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  1. SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY IN PATIENTS WITH MORBID OBESITY AND HIV.

    PubMed

    Pinto, José Máximo Costa; Lima, Marianna Gomes Cavalcanti Leite de; Almeida, Ana Luiza Melo Cavalcanti de; Sousa, Marcelo Gonçalves

    , Scielo, Cochrane e Lilacs, no período de 1998 a 2015. Os descritores do MeSH utilizados na coleta dos dados foram "Gastrectomia" e "Obesidade mórbida", sendo combinados com o descritor "HIV". Foram encontrados 2.148 artigos na Scopus, 1.234 no Pubmed e 784 na Cinahl. Os artigos foram analisados pela Escala de Qualidade de Jadad, reduzindo para um total de 40 artigos, os quais foram posteriormente reavaliados, utilizando um formulário elaborado pelo Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP), chegando ao montante de 12 artigos ao final. Verificou-se que a gastrectomia vertical constitui método seguro e eficaz, apresentando baixa morbimortalidade e baixo índice de complicações pós-operatórias, sendo técnica cirúrgica segura para uso em pacientes com obesidade, HIV e comorbidades.

  2. HIV Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  3. HIV Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Collapse All Is abstinence the only 100% effective HIV prevention option? Yes. Abstinence means not having oral, ...

  4. Stages of HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Stages of HIV Infection How Does HIV Progress in Your Body? Without treatment, HIV advances ... are the three stages of HIV infection: Acute HIV Infection Stage Within 2-4 weeks after HIV ...

  5. Women and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women and HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... HIV? What should pregnant women know about HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the ...

  6. Treatment for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Treatment » Treatment Decisions and HIV HIV/AIDS Menu Menu HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Home ... here Enter ZIP code here Treatment Decisions and HIV for Veterans and the Public Treatment for HIV: ...

  7. HIV Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibody tests, combination or fourth-generation tests, and nucleic acid tests (NAT). HIV tests may be performed on ... retested 3 months after your possible exposure. A nucleic acid test (NAT) looks for HIV in the blood. ...

  8. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  9. HIV chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Douglas D.

    2001-04-01

    The use of chemotherapy to suppress replication of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has transformed the face of AIDS in the developed world. Pronounced reductions in illness and death have been achieved and healthcare utilization has diminished. HIV therapy has also provided many new insights into the pathogenesis and the viral and cellular dynamics of HIV infection. But challenges remain. Treatment does not suppress HIV replication in all patients, and the emergence of drug-resistant virus hinders subsequent treatment. Chronic therapy can also result in toxicity. These challenges prompt the search for new drugs and new therapeutic strategies to control chronic viral replication.

  10. Advertising HIV.

    PubMed

    Mougenez, Stephane; Chad, N'Djamena; Howe, John

    1995-04-05

    Think of advertising and what comes to mind, soap powders, motor cars, baked beans? All of these, of course, are heavily advertised, but what about HIV? Among the most durable of the government's advertisement campaigns have been the ones concerning HIV. Tens of millions of pounds have been spent telling the public of the presence and dangers of the virus.

  11. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  12. HIV Viral Load

    MedlinePlus

    ... Count ; HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) ; HIV Drug Resistance ( Genotypic and Phenotypic ) All content on Lab Tests ... have their therapy changed. They should undergo HIV drug resistance testing to help in the selection of an ...

  13. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... How to Find HIV Treatment Services HIV and Mental Health HIV and Nutrition and Food Safety Print This ... from the following sources: From the Department of Health and Human Services: ... of Veterans Affairs: Treatment Decisions for HIV From the National ...

  14. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: HIV Screening Tests; AIDS Test; AIDS Screen; HIV Serology; ...

  15. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... 03-13T18:29:11+00:00 PH and HIV Print PH and HIV Brochure (PDF) Order Copies ... to know about pulmonary hypertension in connection with HIV? Although pulmonary hypertension and HIV are two separate ...

  16. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  17. HIV and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG HIV and Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs HIV ... HIV and Pregnancy FAQ113, July 2017 PDF Format HIV and Pregnancy Pregnancy What is human immunodeficiency virus ( ...

  18. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medication Adherence Last Reviewed: March 2, 2017 Key ...

  19. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Kids > HIV and AIDS ... actually the virus that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV ...

  20. Living with HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Living With HIV Language: English Spanish Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  1. HIV among Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Women Format: Select One File [155K] Recommend ...

  2. HIV among Transgender People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Transgender People Format: Select One PDF [227K] ...

  3. HIV Life Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Overview The HIV Life Cycle (Last updated 9/13/2016; last reviewed 9/8/2016) Key Points HIV gradually destroys the immune ... life cycle. What is the connection between the HIV life cycle and HIV medicines? Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ...

  4. HIV and Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV and Immunizations (Last updated 2/24/2017; last reviewed 2/24/2017) Key Points Vaccines protect people from ... a disease outbreak. Is there a vaccine against HIV? Testing is underway on experimental vaccines to prevent ...

  5. HIV Among Asians

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partnerships for Care THRIVE Serostatus Approach Policy and Law Affordable Care Act Expanded Testing Initiative High-Impact ... of High-Impact Prevention Bibliography HIV and the Law State HIV Laws HIV-Specific Criminal Laws Laboratory ...

  6. HIV/AIDS Coinfection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laotian Mongolian Spanish Turkish Vietnamese Hindi Subscribe HIV/AIDS Coinfection Approximately 10% of the HIV-infected population ... Control and Prevention website to learn about HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis guidelines and resources. Home About ...

  7. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... at risk for serious infections and certain cancers. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV most often spreads through unprotected sex with ...

  8. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts HIV/AIDS Fact sheet Updated November 2016 Key facts HIV ... and 2015, new HIV infections fell by 35%, AIDS-related deaths fell by 28% with some 8 ...

  9. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Kids > HIV and AIDS A A ... serious infection. continue How Many People Have HIV/AIDS? Since the discovery of the virus in 1983, ...

  10. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which ...

  11. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... AGENT HIV, a single-stranded, positive-sense, enveloped RNA virus in the genus Lentivirus. TRANSMISSION HIV can ... be diagnosed is approximately 9 days, when HIV RNA becomes detectable in blood; however, tests needed to ...

  12. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Teens > HIV and AIDS Print A A A What's in this article? ... in human history. HIV causes a condition called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome — better known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type ...

  13. HIV Structural Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 102 HIV Structural Database (Web, free access)   The HIV Protease Structural Database is an archive of experimentally determined 3-D structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1), Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 (HIV-2) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Proteases and their complexes with inhibitors or products of substrate cleavage.

  14. FDA-Approved HIV Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment FDA-Approved HIV Medicines (Last updated 2/27/2017; last reviewed 2/27/2017) Treatment with ... 2007 Pharmacokinetic Enhancers Pharmacokinetic enhancers are used in HIV treatment to increase the effectiveness of an HIV medicine ...

  15. HIV-1 Prevention for HIV-1 Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Kathryn; Baeten, Jared M.; Coates, Thomas J.; Kurth, Ann; Mugo, Nelly R.

    2013-01-01

    A substantial proportion of HIV-1-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa are in stable relationships with HIV-1-uninfected partners, and HIV-1 serodiscordant couples thus represent an important target population for HIV-1 prevention. Couple-based HIV-1 testing and counseling facilitates identification of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, counseling about risk reduction, and referrals to HIV-1 treatment, reproductive health services, and support services. Maximizing HIV-1 prevention for HIV-1 serodiscordant couples requires a combination of strategies, including counseling about condoms, sexual risk, fertility, contraception, and the clinical and prevention benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the HIV-1-infected partner; provision of clinical care and ART for the HIV-1-infected partner; antenatal care and services to prevent mother to child transmission for HIV-1- infected pregnant women; male circumcision for HIV-1-uninfected men; and, pending guidelines and demonstration projects, oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV-1-uninfected partners. PMID:22415473

  16. Mechanisms of HIV persistence in HIV reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Mzingwane, Mayibongwe L; Tiemessen, Caroline T

    2017-03-01

    The establishment and maintenance of HIV reservoirs that lead to persistent viremia in patients on antiretroviral drugs remains the greatest challenge of the highly active antiretroviral therapy era. Cellular reservoirs include resting memory CD4+ T lymphocytes, implicated as the major HIV reservoir, having a half-life of approximately 44 months while this is less than 6 hours for HIV in plasma. In some individuals, persistent viremia consists of invariant HIV clones not detected in circulating resting CD4+ T lymphocytes suggesting other possible sources of residual viremia. Some anatomical reservoirs that may harbor such cells include the brain and the central nervous system, the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and other lymphoid organs, and the genital tract. The presence of immune cells and other HIV susceptible cells, occurring in differing compositions in anatomical reservoirs, coupled with variable and poor drug penetration that results in suboptimal drug concentrations in some sites, are all likely factors that fuel the continued low-level replication and persistent viremia during treatment. Latently, HIV-infected CD4+ T cells harboring replication-competent virus, HIV cell-to-cell spread, and HIV-infected T cell homeostatic proliferation due to chronic immune activation represent further drivers of this persistent HIV viremia during highly active antiretroviral therapy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Testing for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability (Biologics) HIV Home Test Kits Testing for HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  18. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    HIV infection; Infection - HIV; Human immunodeficiency virus; Acquired immune deficiency syndrome ... The virus is spread (transmitted) person-to-person in any of the following ways: Through sexual contact Through blood -- ...

  19. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type of defense cell in the body called a CD4 helper ... are part of the body's immune system , the defense system that fights infections. When HIV destroys these ...

  20. Microbiome in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Salas, January T.; Chang, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV primary infection occurs at mucosa tissues, suggesting an intricate interplay between microbiome and HIV infection. Recent advanced technologies of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics allow researchers to explore nonculturable microbes including bacteria, virus and fungi and their association with diseases. HIV/SIV infection is associated with microbiome shifts and immune activation that may affect the outcome of disease progression. Similarly, altered microbiome and inflammation are associated with increased risks of HIV acquisition, suggesting the role of microbiome in HIV transmission. In this review, we will focus on microbiome in HIV infection at various mucosal compartments. Understanding the relationship between microbiome and HIV may offer insights into development of better strategies for HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25439273

  1. HIV/AIDS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partner Spotlight Awareness Days Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or ... AIDS Get Email Updates on AAA Anonymous Feedback HIV/AIDS Media Infographics Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets ...

