, buoyancy dominates the flow, and a plume of oil droplets rises to the interface. The interface is deflected upward by the impinging oil-brine plume. Two different diameter injection tubes were used (1/2-inch and 1-inch OD) to vary the scaling. Use of the 1-inch injection tube also assured that turbulent pipe flow was achieved, which was questionable for lower flow rates in the 1/2-inch tube. In addition, a 1/2-inch J-tube was used to direct the buoyant jet upwards rather than downwards to determine whether flow redirection could substantially reduce the oil-plume size and the

  14. Short-interval multi-laser Thomson scattering measurements of hydrogen pellet ablation in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuhara, R. Sakamoto, R.; Yamada, I.; Motojima, G.; Hayashi, H.

    2014-11-15

    Thomson scattering forms an important aspect of measuring the electron density and temperature profiles of plasmas. In this study, we demonstrate Thomson scattering measurements obtained over a short interval (<1 ms) by using an event triggering system with a multi-laser configuration. We attempt to use our system to obtain the electron temperature and density profiles before and immediately after pellet injection into the large helical device. The obtained profiles exhibit dramatic changes after pellet injection as per our shot-by-shot measurements. We believe that this measurement technique will contribute towards a better understanding of the physics of the pellet deposition.

  15. Injection in basin and range-type reservoirs: the Raft River experience

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, S.; Spencer, S.

    1981-01-01

    Injection testing at the Raft River KGRA has yielded some interesting results which can be useful in planning injection systems in Basin and Range type reservoirs. Because of inhomogeneities and possible fracturing in basin fill sediment, rapid pressure response to injection has been observed in one shallow monitor well, but not others. In some monitor wells in the injection field, pressure drops are observed during injection suggesting plastic deformation of the sediments. Seismicity, however, has not accompanied these observed water level changes.

  16. Shattered Pellet Disruption Mitigation Technology Development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, Steven J; Edgemon, Timothy D; Parks, P. B.; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Maruyama, S.; Caughman, John B; Rasmussen, David A

    2010-01-01

    The mitigation of first wall thermal and mechanical loads and damage from runaway electrons during disruptions are critical for successful long term operation of ITER. Disruption mitigation tools based on shattered pellet injection are being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that can be employed on ITER to provide the necessary mitigation of thermal and mechanical loads from disruptions as well as provide collisional damping to inhibit the formation of runaway electrons . Here we present progress on the development of the technology to provide reliable disruption mitigation with large shattered cryogenic pellets. An example of how this concept can be employed on ITER is discussed.

  17. Tracer-encapsulated pellet injector for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Viniar, I.; Lukin, A.; Reznichenko, P.; Umov, A.

    2005-05-01

    An injector for making solid hydrogen pellets around impurity cores has been developed for plasma transport study in large helical device. A technique has been employed for automatic loading carbon or polystyrene cores of 0.2 mm diameter from a gun magazine to a light-gas gun barrel. The injector is equipped with a cryocooler and is able to form a 3.2 mm long and 3 mm diameter cylindrical solid hydrogen pellet at 7-8 K with an impurity core in its center within 6 min and to inject it in the light-gas gun up to 1 km/s.

  18. Hydrogen-encapsulated impurity pellet injector for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viniar, I.; Reznichenko, P.; Lukin, A.; Umov, A.; Sudo, S.

    2001-06-01

    A novel technology is suggested for making solid hydrogen shells around impurity pellets to be injected into plasmas of fusion devices with a view to looking into its transport properties. In proof-of-principle tests, a 3 mm long and 3 mm diameter cylindrical solid hydrogen shell was formed around a 0.2 mm diameter globular pellet at a temperature of 8-11 K within 5 min and accelerated in a pipe-gun barrel up to 1 km/s.

  19. Comparison of Subjective Experiences and Effectiveness of First-Generation Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics and Risperidone Long-Acting Injectables in Patients With Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Yin; Lin, Shih-Ku

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to compare the subjective experiences and clinical effects of first-generation long-acting injectable (FGA-LAI) antipsychotics with those of risperidone long-acting injectables (RIS-LAIs) in 434 schizophrenia patients. Compared with the RIS-LAI group, the patients treated with FGA-LAIs had a significantly longer duration of illness and LAI treatment and were older. Our results suggest that patients treated with FGA-LAI have more satisfactory subjective experiences compared with patients treated with RIS-LAI and that both FGA-LAI and RIS-LAI treatments can prevent relapses and hospitalization. Additional longitudinal studies determining the long-term benefits of RIS-LAI are warranted. PMID:27580495

  20. Electron-beam rocket acceleration of hydrogen pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. C.; Foster, C. A.; Milora, S. L.; Schechter, D. E.; Whealton, J. H.

    A proof-of-principle device for characterizing electron-beam rocket pellet acceleration has been developed and operated during the last few years. Experimental data have been collected for thousands of accelerated hydrogen pellets under a variety of beam conditions. One intact hydrogen pellet was accelerated to a speed of 578 m/s by an electron beam of 10 kV, 0.8 A, and I ms. The collected data reveal the significant finding that the measured bum velocity of bare hydrogen pellets increases with the square of the beam voltage in a way that is qualitatively consistent with the theoretical prediction based on the neutral gas shielding (NGS) model. The measured bum velocity increases with the beam current or power and then saturates at values two to three times greater than that predicted by the NGS model. The discrepancy may result from low pellet strength and large beam-pellet interaction areas. Moreover, this feature may be the cause of the low measured exhaust velocity, which often exceeds the sonic velocity of the ablated gas. Consistent with the NGS model, the measured exhaust velocity increases in direct proportion to the beam current and in inverse proportion to the beam voltage. To alleviate the pellet strength problem, experiments have been performed with the hydrogen ice contained in a lightweight rocket casing or shell. Pellets in such sabots have the potential to withstand higher beam powers and achieve higher thrust-coupling efficiency. Some experimental results are reported and ways of accelerating pellets to higher velocity are discussed.

  1. Mesigyna once-a-month combined injectable contraceptive: experience in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Bassol, S; Cravioto, M C; Durand, M; Bailon, R; Carranza, S; Fugarolas, J; Gaona, R; Parada, L M; Celis, C; Santoyo, S; Garza-Flores, J; Vazquez, L; Lopez, C; Gurucharri, C; Novelli, J; Carneiro de Oliveira, H; Mendez, J; de Andrade, M E; de Mello, N R; de Melo, K; Chada, E; Yassle, M E; Castañeda, A; Gomez, P; Arboleda, C; Trujillo, L; Bucheli, R; Hidalgo, I; Olavide, R; Parejarios, J; Succar, J; Reyes-Marquez, R; Albrecht, G

    2000-05-01

    A phase III clinical study was carried out among 534 fertile Latin American women to evaluate cycle control, side effects, and contraceptive efficacy of a once-a-month combined injectable, Mesigyna, consisting of 50 mg norethisterone enanthate and 5 mg estradiol valerate. The pregnancy rate at 1 year was 0 per 100 woman-years for a total experience of 4688 woman-months. The overall discontinuation rate at one year was 17.9%. Discontinuation rate for bleeding problems was 5.1%. The Colombian women had a significant increase (p <0.001) in bleeding problems compared to other countries. The discontinuation rate for amenorrhea was 1.1%. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding discontinuation for other medical or non-medical reasons. Mean weight gain after one year of use was 1.02 kg. Mesigyna is an appropiate once-a-month injectable contraceptive for Latin American women since it is highly effective and its perception of normal menstrual bleeding is of importance in the Latin American population.

  2. Pelletization of fine coals. Technical progress report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1992-09-01

    The first step consisted of producing a batch of seed pellets (in the size range {minus}4.75+4.00 mm) by pelletizing of 200 g of ground coal with desired additives (surface active agents and binders) and moisture content for 800 revolutions. The seed pellets are obtained by sieving the output from the batch drum. The second step involved the production of finished size pellets by layering the seed pellets with stepwise addition of moist feed which is again produced with desired additives and moisture content. Specifically, 25 g of the {minus}4.75+4.00 mm seed pellets are placed in the drum and 20 g of moist fluffy feed is added every 80 revolutions for five times. After 400 revolutions the pellets are sieved on the 4.75 mm screen and the screen undersize which corresponds to new seeds generated during the layering cycles is discarded. Now, 30 g of moist fluffy feed is added every 50 revolutions for five more cycles. These layered pellets are sieved again and the {minus}9.5+8.00 mm pellets. Coal agglomerates produced by the above described technique are nice and spherical. With our past experience with iron ore pelletization we learnt that as long as sufficient fluffy feed is available for the consumption by the seed pellets, they generally grow by forming layers consuming the feed rather than grow by coalescence. This is found to be true in the case of coal also. Growth by coalescence of coal pellets is found to yield raspberry type uneven agglomerates. After ascertaining the possibility of producing nice spherical pellets, several experiments have been conducted to develop the above standard procedure for making pellets in a reproducible way and testing them for their quality.

  3. Laser Blow-Off Impurity Injection Experiments at the HSX Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, C.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.; Zhai, K.; Lore, J.

    2011-10-01

    Experiments are under way to measure impurity transport in a quasisymmetric stellarator for the first time. A laser blow-off impurity injection system, which is capable of rapidly depositing a small, controlled quantity of a wide variety of solid impurities into the confinement volume, has been installed and successfully tested. AXUV photodiode arrays equipped with optional soft x-ray filters have also been installed on the machine. The arrays will take time-resolved measurements of the impurity radiation, which will be inverted into radial profile and then interpreted using the transport code, STRAHL and atomic data from ADAS to determine the transport coefficients within the paradigm of a diffusivity and convective velocity. Details of the system and first results will be presented along with PENTA calculations of the neoclassical predicted impurity transport Work supported by US DOE contracts DE-FG02-01ER54615 and DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  4. Colliding pulse injection experiments in non-collinear geometryfor controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric H.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Leemans,Wim P.; Nakamura, Kei; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Bruhwiler,D.; Cary, J.R.

    2007-06-25

    An optical injection scheme for a laser-plasma basedaccelerator which employs a non-collinear counter-propagating laser beamto push background electrons in the focusing and acceleration phase viaponderomotive beat with the trailing part of the wakefield driver pulseis discussed. Preliminary experiments were performed using a drive beamof a_0 = 2.6 and colliding beam of a_1 = 0.8 both focused on the middleof a 200 mu m slit jet backed with 20 bar, which provided ~; 260 mu mlong gas plume. The enhancement in the total charge by the collidingpulse was observed with sharp dependence on the delay time of thecolliding beam. Enhancement of the neutron yield was also measured, whichsuggests a generation of electrons above 10 MeV.

  5. Hydrologic Responses to CO2 Injection in Basalts Based on Flow-through Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D.; Hingerl, F.; Garing, C.; Bird, D. K.; Benson, S. M.; Maher, K.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental studies of basalt-CO2 interactions have increased our ability to predict geochemical responses within a mafic reservoir during geologic CO2 sequestration. However, the lack of flow-through experiments prevents the use of coupled hydrologic-geochemical models to predict evolution of permeability and porosity, critical parameters for assessing storage feasibility. We present here results of three flow-through experiments on an intact basalt core during which we employed X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) to quantify porosity evolution and fluid flow. Using a single core of glassy basaltic tuff from the Snake River Plain (Menan Buttes complex), we performed tracer tests using a solution of NaI (~100,000 ppm) before and after injection of CO2-saturated water at reservoir conditions (90 bar, 50°C) to image porosity and flow path distribution. During the tracer tests, CT scans were taken at 2.5-minute intervals, and outlet fluid was discretely sampled at the same intervals and subsequently measured via ICP-MS, enabling interpretation of the tracer breakthrough curve through both imaging and geochemical analyses. Comparison of the porosity distribution from before and after injection of CO2 shows an overall decrease in core-averaged porosity from 34% to 31.1%. Permeability decreased exponentially from ~4.9x10-12 m2 to 1.18 x10-12 m2. The decrease in porosity and permeability suggests geochemical transformations in the mineral assemblage of the core, which we observe through petrographic analysis of an unaltered sample of the same lithology in contrast with the altered core. There is a significant increase in grain coatings, as well as reduction in the grain size, suggesting dissolution re-precipitation mechanisms. Finally, to develop a framework for the coupled geochemical and hydrologic responses observed experimentally, we have calibrated a reactive transport model at the core scale using the TOUGHREACT simulator [1]. [1] Xu et al. (2011) Comput. Geosci.

  6. Physics of forced magnetic reconnection in coaxial helicity injection experiments in National Spherical Torus Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Raman, R.; Hooper, E. B.; Sovinec, C. R.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2014-05-01

    We numerically examine the physics of fast flux closure in transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) experiments in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). By performing resistive Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with poloidal injector coil currents held constant in time, we find that closed flux surfaces are formed through forced magnetic reconnection. Through a local Sweet-Parker type reconnection with an elongated current sheet in the injector region, closed flux surfaces expand in the NSTX global domain. Simulations demonstrate outflows approaching poloidally Alfvénic flows and reconnection times consistent with the Sweet-Parker model. Critical requirements for magnetic reconnection and flux closure are studied in detail. These primary effects, which are magnetic diffusivity, injector flux, injector flux footprint width, and rate of injector voltage reduction, are simulated for transient CHI experiments. The relevant time scales for effective reconnection are τV<τrec≈τA√S (1+Pm)1/4<τR, where τV is the time for the injector voltage reduction, τA is the poloidal Alfvén transit time, τR is the global resistive diffusion time, and Pm and S are Prandtl and Lundquist numbers.

  7. Pelletizing of sulfide molybdenite concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palant, A. A.

    2007-04-01

    The results of a pelletizing investigation using various binding components (water, syrup, sulfite-alcohol distillery grains, and bentonite) of the flotation sulfide molybdenite concentrate (˜84% MoS2) from the Mongolian deposit are discussed. The use of syrup provides rather high-strength pellets (>3 N/pellet or >300 g/pellet) of the required size (2 3 mm) for the consumption of 1 kg binder per 100 kg concentrate. The main advantage of the use of syrup instead of bentonite is that the molybdenum cinder produced by oxidizing roasting of raw ore materials is not impoverished due to complete burning out of the syrup. This fact exerts a positive effect on the subsequent hydrometallurgical process, decreasing molybdenum losses related to dump cakes.

  8. Design of a tritium pellet injector for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.; Gouge, M.J.; Fisher, P.W.; Combs, S.K.; Cole, M.J.; Wysor, R.B.; Fehling, D.T.; Foust, C.R.; Baylor, L.R. ); Schmidt, G.L.; Barnes, G.W.; Persing, R.G. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    The TFTR tritium pellet injector (TPI) is designed to provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1{minus} to 3 km/s-range for the TFTR D-T phase. The existing TFTR deuterium pellet injector is being modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide a fourshot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns a two -stage light gas gun driver. The pipe gun concept has been qualified for tritium operation by the tritium proof-of-principle injector experiments conducted on the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In these experiments, tritium and D-T pellets were accelerated to speeds near 1.5 km/s. The TPI is being designed for pellet sizes in the range from 3.43 to 4.0 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation will be controlled by a programmable logic controller. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  9. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  10. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  11. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  12. 46 CFR 148.325 - Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. 148.325... § 148.325 Wood chips; wood pellets; wood pulp pellets. (a) This part applies to wood chips and wood pulp... cargo hold. (b) No person may enter a cargo hold containing wood chips, wood pellets, or wood...

  13. Formation and sustainment of a very low aspect ratio tokamak using coaxial helicity injection (the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT) experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarboe, T.R.; Nelson, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    In the paper we will detail the progress of the HIT experiment construction, including the following components: preliminary data and interpretation; diagnostic systems; vacuum vessel and pumping system; helicity source and power supplies; toroidal field coil and power supply; data acquisition system; collaboration with general atomics, with a brief summary given on each.

  14. Design, Construction, and Experiments on a Magnetron Injection Gun for X-band Cluster Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Palmer, R. B.; Fernow, R. C.; Gallardo, J. C.; Kirk, H. G.; Ulc, S.; Zhao, Y.

    1997-05-01

    A high-power, high-efficiency X-band Cluster Klystron experiment is being developed at BNL for future linear colliders. This type of klystron requires multiple beams generated from Magnetron Injection Guns (MIGs) and focused by a common solenoidal magnetic field. Each beam has a low current of 100 A and a small diameter of 8.4 mm. The MIG cathode has a lifetime of at least 10,000 hours operating at 1200^o C, a small cone half-angle of 6.3^o, and a high current density of 23-46 A/cm^2. Using the Dryden-Harker-Tsimring design theory, a modulation anode driven by a 30 kV, 350 ns PFN has been constructed. To get electron laminar flow, the MIG has to be operated at more than 94% space-charge limited emission. The current experiment has the MIG on-axis with a DC anode voltage of 120 kV. Using diagnostic devices, the hollow beam profile, noise level and cathode temperature are measured. Stability conditions will be examined to confirm the design theory and feasibility for the klystron.

  15. Modeling injected interstitial effects on void swelling in self-ion irradiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, M. P.; Gaston, D. R.; Jin, M.; Shao, L.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy ion irradiations at high dose rates are often used to simulate slow and expensive neutron irradiation experiments. However, many differences in the resultant modes of damage arise due to unique aspects of heavy ion irradiation. One such difference was recently shown in pure iron to manifest itself as a double peak in void swelling, with both peaks located away from the region of highest displacement damage. In other cases involving a variety of ferritic alloys there is often only a single peak in swelling vs. depth that is located very near the ion-incident surface. We show that these behaviors arise due to a combination of two separate effects: 1) suppression of void swelling due to injected interstitials, and 2) preferential sinking of interstitials to the ion-incident surface, which are very sensitive to the irradiation temperature and displacement rate. Care should therefore be used in collection and interpretation of data from the depth range outside the Bragg peak of ion irradiation experiments, as it is shown to be more complex than previously envisioned.

  16. Alternative Techniques for Injecting Massive Quantities of Gas for Plasma Disruption Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Meitner, Steven J; Caughman, John B; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Fehling, Dan T; Foust, Charles R; Jernigan, Thomas C; McGill, James M; Parks, P. B.; Rasmussen, David A

    2010-01-01

    Injection of massive quantities of noble gases or D2 has proven to be effective at mitigating some of the deleterious effects of disruptions in tokamaks. Two alternative methods that might offer some advantages over the present technique for massive gas injection are shattering massive pellets and employing closecoupled rupture disks. Laboratory testing has been carried out to evaluate their feasibility. For the study of massive pellets, a pipe gun pellet injector cooled with a cryogenic refrigerator was fitted with a relatively large barrel (16.5 mm bore), and D2 and Ne pellets were made and were accelerated to speeds of ~600 and 300 m/s, respectively. Based on the successful proof-of-principle testing with the injector and a special double-impact target to shatter pellets, a similar system has been prepared and installed on DIII-D, with preliminary experiments already carried out. To study the applicability of rupture disks for disruption mitigation, a simple test apparatus was assembled in the lab. Commercially available rupture disks of 1 in. nominal diameter were tested at conditions relevant for the application on tokamaks, including tests with Ar and He gases and rupture pressures of ~54 bar. Some technical and practical issues of implementing this technique on a tokamak are discussed.

  17. Complementary effects of torrefaction and co-pelletization: Energy consumption and characteristics of pellets.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liang; Yuan, Xingzhong; Li, Hui; Li, Changzhu; Xiao, Zhihua; Jiang, Longbo; Huang, Binbin; Xiao, Zhihong; Chen, Xiaohong; Wang, Hou; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-06-01

    In this study, complementary of torrefaction and co-pelletization for biomass pellets production was investigated. Two kinds of biomass materials were torrefied and mixed with oil cake for co-pelletization. The energy consumption during pelletization and pellet characteristics including moisture absorption, pellet density, pellet strength and combustion characteristic, were evaluated. It was shown that torrefaction improved the characteristics of pellets with high heating values, low moisture absorption and well combustion characteristic. Furthermore, co-pelletization between torrefied biomass and cater bean cake can reduce several negative effects of torrefaction such as high energy consumption, low pellet density and strength. The optimal conditions for energy consumption and pellet strength were torrefied at 270°C and a blending with 15% castor bean cake for both biomass materials. The present study indicated that compelmentary performances of the torrefaction and co-pelletization with castor bean cake provide a promising alternative for fuel production from biomass and oil cake.

  18. Solar flare injection as analog of active experiment in an ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhin, Yu.; Sinelnikov, V.; Shagimuratov, I.; Kanonidi, Kh.

    At realization of active experiment are always known precisely both localization and amplitude of an entered disturbance (whether at a beam particles or mass injection, whether at heating of an ionosphere by EM wave radiation). The nuclear explosion in atmosphere was the maiden active experiment, but the action source was instant and very multicomponent (shock wave, energetic particles and EM radiation with a broadband spectrum) or, in other words, effect was too complex. The solar flare renders mixed action on near Earth space too, but it is clear separated in time (the short pulse of electromagnetic radiation reaches the Earth behind some minutes, then the solar cosmic rays and after one day (or two) the high-velocity flow of plasma arrive) and space of each components action: ionosphere, polar cap or magnitosphere. Analysis of form and dynamics of the X-ray pulse radiation (data of GOES satellites) from a solar flare (class X17) 28.10.03 shows, that there are all basis to consider it as reference source for active experiment in an ionosphere. For this short pulse of EM radiation the investigation of disturbances (SFE, SID or Crochet) of ionosphere Sq currents system and dynamics of the integral plasma contents (or TEC, the data of GPS constellation) in an ionosphere for a network of Europe midlatitude stations (IGS and INTERMAGNET) are conducted. The availability of a maximum gradient (up to 15 A/km) of loop currents and sharp increase in TEC on a narrow range of Sun zenith angles (Z0=60°-75°) is shown. The observed spatial dependence of intensity of such localized disturbance generated in an ionosphere by short EM pulse from a solar flare is discussed.

  19. ‘On the same level’: facilitators’ experiences running a drug user-led safer injecting education campaign

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Unsafe injection practices play a major role in elevated rates of morbidity and mortality among people who inject drugs (IDU). There is growing interest in the direct involvement of IDU in interventions that seek to address unsafe injecting. This study describes a drug user-led safer injecting education campaign, and explores facilitators’ experiences delivering educational workshops. Methods We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with 8 members of the Injection Support (IS) Team who developed and facilitated a series of safer injecting education workshops. Interviews explored facilitator’s perceptions of the workshops, experiences being a facilitator, and perspectives on the educational campaign. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted. Results IS Team facilitators described how the workshop’s structure and content enabled effective communication of information about safer injecting practices, while targeting the unsafe practices of workshop participants. Facilitators’ identity as IDU enhanced their ability to relate to workshop participants and communicate educational messages in language accessible to workshop participants. Facilitators reported gaining knowledge and skills from their involvement in the campaign, as well as positive feelings about themselves from the realization that they were helping people to protect their health. Overall, facilitators felt that this campaign provided IDU with valuable information, although facilitators also critiqued the campaign and suggested improvements for future efforts. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of involving IDU in educational initiatives targeting unsafe injecting. Findings illustrate how IDU involvement in prevention activities improves relevance and cultural appropriateness of interventions while providing individual, social, and professional benefits to those IDU delivering education. PMID:23497293

  20. Treatment readiness, attitudes toward, and experiences with methadone and buprenorphine maintenance therapy among people who inject drugs in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Aishwarya; Bazazi, Alexander R.; Yee, Ilias; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about attitudes toward and experiences with opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) among people who inject drugs in Malaysia, a country where people who inject drugs comprise 1.3% of the adult population. Methods In 2010, 460 people who inject drugs in Greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were surveyed to evaluate attitudes toward and experience with OMT and treatment readiness. Attitudes towards OMT with both methadone and buprenorphine were assessed using an opinions scale. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess correlates of treatment readiness, measured with the 19-item Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Results All 460 participants used opioids and nearly all (99.1%) met criteria for opioid dependence. Few had had previous experience with methadone (9.3%) or buprenorphine (12.6%) maintenance therapy, yet many had used methadone (55.2%) or buprenorphine (51.7%) outside of treatment settings. Fifteen percent had injected buprenorphine in the past month, and of the few that were currently receiving buprenorphine maintenance therapy, almost all were injecting it. The majority of subjects exhibited a moderate level of treatment readiness and a preference for methadone over buprenorphine. Those with low treatment readiness scores were more likely to have previous experience with compulsory drug detention centers (p<0.01), needle/syringe exchange programs (p<0.005), or be of Indian ethnicity (p<0.001). Past use of methadone (p<0.01), older age (p<0.001), stress symptom severity (p<0.001), and sharing of needles or syringes (p<0.05) were associated with higher treatment readiness scores. Conclusion There are suboptimal levels of OMT experience among people who inject drugs that may be improved by addressing factors that influence patient attitudes. Those individuals with moderate treatment readiness may be targeted by brief motivational and cognitive interventions in primary care, prisons or OMT clinics

  1. ELM control at the L → H transition by means of pellet pacing in the ASDEX Upgrade and JET all-metal-wall tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, P. T.; Meyer, H.; Birkenmeier, G.; Burckhart, A.; Carvalho, I. S.; Delabie, E.; Frassinetti, L.; Huijsmans, G.; Kocsis, G.; Loarte, A.; Maggi, C. F.; Maraschek, M.; Ploeckl, B.; Rimini, F.; Ryter, F.; Saarelma, S.; Szepesi, T.; Wolfrum, E.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Contributors, JET

    2015-04-01

    In ITER, pellets are used for ELM pacing and fueling. More importantly, ELM control and in particular control of the first ELM needs to be demonstrated in the non-nuclear phase of ITER during operation in H or He. Whilst D pellets have been established as an ELM control technique in the stationary phase with D target plasmas in devices with C as plasma-facing component, the behavior of other isotopes in non-stationary phases are not so well known. Here, we report on new pellet triggering experiments in ASDEX Upgrade and JET that mimic specific ITER operating scenarios. Both machines are equipped with an all-metal wall; recent investigations have shown that pellet triggering and pacing become more intricate when an all-metal wall surface is employed. In both machines, ELM triggering has been shown to occur after injection of D pellets into D plasmas during extended ELM-free phases, often following the L → H transition. In both devices the pellets are found to induce ELMs under conditions far from the stability boundary for type-I ELMs. Near the L → H transition, induced ELMs in some cases are more likely to have type-III rather than type-I characteristics. Furthermore, in ASDEX Upgrade this study was conducted during L → H transitions in the current ramp-up phase as envisaged for ITER. In addition, the pellet’s ELM trigger potential has been proven in ASDEX Upgrade with a correct isotopic compilation for the non-nuclear phase in ITER, viz. H pellets into either He or H plasmas. Results from this study are encouraging since they have demonstrated the pellets’ potential to provoke ELMs even under conditions that are quite far from the stability boundaries attributed to the occurrence of spontaneous ELMs. However, with the recent change from carbon to an all-metal plasma-facing component, examples have been found in both machines where pellets failed to establish ELM control under conditions where this would be expected and needed. Consequently, a major task

  2. Radiation analysis of the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) pellet injector system and its impact on personnel access

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.; Stevens, P.N.; Gomes, I.C.; Gomes, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is near completion. This short-pulse ignition experiment is planned to follow the operations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The high neutron wall loadings, /approximately/4-5 MW/m/sup 2/, associated with the operation of this device require that neutronics-related issues be considered in the overall system design. Radiation shielding is required for the protection of device components and personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure, and the entire experiment is housed in a circular test cell facility with a radius of /approximately/12 m. The most critical radiation concern in the CIT design process relates to the numerous penetrations in the device. This paper discusses the impact of a major penetration on the design and operations of the CIT pellet injection system. The pellet injector is a major component, which has a line-of-sight penetration through the igloo and test cell wall. All current options for maintenance of the injector require personnel access. A nuclear analysis has been performed to determine the feasibility of hands-on access. Results indicate that personnel access to the pellet injector glovebox is possible. 10 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Can adult and juvenile European rabbits be differentiated by their pellet sizes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delibes-Mateos, Miguel; Rouco, Carlos; Villafuerte, Rafael

    2009-03-01

    Recently, a new method for differentiating juvenile and adult rabbits based on faecal pellet size was published. According to this method, pellets >6 mm diameter are inferred to be deposited by adults, while those <6 mm are inferred to be from juveniles or kittens. In this study, we designed a simple experiment to test the accuracy of this methodology. Twelve adult rabbits were housed in individual outdoor cages and their pellets were removed every day for 10 consecutive days. Pellets were separated using a sieve according to their size and counted. Results showed that adult rabbits produce pellets >6 mm diameter in the same proportion as those <6 mm. We also observed a strong influence of the individual rabbit on pellet size; some rabbits produce a high proportion of pellets >6 mm, whereas others deposit mostly pellets <6 mm in size. Our findings demonstrate that pellet size is unsuitable for aging wild rabbits. Field biologists should therefore be cautious when employing the pellet size method of age determination in other wild animals in the absence of validating studies.

  4. Pellet injector development at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Argo, B.E.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Schechter, D.E.; Simmons, D.W.; Sparks, D.O.; Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced plasma fueling systems for magnetic confinement experiments are under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The general approach is that of producing and accelerating frozen hydrogenic pellets to speeds in the kilometer-per-second range by either pneumatic (light-gas gun) or mechanical (centrifugal force) techniques. ORNL has recently provided a centrifugal pellet injector for the Tore Supra tokamak and a new, simplified, eight-shot pneumatic injector for the Advanced Toroidal Facility stellarator at ORNL. Hundreds of tritium and DT pellets were accelerated at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly facility at Los Alamos in 1988--89. These experiments, done in a single-shot pipe-gun system, demonstrated the feasibility of forming and accelerating tritium pellets at low {sup 3}He levels. A new, tritium-compatible extruder mechanism is being designed for longer-pulse DT applications. Two-stage light-gas guns and electron beam rocket accelerators for speeds of the order of 2--10 km/s are also under development. Recently, a repeating, two-stage light-gas gun accelerated 10 surrogate pellets at a 1-Hz repetition rate to speeds in the range of 2--3 km/s; and the electron beam rocket accelerator completed initial feasibility and scaling experiments. ORNL has also developed conceptual designs of advanced plasma fueling systems for the Compact Ignition Tokamak and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

  5. Blood Trials: Transfusions, Injections, and Experiments in Africa, 1890-1920.

    PubMed

    Sunseri, Thaddeus

    2016-07-01

    From about 1880 to 1920, a culture of medical experimentation promoted blood transfusion as a therapy for severe anemia in Europe, which was applied in German East Africa in 1892 for a case of blackwater fever, a complication of malaria afflicting mainly Europeans. This first case of blood transfusion in Africa, in which an African's blood was transfused into a German official, complicates the dominant narrative that blood transfusions in Africa came only after World War I. Medical researchers moreover experimented with blood serum therapies on human and animal subjects in Europe and Africa, injecting blood of different species, "races" and ethnicities into others to demonstrate parasite transmissibility and to discover vaccines for diseases such as malaria, sleeping sickness, and yellow fever. While research in German colonies is highlighted here, this was a transnational medical culture that crossed borders and oceans. This research is of interest as a possible early pathway for the epidemic spread of HIV and other zoonoses in Africa and the world, which biomedical researchers have identified as emerging in West-Central Africa sometime around the turn of the twentieth century. PMID:26514397

  6. Laboratory experiments in the argon plasma perturbed by injections of the electronegative gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Cao, Jin-xiang; Liu, Yu; Yu, Peng-cheng; Zhang, Zhong-kai

    2016-07-01

    In this study, laboratory observations of the perturbations of the magnetic field are reported due to the injection of attachment chemicals (CF4, SF6, and CO2) into argon plasmas. Besides the well-known electron density reduction, we also observed magnetic field perturbation in the experiment. The measured induced voltage B ˙ , which is taken as a proxy of the time-changing electromagnetic field, fluctuates in the boundary layer between the ambient plasmas and negative ions plasmas. Perturbations of the magnetic field were investigated by changing the ambient pressure and ratio of attachment chemicals. The measured B ˙ keeps increasing in these lower pressures; but it no longer increases as the ambient pressure higher than a threshold, e.g., for CF4, SF6, and CO2, the transition pressure is 6Pa, 5Pa and 4Pa, respectively. The magnitude of the B ˙ increase with the change of the ratio of release flow until at higher ratios, e.g., 40%. We transformed these time-sampled data into the frequency domain and found coherent modes with fundamental frequencies lying in the lower hybrid range. In addition, these coherent frequencies show a frequency drift with the increase of the contents of the negative ions. These modes were suggested as the magnetic component of electron-ion hybrid mode. This work has an important application in the study of artificially-created ionospheric depletion which is usually generated by releasing of attachment chemicals in the upper atmosphere.

  7. A mathematical model to predict the size of the pellets formed in freeze pelletization techniques: parameters affecting pellet size.

    PubMed

    Cheboyina, Sreekhar; O'Haver, John; Wyandt, Christy M

    2006-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed based on the theory of drop formation to predict the size of the pellets formed in the freeze pelletization process. Further the model was validated by studying the effect of various parameters on the pellet size such as viscosity of the pellet forming and column liquids, surface/interfacial tension, density difference between pellet forming and column liquids; size, shape, and material of construction of the needle tips and temperatures maintained in the columns. In this study, pellets were prepared from different matrices including polyethylene glycols and waxes. The column liquids studied were silicone oils and aqueous glycerol solutions. The surface/interfacial tension, density difference between pellet forming and column liquids and needle tip size were found to be the most important factors affecting pellet size. The viscosity of the column liquid was not found to significantly affect the size of the pellets. The size of the pellets was also not affected by the pellet forming liquids of low viscosities. An increase in the initial column temperature slightly decreased the pellet size. The mathematical model developed was found to successfully predict the size of the pellets with an average error of 3.32% for different matrices that were studied.

  8. Experiences with Policing among People Who Inject Drugs in Bangkok, Thailand: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kanna; Small, Will; Csete, Joanne; Hattirat, Sattara; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite Thailand's commitment to treating people who use drugs as “patients” not “criminals,” Thai authorities continue to emphasize criminal law enforcement for drug control. In 2003, Thailand's drug war received international criticism due to extensive human rights violations. However, few studies have since investigated the impact of policing on drug-using populations. Therefore, we sought to examine experiences with policing among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Bangkok, Thailand, between 2008 and 2012. Methods and Findings Between July 2011 and June 2012, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 42 community-recruited PWID participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Interviews explored PWID's encounters with police during the past three years. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim, and a thematic analysis was conducted to document the character of PWID's experiences with police. Respondents indicated that policing activities had noticeably intensified since rapid urine toxicology screening became available to police. Respondents reported various forms of police misconduct, including false accusations, coercion of confessions, excessive use of force, and extortion of money. However, respondents were reluctant to report misconduct to the authorities in the face of social and structural barriers to seeking justice. Respondents' strategies to avoid police impeded access to health care and facilitated transitions towards the misuse of prescribed pharmaceuticals. The study's limitations relate to the transferability of the findings, including the potential biases associated with the small convenience sample. Conclusions This study suggests that policing in Bangkok has involved injustices, human rights abuses, and corruption, and policing practices in this setting appeared to have increased PWID's vulnerability to poor health through various pathways. Novel to this study are findings

  9. Injection Methods and Instrumentation for Serial X-ray Free Electron Laser Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Daniel

    Scientists have used X-rays to study biological molecules for nearly a century. Now with the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL), new methods have been developed to advance structural biology. These new methods include serial femtosecond crystallography, single particle imaging, solution scattering, and time resolved techniques. The XFEL is characterized by high intensity pulses, which are only about 50 femtoseconds in duration. The intensity allows for scattering from microscopic particles, while the short pulses offer a way to outrun radiation damage. XFELs are powerful enough to obliterate most samples in a single pulse. While this allows for a "diffract and destroy" methodology, it also requires instrumentation that can position microscopic particles into the X-ray beam (which may also be microscopic), continuously renew the sample after each pulse, and maintain sample viability during data collection. Typically these experiments have used liquid microjets to continuously renew sample. The high flow rate associated with liquid microjets requires large amounts of sample, most of which runs to waste between pulses. An injector designed to stream a viscous gel-like material called lipidic cubic phase (LCP) was developed to address this problem. LCP, commonly used as a growth medium for membrane protein crystals, lends itself to low flow rate jetting and so reduces the amount of sample wasted significantly. This work discusses sample delivery and injection for XFEL experiments. It reviews the liquid microjet method extensively, and presents the LCP injector as a novel device for serial crystallography, including detailed protocols for the LCP injector and anti-settler operation.