  2. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Compartir Chapter 3 - Histoplasmosis Chapter 3 - Influenza HIV Infection Philip J. Peters, John T. Brooks INFECTIOUS ... at 888-448-4911 ( www.nccc.ucsf.edu ). HIV TESTING REQUIREMENTS FOR US TRAVELERS ENTERING FOREIGN COUNTRIES ...

  3. Children and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... to living with HIV disease, including, family issues, bullying and medication adherence. As children age into adolescence ... 60 years) infection. But many young adults and adolescents who have lived with HIV since they were ...

  4. HIV and employment.

    PubMed

    McGoldrick, C

    2012-06-01

    According to 2009 statistics, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected an estimated 86,500 individuals within the UK, although around one-quarter were unaware of their infection. In the majority of cases, it is now considered a long-term controllable but incurable infection. Indeed, most HIV-positive individuals are able to work. Employment is across most, if not all, workforce sectors and protection against workplace discrimination is provided by the Equality Act 2010. Issues including confidentiality, workplace adjustments, vaccinations and travel restrictions may be relevant to the occupational health of HIV-positive workers. There are special considerations concerning HIV-infected health care workers, including avoidance of performing exposure-prone procedures. Prevention of HIV acquisition in the workplace is relevant to a diverse range of occupational environments, and HIV post-exposure prophylaxis should be considered after potential HIV exposure incidents. If a worker contracts HIV by occupational means, financial help may be available.

  5. HIV Disease: Current Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), newly characterized human retrovirus which causes chronic, progressive, immune deficiency disease, the most severe phase of which is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Reviews most important current epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic information about HIV and HIV disease and provides…

  6. HIV Disease: Current Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), newly characterized human retrovirus which causes chronic, progressive, immune deficiency disease, the most severe phase of which is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Reviews most important current epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic information about HIV and HIV disease and provides…

  7. HIV antibodies for treatment of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Margolis, David M; Koup, Richard A; Ferrari, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The bar is high to improve on current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), now highly effective, safe, and simple. However, antibodies that bind the HIV envelope are able to uniquely target the virus as it seeks to enter new target cells, or as it is expressed from previously infected cells. Furthermore, the use of antibodies against HIV as a therapeutic may offer advantages. Antibodies can have long half-lives, and are being considered as partners for long-acting antiretrovirals for use in therapy or prevention of HIV infection. Early studies in animal models and in clinical trials suggest that such antibodies can have antiviral activity but, as with small-molecule antiretrovirals, the issues of viral escape and resistance will have to be addressed. Most promising, however, are the unique properties of anti-HIV antibodies: the potential ability to opsonize viral particles, to direct antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against actively infected cells, and ultimately the ability to direct the clearance of HIV-infected cells by effector cells of the immune system. These distinctive activities suggest that HIV antibodies and their derivatives may play an important role in the next frontier of HIV therapeutics, the effort to develop treatments that could lead to an HIV cure. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Basic HIV/AIDS Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Statistics Center . How many people are diagnosed with HIV each year in the United States? In 2015, ...

  9. HIV Medicines and Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV Medicines and Side Effects (Last updated 1/17/2017; last reviewed 1/17/2017) Key Points HIV medicines help people with ... will depend on a person’s individual needs. Can HIV medicines cause side effects? HIV medicines help people ...

  10. HIV Testing in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV/AIDS HIV Testing in the United States HIV Testing in the United States Jun 23, 2017 ... States or for refugees. 27 Insurance Coverage of HIV Testing HIV testing that is “medically necessary” – recommended ...

  11. HIV, AIDS, and the Future

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV, AIDS, and the Future Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... and your loved ones from HIV/AIDS. The AIDS Memorial Quilt In 1987, a total of 1, ...

  12. HIV/AIDS and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets the body’s immune ... and often leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Each year in the United States, between 55, ...

  13. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us | En Español OFFERING INFORMATION ON HIV/AIDS TREATMENT, PREVENTION, AND RESEARCH Search Search Search Search Search Menu Home Guidelines Understanding HIV/AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps Home Guidelines Understanding HIV/ ...

  14. HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... Victoria Cargill talks to students about HIV and AIDS at the opening of a National Library of ...

  15. Sex and Sexuality and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... level of risk you are willing to take. Birth control and HIV The only forms of birth control ... protect against HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases. Birth control options that DO protect against HIV: abstinence (not ...

  16. Women and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS email updates Enter email Submit HIV and AIDS The human immunodeficiency (IH-myoo-noh-di-FISH- ... health Pregnancy and HIV View more HIV and AIDS resources Related information Birth control methods Sexually transmitted ...

  17. HIV/AIDS in Women

    MedlinePlus

    HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus, kills or damages cells of the body's immune system. The most advanced stage of infection with HIV is AIDS, which stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV often ...

  18. Parenting and HIV.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Tamsen; Netsi, Elena; Redinger, Stephanie; Stein, Alan

    2017-06-01

    With the widespread use of antiretroviral therapy and successful prevention of mother-to-child transmission the development of HIV-negative children with HIV-positive parents has become an important focus. There is considerable evidence that children's developmental risk is heightened because a parental HIV-diagnosis is associated with a range of potential problems such as depression, stigma and financial difficulties. Up to a third of children in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are cared for by an HIV-positive parent or caregiver. We review the mechanisms by which HIV affects parenting including its negative effects on parental responsiveness in the early years of parenting and parental avoidant coping styles and parenting deficits in the later years. We describe low-cost parenting interventions suited for low resourced HIV endemic settings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. HIV testing in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Jeannin, A; Dubois-Arber, F; Paccaud, F

    1994-11-01

    To obtain information about the prevalence of, reasons for, and adequacy of HIV testing in the general population in Switzerland in 1992. Telephone survey (n = 2800). Some 47% of the sample underwent one HIV test performed through blood donation (24%), voluntary testing (17%) or both (6%). Of the sample, 46% considered themselves well or very well informed about the HIV test. Patients reported unsystematic pre-test screening by doctors for the main HIV risks. People having been in situations of potential exposure to risk were more likely to have had the test than others. Overall, 85% of those HIV-tested had a relevant, generally risk-related reason for having it performed. HIV testing is widespread in Switzerland. Testing is mostly performed for relevant reasons. Pre-test counselling is poor and an opportunity for prevention is thus lost.

  20. HIV Evolution and Escape.

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Douglas D.; Little, Susan J.; Smith, Davey M.; Wrin, Terri; Petropoulos, Christos; Wong, Joseph K.

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exemplifies the principles of Darwinian evolution with a telescoped chronology. Because of its high mutation rate and remarkably high rates of replication, evolution can be appreciated over periods of days in contrast to the durations conceived of by Darwin. Certain selective pressures that drive the evolution of HIV include chemotherapy, anatomic compartmentalization and the immune response. Examples of these selective forces on HIV evolution are described. Images Fig. 5 PMID:17060974

  1. Science challenging HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Rao, R R; Lakshi, V

    1993-04-01

    The first accepted report of a novel human, slow virus disease belonging to "lentivirus" known as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can be traced to reports of June 1981. HIV-1 and HIV-2 were later found over the period 1984-86 to be unequivocally associated with AIDS. They are two serologically distinct viruses belonging to the same family with the unique properties of integration and latency in the host cell genome and the presence of reverse transcriptase. Typical of all retroviruses, the HIV genome comprises three genes governing the synthesis of all core proteins, replication protein encoding, and envelope proteins. HIV uses the CD4 antigen on T-helper cells, and about 40% of blood monocytes and tissue macrophages as a cell surface receptor. HIV may, however, also infect cells which contain no CD4. Macrophages serve as the main reservoir of HIV and may carry the virus to different organs. Very recently a rare type of white blood cell called the dendritic cell has been found to allow for direct infection by HIV during sexual intercourse. These cells are prominently present in the anal and vaginal mucosa. The authors discuss facts and figures on the HIV epidemic, the Indian scenario, classification of the clinical spectrum, the enzyme immunoassay HIV testing format, Western blot, immunofluorescence antibody, HIV culture, flow cytometry, radio immuno precipitation assay, and the detection of HIV DNA. Significant advances have been made over the last ten years in understanding the pathogenesis of HIV infection and accurately diagnosing infected individuals, with recombinant technology, polymerase chain reaction, and the construction of synthetic hybrid virus rapidly becoming part of routine diagnostics. More sensitive, specific, and rapid techniques are, however, needed for the early diagnosis and management of AIDS cases. The need for more ideal antibody incorporating both regulatory and structural proteins of the virion, preferably manufactured using

  2. Psychogenic "HIV infection".

    PubMed

    Sno, H N; Storosum, J G; Wortel, C H

    1991-01-01

    The case of a man who falsely represented himself as being HIV positive is reported. In less than one year he was admitted twice with symptoms suggestive of HIV infection. The diagnoses malingering and factitious disorder were consecutively made. Early recognition of Factitious Disorder is essential to prevent patients from harmful diagnostic procedures or surgical treatments. Psychiatric treatment is best focused on management and care rather than cure. Psychogenic "HIV infection" might become more common than acknowledged up to now. Physicians should consider the occurrence of psychogenic "HIV infection," part of the symptomatology may be psychogenically determined, or indeed frankly simulated.

  3. Gynecologic conditions and HIV.

    PubMed

    1997-07-01

    Studies are reinforcing the need for HIV-infected women to continue getting regular gynecologic examinations so that gynecologic complications can be detected early and monitored regularly. HIV-infected women who also have the human papillomavirus are more likely to progress to cervical cancer than their HIV-negative counterparts. Also, HIV-infected women are more likely to have abnormal pap smears and the presence of squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) compared to women who are HIV-negative. Because pap smears are not always accurate, women who have a history of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or SIL should probably include a colposcopy with their pap smear. Studies are showing a positive effect of anti-HIV therapy in lowering viral levels in vaginal secretions and in blood and semen in men. HIV RNA levels, however, have increased in vaginal secretions in response to standard treatment for CIN. HIV levels have also been shown to increase in the presence of sexually transmitted diseases, but when HIV viral levels are suppressed, there appears to be a lower susceptibility to gynecologic infections. Since research shows the benefits of early detection and treatment of gynecologic infections or conditions, all women should be aggressive and proactive in maintaining their health through regular gynecologic care.

  4. Mental Health and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policies and Reports Provider Education Provider Education Home HIV Meds Updates Online Courses (CME) Case Studies Journal Articles Glossary Quick References Quick References Home Guidelines Integrated ...

  5. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Hyperlipidemia

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Hyperlipidemia (Last updated 11/22/2016; last reviewed 11/22/2016) Key Points Hyperlipidemia refers to high levels ... pancreas). HIV infection and treatment with some HIV medicines can increase the risk of hyperlipidemia. Other risk ...

  6. Slow progress against HIV.

    PubMed

    Alcorn, K

    1995-01-01

    Treatment for people with HIV attempts to prevent HIV from reproducing, boost the immune system, or cure opportunistic infections. The chemical structure of anti-viral drugs is similar to that of DNA. Since HIV bonds with the drugs rather than DNA, it cannot replicate itself. The most widely used anti-viral drug is zidovudine or AZT (brand name, Retrovir), but it does not help HIV infected persons who are still healthy. A recent trial shows that a combination of anti-viral drugs is more likely to delay opportunistic infections and death than AZT alone. When pregnant women use AZT before and during delivery and when their newborns receive AZT therapy, the likelihood of HIV transmission to the newborn is reduced by about 66%. Follow-up studies are needed, however, since AZT is toxic. Disadvantages of anti-viral drugs include resistance, toxicity, side effects (e.g., nausea and anemia), which are particularly severe at high doses, and accessibility of regular and expensive monitoring tests. Protease inhibitors are in the early stages of development. They deactivate the HIV enzyme which allows HIV to attach to white blood cells. Imuthiol (DTC) aims to increase the number of white blood cells so the body can fight HIV longer, but it appears that it has no benefit and may even facilitate development of opportunistic infections. Interleuken 2 may increase the number of CD4 cells. Alternative approaches to strengthening the immune system are lifestyle changes, improved diet, reduced stress, Chinese medicine and acupuncture, herbal medicines, and relaxation exercises. HIV/AIDS therapies are very expensive and often induce side effects. Many HIV positive people in developed countries are opting out of these treatments, even though they have access to them. Prevention and treatment of opportunistic infection remain the best strategies for most HIV-infected persons.

  7. Living with HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Infection with HIV is serious. But the outlook for people with HIV/AIDS is improving. If you are infected with HIV, there are many things you can do to ... health care provider who knows how to treat HIV. You may want to join a support group. ...

  8. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    DOEpatents

    Caulfield, Michael; Cupo, Albert; Dean, Hansi; Hoffenberg, Simon; King, C. Richter; Klasse, P. J.; Marozsan, Andre; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew; Wilson, Ian; Julien, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-22

    The present application relates to novel HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, which may be utilized as HIV-1 vaccine immunogens, and antigens for crystallization, electron microscopy and other biophysical, biochemical and immunological studies for the identification of broad neutralizing antibodies. The present invention encompasses the preparation and purification of immunogenic compositions, which are formulated into the vaccines of the present invention.

  9. Positive: HIV Affirmative Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kain, Craig D.

    At the end of the 1980s, counselors largely lacked an integrated approach to counseling people living with HIV disease. This book describes the experience of counseling this group of persons. The major premise here is that counselors who counsel HIV-positive clients must come to understand and affirm their clients' experiences. The text defines a…

  10. HIV and Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeilly, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to plague many countries across the globe, including the United States, Africa, China and India. Children and adults have been infected with HIV, and both populations can present with communication disorders that coexist with the presence of the virus. The purpose of this paper is to present an…

  11. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  12. Avascular necrosis in HIV.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Puja; Nelson, Mark; Brand, Alexander; Boag, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is an emerging complication of HIV infection. The incidence of AVN in HIV patients is greater than the general population. Although the incidence has increased in the HAART era, the aetiology remains unclear. We report our experience of AVN from our tertiary referral HIV centre and evaluate risk factors for its development. Review of MRI reports of HIV-positive patients between 2007 and 2010 identified 22 patients with AVN (19 men, 3 women). Case notes and electronic records were reviewed. Twenty-two patients developed AVN, among 6,487 HIV patients attending our centre (0.34% incidence; 95% CI, 0.2-0.48%). 68% of patients had multi-joint involvement. The median nadir CD4 count was 52 cells/μL. 73% of patients had more than two risk factors including HAART (91%), protease inhibitors (68%), hypercholesterolaemia (59%), corticosteroids (55%), hypertriglyceridaemia (45%), smoking (45%), alcohol (27%) and CD4 <200 cells/μL (23%). 9% were idiopathic. AVN is an important musculoskeletal manifestation of HIV and may be multi-focal with multi-factorial aetiology. Preventative strategies should focus on risk factor modification. When investigating joint pain in HIV-infected patients, clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for AVN. Unexplained AVN, particularly if multi-focal, should prompt consideration of HIV testing.

  13. Smart HIV testing system.

    PubMed

    El Kateeb, Ali; Law, Peter; Chan, King

    2005-06-01

    The quick HIV testing method called "MiraWell Rapid HIV Test" uses a specialized testing kit to determine whether an individual's blood is contaminated with the HIV virus or not. When a drop of blood is placed on the center of the testing kit, a simple pattern will appear in the middle of the kit to indicate the test status, i.e., positive or negative. This HIV test should be done in a small clinic or in a lab and the test must be conducted by a trained technician. A smart HIV testing system was developed through this research to eliminate the human error that is associated with the use of the quick HIV testing kits. Also, the smart HIV system will improve the testing productivity in comparison to those achieved by the trained technicians. In this research, we have developed a cost-effective system that analyzes the image produced by the HIV kits. We have used a System-On-Chip (SOC) design approach based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology and the Xilinx Virtex SOC chip in building the system's prototype. The system used a CMOS digital camera to capture the image and an FPGA chip to process the captured image and send the testing results to the display unit. The system can be used in small clinics and pharmacies and eliminates the need for trained technicians. The system has been tested successfully and 98% of the tests were correct.

  14. HIV and Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeilly, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to plague many countries across the globe, including the United States, Africa, China and India. Children and adults have been infected with HIV, and both populations can present with communication disorders that coexist with the presence of the virus. The purpose of this paper is to present an…

  15. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... together, then? This is another question that medical science is searching to answer. We do know that many HIV-infected individu- als have other problems and other risk factors that can lead to PH. A direct cause-and-effect relationship between HIV infection and ...

  16. Get Tested for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Affordable Care Act , the health care reform law passed in 2010, insurance plans must cover HIV testing. HIV counseling is covered for women who are sexually active. Talk to your insurance company to find out more. To learn about other ...

  17. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis with HIV.

    PubMed

    Talat, Humaira; Attarwala, Sharmeen; Saleem, Mubasshir

    2014-05-01

    Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) is a vector borne disease caused by various species of the Leishmania parasite. CL is endemic in the province of Balochistan in Pakistan. In certain instances a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-related immunocompromised is associated with atypical clinical presentation and occurrence of reactivated lesions of CL. Such presentations respond poorly to the standard treatment and frequent relapses are noted. We are reporting three cases of localized and disseminated CL due to Leishmania tropica which responded to meglumine antimoniate. Due to the fact that CL is endemic in Balochistan, we did not consider HIV infection as a causative organism. It was their presentation with history of weight loss and fever that prompted Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) tests for HIV, which turned out to be positive. CL is becoming visible as an opportunistic infection associated with HIV/AIDS and may even be the first symptom in HIV positive patients in an endemic area.

  18. Thinking about HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, Evelyn P; Siberry, George K; Hutton, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of HIV can occur during pregnancy, labor, delivery, and breastfeeding. Evidence-based interventions (routine screening of pregnant women, initiation of antiretroviral drugs for mother's treatment or prevention of MTCT, and avoiding breastfeeding) have reduced transmission rates in the United States from 25% to 30% to less than 2%. Triple-drug combination antiretroviral therapy effectively controls HIV infection and improves survival and quality of life for HIV-infected children and adolescents. Initial regimens use combinations of two NRTIs together with an NNRTI or a ritonavir-boosted PI. These regimens have been shown to increase CD4 counts and achieve virologic suppression. Prevention of serious and opportunistic infections reduces morbidity and mortality in children and adolescents who have HIV infection. Recommendations for immunizations and chemoprophylaxis vary with the patient's CD4 count. Condoms made from latex, polyurethane, or other synthetic materials have been shown to decrease the transmission of STIs, including HIV infection.

  19. Depression and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Benton, Tami D

    2008-06-01

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a significant public health problem. Millions of people worldwide are infected with this virus daily, and thousands die yearly of AIDS-related illnesses. Despite rapid advances in our knowledge about HIV and its mode of transmission, we have been unable to find a cure or prevent new infections. Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with HIV/AIDS: as a risk factor for HIV infection, a comorbidity of HIV infection, sequelae of HIV/AIDS, and a potential mediator for progression to AIDS. In this article, we focus on depression, which is prevalent in HIV/AIDS. We review the evidence associating depression with HIV, the challenges in recognizing depression in HIV-positive individuals, and the psychopharmacologic strategies known to be effective in the treatment of HIV-positive individuals with depression.

  20. [Epidemiology of HIV].