  10. Injection Seeding of Ti:Al2O3 in an unstable resonator theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C.; Wang, L. G.; Barnes, N. P.; Edwards, W. C.; Cheng, W. A.; Hess, R. V.; Lockard, G. E.; Ponsardin, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    Injection Seeding of a Ti:Al2O3 unstable resonator using both a pulsed single-mode Ti:Al2O3 laser and a continuous wave laser diode has been characterized. Results are compared with a theory which calculates injection seeding as function of seed and resonator alignment, beam profiles, and power.

  11. Sequential dermal-peritumoral radiocolloid injection for sentinel node biopsy for breast cancer: the University of Florida experience.

    PubMed

    Feezor, Robert J; Kasraeian, Ali; Copeland, Edward M; Schell, Scott R; Hochwald, Steven N; Cendan, Juan; Drane, Walter; Mastin, Suzanne; Wilkinson, Edward; Lind, D Scott

    2002-08-01

    Although sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is rapidly becoming the standard of care for small breast cancers the optimal radiocolloid injection technique remains controversial. We report our experience with sequential dermal-peritumoral radiocolloid injection that takes advantage of both techniques. One hundred eighteen patients with clinical stage T(is), T1, T2 and N0 breast cancer underwent SLN biopsy at the University of Florida. Twelve to 18 hours before surgery patients received either an injection of 0.5 to 1.0 mCi 50:50 filtered:unfiltered technetium sulfur colloid into the dermis overlying the tumor and/or a peritumoral injection of a 3 to 4-mCi of radiocolloid 30 minutes later. Dynamic lymphoscintigraphy was performed and the topographical location of all imaged lymph nodes was marked on the skin. The next morning the surgeon utilized a hand-held gamma probe to remove all SLN(s) defined as any lymph node with radioactive counts 10 per cent or more of the ex vivo counts of the most radioactive SLN [internal mammary (IM) nodes were not removed]. The SLN identification rate was 98.5 per cent (3 IM nodes) for dermal injection (d.), 83.3 per cent (1 IM node) for peritumoral injection (p.), and 100 per cent (14 IM nodes) for sequential dermal-peritumoral injection (d.p.) (p < 0.05 DP versus D). Sequential d.p. 50:50 filtered:unfiltered technetium sulfur colloid injection results in a rapid, high SLN identification rate that persists until surgery the next morning. Delineation of nonaxillary SLNs may lead to more accurate breast cancer staging and may also influence the delivery of IM node radiation.

  12. Confinement of high-density pellet-fueled discharges in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.; Schmidt, G.L.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Bush, C.E.; Combs, S.K.; England, A.; Fredrickson, E.; Goldston, R.J.; Grek, B.

    1986-01-01

    TFTR pellet injection results reported by Schmidt have been extended to higher density and ntau in plasmas limited by a graphite inner-wall belt limiter. Increased pellet penetration and larger density increases were achieved by operation at reduced plasma current (1.6 MA), minor radius (70 cm), and major radius (235 cm). Under these conditions, beam heating results have been extended to 7 MW.

  13. Validating An Analytic Completeness Model for Kepler Target Stars Based on Flux-level Transit Injection Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzarite, Joseph; Burke, Christopher J.; Li, Jie; Seader, Shawn; Haas, Michael R.; Batalha, Natalie; Henze, Christopher; Christiansen, Jessie; Kepler Project, NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division

    2016-06-01

    The Kepler Mission is developing an Analytic Completeness Model (ACM) to estimate detection completeness contours as a function of exoplanet radius and period for each target star. Accurate completeness contours are necessary for robust estimation of exoplanet occurrence rates.The main components of the ACM for a target star are: detection efficiency as a function of SNR, the window function (WF) and the one-sigma depth function (OSDF). (Ref. Burke et al. 2015). The WF captures the falloff in transit detection probability at long periods that is determined by the observation window (the duration over which the target star has been observed). The OSDF is the transit depth (in parts per million) that yields SNR of unity for the full transit train. It is a function of period, and accounts for the time-varying properties of the noise and for missing or deweighted data.We are performing flux-level transit injection (FLTI) experiments on selected Kepler target stars with the goal of refining and validating the ACM. “Flux-level” injection machinery inserts exoplanet transit signatures directly into the flux time series, as opposed to “pixel-level” injection, which inserts transit signatures into the individual pixels using the pixel response function. See Jie Li's poster: ID #2493668, "Flux-level transit injection experiments with the NASA Pleiades Supercomputer" for details, including performance statistics.Since FLTI is affordable for only a small subset of the Kepler targets, the ACM is designed to apply to most Kepler target stars. We validate this model using “deep” FLTI experiments, with ~500,000 injection realizations on each of a small number of targets and “shallow” FLTI experiments with ~2000 injection realizations on each of many targets. From the results of these experiments, we identify anomalous targets, model their behavior and refine the ACM accordingly.In this presentation, we discuss progress in validating and refining the ACM, and we

  14. Thermionic plasma injection for the Lockheed Martin T4 Compact Fusion Reactor experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Jonathon

    2015-11-01

    Lockheed Martin's Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) concept relies on diamagnetic confinement in a magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp geometry. Plasma injection into cusp field configurations requires careful deliberation. Previous work has shown that axial injection via a plasma gun is capable of achieving high-beta conditions in cusp configurations. We present a pulsed, high power thermionic plasma source and the associated magnetic field topology for plasma injection into the caulked-cusp magnetic field. The resulting plasma fueling and cross-field diffusion is discussed.

  15. Design of a field experiment for injection of natural colloids in a sandy coastal plain aquifer, Belle W. Baruch Forest Science Institute, Georgetown, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Toran, L.E.; McCarthy, J.F. ); Williams, T.M. . Belle W. Baruch Forest Science Inst.)

    1990-06-01

    This report summarizes the design of field injection experiments that constitute one task in the larger project described in the report Experiments Using Natural Organics.'' In the experiment, we plan to inject a large volume of colloidal organic matter (COM) into a sandy, unconsolidated coastal aquifer and observe the migration of COM into the groundwater flow system. The report provides a brief overview of the research project, including hypotheses to be tested; describes the purpose of the field injection experiments; summarizes the site characterization preliminary to the experiments; and explains the design of the experiments. 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Physics of fast flux closure in coaxial helicity injection experiments in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Fatima

    2013-10-01

    Advancing toward non-inductive start-up and current drive for tokamaks, a solenoid-free plasma start-up method called transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI), first developed on the small HIT-II device, has been extended to the large NSTX device, in which up to 300 kA of plasma current has been generated. Unlike driven CHI (edge current drive) where non-axisymmetric MHD activity relaxes the current inward, in transient CHI only axisymmetric reconnection generates a high quality closed flux start-up equilibrium, as found in resistive MHD simulations of CHI in NSTX using the NIMROD code (nimrodteam.org). Closed flux surfaces during simulations of transient CHI can be explained through 2-D Sweet-Parker type reconnection. Non-axisymmetric 3-D modes do not appear to play a dominant role at present experimental parameters. Our simulations have used fixed boundary flux (including NSTX poloidal coil currents) and the NSTX experimental geometry. We find that, as in the experiment, an X point followed by a fairly large volume of closed flux surfaces is rapidly formed; within 0.5 ms after the injector voltage and current begin to rapidly decrease. These direct numerical simulations reveal the fundamental mechanism for the reconnection process in transient CHI. Through direct numerical calculations, we find that as the injector voltage is turned off, the fields lines tend to untwist in the toroidal direction and magnetic field compression exerts a radial JXB force to bring oppositely directed field lines closer together to reconnect. A hierarchy of models from a zero pressure model to simulations with temperature evolution, allow us a full and more detailed understanding of the reconnection and closed flux surfaces. We find that magnetic fluxes are only reconnected at low magnetic diffusivity (high Lundquist number). In these simulations, narrow current layers form and cause the flux to close at a fast time scale when pinch flows are generated near the injector flux foot

  17. Pellet fueling development at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Foster, C.A.; Schuresko, D.D.; Foust, C.R.; Simmons, D.W.; Beard, D.S.

    1986-09-01

    Advanced plasma fueling systems for magnetic confinement devices are being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The general approach is that of producing and accelerating frozen hydrogenic pellets at speeds in the range of 1-2 km/s and higher. Two specific concepts are under development: (1) high-speed pneumatic acceleration; and (2) mechanical (centrifugal) acceleration. Both approaches are being pursued to meet the projected pellet size and delivery rates for major near-term plasma confinement devices, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Tore Supra, the Joint European Torus (JET), JT-60, and Doublet III-D (DIII-D), as well as future applications. In addition to these confinement physics related activities, ORNL is pursuing advanced technologies to achieve pellet velocities significantly in excess of the 2-km/s range already attained with pneumatic injectors and has embarked on a development program designed to explore the feasibility of fabricating and accelerating tritium pellets. This paper describes these ongoing activities.

  18. Clinical experience with repository corticotropin injection in patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing mood changes with intravenous methylprednisolone: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Stacey; Woo, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The elevated prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms and disorders among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is well recognized, as are potential neuropsychiatric side effects of treatment with corticosteroids. Both methylprednisolone (MP) and repository corticotropin injection (HP Acthar® gel) have demonstrated efficacy in reducing short-term disability after exacerbations of MS. Although historical data are limited, repository corticotropin injection has not generally been associated with detrimental neuropsychiatric effects. We describe six cases of patients with relapsing-remitting MS who had previously experienced detrimental mood changes with MP treatment. Some of these patients had previous histories of mood disorders or other neuropsychiatric symptoms prior to MS diagnosis. All six patients were subsequently treated with repository corticotropin injection for MS exacerbations and each demonstrated improvements in MS symptoms. This clinical experience suggests that repository corticotropin injection should be considered as an alternative for patients who do not tolerate corticosteroids or have difficulties associated with intravenous medication. Furthermore, the rate of neuropsychiatric side effects observed in these patients was low. These observations support repository corticotropin injection as a viable alternative for the treatment of acute exacerbations of MS, particularly in patients who have a history of neuropsychiatric disorders or symptoms either independently or in response to MP treatment. In reviewing both the published data and our own clinical experience regarding potential neuropsychiatric adverse events with treatment for MS exacerbations, we hope to stimulate further research into the potential efficacy and safety of repository corticotropin injection among patients with some form of neuropsychiatric complications that must be considered when establishing a treatment plan for MS. PMID:27134674

  19. Method for producing pellets for use in a cryoblasting process

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Christopher A.; Fisher, Paul W.

    1997-01-01

    A cryoblasting process having a centrifugal accelerator for accelerating frozen pellets of argon or carbon dioxide toward a target area utilizes an accelerator throw wheel designed to induce, during operation, the creation of a low-friction gas bearing within internal passages of the wheel which would otherwise retard acceleration of the pellets as they move through the passages. An associated system and method for removing paint from a surface with cryoblasting techniques involves the treating, such as a preheating, of the painted surface to soften the paint prior to the impacting of frozen pellets thereagainst to increase the rate of paint removal. A system and method for producing large quantities of frozen pellets from a liquid material, such as liquid argon or carbon dioxide, for use in a cryoblasting process utilizes a chamber into which the liquid material is introduced in the form of a jet which disintegrates into droplets. A non-condensible gas, such as inert helium or air, is injected into the chamber at a controlled rate so that the droplets freeze into bodies of relatively high density.

  20. INJECTING DRUG USERS’ EXPERIENCES OF POLICING PRACTICES IN TWO MEXICAN-U.S. BORDER CITIES: PUBLIC HEALTH PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cari L.; Firestone, Michelle; Ramos, Rebeca; Burris, Scott; Ramos, Maria Elena; Case, Patricia; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Fraga, Miguel Angel; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous research has identified the impact of law enforcement practices on the behaviors and health of injection drug users (IDUs). We undertook a qualitative study of IDUs’ experiences of policing practices in two Mexican cities on the U.S. border. Methods In 2004, two teams of Mexican interviewers conducted in-depth interviews with IDUs residing in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez (Cd. Juarez), Mexico who had injected drugs at least once in the prior month. Topics included types of drug used, injection settings, access to sterile needles and experiences with police. Field notes and transcribed interviews were analyzed to identify emergent themes. Results Among the 43 participants, most reported that it is common for IDUs to be arrested and detained for 36 hours for carrying sterile or used syringes. Most reported that they or someone they knew had been beaten by police. Interviews suggested 5 key themes relating to police influence on the risk environment: 1) impact of policing practices on accessibility of sterile syringes, 2) influence of police on choice of places to inject drugs (e.g., shooting galleries), 3) police violence, 4) police corruption, and 5) perceived changes in policing practices. Conclusion Findings suggest that some behavior of police officers in Tijuana and Cd. Juarez is inconsistent with legal norms and may be negatively influencing the risk of acquiring blood-borne infections among IDUs. Implementing a comprehensive and successful HIV prevention program among IDUs requires interventions to influence the knowledge, attitudes and practices of law enforcement officers. PMID:17997089

  1. [Pharmacodynamic experiment of the antivirus effect of Houttuynia cordata injection on influenza virus in mice].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang-zhou; Shi, Han; Shi, Yu-jing; Liu, Ying; Jin, Ya-hong; Gao, Ying-jie; Guo, Shan-shan; Cui, Xiao-lan

    2010-03-01

    It is to investigate the effect of two kinds of Houttuynia Cordata Injection on preventing and treating H1N1 influenza virus infection in mice. Pneumonia model was set up by intranasal infection of the normal and immunocompromised mice with influenza virus FM1 and PR8. The two injections were administered before and after the administration of virus, separately, and the lung index was observed. The results showed that the two preparations have obvious therapeutic effect on normal mice infected with influenza virus FM1 and PR8. And to FM1, the new injection's effect is better at small dosage. The results also showed that the two preparations have obvious prophylactic effect on immunodepressed mice infected with influenza virus FM1 and PR8. And to PR8, the old injection's effect is better at small dosage. Houttuynia Cordata Injection can improve the mice pneumonia caused by influenza virus H1N1 and decrease the lung index markedly. It has a remarkable preventive and therapeutic effect on H1N1 influenza virus in mice. PMID:21351520

  2. Non-solenoidal Startup through Local Helicity Injection in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongard, M. W.; Barr, J. L.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Perry, J. M.; Redd, A. J.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Schoenbeck, N. L.; Shriwise, P. C.; Thome, K. E.

    2012-10-01

    Non-solenoidal plasma startup via local helicity injection is governed by helicity balance and Taylor relaxation constraints. Local helicity injection capabilities at Pegasus have been increased, supporting an expansion of the existing operational space towards Ip˜ 0.3 MA and characterization of helicity dissipation mechanisms during plasma startup, growth, and sustainment. After discharge initiation with an active current source, helicity injection may be provided by passive electrodes to continue its evolution and extend pulse length. Local magnetic measurements confirm that a local field null is transiently created by injected current streams prior to relaxation into a tokamak-like state and sustained helicity injection. Bursts of MHD activity during the growth phase are correlated with rapid equilibrium changes, redistribution of the toroidal current density, and observations of strong ion heating (Ti ˜ 1 keV). The impedance of active injectors and thereby their helicity input rate appears constrained by a double-layer space charge limit at low currents and the Alfv'en-Lawson limit for intense electron beams at high currents. Facility and diagnostic upgrades include an expanded poloidal field coil system for improved plasma control, new divertor coils, new plasma gun-electrode injector assemblies, a Thomson scattering system, expanded gas fueling techniques, and support for doubling the toroidal field.

  3. Active Flow Separation Control of a Stator Vane Using Surface Injection in a Multistage Compressor Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.; Prahst, Patricia S.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    2003-01-01

    Micro-flow control actuation embedded in a stator vane was used to successfully control separation and improve near stall performance in a multistage compressor rig at NASA Glenn. Using specially designed stator vanes configured with internal actuation to deliver pulsating air through slots along the suction surface, a research study was performed to identify performance benefits using this microflow control approach. Pressure profiles and unsteady pressure measurements along the blade surface and at the shroud provided a dynamic look at the compressor during microflow air injection. These pressure measurements lead to a tracking algorithm to identify the onset of separation. The testing included steady air injection at various slot locations along the vane. The research also examined the benefit of pulsed injection and actively controlled air injection along the stator vane. Two types of actuation schemes were studied, including an embedded actuator for on-blade control. Successful application of an online detection and flow control scheme will be discussed. Testing showed dramatic performance benefit for flow reattachment and subsequent improvement in diffusion through the use of pulsed controlled injection. The paper will discuss the experimental setup, the blade configurations, and preliminary CFD results which guided the slot location along the blade. The paper will also show the pressure profiles and unsteady pressure measurements used to track flow control enhancement, and will conclude with the tracking algorithm for adjusting the control.

  4. Investigation of oil injection into brine for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve : hydrodynamics and mixing experiments with SPR liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Cote, Raymond O.; Torczynski, John Robert; O'Hern, Timothy John

    2004-05-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study a proposed approach for oil reintroduction in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The goal was to assess whether useful oil is rendered unusable through formation of a stable oil-brine emulsion during reintroduction of degassed oil into the brine layer in storage caverns. An earlier report (O'Hern et al., 2003) documented the first stage of the program, in which simulant liquids were used to characterize the buoyant plume that is produced when a jet of crude oil is injected downward into brine. This report documents the final two test series. In the first, the plume hydrodynamics experiments were completed using SPR oil, brine, and sludge. In the second, oil reinjection into brine was run for approximately 6 hours, and sampling of oil, sludge, and brine was performed over the next 3 months so that the long-term effects of oil-sludge mixing could be assessed. For both series, the experiment consisted of a large transparent vessel that is a scale model of the proposed oil-injection process at the SPR. For the plume hydrodynamics experiments, an oil layer was floated on top of a brine layer in the first test series and on top of a sludge layer residing above the brine in the second test series. The oil was injected downward through a tube into the brine at a prescribed depth below the oil-brine or sludge-brine interface. Flow rates were determined by scaling to match the ratio of buoyancy to momentum between the experiment and the SPR. Initially, the momentum of the flow produces a downward jet of oil below the tube end. Subsequently, the oil breaks up into droplets due to shear forces, buoyancy dominates the flow, and a plume of oil droplets rises to the interface. The interface was deflected upward by the impinging oil-brine plume. Videos of this flow were recorded for scaled flow rates that bracket the equivalent pumping rates in an SPR cavern during injection of degassed oil. Image-processing analyses were

  5. Assessment of nitrification potential in ground water using short term, single-well injection experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Baumgartner, L.K.; Miller, D.N.; Repert, D.A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrification was measured within a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, using a series of single-well injection tests. The aquifer contained a wastewater-derived contaminant plume, the core of which was anoxic and contained ammonium. The study was conducted near the downgradient end of the ammonium zone, which was characterized by inversely trending vertical gradients of oxygen (270 to 0 ??M) and ammonium (19 to 625 ??M) and appeared to be a potentially active zone for nitrification. The tests were conducted by injecting a tracer solution (ambient ground water + added constituents) into selected locations within the gradients using multilevel samplers. After injection, the tracers moved by natural ground water flow and were sampled with time from the injection port. Rates of nitrification were determined from changes in nitrate and nitrite concentration relative to bromide. Initial tests were conducted with 15N-enriched ammonium; subsequent tests examined the effect of adding ammonium, nitrite, or oxygen above background concentrations and of adding difluoromethane, a nitrification inhibitor. In situ net nitrate production exceeded net nitrite production by 3- to 6- fold and production rates of both decreased in the presence of difluoromethane. Nitrification rates were 0.02-0.28 ??mol (L aquifer)-1 h-1 with in situ oxygen concentrations and up to 0.81 ??mol (L aquifer)-1 h-1 with non-limiting substrate concentrations. Geochemical considerations indicate that the rates derived from single-well injection tests yielded overestimates of in situ rates, possibly because the injections promoted small-scale mixing within a transport-limited reaction zone. Nonetheless, these tests were useful for characterizing ground water nitrification in situ and for comparing potential rates of activity when the tracer cloud included non-limiting ammonium and oxygen concentrations. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005.

  6. Solidification and Acceleration of Large Cryogenic Pellets Relevant for Plasma Disruption Mitigation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Meitner, S. J.; Gebhart, T. E.; Baylor, Larry R.; Caughman, John B.; Fehling, Dan T.; Foust, Charles R.; Ha, Tam T.; Lyttle, Mark S.; Fisher, J. T.; et al

    2016-01-01

    The technology for producing, accelerating, and shattering large pellets (before injection into plasmas) for disruption mitigation has been under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for several years, including a system on DIII-D that has been used to provide some significant experimental results. The original proof-of-principle testing was carried out using a pipe gun injector cooled by a cryogenic refrig- erator (temperatures ~8-20 K) and equipped with a stainless steel tube to produce 16.5-mm pellets composed of either pure D2, pure Ne, or a dual layer with a thin outer shell of D2 and core of Ne. Recently, significantmore » progress has been made in the laboratory using that same pipe gun and a new injector that is an ITER test apparatus cooled with liquid helium. The new injector operates at ~5-8 K, which is similar to temperatures expected with cooling provided by the flow of supercritical helium on ITER. An alternative technique for producing/solidifying large pellets directly from a premixed gas has now been successfully tested in the laboratory. Also, two additional pellet sizes have been tested recently (nominal 24.4 and 34.0 mm diameters). With larger pellets, the number of injectors required for ITER disruption mitigation can be reduced, resulting in less cost and a smaller footprint for the hardware. An attractive option is longer pellets, and 24.4-mm pellets with a length/diameter ratio of ~3 have been successfully tested. Since pellet speed is the key parameter in determining the response time of a shattered pellet system to a plasma disruption event, recent tests have concentrated on documenting the speeds with different hardware configurations and operating parameters; speeds of ~100-800 m/s have been recorded. The data and results from laboratory testing are presented and discussed, and a simple model for the pellet solidification process is described.« less

  7. Solidification and Acceleration of Large Cryogenic Pellets Relevant for Plasma Disruption Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephen Kirk; Meitner, S. J.; Gebhart, T. E.; Baylor, Larry R.; Caughman, John B.; Fehling, Dan T.; Foust, Charles R.; Ha, Tam T.; Lyttle, Mark S.; Fisher, J. T.; Younkin, T. R.

    2016-01-01

    The technology for producing, accelerating, and shattering large pellets (before injection into plasmas) for disruption mitigation has been under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for several years, including a system on DIII-D that has been used to provide some significant experimental results. The original proof-of-principle testing was carried out using a pipe gun injector cooled by a cryogenic refrig- erator (temperatures ~8-20 K) and equipped with a stainless steel tube to produce 16.5-mm pellets composed of either pure D2, pure Ne, or a dual layer with a thin outer shell of D2 and core of Ne. Recently, significant progress has been made in the laboratory using that same pipe gun and a new injector that is an ITER test apparatus cooled with liquid helium. The new injector operates at ~5-8 K, which is similar to temperatures expected with cooling provided by the flow of supercritical helium on ITER. An alternative technique for producing/solidifying large pellets directly from a premixed gas has now been successfully tested in the laboratory. Also, two additional pellet sizes have been tested recently (nominal 24.4 and 34.0 mm diameters). With larger pellets, the number of injectors required for ITER disruption mitigation can be reduced, resulting in less cost and a smaller footprint for the hardware. An attractive option is longer pellets, and 24.4-mm pellets with a length/diameter ratio of ~3 have been successfully tested. Since pellet speed is the key parameter in determining the response time of a shattered pellet system to a plasma disruption event, recent tests have concentrated on documenting the speeds with different hardware configurations and operating parameters; speeds of ~100-800 m/s have been recorded. The data and results from laboratory testing are presented and discussed, and a simple model for the pellet solidification process is described.

  8. Lacosamide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... drowsiness uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body problems with coordination, balance, or walking weakness itching redness, irritation, pain, or discomfort at the injection spot Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of ...

  9. Assessment of electrical conductivity as a surrogate measurement for water samples in a tracer injection experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transport behavior of solutes in streams depends on chemical, physical, biological, and hydrodynamic processes. Although it is a very complex system, it is known that this behavior is greatly influenced by surface and subsurface flows. For this reason, tracer injection in the water flows is one ...

  10. [Effect of pretreatment by solid-state fermentation of sawdust on the pelletization and pellet's properties].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Yuan, Xingzhong; Li, Hui; Li, Changzhu; Xiao, Zhihong; Xiao, Zhihua; Jiang, Longbo; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-10-01

    We pretreated sawdust (Castanopsis fissa Rehd.et Wils) by solid state fermentation (SSF) with Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and then compressed it into pellets with the moisture content of 15% and the pressure of 98 MPa, to solve the problem of low density, low Meyer hardness, high water uptake, and short storage period of pellet in the woody pellet industry. We studied the effects of fermentation time on pelletization and pellets's characteristics (including energy consumption, density, Meyer hardness, and hydrophobicity). SSF affected the heating values of pellet. Compared with fresh sawdust, SSF consumed more energy at the maximal value by 6.98% but saved extrusion energy by 32.19% at the maximum. Meanwhile, SSF could improve the density, Meyer hardness and hydrophobicity of pellet. Pellet made of sawdust pretreated by SSF for 48 d had best quality, beneficial for long-term transportation and storage of pellets. PMID:26964334

  11. [Effect of pretreatment by solid-state fermentation of sawdust on the pelletization and pellet's properties].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Yuan, Xingzhong; Li, Hui; Li, Changzhu; Xiao, Zhihong; Xiao, Zhihua; Jiang, Longbo; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-10-01

    We pretreated sawdust (Castanopsis fissa Rehd.et Wils) by solid state fermentation (SSF) with Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and then compressed it into pellets with the moisture content of 15% and the pressure of 98 MPa, to solve the problem of low density, low Meyer hardness, high water uptake, and short storage period of pellet in the woody pellet industry. We studied the effects of fermentation time on pelletization and pellets's characteristics (including energy consumption, density, Meyer hardness, and hydrophobicity). SSF affected the heating values of pellet. Compared with fresh sawdust, SSF consumed more energy at the maximal value by 6.98% but saved extrusion energy by 32.19% at the maximum. Meanwhile, SSF could improve the density, Meyer hardness and hydrophobicity of pellet. Pellet made of sawdust pretreated by SSF for 48 d had best quality, beneficial for long-term transportation and storage of pellets.

  12. Pellet imaging techniques in the ASDEX tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A. ); Buechl, K.; Hofmann, J.; Lang, R.; Loch, R.; Rudyj, A.; Sandmann, W. )

    1990-11-01

    As part of a USDOE/ASDEX collaboration, a detailed examination of pellet ablation in ASDEX with a variety of diagnostics has allowed a better understanding of a number of features of hydrogen ice pellet ablation in a plasma. In particular, fast-gated photos with an intensified Xybion CCD video camera allow {ital in} {ital situ} velocity measurements of the pellet as it penetrates the plasma. With time resolution of typically 100 ns and exposures every 50 {mu}s, the evolution of each pellet in a multipellet ASDEX tokamak plasma discharge can be followed. When the pellet cloud track has striations, the light intensity profile through the cloud is hollow (dark near the pellet), whereas at the beginning or near the end of the pellet trajectory the track is typically smooth (without striations) and has a gaussian-peaked light emission profile. New, single pellet Stark broadened {ital D}{sub {alpha}}, {ital D}{sub {beta}}, and {ital D}{sub {gamma}} spectra, obtained with a tangentially viewing scanning mirror/spectrometer with Reticon array readout, are consistent with cloud densities of 2{times}10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} or higher in the regions of strongest light emission. A spatially resolved array of {ital D}{sub {alpha}} detectors shows that the light variations during the pellet ablation are not caused solely by a modulation of the incoming energy flux as the pellet crosses rational {ital q} surfaces, but instead are a result of dynamic, nonstationary, ablation process.

  13. Ion heating during magnetic relaxation in the helicity injected torus-II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, R.G.; Redd, A.J.; Hamp, W.T.; Smith, R.J.; Jarboe, T.R.

    2005-12-15

    Ion doppler spectroscopy (IDS) is applied to the helicity injected torus (HIT-II) spherical torus to measure impurity ion temperature and flows. [A. J. Redd et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2006 (2002)] The IDS instrument employs a 16-channel photomultiplier and can track temperature and velocity continuously through a discharge. Data for the coaxial helicity injection (CHI), transformer, and combined current drive configurations are presented. Ion temperatures for transformer-driven discharges are typically equal to or somewhat lower than electron temperatures measured by Thomson scattering. Internal reconnection events in transformer-driven discharges cause rapid ion heating. The CHI discharges exhibit anomalously high ion temperatures >250 eV, which are an order of magnitude higher than Thomson measurements, indicating ion heating through magnetic relaxation. The CHI discharges that exhibit current and poloidal flux buildup after bubble burst show sustained ion heating during current drive.

  14. Analysis of ICRH antenna loading data in TEXTOR obtained during gas injection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, I.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Dumortier, P.; Koch, R.; Messiaen, A.; Vervier, M.

    2011-12-23

    The possibility of increasing the coupling of ICRH power to plasmas on TEXTOR by gas injection was investigated, for a given voltage applied at the input of an antenna pair. The antenna pair was operated in the conjugated T mode, D(H) heating was used. Modeling of the antenna by transmission line theory shows that load resilience is maintained in a broad range of independent resistance variation for each strap. It is found that the absolute value of the reflection coefficient can be maintained below 0.2 for typical values of resistance measured in plasma shots (2-10 {Omega}/m) in good matching conditions. During gas injection, the loading resistance showed a clear increase with increasing line average electron density measured close to the plasma edge. Evidence of fast wave eigenmodes was also found, as characteristic resonant behavior of loading resistance and antenna self-inductance, due to poor absorption in the plasma caused by high H minority concentration.

  15. Response to Delibes-Mateos et al. : Pellet size matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Marta; Rebollo, Salvador; Gálvez-Bravo, Lucía

    2009-05-01

    In Rueda et al. [Rueda, M., Rebollo, S., Gálvez-Bravo, L., 2008. Age and season determine European rabbit habitat use in Mediterranean ecosystems. Acta Oecol. 34, 266-273] we used a threshold of 6 mm faecal pellet diameter to differentiate between adult and juvenile European rabbit ( Oryctolagus cuniculus) habitat use. Delibes-Mateos et al. designed a housing experiment with 12 adult rabbits and criticised the choice of 6 mm as a threshold to separate adult and juvenile rabbit pellets, claiming that adults can produce pellets both larger and smaller than 6 mm in similar proportions. In response to their criticism we argue the following. The selection of a 6 mm threshold has a bibliographic basis, it is not a new method developed by Rueda et al. and produces consistent results when applied in the field. Assuming that Delibes-Mateos et al. results are accurate, we should have found a greater number of <6 mm pellets than >6 mm, overall and seasonally, which is not the case. We believe that the use of commercial pelleted food, keeping animals isolated in small cages for over a year, and the use of adult rabbits only, makes the experimental design used by these authors not suitable to refute the usefulness of separating rabbit pellets smaller and larger than 6 mm diameter as indicators of changes in the relative abundance of juvenile and adult rabbits in the field. Finally, we agree with the authors that the use of indirect methods of animal aging would require case-specific validation studies; however, we believe these studies should be correctly designed.

  16. Non invasive monitoring of water flow in the vadose zone: the issue of mass balance in controlled tracer injection experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Kemna, A.

    2006-12-01

    The non invasive characterization of the subsurface, with the goal of obtaining data for the calibration of flow and transport hydrologic models, has become very popular in recent years. However, the process of converting geophysical data into quantitative estimates of volumetric water content and/or solute concentrations is not straightforward, as it requires knowledge of (1) resolution and penetration characteristics of the geophysical methods (imaging characteristics); (2) suitable constitutive laws for the conversion of geophysical quantities into hydrologic quantities (petrophysics). In addition, the calibration of flow/transport models on the basis of geophysically-derived data requires that the space/time evolution of these data be summarized in terms that can be directly compared with simulation results. In the case of controlled injection experiments having a point source (e.g. a borehole section), an effective tool is the analysis of spatial moments of the injected slug. However, important issues are still unresolved, particularly with regard to the identifiability of second order spatial moments (spread) and, more disturbing, mass balance. Field experience demonstrates that it is rarely possible to "see" the total injected tracer mass by means of a non invasive method, be it cross-hole ERT or GPR, leading to errors of the order of 50%. The reasons of these limitations lie mostly in the imaging characteristics of the methods. A better understanding of these characteristics can, on the other hand, provide new tools for a more accurate calibration of flow/transport models.

  17. Road Maintenance Experience Using Polyurethane (PU) Foam Injection System and Geocrete Soil Stabilization as Ground Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhar, A. M. M.; Asmaniza, A.

    2016-07-01

    There are many types of ground rehabilation and improvement that can be consider and implement in engineering construction works for soil improvement in order to prevent road profile deformation in later stage. However, when comes to road maintenance especially on operated expressways, not all method can be apply directly as it must comply to opreation's working window and lane closure basis. Key factors that considering ideal proposal for ground rehabilitation are time, cost, quality and most importantly practicality. It should provide long lifespan structure in order to reduce continuous cycle of maintenance. Thus, this paper will present two approaches for ground rehabilitation, namely Polyurethane (PU) Foam Injection System and Geocrete Soil Stabilization. The first approach is an injection system which consists two-parts chemical grout of Isocynate and Polyol when mixed together within soil structure through injection will polymerized with volume expansion. The strong expansion of grouting causes significant compression and compacting of the surrounding soil and subsequently improve ground properties and uplift sunken structure. The later is a cold in-place recyclying whereby mixture process that combines in-situ soil materials, cement, white powder (alkaline) additive and water to produce hard yet flexible and durable ground layer that act as solid foundation with improved bearing capacity. The improvement of the mechanical behaviour of soil through these two systems is investigated by an extensive testing programme which includes in-situ and laboratory test in determining properties such as strength, stiffness, compressibility, bearing capacity, differential settlement and etc.

  18. Monitoring a pilot CO2 injection experiment in a shallow aquifer using 3D cross-well electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Lassen, R. N.; Looms, M. C.; Jensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Three dimensional electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a pilot CO2 injection experiment at Vrøgum, Denmark. The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ERT method for monitoring the two opposing effects from gas-phase and dissolved CO2 in a shallow unconfined siliciclastic aquifer. Dissolved CO2 increases water electrical conductivity (EC) while gas phase CO2 reduce EC. We injected 45kg of CO2 into a shallow aquifer for 48 hours. ERT data were collected for 50 hours following CO2 injection. Four ERT monitoring boreholes were installed on a 5m by 5m square grid and each borehole had 24 electrodes at 0.5 m electrode spacing at depths from 1.5 m to 13 m. ERT data were inverted using a difference inversion algorithm for bulk EC. 3D ERT successfully detected the CO2 plume distribution and growth in the shallow aquifer. We found that the changes of bulk EC were dominantly positive following CO2 injection, indicating that the effect of dissolved CO2 overwhelmed that of gas phase CO2. The pre-injection baseline resistivity model clearly showed a three-layer structure of the site. The electrically more conductive glacial sand layer in the northeast region are likely more permeable than the overburden and underburden and CO2 plumes were actually confined in this layer. Temporal bulk EC increase from ERT agreed well with water EC and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar data. ERT monitoring offers a competitive advantage over water sampling and GPR methods because it provides 3D high-resolution temporal tomographic images of CO2 distribution and it can also be automated for unattended operation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL IM release#: LLNL-PROC-657944.