    PubMed

    Ledergerber, Bruno; Battegay, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Globally, an estimated 35 million people were living with HIV in 2012; of these, 69 % in sub-Saharan Africa. There were 2.3 million new HIV infections globally and 1.6 million AIDS deaths in 2012. As a result of large roll-out programs with integrated voluntary counselling and testing and prevention programs in resource limited settings, sexual transmission of HIV decreased substantially over the last years. However, the world is not on track to reduced HIV transmission among people who inject drugs. Especially in Eastern Europe and Asia prevention coverage for people who inject drugs remains low. In addition, effective prevention among these people is undermined by stigmatisation, discrimination, punitive policy frameworks and law enforcement practices, which discourage people from seeking the health and social services they need. Antiretroviral coverage among pregnant women living with HIV reached 62 % in 2012 resulting in a reduction of newly infected children by 35 % from 2009. In 2012, 9.7 million people in low and middle-income countries received antiretroviral therapy, representing 61 % of all who were eligible under the 2010 WHO HIV treatment guidelines. Under the 2013 guidelines, this represents only 34 % of the 28.3 million people eligible in 2013. A new concept to curb the HIV epidemic is "Test and Treat" which involves population-wide HIV tests with immediate initiation of antiretroviral therapy among all HIV infected individuals. However, there are concerns regarding the sustainability of such treatment programs for decades due to lost to follow up and insufficient adherence and the danger of a large increase of resistant HIV which jeopardize the effectiveness of affordable treatments.

  1. HIV/AIDS and the Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters HIV/AIDS and the Flu Questions & Answers Language: English Españ ... with HIV and AIDS. Should people with HIV/AIDS receive the inactivated influenza vaccine? People with HIV ...

  2. HIV and AIDS: Medicines to Help You

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Audience For Women Free Publications HIV and AIDS--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... HIV treatment. HIV is the virus that causes AIDS. HIV stands for H uman I mmunodeficiency V ...

  3. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Care Saves Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Error processing SSI file Error processing SSI file HIV Care Saves Lives Viral Suppression is Key Language: ... high risk of getting HIV. People living with HIV can Get into HIV medical care as soon ...

  4. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ... to HIV Can anyone participate in an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? It depends on the study. Some ...

  5. The INSTI HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody test: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ameeta E; Lee, Bonita; Fenton, Jayne; Preiksaitis, Jutta

    2013-05-01

    Rapid HIV tests have been widely adopted globally as an important component of HIV prevention and control programs. The INSTI™ HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody test is a second-generation HIV antibody test, available in most countries for use from whole blood, serum, and plasma. Available data on kit characteristics and current performance data on the INSTI™ HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody test are presented together with six other rapid point-of-care tests (RPOCTs) for HIV antibody. Few published data are available providing direct comparisons of INSTI™ with other RPOCTs for HIV antibody and standard laboratory-based HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody assays. Existing data showed that INSTI™ has comparable performance to other RPOCTs but detected seroconversion later than standard laboratory-based assays. The good performance of INSTI HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody test, its ease of use, the rapid availability of results (< 5 min), and the lack of specialized equipment required to use the kit make this kit a useful addition to the global market. The unique antigen and flow through technology contained in the kit make it a strong addition to HIV RPOCTs and to rapid/rapid algorithms used in many resource-limited settings.

  6. The HIV-1 transgenic rat model of neuroHIV

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Michael; Connaghan, Kaitlyn P.; Chang, Sulie L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ability of current combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) to limit the progression of HIV-1 to AIDS, HIV-positive individuals continue to experience neuroHIV in the form of HIV-associated neurological disorders (HAND), which can range from subtle to substantial neurocognitive impairment. NeuroHIV may also influence substance use, abuse, and dependence in HIV-positive individuals. Because of the nature of the virus, variables such as mental health co-morbidities make it difficult to study the interaction between HIV and substance abuse in human populations. Several rodent models have been developed in an attempt to study the transmission and pathogenesis of the HIV-1 virus. The HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat is a reliable model of neuroHIV because it mimics the condition of HIV-infected patients on cART. Research using this model supports the hypothesis that the presence of HIV-1 viral proteins in the central nervous system increases the sensitivity and susceptibility of HIV-positive individuals to substance abuse. PMID:25733103

  7. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  8. HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Saksena, Nitin K.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is associated with the development of neurocognitive disorders in many infected individuals, including a broad spectrum of motor impairments and cognitive deficits. Despite extensive research, the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) is still not clear. This review provides a comprehensive view of HAND, including HIV neuroinvasion, HAND diagnosis and different level of disturbances, influence of highly-active antiretroviral therapy to HIV-associated dementia (HAD), possible pathogenesis of HAD, etc. Together, this review will give a thorough and clear understanding of HAND, especially HAD, which will be vital for future research, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24470972

  9. Mobility and HIV.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    Migrants, refugees, and internally displaced people are vulnerable to HIV because they live in poor areas with little privacy, have different sexual relationships, and lack information about sexual health and services. In response to these problems, HIV prevention and care programs were initiated. The programs include: 1) involving migrant workers as both interviewers and outreach workers to better understand the idea of the migrants per Coordination of Action Research on Mobility and AIDS; 2) improving living conditions; 3) access of migrants to information and services; 4) improving the rights of the people; 5) increasing income; and 6) access to sexual health information that concerns exposure of HIV through different sexual partners.

  10. HIV and gynaecological infections.

    PubMed

    Sebitloane, Mothshedisi H

    2005-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection primarily affects women during their reproductive years, and the co-existence of gynaecological infections is not surprising, given the fact that HIV is mainly acquired via heterosexual contact. Most gynaecological infections are themselves sexually acquired, and have the potential to increase the risk both of acquiring and transmitting the HI virus. As most sexually transmitted infections are asymptomatic, there is a need to improve methods of diagnosis and algorithms for early detection of sexually transmitted infections. HIV infection, however, particularly advanced disease, may alter the clinical presentation, course and response to conservative treatment for some of the sexually transmitted infections.

  11. HIV infections in otolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Rzewnicki, Ireneusz; Olszewska, Ewa; Rogowska-Szadkowska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Summary HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection may produce no clinical symptoms for 10 years on average. However, after many years of infection most people develop symptoms that indicate progression of the disease. There are no regular characteristic symptoms or early stage, and no logical sequence of AIDS indicator disorders has been observed. People who are not aware of the infection are referred to physicians of various specializations, including otolaryngologists. It is on their knowledge about HIV infections, among other factors, that early diagnosis of the disease depends. Appropriate and quick introduction of anti-retroviral drugs may let a person with HIV live decades longer. PMID:22367140

  12. HIV/AIDS eradication.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Matthew D; Zack, Jerome A

    2013-07-15

    Antiretroviral therapy can inhibit HIV replication in patients and prevent progression to AIDS. However, it is not curative. Here we provide an overview of what antiretroviral drugs do and how the virus persists during therapy in rare reservoirs, such as latently infected CD4+ T cells. We also outline several innovative methods that are currently under development to eradicate HIV from infected individuals. These strategies include gene therapy approaches intended to create an HIV-resistant immune system, and activation/elimination approaches directed towards flushing out latent virus. This latter approach could involve the use of novel chemically synthesized analogs of natural activating agents.

  13. HIV Sequence Databases

    PubMed Central

    Kuiken, Carla; Korber, Bette; Shafer, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Two important databases are often used in HIV genetic research, the HIV Sequence Database in Los Alamos, which collects all sequences and focuses on annotation and data analysis, and the HIV RT/Protease Sequence Database in Stanford, which collects sequences associated with the development of viral resistance against anti-retroviral drugs and focuses on analysis of those sequences. The types of data and services these two databases offer, the tools they provide, and the way they are set up and operated are described in detail. PMID:12875108

  14. What is a Preventive HIV Vaccine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mental Health How to Find HIV Treatment Services HIV Overview What is a Preventive HIV Vaccine? (Last updated 2/20/2017; last reviewed ... a preventive HIV vaccine. What is a preventive HIV vaccine? A preventive HIV vaccine is given to ...

  15. What is a Therapeutic HIV Vaccine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mental Health How to Find HIV Treatment Services HIV Overview What is a Therapeutic HIV Vaccine? (Last updated 10/17/2016; last reviewed ... HIV from the body. What is a therapeutic HIV vaccine? A therapeutic HIV vaccine is a vaccine ...

  16. HIV among Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Gay and Bisexual Men Language: English Spanish ...

  17. HIV/AIDS among African Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among African Americans Format: Select One File [163K] ...

  18. Restoring HIV-specific immunity.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1999-02-12

    When HIV is controlled with antiretrovirals, immunity to other infections often returns. Sometimes patients can stop prophylactic treatment, and sometimes opportunistic infections can clear up without treatment. However, immunity to HIV itself does not return, or returns very slowly, even when HIV has been suppressed for years with drug therapy. Researchers do not know why HIV immunity reacts differently, but several possible approaches to restoring HIV-specific immunity are being researched. One approach involves a therapeutic vaccination while the virus is well suppressed with antiretrovirals. The other approach is beginning HIV treatment very early, before the virus begins destroying the cells that recognize it. Several studies are discussed.

  19. HIV counseling for behavior change.

    PubMed

    Grinstead, O A

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this paper was to provide a framework for discussion in the working group on HIV Counseling for Behavior Change at the Third USAID HIV/AIDS Prevention Conference. The paper begins with a section defining HIV counseling and describing different types of HIV counseling. Next, points of consensus and controversy regarding the conduct and evaluation of HIV counseling are discussed. This is followed by a section outlining findings to date on the effectiveness of HIV counseling, and a discussion of methodological issues in evaluating counseling outcomes. Finally, the paper includes a list of key issues for further research.

  20. HIV Treatment Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Risk Activities When One Partner Is HIV+ Substance Abuse/Use Pregnancy & Childbirth Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Post-Exposure ... Doctor, Clinical & Dental Visits Treatment Adherence Mental Health Substance Abuse Issues Sexual Health Nutrition & Food Safety Exercise Immunizations ...

  1. Mental Health and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... a headache or other physical problem. Taking some deep breaths also releases tension. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders ( ... rested. Learn relaxation methods like meditation, yoga, or deep breathing. Limit the amount of caffeine and nicotine ...

  2. Hepatitis C and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Changes Find Care & Treatment You and Your Provider Discrimination from Providers Locating HIV/AIDS Services Addressing the ... Dating and Marriage Family Planning Mixed-Status Couples Discrimination Legal Issues Workplace Issues Federal Resources Federal Programs ...

  3. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Changes Find Care & Treatment You and Your Provider Discrimination from Providers Locating HIV/AIDS Services Addressing the ... Dating and Marriage Family Planning Mixed-Status Couples Discrimination Legal Issues Workplace Issues Federal Resources Federal Programs ...

  4. [HIV infection and immigration].

    PubMed

    Monge, Susana; Pérez-Molina, José A

    2016-01-01

    Migrants represent around one third of patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Spain and they constitute a population with higher vulnerability to its negative consequences due to the socio-cultural, economical, working, administrative and legal contexts. Migrants are diagnosed later, which worsens their individual prognosis and facilitates the maintenance of the HIV epidemic. In spite of the different barriers they experience to access healthcare in general, and HIV-related services in particular, access to antiretroviral treatment has been similar to that of the autochthonous population. However, benefits of treatment have been not, with women in general and men from Sub-Saharan Africa exhibiting the worse response to treatment. We need to proactively promote earlier diagnosis of HIV infection, the adoption of preventive measures to avoid new infections, and to deliver accessible, adapted and high-quality health-care.

  5. Reduce HIV Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... incidence could be reduced if people changed their sexual behaviors. Our research has demonstrated remarkable success in reducing HIV risk-associated sexual behaviors among African American adolescents and adults." Spring 2008 ...

  6. HIV/AIDS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - HIV/AIDS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on AIDS : AIDS.gov -- www.aids.gov AIDS Info -- aidsinfo.nih.gov The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation -- www. ...

  7. HIV and Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis C (Last updated 8/31/2016; last reviewed ... the medicines for any side effects. What is hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused ...

  8. HIV and Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis B (Last updated 8/31/2016; last reviewed ... should be treated for both diseases. What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused ...

  9. Depression and HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Valente, Sharon M

    2003-01-01

    Depressive disorders are common among 20% to 32% of people with HIV disease but are frequently unrecognized. Major depression is a recurring and disabling illness that typically responds to medications, cognitive psychotherapy, education, and social support. A large percentage of the emotional distress and major depression associated with HIV disease results from immunosuppression, treatment, and neuropsychiatric aspects of the disease. People with a history of intravenous drug use also have increased rates of depressive disorders. Untreated depression along with other comorbid conditions may increase costly clinic visits, hospitalizations, substance abuse, and risky behaviors and may reduce adherence to treatment and quality of life. HIV clinicians need not have psychiatric expertise to play a major role in depression. Screening tools improve case finding and encourage early treatment. Effective treatments can reduce major depression in 80% to 90% of patients. Clinicians who mistake depressive signs and symptoms for those of HIV disease make a common error that increases morbidity and mortality.

  10. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) (Last updated 9/1/2016; last reviewed ... depends on a person’s individual circumstances. What is tuberculosis? Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious disease that can ...

  11. Mouth Problems and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... orientation. This information is for people who have mouth (oral) problems related to HIV infection. It explains ... look like. It also describes where in the mouth they occur and how they are treated. They ...

  12. HIV Molecular Immunology 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina; Brander, Christian; Barouch, Dan; de Boer, Rob; Haynes, Barton F.; Koup, Richard; Moore, John P.; Walker, Bruce D.; Watkins, David

    2016-04-05

    The scope and purpose of the HIV molecular immunology database: HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2015 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as cross-reactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins

  13. Pediatric HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Espanol, Teresa; Caragol, Isabel; Soler, Pere; Hernandez, Manuel

    2004-12-01

    HIV infection by maternal transmission is increasing in the world due to the increase in infected women who are not receiving appropriate antiretroviral therapy. Prognosis of HIV infection in children is poor because the newborn has an immature immune system. Early diagnosis and therapy are needed to avoid the development of AIDS. New therapies are becoming available but prevention of infection, through maternal therapy during pregnancy, is the most effective measure in avoiding this infection through this transmission route.

  14. Unconventional conceptions and HIV.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, L; Kitzinger, J; Green, G; Wight, D

    1995-01-01

    The condom is widely recommended as the principal method for preventing HIV transmission, but such advice obviously does not apply to women who are seeking to become pregnant. In this sense, 'safer sex' is incompatible with reproduction. Existing research into HIV transmission has examined the choices made by those wishing to conceive within a sexual relationship; such research shows that HIV is not a highly significant factor in their decision-making processes. This study aims to extend the debate by exploring the decision-making processes of women seeking to become pregnant with donated sperm. In particular, we focus on women outside the fertility clinic system who do not have access to sperm screened for HIV to see whether HIV is a significant factor in these women's decisions. The study involved in-depth interviews with 20 women (14 lesbians, one bisexual and five heterosexuals) recruited through informal networking and snowball sampling. HIV was a salient concern for our sample, largely because of their contacts with gay men, but nonetheless most of these women took some risks. On the one hand, the conscious deliberations necessary to conceive through self-insemination facilitated risk reduction, as did factors such as 'stranger-danger'. On the other hand, factors such as the scarcity of suitable sperm donors and the women's own feelings of gratitude and loyalty to their donors mitigated against their requesting that their donor take an HIV test. This study highlights the need to provide information for women seeking self-insemination, and to remove restrictions on access to fertility clinics, in order to reduce their risk of HIV infection and subsequent vertical transmission.

  15. HIV resistance to raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Francois

    2009-11-24

    Similar to all antiretroviral drugs, failure of raltegravir-based treatment regimens to fully supress HIV replication almost invariably results in emergence of HIV resistance to this new drug. HIV resistance to raltegravir is the consequence of mutations located close to the integrase active site, which can be divided into three main evolutionary pathways: the N155H, the Q148R/H/K and the Y143R/C pathways. Each of these primary mutations can be accompanied by a variety of secondary mutations that both increase resistance and compensate for the variable loss of viral replicative capacity that is often associated with primary resistance mutations. One unique property of HIV resistance to raltegravir is that each of these different resistance pathways are mutually exclusive and appear to evolve separately on distinct viral genomes. Resistance is frequently initiated by viruses carrying mutations of the N155H pathway, followed by emergence and further dominance of viral genomes carrying mutations of the Q148R/H/K or of the Y143R/C pathways, which express higher levels of resistance. Even if some natural integrase polymorphisms can be part of this evolution process, these polymorphisms do not affect HIV susceptibility in the absence of primary mutations. Therefore, all HIV-1 subtypes and groups, together with HIV-2, are naturally susceptible to raltegravir. Finally, because interaction of integrase strand transfer inhibitors with the HIV integrase active site is comparable from one compound to another, raltegravir-resistant viruses express significant cross resistance to most other compounds of this new class of antiretroviral drugs.

  16. HIV in the military.

    PubMed

    1996-04-05

    A stopgap spending bill that would repeal a recently enacted provision discharging members of the armed services who test positive for HIV was approved in the Senate. The provision, inserted into the bill by Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-CA), was part of a $256 defense authorization bill that forces the Pentagon to discharge all HIV-positive service members within 6 months of diagnosis. Dornan promises to insert the same language into next year's defense bill if the repeal stands.

  17. HIV in Europe.

    PubMed

    Põder, Airi; Haldre, Madli

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the estimated number of people living with HIV in Europe and Central Asia was 2.3 million. This is more than twice the 2001 figure. At the same time, approximately 50% of the infected people may not know their HIV status. The Europe/Central Asia region is one of only two regions in which HIV infections continue to increase. The estimated prevalence rate in the west and center of the region, however, has remained stable at 0.2%. The HIV epidemics in Eastern Europe and Central Asia are typically driven by unsafe drug injection and by onward transmission to the sexual partners of people who inject drugs. In the western part of the region, the epidemic remains concentrated among men who have sex with men and migrants from countries with generalized epidemics. Means of preventing and fighting HIV should, first and foremost, be directed to those parts of the population that are most exposed to the risk of the infection. Proceeding from the data presented, recommendations are given for ways of decreasing HIV prevalence in the region, such as promoting dialogue and awareness among multistakeholders, including policy makers, donors, and population groups most exposed to the infection. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. HIV infection in children.

    PubMed

    Canosa, C A

    1991-01-01

    Various studies have reported rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission from mother to child of 13-40%. Vertical transmission occurs in utero, during delivery, or, in a small number of cases, through breast milk. Whether mothers at various stages of HIV infection experience different rates of transmission remains unknown. Maternal antibodies cross the placenta and are present from birth up to 18 months of age. The offspring of HIV-positive mothers tend to be low birthweight, under 37 weeks' gestation, and at high risk of perinatal mortality. It is likely, however, that this profile is indicative of the low socioeconomic status of most women with HIV rather than a result of infection. Also emerging is a psychosocial profile of the HIV child. These children are isolated, neglected, battered, frequently abandoned, and exhibit various degrees of mental retardation. Also common are delayed psychomotor development, loss of developmental milestones, limited attention span, poor language development, and abnormal reflexes. These features result from the interaction of low socioeconomic status, a lack of psychosocial stimulation, nutritional deficiencies, and central nervous system infections. Since HIV-infected children tend to be the offspring of drug addicts, bisexuals, and prostitutes, they are not awarded the same compassion as children afflicted with other terminal illnesses. Moreover, these children are generally neglected by groups formed to provide support to AIDS patients. Thus, it is up to the general public, the mass media, and the health care system to advocate for the needs of these neglected children.

  19. HIV among transgendered people.

    PubMed

    Kenagy, G P

    2002-02-01

    This study explores HIV status and HIV-related risk factors among transgendered people. A needs assessment survey developed with the help of transgendered people was used to conduct face-to-face interviews with 81 transgendered persons, 49 male-to-females (MTFs) and 32 female-to-males (FTMs). The findings indicate that HIV/AIDS is a serious health concern facing the transgender community. The majority of respondents engaged in at least one high risk sexual activity during the past three months, were willing to have high risk sex in the future and did not believe they were susceptible to infection. FTMs have a significantly lower level of AIDS knowledge than MTFs (p < 0.01). Over half (56.7%) of FTMs have not been tested for HIV/AIDS. Efforts to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS among the transgender community are urgently needed. HIV/AIDS prevention must specifically target transgendered people, including FTMs who, despite being at risk, have been largely ignored.