  19. Mathematical simulation of direct reduction process in zinc-bearing pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Su, Fu-yong; Wen, Zhi; Li, Zhi; Yong, Hai-quan; Feng, Xiao-hong

    2013-11-01

    A one-dimensional unsteady mathematical model was established to describe direct reduction in a composite pellet made of metallurgical dust. The model considered heat transfer, mass transfer, and chemical reactions including iron oxide reductions, zinc oxide reduction and carbon gasification, and it was numerically solved by the tridiagonal matrix algorithm (TDMA). In order to verify the model, an experiment was performed, in which the profiles of temperature and zinc removal rate were measured during the reduction process. Results calculated by the mathematical model were in fairly good agreement with experimental data. Finally, the effects of furnace temperature, pellet size, and carbon content were investigated by model calculations. It is found that the pellet temperature curve can be divided into four parts according to heating rate. Also, the zinc removal rate increases with the increase of furnace temperature and the decrease of pellet size, and carbon content in the pellet has little influence on the zinc removal rate.

  20. Geostatistical Analyses of Moisture Plume Dynamics at an Injection Experiment Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleel, R.; Yeh, T.-C.; Ye, M.

    2003-04-01

    At the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Washington state, spatial and temporal distribution of volumetric water contents were measured by neutron probe in 32 wells arranged in a concentric pattern extending to a depth of 16 m [Gee, G. W. and A. L. Ward, “Vadose Zone Transport Field Study,” PNNL-13679, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, 2001]. Variogram analysis of the initial moisture content data exhibits a three-dimensional zonal anisotropic variogram. The vertical variogram shows hole effects, indicating existence of a natural cyclicity of about three meters in the vertical direction. The horizontal variogram was found to have a long range and did not reach a stable sill, implying that the horizontal range is large in relation to the sampled area. This simply reflects the fact that the field site consists of highly stratified geologic units. During the injection period, sample variograms show that both horizontal and vertical sills increased and decreased afterward. Vertical sills were consistently larger than the horizontal ones, reflecting significant contrasts among different lags. This is due to flow being perpendicular to alternating layers of fine and coarse-textured materials. The vertical ranges increased and then oscillated around a certain value indicating a significant reduction in vertical movement of the moisture plume. The horizontal ranges kept on increasing indicating a continuous lateral spreading of the injected fluid. Zero, first, and second moments of the moisture content difference were calculated to quantify the bulk movement in space and time. The moment analyses revealed that the spreading rate in the lateral directions remained constant during the injection period, while spreading rate in the vertical direction kept increasing.

  1. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  2. Preferential heating of light ions during an ionospheric AR(+) injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, C. J.; Moore, T. E.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Kintner, P. M.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The ARCS 4 sounding rocket was launched northward into high altitude from Poker Flat Research Range on February 23, 1990. The vehicle crossed geomagnetic field lines containing discrete auroral activity. An instrumented subpayload released 100 ev and 200 ev Ar(+) ion beams sequentially, in a direction largely perpendicular to both the local geomagnetic field and the subpayload spin axis. The instrumented main payload was separated along field lines from the beam emitting subpayload by a distance which increased at a steady rate of approx. 2.4 m/s. Three-dimensional mass spectrometric ion observations of ambient H(+) and O(+) ions, obtained onboard the main payload, are presented. Main payload electric field observations in the frequency range 0-16 kHz, are also presented. These observations are presented to demonstrate the operation of transverse ion acceleration, that was differential with respect to ion mass, primarily during 100-ev beam operations. The preferential transverse acceleration of ambient H(+) ions, as compared with ambient O(+) ions during the second, third, fourth, and fifth 100-ev beam operations, is attributed to a resonance at the injected the beam drift velocity among the thermal H(+) ions and plasma waves generated by the injected beam and propagating at the beam drift speed. This work provides experimental support of processes predicted by previously published theory and simulations.

  3. Bulk and Surface Molecular Orientation Distribution in Injection-molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers: Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.; Burghardt, W; Bubeck, R; Burgard, S; Fischer, D

    2010-01-01

    Bulk and surface distributions of molecular orientation in injection-molded plaques of thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers (TLCPs) have been studied using a combination of techniques, coordinated with process simulations using the Larson-Doi 'polydomain' model. Wide-angle X-ray scattering was used to map out the bulk orientation distribution. Fourier Transform Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) were utilized to probe the molecular orientation states to within about {approx}5 {micro}m and {approx}2 nm, respectively, of the sample surface. These noninvasive, surface-sensitive techniques yield reasonable self-consistency, providing complementary validation of the robustness of these methods. An analogy between Larson-Doi and fiber orientation models has allowed the first simulations of TLCP injection molding. The simulations capture many fine details in the bulk orientation distribution across the sample plaque. Direct simulation of surface orientation at the level probed by FTIR-ATR and NEXAFS was not possible due to the limited spatial resolution of the simulations. However, simulation results extracted from the shear-dominant skin region are found to provide a qualitatively accurate indicator of surface orientation. Finally, simulations capture the relation between bulk and surface orientation states across the different regions of the sample plaque.

  4. [Experiences with pain control during piglet castration in Switzerland Part 2: Injection anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Enz, A; Schüpbach-Regula, G; Bettschart, R; Fuschini, E; Bürgi, E; Sidler, X

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the practical implementation of the painless castration under injection anaesthesia in Switzerland. 30 swine farms were visited and 60 farmers answered a questionnaire. 34 % of the piglets showed movements during castration under injection anaesthesia and 17 % had excitations during recovery from anaesthesia. After 48 minutes half of the piglets were in sternal position and after 112 minutes half of them showed coordinated movements. The body temperature decreased by 3.1 °C until 60 minutes after castration, especially small piglets reached critical temperature levels. 38 % of the piglets showed strong bleeding after castration. The healing of the wound was good according to 82 % of the farmers. 83 % of the farmers reported piglet losses, especially at the beginning of the anaesthesia period. The anaesthesia may be improved by using butorphanol in addition to the combination of ketamine and azaperone. The recovery of the piglets should be in a warm place without any risk of injury by obstacles or the sow. Increased bleeding can be controlled by using an emasculator.

  5. Non-linear flow transients in fractured rock masses - the 1995 injection experiment in Soultz

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, T.; Jung, R.; Hopkirk, R.J.; Rybach, L.

    1996-01-24

    In July 1995 in the course of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) site investigation studies in Soultz s.F. (France) multi rate hydraulic injection tests were conducted in the borehole GPK2. The downhole pressure records obtained from the lowermost depth domain between 3211 m and 3876 m demonstrate non-laminar hydraulic behavior. Such behavior was also observed earlier during a similar set of flow step tests in the GPKl borehole Soultz. Like the analysis of these earlier data sets, it could be shown that the pressure records from July 1995 are corresponding to empirical flow laws established for non-laminar hydraulic regimes. In this study a numerical model is described which is being developed for the analysis of non-laminar flow in fractures. Similar models have already been applied to production and injection tests at GPK1. The results show that the observed transient pressure record is well predicted by such a non-linear flow law. Conventional laminar flow models cannot reproduce these curves. An evaluation of the parameters resulting from both, steady state and transient analysis leads to assumptions on the geometry of the main fracture system. Our calculations show that surface areas above 0.05 km² and apertures in the order of 0.4 mm results in an excellent fit of the data.

  6. Transient changes in shallow groundwater chemistry during the MSU ZERT CO2 injection experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apps, J.A.; Zheng, Lingyun; Spycher, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Kharaka, Y.; Thordsen, J.; Kakouros, E.; Trautz, R.

    2011-01-01

    Food-grade CO2 was injected into a shallow aquifer through a perforated pipe placed horizontally 1-2 m below the water table at the Montana State University Zero Emission Research and Technology (MSU-ZERT) field site at Bozeman, Montana. The possible impact of elevated CO2 levels on groundwater quality was investigated by analyzing 80 water samples taken before, during, and following CO2 injection. Field determinations and laboratory analyses showed rapid and systematic changes in pH, alkalinity, and conductance, as well as increases in the aqueous concentrations of trace element species. The geochemical data were first evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA) in order to identify correlations between aqueous species. The PCA findings were then used in formulating a geochemical model to simulate the processes likely to be responsible for the observed increases in the concentrations of dissolved constituents. Modeling was conducted taking into account aqueous and surface complexation, cation exchange, and mineral precipitation and dissolution. Reasonable matches between measured data and model results suggest that: (1) CO2 dissolution in the groundwater causes calcite to dissolve. (2) Observed increases in the concentration of dissolved trace metals result likely from Ca+2-driven ion exchange with clays (smectites) and sorption/desorption reactions likely involving Fe (hydr)oxides. (3) Bicarbonate from CO2 dissolution appears to compete for sorption with anionic species such as HAsO4-2, potentially increasing dissolved As levels in groundwater. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. [Experiences with pain control during piglet castration in Switzerland Part 2: Injection anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Enz, A; Schüpbach-Regula, G; Bettschart, R; Fuschini, E; Bürgi, E; Sidler, X

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the practical implementation of the painless castration under injection anaesthesia in Switzerland. 30 swine farms were visited and 60 farmers answered a questionnaire. 34 % of the piglets showed movements during castration under injection anaesthesia and 17 % had excitations during recovery from anaesthesia. After 48 minutes half of the piglets were in sternal position and after 112 minutes half of them showed coordinated movements. The body temperature decreased by 3.1 °C until 60 minutes after castration, especially small piglets reached critical temperature levels. 38 % of the piglets showed strong bleeding after castration. The healing of the wound was good according to 82 % of the farmers. 83 % of the farmers reported piglet losses, especially at the beginning of the anaesthesia period. The anaesthesia may be improved by using butorphanol in addition to the combination of ketamine and azaperone. The recovery of the piglets should be in a warm place without any risk of injury by obstacles or the sow. Increased bleeding can be controlled by using an emasculator. PMID:24297840

  8. Compulsory drug detention center experiences among a community-based sample of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite Thailand's official reclassification of drug users as "patients" deserving care and not "criminals," the Thai government has continued to rely heavily on punitive responses to drug use such as "boot camp"-style compulsory "treatment" centers. There is very little research on experiences with compulsory treatment centers among people who use drugs. The work reported here is a first step toward filling that gap. Methods We examined experiences of compulsory drug treatment among 252 Thai people who inject drugs (IDU) participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors independently associated with a history of compulsory treatment experience. Results In total, 80 (31.7%) participants reported a history of compulsory treatment. In multivariate analyses, compulsory drug detention experience was positively associated with current spending on drugs per day (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.86; 95%CI: 1.07 - 3.22) and reporting drug planting by police (AOR = 1.81; 95%CI: 1.04 - 3.15). Among those with compulsory treatment experience, 77 (96.3%) reported injecting in the past week, and no difference in intensity of drug use was observed between those with and without a history of compulsory detention. Conclusion These findings raise concerns about the current approach to compulsory drug detention in Thailand. Exposure to compulsory drug detention was associated with police abuse and high rates of relapse into drug use, although additional research is needed to determine the precise impact of exposure to this form of detention on future drug use. More broadly, compulsory "treatment" based on a penal approach is not consistent with scientific evidence on addressing drug addiction and should be phased out in favor of evidence-based interventions. PMID:22014093

  9. Preliminary experience with precipitating hydrophobic injectable liquid in brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Koçer, Naci; Hanımoğlu, Hakan; Batur, Şebnem; Kandemirli, Sedat Giray; Kızılkılıç, Osman; Sanus, Zihni; Öz, Büge; Işlak, Civan; Kaynar, Mehmet Yaşar

    2016-01-01

    Advancement in microcatheter design and emergence of new embolic agents offer better results in endovascular treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Precipitating hydrophobic injectable liquid (PHIL) (Microvention) is a newly introduced dimethyl sulfoxide-based embolic agent for endovascular use. Herein, we present three patients who underwent endovascular treatment of brain AVMs with PHIL, followed by surgical resection. Endovascular features and same-day surgical handling of the new embolic agent PHIL are presented along with histopathologic changes in the acute stage in brain AVMs are presented, and its major differences from Onyx. In our series, PHIL had moderate inflammatory reaction in the acute stage without any associated angionecrosis that is different than Onyx which cause mild inflammatory reaction with angionecrosis. Smallest vessel containing PHIL was 2.9 μm compared to 5 μm with Onyx, which suggests better penetration. PMID:26782157

  10. A unique experiment in neurological surgery: intracerebral injection of antitoxin for tetanus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neal B; Pendleton, Courtney; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2010-06-01

    The discipline of neurological surgery was considered primarily "hopeless" and, at best, experimental in the late 19th century. Harvey Cushing's efforts during his initial uncharted voyage through the surgery of the human cranium were rudimentary and exploratory. A direct review of his available patient records from early in his career provides the opportunity to look back at Cushing as a physician-scientist, uncovering work that demonstrates that he was at the forefront of neurosurgical intervention in avenues that have been largely overlooked. The authors present Cushing's notes pertaining to a case of tetanus. This case represents the intersection of neurosurgery and tetanus treatment in Dr. Cushing's intracerebral injection of antitoxin to treat generalized tetanus. PMID:19817546

  11. Preliminary experience with precipitating hydrophobic injectable liquid in brain arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Koçer, Naci; Hanımoğlu, Hakan; Batur, Şebnem; Kandemirli, Sedat Giray; Kızılkılıç, Osman; Sanus, Zihni; Öz, Büge; Işlak, Civan; Kaynar, Mehmet Yaşar

    2016-01-01

    Advancement in microcatheter design and emergence of new embolic agents offer better results in endovascular treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Precipitating hydrophobic injectable liquid (PHIL) (Microvention) is a newly introduced dimethyl sulfoxide-based embolic agent for endovascular use. Herein, we present three patients who underwent endovascular treatment of brain AVMs with PHIL, followed by surgical resection. Endovascular features and same-day surgical handling of the new embolic agent PHIL are presented along with histopathologic changes in the acute stage in brain AVMs are presented, and its major differences from Onyx. In our series, PHIL had moderate inflammatory reaction in the acute stage without any associated angionecrosis that is different than Onyx which cause mild inflammatory reaction with angionecrosis. Smallest vessel containing PHIL was 2.9 μm compared to 5 μm with Onyx, which suggests better penetration. PMID:26782157

  12. Initial Thomson Scattering Survey of Local Helicity Injection and Ohmic Plasmas at the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Winz, G. R.

    2014-10-01

    A multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic has recently been installed on the Pegasus ST. The system utilizes a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (λ0 ~ 532 nm), spectrometers with volume phase holographic gratings, and a gated, intensified CCD camera. It provides measurements of Te and ne at 8 spatial locations for each spectrometer once per discharge. A new multiple aperture and beam dump system has been implemented to mitigate interference from stray light. This system has provided initial measurements in the core region of plasmas initiated by local helicity injection (LHI), as well as conventional Ohmic L- and H-mode discharges. Multi-shot averages of low-density (ne ~ 3 ×1018 m-3) , Ip ~ 0 . 1 MA LHI discharges show central Te ~ 75 eV at the end of the helicity injection phase. Ip ~ 0 . 13 MA Ohmic plasmas at moderate densities (ne ~ 2 ×1019 m-3) have core Te ~ 150 eV in L-mode. Generally, these plasmas do not reach transport equilibrium in the short 25 ms pulse length available. After an L-H transition, strong spectral broadening indicates increasing Te, to values above the range of the present spectrometer system with a high-dispersion VPH grating. Near-term system upgrades will focus on deploying a second spectrometer, with a lower-dispersion grating capable of measuring the 0.1-1.0 keV range. The second spectrometer system will also increase the available number of spatial channels, enabling study of H-mode pedestal structure. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  13. The design and performance of a twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector for Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Urbahn, J.A.

    1994-05-01

    A twenty barrel hydrogen pellet injector has been designed, built and tested both in the laboratory and on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak at MIT. The injector functions by firing pellets of frozen hydrogen or deuterium deep into the plasma discharge for the purpose of fueling the plasma, modifying the density profile and increasing the global energy confinement time. The design goals of the injector are: (1) Operational flexibility, (2) High reliability, (3) Remote operation with minimal maintenance. These requirements have lead to a single stage, pipe gun design with twenty barrels. Pellets are formed by in- situ condensation of the fuel gas, thus avoiding moving parts at cryogenic temperatures. The injector is the first to dispense with the need for cryogenic fluids and instead uses a closed cycle refrigerator to cool the thermal system components. The twenty barrels of the injector produce pellets of four different size groups and allow for a high degree of flexibility in fueling experiments. Operation of the injector is under PLC control allowing for remote operation, interlocked safety features and automated pellet manufacturing. The injector has been extrusively tested and shown to produce pellets reliably with velocities up to 1400 m/sec. During the period from September to November of 1993, the injector was successfully used to fire pellets into over fifty plasma discharges. Experimental results include data on the pellet penetration into the plasma using an advanced pellet tracking diagnostic with improved time and spatial response. Data from the tracker indicates pellet penetrations were between 30 and 86 percent of the plasma minor radius.

  14. Does the effect of pelleting depend on the wheat sample when fed to chickens?

    PubMed

    Pirgozliev, V; Mirza, M W; Rose, S P

    2016-04-01

    Experimental comparisons of the nutritional value of different wheat cultivars commonly use feeds in meal form even though the large-scale broiler producers use steam pelleted feeds. The aim of this experiment was to examine the effect of steam pelleting on the performance, dietary N-corrected apparent metabolisable energy (AMEn), total tract dry matter retention (DMR), nitrogen retention (NR) and fat digestibility (FD) coefficients, and digestive tract development of broilers fed four different wheat samples in complete diets. Four European wheat samples, with different chemical composition and endosperm characteristics, were used in a broiler experiment. The wheat samples were milled through a 5 mm screen and four basal feeds containing 670 g/kg of each selected wheat sample were mixed. The basal feeds were then split into two batches and one of them was steam pelleted resulting in eight experimental diets. Each diet was fed ad libitum to eight pens of two male Ross 308 broilers from 10 to 24 days of age. Feeding pelleted diets improved (P0.05). Feeding different wheat types and pelleting did not (P>0.05) change the development of the gastrointestinal tract of the birds. The study showed that there were differences between four wheat samples when they were fed in pelleted complete feed, but no differences were observed when fed in mash form complete diets. Research on the interaction between pelleting and wheat chemical and quality characteristics is warranted. PMID:26538484

  15. EMC3-EIRENE modelling of toroidally-localized divertor gas injection experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Lore, Jeremy D.; Reinke, M. L.; LaBombard, Brian; Lipschultz, B.; Churchill, R. M.; Pitts, R. A.; Feng, Y.

    2014-09-30

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod with toroidally and poloidally localized divertor nitrogen injection have been modeled using the three-dimensional edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE to elucidate the mechanisms driving measured toroidal asymmetries. In these experiments five toroidally distributed gas injectors in the private flux region were sequentially activated in separate discharges resulting in clear evidence of toroidal asymmetries in radiated power and nitrogen line emission as well as a ~50% toroidal modulation in electron pressure at the divertor target. The pressure modulation is qualitatively reproduced by the modelling, with the simulation yielding a toroidal asymmetry in the heat flow to the outer strike point. Finally, toroidal variation in impurity line emission is qualitatively matched in the scrape-off layer above the strike point, however kinetic corrections and cross-field drifts are likely required to quantitatively reproduce impurity behavior in the private flux region and electron temperatures and densities directly in front of the target.

  16. SAF line pellet gaging. [Secure Automated Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Jedlovec, D.R.; Bowen W.W.; Brown, R.L.

    1983-10-01

    Automated and remotely controlled pellet inspection operations will be utilized in the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) line. A prototypic pellet gage was designed and tested to verify conformance to the functions and requirements for measurement of diameter, surface flaws and weight-per-unit length.

  17. Geophysical monitoring of near surface CO2 injection at Svelvik - Learnings from the CO2FieldLab experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querendez, Etor; Romdhane, Anouar; Jordan, Michael; Eliasson, Peder; Grimstad, Alv-Arne

    2014-05-01

    A CO2 migration field laboratory for testing monitoring methods and tools has been established in the glaciofluvial-glaciomarine Holocene deposits of the Svelvik ridge, near Oslo (Norway). At the site, feasibility, sensitivity, acquisition geometry and usefulness of various surface and subsurface monitoring tools are investigated during controlled CO2 injection experiments. In a first stage, a shallow CO2 injection experiment was conducted in September 2011. Approximately 1700 kg of CO2 was injected at 18 m depth below surface in an unconsolidated sand formation. The objectives of this experiment were to (i) detect and, where possible, quantify migrated CO2 concentrations at the surface and very shallow subsurface, (ii) evaluate the sensitivity of the monitoring tools and (iii) study the impact of the vadose zone on observed measurements. Results showed that all deployed monitoring tools (for surface and near-surface gas monitoring, subsurface water monitoring and subsurface geophysical monitoring) where able to detect the presence of CO2 even though the CO2 plume did not migrate vertically as expected in what was thought to be an homogeneous unconsolidated sand structure. The upper part of the site revealed to be more heterogeneous than expected, mainly due to the highly variable lamination and channelling of the morainic sediments and to the presence of pebble and cobble beds sporadically showing throughout the deposits. Building on the learnings from the 18m depth injection experiment, a second experiment is being planned for a deeper injection, at a depth of 65m. Re-processing of the appraisal 2D multi-channel seismic with state-of-the-art processing techniques, like Linear Radon coherent and random noise attenuation and Full Waveform Inversion followed by pre-stack depth migration, corroborate the presence of heterogeneities at the near surface. Based on the re-interpreted seismic sections, a more realistic 3D geomodel, where the complex topography of the site

  18. Radiation analysis of the CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak) pellet injector system and its impact on personnel access

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.; Stevens, P.N.; Gomes, I.C.; Gomes, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    The conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is nearing completion. The CIT is a short-pulse ignition experiment, which is planned to follow the operations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The high neutron wall loadings, 4--5 MW/m/sup 2/, associated with the operation of this device require that neutronics-related issues be considered in the overall system design. Radiation shielding is required for the protection of device components as well as personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure, and the entire experiment is housed in a circular test cell facility that has a radius of 12 m. The most critical radiation concerns in the CIT design process relate to the numerous penetrations in the device. This report discusses the impact of a major penetration on the design and operation of the pellet injection system in the CIT. The pellet injector is a major component, and it has a line-of-sight penetration through the igloo and test cell wall. All current options for maintenance of the injector require hands-on-access. A nuclear analysis has been performed to establish the feasibility of hands-on-access. A coupled Monte Carlo/discrete-ordinates methodology was used to perform the analysis. This problem is characterized by deep penetration and streaming with very large length-to-diameter ratios. Results from this study indicate that personnel access to the pellet injector glovebox is possible. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Preferential heating of light ions during an ionospheric Ar(+) injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, C. J.; Chandler, M. O.; Moore, T. E.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Kintner, P. M.; Chesney, S.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The Argon Release for Controlled Studies (ARCS) 4 sounding rocket was launched northward into high altitude from Poker Flat Research Range on February 23, 1990. The vehicle crossed geomagnetic field lines containing discrete auroral activity. An instrumented subpayload released 100-eV and 200-eV Ar(+) ion beams sequentially, in a direction largely perpendicular to both the local geomagnetic field and the subpayload spin axis. The instrumented main payload was separated along field lines from the beam emitting subpayload by a distance which increased at a steady rate of approximately 2.4 m/s. Three dimensional mass spectrometric ion observations of ambient H(+) and O(+) ions, obtained on board the main payload, are presented. Main payload electric field observations in the frequency range 0-16 kHz, are also presented. These observations are presented to demonstrate the operation of transverse ion acceleration, which was differential with respect to ion mass, primarily during 100-eV beam operations. The preferential transverse acceleration of ambient H(+) ions, as compared with ambient O(+) ions, during the second, third, fourth, and fifth 100-eV beam operations, is attributed to a resonance among the injected Ar(+) ions, beam-generated lower hybrid waves, and H(+) ions in the tail of the ambient thermal distribution. This work provides experimental support of processes predicted by previously published theory and simulations.

  20. Visible Spectrometer at the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment, the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment and the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak for Doppler Width and Shift Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, A; Howard, S; Horton, R; Hwang, D; May, M; Beiersdorfer, P; McLean, H; Terry, J

    2006-05-15

    A novel Doppler spectrometer is currently being used for ion or neutral velocity and temperature measurements on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak. The spectrometer has an f/No. of {approx}3.1 and is appropriate for visible light (3500-6700 {angstrom}). The full width at half maximum from a line emitting calibration source has been measured to be as small as 0.4 {angstrom}. The ultimate time resolution is line brightness light limited and on the order of ms. A new photon efficient detector is being used for the setup at C-Mod. Time resolution is achieved by moving the camera during a plasma discharge in a perpendicular direction through the dispersion plane of the spectrometer causing a vertical streaking across the camera face. Initial results from C-Mod as well as previous measurements from the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) and the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) are presented.

  1. Looking Northeast Along Hallway between Pellet Plant and Oxide Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Northeast Along Hallway between Pellet Plant and Oxide Building, including Virgin Hopper Bins - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Pellet Plant, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  2. Diffusion behavior and distribution regulation of MgO in MgO-bearing pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qiang-jian; Shen, Yan-song; Wei, Guo; Jiang, Xin; Shen, Feng-man

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the diffusion behavior between MgO and Fe2O3 (the main iron oxide in pellets) is investigated using a diffusion couple method. In addition, the distribution regulation of MgO in MgO-bearing pellets is analyzed via pelletizing experiments. The results illustrate that MgO is prone to diffuse into Fe2O3 in the form of solid solution; the diffusion rate considered here is 13.64 µm·min-1. Most MgO content distributes in the iron phase instead of the slag phase. The MF phase {(Mg1-x Fex)O·Fe2O3, x ≤ 1} is generated in the MgO-bearing pellets. However, the distribution of MgO in the radial direction of the pellets is inconsistent. The solid solution portion of MgO in the MF phase is larger in the outer layer of the pellets than in the inner layer. In this work, the approximate chemical composition of the MF phase in the outer layer of the pellets is {(Mg0.35-0.77·Fe0.65-0.23) O·Fe2O3} and in the inner layer is {(Mg0.13-0.45·Fe0.87-0.55) O·Fe2O3}.

  3. Energy Confinement of High-Density Pellet-Fueled Plasmas in the Alcator C Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, M.; Gwinn, D.; Milora, S.; Parker, J.; Parker, R.; Wolfe, S.; Besen, M.; Camacho, F.; Fairfax, S.; Fiore, C.; Foord, M.; Gandy, R.; Gomez, C.; Granetz, R.; Labombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Lloyd, B.; Marmar, E.; McCool, S.; Pappas, D.; Petrasso, R.; Pribyl, P.; Rice, J.; Schuresko, D.; Takase, Y.; Terry, J.; Watterson, R.

    1984-07-01

    A series of pellet-fueling experiments has been carried out on the Alcator C tokamak. High-speed hydrogen pellets penetrate to within a few centimeters of the magnetic axis, raise the plasma density, and produce peaked density profiles. Energy confinement is observed to increase over similar discharges fueled only by gas puffing. In this manner record values of electron density, plasma pressure, and Lawson number (n τ) have been achieved.

  4. Automated fabrication, characterization and transport of ICF pellets. Final report, March 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, D W; Boyd, B A; Lilienkamp, R H

    1980-12-01

    The near-term objectives of the contract were threefold: (1) evaluate techniques for the production of frozen hydrogen microspheres and demonstrate concepts for coating them; (2) develop and demonstrate an optical characterization system which could lead to automated pellet inspection; and (3) develop and demonstrate a preliminary electrostatic pellet transport control system. This report describes the equipment assembled for these experiments and the results obtained.

  5. Preliminary experiment of high-speed gas flow generation by a compact toroid injection into a gas neutralizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Liu, D.; Shoji, T.; Nakanishi, R.; Fukumoto, N.; Sekioka, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Nagata, M.

    2007-11-01

    A supersonic gas jet injection has been considered to be a new technique for future reactor fuelling and disruption mitigation in tokamak devices [1]. We have recently started to investigate a production of high-speed gas flow by using a compact toroid (CT) injection into a hydrogen gas neutralizer. The electron density of the CT plasma is 1˜4 x10^21 m-3, and the CT speed is 30˜70 km/s in the preliminary experiment. The kinetic-energy measurements of ions and neutrals after the neutralization were carried out by using an electrostatic ion energy analyzer and time-of-flight technique. An enhancement of the Hβ emission level, a significant decay of the CT plasma density and the magnetic field profile have been observed after the neutralization when the neutral pressure is about 10-3 Torr. It could be considered that high-energy neutral particles were generated by a charge exchange process from the CT plasma to the neutral particles. [1] V. Rozhansky, et al., Nucl. Fusion 46, 367 (2006).

  6. Injection of CO2-saturated water through a siliceous sandstone plug from the Hontomin test site (Spain): experiment and modeling.

    PubMed

    Canal, J; Delgado, J; Falcón, I; Yang, Q; Juncosa, R; Barrientos, V

    2013-01-01

    Massive chemical reactions are not expected when injecting CO(2) in siliceous sandstone reservoirs, but their performance can be challenged by small-scale reactions and other processes affecting their transport properties. We have conducted a core flooding test with a quartzarenite plug of Lower Cretaceous age representative of the secondary reservoir of the Hontomín test site. The sample, confined at high pressure, was successively injected with DIW and CO(2)-saturated DIW for 49 days while monitoring geophysical, chemical, and hydrodynamic parameters. The plug experienced little change, without evidence of secondary carbonation. However, permeability increased by a factor of 4 (0.022-0.085 mD), and the V(P)/V(S) ratio, whose change is related with microcracking, rose from ~1.68 to ~1.8. Porosity also increased (7.33-8.1%) from the beginning to the end of the experiment. Fluid/rock reactions were modeled with PHREEQC-2, and they are dominated by the dissolution of Mg-calcite. Mass balances show that ~4% of the initial carbonate was consumed. The results suggest that mineral dissolution and microcracking may have acted in a synergistic way at the beginning of the acidic flooding. However, dissolution processes concentrated in pore throats can better explain the permeability enhancement observed over longer periods of time.

  7. Paper 58714 - Exploring activated faults hydromechanical processes from semi-controled field injection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Nussbaum, C.

    2015-12-01

    The appreciation of the sensitivity of fractures and fault zones to fluid-induced-deformations in the subsurface is a key question in predicting the reservoir/caprock system integrity around fluid manipulations with applications to reservoir leakage and induced seismicity. It is also a question of interest in understanding earthquakes source, and recently the hydraulic behavior of clay faults under a potential reactivation around nuclear underground depository sites. Fault and fractures dynamics studies face two key problems (1) the up-scaling of laboratory determined properties and constitutive laws to the reservoir scale which is not straightforward when considering faults and fractures heterogeneities, (2) the difficulties to control both the induced seismicity and the stimulated zone geometry when a fault is reactivated. Using instruments dedicated to measuring coupled pore pressures and deformations downhole, we conducted field academic experiments to characterize fractures and fault zones hydromechanical properties as a function of their multi-scale architecture, and to monitor their dynamic behavior during the earthquake nucleation process. We show experiments on reservoir or cover rocks analogues in underground research laboratories where experimental conditions can be optimized. Key result of these experiments is to highlight how important the aseismic fault activation is compared to the induced seismicity. We show that about 80% of the fault kinematic moment is aseismic and discuss the complex associated fault friction coefficient variations. We identify that the slip stability and the slip velocity are mainly controlled by the rate of the permeability/porosity increase, and discuss the conditions for slip nucleation leading to seismic instability.

  8. A centrifuge CO2 pellet cleaning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, C. A.; Fisher, P. W.; Nelson, W. D.; Schechter, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    An advanced turbine/CO2 pellet accelerator is being evaluated as a depaint technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The program, sponsored by Warner Robins Air Logistics Center (ALC), Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, has developed a robot-compatible apparatus that efficiently accelerates pellets of dry ice with a high-speed rotating wheel. In comparison to the more conventional compressed air 'sandblast' pellet accelerators, the turbine system can achieve higher pellet speeds, has precise speed control, and is more than ten times as efficient. A preliminary study of the apparatus as a depaint technology has been undertaken. Depaint rates of military epoxy/urethane paint systems on 2024 and 7075 aluminum panels as a function of pellet speed and throughput have been measured. In addition, methods of enhancing the strip rate by combining infra-red heat lamps with pellet blasting and by combining the use of environmentally benign solvents with the pellet blasting have also been studied. The design and operation of the apparatus will be discussed along with data obtained from the depaint studies.

  9. Pelletization of fine coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1995-12-31

    Coal is one of the most abundant energy resources in the US with nearly 800 million tons of it being mined annually. Process and environmental demands for low-ash, low-sulfur coals and economic constraints for high productivity are leading the coal industry to use such modern mining methods as longwall mining and such newer coal processing techniques as froth flotation, oil agglomeration, chemical cleaning and synthetic fuel production. All these processes are faced with one common problem area--fine coals. Dealing effectively with these fine coals during handling, storage, transportation, and/or processing continues to be a challenge facing the industry. Agglomeration by the unit operation of pelletization consists of tumbling moist fines in drums or discs. Past experimental work and limited commercial practice have shown that pelletization can alleviate the problems associated with fine coals. However, it was recognized that there exists a serious need for delineating the fundamental principles of fine coal pelletization. Accordingly, a research program has been carried involving four specific topics: (i) experimental investigation of coal pelletization kinetics, (ii) understanding the surface principles of coal pelletization, (iii) modeling of coal pelletization processes, and (iv) simulation of fine coal pelletization circuits. This report summarizes the major findings and provides relevant details of the research effort.

  10. A centrifuge CO2 pellet cleaning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, C. A.; Fisher, P. W.; Nelson, W. D.; Schechter, D. E.

    1995-03-01

    An advanced turbine/CO2 pellet accelerator is being evaluated as a depaint technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The program, sponsored by Warner Robins Air Logistics Center (ALC), Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, has developed a robot-compatible apparatus that efficiently accelerates pellets of dry ice with a high-speed rotating wheel. In comparison to the more conventional compressed air 'sandblast' pellet accelerators, the turbine system can achieve higher pellet speeds, has precise speed control, and is more than ten times as efficient. A preliminary study of the apparatus as a depaint technology has been undertaken. Depaint rates of military epoxy/urethane paint systems on 2024 and 7075 aluminum panels as a function of pellet speed and throughput have been measured. In addition, methods of enhancing the strip rate by combining infra-red heat lamps with pellet blasting and by combining the use of environmentally benign solvents with the pellet blasting have also been studied. The design and operation of the apparatus will be discussed along with data obtained from the depaint studies.

  11. MREIT experiments with 200 µA injected currents: a feasibility study using two reconstruction algorithms, SMM and harmonic BZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpinar, V. E.; Hamamura, M. J.; Degirmenci, E.; Muftuler, L. T.

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a technique that produces images of conductivity in tissues and phantoms. In this technique, electrical currents are applied to an object and the resulting magnetic flux density is measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the conductivity distribution is reconstructed using these MRI data. Currently, the technique is used in research environments, primarily studying phantoms and animals. In order to translate MREIT to clinical applications, strict safety standards need to be established, especially for safe current limits. However, there are currently no standards for safe current limits specific to MREIT. Until such standards are established, human MREIT applications need to conform to existing electrical safety standards in medical instrumentation, such as IEC601. This protocol limits patient auxiliary currents to 100 µA for low frequencies. However, published MREIT studies have utilized currents 10-400 times larger than this limit, bringing into question whether the clinical applications of MREIT are attainable under current standards. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of MREIT to accurately reconstruct the relative conductivity of a simple agarose phantom using 200 µA total injected current and tested the performance of two MREIT reconstruction algorithms. These reconstruction algorithms used are the iterative sensitivity matrix method (SMM) by Ider and Birgul (1998 Elektrik 6 215-25) with Tikhonov regularization and the harmonic BZ proposed by Oh et al (2003 Magn. Reason. Med. 50 875-8). The reconstruction techniques were tested at both 200 µA and 5 mA injected currents to investigate their noise sensitivity at low and high current conditions. It should be noted that 200 µA total injected current into a cylindrical phantom generates only 14.7 µA current in imaging slice. Similarly, 5 mA total injected current results in 367 µA in imaging slice. Total acquisition time

  12. MREIT experiments with 200μA injected currents: a feasibility study using two reconstruction algorithms, SMM and Harmonic BZ

    PubMed Central

    Arpinar, V E; Hamamura, M J; Degirmenci, E; Muftuler, L T

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a technique that produces images of conductivity in tissues and phantoms. In this technique electrical currents are applied to an object and the resulting magnetic flux density is measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the conductivity distribution is reconstructed using these MRI data. Currently the technique is used in research environments, primarily studying phantoms and animals. In order to translate MREIT to clinical applications, strict safety standards need to be established, especially for safe current limits. However, there are currently no standards for safe current limits specific to MREIT. Until such standards are established, human MREIT applications need to conform to existing electrical safety standards in medical instrumentation, such as the IEC601. This protocol limits patient auxiliary currents to 100μA for low frequencies. However, published MREIT studies have utilized currents 10 to 400 times larger than this limit, bringing into question whether the clinical applications of MREIT are attainable under current standards. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of MREIT to accurately reconstruct the relative conductivity of a simple agarose phantom using 200μA total injected current and we tested the performance of two MREIT reconstruction algorithms. These reconstruction algorithms used are the iterative sensitivity matrix method (SMM) by Ider and Birgul in 1998 with Tikhonov regularization and the Harmonic BZ proposed by Oh et al in 2003. The reconstruction techniques were tested at both 200μA and 5mA injected currents to investigate their noise sensitivity at low and high current conditions. It should be noted that 200μA total injected current into a cylindrical phantom generates only 14.7μA current in imaging slice. Similarly, 5mA total injected current results in 367μA in imaging slice. Total acquisition time for 200μA and 5mA experiments were about one

  13. Experiments on opposed lateral jets injected into swirling crossflow. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurry, C. B.; Lilley, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to obtain the time-mean and turbulent quantities of opposed lateral jets in a low speed, nonreacting flowfield. A jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of R = v sub J/u sub 0 = 4 was used throughout the experiments, with swirl vane angles of d = 0 (swirler removed), 45 and 70 deg used with the crossflow. Flow visualization techniques used were neutrally-buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles and multispark photography in order to obtain the gross flowfield characteristics. Measurements of time-mean and turbulent quantities were obtained utilizing a six-orientation single hot-wire technique. For the nonswirling case, the jets were found not to penetrate past the test-section centerline, in contrast to the single lateral jet with the same jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio. In the swirling cases, the crossflow remains in a narrow region near the wall of the test section. The opposed jets are swept from their vertical courses into spiral trajectories close to the confining walls. Extensive results are presented in r-x plane plots.

  14. Cement/caprock fracture healing experiments to assess the integrity of CO2 injection wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Frane, W. L.; Mason, H. E.; Walsh, S. D.; Ruddle, D. G.; Carroll, S.

    2012-12-01

    It has been speculated that fractures along wellbore cement/caprock interfaces may provide a path for release of carbon from both long-term sequestration-sites and CO2-based enhanced oil recovery operations. The goal of this study is to evaluate the potential for fracture growth and healing in the wellbore environment, and its impact on wellbore permeability. A series of flow-through experiments was conducted, in which sample cores containing a planar fracture between impermeable caprock (compacted quartz, from 13,927' depth in Kern County) and cement (Portland G cured by ATSM standards) were reacted with brine containing variable amounts of carbonic acid (pCO2 between 0 and 3 MPa). The initial fracture geometry was controlled by grinding the caprock and cement pieces flat, and then bead blasting topography into the cement surfaces. Runs lasted 4-8 days with cores and brine maintained at constant temperature (60 °C). Constant confining pressure (24.8 MPa) was applied to cores, while brine was flowed with constant rates (0.05-0.10 mL/min) and pore pressure (12.4 MPa). Geomechanical and geochemical responses of the fractures were monitored by in situ measurements of differential pressure, and by periodically sampling output brine to analyze compositional changes. In every experiment the total permeability of samples cores decreased substantially. For runs using brine with pCO2 = 3 MPa, sample permeability continually decreased by over a factor of 200. Sample permeability also decreased by a factor of 50 having stabilized after ~3 days in a run using brine without CO2 (pCO2 = 0 MPa). These reductions in permeability appear to be the result of chemically-induced changes to the mechanical properties of the cement surface. Prior to reaction, the cement-caprock samples had high strength and elastic response to changes in stress during loading. After the experiments, the samples were weaker, and showed inelastic response to changes in stress during unloading. All cement

  15. Charge-injection-device performance in the high-energy-neutron environment of laser-fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F. J.; DeHaas, T.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2010-10-15

    Charge-injection devices (CIDs) are being used to image x rays in laser-fusion experiments on the University of Rochester's OMEGA Laser System. The CID cameras are routinely used up to the maximum neutron yields generated ({approx}10{sup 14} DT). The detectors are deployed in x-ray pinhole cameras and Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes. The neutron fluences ranged from {approx}10{sup 7} to {approx}10{sup 9} neutrons/cm{sup 2} and useful x-ray images were obtained even at the highest fluences. It is intended to use CID cameras at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a supporting means of recording x-ray images. The results of this work predict that x-ray images should be obtainable on the NIF at yields up to {approx}10{sup 15}, depending on distance and shielding.

  16. Charge-Injection-Device Performance in the High-Energy-Neutron Environment of Laser-Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F.J.; DeHaas, T.; Glebov, V.Yu.

    2010-10-22

    Charge-injection devices (CIDs) are being used to image x rays in laser-fusion experiments on the University of Rochester’s OMEGA Laser System. The CID cameras are routinely used up to the maximum neutron yields generated (~10^14 DT). The detectors are deployed in x-ray pinhole cameras and Kirkpatrick–Baez microscopes. The neutron fluences ranged from ~10^7 to ~10^9 neutrons/cm^2 and useful x-ray images were obtained even at the highest fluences. It is intended to use CID cameras at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a supporting means of recording x-ray images. The results of this work predict that x-ray images should be obtainable on the NIF at yields up to ~10^15, depending on distance and shielding.

  17. Charge-injection-device performance in the high-energy-neutron environment of laser-fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Marshall, F J; DeHaas, T; Glebov, V Yu

    2010-10-01

    Charge-injection devices (CIDs) are being used to image x rays in laser-fusion experiments on the University of Rochester's OMEGA Laser System. The CID cameras are routinely used up to the maximum neutron yields generated (∼10(14) DT). The detectors are deployed in x-ray pinhole cameras and Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes. The neutron fluences ranged from ∼10(7) to ∼10(9) neutrons/cm(2) and useful x-ray images were obtained even at the highest fluences. It is intended to use CID cameras at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a supporting means of recording x-ray images. The results of this work predict that x-ray images should be obtainable on the NIF at yields up to ∼10(15), depending on distance and shielding.

  18. Demonstration of Tokamak Ohmic Flux Saving by Transient Coaxial Helicity Injection in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R.; Mueller, D.; Nelson, B. A.; Jarboe, T. R.; Gerhardt, S.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Paul, S.; Roquemore, L.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Soukhanovskii, V.

    2010-03-01

    Transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) started discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have attained peak currents up to 300 kA and when coupled to induction, it has produced up to 200 kA additional current over inductive-only operation. CHI in NSTX has shown to be energetically quite efficient, producing a plasma current of about 10 A/J of capacitor bank energy. In addition, for the first time, the CHI-produced toroidal current that couples to induction continues to increase with the energy supplied by the CHI power supply at otherwise similar values of the injector flux, indicating the potential for substantial current generation capability by CHI in NSTX and in future toroidal devices.

  19. Demonstration of Tokamak Ohmic Flux Saving by Transient Coaxial Helicity Injection in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R.; Nelson, B. A.; Jarboe, T. R.; Mueller, D.; Gerhardt, S.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Paul, S.; Roquemore, L.; Maingi, R.; Sabbagh, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.

    2010-03-05

    Transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) started discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have attained peak currents up to 300 kA and when coupled to induction, it has produced up to 200 kA additional current over inductive-only operation. CHI in NSTX has shown to be energetically quite efficient, producing a plasma current of about 10 A/J of capacitor bank energy. In addition, for the first time, the CHI-produced toroidal current that couples to induction continues to increase with the energy supplied by the CHI power supply at otherwise similar values of the injector flux, indicating the potential for substantial current generation capability by CHI in NSTX and in future toroidal devices.

  20. Demonstration of Tokamak ohmic flux saving by transient coaxial helicity injection in the national spherical torus experiment.

    PubMed

    Raman, R; Mueller, D; Nelson, B A; Jarboe, T R; Gerhardt, S; Kugel, H W; Leblanc, B; Maingi, R; Menard, J; Ono, M; Paul, S; Roquemore, L; Sabbagh, S; Soukhanovskii, V

    2010-03-01

    Transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) started discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have attained peak currents up to 300 kA and when coupled to induction, it has produced up to 200 kA additional current over inductive-only operation. CHI in NSTX has shown to be energetically quite efficient, producing a plasma current of about 10 A/J of capacitor bank energy. In addition, for the first time, the CHI-produced toroidal current that couples to induction continues to increase with the energy supplied by the CHI power supply at otherwise similar values of the injector flux, indicating the potential for substantial current generation capability by CHI in NSTX and in future toroidal devices. PMID:20366991

  1. Estimation of Sintering Kinetics of Oxidized Magnetite Pellet Using Optical Dilatometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep Kumar, T. K.; Viswanathan, Neelakantan Nurni; Ahmed, Hesham M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Björkman, Bo

    2015-04-01

    The quality of magnetite pellet is primarily determined by the physico-chemical changes the pellet undergoes as it makes excursion through the gaseous and thermal environment in the induration furnace. Among these physico-chemical processes, the oxidation of magnetite phase and the sintering of oxidized magnetite (hematite) and magnetite (non-oxidized) phases are vital. Rates of these processes not only depend on the thermal and gaseous environment the pellet gets exposed in the induration reactor but also interdependent on each other. Therefore, a systematic study should involve understanding these processes in isolation to the extent possible and quantify them seeking the physics. With this motivation, the present paper focusses on investigating the sintering kinetics of oxidized magnetite pellet. For the current investigation, sintering experiments were carried out on pellets containing more than 95 pct magnetite concentrate from LKAB's mine, dried and oxidized to completion at sufficiently low temperature to avoid sintering. The sintering behavior of this oxidized pellet is quantified through shrinkage captured by Optical Dilatometer. The extent of sintering characterized by sintering ratio found to follow a power law with time i.e., Kt n . The rate constant K for sintering was determined for different temperatures from isothermal experiments. The rate constant, K, varies with temperature as and the activation energy ( Q) and reaction rate constant ( K') are estimated. Further, the sintering kinetic equation was also extended to a non-isothermal environment and validated using laboratory experiments.

  2. Influence of the low order rational q surfaces on the pellet deposition profile

    SciTech Connect

    Commaux, Nicolas JC; Pegourie, B.; Baylor, Larry R; Kochi, F.; Parks, P. B.; Jernigan, T. C.; Geraud, A.; Nehme, H.

    2010-02-01

    Pellet injection is planned to be the main fuelling method on ITER. The high temperature of the plasma during a fusion burn will limit the penetration of the pellet to the outer third of the minor radius. This limited penetration is expected to be compensated by a polarization drift, which will deposit the particles deeper in the plasma for the pellets injected from the high field side. In order to evaluate the expected depth of the fuelling on ITER, a good understanding of this drift effect is important. Experimental data acquired on the DIII-D (USA) and Tore Supra (France) tokamaks show that the polarization drift is influenced by the low order rational q surfaces. These surfaces appear to attenuate the polarization mechanism as the drifting particles cross them. In this paper, a correlation between the maximum of the pellet mass deposition profile and the positions of the q = 2 and q = 3 surfaces on DIII-D and Tore Supra is shown for high field side and low field side injection. A model is proposed to explain this effect and compared with the experimental results. To conclude, the possible consequences of this phenomenon on the fuelling in ITER are described.

  3. The resolution of reservoir dynamics with noise based technologies: A case study from the 2006 Basel injection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillers, Gregor; Husen, Stephan; Obermann, Anne; Planes, Thomas; Campillo, Michel; Larose, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We explore the applicability of noise-based monitoring and imaging techniques in the context of the 2006 Basel stimulation experiment using data from five borehole velocimeters and five surface accelerometers located around the injection site. We observe a significant perturbation of medium properties associated with the reservoir stimulation. The transient perturbation, with a duration of 20-30 days, reaches its maximum about 15 days after shut in, when microseismic activity has ceased; it is thus associated with aseismic deformation. Inverting relative velocity change and decorrelation observations using techniques developed and applied on laboratory and local to regional seismological scales, we can image the associated deformation pattern. We discuss limits of the the frequency- and lapse-time dependent resolution and suggestions for improvements considering the 3-D network geometry together with wave propagation models. The depth sensitivity of the analyzed wave field indicates resolution of perturbation in the shallow parts of the sedimentary layer above the stimulated deep volume located in the crystalline base layer. The deformation pattern is similar to InSAR/satellite observations associated with CO2 sequestration experiments, and indicates the transfer of deformation beyond scales associated with the instantaneously stimulated volume. Our detection and localization of delayed induced shallow aseismic transient deformation indicates that monitoring the evolution of reservoir properties using the ambient seismic field provides observables that complement information obtained with standard microseismic approaches. The results constitute a significant advance for the resolution of reservoir dynamics; the technology has the potential to provide critical constraints in related geotechnical situations associated with fluid injection, fracking, (nuclear) waste management, and carbon capture and storage.

  4. Microbiological survey of birds of prey pellets.

    PubMed

    Dipineto, Ludovico; Bossa, Luigi Maria De Luca; Pace, Antonino; Russo, Tamara Pasqualina; Gargiulo, Antonio; Ciccarelli, Francesca; Raia, Pasquale; Caputo, Vincenzo; Fioretti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    A microbiological survey of 73 pellets collected from different birds of prey species housed at the Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center of Napoli (southern Italy) was performed. Pellets were analyzed by culture and biochemical methods as well as by serotyping and polymerase chain reaction. We isolated a wide range of bacteria some of them also pathogens for humans (i.e. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, Campylobacter coli, Escherichia coli O serogroups). This study highlights the potential role of birds of prey as asymptomatic carriers of pathogenic bacteria which could be disseminated in the environment not only through the birds of prey feces but also through their pellets.

  5. Microbiological survey of birds of prey pellets.

    PubMed

    Dipineto, Ludovico; Bossa, Luigi Maria De Luca; Pace, Antonino; Russo, Tamara Pasqualina; Gargiulo, Antonio; Ciccarelli, Francesca; Raia, Pasquale; Caputo, Vincenzo; Fioretti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    A microbiological survey of 73 pellets collected from different birds of prey species housed at the Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center of Napoli (southern Italy) was performed. Pellets were analyzed by culture and biochemical methods as well as by serotyping and polymerase chain reaction. We isolated a wide range of bacteria some of them also pathogens for humans (i.e. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, Campylobacter coli, Escherichia coli O serogroups). This study highlights the potential role of birds of prey as asymptomatic carriers of pathogenic bacteria which could be disseminated in the environment not only through the birds of prey feces but also through their pellets. PMID:26026881

  6. Decomposition of oak leaf litter and millipede faecal pellets in soil under temperate mixed oak forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav; Háněl, Ladislav; Šantrůčková, Hana; Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The millipedes Glomeris hexasticha (Diplopoda, Glomerida) were maintained under laboratory conditions and fed on oak leaf litter collected from a mixed oak forest (Abieto-Quercetum) in South Bohemia, Czech Republic. Every fourth day litter was changed and produced faecal pellets were separated and afterwards analysed. Content of organic carbon and C:N ratio lowered in faecal pellets as compared with consumed litter. Changes in content of chemical elements (P, K, Ca, Mg, Na) were recognised as those characteristic for the first stage of degradation of plant material. Samples of faecal pellets and oak leaf litter were then exposed in mesh bags between the F and H layers of forest soil for up to one year, subsequently harvested and analysed. A higher rate of decomposition of exposed litter than that of faecal pellets was found during the first two weeks. After 1-year exposure, the weight of litter was reduced to 51%, while that of pellets to 58% only, although the observed activity of present biotic components (algae, protozoans, nematodes; CO2 production, nitrogenase activity) in faecal pellets was higher as compared with litter. Different micro-morphological changes were observed in exposed litter and in pellets although these materials originated from the same initial sources. Comparing to intact leaf litter, another structural and functional processes occurred in pellets due to the fragmentation of plant material by millipedes. Both laboratory and field experiments showed that the millipede faecal pellets are not only a focal point of biodegradation activity in upper soil layers, but also confirmed that millipede feces undergo a slower decomposition than original leaf litter.

  7. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Ling; Li, Wei; Song, Ping; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors originate during drug administration; of those errors, about two-thirds involve injectables. Therefore, injection device management is pivotal to safe administration of medications. In this article, the authors summarize the relevant experiences by retrospective analysis of injection device-related near misses and adverse events in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, People's Republic of China. Injection device-related near misses and adverse events comprised the following: 1) improper selection of needle diameter for subcutaneous injection, material of infusion sets, and pore size of in-line filter; 2) complications associated with vascular access; 3) incidents induced by absence of efficient electronic pump management and infusion tube management; and 4) liquid leakage of chemotherapeutic infusion around the syringe needle. Safe injection drug use was enhanced by multidisciplinary collaboration, especially among pharmacists and nurses; drafting of clinical pathways in selection of vascular access; application of approaches such as root cause analysis using a fishbone diagram; plan-do-check-act and quality control circle; and construction of a culture of spontaneous reporting of near misses and adverse events. Pharmacists must be professional in regards to medication management and use. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of cooperation between nurses and pharmacists are pivotal to injection safety. PMID:24669192

  8. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling-ling; Li, Wei; Song, Ping; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors originate during drug administration; of those errors, about two-thirds involve injectables. Therefore, injection device management is pivotal to safe administration of medications. In this article, the authors summarize the relevant experiences by retrospective analysis of injection device-related near misses and adverse events in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, People’s Republic of China. Injection device-related near misses and adverse events comprised the following: 1) improper selection of needle diameter for subcutaneous injection, material of infusion sets, and pore size of in-line filter; 2) complications associated with vascular access; 3) incidents induced by absence of efficient electronic pump management and infusion tube management; and 4) liquid leakage of chemotherapeutic infusion around the syringe needle. Safe injection drug use was enhanced by multidisciplinary collaboration, especially among pharmacists and nurses; drafting of clinical pathways in selection of vascular access; application of approaches such as root cause analysis using a fishbone diagram; plan–do–check–act and quality control circle; and construction of a culture of spontaneous reporting of near misses and adverse events. Pharmacists must be professional in regards to medication management and use. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of cooperation between nurses and pharmacists are pivotal to injection safety. PMID:24669192

  9. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Ling; Li, Wei; Song, Ping; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors originate during drug administration; of those errors, about two-thirds involve injectables. Therefore, injection device management is pivotal to safe administration of medications. In this article, the authors summarize the relevant experiences by retrospective analysis of injection device-related near misses and adverse events in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, People's Republic of China. Injection device-related near misses and adverse events comprised the following: 1) improper selection of needle diameter for subcutaneous injection, material of infusion sets, and pore size of in-line filter; 2) complications associated with vascular access; 3) incidents induced by absence of efficient electronic pump management and infusion tube management; and 4) liquid leakage of chemotherapeutic infusion around the syringe needle. Safe injection drug use was enhanced by multidisciplinary collaboration, especially among pharmacists and nurses; drafting of clinical pathways in selection of vascular access; application of approaches such as root cause analysis using a fishbone diagram; plan-do-check-act and quality control circle; and construction of a culture of spontaneous reporting of near misses and adverse events. Pharmacists must be professional in regards to medication management and use. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of cooperation between nurses and pharmacists are pivotal to injection safety.

  10. Renal capsule xenografting and subcutaneous pellet implantation for the evaluation of prostate carcinogenesis and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Uchtmann, Kristen S; Valdez, Conrad D; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Miralem, Tihomir; Ricke, William A

    2013-01-01

    New therapies for two common prostate diseases, prostate cancer (PrCa) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), depend critically on experiments evaluating their hormonal regulation. Sex steroid hormones (notably androgens and estrogens) are important in PrCa and BPH; we probe their respective roles in inducing prostate growth and carcinogenesis in mice with experiments using compressed hormone pellets. Hormone and/or drug pellets are easily manufactured with a pellet press, and surgically implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of the male mouse host. We also describe a protocol for the evaluation of hormonal carcinogenesis by combining subcutaneous hormone pellet implantation with xenografting of prostate cell recombinants under the renal capsule of immunocompromised mice. Moreover, subcutaneous hormone pellet implantation, in combination with renal capsule xenografting of BPH tissue, is useful to better understand hormonal regulation of benign prostate growth, and to test new therapies targeting sex steroid hormone pathways. PMID:24022657

  11. Groundwater geochemistry in field injection and lab incubation experiments simulating CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers in Newark Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Goldberg, D.; Stute, M.; Matter, J. M.; Takahashi, T.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Umemoto, K.; Seltzer, A. M.; Goddard, J.; Clauson, K.; Zakharova, N. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Newark Basin region has been identified as a potential site for geologic carbon sequestration, given the high energy production in the New York metropolitan area. Its feasibility for carbon storage has been studied at various locations. Public and private wells tap into various aquifer formations in the basin, making it very important to understand the potential risks to drinking groundwater resources associated with CO2 sequestration activities. Geochemical modeling of aquifer water chemistry in response to a CO2 leak has been conducted for field injection and lab incubation experiments to estimate the mineral dissolution and trace metal release, and to develop criteria for water quality monitoring and risk assessment in support of EPA drinking water regulations. A field injection of 827 gallons of 1 atm CO2 saturated aquifer water was conducted in a fracture zone at 1200 ft depth in a sand and clay aquifer in the Newark Basin, followed by three-week incubation and then continuous pumping back. The decrease of pH from 8.2 to 6.1, increase of Ca, Mg and Si concentrations, decrease of sulfate and Mo concentrations, and the release of trace elements, including Fe, Mn, Co, Zn, Ni, Cu, Rb, Sr, Ba and U were observed in the aquifer. Lab incubation experiments using rock samples and aquifer water from Newark Basin showed lower pH, higher concentrations of Ca, Mg, Si, K and Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Rb, Sr, Cd, Ba, Pb, U, and lower concentrations of S, P, Mo, Sb in CO2 treated experiments than in N2 treated control experiments under both abiotic and biotic conditions. Geochemical modeling using PHREEQC indicates silicate and carbonate dissolution, and the desorption/adsorption of trace elements due to pH and redox change. Rapid and simultaneous change of pH, electrical conductivity, carbonate/silicate dissolution, and trace metal release in aquifer water could be used as indicators of possible CO2 leaking from geological sequestration sites. Under leakage scenarios

  12. Biological improvement on combined mycelial pellet for aniline treatment by tourmaline in SBR process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si; Li, Ang; Cui, Di; Duan, Shuyue; Yang, Jixian; Ma, Fang; Shi, Shengnan; Ren, Nanqi

    2011-10-01

    As a biomass carrier, mycelial pellet of Aspergillus niger Y3 was used to immobilize the aniline-degrading bacterium Acinetobacter calcoaceticus JH-9 and the mix culture of the COD rapid degrading bacteria in this study. Tourmaline was added to this system in order to improve the aniline removal performance using combined mycelial pellet. Flask experiments were performed to investigate the promotion mechanism. The results showed that the start-up time was shorted from 7 cycles to only 1 cycle. The aniline and COD concentration in effluent were much lower in the tourmaline-adding system. It was suggested that tourmaline could enhance the number and activity of the aniline-degrading bacteria immobilized on the mycelial pellet. Therefore, the performance of mycelial pellet as a biomass carrier could be improved by tourmaline. PMID:21764303

  13. Study on the Structures of Two Booster Pellets Having High Initiation Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang-Qi, Hu; Hong-Rong, Liu; Li-shuang, Hu; Xiong, Cao; Xiang-Chao, Mi; Hai-Xia, Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Insensitive munitions (IM) improve the survivability of both weapons and their associated platforms, which can lead to a reduction in casualties, mission losses, and whole life costs. All weapon systems contain an explosive train that needs to meet IM criteria but reliably initiate a main charge explosive. To ensure that these diametrically opposed requirements can be achieved, new highly effective booster charge structures were designed. The initiation capacity of the two booster pellets was studied using varied composition and axial-steel-dent methods. The results showed that the two new booster pellets can initiate standard main charge pellets with less explosive mass than the ordinary cylindrical booster pellet. The numerical simulation results were in good agreement with the experiment results.

  14. Biological improvement on combined mycelial pellet for aniline treatment by tourmaline in SBR process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si; Li, Ang; Cui, Di; Duan, Shuyue; Yang, Jixian; Ma, Fang; Shi, Shengnan; Ren, Nanqi

    2011-10-01

    As a biomass carrier, mycelial pellet of Aspergillus niger Y3 was used to immobilize the aniline-degrading bacterium Acinetobacter calcoaceticus JH-9 and the mix culture of the COD rapid degrading bacteria in this study. Tourmaline was added to this system in order to improve the aniline removal performance using combined mycelial pellet. Flask experiments were performed to investigate the promotion mechanism. The results showed that the start-up time was shorted from 7 cycles to only 1 cycle. The aniline and COD concentration in effluent were much lower in the tourmaline-adding system. It was suggested that tourmaline could enhance the number and activity of the aniline-degrading bacteria immobilized on the mycelial pellet. Therefore, the performance of mycelial pellet as a biomass carrier could be improved by tourmaline.

  15. Comment on Li pellet Conditioning in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2011-05-23

    Li pellet conditioning in TFTR results in a reduction of the edge electron density which allows increased neutral beam penetration, central heating, and fueling. Consequently the temperature profiles became more peaked with higher central Ti, Te, and neutron emission rates.

  16. 21 CFR 520.1628 - Oxfendazole powder and pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxfendazole powder and pellets. 520.1628 Section... Oxfendazole powder and pellets. (a) Specifications—(1) Powder for suspension. Each gram of powder contains 7.57 percent oxfendazole. (2) Pellets. Each gram of pellets contains 6.49 percent oxfendazole....

  17. 21 CFR 520.1628 - Oxfendazole powder and pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxfendazole powder and pellets. 520.1628 Section... Oxfendazole powder and pellets. (a) Specifications—(1) Powder for suspension. Each gram of powder contains 7.57 percent oxfendazole. (2) Pellets. Each gram of pellets contains 6.49 percent oxfendazole....

  18. 21 CFR 520.1628 - Oxfendazole powder and pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxfendazole powder and pellets. 520.1628 Section... Oxfendazole powder and pellets. (a) Specifications—(1) Powder for suspension. Each gram of powder contains 7.57 percent oxfendazole. (2) Pellets. Each gram of pellets contains 6.49 percent oxfendazole....

  19. 21 CFR 520.1628 - Oxfendazole powder and pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxfendazole powder and pellets. 520.1628 Section... Oxfendazole powder and pellets. (a) Specifications—(1) Powder for suspension. Each gram of powder contains 7.57 percent oxfendazole. (2) Pellets. Each gram of pellets contains 6.49 percent oxfendazole....

  20. 21 CFR 520.1628 - Oxfendazole powder and pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxfendazole powder and pellets. 520.1628 Section... Oxfendazole powder and pellets. (a) Specifications—(1) Powder for suspension. Each gram of powder contains 7.57 percent oxfendazole. (2) Pellets. Each gram of pellets contains 6.49 percent oxfendazole....

  1. The effect of polycarbophil on the gastric emptying of pellets.

    PubMed

    Khosla, R; Davis, S S

    1987-01-01

    The influence of the putative bioadhesive, polycarbophil, on the gastric emptying of a pellet formulation, has been investigated in three fasted subjects. The pellets were radiolabelled with technetium-99m. Gastric emptying was measured using the technique of gamma scintigraphy. The pellets emptied from the stomach rapidly and in an exponential manner. Polycarbophil did not retard the gastric emptying of the pellets.

  2. Study of the influence of alkalizing components on matrix pellets prepared by extrusion/spheronization.

    PubMed

    Hamedelniel, Elnazeer I; Bajdik, János; Kása, Péter; Pintye-Hódi, Klára

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of alkalizing components and the nature of the wetting liquid on the properties of matrix pellets prepared by extrusion and spheronization. Atenolol was used as an active pharmaceutical ingredient, ethylcellulose as a matrix former, microcrystalline cellulose as a filler and disodium phosphate anhydrous and trisodium phosphate dodecahydrate as alkalizing materials. Water and a water-ethanol mixture served as granulation liquids. Pellet formation was evaluated via mechanical, dissolution and morphological studies. In order to enhance the dissolution of Atenolol from the pellets, alkalizing components were used and the influence of these components on the pH was tested. Investigations of the breaking hardness, the morphology and the dissolution revealed that the pellets containing trisodium phosphate dodecahydrate and prepared with a higher amount of water as binding liquid displayed the best physico-chemical parameters and uniform dissolution. In in vitro experiments, the dissolution release complied with the texture of the pellets and the effect of pH. The pellets have suitable shape and very good hardness for the coating process and are appropriate for subsequent in vivo experiments. PMID:21067337

  3. Pellet-press-to-sintering-boat nuclear fuel pellet loading system

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, G.D.

    1988-08-23

    This patent describes a system for loading nuclear fuel pellets into a sintering boat from a pellet press which ejects newly made the pellets from a pellet press die table surface. The system consists of: (a) a bowl having an inner surface, a longitudinal axis, an open and generally circular top of larger diameter, and an open and generally circular bottom of smaller diameter; (b) means for supporting the bowl in a generally upright position such that the bowl is rotatable about its longitudinal axis; (c) means for receiving the ejected pellets proximate the die table surface of the pellet press and for discharging the received pellets into the bowl at a location proximate the inner surface towards the top of the bowl with a pellet velocity having a horizontal component which is generally tangent to the inner surface of the bowl proximate the location; (d) means for rotating the bowl about the longitudinal axis such that the bowl proximate the location has a velocity generally equal, in magnitude and direction, to the horizontal component of the pellet velocity at the location; and (e) means for moving the sintering boat generally horizontally beneath and proximate the bottom of the bowl.

  4. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of floating riboflavin pellets developed using the melt pelletization process.

    PubMed

    Hamdani, J; Goole, J; Moës, A J; Amighi, K

    2006-10-12

    Floating pellets were prepared using the melt pelletization process in a Mi-Pro high shear mixer (Pro-C-epT, Belgium). Formulations were based on a mixture of Compritol and Precirol as meltable binders and on the use of sodium bicarbonate and tartaric acid as gas-generating agents. Good floating abilities were obtained by using the gas-generating agents in both the inner matrix and the outer coating layer of the pellets. In vitro evaluation of floating capability was performed both by using the resultant weight apparatus and by counting floating pellets at the surface of beakers containing 0.1N HCl solution, in vivo evaluation of floating pellets capabilities was also performed. Riboflavin-containing floating pellets (FRF) were administered orally to nine healthy volunteers versus non-floating pellets (NFRF). Volunteers were divided in two groups, fasted group (n=4) 729 kcal and fed group (n=5) 1634 kcal as the total calorie intake on the testing day. An increase of urinary excretion of riboflavin was observed when the volunteers were dosed with the floating pellets, especially after feeding. As riboflavin has a narrow window of absorption in the upper part of small intestine, this phenomenon could be attributable to the gastric retention of floating pellets. PMID:16815656

  5. Pelletization process of postproduction plant waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obidziński, S.

    2012-07-01

    The results of investigations on the influence of material, process, and construction parameters on the densification process and density of pellets received from different mixtures of tobacco and fine-grained waste of lemon balm are presented. The conducted research makes it possible to conclude that postproduction waste eg tobacco and lemon balm wastes can be successfully pelletized and used as an ecological, solid fuels.

  6. EMC3-EIRENE modelling of toroidally-localized divertor gas injection experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lore, Jeremy D.; Reinke, M. L.; LaBombard, Brian; Lipschultz, B.; Churchill, R. M.; Pitts, R. A.; Feng, Y.

    2014-09-30

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod with toroidally and poloidally localized divertor nitrogen injection have been modeled using the three-dimensional edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE to elucidate the mechanisms driving measured toroidal asymmetries. In these experiments five toroidally distributed gas injectors in the private flux region were sequentially activated in separate discharges resulting in clear evidence of toroidal asymmetries in radiated power and nitrogen line emission as well as a ~50% toroidal modulation in electron pressure at the divertor target. The pressure modulation is qualitatively reproduced by the modelling, with the simulation yielding a toroidal asymmetry in the heat flow to the outermore » strike point. Finally, toroidal variation in impurity line emission is qualitatively matched in the scrape-off layer above the strike point, however kinetic corrections and cross-field drifts are likely required to quantitatively reproduce impurity behavior in the private flux region and electron temperatures and densities directly in front of the target.« less

  7. An economical and market analysis of Canadian wood pellets.

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, J.

    2010-08-01

    This study systematically examined the current and future wood pellet market, estimated the cost of Canadian torrefied pellets, and compared the torrefied pellets with the conventional pellets based on literature and industrial data. The results showed that the wood pellet industry has been gaining significant momentum due to the European bioenergy incentives and the rising oil and natural gas prices. With the new bioenergy incentives in USA, the future pellets market may shift to North America, and Canada can potentially become the largest pellet production centre, supported by the abundant wood residues and mountain pine beetle (MPB) infested trees.

  8. Antibiotic release from impregnated pellets and beads.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, G W; Cumberland, N

    1994-03-01

    Antibiotic impregnated beads are being used increasingly in the initial treatment of open fracture wounds, producing high antibiotic levels locally, over the first few days. Pellets were prepared to assess the release of the following antibiotics: benzylpenicillin, flucloxacillin, amoxycillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate (Co-Amoxiclav), ciprofloxacin, imipenem, or gentamicin; the carrier material was either polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or plaster of Paris (PoP). Elution of antibiotic over 72 hours from the pellets in vitro was determined using an agar-diffusion microbiologic assay. The initial rapid release of antibiotic lasted 12-24 hours, with release from PoP pellets at least four-fold greater than that from corresponding PMMA pellets. A second phase consisted of a sustained but gradually diminishing elution. The release of antibiotics from PoP pellets compared favorably with that from the PMMA beads currently used. We conclude that PoP pellets may be particularly suitable for short-term applications such as infection prophylaxis in open fractures.

  9. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; Lau, A.; Bi, X. T.