  20. HIV / AIDS and tourism.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, S

    1999-01-01

    Since it tends to be significantly affected by HIV/AIDS, the tourism sector is a likely target for HIV/AIDS interventions in many countries. The tourist industry is at particular risk from the pandemic because of the mobility of the work force, the presence of sex tourists, and the heavy reliance of many countries upon tourism revenues. Indeed, tourism is one of the largest and fastest growing industries in many countries. Some people have speculated that potential tourists' fear of AIDS could discourage them from visiting certain countries, while others have even suggested that tourism should be discouraged because the industry contributes to the spread of HIV/AIDS. When traveling, tourists often take risks that they would not take at home. They tend to drink more, use drugs more, and be generally more adventurous while on holiday. Such adventures often include taking sexual risks. When tourists have sex with prostitutes, hotel staff, and others in the local population, a bridge can be created for HIV to cross back and forth between the tourist's home country and the tourist destination. The author reviews selected studies on the relationship between HIV/AIDS and tourism. Overall, the existing literature offers no definitive evidence that AIDS has had any lasting impact upon the tourism industry anywhere in the world. Rather, promoting a healthy tourism industry and HIV/AIDS prevention are likely complementary in many ways.

  1. Genetic therapies against HIV

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, John J; June, Carl H; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy prolongs the life of HIV-infected individuals, but it requires lifelong treatment and results in cumulative toxicities and viral-escape mutants. Gene therapy offers the promise of preventing progressive HIV infection by sustained interference with viral replication in the absence of chronic chemotherapy. Gene-targeting strategies are being developed with RNA-based agents, such as ribozymes, antisense, RNA aptamers and small interfering RNA, and protein-based agents, such as the mutant HIV Rev protein M10, fusion inhibitors and zinc-finger nucleases. Recent advances in T-cell–based strategies include gene-modified HIV-resistant T cells, lentiviral gene delivery, CD8+ T cells, T bodies and engineered T-cell receptors. HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem cells have the potential to protect all cell types susceptible to HIV infection. The emergence of viral resistance can be addressed by therapies that use combinations of genetic agents and that inhibit both viral and host targets. Many of these strategies are being tested in ongoing and planned clinical trials. PMID:18066041

  2. Women, drugs and HIV.

    PubMed

    Azim, Tasnim; Bontell, Irene; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2015-02-01

    Women who use drugs, irrespective of whether these are injected or not, are faced with multiple issues which enhance their vulnerability to HIV. In this commentary, we explore the HIV risks and vulnerabilities of women who use drugs as well as the interventions that have been shown to reduce their susceptibility to HIV infection. Women who inject drugs are among the most vulnerable to HIV through both unsafe injections and unprotected sex. They are also among the most hidden affected populations, as they are more stigmatized than their male counterparts. Many sell sex to finance their own and their partner's drug habit and often their partner exerts a significant amount of control over their sex work, condom use and injection practices. Women who use drugs all over the world face many different barriers to HIV service access including police harassment, judgmental health personnel and a fear of losing their children. In order to enable these women to access life-saving services including needle-syringe and condom programs, opioid substitution therapy and HIV testing and treatment, it is essential to create a conducive environment and provide tailor-made services that are adapted to their specific needs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. HIV, poverty and women.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2010-03-01

    This review examines the interactions of financial status and HIV and its implications for women. MEDLINE and Google scholar were searched using the keywords 'women', 'poverty' and 'HIV' in any field of the article. The search was limited to articles published in English over the last 10 years. The first section of the article tries to establish whether poverty or wealth is a risk factor for HIV. There is credible evidence for both arguments. While wealth shows an increased risk for both sexes, poverty places women at a special disadvantage. The second section explains how the financial status interacts with other 'non biological' factors to put women at increased risk. While discrimination based on these factors disadvantage women, there are some paradoxical observations that do not fit with the traditional line of explanation (e.g. paradoxical impact of wealth and education on HIV). The final section assesses the impact of HIV in driving poverty and the role of women in interventional programmes. The specific impact of poverty on females in families living with HIV is less explored. Though microfinance initiatives to empower women are a good idea in theory, the actual outcome of such a programme is less convincing.

  4. Maternal HIV Infection Influences the Microbiome of HIV Uninfected Infants

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Jeffrey M.; Li, Fan; Martelly, Shoria; Byrt, Erin; Rouzier, Vanessa; Leo, Marguerithe; Tobin, Nicole; Pannaraj, Pia S.; Adisetiyo, Helty; Rollie, Adrienne; Santiskulvong, Chintda; Wang, Shuang; Autran, Chloe; Bode, Lars; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Kuhn, Louise; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2017-01-01

    More than one million HIV-exposed, uninfected infants are born annually to HIV-positive mothers worldwide. This growing population of infants experiences twice the mortality of HIV-unexposed infants. We found that although there were very few differences seen in the microbiomes of mothers with and without HIV infection, maternal HIV infection was associated with changes in the microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Furthermore, we observed that human breast milk oligosaccharides were associated with the bacterial species in the infant microbiome. The disruption of the infant’s microbiome associated with maternal HIV infection may contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. PMID:27464748

  5. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Hepatotoxicity

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Hepatotoxicity (Last updated 11/15/2016; last reviewed 11/15/2016) Key Points Hepatotoxicity means damage to the liver caused by a medicine, chemical, or herbal or dietary supplement. Hepatotoxicity can ...

  6. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Diabetes (Last updated 11/17/2016; last reviewed 11/17/2016) Key Points Diabetes is a disease in which levels ... diabetes and type 2 diabetes . Use of some HIV medicines may increase blood glucose levels and lead ...

  7. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Rash

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Rash (Last updated 11/23/2016; last reviewed 11/23/2016) Key Points A rash is an irritated area of ... requires immediate medical attention. Why do people with HIV develop rash? A rash is an irritated area ...

  8. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Lipodystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection or medicines used to treat HIV. Other risk factors for lipodystrophy include: Age : Older people are at ... Effects of Antiretroviral Agents From the Department of Veterans Affairs: Body Shape Changes with HIV From the Health Resources and Services Administration: Guide for HIV/AIDS ...

  9. HIV/AIDS and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID). /* // ** // */ Prevention Research Vaccines Microbicides Related Topics on AIDS.gov Clinical Trials Immune System 101 HIV Vaccine ... Be the Generation Last revised: 12/09/2016 AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  10. Research Report: HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports » HIV/AIDS » Letter from the Director HIV/AIDS Email Facebook Twitter Letter from the Director Human ... the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) — has been with us for three decades now. ...

  11. HIV/AIDS and Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Having HIV/AIDS weakens your body's immune system. It destroys the white blood cells that fight infection. This puts ... such as crypto (cryptosporidiosis) and toxo (toxoplasmosis) Having HIV/AIDS can make infections harder to treat. People ...

  12. What Is HIV/AIDS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video Games Video Sharing Sites Webcasts/ Webinars Widgets Wikis Follow Us on New Media Virtual Office Hours ... HIV currently exists, but with proper treatment and medical care, HIV can be controlled. The medicine used ...

  13. Rapid HIV screening: missed opportunities for HIV diagnosis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pragna; Bennett, Berry; Sullivan, Timothy; Parker, Monica M; Heffelfinger, James D; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2012-05-01

    Although rapid HIV tests increase the number of persons who are aware of their HIV status, they may fail to detect early HIV infection. To evaluate the sensitivity for early HIV infection of several rapid tests and third- and fourth-generation assays compared with nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT). Sensitivity for early HIV infection was evaluated using 62 NAAT-positive/WB-negative or indeterminate specimens from the CDC Acute HIV Infection study. Specimens underwent third-generation testing with Genetic Systems 1/2+O(®) and rapid testing with Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2. A subset was also tested with four FDA-approved rapid tests and Determine HIV-1 Antigen/Antibody Rapid Test(®) and Architect HIV Antigen/Antibody Combo(®), both fourth-generation tests. Of 99,111 specimens screened from April 2006 to March 2008, 62 met the definition for early HIV infection (60 NAAT-positive/seronegative and 2 NAAT-positive/Western blot indeterminate). Third-generation testing correctly detected antibody in 34 specimens (55%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 42-67); Multispot detected antibody in 16 (26%; 95% CI: 16-38). Of the 62 specimens, 33 (53%) had sufficient quantity for further testing. Rapid test sensitivities for early HIV infection ranged from 22-33% compared with 55-57% for the third-generation assay and 76-88% for the fourth-generation tests. Many rapid HIV tests failed to detect half of the early HIV infection cases in whom antibody was present. Programs that screen high-incidence populations with rapid tests should consider supplemental testing with NAAT or other antigen-based tests. These data support the need for more sensitive antigen-based point-of-care screening tests for early HIV infection. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Clinical performance of the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test to correctly differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection in screening algorithms using third and fourth generation assays and to identify cross reactivity with the HIV-1 Western Blot.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Eric M; Harb, Socorro; Dragavon, Joan; Coombs, Robert W

    2013-12-01

    An accurate and rapid serologic method to differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection is required since the confirmatory HIV-1 Western Blot (WB) may demonstrate cross-reactivity with HIV-2 antibodies. To evaluate the performance of the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid assay as a supplemental test to correctly identify HIV-2 infection and identify HIV-1 WB cross-reactivity with HIV-2 in clinical samples tested at an academic medical center. Between August 2008 and July 2012, clinical samples were screened for HIV using either 3rd- or 4th-generation HIV-1/2 antibody or combination antibody and HIV-1 p24 antigen assays, respectively. All repeatedly reactive samples were reflexed for Multispot rapid testing. Multispot HIV-2 and HIV-1 and HIV-2-reactive samples were further tested using an HIV-2 immunoblot assay and HIV-1 or HIV-2 RNA assays when possible. The HIV-1 WB was performed routinely for additional confirmation and to assess for HIV-2 antibody cross-reactivity. Of 46,061 samples screened, 890 (89.6%) of 993 repeatedly reactive samples were also Multispot-reactive: 882 for HIV-1; three for only HIV-2; and five for both HIV-1 and HIV-2. All three HIV-2-only Multispot-positives along with a single dually reactive HIV-1/2 Multispot-positive were also HIV-2 immunoblot-positive; the latter was HIV-1 RNA negative and HIV-2 RNA positive. The Multispot rapid test performed well as a supplemental test for HIV-1/2 diagnostic testing. Four new HIV-2 infections (0.45%) were identified from among 890 Multispot-reactive tests. The use of HIV-1 WB alone to confirm HIV-1/2 screening assays may underestimate the true prevalence of HIV-2 infection in the United States. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. HIV sequence compendium 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Carla; Foley, Brian; Freed, Eric; Hahn, Beatrice; Marx, Preston; McCutchan, Francine; Mellors, John; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette