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challengingmore » due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.« less

  10. Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT-SI) Spheromak Experiment with the NIMROD Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Cihan

    A comparative study of 3-D pressureless resistive (single-fluid) magnetohydrodynamic (rMHD) and 3-D pressureless two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (2fl-MHD) models of the Helicity Injected Torus experiment (HIT-SI) is presented. HIT-SI is a spheromak current-drive experiment that uses two geometrically asymmetric helicity injectors to generate and sustain toroidal plasmas. The goal of the experiment is to demonstrate that steady inductive helicity injection (SIHI) is a viable method for driving and sustaining a magnetized plasma for the eventual purpose of electricity production with magnetic fusion power. The experiment has achieved sustainment of nearly 100 kA of plasma current for ˜1~ms. Fusion power plants are expected to sustain a burning plasma for many minutes to hours with more than 10~MA of plasma current. The purpose of project is to determine the validity of the single-fluid and two-fluid MHD models of HIT-SI. The comparable size of the collisionless ion skin depth to the diameter of the injectors and resistive skin depth predicates the importance of two-fluid effects. The simulations are run with NIMROD (non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics code with rotation-open discussion), an initial-value, 3-D extended MHD code. A constant and uniform plasma density and temperature are assumed. The helicity injectors are modeled as oscillating normal magnetic and parallel electric field boundary conditions. The simulations use parameters that closely match those of the experiment. The simulation output is compared to the formation time, plasma current, and internal and surface magnetic fields. Results of the study indicate 2fl-MHD shows quantitative agreement with the experiment while rMHD only captures the qualitative features. The validity of each model is assessed based on how accurately it reproduces the global quantities as well as the temporal and spatial dependence of the measured magnetic fields. 2fl-MHD produces the current amplification and formation time

  11. Capacity of a horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland system for the removal of emerging pollutants: an injection experiment.

    PubMed

    Avila, Cristina; Pedescoll, Anna; Matamoros, Víctor; Bayona, Josep María; García, Joan

    2010-11-01

    A continuous injection experiment was implemented in a pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland system to evaluate the behavior of four pharmaceuticals and personal care products (i.e. ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac and tonalide) and a phenolic estrogenic compound (i.e. bisphenol A). The treatment system consisted of an anaerobic reactor as a primary treatment, followed by two 0.65 m² wetlands (B1 and B2) working in parallel and connected to a 1.65 m² wetland (B3) operating in series. Overall removal efficiencies for the selected compounds ranged from 97% to 99%. The response curves of the injected pollutants show that the behavior of these compounds strongly depends on their sorption and biodegradation characteristics. While about 50% of ibuprofen was removed in B1 and B2, 99% was achieved at B3, where the dissolved oxygen concentration was significantly higher (B1-B2=0.5 mg L⁻¹ and B3=5.4 mg L⁻¹). Naproxen and diclofenac were efficiently removed (93%) in B1 and B2, revealing anaerobic degradation as a probable removal mechanism. Moreover, tonalide and bisphenol A were readily removed in the small wetlands (94% and 83%, respectively), where the removal of total suspended solids was 93%. Therefore, given their high hydrophobicity, sorption onto the particulate matter stands for the major removal mechanism. However, the tentative identification of carboxy-bisphenol A as an intermediate degradation product in B3 suggested biodegradation as a relevant bisphenol A removal pathway under aerobic prevailing conditions.

  12. Onyx injection by direct puncture for the treatment of hypervascular spinal metastases close to the anterior spinal artery: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Clarençon, Frédéric; Di Maria, Federico; Cormier, Evelyne; Sourour, Nader-Antoine; Enkaoua, Eric; Sailhan, Frédéric; Iosif, Christina; Le Jean, Lise; Chiras, Jacques

    2013-06-01

    Presurgical devascularization of hypervascular spinal metastases has been shown to be effective in preventing major blood loss during open surgery. Most often, embolization can be performed using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) microparticles. However, in some cases, the close relationship between the feeders of the metastases and the feeders of the anterior spinal artery (ASA) poses a risk of spinal cord ischemia when PVA microparticle embolization is performed. The authors present their early experience in the treatment of spinal metastases close to the ASA; in 2 cases they injected Onyx-18, by direct puncture, into hypervascular posterior arch spinal metastases situated close to the ASA. Two women, one 36 and the other 55 years of age, who presented with spinal lesions (at the posterior arch of C-4 and T-6, respectively) from thyroid and a kidney tumors, were sent to the authors' department to undergo presurgical embolization. After having performed a complete spinal digital subtraction angiography study, a regular angiography catheter was positioned at the ostium of the artery that mainly supplied the lesion. Then, with the patient in the left lateral decubitus position, direct puncture with 18-gauge needles of the lesion was performed using roadmap guidance. Onyx-18 was injected through the needles under biplanar fluoroscopy. Satisfactory devascularization of the lesions was obtained; the ASA remained patent in both cases. The metastases were surgically removed in both cases within the 48 hours after the embolization and major blood loss did not occur. Presurgical devascularization of hypervascular spinal metastases close the ASA by direct puncture with Onyx-18 seems to be an effective technique and appears to be safe in terms of the preserving the ASA's patency. PMID:23600580

  13. Simulation of reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Sabuj

    The primary motivation of this work is to evaluate a new alternative ironmaking process which involves the combination of a Rotary Hearth Furnace (RHF) with an iron bath smelter. This work is concerned primarily, with the productivity of the RHF. It is known that the reduction in the RHF is controlled by chemical kinetics of the carbon oxidation and wustite reduction reactions as well as by heat transfer to the pellet surface and within the pellet. It is heat transfer to the pellet which limits the number of layers of pellets in the pellet bed in the RHF and thus, the overall productivity. Different types of carbon like graphite, coal-char and wood charcoal were examined. Part of the research was to investigate the chemical kinetics by de-coupling it from the influence of heat and mass transfer. This was accomplished by carrying out reduction experiments using small iron-oxide-carbon powder composite mixtures. The reaction rate constants were determined by fitting the experimental mass loss with a mixed reaction model. This model accounts for the carbon oxidation by CO2 and wustite reduction by CO, which are the primary rate controlling surface-chemical reactions in the composite system. The reaction rate constants have been obtained using wustite-coal-char powder mixtures and wustite-wood-charcoal mixtures. The wustite for these mixtures was obtained from two iron-oxide sources: artificial porous analytical hematite (PAH) and hematite ore tailings. In the next phase of this study, larger scale experiments were conducted in a RHF simulator using spherical composite pellets. Measurement of the reaction rates was accomplished using off-gas analysis. Different combinations of raw materials for the pellets were investigated. These included artificial ferric oxide as well as naturally existing hematite and taconite ores. Graphite, coal-char and wood-charcoal were the reductants. Experiments were conducted using a single layer, a double layer and a triple layer of

  14. Ultrasonic vibration-assisted (UV-A) pelleting of wheat straw: a constitutive model for pellet density.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Meng; Pei, Z J; Wang, Donghai

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic vibration-assisted (UV-A) pelleting can increase cellulosic biomass density and reduce biomass handling and transportation costs in cellulosic biofuel manufacturing. Effects of input variables on pellet density in UV-A pelleting have been studied experimentally. However, there are no reports on modeling of pellet density in UV-A pelleting. Furthermore, in the literature, most reported density models in other pelleting methods of biomass are empirical. This paper presents a constitutive model to predict pellet density in UV-A pelleting. With the predictive model, relations between input variables (ultrasonic power and pelleting pressure) and pellet density are predicted. The predicted relations are compared with those determined experimentally in the literature. Model predictions agree well with reported experimental results.

  15. Development of Metal/Polymer Mixtures Dedicated to Macro and Micro powder Injection Moulding : Experiments and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Quinard, C.; Barriere, T.; Gelin, J. C.; Song, J. P.; Cheng, Z. Q.; Liu, B. S.

    2007-05-17

    Important research tasks at ENSMM/LMA are concerned for the development of mixtures of fine powders associated to polymer binders dedicated to the powder injection moulding (PIM) and to the powder injection micro-moulding ({mu}PIM) in accordance with many works already carried out with different feedstock suppliers dedicated to the macro-components. These research tasks are completed with the simulations of injection and sintering for solid state diffusion for to validate the mumerical models.

  16. An investigation into pellet dispersion ballistics.

    PubMed

    Nag, N K; Sinha, P

    1992-08-01

    Existing works on pellet dispersion ballistics are confined to some data-based models derived from statistical analysis of observed patterns on targets but the underlying process causing the dispersion lacks due attention. The present article delves into the relatively unexplored areas of dispersion phenomena, and attempts to develop a theoretical model for general application. The radial velocity distribution of pellets has been worked out by probing into the physical process of dispersion based on transfer of momentum from undispersed shot mass to dispersed pellets. The ratio 2u/v0 (u = root mean square (r.m.s.) radial velocity and v0 = muzzle velocity of the pellets) is found to be fairly constant for a fixed gun-ammunition combination and has been suitably designated as 'Dispersion Index' (DI) characterising its dispersion capability. The present model adequately accounts for pellet distribution on targets and it appears that 'Effective Shot Dispersion' (ESD) as introduced by Mattoo and Nabar [ESD = [(4/N0)sigma Ri2]1/2, where N(0) is the total number of pellets and Ri is the radial distance of the i-th pellet from centre of pattern], gives a faithful numerical measure of overall dispersion at a given distance. A relationship between ESD and firing distance, incorporating the effects of air resistance and gravity has been worked out, which reveals that DI controls the dispersion at a given distance. For small distances (less than 20 m) the relation reduces to a linear one, as already observed empirically and looks like ESD = E0+DI x firing distance, E0 being a parameter dependent on gun and ammunition. The present model, unlike earlier ones, is versatile enough to explain the natures of the dependence of dispersion on firing distance as well as on gun-ammunition parameters, which are essential for a faithful reconstruction of a crime scene. The model has been tested with such experimental data as are available and reasonable agreement is observed. PMID:1398370

  17. Low velocity boron micro-pellet injector for edge and core impurity transport measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Gorman, J.; Kaita, R.; Munsat, T.; Stutman, D.

    1999-01-01

    A simple low velocity boron micro-pellet injector has been under development for Current Drive Experiment Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus edge and core impurity transport measurements, and wall conditioning. The injector consists of 16 barrels on a rotatable turret. Each barrel can be loaded with boron powder particles of diameters ranging from 1 to 40 {mu}m diameter in amounts ranging from less than 0.25 mg to more than 2 mg. A selected barrel is manually rotated into firing position using a vacuum precision rotary/linear motion feedthrough. A piezoelectric valve gas feed system triggered by CDX-U discharge timing is used to control H{sub 2} or D{sub 2} propellant gas at a cylinder pressure of 5.8{times}10{sup {minus}3thinsp} Pa (40 psi) or less. The injector barrel-to-CDX-U plasma edge distance is 0.47 m. Initial low mass injections of neutral boron beams were performed into CDX-U plasmas at a velocity of 23 m/s. Measurements were obtained with a filtered gated charge coupled device TV camera, bolometry, visible spectroscopy, and ultrasoft x-ray diagnostics. This work is in support of the present CDX-U research program and possible applications on National Spherical Torus Experiment. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Low velocity boron micro-pellet injector for edge and core impurity transport measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugel, H. W.; Gorman, J.; Kaita, R.; Munsat, T.; Stutman, D.

    1999-01-01

    A simple low velocity boron micro-pellet injector has been under development for Current Drive Experiment Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus edge and core impurity transport measurements, and wall conditioning. The injector consists of 16 barrels on a rotatable turret. Each barrel can be loaded with boron powder particles of diameters ranging from 1 to 40 μm diameter in amounts ranging from less than 0.25 mg to more than 2 mg. A selected barrel is manually rotated into firing position using a vacuum precision rotary/linear motion feedthrough. A piezoelectric valve gas feed system triggered by CDX-U discharge timing is used to control H2 or D2 propellant gas at a cylinder pressure of 5.8×10-3 Pa (40 psi) or less. The injector barrel-to-CDX-U plasma edge distance is 0.47 m. Initial low mass injections of neutral boron beams were performed into CDX-U plasmas at a velocity of 23 m/s. Measurements were obtained with a filtered gated charge coupled device TV camera, bolometry, visible spectroscopy, and ultrasoft x-ray diagnostics. This work is in support of the present CDX-U research program and possible applications on National Spherical Torus Experiment.

  19. A 400-pellet feed system for the ORNL centrifuge pellet injector

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, C.A.; Qualls, A.L.; Baylor, L.R.; Schechter, D.E.; Dyer, G.R.; Milora, S.L.

    1993-11-01

    An improved and extended pellet fabrication and feed mechanism is being developed for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) centrifuge pellet injector that is presently installed on Tore Supra. This upgrade will extend the number of pellets available for a single-plasma discharge from 100 to 400. In addition, a new pusher and delivery system is expected to improve the performance of the device. As in the original system, deuterium ice is deposited from the gas phase on a liquid-helium-cooled rotating disk, forming a rim of solid deuterium. The rim of ice is machined to a parabolic profile from which pellets are pushed. In the new device, a stack of four ice rims are formed simultaneously, thereby increasing the capacity from 100 to 400 pellets. An improved method of ice formation has also been developed that produces clear ice. The pellet pusher and delivery system utilizes a four-axis, brushless dc servo system to precisely cut and deliver the pellets from the ice rim to the entrance of the centrifuge wheel. Pellets can be formed with sizes ranging from 2.5- to 4-mm diam at a rate of up to 8 per second. The operation of the injector is fully automated by a computer control system. The design and test results of the device are reported.

  20. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Jason M.; Lessing, Paul A.; Hoggan, Rita E.

    2015-11-01

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ± 0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. Pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.

  1. Effects of calcium hydroxide and calcium chloride addition to bentonite in iron ore pelletization.

    PubMed

    Tugrul, Nurcan; Derun, Emek Moroydor; Pişkin, Mehmet

    2006-10-01

    Pyrite ash is created as waste from the roasting of pyrite ores during the production of sulphuric acid. These processes generate great amounts of pyrite ash waste that is generally land filled. This creates serious environmental pollution due to the release of acids and toxic substances. Pyrite ash waste can be utilized in the iron production industry as a blast furnace feed to process this waste and prevent environmental pollution. The essential parameters affecting the pelletization process of pyrite ash were studied using bentonite as a binder. Experiments were then carried out using bentonite and a mixture of bentonite with calcium hydroxide and calcium chloride in order to make the bentonite more effective. The metallurgical properties of pyrite ash, bentonite, calcium hydroxide, calcium chloride, a mixture of these and sintered pellets were studied using X-ray analysis. The crushing strength tests were carried out to investigate the strength of pyrite ash waste pellets. The results of these analyses showed that pyrite ash can be agglomerated to pellets and used in the iron production industry as a blast furnace feed. The crushing strength of the pellets containing calcium hydroxide and calcium chloride in addition to bentonite was better than the strength of pellets prepared using only bentonite binder. PMID:17121116

  2. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, Jason Michael; Lessing, Paul Alan; Hoggan, Rita Elaine

    2015-06-21

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinations that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ±0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scaning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. As a result, pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.

  3. Uranium silicide pellet fabrication by powder metallurgy for accident tolerant fuel evaluation and irradiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Harp, Jason Michael; Lessing, Paul Alan; Hoggan, Rita Elaine

    2015-06-21

    In collaboration with industry, Idaho National Laboratory is investigating uranium silicide for use in future light water reactor fuels as a more accident resistant alternative to uranium oxide base fuels. Specifically this project was focused on producing uranium silicide (U3Si2) pellets by conventional powder metallurgy with a density greater than 94% of the theoretical density. This work has produced a process to consistently produce pellets with the desired density through careful optimization of the process. Milling of the U3Si2 has been optimized and high phase purity U3Si2 has been successfully produced. Results are presented from sintering studies and microstructural examinationsmore » that illustrate the need for a finely ground reproducible particle size distribution in the source powder. The optimized process was used to produce pellets for the Accident Tolerant Fuel-1 irradiation experiment. The average density of these pellets was 11.54 ±0.06 g/cm3. Additional characterization of the pellets by scaning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction has also been performed. As a result, pellets produced in this work have been encapsulated for irradiation, and irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor is expected soon.« less

  4. Injection drug users' and their risk networks experiences of and attitudes toward drug dealer violence in Baltimore, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Latkin, Carl A.; Yang, Cui; Tobin, Karin E.; German, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Background A large portion of violence associated with drug use is due to drug dealing. These analyses sought to examine injection drug users' attitudes and experiences of drug dealer violence. Methods The current study used the 18-month follow up data of STEP into Action (STEP) study, an HIV prevention intervention among drug injectors and their risk network members conducted in Baltimore, Maryland. Four scales assessed acceptability of drug dealer violence, willingness to talk to drug users about avoiding drug dealer violence, social norms about reporting drug dealer violence, and intentions to report drug dealer violence to the police. Results Many (44%) of the 373 participants reported witnessing drug dealers' acts of violence within the prior 6 months. Although the majority of participants disagreed with statements on the acceptability of dealers using violence, only a minority indicated that they would call the police if they observed dealer violence. Most participants indicated that they would be interested in talking to drug users about how to avoid violent dealers. Males were more likely to report that violence was acceptable, whereas African Americans were less likely to condone violence. Those who were homeless and had higher incomes were more likely to report witnessing drug dealer violence. Conclusions These results suggest that it may be feasible to train current and former drug users and their risk network members in methods to promote violence reduction among drug dealers. PMID:22959117

  5. Obtaining the Linear Electron Beams by Using the Magnetron Injection Guns with Cold Secondary Emission Metallic Cathodes (Experiment).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tur, Yu. D.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Mitrochenko, V. V.; Reshetnyak, N. G.; Romas'ko, V. P.; Zakutin, V. V.

    1997-05-01

    The problem of extending the life-time, of increasing the pulse and average power of many RF-sources is closely related to the design of their electron guns. As it is known, the magnetron injection guns with secondary emission metallic cathodes (SEMC-MIG) are specified by the high current emission density and long life-time. The main goal of these investigations is to determine the possibility of using SEMC-MIGs as the electron source in high-power RF devices and accelerator injector systems. The experiments have been performed by using the experimental setup to investigate SEMC-MIG linear electron beam parameters from single and multiple beams gun assemblies with the anode voltage up to 100 kV, pulse duration up to 10 μs, repetition rate 25 Hz and 0.1-0.2 T magnetic field strength. Pulse-to-pulse long-term stability of the annular electron beams (internal diameter nearly equal to the cathode diameter, wide of ring 1-2 mm ) with beam density up to 70 A/cm^2 have been achieved. It is shown, that the cathode diameter extension provides a proportionate increasing of the beam current. In the case of multiple beam gun assemblies we have separated identical electron beams.

  6. Ionic Strength Effect on the Rate of Reduction of Hexacyanoferrate(III) by Ascorbic Acid: A Flow Injection Kinetic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobrega, Joanquim A.; Rocha, Fabio R. P.

    1997-05-01

    Flow injection analysis (FIA) is a well recognized tool for solutions management. In spite of the use of this technique mainly for quantitative determination of analytes in solution, FIA systems can also be used for obtaining physical chemistry data. This work describes the use of a flow diagram to perform a kinetic experiment: the effect of ionic strength on the rate of reduction of hexacyanoferrate(III) by ascorbic acid. The rate determining step of this reaction involves the collision between two anionic species. The increase of the ionic strength of the medium alters the ionic atmosphere and changes the charge densities around the anions. Consequently, there is an increment of the rate constants for higher ionic strengths. In the proposed system, the flow is stopped by commutation when the center of the sample zone attained the flow cell and a gradual decrease in signal, related to the redox reaction, is registered as function of time. This allowed the determination of the rate constants as a function of the ionic strength. The product of the charges of the ions involved in the rate determining step was estimated in 3.2 that is close to the expected value considering the proposed mechanism.

  7. Gas migration in fractured rock: results and modelling of a helium gas injection experiment at the Reskajeage farm test site, SW England, United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineham, T. R.; Nash, P. J.; Rodwell, W. R.; Bolt, J.; Watkins, V. M. B.; Grainger, P.; Heath, M. J.; Merefield, J. R.

    1996-02-01

    It is anticipated that the U.K. radioactive waste repository will be sited in a saturated low-permeability fractured geology. The repository will contain material that will give rise to the generation of significant quantities of gas over an extended period of time. It is important to understand the mechanisms whereby these gases are released from the repository and migrate away. If the gases were to be localised at surface they could potentially pose radiological, toxicological or flammability risks to man. This paper discusses experimental and modelling studies of gas migration in water-saturated fractured rock. A field-scale helium gas injection experiment has been undertaken at a test site in a disused quarry. The aims of the experiment were to establish whether gas injected at depth was localised on release at the land surface, and to contribute to building confidence in the models being developed to describe gas migration processes. Gas was injected for nine days and throughout this period and the subsequent twelve months soil-gas surveying was used to establish release locations. Data from the experiment have been modelled using a number of approaches ranging from analytical scoping calculations to numerical simulations of two-phase flow in a porous medium. These approaches have proved useful in modelling gas injection experiments.

  8. Tritium pellet injector design for tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Baylor, L.R.; Bryan, W.E.; Combs, S.K.; Easterly, C.E.; Lunsford, R.V.; Milora, S.L.; Schuresko, D.D.; White, J.A.; Williamson, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    A tritium pellet injector (TPI) system has been designed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Q approx. 1 phase of operation. The injector gun utilizes a radial design with eight independent barrels and a common extruder to minimize tritium inventory. The injection line contains guide tubes with intermediate vacuum pumping stations and fast valves to minimize propellant leakage to the torus. The vacuum system is designed for tritium compatibility. The entire injector system is contained in a glove box for secondary containment protection against tritium release. Failure modes and effects have been analyzed, and structural analysis has been performed for most intense predicted earthquake conditions. Details of the design and operation of this system are presented in this paper.

  9. Modeling single-well injection experiments with delayed extraction in fractured bedrock aquifers - applications in CO2 geosequestration research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Stute, M.; Zakharova, N. V.; Matter, J.; Takahashi, T.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Goldberg, D.

    2013-12-01

    Characterization of the solute transport of anthropogenically introduced solutions in fractured bedrock aquifers has practical implications on environmental problems related to CO2 geological sequestration, hydraulic fracturing, and environmental fracturing remediation. Tracer tests using conservative chemicals, such as push-pull experiments in single borehole, provide a direct and reliable method to estimate the solute transport and have been used as a basis for further understanding of the biogeochemical processes in the subsurface. Obtaining analytical solutions often requires simplification of the hydrogeological processes and usually is not practical or very difficult. For example, environmental studies often require a delayed extraction to increase the reaction time and amplify the biogeochemical signals during the push-pull experiments. Simulating these processes by numerical models demands large computation resources, but can reveal the complexity and heterogeneity of aquifer and hydrological processes. Testing the sensitivity of model parameters in such simulations allows for an understanding of the most significant parameters of these processes. In this study, seven push-pull experiments with delayed extraction after the introduction of chemical salts (e.g. NaCl and KBr), gases (SF6, SF5CF3), or isotopic tracers (18O, 13C) were conducted in a test well in the Newark Basin at two different depths. Fracture zones at these depths correspond to the contact zone (232-240 m) between the Palisades diabase sill and the underlying Newark Basin sand and clay sediments and an interval (362-366 m) within the sedimentary rock formations. This study investigates the feasibility of CO2 geological sequestration and the potential environmental impact in the event of CO2 leakage into overlying groundwater aquifers in sedimentary formations. Analytical solutions were adapted using non-Fickian models to fit the observed tracer breakthrough curves. Normalized tracer

  10. Air gun pellet: cardiac penetration and peripheral embolization.

    PubMed

    Işık, Onur; Engin, Çağatay; Daylan, Ahmet; Şahutoğlu, Cengiz

    2016-05-01

    Use of high-velocity air guns can to lead to serious injuries. Management options of cardiac pellet gun injuries are based on patient stability, and course and location of the pellet. Presently reported is the case of a boy who was shot with an air gun pellet. Following right ventricular entry, the pellet lodged in the left atrium and embolized to the right iliac and femoral artery. Following pellet localization, right ventricular injury was repaired, and the pellet was removed successfully. PMID:27598599

  11. High-speed repetitive pellet injector for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Foust, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    The projected fueling requirements of future magnetic confinement devices for controlled thermonuclear research [e.g., the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)] indicate that a flexible plasma fueling capability is required. This includes a mix of traditional gas puffing and low- and high-velocity deuterium-tritium pellets. Conventional pellet injectors (based on light gas guns or centrifugal accelerators) can reliably provide frozen hydrogen pellets (1- to 6-mm-diam sizes tested) up to {approximately}1.3-km/s velocity at the appropriate pellet fueling rates (1 to 10 Hz or greater). For long-pulse operation in a higher velocity regime (>2 km/s), an experiment in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ENEA Frascati is under way. This activity will be carried out in the framework of a collaborative agreement between the US Department of Energy and European Atomic Energy Community -- ENEA Association. In this experiment, an existing ORNL hydrogen extruder (equipped with a pellet chambering mechanism/gun barrel assembly) and a Frascati two-stage light gas gun driver have been combined on a test facility at ORNL. Initial testing has been carried out with single deuterium pellets accelerated up to 2.05 km/s with the two-stage driver; in addition, some preliminary repetitive testing (to commission the diagnostics) was performed at reduced speeds, including sequences at 0.5 to 1 Hz and 10 to 30 pellets. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate repetitive operation (up to {approximately}1 Hz) with speeds in the 2- to 3-km/s range. In addition, the strength of extruded hydrogen ice as opposed to that produced in situ by direct condensation in pipe guns can be investigated. The equipment and initial experimental results are described.

  12. Development and optimization of solid dispersion containing pellets of itraconazole prepared by high shear pelletization.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guanhao; Wang, Siling; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chen, Ling; Wang, Chao

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated the solid dispersion containing pellets of itraconazole for enhanced drug dissolution rate. The influence of process parameters used during high shear pelletization on the pellet properties including pellet size and dissolution rate was also studied. Solid dispersions of itraconazole were prepared with Eudragit E100, a hydrophilic polymer, by a simple fusion method followed by powdered and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction. Solid dispersions containing pellets were consequently prepared using a lab-scale high shear mixer. In order to improve the product quality, a central composite design was applied to optimize the critical process variables, such as impeller speed and kneading time, and the results were modeled statistically. Itraconazole was presented as an amorphous state in the solid dispersion prepared at a drug to polymer ratio of 1:2. Both studied parameters had great effect on the responses. Powdered solid dispersion and pellets prepared using the optimal parameter settings showed approximately 30- and 70-fold increases in dissolution rate over the pure drug, respectively. Solid dispersion prepared by simple fusion method could be an option for itraconazole solubility enhancement. Pelletization process in high shear mixer can be optimized effectively by central composite design. PMID:17241757

  13. International Trade of Wood Pellets (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-05-01

    The production of wood pellets has increased dramatically in recent years due in large part to aggressive emissions policy in the European Union; the main markets that currently supply the European market are North America and Russia. However, current market circumstances and trade dynamics could change depending on the development of emerging markets, foreign exchange rates, and the evolution of carbon policies. This fact sheet outlines the existing and potential participants in the wood pellets market, along with historical data on production, trade, and prices.

  14. CO{sub 2} pellet blasting studies

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    Initial tests with CO{sub 2} pellet blasting as a decontamination technique were completed in 1993 at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). During 1996, a number of additional CO{sub 2} pellet blasting studies with Alpheus Cleaning Technologies, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pennsylvania State University were conducted. After the testing with Alpheus was complete, an SDI-5 shaved CO{sub 2} blasting unit was purchased by the ICPP to test and determine its capabilities before using in ICPP decontamination efforts. Results of the 1996 testing will be presented in this report.

  15. Studies of cell pellets: I. Electrical properties and porosity.

    PubMed Central

    Abidor, I G; Li, L H; Hui, S W

    1994-01-01

    Cell pellets formed by centrifugation provided a good system to study the osmotic behavior, electroporation, and interaction between cells. Rabbit erythrocyte pellets were used in this study because they were simpler than nucleated cells to model analytically. Structurally, cell pellets possessed properties of porous solid bodies and gels. Electrically, cell pellets were shown to behave as a parallel set of resistance, Rp, and capacitance, Cp. Information on pellet structures was obtained from electric measurements. The pellet resistance reflected the intercellular conductivity (porosity and gap conductivity), whereas the pellet capacitance depended mostly on membrane capacitance. The pellet resistance was more sensitive to experimental conditions. The intercellular gap distance can be derived from pellet porosity measurements, providing the cell volume and surface area were known. Rp increased and relaxed exponentially with time when centrifugation started and stopped; the cycles were reversible. When supernatants were exchanged with solutions containing hypotonic electrolytes or macromolecules (such as PEG) after the pellets were formed, complicated responses to different colloidal osmotic effects were observed. A transient decrease followed by a large increase of Rp was observed after the application of a porating electric pulse, as expected from a momentary membrane breakdown, followed by a limited colloidal-osmotic swelling of pelleted cells. The equilibrium values of Rp, Cp, pellet porosity, and intercellular distances were measured and calculated as functions of cell number, centrifugation force, and ionic strength of the exchanged supernatant. Thus, the structure and properties of cell pellets can be completely characterized by electrical measurements. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 11 PMID:7919015

  16. Ion heating with high-power perpendicular neutral-beam injection in the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, M.; Bitter, M.; Bol, K.; Brau, K.; Davis, S.; Dylla, F.; Eubank, H.; Finkenthal, M.; Fonck, R.; Goldston, R.; Grek, B.; Hugill, J.; Johnson, D.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Mansfield, D.; Manos, D.; McGuire, K.; McCann, R.; McCune, D.; Mueller, D.; Okabayashi, M.; Owens, K.; Reusch, M.; Sauthoff, N.; Schilling, G.; Schmidt, G.; Sesnic, S.; Suckewer, S.; Tait, G.; Takahashi, H.; Tenney, F.; Yamazaki, K.

    1982-08-02

    Plasma heating by near-perpendicular injection of up to 7.2 MW of neutral-beam power has been studied in the PDX tokamak. Collisionless plasmas with central ion temperatures up to 6 keV have been obtained. The total plasma energy, which is dominated by contributions from beam and thermal ions, rises linearly with increasing beam power. The ion heating efficiency in PDX is comparable to that measured in PLT with tangential injection.

  17. Ion Heating with High-Power Perpendicular Neutral-Beam Injection in the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, M.; Bitter, M.; Bol, K.; Brau, K.; Davis, S.; Dylla, F.; Eubank, H.; Finkenthal, M.; Fonck, R.; Goldston, R.; Grek, B.; Hugill, J.; Johnson, D.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Mansfield, D.; Manos, D.; McGuire, K.; McCann, R.; McCune, D.; Mueller, D.; Okabayashi, M.; Owens, K.; Reusch, M.; Sauthoff, N.; Schilling, G.; Schmidt, G.; Sesnic, S.; Suckewer, S.; Tait, G.; Takahashi, H.; Tenney, F.; Yamazaki, K.

    1982-08-01

    Plasma heating by near-perpendicular injection of up to 7.2 MW of neutral-beam power has been studied in the PDX tokamak. Collisionless plasmas with centrla ion temperatures up to 6 keV have been obtained. The total plasma energy, which is dominated by contributions from beam and thermal ions, rises linearly with increasing beam power. The ion heating efficiency in PDX is comparable to the measured in the Princeton Large Torus with tangential injection.

  18. “We don't need services. We have no problems”: exploring the experiences of young people who inject drugs in accessing harm reduction services

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Anita; Hildebrand, Mikaela; Sun, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Evidence suggests that people who inject drugs often begin their drug use and injecting practices in adolescence, yet there are limited data available on the HIV epidemic and the responses for this population. The comprehensive package of interventions for the prevention, treatment and care of HIV infection among people who inject drugs first laid out in 2009 (revised in 2012) by World Health Organization, United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime and Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, does not consider the unique needs of adolescent and young people. In order to better understand the values and preferences of young people who inject drugs in accessing harm reduction services and support, we undertook a series of community consultations with young people with experience of injecting drugs during adolescence. Methods Community consultations (4–14 persons) were held in 14 countries. Participants were recruited using a combined criterion and maximum variation sampling strategy. Data were analyzed using collaborative qualitative data analysis. Frequency analysis of themes was conducted. Results Nineteen community consultations were organized with a total of 132 participants. All participants had experienced injecting drugs before the age of 18. They had the following age distribution: 18–20 (37%), 21–25 (48%) and 26–30 (15%). Of the participants, 73.5% were male while 25.7% were female, with one transgender participant. Barriers to accessing the comprehensive package included: lack of information and knowledge of services, age restrictions on services, belief that services were not needed, fear of law enforcement, fear of stigma, lack of concern, high cost, lack of outreach, lack of knowledge of HCV/TB and lack of youth friendly services. Conclusions The consultations provide a rare insight into the lived experiences of adolescents who inject drugs and highlight the dissonance between their reality and current policy and programmatic

  19. Modeling of Fluid Induced Deformation of the Upper Crust of the Earth: Tilt Investigations About the Large Scale Injection Experiment at the KTB/Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahr, T.; Jentzsch, G.; Gebauer, A.

    2006-12-01

    The injection experiment at the KTB started in June, 2004 with a medium injection rate of 180 liters/minute into the KTB pilot borehole (4000 meters deep). A tiltmeter array, consisting of five high resolution borehole tiltmeters of the ASKANIA type, was operating in the surrounding area of the KTB location from mid 2003 until September 2006. The tiltmeters have a resolution of better than 0.2 msec (about 1 nrad). The aim of the research project was to observe the induced deformation of the upper crust at kilometer scale and to interpret the observation by numerical modeling, together with the monitoring of induced seismicity in the area. We expect elastic as well as anelastic responses: Changes of the rheologic properties due to pore pressure increase will cause changes in the tidal parameters. Further we expect sudden changes of the drift curve as well as slow variations. For the separation of the induced drift signal it is necessary to eliminate locally induced interference, e.g. arising from groundwater variations. The ground water / pore pressure changes, observed at all stations show significant correlations with the recorded tilt signals. The reduction of these locally acting effects and also meteorological influences like barometric pressure changes or precipitation yield tilt signals, which are significantly correlated with the injection experiment: The hodograms, which describe the tip movement of the pendulum over ground, show a clear dominant drift away from the injection point for three stations. This corresponds with a bulge in the area where the injection takes place. The tilt amplitudes are in the order of some milliseconds. Parallel to the observations with the tiltmeter array we quantified the expected additional drift for different injection scenarios at each tiltmeter site, by numerical modeling using the program POEL. It can be demonstrated that the tilt signals caused by injection intervals of less than three days are not detectable by the

  20. Feeding soywaste or pellet on performance and carcass characteristics of post-weaning kids.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Mijanur; Khadijah, Wan Embong Wan; Abdullah, Ramli Bin

    2016-08-01

    Twelve Jermasia kids were individually housed in pens to study the effects of soywaste on growth performance and carcass characteristics and to compare such effects with commercial pellet. Kids were divided into a pellet group and a soywaste group, including six kids (3 males and 3 females) in each group. Pellet or soywaste was offered to kids at a rate of 2.0 % dry matter (DM) of body weight/day in addition to Napier grass ad libitum. In last 10 days of experiment, kids were housed in metabolism crates for faeces collection. At the end of the experiment, three males from each group were slaughtered. Kids fed soywaste diet consumed more grass and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) than those fed pellet. The same trend was found for the digestibilities of DM, organic matter (OM) and NDF. Conversely, kids fed soywaste diet consumed less soywaste supplement than kids fed pellet. No treatment effects were observed on total intakes of DM, OM and crude protein (CP) including CP digestibility. Similarly, no effects were found on carcass and non-carcass components, except for lean, lean to fat ratio and kidney weight which were higher for kids fed soywaste diet. Results indicate that soywaste is effective as a feed for growing kids.