    2002-12-31

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. In these compendia we try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Traditionally, we present the sequence data themselves in the form of alignments: Section II, an alignment of a selection of HIV-1/SIVcpz full-length genomes (a lot of LAI-like sequences, for example, have been omitted because they are so similar that they bias the alignment); Section III, a combined HIV-1/HIV-2/SIV whole genome alignment; Sections IV–VI, amino acid alignments for HIV-1/SIV-cpz, HIV-2/SIV, and SIVagm. The HIV-2/SIV and SIVagm amino acid alignments are separate because the genetic distances between these groups are so great that presenting them in one alignment would make it very elongated because of the large number of gaps that have to be inserted. As always, tables with extensive background information gathered from the literature accompany the whole genome alignments. The collection of whole-gene sequences in the database is now large enough that we have abundant representation of most subtypes. For many subtypes, and especially for subtype B, a large number of sequences that span entire genes were not included in the printed alignments to conserve space. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov/content/hiv-db/ALIGN_CURRENT/ALIGN-INDEX.html. Importantly, all these alignments have been edited to include only one sequence per person, based on phylogenetic trees that were created for all of them, as well as on the literature. Because of the number of sequences available, we have decided to use a different selection principle this year, based on the epidemiological importance of the subtypes. Subtypes A–D and CRFs 01 and 02 are by far the most widespread variants, and for these (when available) we have included 8–10 representatives in the alignments. The other

  16. HIV in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Abrams, S

    1998-01-01

    This article explores the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southeast Asia. Prostitution and injecting drug use are two major factors in the appearance of HIV/AIDS in a country. But, it is the correct social network that assures its transmission to epidemic proportions. Heterosexual transmission in Cambodia, Myanmar, and Thailand is linked with prevalence among female sex workers and their clients. In Malaysia, the Ministry of Health responded immediately, but the number of new infections continued to increase. The failures suggest the need for more effective, intensive health education programs, outreach by nongovernmental organizations, and peer education at the grassroots level and in remote areas. Public health officials need to promote political change. International agencies could play an important role, if countries such as Myanmar, Cambodia, and Viet Nam were open to international exchanges. In Myanmar, political unrest has a priority over the need for aggressive health interventions. In Indonesia, the Islamic influence prevents recognition of the country's significant sex industry or the existence of a homosexual community. In Cambodia, health officials warned about the high number of sexual partners, high mobility rate, and low condom use, but HIV spread rapidly in the 1990s. Thailand initiated a 100% condom campaign to combat HIV prevalence in the 1990s, and HIV prevalence declined among sex workers and military recruits. Risk factors for rapid transmission include mobility, the number of sexual partners/sex worker, the proportion engaging in commercial sex, and the rate of regular condom use among sex workers.

  17. HIV-1 vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure. PMID:24637946

  18. HIV Sequence Compendium 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Brian Thomas; Leitner, Thomas Kenneth; Apetrei, Cristian; Hahn, Beatrice; Mizrachi, Ilene; Mullins, James; Rambaut, Andrew; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette Tina Marie

    2015-10-05

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. We try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2015. Hence, though it is published in 2015 and called the 2015 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2014 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing. In total, at the end of 2014, there were 624,121 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 7% since the previous year. This is the first year that the number of new sequences added to the database has decreased compared to the previous year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 5834 by end of 2014. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a fraction of these. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  19. HIV disclosure among HIV positive individuals: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Eustace, Rosemary W; Ilagan, Perla R

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of HIV disclosure. There is a growing interest among healthcare providers and researchers in HIV disclosure as an effective HIV prevention and early disease management initiative. However, the concept still remains unclear. Conceptual clarity is important for providing an expanded theoretical definition and understanding of attributes of HIV disclosure. This information is useful in constructing better HIV disclosure measures in HIV/AIDS nursing practice and research. A computer search of the following databases was conducted to capture the meaning and processes of HIV disclosure among HIV-positive individuals: PubMed, CINAHL and PSYCINFO. Only English language journals were used. Publication dates of the literature review ranged from 1999 to 2009. The following key words were used: HIV disclosure, self-disclosure, disclosure and serostatus disclosure. The Walker and Avant (2005) concept analysis model (Strategies for Theory Construction in Nursing, Pearson Prentice Hall, River, NJ, 2005) was used to guide the analysis process, which was completed in 2009. The concept analysis revealed that HIV disclosure is a complex process characterized by the following attributes: experiencing an event, communicating something, timing, and contextual environment, protecting someone, relationship status and improving something or being therapeutic. In addition, the process of HIV disclosure varies across time. The proposed HIV disclosure attributes provide nursing scholars and researchers with new directions on how to reframe research questions, develop measurement tools to reflect better the diversity and fluidity of the process of HIV disclosure among HIV-positive individuals. Policy implications include the need to develop approaches that protect individual and public rights.

  20. Advances in HIV microbicide development.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Joanna S; Easterhoff, David; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-12-01

    There is an urgent need control the spread of the global HIV pandemic. A microbicide, or topical drug applied to the mucosal environment to block transmission, is a promising HIV prevention strategy. The development of a safe and efficacious microbicide requires a thorough understanding of the mucosal environment and its role in HIV transmission. Knowledge of the key events in viral infection identifies points at which the virus might be most effectively targeted by a microbicide. The cervicovaginal and rectal mucosa play an important role in the innate defense against HIV, and microbicides must not interfere with these functions. In this review, we discuss the current research on HIV microbicide development.

  1. HIV/neuroAIDS biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Rahimian, Pejman; He, Johnny J

    2017-10-01

    HIV infection often causes neurological symptoms including cognitive and motor dysfunction, which have been collectively termed HIV/neuroAIDS. Neuropsychological assessment and clinical symptoms have been the primary diagnostic criteria for HIV/neuroAIDS, even for the mild cognitive and motor disorder, the most prevalent form of HIV/neuroAIDS in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. Those performance-based assessments and symptoms are generally descriptive and do not have the sensitivity and specificity to monitor the diagnosis, progression, and treatment response of the disease when compared to objective and quantitative laboratory-based biological markers, or biomarkers. In addition, effects of demographics and comorbidities such as substance abuse, psychiatric disease, nutritional deficiencies, and co-infection on HIV/neuroAIDS could be more readily determined using biomarkers than using neuropsychological assessment and clinical symptoms. Thus, there have been great efforts in identification of HIV/neuroAIDS biomarkers over the past two decades. The need for reliable biomarkers of HIV/neuroAIDS is expected to increase as the HIV-infected population ages and their vulnerability to neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer's disease increases. Currently, three classes of HIV/neuroAIDS biomarkers are being pursued to establish objective laboratory-based definitions of HIV-associated neurologic injury: cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, blood biomarkers, and neuroimaging biomarkers. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge in the field of HIV/neuroAIDS biomarker discovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, A

    1996-09-01

    Many of the clinical features of HIV/AIDS can be ascribed to the profound immune deficiency which develops in infected patients. The destruction of the immune system by the virus results in opportunistic infection, as well as an increased risk of autoimmune disease and malignancy. In addition, disease manifestations related to the virus itself may occur. For example, during the primary illness which occurs within weeks after first exposure to HIV, clinical symptoms occur in at least 50% of cases, typically as a mononucleosis syndrome. HIV-related complications are rarely encountered in patients with preserved immunity (i.e. CD4 T-cell counts greater than 500 cells/mm3). Recurrent mucocutaneous herpes simplex (HSV), herpes zoster (VZV), oral candidiasis and oral hairy leukoplakia occur with increasing frequency as the CD4 count drops below this level. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) occurs in association with HIV and often presents early in the clinical course. The risk of developing opportunistic infections and malignancies typical of AIDS increases progressively as CD4 counts fall below 200 cells/mm3. The clinical manifestations of infections associated with AIDS tend to fall into well-recognized patterns of presentation, including pneumonia, dysphagia/odynophagia, diarrhoea, neurological symptoms, fever, wasting, anaemia and visual loss. The commonest pathogens include Candida albicans, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium avium intracellulare and cytomegalovirus. Malignant disease in patients with HIV infection also occurs in a characteristic pattern. Only two tumours are prevalent: Kaposi's sarcoma, a multifocal tumour of vascular endothelium which typically involves skin and mucosal surfaces; and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is typically high grade in phenotype, often arising within the central nervous system. The principles of therapy include reduction of HIV replication by antiretroviral

  3. HIV and Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Vachiat, Ahmed; McCutcheon, Keir; Tsabedze, Nqoba; Zachariah, Don; Manga, Pravin

    2017-01-03

    The association of coronary heart disease (CHD) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been well recognized for many years. The etiology of the increased prevalence of CHD in HIV-infected populations is the result of complex interactions among the viral infection, host factors, traditional risk factors, and therapies for HIV. As the HIV population is living longer, largely attributable to combination antiretroviral therapy, there is concern about the effect of the rising prevalence of CHD on morbidity and mortality, as well its effect on health systems around the world. This review will highlight the epidemiological evidence linking HIV infection and CHD. It will also focus on our current understanding of the pathogenesis and factors associated with HIV infection and CHD. In addition, the review will highlight modes of presentation and management strategies for mitigating risk and treatment of HIV-positive patients presenting with CHD. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Immune mechanisms of HIV control

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Lisa A.; Simon, Viviana

    2010-01-01

    Summary HIV-1 can be contained by the immune system, as demonstrated by the existence of rare individuals who spontaneously control HIV-1 replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. Emerging evidence points to the importance of a very active cellular immune response in mediating HIV-1 control. The rapid induction of interferon-dependent HIV restriction factors, the presence of protective MHC class I alleles, and the development of a high avidity T-cell response may all cooperate in limiting HIV replication at an early stage. This review will focus on recent advances in understanding the immune mechanisms of HIV control, and on the lessons that may be drawn for the development of candidate HIV vaccines. PMID:20650621

  5. What is an Investigational HIV Drug?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mental Health How to Find HIV Treatment Services HIV Overview What is an Investigational HIV Drug? (Last updated 12/13/2016; last reviewed ... and expanded access programs. What is an investigational HIV drug? An investigational HIV drug is a drug ...