  1. Effects of pelleting, extrusion, or extrusion and pelleting on energy and nutrient digestibility in diets containing different levels of fiber and fed to growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Rojas, O J; Vinyeta, E; Stein, H H

    2016-05-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine effects of pelleting, extrusion, and extrusion and pelleting on energy and nutrient digestibility in diets containing low, medium, or high concentrations of fiber. Three diets were formulated: 1) the low-fiber diet contained corn and soybean meal; 2) the medium-fiber diet contained corn, soybean meal, and 25% distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS); and 3) the high-fiber diet contained corn, soybean meal, 25% DDGS, and 20% soybean hulls. Each diet was divided into 4 batches after mixing. One batch was not further processed and was fed in a meal form, one batch was pelleted at 85°C, one batch was extruded at 115°C using a single-screw extruder, and one batch was extruded at 115°C and then pelleted at 85°C. Thus, 12 different diets were produced. Twenty-four growing pigs (26.5 ± 1.5 kg initial BW) had a T-cannula installed in the distal ileum and were allotted to the 12 diets in a split-plot design with 8 pigs allotted to the low-fiber diets, the medium-fiber diets, and the high-fiber diets, respectively. Diets were fed to the pigs during four 14-d periods. Within each type of diet, the 8 pigs were fed the diets produced using the 4 processing technologies. Therefore, there were 8 replicate pigs per diet. Pigs were adjusted to their diets for 14 d before the experiment was initiated. Each of the four 14-d periods consisted of 5 d for adaptation, 5 d of fecal collection according to the marker to marker approach, and ileal digesta were collected on d 13 and 14. Results indicated that pelleting, extrusion, or extrusion and pelleting improved ( < 0.05) the apparent ileal digestibility of starch and most indispensable AA. In most cases, there were no differences between the pelleted, the extruded, and the extruded and pelleted diets. The apparent total tract digestibility of GE was also improved ( < 0.05) by pelleting and by the combination of extrusion and pelleting. The ME of pelleted diets was greater ( < 0.05) than

  2. Ceramic fuel pellets for isotopic heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, D.T.; Congdon, J.W.; Livingston, J.T.; Duncan, N.D.

    1980-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) will supply power for future space missions. The GPHS fuel pellets are fabricated by hot pressing a blended mixture of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ granules prepared from calcined plutonium oxalate. Results of a test program which led to the development of the production process are described.

  3. Paleoparasitological analysis of a raptor pellet from southern Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Fugassa, M H; Sardella, N H; Denegri, G M

    2007-04-01

    Organic remains attributable to one regurgitated pellet were examined. The pellet, belonging to a bird of prey and collected from a cave of Southern Patagonia, was dated at 6,540 +/- 110 yr. With standard paleoparasitological procedures, eggs of Capillaria sp. and a mite, Demodex sp., were found. The parasites found in the pellet belong to a rodent ingested by the bird. The present report constitutes the first paleoparasitological study of a regurgitated pellet. PMID:17539429

  4. Paleoparasitological analysis of a raptor pellet from southern Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Fugassa, M H; Sardella, N H; Denegri, G M

    2007-04-01

    Organic remains attributable to one regurgitated pellet were examined. The pellet, belonging to a bird of prey and collected from a cave of Southern Patagonia, was dated at 6,540 +/- 110 yr. With standard paleoparasitological procedures, eggs of Capillaria sp. and a mite, Demodex sp., were found. The parasites found in the pellet belong to a rodent ingested by the bird. The present report constitutes the first paleoparasitological study of a regurgitated pellet.

  5. NIR techniques create added values for the pellet and biofuel industry.

    PubMed

    Lestander, Torbjörn A; Johnsson, Bo; Grothage, Morgan

    2009-02-01

    A 2(3)-factorial experiment was carried out in an industrial plant producing biofuel pellets with sawdust as feedstock. The aim was to use on-line near infrared (NIR) spectra from sawdust for real time predictions of moisture content, blends of sawdust and energy consumption of the pellet press. The factors varied were: drying temperature and wood powder dryness in binary blends of sawdust from Norway spruce and Scots pine. The main results were excellent NIR calibration models for on-line prediction of moisture content and binary blends of sawdust from the two species, but also for the novel finding that the consumption of electrical energy per unit pelletized biomass can be predicted by NIR reflectance spectra from sawdust entering the pellet press. This power consumption model, explaining 91.0% of the variation, indicated that NIR data contained information of the compression and friction properties of the biomass feedstock. The moisture content model was validated using a running NIR calibration model in the pellet plant. It is shown that the adjusted prediction error was 0.41% moisture content for grinded sawdust dried to ca. 6-12% moisture content. Further, although used drying temperatures influenced NIR spectra the models for drying temperature resulted in low prediction accuracy. The results show that on-line NIR can be used as an important tool in the monitoring and control of the pelletizing process and that the use of NIR technique in fuel pellet production has possibilities to better meet customer specifications, and therefore create added production values. PMID:18952415

  6. Preparation and evaluation of colon adhesive pellets of 5-aminosalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meixia; Sun, Minjie; Qiao, Hongzhi; Ping, Qineng; Elamin, Eltayeb Suliman

    2014-07-01

    Oral modified-release delivery systems, such as bio-adhesive one, enable drug delivery to affected regions and minimize the side effects by reducing the systemic absorption. Our aim was to develop colon adhesive pellets of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. The core of the pellet was formulated from bioadhesive agents, Carbomer 940 and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), by extrusion/spheronization method and coated with Surelease(®) as inner layer for waterproof and with Eudragit(®) S100 as outer layer for pH control. The rat model of ulcerative colitis was used to evaluate the efficiency of our loaded pellets as a drug carrier. Microcrystalline cellulose 101 (PH 301) was found to be the best agent for pellet core. The ratio of CP940 to HPC should be kept as (1:1) to achieve high bioadhesion. When the amount of Surelease(®) was from 16% to 20% and of Eudragit(®) S100 was 28%, the dissolution profiles of coated pellets revealed no drug release in the artificial gastric fluid (pH 1.0) within 2h and less than 10% was released in phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) within 2h whereas complete dissolution was observed in colonic fluid of pH 7.4 for 20 h. The animal experiment showed that 5-ASA loaded colon adhesive pellets had optimal therapeutic effect. We showed a novel approach to prepare effective bioadhesive pellets as colon targeted drug delivery system. PMID:24746693

  7. Effects of intra-prelimbic prefrontal cortex injection of cannabidiol on anxiety-like behavior: involvement of 5HT1A receptors and previous stressful experience.

    PubMed

    Fogaça, M V; Reis, F M C V; Campos, A C; Guimarães, F S

    2014-03-01

    The prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex (PL) is an important encephalic structure involved in the expression of emotional states. In a previous study, intra-PL injection of cannabidiol (CBD), a major non-psychotomimetic cannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant, reduced the expression of fear conditioning response. Although its mechanism remains unclear, CBD can facilitate 5HT1A receptor-mediated neurotransmission when injected into several brain structures. This study was aimed at verifying if intra-PL CBD could also induce anxiolytic-like effect in a conceptually distinct animal model, the elevated plus maze (EPM). We also verified if CBD effects in the EPM and contextual fear conditioning test (CFC) depend on 5HT1A receptors and previous stressful experience. CBD induced opposite effects in the CFC and EPM, being anxiolytic and anxiogenic, respectively. Both responses were prevented by WAY100,635, a 5HT1A receptor antagonist. In animals that had been previously (24h) submitted to a stressful event (2h-restraint) CBD caused an anxiolytic, rather than anxiogenic, effect in the EPM. This anxiolytic response was abolished by previous injection of metyrapone, a glucocorticoid synthesis blocker. Moreover, restraint stress increased 5HT1A receptors expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus, an effect that was attenuated by injection of metyrapone before the restraint procedure. Taken together, these results suggest that CBD modulation of anxiety in the PL depend on 5HT1A-mediated neurotransmission and previous stressful experience.

  8. Citizen Science International Pellet Watch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dohrenwend, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Like Tokyo, other cities, both small and large, typically have numerous universities with dedicated faculties of scientists. By using portals such as Citizen Science and SciStarter, teachers can reach beyond the four walls of their classroom. The incredible experience of forging a relationship with a local scientist can easily begin via a cordial…

  9. Particle confinement of pellet-fuelled tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valovič, M.; Axon, K.; Garzotti, L.; Saarelma, S.; Thyagaraja, A.; Akers, R.; Gurl, C.; Kirk, A.; Lloyd, B.; Maddison, G. P.; Morris, A. W.; Patel, A.; Shibaev, S.; Scannell, R.; Taylor, D.; Walsh, M.; MAST Team

    2008-07-01

    This paper quantifies the particle confinement of pellet-fuelled plasmas as measured in the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak. The dataset is restricted mostly to neutral beam heated plasmas in H-mode and to shallow pellets launched from the high-field side. It is shown that the pellet deposition can be explained only by invoking the ∇B drift of the pellet ablatant. The pellet creates a zone with positive density gradient and increased temperature gradient. Simulations show that these changes could increase the level of micro-turbulence and thus enhance further the penetration of pellet-deposited particles towards the core. Post-pellet dynamics of the density profile is characterized by the pellet retention time τpel. It is shown that τpel correlates with the status of the edge transport barrier (L-mode or H-mode) and decreases rapidly for pellet deposition radius rpel approaching the plasma edge. For ELMy H-mode and pellet deposition radius of rpel ≈ 0.8a, the pellet retention time is about 20% of the energy confinement time. The fuelling requirement by the pellets for ITER and the Component Test Facility based on the spherical tokamak is discussed.

  10. Owl Pellet Analysis--A Useful Tool in Field Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medlin, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a technique by which the density and hunting habits of owls can be inferred from their pellets. Owl pellets--usually small, cylindrical packages of undigested bone, hair, etc.--are regurgitated by a roosting bird. A series of activities based on owl pellets are provided. (CP)

  11. Preliminary Results from a Gas Tracer Injection Experiment in the Upper Oceanic Crust on the Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neira, N. M.; Clark, J. F.; Fisher, A. T.; Wheat, C. G.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first results from a gas tracer injection experiment in the ocean crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an area of vigorous hydrothermal circulation. A mixture of tracers was injected in Hole 1362B in 2010, during IODP Expedition 327, as part of a 24-hour pumping experiment. Fluid samples were subsequently collected from this hole and three additional holes (1026B, 1362A, and 1301A), located 300 to 500 m away. The array of holes is located on 3.5 M.y. old seafloor, and oriented N20°E, subparallel to the Endeavor Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge, 100 km to the west. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was injected at a concentration of 0.0192 mol/min, with fluid pumping rate of 6.7 L/s for 20.2 h, resulting in a mean concentration of 47.6 μM and 23.3 mol of SF6 being added to crustal fluids. Borehole fluid samples were collected in copper coils using osmotic pumps attached to the wellheads of several long-term, subseafloor observatories (CORKs). These samples were recovered from the seafloor using a remotely-operated vehicle in 2011 and 2013. Analyses of SF6 concentrations in samples recovered in 2011 indicate the first arrival of SF6 in Hole 1301A, 550 m south of the injection Hole 1362B, ~265 days after injection. This suggests that the most rapid lateral transport of gas (at the leading edge of the plume) occurred at ~2 m/day. Samples recovered in 2013 should provide a more complete breakthrough curve, allowing assessment of the mean lateral transport rate. Additional insights will come from analysis of metal salts and particle tracers injected contemporaneously with the SF6, the cross-hole pressure response to injection and a two-year fluid discharge experiment. Additional wellhead samples will be collected in Summer 2014, as will downhole osmosamplers deployed in perforated casing within the upper ocean crust in Holes 1362A and 1362B.

  12. Pegfilgrastim Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a pre-filled automatic injection device (On-body Injector) to inject subcutaneously (under the skin). If you ... a pre-filled automatic injection device (On-body Injector), the device will usually be applied to your ...

  13. Cabazitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used along with prednisone to treat prostate cancer (cancer of a male reproductive organ) that has ... cabazitaxel injection is usually used in men with prostate cancer. If used by pregnant women, cabazitaxel injection can ...

  14. Morphine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Morphine injection is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Morphine injection comes as a solution (liquid) to inject intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a ...

  15. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Romidepsin injection is used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL; a group of cancers of the ... other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a class of medications called ...

  16. Preparation, characterisation and out-of-pile property evaluation of (U,Pu)N fuel pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, C.; Hegde, P. V.; Sengupta, A. K.

    1991-02-01

    (U 0.45Pu 0.55)N and (U 0.8Pu 0.2)N are being considered in India as advanced alternative fuels for the operating fast breeder test reactor (FBTR) and the forthcoming prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR). Mixed nitride fuel pellets containing <0.1 wt% each of oxygen and carbon impurities were fabricated by the conventional "powder-pellet" (POP) and the advanced "sol-gel microsphere pelletisation" (SGMP) processes, involving two major steps. First, carbothermic reduction of an oxide-graphite powder mixture (in the form of tablets) or gel-microspheres at 1773-1823 K in N 2 followed by N2 + H2 and Ar+ H2 atmospheres. The nitride microspheres could be directly pelletised and sintered to pellets of relatively low density (≤ 85% TD) with an "open" pore structure desirable for LMFBR application. Thermal conductivity and hot hardness of nitride pellets were evaluated up to 1800 and 1500 K respectively. The out-of-pile chemical compatibility experiments of mixed nitride fuel pellets for FBTR with SS 316 cladding at 973 K for 1000 h did not reveal any significant fuel-cladding chemical interaction.

  17. Production of three-dimensional tissue-engineered cartilage through mutual fusion of chondrocyte pellets.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, K; Fujihara, Y; Mori, Y; Asawa, Y; Kanazawa, S; Nishizawa, S; Misawa, M; Numano, T; Inoue, H; Sakamoto, T; Watanabe, M; Komura, M; Takato, T

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the mutual fusion of chondrocyte pellets was promoted in order to produce large-sized tissue-engineered cartilage with a three-dimensional (3D) shape. Five pellets of human auricular chondrocytes were first prepared, which were then incubated in an agarose mold. After 3 weeks of culture in matrix production-promoting medium under 5.78g/cm(2) compression, the tissue-engineered cartilage showed a sufficient mechanical strength. To confirm the usefulness of these methods, a transplantation experiment was performed using beagles. Tissue-engineered cartilage prepared with 50 pellets of beagle chondrocytes was transplanted subcutaneously into the cell-donor dog for 2 months. The tissue-engineered cartilage of the beagles maintained a rod-like shape, even after harvest. Histology showed fair cartilage regeneration. Furthermore, 20 pellets were made and placed on a beta-tricalcium phosphate prism, and this was then incubated within the agarose mold for 3 weeks. The construct was transplanted into a bone/cartilage defect in the cell-donor beagle. After 2 months, bone and cartilage regeneration was identified on micro-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This approach involving the fusion of small pellets into a large structure enabled the production of 3D tissue-engineered cartilage that was close to physiological cartilage tissue in property, without conventional polyper scaffolds. PMID:27173826

  18. Compositions of volatile organic compounds emitted from melted virgin and waste plastic pellets.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Noguchi, Miyuki; Ni, Yueyong; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2009-03-01

    To characterize potential air pollution issues related to recycling facilities of waste plastics, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from melted virgin and waste plastics pellets were analyzed. In this study, laboratory experiments were performed to melt virgin and waste plastic pellets under various temperatures (150, 200, and 250 degrees C) and atmospheres (air and nitrogen [N2]). In the study presented here, low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS) and the recycled waste plastic pellets were used. The VOCs generated from each plastic pellets were collected by Tenax/Carboxen adsorbent tubes and analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). The result showed the higher temperatures generated larger amounts of total VOCs (TVOCs). The VOCs emitted from the virgin plastic pellets likely originated from polymer degradation. Smaller TVOC emissions were observed in N2 atmosphere than in air atmosphere. In particular, larger amounts of the oxygenated compounds, which are generally hazardous and malodorous, were detected in air than in N2. In addition to the compounds originating from polymer degradation, the compounds originating from the plastic additives were also detected from LDPE and PS. Furthermore, various species of VOCs likely originating from contaminant inseparate polyvinyl chloride (PVC), food residues, cleaning agents, degreasers, and so on were detected from the waste plastic. Thus, melting waste plastics, as is conducted in recycling facilities, might generate larger amounts of potentially toxic compounds than producing virgin plastics.

  19. Effect of Pellet Coatings on PETN Porosity and Slapper Detonator Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kathryn; Haroz, Erik; Brown, Geoff; Monroe, Deirdre

    2015-06-01

    PETN is well known to have a high vapor pressure and tends to sublime when heated. Preliminary experiments suggest that this phenomenon results in increased porosity and may decrease sensitivity to shock initiation by a chip slapper detonator. In this study, PETN pellets were coated on the flyer impact surface with various materials. The pellets were subjected to heating over several days, and the surfaces were analyzed for porosity and recrystallization. We attempted to shock initiate each using a chip slapper detonator, and the timing and voltages required were noted.

  20. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD3.1 for gravity-driven injection experiment in the core makeup tank of the CARR Passive Reactor (CP-1300)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.I.; No, H.C.; Bang, Y.S.; Kim, H.J.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to improve the analysis capability of RELAP5/MOD3.1 on the direct contact condensation in the core makeup tank (CMT) of passive high-pressure injection system (PHPIS) in the CARR Passive Reactor (CP-1300). The gravity-driven injection experiment is conducted by using a small scale test facility to identify the parameters having significant effects on the gravity-driven injection and the major condensation modes. It turns out that the larger the water subcooling is, the more initiation of injection is delayed, and the sparger and the natural circulation of the hot water from the steam generator accelerate the gravity-driven injection. The condensation modes are divided into three modes: sonic jet, subsonic jet, and steam cavity. RELAP5/MOD3.1 is chosen to evaluate the cod predictability on the direct contact condensation in the CMT. It is found that the predictions of MOD3.1 are in better agreement with the experimental data than those of MOD3.0. From the nodalization study of the test section, the 1-node model shows better agreement with the experimental data than the multi-node models. RELAP5/MOD3.1 identifies the flow regime of the test section as vertical stratification. However, the flow regime observed in the experiment is the subsonic jet with the bubble having the vertical cone shape. To accurately predict the direct contact condensation in the CMT with RELAP5/MOD3.1, it is essential that a new set of the interfacial heat transfer coefficients and a new flow regime map for direct contact condensation in the CMT be developed.

  1. Zirconium carbonitride pellets by internal sol gel and spark plasma sintering as inert matrix fuel material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedberg, Marcus; Cologna, Marco; Cambriani, Andrea; Somers, Joseph; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Inert matrix fuel is a fuel type where the fissile material is blended with a solid diluent material. In this work zirconium carbonitride microspheres have been produced by internal sol gel technique, followed by carbothermal reduction. Material nitride purities in the produced materials ranged from Zr(N0.45C0.55) to Zr(N0.74C0.26) as determined by X-ray diffraction and application of Vegard's law. The zirconium carbonitride microspheres have been pelletized by spark plasma sintering (SPS) and by conventional cold pressing and sintering. In all SPS experiments cohesive pellets were formed. Maximum final density reached by SPS at 1700 °C was 87% theoretical density (TD) compared to 53% TD in conventional sintering at 1700 °C. Pore sizes in all the produced pellets were in the μm scale and no density gradients could be observed by computer tomography.

  2. Exploring Liquid Sequential Injection Chromatography to Teach Fundamentals of Separation Methods: A Very Fast Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penteado, Jose C.; Masini, Jorge Cesar

    2011-01-01

    Influence of the solvent strength determined by the addition of a mobile-phase organic modifier and pH on chromatographic separation of sorbic acid and vanillin has been investigated by the relatively new technique, liquid sequential injection chromatography (SIC). This technique uses reversed-phase monolithic stationary phase to execute fast…

  3. Induction Produced by Upcoming Food-Pellet Reinforcement: Effects on Subsequent Operant Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Arthur, Emily I. L.; Palbicki, Janel; Nurnberger, Jeri T.

    2004-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that rats' rates of operant behavior maintained by 1% sucrose reinforcement in the first half of an experimental session are heightened when food-pellet reinforcers, rather than 1% sucrose, will be available in the second half. Experiment 1 showed that rats that had been displaying this positive induction effect acquired…

  4. Dysprosium transport in Nd-Fe-B pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumwongpitak, Parawee

    .4 layered pellets and melt spun ribbons were obtained from the calculation of Fick's second law combined with EDS results from the experiment. The results indicate that the effective diffusion coefficient of Dy in the layered pellets is higher than the diffusion in ribbons due to its higher porosity than ribbons.

  5. Tabletting behaviour of pellets of a series of porosities--a comparisonbetween pellets of two different compositions.

    PubMed

    Nicklasson, F; Johansson, B; Alderborn, G

    1999-04-01

    The tabletting behaviour of pellets prepared from a 4:1 mixture of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCP) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was studied and compared with the tabletting behaviour of pellets made solely from microcrystalline cellulose (results from an earlier study by Johansson et al.). A series of pellets with porosities in the range 26-55% were prepared and tabletted at applied pressures of 25-200 MPa. Tablets were also formed from lubricated pellets. The degree of compression during compaction was calculated, and the porosity and tensile strength of the tablets and their permeability to air flow were determined. The porosity of the pellets was found to significantly affect the tabletting behaviour of the DCP/MCC pellets. However, the relationship between pellet porosity and tablet data for the DCP/MCC pellets was different from that for the MCC pellets. The DCP/MCC pellets were generally less prone to a reduction in volume during tabletting, and the pore structure of the DCP/MCC tablets was more closed. It was concluded that the DCP/MCC pellets were more rigid and underwent a different mode of deformation during tabletting than the MCC pellets. This mode of deformation was characterised by a more limited bulk deformation and a more extensive surface deformation at the pellet surfaces. The DCP/MCC pellets tended to give tablets of a lower mechanical strength. They were also less sensitive to lubrication in terms of their compactability, which may be explained either by less surface coverage by the lubricant before compression or rupture of the lubricant film during compression caused by the more extensive surface deformation of DCP/MCC pellets.

  6. High-rate behaviour of iron ore pellet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Gustaf; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Nishida, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    Iron ore pellets are sintered, centimetre-sized spheres of ore with high iron content. Together with carbonized coal, iron ore pellets are used in the production of steel. In the transportation from the pelletizing plants to the customers, the iron ore pellets are exposed to different loading situations, resulting in degradation of strength and in some cases fragmentation. For future reliable numerical simulations of the handling and transportation of iron ore pellets, knowledge about their mechanical properties is needed. This paper describes the experimental work to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of blast furnace iron ore pellets. To study the dynamic fracture of iron ore pellets a number of split Hopkinson pressure bar tests are carried out and analysed.

  7. Pilot plant processing of sodium bifluoride to sodium fluoride pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, S.M.

    1985-01-25

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) traps in the PGDP purge cascade presently use NaF pellets to remove residual UF{sub 6} from the gas stream. These pellets are procured from ORGDP which converts sodium bifluoride pellets to NaF by thermal decomposition. Discussions of the possibility of no longer producing pellets at ORGDP, due to oven corrosion problems, led to a pilot plant test at PGDP. This test was designed to examine the feasibility of producing the NaF pellets at PGDP in the event that an alternative source of supply became necessary. Satisfactory pellets were produced without difficulty; however, it was determined that the conversion process could not be readily carried out in the existing NaF traps. Construction of a separate facility with provisions to handle the large quantities of hydrogen fluoride (HF) released during the process would be required to produce pellets at the rate needed. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Production of sintered porous metal fluoride pellets

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, L.W.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1973-12-25

    Porous pellets characterized by a moderately reactive crust and a softer core of higher reactivity are produced by forming agglomerates containing a metal fluoride powder and a selected amount ofwater. The metal fluoride is selected to be sinterable and essentially non-reactive with gaseous fluorinating agents. The agglomerates are contacted with a gaseous fluorinating agent under controlled conditions whereby the heat generated by localized reaction of the agent and water is limited to values effccting bonding by localized sintering. Porous pellets composed of cryolite (Na/sub 3/AlF/sub 6/) can be used to selectively remove trace quantities of niobium pentafluoride from a feed gas consisting predominantly of uranium hexafluoride. (Official Gazette)

  9. Local pellet based and line-integrated nonperturbing charge exchange measurements with a compact neutral particle analyzer on Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, P. R.; Ozaki, T.; Sudo, S.; Tamura, N.; Veshchev, E. A.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Krasilnikov, A. V.

    2006-10-15

    Experiments on suprathermal ion physics are carried out on the Large Helical Device (LHD) with a 40 channel compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA). The analyzer is used both in passive nonperturbing chord-integral neutral particle flux measurements and for local probing with an impurity pellet. The analyzer observes trapped particles with vertical bar v{sub parallel}/v vertical bar <0.25 and the pitch angle cosine value v{sub parallel}/v changes sign along the diagnostic sight line. The measurable energy range for H{sup 0} is 1-170 keV. Radially resolved data on local H{sup 0} atomic energy spectra have been obtained on LHD by the pellet charge exchange method with CNPA, as well as chord-integral atomic energy distribution data for electron cyclotron heated, neutral beam injected, and high power ion cyclotron heated plasma. The article addresses the diagnostic technical background and the analysis scheme of measurement results taking into account the helical geometry and the species and densities of the charge exchange targets.

  10. Pellet stoves wood energy for all

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    While it`s true that specialized pellet stoves, capable of burning fuels as diverse as reprocessed paper waste and feed corn, are expensive and occasionally clunky, they also represent one of the best hopes for introducing clean burning, reliable renewable energy to those now heating with gas and oil. This article explores the benefits and operation of the stoves including discussions of the following: ecological benefits, combustion, stove venting, ashes, costs, fuels, and the future of wood heat. 1 tab.

  11. Surface properties of beached plastic pellets.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulou, Kalliopi N; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K

    2012-10-01

    The presence of pollutants on plastic debris is an emerging environmental hot topic. Understanding the surface alteration of plastics while in the marine environment increases our understanding of the pollutant-plastic debris interaction. Plastic pellets are widely distributed throughout the world oceans. Eroded and virgin polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) pellets were studied for their surface properties to better understand the interaction between plastic and compounds in marine environment. Surface properties such as point of zero charge, surface area and pore volume, surface topography, functional groups and acid-base behavior are important factors which affect sorption. Virgin plastic pellets had homogeneous smooth surfaces that do not have any acid-base behavior. Eroded PE demonstrates an altered surface that at seawater pH acquires a negative charge due to ketone groups. The uneven surface and possible functional groups could have been formed from the erosion processes while floating at the sea surface and might explain the interaction of eroded plastics with microbes and metals.

  12. On the Ablation Models of Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.

    2005-12-15

    The neutral gas shielding model and neutral-gas-plasma shielding model are analyzed qualitatively. The main physical processes that govern the formation of the shielding gas cloud and, consequently, the ablation rate are considered. For the neutral gas shielding model, simple formulas relating the ablation rate and cloud parameters to the parameters of the pellet and the background plasma are presented. The estimates of the efficiency of neutral gas shielding and plasma shielding are compared. It is shown that the main portion of the energy flux of the background electrons is released in the plasma cloud. Formulas for the ablation rate and plasma parameters are derived in the neutral-gas-plasma shielding model. The question is discussed as to why the neutral gas shielding model describes well the ablation rate of the pellet material, although it does not take into account the ionization effects and the effects associated with the interaction of ionized particles with the magnetic field. The reason is that the ablation rate depends weakly on the energy flux of hot electrons; as a result, the attenuation of this flux by the electrostatic shielding and plasma shielding has little effect on the ablation rate. This justifies the use of the neutral gas shielding model to estimate the ablation rate (to within a factor of about 2) over a wide range of parameters of the pellet and the background plasma.

  13. Fabrication of high exposure nuclear fuel pellets

    DOEpatents

    Frederickson, James R.

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for making a fuel pellet for a nuclear reactor. A mixture is prepared of PuO.sub.2 and UO.sub.2 powders, where the mixture contains at least about 30% PuO.sub.2, and where at least about 12% of the Pu is the Pu.sup.240 isotope. To this mixture is added about 0.3 to about 5% of a binder having a melting point of at least about 250.degree. F. The mixture is pressed to form a slug and the slug is granulated. Up to about 4.7% of a lubricant having a melting point of at least about 330.degree. F. is added to the granulated slug. Both the binder and the lubricant are selected from a group consisting of polyvinyl carboxylate, polyvinyl alcohol, naturally occurring high molecular weight cellulosic polymers, chemically modified high molecular weight cellulosic polymers, and mixtures thereof. The mixture is pressed to form a pellet and the pellet is sintered.

  14. Cell bricks-enriched platelet-rich plasma gel for injectable cartilage engineering - an in vivo experiment in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Cai, Bolei; Ma, Qin; Chen, Fulin; Wu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Clinical application of platelet-rich plasma (PRP)-based injectable tissue engineering is limited by weak mechanical properties and a rapid fibrinolytic rate. We proposed a new strategy, a cell bricks-stabilized PRP injectable system, to engineer and regenerate cartilage with stable morphology and structure in vivo. Chondrocytes from the auricular cartilage of rabbits were isolated and cultured to form cell bricks (fragmented cell sheet) or cell expansions. Fifteen nude mice were divided evenly (n = 5) into cells-PRP (C-P), cell bricks-PRP (CB-P) and cell bricks-cells-PRP (CB-C-P) groups. Cells, cell bricks or a cell bricks/cells mixture were suspended in PRP and were injected subcutaneously in animals. After 8 weeks, all the constructs were replaced by white resilient tissue; however, specimens from the CB-P and CB-C-P groups were well maintained in shape, while the C-P group appeared distorted, with a compressed outline. Histologically, all groups presented lacuna-like structures, glycosaminoglycan-enriched matrices and positive immunostaining of collagen type II. Different from the uniform structure presented in CB-C-P samples, CB-P presented interrupted, island-like chondrogenesis and contracted structure; fibrous interruption was shown in the C-P group. The highest percentage of matrix was presented in CB-C-P samples. Collagen and sGAG quantification confirmed that the CB-C-P constructs had statistically higher amounts than the C-P and CB-P groups; statistical differences were also found among the groups in terms of biomechanical properties and gene expression. We concluded that cell bricks-enriched PRP gel sufficiently enhanced the morphological stability of the constructs, maintained chondrocyte phenotypes and favoured chondrogenesis in vivo, which suggests that such an injectable, completely biological system is a suitable cell carrier for cell-based cartilage repair.

  15. Intratumor photosensitizer injection for photodynamic therapy: Pre-clinical experience with methylene blue, Pc 4, and Photofrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Timothy M.; Foster, Thomas H.

    2016-03-01

    Intravenous administration of some photosensitizers, including the FDA-approved Photofrin, results in significant systemic photosensitivity and a 2-3-day drug-light interval. Direct intratumor injection of photosensitizer could potentially eliminate these negative aspects of photodynamic therapy (PDT), while requiring a lower photosensitizer dose to achieve comparable drug concentration in the target tissue. We performed PDT using intratumor injection of 3 photosensitizers, methylene blue (MB), Pc 4, and Photofrin, in mouse tumor models. After a 0-15 minute drug-light interval, illumination was delivered by appropriate diode lasers. For animals receiving MB or Pc 4, surface illumination was delivered using a microlens-terminated fiber. For animals receiving Photofrin, interstitial illumination was delivered by a 1 cm diffuser. In animals receiving MB or Pc 4, tumor dimensions were measured daily post-PDT, with a cure being defined as no palpable tumor 90 days post-treatment. For Photofrin, animals were sacrificed 24 hours post-PDT and tumors were excised, with samples HE stained to assess PDT-induced necrosis. 55% of tumors were cured with MB-PDT, and significant tumor growth delay (p=0.002) was observed for Pc 4. For Photofrin PDT, the mean necrosis radius was 3.4+/-0.8 mm, compared to 2.9+/-1.3 mm for systemic administration, which was not a significant difference (p=0.58). Intratumoral injection of the photosensitizers methylene blue, Pc 4, and Photofrin is feasible, and results in appreciable tumor response. Further investigation is necessary to optimize treatment protocols and assess the systemic photosensitivity induced by intratumor injection.

  16. Simulation of injector dynamics during steady inductive helicity injection current drive in the HIT-SI experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.; Marklin, G.; Victor, B.; Akcay, C.; Jarboe, T.

    2015-04-15

    We present simulations of inductive helicity injection in the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive helicity injection (HIT-SI) device that treats the entire plasma volume in a single dynamic MHD model. A new fully 3D numerical tool, the PSI-center TETrahedral mesh code, was developed that provides the geometric flexibility required for this investigation. Implementation of a zero-β Hall MHD model using PSI-TET will be presented including formulation of a new self-consistent magnetic boundary condition for the wall of the HIT-SI device. Results from simulations of HIT-SI are presented focusing on injector dynamics that are investigated numerically for the first time. Asymmetries in the plasma loading between the two helicity injectors and progression of field reversal in each injector are observed. Analysis indicates cross-coupling between injectors through confinement volume structures. Injector impedance is found to scale with toroidal current at fixed density, consistent with experimental observation. Comparison to experimental data with an injector drive frequency of 14.5 kHz shows good agreement with magnetic diagnostics. Global mode structures from Bi-Orthogonal decomposition agree well with experimental data for the first four modes.

  17. U.S. Drug Use and Migration experiences of Mexican Female Sex Workers who are injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Victoria D.; Burgos, José Luis; Rangel, María Gudelia; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe U.S.-based drug/sex behaviors and correlates of lifetime U.S. drug use by Mexican female sex workers who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs). Methods Between 2008–2010, 315 migrant FSW-IDUs residing in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico responded to questionnaires. Results Twenty-seven percent (n=85) of FSW-IDUs were U.S. migrants; of these, 46% (n=39) were deportees. One-half of U.S.-migrant FSW-IDUs consumed illicit drugs in the U.S., and two-thirds of these injected drugs in the U.S. Among U.S. injectors, over 75% ever received or shared used injection equipment. The majority (92%) of U.S.-migrant FSW-IDUs never obtained U.S. drug treatment services. HIV prevalence was 4% among U.S.-migrant and 5% among non-U.S. migrant FSW-IDUs; 100% of U.S.-migrant and 75% of non-U.S. migrant FSW-IDUs were unaware of their HIV status. Conclusions Binational coordination to improve access to substance use treatment and HIV testing services in Mexico and the U.S. among marginalized binational migrants may be critical to containing HIV transmission. PMID:23698687

  18. Managing la malilla: Exploring drug treatment experiences among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico, and their implications for drug law reform

    PubMed Central

    Syvertsen, Jennifer; Pollini, Robin A.; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Rangel, Gudelia; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Background In August 2009, Mexico reformed its drug laws and decriminalized small quantities of drugs for personal use; offenders caught three times will be mandated to enter drug treatment. However, little is known about the quality or effectiveness of drug treatment programs in Mexico. We examined injection drug users’ (IDUs) experiences in drug treatment in Tijuana, Mexico, with the goal of informing program planning and policy. Methods We examined qualitative and quantitative data from Proyecto El Cuete, a multi-phased research study on HIV risk among IDUs in Tijuana. Phase I consisted of 20 in-depth interviews and Phase II employed respondent-driven sampling to recruit 222 IDUs for a quantitative survey. We also reviewed national drug policy documents, surveillance data, and media reports to situate drug users’ experiences within the broader sociopolitical context. Results Participants in the qualitative study were 50% male with a mean age of 32; most injected heroin (85.0%) and methamphetamine (60.0%). The quantitative sample was 91.4% male with a mean age of 35; 98.2% injected heroin and 83.7% injected heroin and methamphetamine together. The majority of participants reported receiving treatment: residential treatment was most common, followed by methadone; other types of services were infrequently reported. Participants’ perceptions of program acceptability and effectiveness were mixed. Mistreatment emerged as a theme in the qualitative interviews and was reported by 21.6% of Phase II participants, primarily physical (72.0%) and verbal (52.0%) abuse. Conclusions Our results point to the need for political, economic, and social investment in the drug treatment system before offenders are sentenced to treatment under the revised national drug law. Resources are needed to strengthen program quality and ensure accountability. The public health impact of the new legislation that attempts to bring drug treatment to the forefront of national drug policy

  19. Low-pressure injection molding

    SciTech Connect

    Mangels, J.A. )

    1994-05-01

    Ceramic injection molding experienced a revival in the 1970s and 1980s with the application of ceramics for gas turbine components. Concurrently, techniques were being developed for the injection molding of powdered metal compositions into complex shaped articles. The impetus for the development of injection molding as a ceramic fabrication process lay in the potential to produce complex-shaped components to near-net shape. In the ceramic injection molding process, ceramic powders are processed to obtain the desired particle size, distribution and morphology and blended to obtain a homogeneous distribution. These powders are then mixed with the organic binders, generally in a heated, highshear mixer at temperatures above the melting point of the organic binders. The injection molding mix is pelletized, cooled and fed into an injection molding machine. The molding mix is reheated to a fluid state and injected under high pressure (7--70 MPa) into a die cavity. The molded part is removed from the tooling after the molding mix has solidified in the die. The organic binders are then removed from the component at temperatures up to 400 C, generally by some combination of wicking and thermal decomposition. Finally, the component is sintered to obtain its final ceramic properties, using conventional ceramic processes.

  20. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Milora, S.L.; Schechter, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A proof-of-principle (POP) electron-beam pellet accelerator has been developed and used for accelerating hydrogen and deuterium pellets. An intact hydrogen pellet was accelerated to a speed of 460 m/s by an electron beam of 13.5 keV. 0.3 A, and 2 ms. The maximum speed is limited by the acceleration path length (0.4 m) and pellet integrity. Experimental data have been collected for several hundred hydrogen pellets, which were accelerated by electron beams with parameters of voltage up to 16 kV, current up to 0.4 A, and pulse length up to 10 ms. Preliminary results reveal that the measured burn velocity increases roughly with the square of the beam voltage, as the theoretical model predicts. The final pellet velocity is proportional to the exhaust velocity, which increases with the beam power. To reach the high exhaust velocity needed for accelerating pellets to >1000 m/s, a new electron gun, with its cathode indirectly heated by a graphite heater and an electron beam, is being developed to increase beam current and power. A rocket casing or shell around the pellet has been designed and developed to increase pellet strength and improve the electron-rocket coupling efficiency. We present the characteristics of this pellet accelerator, including new improvements. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Mycelial pellet formation by edible ascomycete filamentous fungi, Neurospora intermedia.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ramkumar B; Lennartsson, Patrik R; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2016-12-01

    Pellet formation of filamentous fungi in submerged culture is an imperative topic of fermentation research. In this study, we report for the first time the growth of filamentous ascomycete fungus, Neurospora intermedia in its mycelial pellet form. In submerged culture, the growth morphology of the fungus was successfully manipulated into growing as pellets by modifying various cultivation conditions. Factors such as pH (2.0-10.0), agitation rate (100-150 rpm), carbon source (glucose, arabinose, sucrose, and galactose), the presence of additive agents (glycerol and calcium chloride) and trace metals were investigated for their effect on the pellet formation. Of the various factors screened, uniform pellets were formed only at pH range 3.0-4.0, signifying it as the most influential factor for N. intermedia pellet formation. The average pellet size ranged from 2.38 ± 0.12 to 2.86 ± 0.38 mm. The pellet formation remained unaffected by the inoculum type used and its size showed an inverse correlation with the agitation rate of the culture. Efficient glucose utilization was observed with fungal pellets, as opposed to the freely suspended mycelium, proving its viability for fast-fermentation processes. Scale up of the pelletization process was also carried out in bench-scale airlift and bubble column reactors (4.5 L).

  2. Pellet imaging techniques in the ASDEX tokamak (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A. ); Buechl, K.; Hofmann, J.; Lang, R.; Loch, R.; Rudyj, A.; Sandmann, W. )

    1990-10-01

    As part of a USDOE/ASDEX collaboration, a detailed examination of pellet ablation in ASDEX with a variety of diagnostics has allowed a better understanding of a number of features of hydrogen ice pellet ablation in a plasma. In particular, fast-gated photos with an intensified Xybion CCD video camera allow {ital in} {ital situ} velocity measurements of the pellet as it penetrates the plasma. With time resolution of typically 100 ns and exposures every 50 {mu}s, the evolution of each pellet in a multipellet ASDEX tokamak plasma discharge can be followed. When the pellet cloud track has striations, the light intensity profile through the cloud is hollow (dark near the pellet), whereas at the beginning or near the end of the pellet trajectory the track is typically smooth (without striations) and has a gaussian-peaked light emission profile. New, single pellet Stark broadened {ital D}{sub {alpha}}, {ital D}{sub {beta}}, and {ital D}{sub {gamma}} spectra, obtained with a tangentially viewing scanning mirror/spectrometer with Reticon array readout, are consistent with cloud densities of 2{times}10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3} or higher in the regions of strongest light emission. A spatially resolved array of {ital D}{sub {alpha}} detectors shows that the light variations during the pellet ablation are not caused solely by a modulation of the incoming energy flux as the pellet crosses rational {ital q} surfaces, but instead are a result of dynamic, nonstationary, ablation process.

  3. Influences on particle shape in underwater pelletizing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kast, O. E-mail: matthias.musialek@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Musialek, M. E-mail: matthias.musialek@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Geiger, K. E-mail: matthias.musialek@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Bonten, C. E-mail: matthias.musialek@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de E-mail: christian.bonten@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de

    2014-05-15

    Underwater pelletizing has gained high importance within the last years among the different pelletizing technologies, due to its advantages in terms of throughput, automation, pellet quality and applicability to a large variety of thermoplastics. The resulting shape and quality of pellets, however, differ widely, depending on material characteristics and effects not fully understood yet. In an experimental set-up, pellets of different volumes and shapes were produced and the medium pellet mass, the pellet surface and the bulk density were analyzed in order to identify the influence of material properties and process parameters. Additionally, the shaping kinetics at the die opening were watched with a specially developed camera system. It was found that rheological material properties correlate with process parameters and resulting particle form in a complex way. Higher cutting speeds were shown to have a deforming influence on the pellets, leading to less spherical s and lower bulk densities. More viscous materials, however, showed a better resistance against this. Generally, the viscous properties of polypropylene proofed to be dominant over the elastic ones in regard to their influence on pellet shape. It was also shown that the shapes filmed at the die opening and the actual form of the pellets after a cooling track do not always correlate, indicating a significant influence of thermodynamic properties during the cooling.

  4. Applications and Progress of Dust Injection to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhehui; Wurden, Glen A.; Mansfield, Dennis K.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Ticos, Catalin M.

    2008-09-07

    Three regimes of dust injection are proposed for different applications to fusion energy. In the 'low-speed' regime (<5 km/s), basic dust transport study, edge plasma diagnostics, edge-localized-mode (ELM) pacing in magnetic fusion devices can be realized by injecting dust of known properties into today's fusion experiments. ELM pacing, as an alternative to mini-pellet injection, is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion devices. Different schemes are available to inject dust. In the 'intermediate-speed' regime (10-200 km/s), possible applications of dust injection include fueling of the next-step fusion devices, core-diagnostics of the next-step fusion devices, and compression of plasma and solid targets to aid fusion energy production. Promising laboratory results of dust moving at 10-50 km/s do exist. Significant advance in this regime may be expected in the near term to achieve higher dust speeds. In the 'high-speed' regime (>500 km/s), dust injection can potentially be used to directly produce fusion energy through impact. Ideas on how to achieve these extremely high speeds are mostly on paper. No plan exists today to realize them in laboratory. Some experimental results, including electrostatic, electromagnetic, gas-dragged, plasma-dragged, and laser-ablation-based acceleration, are summarized and compared. Some features and limitations of the different acceleration methods will be discussed. A necessary component of all dust injectors is the dust dropper (also known as dust dispenser). A computer-controlled piezoelectric crystals has been developed to dropped dust in a systematic and reproducible manner. Particle fluxes ranges from a few tens of particles per second up to thousands of particles per second by this simple device.

  5. Experiment on synchronization of semiconductor lasers by common injection of constant-amplitude random-phase light.

    PubMed

    Aida, Hiroki; Arahata, Masaya; Okumura, Haruka; Koizumi, Hayato; Uchida, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki; Muramatsu, Jun; Davis, Peter

    2012-05-21

    We experimentally and numerically observe the synchronization between two semiconductor lasers induced by common optical injection with constant-amplitude and random-phase modulation in configurations with and without optical feedback. Large cross correlation (~0.9) between the intensity oscillations of the two response lasers can be achieved although the correlation between the drive laser and either one of the two response lasers is very small (~0.2). High quality synchronization is achieved in the presence of optical feedback in response lasers with matched feedback phase offset. We investigate the dependence of synchronization on parameter values over wide parameter ranges.

  6. Effect of steaming process on new formulation and physical properties of earthworm-based fish pellets for African catfish (Clarias gariepinus).

    PubMed

    Liam, Kulaab; Zakaria, Zarina; Gunny, Ahmad Anas Nagoor; Ishak, Mohd Azlan Mohd

    2014-09-01

    Fish feed has been recognized as one of main part/unit in aquaculture industry. However, current fish feed faces few challenges in terms of health aspects and cost issues. Alternatively, new nutritional and economical/low cost formulation of fish pellets was designed by combination of earthworm powder and other economical ingredients such as fishmeal, soybean waste, rice bran and tapioca flour. The formulation was calculated using Pearson's square and optimized by One-Factor-At-Time (OFAT) method. The effect of steaming processing on the water stability, soaking experiment, protein leaching test and breaking force of the earthworm-based fish pellets was investigated. Results indicate steam pellet at 80 degrees C for 40 min has higher water stability, less protein leaching and more durable than unsteam pellets. Introduction of this new formulation of fish meal is expected to provide essential nutrient, energy and improved the quality of pellets to fuel the growth of aquaculture industry.

  7. Effect of steaming process on new formulation and physical properties of earthworm-based fish pellets for African catfish (Clarias gariepinus).

    PubMed

    Liam, Kulaab; Zakaria, Zarina; Gunny, Ahmad Anas Nagoor; Ishak, Mohd Azlan Mohd

    2014-09-01

    Fish feed has been recognized as one of main part/unit in aquaculture industry. However, current fish feed faces few challenges in terms of health aspects and cost issues. Alternatively, new nutritional and economical/low cost formulation of fish pellets was designed by combination of earthworm powder and other economical ingredients such as fishmeal, soybean waste, rice bran and tapioca flour. The formulation was calculated using Pearson's square and optimized by One-Factor-At-Time (OFAT) method. The effect of steaming processing on the water stability, soaking experiment, protein leaching test and breaking force of the earthworm-based fish pellets was investigated. Results indicate steam pellet at 80 degrees C for 40 min has higher water stability, less protein leaching and more durable than unsteam pellets. Introduction of this new formulation of fish meal is expected to provide essential nutrient, energy and improved the quality of pellets to fuel the growth of aquaculture industry. PMID:26031027

  8. Practical experience applied to the design of injection and sample manifolds to perform in-place surveillance tests according to ANSI/ASME N-510

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, E.M.; Wikoff, W.O.; Shaffer, L.L.

    1997-08-01

    At the current level of maturity and experience in the nuclear industry, regarding testing of air treatment systems, it is now possible to design and qualify injection and sample manifolds for most applications. While the qualification of sample manifolds is still in its infancy, injection manifolds have reached a mature stage that helps to eliminate the {open_quotes}hit or miss{close_quotes} type of design. During the design phase, manifolds can be adjusted to compensate for poor airflow distribution, laminar flow conditions, and to take advantage of any system attributes. Experience has shown that knowing the system attributes before the design phase begins is an essential element to a successful manifold design. The use of a spreadsheet type program commonly found on most personal computers can afford a greater flexibility and a reduction in time spent in the design phase. The experience gained from several generations of manifold design has culminated in a set of general design guidelines. Use of these guidelines, along with a good understanding of the type of testing (theoretical and practical), can result in a good manifold design requiring little or no field modification. The requirements for manifolds came about because of the use of multiple banks of components and unconventional housing inlet configurations. Multiple banks of adsorbers and pre and post HEPA`s required that each bank be tested to insure that each one does not exceed a specific allowable leakage criterion. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A curious pellet from a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodman, N.; Dove, C.J.; Peurach, S.C.

    2005-01-01

    One of the traditional methods of determining the dietary preferences of owls relies upon the identification of bony remains of prey contained in regurgitated pellets. Discovery of a pellet containing a large, complete primary feather from an adult, male Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) prompted us to examine in detail a small sample of pellets from a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). Our analyses of feather and hair remains in these pellets documented the presence of three species of birds and two species of mammals, whereas bones in the pellets represented only mammals. This finding indicates an important bias that challenges the reliability of owl pellet studies making use of only osteological remains.

  10. Mechanical durability and combustion characteristics of pellets from biomass blends.

    PubMed

    Gil, M V; Oulego, P; Casal, M D; Pevida, C; Pis, J J; Rubiera, F

    2010-11-01

    Biofuel pellets were prepared from biomass (pine, chestnut and eucalyptus sawdust, cellulose residue, coffee husks and grape waste) and from blends of biomass with two coals (bituminous and semianthracite). Their mechanical properties and combustion behaviour were studied by means of an abrasion index and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively, in order to select the best raw materials available in the area of study for pellet production. Chestnut and pine sawdust pellets exhibited the highest durability, whereas grape waste and coffee husks pellets were the least durable. Blends of pine sawdust with 10-30% chestnut sawdust were the best for pellet production. Blends of cellulose residue and coals (<20%) with chestnut and pine sawdusts did not decrease pellet durability. The biomass/biomass blends presented combustion profiles similar to those of the individual raw materials. The addition of coal to the biomass in low amounts did not affect the thermal characteristics of the blends. PMID:20605093

  11. Microstructure of bentonite in iron ore green pellets.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Iftekhar U; Mouzon, Johanne; Schröppel, Birgit; Kaech, Andres; Dobryden, Illia; Forsmo, Seija P E; Hedlund, Jonas

    2014-02-01

    Sodium-activated calcium bentonite is used as a binder in iron ore pellets and is known to increase strength of both wet and dry iron ore green pellets. In this article, the microstructure of bentonite in magnetite pellets is revealed for the first time using scanning electron microscopy. The microstructure of bentonite in wet and dry iron ore pellets, as well as in distilled water, was imaged by various imaging techniques (e.g., imaging at low voltage with monochromatic and decelerated beam or low loss backscattered electrons) and cryogenic methods (i.e., high pressure freezing and plunge freezing in liquid ethane). In wet iron ore green pellets, clay tactoids (stacks of parallel primary clay platelets) were very well dispersed and formed a voluminous network occupying the space available between mineral particles. When the pellet was dried, bentonite was drawn to the contact points between the particles and formed solid bridges, which impart strength to the solid compact. PMID:24397939

  12. Manufacture of Regularly Shaped Sol-Gel Pellets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Johnston, James C.; Kinder, James D.

    2006-01-01

    An extrusion batch process for manufacturing regularly shaped sol-gel pellets has been devised as an improved alternative to a spray process that yields irregularly shaped pellets. The aspect ratio of regularly shaped pellets can be controlled more easily, while regularly shaped pellets pack more efficiently. In the extrusion process, a wet gel is pushed out of a mold and chopped repetitively into short, cylindrical pieces as it emerges from the mold. The pieces are collected and can be either (1) dried at ambient pressure to xerogel, (2) solvent exchanged and dried under ambient pressure to ambigels, or (3) supercritically dried to aerogel. Advantageously, the extruded pellets can be dropped directly in a cross-linking bath, where they develop a conformal polymer coating around the skeletal framework of the wet gel via reaction with the cross linker. These pellets can be dried to mechanically robust X-Aerogel.

  13. Use of к-carrageenan, chitosan and Carbopol 974P in extruded and spheronized pellets that are devoid of MCC.

    PubMed

    Valle, Brenda L; Omwancha, Wycliffe S; Neau, Steven H; Wigent, Rodney J

    2016-11-01

    The search for excipients to replace microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) in the production of pellets by extrusion-spheronization in cases of drug incompatibility or the lack of pellet matrix disintegration forms the basis of this study. A combination of к-carrageenan as a spheronization aid, chitosan as a diluent and Carbopol(®) 974P as a binder in the production of pellets containing no MCC has been investigated using acetaminophen as a model drug. Design of experiments allowed assessment of formulation and processing effects on pellet responses that included size, shape, fines, yield and friability. Statistical analysis revealed that the main factors and some of the two-factor interactions had a significant effect on pellet characteristics. Formulations containing high levels of к-carrageenan required more water to produce a wetted mass with good extrudability and extrudate capable of being spheronized. Although only a low level of Carbopol was used in the formulation, it imparted cohesiveness to the wetted mass as well as the extrudate. Furthermore, it was discovered that Carbopol could act as an extrusion aid, enabling the wetted mass to flow easily through the extruder screen holes without building up heat. Spherical and rugged pellets were produced that met the immediate release criterion. PMID:27100683

  14. Charge-exchange measurements of MHD activity during neutral beam injection in the Princeton Large Torus and the Poloidal Divertor Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.; Kaita, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gammel, G.; Herndon, D.L.; McCune, D.C.; Meyerhofer, D.D.

    1986-07-01

    The horizontally scanning, multiangle charge-exchange analyzers on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) were used to study the effects of MHD activity on the background ion distribution function and on the beam ion slowing-down process during high-power neutral injection. Sawtooth oscillations were observed in the fast ion flux on PLT and PDX, and measurements with neutral beams providing local neutral density enhancement indicate that ions are transported radially when these events occur. With near-perpendicular injection in PDX, at the lower toroidal fields necessary to maximize beta, rapid, repetitive bursts of greatly enhanced charge-exchange flux were observed. These are associated with the ''fishbone'' MHD instability, and a substantial depletion of the perpendicular slowing-down spectrum below the injection energy was seen. A simple phenomenological model for this loss mechanism was developed, and its use in simulation codes has been successful in providing good agreement with the data. The behavior and characteristics of this model are well matched by the direct theoretical calculations.

  15. Effect of process variables on the density and durability of the pellets made from high moisture corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru

    2014-03-01

    A flat die pellet mill was used to understand the effect of high levels of feedstock moisture content in the range of 28–38% (w.b.), with die rotational speeds of 40–60 Hz, and preheating temperatures of 30–110 °C on the pelleting characteristics of 4.8 mm screen size ground corn stover using an 8 mm pellet die. The physical properties of the pelletised biomass studied are: (a) pellet moisture content, (b) unit, bulk and tapped density, and (c) durability. Pelletisation experiments were conducted based on central composite design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that feedstock moisture content influenced all of the physical properties at P < 0.001. Pellet moisture content decreased with increase in preheating temperature to about 110 °C and decreasing the feedstock moisture content to about 28% (w.b.). Response surface models developed for quality attributes with respect to process variables has adequately described the process with coefficient of determination (R2) values of >0.88. The other pellet quality attributes such as unit, bulk, tapped density, were maximised at feedstock moisture content of 30–33% (w.b.), die speeds of >50 Hz and preheating temperature of >90 °C. In case of durability a medium moisture content of 33–34% (w.b.) and preheating temperatures of >70 °C and higher die speeds >50 Hz resulted in high durable pellets. It can be concluded from the present study that feedstock moisture content, followed by preheating, and die rotational speed are the interacting process variables influencing pellet moisture content, unit, bulk and tapped density and durability.

  16. Durable zinc ferrite sorbent pellets for hot coal gas desulfurization

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Mahesh C.; Blandon, Antonio E.; Hepworth, Malcolm T.

    1988-01-01

    Durable, porous sulfur sorbents useful in removing hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gas are prepared by water pelletizing a mixture of fine zinc oxide and fine iron oxide with inorganic and organic binders and small amounts of activators such as sodium carbonate and molybdenite; the pellets are dried and then indurated at a high temperature, e.g., 1800.degree. C., for a time sufficient to produce crush-resistant pellets.

  17. Adalimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... not improved when treated with other medications, ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ... adalimumab injection to treat Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, your doctor may tell you to inject the ...

  18. Denosumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Denosumab injection (Prolia) is also used to treat bone loss in men with prostate cancer and in women with breast cancer who are receiving certain treatments that increase their risk for fractures. Denosumab injection ( ...

  19. Diphenhydramine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the nervous system that causes difficulties with movement, muscle control, and balance). Diphenhydramine injection should not be ... solution (liquid) to be injected intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a vein). Your dosing schedule ...

  20. Leucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... red blood cells) caused by low levels of folic acid in the body. Leucovorin injection is also used ... injection is in a class of medications called folic acid analogs. It treats people who are receiving methotrexate ...

  1. Glatiramer Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... to inject glatiramer, inject it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription ...

  2. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large ... injection is also used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped abusing opiate ...

  3. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  4. Cefazolin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cefazolin injection is also sometimes used for certain penicillin allergic patients who have a heart condition and ... injection is also sometimes used to treat certain penicillin allergic women who are in labor in order ...

  5. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... cancer, and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  6. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... aripiprazole injection and aripiprazole extended-release injection developed gambling problems or other intense urges or behaviors that ... even if you do not realize that your gambling or any other intense urges or unusual behaviors ...

  7. Testosterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testopel) are also used to stimulate puberty in males with delayed puberty. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) injection may ... to the growth, development, and functioning of the male sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone injection ...

  8. Degarelix Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Degarelix injection is used to treat advanced prostate cancer (cancer that begins in the prostate [a male reproductive gland]). Degarelix injection is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) ...

  9. Naloxone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection device.The automatic injection device has an electronic voice system that provides step by step directions ... of opiate withdrawal such as body aches, diarrhea, fast heart beat, fever, runny nose, sneezing, sweating, yawning, ...

  10. Cefoxitin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephamycin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefoxitin injection will not work ...

  11. Doripenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tract, kidney, and abdomen that are caused by bacteria. Doripenem injection is not approved by the Food ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as doripenem injection will not work ...

  12. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria..Antibiotics such as chloramphenicol injection will not work ...

  13. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection is also used to treat endometriosis (a condition in which the type of tissue ... parts of the body in women who have endometriosis. Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of ...

  14. Levoleucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of ... people who have accidentally received an overdose of methotrexate or similar medications. Levoleucovorin injection is in a ...

  15. Vancomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vancomycin injection is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat certain serious infections such ... infections of the lungs, skin, blood, and bones. Vancomycin injection is in a class of medications called ...

  16. An unfortunate injection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavik Sandip; Yarbrough, Chase; Price, Amy; Biswas, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular injection has been used to administer medications for more than a hundred years. However, despite our profession's long experience with intramuscular administration, preventable complications such as injection nerve palsies are still prevalent in developing countries. Injections account for one-fifth of all traumatic nerve injuries. These injuries largely occur due to indiscriminate use of intramuscular injections for treating common illnesses, frequently by unlicensed or undertrained practitioners administering unnecessary treatment to impoverished patients. The sciatic nerve is the most commonly injured, and frequently the resulting muscle weakness and associated disability are irreversible. This case report includes a video of a patient with foot drop 6 weeks after gluteal intramuscular injection. Such injuries can be prevented by proper awareness and training, the implementation of safer injection techniques, and quality assurance methods. PMID:26931130

  17. Sintering of wax for controlling release from pellets.

    PubMed

    Singh, Reena; Poddar, S S; Chivate, Amit

    2007-09-14

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate incorporation of hydrophobic (ie, waxy) material into pellets using a thermal sintering technique and to evaluate the pellets in vitro for controlled release. Pellets prepared by extrusion-spheronization technology were formulated with a water-soluble drug, microcrystalline cellulose, and carnauba wax. Powdered carnauba wax (4%-20%) prepared by grinding or by emulsification was studied with an attempt to retard the drug release. The inclusion of ground or emulsified carnauba wax did not sustain the release of theophylline for more than 3 hours. Matrix pellets of theophylline prepared with various concentrations of carnauba wax were sintered thermally at various times and temperatures. In vitro drug release profiles indicated an increase in drug release retardation with increasing carnauba wax concentration. Pellets prepared with ground wax showed a higher standard deviation than did those prepared with emulsified wax. There was incomplete release at the end of 12 hours for pellets prepared with 20% ground or emulsified wax. The sintering temperature and duration were optimized to allow for a sustained release lasting at least 12 hours. The optimized temperature and duration were found to be 100 degrees C and 140 seconds, respectively. The sintered pellets had a higher hydrophobicity than did the unsintered pellets. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that the carnauba wax moved internally, thereby increasing the surface area of wax within the pellets.

  18. Prevalence and characteristics of abuse experiences and depression symptoms among injection drug-using female sex workers in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ulibarri, Monica D; Hiller, Sarah P; Lozada, Remedios; Rangel, M Gudelia; Stockman, Jamila K; Silverman, Jay G; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the prevalence and characteristics of physical and sexual abuse and depression symptoms among 624 injection drug-using female sex workers (FSW-IDUs) in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico; a subset of 47 from Tijuana also underwent qualitative interviews. Linear regressions identified correlates of current depression symptoms. In the interviews, FSW-IDUs identified drug use as a method of coping with the trauma they experienced from abuse that occurred before and after age 18 and during the course of sex work. In a multivariate linear regression model, two factors-ever experiencing forced sex and forced sex in the context of sex work-were significantly associated with higher levels of depression symptoms. Our findings suggest the need for integrated mental health and drug abuse services for FSW-IDUs addressing history of trauma as well as for further research on violence revictimization in the context of sex work in Mexico.

  19. Prevalence and Characteristics of Abuse Experiences and Depression Symptoms among Injection Drug-Using Female Sex Workers in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ulibarri, Monica D.; Hiller, Sarah P.; Lozada, Remedios; Rangel, M. Gudelia; Stockman, Jamila K.; Silverman, Jay G.; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the prevalence and characteristics of physical and sexual abuse and depression symptoms among 624 injection drug-using female sex workers (FSW-IDUs) in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico; a subset of 47 from Tijuana also underwent qualitative interviews. Linear regressions identified correlates of current depression symptoms. In the interviews, FSW-IDUs identified drug use as a method of coping with the trauma they experienced from abuse that occurred before and after age 18 and during the course of sex work. In a multivariate linear regression model, two factors—ever experiencing forced sex and forced sex in the context of sex work—were significantly associated with higher levels of depression symptoms. Our findings suggest the need for integrated mental health and drug abuse services for FSW-IDUs addressing history of trauma as well as for further research on violence revictimization in the context of sex work in Mexico. PMID:23737808

  20. Comparison of Ontology Reasoners: Racer, Pellet, Fact++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; Li, W.; Yang, C.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we examine some key aspects of three of the most popular and effective Semantic reasoning engines that have been developed: Pellet, RACER, and Fact++. While these reasonably advanced reasoners share some notable similarities, it is ultimately the creativity and unique nature of these reasoning engines that have resulted in the successes of each of these reasoners. Of the numerous dissimilarities, the most obvious example might be that while Pellet is written in Java, RACER employs the Lisp programming language and Fact++ was developed using C++. From this and many other distinctions in the system architecture, we can understand the benefits of each reasoner and potentially discover certain properties that may contribute to development of an optimal reasoner in the future. The objective of this paper is to establish a solid comparison of the reasoning engines based on their system architectures, features, and overall performances in real world application. In the end, we expect to produce a valid conclusion about the advantages and problems in each reasoner. While there may not be a decisive first place among the three reasoners, the evaluation will also provide some answers as to which of these current reasoning tools will be most effective in common, practical situations.

  1. Adsorption of zinc on magnetite pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Cargnel, D.A.; Cole, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Zinc is a common contaminant in wastewater electroplating, metal finishing, and many other industrial processes. This paper presents the results of work which is intended to be the first step in an evaluation of the use of concentrated and pelletized magnetite for the adsorption of metals from industrial wastewater. The magnetite used is a cold carbon bonded material which is formulated for the steel industry as a complete product ready for feed to the furnaces. The specific objective of this work was to determine the zinc adsorption capacity of the prepared magnetite pellets through batch tests that were designed to allow the development of an adsorption isotherm. Future work would explore the potential for use of the spent adsorbent in the steel making process, thereby allowing the recovered metals to be recycled into steel products, while avoiding spent adsorbent disposal costs. Although not evaluated in this study, an additional advantage of the use of magnetite as an adsorbent is that it can be magnetically separated from the wastewater.

  2. The influence of polymeric subcoats and pellet formulation on the release of chlorpheniramine maleate from enteric coated pellets.

    PubMed

    Bruce, L Diane; Koleng, John J; McGinity, James W

    2003-09-01

    The influences of aqueous polymeric subcoats and pellet composition on the release properties of a highly water-soluble drug, chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM), from enteric coated pellets were investigated. Three different aqueous polymeric subcoats, Eudragit RD 100, Eudragit RS 30D, and Opadry AMB, were applied to 10% w/w CPM-loaded pellets that were then enteric coated with Eudragit L 30D-55. Observed drug release from the coated pellets in acidic media correlated with water vapor transmission rates derived for the subcoat films. The influence of pellet composition on retarding the release of CPM from enteric coated pellets in 0.1 N HCl was investigated. The rate of drug release was greatest for pellets prepared with lactose, microcrystalline cellulose, or dibasic calcium phosphate compared with pellets formulated with citric acid and microcrystalline cellulose. Citric acid reduced the pellet micro-environmental pH, decreasing the amount of drug leakage in 0.1 N HCL during the first 2 hr of dissolution. Polymer flocculation was observed when CPM was added to the Eudragit L 30D-55 dispersion. An adsorption isotherm was generated for mixtures of CPM and the polymer and the data were found to fit the Freundlich model for adsorption. Adsorption of CPM to the polymer decreased with the addition of citric acid to the drug-polymer mixtures.

  3. Ceria-thoria pellet manufacturing in preparation for plutonia-thoria LWR fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drera, Saleem S.; Björk, Klara Insulander; Sobieska, Matylda

    2016-10-01

    Thorium dioxide (thoria) has potential to assist in niche roles as fuel for light water reactors (LWRs). One such application for thoria is its use as the fertile component to burn plutonium in a mixed oxide fuel (MOX). Thor Energy and an international consortium are currently irradiating plutonia-thoria (Th-MOX) fuel in an effort to produce data for its licensing basis. During fuel-manufacturing research and development (R&D), surrogate materials were utilized to highlight procedures and build experience. Cerium dioxide (ceria) provides a good surrogate platform to replicate the chemical nature of plutonium dioxide. The project's fuel manufacturing R&D focused on powder metallurgical techniques to ensure manufacturability with the current commercial MOX fuel production infrastructure. The following paper highlights basics of the ceria-thoria fuel production including powder milling, pellet pressing and pellet sintering. Green pellets and sintered pellets were manufactured with average densities of 67.0% and 95.5% that of theoretical density respectively.

  4. Effect of Experimental Conditions on Cementite Formation During Reduction of Iron Ore Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Mania; Sichen, Du

    2016-08-01

    Experiments have been carried out to study the effect of temperature, gas composition, residence time, and type of iron ore pellets on formation of cementite during gaseous reduction of hematite. Industrial iron ore pellets have been reduced isothermally in a gas mixture with H2 and CO as main components. The presence of Fe3C in the partially reduced pellets shows that reduction and cementite formation take place at the same time. The maximum content of cementite is identified in the samples reduced by H2-CO at 1123 K (850 °C). The decrease in the carbide content due to addition of 1 pct CO2 to the initial gas mixture reveals the major influence of carbon potential in the gas atmosphere. Further increase of CO2 content increases the Fe3C. The variations of the amount of cementite with the CO2 content suggest that both the thermodynamics and kinetics of cementite formation are affected by the gas composition. Cementite decomposes to graphite and iron particles in reducing and inert atmospheres as the residence time of pellets at high temperature is increased above 60 minutes.

  5. Effects of cultivar, pelleting and enzyme addition on nutritive value of barley in poultry diets.

    PubMed

    Francesch, M; Perez-Vendrell, A M; Esteve-Garcia, E; Brufau, J

    1994-05-01

    1. The effect of pelleting process and Trichoderma viride enzymes (TVE) addition on apparent metabolisable energy, corrected for nitrogen balance (AMEn) and on productive value of practical diets containing 40 and 45% of three different barley cultivars and one wheat were studied in poultry. 2. The effect of the pelleting process on AMEn was inconsistent and was dependent on the cereal included and the addition of enzyme. 3. The growth trial showed a significant effect of enzyme addition to pelleted diets over the whole growth period (0 to 42 d). Addition of TVE improved weight gain and food efficiency by 1.3% and 2.9%, respectively and decreased food intake by 1.6% between 0 and 22 d. In the finisher period (23 to 42 d) TVE improved efficiency by 2.8% and reduced food intake by 2.9%. 4. The incidence of sticky droppings was related to the viscosity of barley used, and enzyme supplementation reduced it. Both pelleting and enzyme addition increased dry matter content of excreta. 5. At the end of the experiment, 14 animals per treatment were slaughtered and carcass yield, viscera weight and abdominal fat were determined.

  6. [Optimatization of pellet preparation is CF-granulator with factorial design].

    PubMed

    Beretzky, Adám; Antal, István; Karsai, János; Eros, István; Hódi, Klára

    2008-01-01

    Lithium carbonate-containing pellets were made in a laboratory-scale centrifugal granulator in order to investigate the effects of the process parameters (rotor rotation speed, slit airflow rate and spray air rate) on the pellet shape and size distribution. The size distribution and the shape parameters (roundness, roughness, rectangularity and sphericity) of the pellets were measured, and an optimization parameter was then calculated from these shape parameters. The experiment was carried out and evaluated according to a 2(3) full factorial design. All three variables were found to exert a significant effect on the pellet shape. With use of the signs and magnitudes of the coefficients of the variables in the fitted linear model, the direction of the gradient was determined; two control measurements were made. These proved the accuracy of the applied model and the direction of the gradient. Overall, a high rotor rotation speed and low slit airflow rate and spray air rate furnished the best value of the optimization parameter.

  7. Effects of intra-infralimbic prefrontal cortex injections of cannabidiol in the modulation of emotional behaviors in rats: contribution of 5HT₁A receptors and stressful experiences.

    PubMed

    Marinho, A L Z; Vila-Verde, C; Fogaça, M V; Guimarães, F S

    2015-06-01

    The infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PL) regions of the prefrontal cortex are involved in behavioral responses observed during defensive reactions. Intra-PL or IL injections of cannabidiol (CBD), a major non-psychotomimetic cannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant, result in opposite behavioral effects in the contextual fear conditioning (CFC) paradigm. The intra-PL effects of CBD are mediated by 5HT1A receptors and depend on previous stressful experiences but the mechanisms and effects of intra-IL CBD injected are unknown. To this aim the present work verified the effects of intra-IL administration of CBD on two animal models of anxiety, the elevated plus maze (EPM) and CFC. We also investigated if these effects were mediated by 5HT1A receptors and depended on previous stressful experience. Male Wistar rats received bilateral microinjections of vehicle, WAY100635 (5HT1A receptor antagonist, 0.37 nmol) and/or CBD (15, 30 or 60 nmol) before being submitted to the behavioral tests. Intra-IL CBD induced anxiolytic and anxiogenic in the EPM and CFC, respectively. To verify if these effects are influenced by the previous stressful experience (footshocks) in the CFC model, we tested the animals in the EPM 24h after a 2-h restraint period. The anxiolytic-like effect of CBD in the EPM disappeared when the animals were previously stressed. Both responses, i.e., anxiolytic and anxiogenic, were prevented by WAY100635, indicating that they involve local 5HT1A-mediated neurotransmission. Together these results indicate that CBD effects in the IL depend on the nature of the animal model, being influenced by previous stressful experiences and mediated by facilitation of 5HT1A receptors-mediated neurotransmission.

  8. Direct injection method for HPLC/MS/MS analysis of acrylamide in aqueous solutions: application to adsorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Ines; Hurel, Charlotte; Marmier, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    Polyacrylamides are polymers used in many fields and represent the main source of release of the highly toxic acrylamide in the environment. In this work, a simple, rapid, and sensitive analytical method was developed with HPLC/MS/MS and direct injection for acrylamide analysis in water and adsorption samples. AFNOR standards NF T90-210 and NF T90-220 were used for the analytical method validation and uncertainty estimation. Limit of quantification (LOQ) for acrylamide was 1 μg/L, and accuracy was checked at three acrylamide levels (1, 6, and 10 μg/L). Uncertainties were estimated at 34.2, 22, and 12.4 % for acrylamide concentrations at LOQ, 6 μg/L, and 10 μg/L, respectively. Acrylamide adsorption on clays (kaolinite, illite) and sludge was then studied as a function of pH, time, and acrylamide concentrations. Acrylamide adsorption on kaolinite, illite, and sludge was found to be very weak since adsorption percentages were inferior to 10 %, whatever the pH value and the initial acrylamide concentration. The low affinity of acrylamide for clays and sludge is likely due to its hydrophilic property, small size, and charge neutrality.

  9. Plasma behaviour with hydrogen supersonic molecular beam and cluster jet injection in the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lianghua; Feng, Beibing; Chen, Chengyuan; Shi, Zhongbin; Yuan, Baoshan; Zhou, Yan; Duan, Xuru; Sun, Hongjuan; Lu, Jie; Jiao, Yiming; Ni, Guoquan; Lu, Haiyang; Xiao, Weiwen; Li, Wei; Pan, Yudong; Hong, Wenyu; Ran, Hong; Ding, Xuantong; Liu, Yong

    2007-11-01

    The experimental results of low pressure supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) fuelling on the HL-2A closed divertor indicate that during the period of pulsed SMBI the power density convected at the target plate surfaces was 0.4 times of that before or after the beam injection. An empirical scaling law used for the SMBI penetration depth for the HL-2A plasma was obtained. The cluster jet injection (CJI) is a new fuelling method which is based on and developed from the experiments of SMBI in the HL-1M tokamak. The hydrogen clusters are produced at liquid nitrogen temperature in a supersonic adiabatic expansion of moderate backing pressure gases into vacuum through a Laval nozzle and are measured by Rayleigh scattering. The measurement results have shown that the averaged cluster size of as large as hundreds of atoms was found at the backing pressures of more than 0.1 MPa. Multifold diagnostics gave coincidental evidence that when there was hydrogen CJI in the HL-2A plasma, a great deal of particles from the jet were deposited at a terminal area rather than uniformly ablated along the injecting path. SMB with clusters, which are like micro-pellets, will be of benefit for deeper fuelling, and its injection behaviour was somewhat similar to that of pellet injection. Both the particle penetration depth and the fuelling efficiency of the CJI were distinctly better than that of the normal SMBI under similar discharge operation. During hydrogen CJI or high-pressure SMBI, a combination of collision and radiative stopping forced the runaway electrons to cool down to thermal velocity due to such a massive fuelling.

  10. Oxidizing Roasting Performances of Coke Fines Bearing Brazilian Specularite Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Tiejun; Zhu, Deqing

    2016-06-01

    Oxidized pellets, consisting of Brazilian specularite fines and coke fines, were prepared by disc pelletizer using bentonite as binder. The roasting process of pellets includes preheating stage and firing stage. The compressive strength of preheated pellets and fired pellets reached the peak value at 1.5% coke fines dosage. During the initial stage of preheating, some original Fe2O3 was reduced to Fe3O4 because of partial reduction atmosphere in pellet. During the later stage of preheating and firing stage, coke fines were burnt out, and the secondary Fe2O3 (new generation Fe2O3) was generated due to the re-oxidization of Fe3O4, which improved the recrystallization of Fe2O3. Compared with the fired pellets without adding coke fines, fired pellets with 1.5% coke fines exhibited the comparable RSI (reduction swelling index) and RDI+3.15 mm (reduction degradation index), and slightly lower RI (reducibility index).

  11. Air gun pellet injuries: the safety of MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Oliver, C; Kabala, J

    1997-04-01

    The ferromagnetism, and therefore the safety in a magnetic resonance (MR) examination, of the most widely available air gun pellets has been tested. While many are made of lead and are not ferromagnetic, some contain steel and are deflected strongly in a magnetic field. There must therefore be careful consideration before undertaking MR examinations of patients with embedded air gun pellets.

  12. A new tritiated water measurement method with plastic scintillator pellets.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Etsuko; Iwasaki, Noriko; Kato, Yuka; Tomozoe, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    A new tritiated water measurement method with plastic scintillator pellets (PS-pellets) by using a conventional liquid scintillation counter was developed. The PS-pellets used were 3 mm in both diameter and length. A low potassium glass vial was filled full with the pellets, and tritiated water was applied to the vial from 5 to 100 μl. Then, the sample solution was scattered in the interstices of the pellets in a vial. This method needs no liquid scintillator, so no liquid organic waste fluid is generated. The counting efficiency with the pellets was approximately 48 % when a 5 μl solution was used, which was higher than that of conventional measurement using liquid scintillator. The relationship between count rate and activity showed good linearity. The pellets were able to be used repeatedly, so few solid wastes are generated with this method. The PS-pellets are useful for tritiated water measurement; however, it is necessary to develop a new device which can be applied to a larger volume and measure low level concentration like an environmental application. PMID:26856930

  13. Preparation and characterization of a self-emulsifying pellet formulation.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Ahmed; Mäder, Karsten

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of the current study is to investigate the feasibility of producing solid self-emulsifying pellets using the extrusion/spheronization technique. Pellets were made from a mixture of C18 partial glycerides, Solutol HS15 and microcrystalline cellulose. Pellets with good physical properties (size, shape, friability) and self-emulsifying properties were produced. The pellets were, in contrast to pellets lacking Solutol, able to transfer a lipophilic dye and a spin probe into the aqueous media. The release kinetics and the microenvironment of the pellets during the release process were assessed using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The ESR results showed that the hydrophobic spin probe was localized mainly in the lipid environment all over the release time. Furthermore, the formulation was capable of accelerating the release of the drug diazepam and achieving a diazepam concentration above its saturation solubility. In conclusion, spherical pellets with low friability and self-emulsifying properties can be produced by the standard extrusion/spheronization technique. The pellets are capable of transfering lipophilic compounds into the aqueous phase and have a high potential to increase the bioavailability of lipophilic drugs.

  14. Belgian experience with triple therapy with boceprevir and telaprevir in genotype 1 infected patients who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    Arain, A; Bourgeois, S; de Galocsy, C; Henrion, J; Deltenre, P; d'Heygere, F; George, C; Bastens, B; Van Overbeke, L; Verrando, R; Bruckers, L; Mathei, C; Buntinx, F; Van Vlierberghe, H; Francque, S; Laleman, W; Moreno, C; Janssens, F; Nevens, F; Robaeys, G

    2016-01-01

    No data have been reported yet on treatment outcome in persons who inject drugs (PWID) infected with hepatitis C virus treated with boceprevir or telaprevir in combination with peginterferon (Peg IFN) and ribavirin (RBV). Additionally, there are concerns about the safety of boceprevir and telaprevir in some subgroups of patients with hepatitis C (HCV). In a cohort of HCV patients infected with genotype 1 in Belgium, treatment outcome of patients infected due to IV drug use was analyzed and compared with patients who have no history of substance use. The study population consisted of 179 patients: 78 PWID and 101 controls treated with boceprevir (n = 79) or telaprevir (n = 100) additional to Peg IFN and RBV; 53 (30%) had advanced disease (F3, F4) and 79 (44%) had an antiviral therapy previously. There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics between both groups, except that PWID patients were more frequently infected with genotype 1a (67% vs 21%), were younger and were predominantly male. Psychiatric complaints during follow-up occurred more frequently in the PWID patients: 24% versus 11% (P = .02). Treatment failure for other reasons than absence of viral response was 70% and 64% in PWID and non-PWID respectively. The sustained viral response (SVR) rates were similar in both groups (71% in PWID vs 72% in non-PWID); with a non-inferiority test with -5% margin there is a difference of -1% (95% CI [-15%, 13%]) and P = 0.30. There are no reasons to exclude PWID from treatment with boceprevir, telaprevir and novel antiviral therapies. PMID:26121975

  15. Validation of single-fluid and two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic models of the helicity injected torus spheromak experiment with the NIMROD code

    SciTech Connect

    Akcay, Cihan; Victor, Brian S.; Jarboe, Thomas R.; Kim, Charlson C.

    2013-08-15

    We present a comparison study of 3-D pressureless resistive MHD (rMHD) and 3-D presureless two-fluid MHD models of the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive helicity injection (HIT-SI). HIT-SI is a current drive experiment that uses two geometrically asymmetric helicity injectors to generate and sustain toroidal plasmas. The comparable size of the collisionless ion skin depth d{sub i} to the resistive skin depth predicates the importance of the Hall term for HIT-SI. The simulations are run with NIMROD, an initial-value, 3-D extended MHD code. The modeled plasma density and temperature are assumed uniform and constant. The helicity injectors are modeled as oscillating normal magnetic and parallel electric field boundary conditions. The simulations use parameters that closely match those of the experiment. The simulation output is compared to the formation time, plasma current, and internal and surface magnetic fields. Results of the study indicate 2fl-MHD shows quantitative agreement with the experiment while rMHD only captures the qualitative features. The validity of each model is assessed based on how accurately it reproduces the global quantities as well as the temporal and spatial dependence of the measured magnetic fields. 2fl-MHD produces the current amplification (I{sub tor}/I{sub inj}) and formation time τ{sub f} demonstrated by HIT-SI with similar internal magnetic fields. rMHD underestimates (I{sub tor}/I{sub inj}) and exhibits much a longer τ{sub f}. Biorthogonal decomposition (BD), a powerful mathematical tool for reducing large data sets, is employed to quantify how well the simulations reproduce the measured surface magnetic fields without resorting to a probe-by-probe comparison. BD shows that 2fl-MHD captures the dominant surface magnetic structures and the temporal behavior of these features better than rMHD.

  16. Preliminary Results from Downhole Osmotic Samplers in a Gas Tracer Injection Experiment in the Upper Oceanic Crust on the Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, M. T.; Clark, J. F.; Neira, N. M.; Fisher, A. T.; Wheat, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a gas tracer injection experiment in the ocean crust on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an area of hydrothermal circulation. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer was injected in Hole 1362B in 2010, during IODP Expedition 327. Fluid samples were subsequently collected from a borehole observatory (CORK) installed in this hole and similar CORKs in three additional holes (1026B, 1362A, and 1301A), located 300 to 500 m away. This array of holes is located on 3.5 My old seafloor, as an array oriented subparallel to the Endeavor Segment of Juan de Fuca Ridge. Borehole fluid samples were collected in copper coils using osmotic pumps. In addition to pumps at seafloor wellheads, downhole sampling pumps were installed in the perforated casing in the upper ocean crust. These downhole samplers were intended to produce a high-resolution continuous record of tracer concentrations, including records from the first year after tracer injection in Holes 1362A and 1362B. In contrast, wellhead samplers were not installed on these CORKs holes until 2011, and wellhead records from all CORKs have a record gap of up to one year, because of a delayed expedition in 2012. The downhole samples were recovered with the submersible Alvin in August 2014. SF6 concentrations in downhole samples recovered in 2014 are generally consistent with data obtained from wellhead samples. Of particular interest are the results from Hole 1362B, where a seafloor valve was opened and closed during various recovery expeditions. High resolution tracer curves produced from the 1362B downhole samples confirm that these operations produced an SF6 breakthrough curve corresponding to a classic push-pull test used to evaluate contaminant field locations in terrestrial setting. Complete analyses of downhole samples from these CORKs are expected to produce high-resolution breakthrough curves that will allow more precise analysis and modeling of hydrothermal flow in the study area.

  17. ["Piggyback" shot: ballistic parameters of two simultaneously discharged airgun pellets].

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Schönekess, Holger C; Grossjohann, Rico; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Bockholdt, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Green and Good reported an uncommon case of homicide committed with an air rifle in 1982 (Am. J. Forensic Med. Pathol. 3: 361-365). The fatal wound was unusual in that two airgun pellets were loaded in so-called "piggyback" fashion into a single shot air rifle. Lack of further information on the ballistic characteristics of two airgun pellets as opposed to one conventionally loaded projectile led to this investigation. The mean kinetic energy (E) of the two pellets discharged in "piggyback" fashion was E = 3.6 J and E = 3.4 J, respectively. In comparison, average kinetic energy values of E = 12.5 J were calculated for conventionally discharged single diabolo pellets. Test shots into ballistic soap confirmed the findings of a single entrance wound as reported by Green and Good. While the ballistic background of pellets discharged in "piggyback" fashion could be clarified, the reason behind this mode of shooting remains unclear. PMID:24855739

  18. In vivo evaluation of matrix pellets containing nanocrystalline ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Vergote, G J; Vervaet, C; Van Driessche, I; Hoste, S; De Smedt, S; Demeester, J; Jain, R A; Ruddy, S; Remon, J P

    2002-06-20

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-vivo behaviour of matrix pellets formulated with nanocrystalline ketoprofen after oral administration to dogs. No significant differences in AUC-values were seen between pellet formulations containing nanocrystalline or microcrystalline ketoprofen and a commercial ketoprofen formulation (reference: Rofenid 200 Long Acting). C(max) of the formulations containing nano- or microcrystalline ketoprofen was significantly higher compared to reference, whereas t(max) was significantly lower. The in-vivo burst release observed for the spray dried nanocrystalline ketoprofen matrix pellets was reduced following compression of the pellets in combination with placebo wax/starch pellets. These matrix tablets sustained the ketoprofen plasma concentrations during 5.6 and 5.4 h for formulations containing nano- and microcrystalline ketoprofen, respectively.

  19. Straw pellets as fuel in biomass combustion units

    SciTech Connect

    Andreasen, P.; Larsen, M.G.

    1996-12-31

    In order to estimate the suitability of straw pellets as fuel in small combustion units, the Danish Technological Institute accomplished a project including a number of combustion tests in the energy laboratory. The project was part of the effort to reduce the use of fuel oil. The aim of the project was primarily to test straw pellets in small combustion units, including the following: ash/slag conditions when burning straw pellets; emission conditions; other operational consequences; and necessary work performance when using straw pellets. Five types of straw and wood pellets made with different binders and antislag agents were tested as fuel in five different types of boilers in test firings at 50% and 100% nominal boiler output.

  20. Solar drying of yam-flour pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Oladiran, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the heat/mass transfer characteristics of a turbulent impinging jet in cross flow in a model of a chamber used for solar drying of yam flour pellets is presented. The variables studied were the nozzle inclination, ..cap alpha.. and the jet-to-cross flow velocity ratio, M. These parameters were varied from 30/sup 0/ to 135/sup 0/ and from 5.0 to 20.9 respectively. Superimposing a cross flow onto the jet reduced the heat transfer coefficients. At low cross flows, inclining the nozzle further reduced the heat transfer coefficients. However, at higher cross flows, inclining the nozzle could be beneficial. The thin film napthalene sublimation technique was employed for the mass transfer measurements.

  1. U.S. Pellet Industry Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Corrie I. Nichol; Jacob J. Jacobsen; Richard D. Boardman

    2011-06-01

    This report is a survey of the U.S. Pellet Industry, its current capacity, economic drivers, and projected demand for biomass pellets to meet future energy consumption needs. Energy consumption in the US is projected to require an ever increasing portion of renewable energy sources including biofuels, among which are wood, and agrictulrual biomass. Goals set by federal agencies will drive an ever increasing demand for biomass. The EIA projections estimate that renewable energy produced by 2035 will be roughly 10% of all US energy consumption. Further analysis of the biofuels consumption in the US shows that of the renewable energy sources excluding biofuels, nearly 30% are wood or biomass waste. This equates to roughly 2% of the total energy consumption in the US coming from biomass in 2009, and the projections for 2035 show a strong increase in this amount. As of 2009, biomass energy production equates to roughly 2-2.5 quadrillion Btu. The EIA projections also show coal as providing 21% of energy consumed. If biomass is blended at 20% to co-fire coal plants, this will result in an additional 4 quadrillion Btu of biomass consumption. The EISA goals aim to produce 16 billion gal/year of cellulosic biofuels, and the US military has set goals for biofuels production. The Air Force has proposed to replace 50% of its domestic fuel requirements with alternative fuels from renewable sources by 2016. The Navy has likewise set a goal to provide 50% of its energy requirements from alternative sources. The Department of Energy has set similarly ambitious goals. The DOE goal is to replace 40% of 2004 gasoline use with biofuels. This equates to roughly 60 billion gal/year, of which, 45 billion gal/year would be produced from lignocellulosic resources. This would require 530 million dry tons of herbaceous and woody lignocellulosic biomass per year.

  2. Light scattering experiments on aqueous solutions of selected cellulose ethers: contribution to the study of polymer-mineral interactions in a new injectable biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Bohic, S; Weiss, P; Roger, P; Daculsi, G

    2001-03-01

    Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) is used as a ligand for a bioactive calcium phosphate ceramic (the filler) in a ready-to-use injectable sterilized biomaterial for bone and dental surgery. Light scattering experiments were usually used to study high water-soluble polymers and to determine the basic macromolecular parameters. In order to gain a deeper understanding of polymer/mineral interactions in this type of material, we have investigated the effect of divalent and trivalent ions (Ca(2+), PO(4)(3-)) and steam sterilization on dilute solutions of HPMC and hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC). The sterilization process may cause some degradation of HEC taking into account its high molecular weight and some rigidity of the polymer chain. Moreover, in the case of HPMC, the changes in the conformations rather than degradation process are supposed. These effects of degradation and flocculation are strengthened in alkaline medium. Experimental data suggested the formation of chelate complexes between Ca(2+) and HPMC which improve its affinity to the mineral blend and consolidate the injectable biomaterial even in the case of its hydration by biological fluid. PMID:15348303

  3. Light scattering experiments on aqueous solutions of selected cellulose ethers: contribution to the study of polymer-mineral interactions in a new injectable biomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Bohic, Sylvain; Weiss, Pierre; Roger, Philippe; Daculsi, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) is used as a ligand for a bioactive calcium phosphate ceramic (the filler) in a ready-to-use injectable sterilized biomaterial for bone and dental surgery. Light scattering experiments were usually used to study high water-soluble polymers and to determine the basic macromolecular parameters. In order to gain a deeper understanding of polymer/mineral interactions in this type of material, we have investigated the effect of divalent and trivalent ions (Ca2+, PO43−) and steam sterilization on dilute solutions of HPMC and HEC. The sterilization process may cause some degradation of HEC taking into account its high molecular weight and some rigidity of the polymer chain. Moreover, in the case of HPMC, the changes in the conformations rather than degradation process are supposed. These effects of degradation and flocculation are strengthened in alkaline medium. Experimental data suggested the formation of chelate complexes between Ca2+ and HPMC which improve its affinity to the mineral blend and consolidate the injectable biomaterial even in the case of its hydration by biological fluid. PMID:15348303

  4. Circular economy in drinking water treatment: reuse of ground pellets as seeding material in the pellet softening process.

    PubMed

    Schetters, M J A; van der Hoek, J P; Kramer, O J I; Kors, L J; Palmen, L J; Hofs, B; Koppers, H

    2015-01-01

    Calcium carbonate pellets are produced as a by-product in the pellet softening process. In the Netherlands, these pellets are applied as a raw material in several industrial and agricultural processes. The sand grain inside the pellet hinders the application in some high-potential market segments such as paper and glass. Substitution of the sand grain with a calcite grain (100% calcium carbonate) is in principle possible, and could significantly improve the pellet quality. In this study, the grinding and sieving of pellets, and the subsequent reuse as seeding material in pellet softening were tested with two pilot reactors in parallel. In one reactor, garnet sand was used as seeding material, in the other ground calcite. Garnet sand and ground calcite performed equally well. An economic comparison and a life-cycle assessment were made as well. The results show that the reuse of ground calcite as seeding material in pellet softening is technologically possible, reduces the operational costs by €38,000 (1%) and reduces the environmental impact by 5%. Therefore, at the drinking water facility, Weesperkarspel of Waternet, the transition from garnet sand to ground calcite will be made at full scale, based on this pilot plant research.

  5. Circular economy in drinking water treatment: reuse of ground pellets as seeding material in the pellet softening process.

    PubMed

    Schetters, M J A; van der Hoek, J P; Kramer, O J I; Kors, L J; Palmen, L J; Hofs, B; Koppers, H

    2015-01-01

    Calcium carbonate pellets are produced as a by-product in the pellet softening process. In the Netherlands, these pellets are applied as a raw material in several industrial and agricultural processes. The sand grain inside the pellet hinders the application in some high-potential market segments such as paper and glass. Substitution of the sand grain with a calcite grain (100% calcium carbonate) is in principle possible, and could significantly improve the pellet quality. In this study, the grinding and sieving of pellets, and the subsequent reuse as seeding material in pellet softening were tested with two pilot reactors in parallel. In one reactor, garnet sand was used as seeding material, in the other ground calcite. Garnet sand and ground calcite performed equally well. An economic comparison and a life-cycle assessment were made as well. The results show that the reuse of ground calcite as seeding material in pellet softening is technologically possible, reduces the operational costs by €38,000 (1%) and reduces the environmental impact by 5%. Therefore, at the drinking water facility, Weesperkarspel of Waternet, the transition from garnet sand to ground calcite will be made at full scale, based on this pilot plant research. PMID:25746637

  6. Development of a radio frequency ion source with multi-helicon plasma injectors for neutral beam injection system of Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Kyumin; Jung, Bongki; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-02-15

    Despite of high plasma density, helicon plasma has not yet been applied to a large area ion source such as a driver for neutral beam injection (NBI) system due to intrinsically poor plasma uniformity in the discharge region. In this study, a radio-frequency (RF) ion source with multi-helicon plasma injectors for high plasma density with good uniformity has been designed and constructed for the NBI system of Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus at Seoul National University. The ion source consists of a rectangular plasma expansion chamber (120 × 120 × 120 mm{sup 3}), four helicon plasma injectors with annular permanent magnets and RF power system. Main feature of the source is downstream plasma confinement in the cusp magnetic field configuration which is generated by arranging polarities of permanent magnets in the helicon plasma injectors. In this paper, detailed design of the multi-helicon plasma injector and plasma characteristics of the ion source are presented.

  7. Triptorelin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to triptorelin injection. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about triptorelin injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  8. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to leuprolide injection. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about leuprolide injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  9. High-Intensity Radiated Field Fault-Injection Experiment for a Fault-Tolerant Distributed Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Amy M.; Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Gray, W. Steven

    2010-01-01

    Safety-critical distributed flight control systems require robustness in the presence of faults. In general, these systems consist of a number of input/output (I/O) and computation nodes interacting through a fault-tolerant data communication system. The communication system transfers sensor data and control commands and can handle most faults under typical operating conditions. However, the performance of the closed-loop system can be adversely affected as a result of operating in harsh environments. In particular, High-Intensity Radiated Field (HIRF) environments have the potential to cause random fault manifestations in individual avionic components and to generate simultaneous system-wide communication faults that overwhelm existing fault management mechanisms. This paper presents the design of an experiment conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center's HIRF Laboratory to statistically characterize the faults that a HIRF environment can trigger on a single node of a distributed flight control system.

  10. The development of an injection-molding process for a polyanhydride implant containing gentamicin sulfate.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jone-Shin; Meisters, Marts; Li, Luk; Setesak, Jeff; Claycomb, Lee; Tian, Youqin; Stephens, Dennis; Widman, Matt

    2002-01-01

    A production-scale manufacturing process has been developed for polyanhydride/gentamicin sulfate implants for the treatment of osteomyelitis. Gentamicin sulfate was first dried to an acceptable moisture level by using a tumble vacuum dryer. Dried gentamicin sulfate powder and polyanhydride granules were separately fed into the twin-screw extruder at a pre-determined metering rate using a gravimetric feeding device. The extruded molten mixture was solidified to form strands which were subsequently cut into pellets by using a pelletizer. The pellets were characterized with respect to copolymer molecular weight and drug content uniformity. The pellets were later fed into production-scale injection-molding equipment for implant fabrication. The injection-molding cycle was developed and evaluated in terms of cycle reproducibility. Implants were tested and shown to yield an oriented skin-core structure exhibiting a desirable in-vitro drug release profile.

  11. Consolidated waste forms: glass marbles and ceramic pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Treat, R.L.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Glass marbles and ceramic pellets have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the multibarrier concept for immobilizing high-level radioactive waste. These consolidated waste forms served as substrates for the application of various inert coatings and as ideal-sized particles for encapsulation in protective matrices. Marble and pellet formulations were based on existing defense wastes at Savannah River Plant and proposed commercial wastes. To produce marbles, glass is poured from a melter in a continuous stream into a marble-making device. Marbles were produced at PNL on a vibratory marble machine at rates as high as 60 kg/h. Other marble-making concepts were also investigated. The marble process, including a lead-encapsulation step, was judged as one of the more feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes. To produce ceramic pellets, a series of processing steps are required, which include: spray calcining - to dry liquid wastes to a powder; disc pelletizing - to convert waste powders to spherical pellets; sintering - to densify pellets and cause desired crystal formation. These processing steps are quite complex, and thereby render the ceramic pellet process as one of the least feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes.

  12. Pellet formation of zygomycetes and immobilization of yeast.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jonas; Lacintra, Michael G; Westman, Johan O; Berglin, Mattias; Lundin, Magnus; Lennartsson, Patrik R; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2013-06-25

    Pelleted growth provides many advantages for filamentous fungi, including decreased broth viscosity, improved aeration, stirring, and heat transfer. Thus, the factors influencing the probability of pellet formation of Rhizopus sp. in a defined medium was investigated using a multifactorial experimental design. Temperature, agitation intensity, Ca(2+)-concentration, pH, and solid cellulose particles, each had a significant effect on pelletization. Tween 80, spore concentration, and liquid volume were not found to have a significant effect. All of the effects were additive; no interactions were significant. The results were used to create a simple defined medium inducing pelletization, which was used for immobilization of a flocculating strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the zygomycetes pellets. A flor-forming S. cerevisiae strain was also immobilized, while a non-flocculating strain colonized the pellets but was not immobilized. No adverse effects were detected as a result of the close proximity between the filamentous fungus and the yeast, which potentially allows for co-fermentation with S. cerevisiae immobilized in pellets of zygomycetes. PMID:23711366

  13. Dependency between removal characteristics and defined measurement categories of pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, C.; Rohrbacher, M.; Rascher, R.; Sinzinger, S.

    2015-09-01

    Optical surfaces are usually machined by grinding and polishing. To achieve short polishing times it is necessary to grind with best possible form accuracy and with low sub surface damages. This is possible by using very fine grained grinding tools for the finishing process. These however often show time dependent properties regarding cutting ability in conjunction with tool wear. Fine grinding tools in the optics are often pellet-tools. For a successful grinding process the tools must show a constant self-sharpening performance. A constant, at least predictable wear and cutting behavior is crucial for a deterministic machining. This work describes a method to determine the characteristics of pellet grinding tools by tests conducted with a single pellet. We investigate the determination of the effective material removal rate and the derivation of the G-ratio. Especially the change from the newly dressed via the quasi-stationary to the worn status of the tool is described. By recording the achieved roughness with the single pellet it is possible to derive the roughness expect from a series pellet tool made of pellets with the same specification. From the results of these tests the usability of a pellet grinding tool for a specific grinding task can be determined without testing a comparably expensive serial tool. The results are verified by a production test with a serial tool under series conditions. The collected data can be stored and used in an appropriate data base for tool characteristics and be combined with useful applications.

  14. Preparation and evaluation of sustained-release doxazosin mesylate pellets.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung-Myung; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Tack-Oon; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Chi, Sang-Cheol; Kuk, Hyon; Park, Chun-Woong; Park, Eun-Seok

    2013-01-01

    Doxazosin mesylate (DXM) sustained release pellets were prepared by an extrusion-spheronization and fluid-bed coating technique. The core pellets containing DXM were prepared by extrusion-spheronization technique, and coated by a fluid-bed coater to control the release of DXM. The factors affecting to properties of pellets, such as diluent content, type and coating level of coating agents and plasticizers were studied in the present study. Polymethacrylate derivatives (Eudragit® RS PO and RL PO) were used for coating agents, and polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000), triethyl citrate (TEC) and castor oil were as plasticizers. To evaluate the properties of prepared pellets, the size of prepared pellets was investigated by sieve analysis technique and the morphology of pellets was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Through the dissolution test, factors that have an effect on the dissolution of the drug were evaluated. As the content ratio of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) had increased, the dissolution was proportionally sustained. Eudragit® RS PO had more marked sustaining effect on the dissolution rate than Eudragit® RL PO, and the effect was more pronounced with the increased coating level. PEG 6000 was an appropriate plasticizer for DXM pellets, and increasing the content of PEG 6000, was also slightly decreasing the dissolution rate.

  15. Microplastic resin pellets on an urban tropical beach in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Coley, Isabel; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2015-07-01

    Microplastics are a problem in oceans worldwide. The current situation in Latin America is not well known. This paper reports, for the first time, the presence of microplastics on an urban Caribbean beach in Cartagena, Colombia. Pellet samples were collected from a tourist beach over a 5-month period covering both dry and rainy seasons. Pellets were classified by color and their surface analyzed by stereomicroscopy, and some were characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The most abundant pellets were white, presenting virgin surfaces, with few signs of oxidation. This is congruent with a short residence time in the marine environment and primary sources possibly located nearby. The frequency of white pellets did not change with sampling period. Surface features identified in the pellets included cracks, material loss, erosion, adhesion, granulation, color change, and glazed surfaces. Reticulated granular pellets exhibited the greatest degradation, easily generating submicroplastics. Sample composition was mostly polyethylene, followed by polypropylene. This pollution problem must be addressed by responsible authorities to avoid pellet deposition in oceans and on beaches around the world.

  16. An oral controlled release matrix pellet formulation containing nanocrystalline ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Vergote, G J; Vervaet, C; Van Driessche, I; Hoste, S; De Smedt, S; Demeester, J; Jain, R A; Ruddy, S; Remon, J P

    2001-05-21

    A controlled release pellet formulation using a NanoCrystal colloidal dispersion of ketoprofen was developed. In order to be able to process the aqueous NanoCrystal colloidal dispersion into a hydrophobic solid dosage form a spray drying procedure was used. The in vitro dissolution profiles of wax based pellets loaded with nanocrystalline ketoprofen are compared with the profiles of wax based pellets loaded with microcrystalline ketoprofen and of a commercial sustained release ketoprofen formulation. Pellets were produced using a melt pelletisation technique. All pellet formulations were composed of a mixture of microcrystalline wax and starch derivatives. The starch derivatives used were waxy maltodextrin and drum dried corn starch. Varying the concentration of drum dried corn starch increased the release rate of ketoprofen but the ketoprofen recovery remained problematic. To increase the dissolution yield surfactants were utilised. The surfactants were either added during the production process of the NanoCrystal colloidal dispersion (sodium laurylsulphate) or during the pellet manufacturing process (Cremophor RH 40). Both methods resulted in a sustained but complete release of nanocrystalline ketoprofen from the matrix pellet formulations.

  17. Mechanisms of phosphorus removal by cement-bound ochre pellets.

    PubMed

    Littler, James; Geroni, Jennifer N; Sapsford, Devin J; Coulton, Richard; Griffiths, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Hydrous ferric oxide (here termed 'ochre') sludge, an abundant waste product produced from the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD), was used in this study for the removal of phosphorus (in the form of phosphate ions) from contaminated waters. The phosphorus uptake capacities of both raw and pelletized AMD solids were compared using batch and column tests. Addition of a cement binder to the AMD solids during pellet production led to significantly increased P-loading of the resultant solids compared to the raw sludge. Additionally, the pellets were found to continue to remove P in tests up to 7 d in duration whereas the unbound AMD sludge appeared to approach equilibrium with phosphate solution after approximately 60 min of contact time. In line with previous studies P uptake by the AMD solids was found to be primarily via adsorption. By contrast calcium phosphate precipitation was found to be the dominant removal mechanism for the cement-bound ochre pellets with a relatively small proportion of removal attributable to the AMD solids. SEM-EDX analysis of the surface of used pellets showed a Ca:P molar ratio close to that of hydroxyapatite (HAP). Continuous column tests on these pellets showed a rapid decrease in P removal capacity by the pellets over time, attributable to the formation of a passivating HAP surface layer. PMID:23041038

  18. Pyrolysis of ground pine chip and ground pellet particles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rezaei, Hamid; Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh; Lim, C. Jim; Lau, Anthony; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2016-08-04

    In addition to particle size, biomass density influences heat and mass transfer rates during the thermal treatment processes. In this research, thermal behaviour of ground pine chip particles and ground pine pellet particles in the range of 0.25–5 mm was investigated. A single particle from ground pellets was almost 3 to 4 times denser than a single particle from ground chips at a similar size and volume of particle. Temperature was ramped up from room temperature (~25 °C) to 600 °C with heating rates of 10, 20, 30, and 50 °C/min. Pellet particles took 25–88 % longer time to drymore » than the chip particles. Microscopic examination of 3 mm and larger chip particles showed cracks during drying. No cracks were observed for pellet particles. The mass loss due to treatment at temperatures higher than 200 °C was about 80% both for chip and pellet particles. It took 4 min for chip and pellet particles to lose roughly 63% of their dry mass at a heating rate of 50 °C/min. The SEM structural analysis showed enlarged pores and cracks in cell walls of the pyrolyzed wood chips. As a result, these pores were not observed in pyrolyzed pellet particles.« less

  19. Evaluation of micro-homogeneity in plutonium based nuclear reactor fuel pellets by alpha-autoradiography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghra, Chetan; Sathe, D. B.; Sharma, Jitender; Walinjkar, Nilima; Behere, P. G.; Afzal, Mohd; Kumar, Arun

    2015-12-01

    Alpha-autoradiography is a fast and non-destructive technique which is used at Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (India) to evaluate micro-homogeneity of plutonium in uranium and plutonium mixed oxide (U-Pu)O2 fuel pellets fabricated for both thermal and fast breeder reactors. In this study, various theoretical calculations to understand effect of alpha autoradiography process parameters and limiting conditions for measuring micro-homogeneity of plutonium in the pellets having different concentrations of plutonium were reported. Experiments were carried out to establish the procedure to evaluate micro-homogeneity of plutonium in (U-x%Pu)O2 pellets where x varies from 0.4 to 44% and to measure the size of agglomerates, if any, present in the pellet. An attempt had been made to measure plutonium content in the agglomerate using alpha-autoradiography. This study can also be useful for carrying out alpha-autoradiography of spent fuel pellets during post-irradiation examination.

  20. Response surface methodology and process optimization of sustained release pellets using Taguchi orthogonal array design and central composite design

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurinder; Pai, Roopa S.; Devi, V. Kusum

    2012-01-01

    Furosemide is a powerful diuretic and antihypertensive drug which has low bioavailability due to hepatic first pass metabolism and has a short half-life of 2 hours. To overcome the above drawback, the present study was carried out to formulate and evaluate sustained release (SR) pellets of furosemide for oral administration prepared by extrusion/spheronization. Drug Coat L-100 was used within the pellet core along with microcrystalline cellulose as the diluent and concentration of selected binder was optimized to be 1.2%. The formulation was prepared with drug to polymer ratio 1:3. It was optimized using Design of Experiments by employing a 32 central composite design that was used to systematically optimize the process parameters combined with response surface methodology. Dissolution studies were carried out with USP apparatus Type I (basket type) in both simulated gastric and intestinal pH. The statistical technique, i.e., the two-tailed paired t test and one-way ANOVA of in vitro data has proposed that there was very significant (P≤0.05) difference in dissolution profile of furosemide SR pellets when compared with pure drug and commercial product. Validation of the process optimization study indicated an extremely high degree of prognostic ability. The study effectively undertook the development of optimized process parameters of pelletization of furosemide pellets with tremendous SR characteristics. PMID:22470891