  6. Advancing Biosocial Pedagogy for HIV Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Mark David McGregor

    2011-01-01

    This article develops the concept of biosocial pedagogy in HIV education for this era of expanding biomedical forms of HIV control. With reference to critical pedagogy and teaching and learning materials addressing HIV treatment and prevention, I explain how HIV education can problematize its own role in HIV control. I also discuss how educational…

  7. Advancing Biosocial Pedagogy for HIV Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Mark David McGregor

    2011-01-01

    This article develops the concept of biosocial pedagogy in HIV education for this era of expanding biomedical forms of HIV control. With reference to critical pedagogy and teaching and learning materials addressing HIV treatment and prevention, I explain how HIV education can problematize its own role in HIV control. I also discuss how educational…

  8. Importance of an Early HIV Antibody Differentiation Immunoassay for Detection of Dual Infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2.

    PubMed

    Zbinden, Andrea; Dürig, Roland; Shah, Cyril; Böni, Jürg; Schüpbach, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    HIV-2 is primarily endemic in West Africa and India, however, in time of global migration, a possible HIV-2 infection or co-infection with HIV-1 should be recognized right at the time of HIV diagnosis, in order to enable optimized antiretroviral treatment. Laboratory HIV testing consists of a combined HIV1/2/O antibody + antigen screening test and subsequent confirmation and type differentiation by a serological test formatted as a multi-line or multi-spot assay. CDC has proposed a revised alternative HIV diagnostic strategy which, in case of a reactive result in a combined HIV1/2/O antibody + antigen screening test, comprises an HIV-1 nucleic acid test (NAT) for HIV confirmation instead of an antibody differentiation immunoassay (ADI). Only a negative NAT must be further investigated by an ADI, thus saving expenses for ADI in most instances. We have investigated this alternative strategy with respect to its recognition of dual HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection. Anonymized data of HIV notifications of patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Switzerland between 2007 and 2014 were analysed retrospectively. In a total of 4'679 notifications, we found 35 HIV-2 infections, 9 (25.7%) of which were dually infected with HIV-1. In 7 of the 9 dual HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections, HIV-1 RNA testing at the time of HIV diagnosis was positive with concentrations from 102 to 94'300 copies/mL plasma. HIV-1 RNA data were not available for the other two cases. The alternative CDC strategy would have missed the concomitant HIV-2 infection in at least 7, but probably even more, of the 9 dually infected patients, as the detectable HIV-1 RNA would have precluded a supplemental ADI. Early ADI is mandatory for diagnosis of dual HIV-1/HIV-2 infection and guidance of appropriate therapy.

  9. Family physicians and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Hall, N; Crochette, N; Blanchi, S; Lavoix, A; Billaud, E; Baron, C; Abgueguen, P; Perré, P; Rabier, V

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to describe the current and desired involvement of family physicians (FPs) in the treatment of HIV patients (screening practices, potential training and patient follow-up) to reduce the duration and frequency of their hospital treatment. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional survey between 2011 and 2012 with the support of COREVIH (Regional Coordinating Committee on HIV). We sent a self-assessment questionnaire to all FPs of the Pays de la Loire region to enquire about their HIV screening practices and expectations for the management of HIV patients. A total of 871 FPs completed the questionnaire (response rate: 30.4%). A total of 54.2% said to provide care to HIV patients; the mean number of HIV patients per FP was estimated at 1.4. With regard to HIV screening, 12.2% systematically suggest an HIV serology to their patients and 72.7% always suggest it to pregnant women. About 45.4% of responding FPs said to be willing to manage HIV patients (clinical and biological monitoring, compliance checks and prescription renewal). FPs mainly reported the lack of training and the low number of HIV patients as a barrier to their further involvement in the management of HIV patients. The responding FPs provide care to very few HIV patients. They are, however, willing to be more involved in the routine care of these patients. Medical training provided by COREVIH would help improve HIV screening. The management of HIV patients could thus be handed over to willing FPs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  10. What to Start: Selecting a First HIV Regimen

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines to treat HIV infection is called antiretroviral therapy (ART). People on ART take a combination of HIV ... treat HIV infection. HIV treatment (also called antiretroviral therapy or ART) begins with choosing an HIV regimen. People on ...

  11. HIV and development.

    PubMed

    Decosas, J

    1996-12-01

    Global patterns of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are consistent with indicators of social development. The highest HIV prevalence is found in poor societies, societies in turmoil, and among the displaced, powerless, and marginalized. AIDS is an indicator of uneven or dysfunctional development, a cause of developmental delays, and a result of inadequacies in the development of health and social services. Factors such as untreated sexually transmitted diseases, the education of women and their level of autonomy to seek medical care, the availability and quality of medical services, large age differences between men and women in sexual partnerships, prostitution as a means of economic survival, and labor migration and refugee movements play key roles in the generation of AIDS epidemics. The impact of HIV on the feminization of poverty and the maldistribution of household wealth is one of the most significant developmental effects. In areas with high HIV prevalence, crop yields and soil fertility are declining, pests and plant diseases are spreading, and starchy crops of low nutritional value are replacing more labor-intensive traditional crops. Finally, AIDS exerts a major impact on the human development index, especially life expectancy at birth.

  12. HIV Excess Cancers JNCI

    Cancer.gov

    In 2010, an estimated 7,760 new cancers were diagnosed among the nearly 900,000 Americans known to be living with HIV infection. According to the first comprehensive study in the United States, approximately half of these cancers were in excess of what wo

  13. Women, drugs and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Tasnim; Bontell, Irene; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2014-01-01

    Women who inject drugs are among the most vulnerable to HIV through both unsafe injections and unprotected sex. They are also among the most hidden affected populations, as they are more stigmatized than their male counterparts. Many sell sex to finance their own and their partner’s drug habit and often their partner exerts a significant amount of control over their sex work, condom use and injection practices. Women who use drugs all over the world face many different barriers to HIV service access including police harassment, judgmental health personnel and a fear of losing their children. In order to enable these women to access life-saving services including needle-syringe and condom programs, opioid substitution therapy and HIV testing and treatment, it is essential to create a conducive environment and provide tailor-made services that are adapted to their specific needs. In this commentary, we explore the risks and vulnerabilities of women who use drugs as well as the interventions that have been shown to reduce their susceptibility to HIV infection. PMID:25277726

  14. The Science of HIV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael

    This book is the first curriculum developed to bring cutting edge research on the HIV virus into science classrooms. The book and video are coordinated to provide a range of learning opportunities--labs, activities, readings, model design, guided discussions and, in the video, a way to see research in action. Both the book and video emphasize the…

  15. Poverty, sex and HIV.

    PubMed

    Nattrass, Nicoli

    2009-10-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the relative importance of economic factors (notably poverty) and sexual behavior in driving the AIDS epidemic. This paper draws on relevant research and cross-country regression analysis to argue that the impact of economic determinants is dwarfed by contextual factors within Africa. The regression analysis suggests that controlling for per capita income, calories per capita and the ratio of female to male participation rates (none of which were statistically significant): being a Southern African country increases expected HIV prevalence 8.3 times; being in the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa 3 times; being a predominantly Protestant country 2.5 times; and being a predominantly Muslim country reduces expected HIV prevalence to 62% of the base case. Including the share of income going to the poor did not improve the model and was itself statistically insignificant. The analysis suggests that poverty may play a role in the HIV epidemic in some countries (and may well be a factor affecting the vulnerability of some people to HIV infection in all countries) but that its overall impact is dwarfed by social and behavioral factors.

  16. Modeling HIV Cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelson, Alan; Conway, Jessica; Cao, Youfang

    A large effort is being made to find a means to cure HIV infection. I will present a dynamical model of post-treatment control (PTC) or ``functional cure'' of HIV-infection. Some patients treated with suppressive antiviral therapy have been taken off of therapy and then spontaneously control HIV infection such that the amount of virus in the circulation is maintained undetectable by clinical assays for years. The model explains PTC occurring in some patients by having a parameter regime in which the model exhibits bistability, with both a low and high steady state viral load being stable. The model makes a number of predictions about how to attain the low PTC steady state. Bistability in this model depends upon the immune response becoming exhausted when over stimulated. I will also present a generalization of the model in which immunotherapy can be used to reverse immune exhaustion and compare model predictions with experiments in SIV infected macaques given immunotherapy and then taken off of antiretroviral therapy. Lastly, if time permits, I will discuss one of the hurdles to true HIV eradication, latently infected cells, and present clinical trial data and a new model addressing pharmacological means of flushing out the latent reservoir. Supported by NIH Grants AI028433 and OD011095.

  17. Migrants and HIV / AIDS.

    PubMed

    Duckett, M

    2000-06-01

    This paper outlines some of the imperatives that should drive attention to the rights of legal and illegal migrants to health, particularly in relation to HIV/AIDS. It is noted that migrants can be especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS/sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), but they are often excluded or simply missed in many prevention and care programs. In terms of the effects of globalization, it would seem that governments are required to ensure that this state of affairs does not continue. Evidence indicates that human rights and other ethical violations are occurring and need to be urgently addressed at local, national and international levels. In view of such, it is recommended that HIV/AIDS/STD prevention and care programs for migrant populations should be developed with and guided by migrant communities, and involving substantial community mobilization. Although some progress in preventing the spread of HIV to and from migrants have been documented, and projects addressing their needs have been made accessible, the challenge of dealing more comprehensively the complex issues involved still remains.

  18. The Science of HIV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael

    This book is the first curriculum developed to bring cutting edge research on the HIV virus into science classrooms. The book and video are coordinated to provide a range of learning opportunities--labs, activities, readings, model design, guided discussions and, in the video, a way to see research in action. Both the book and video emphasize the…

  19. [HIV infection in immigrants].

    PubMed

    López-Vélez, Rogelio; Navarro Beltrá, Miriam; Hernando Jerez, Asunción; del Amo Valero, Julia

    2008-05-01

    Immigration to Spain has greatly increased since 1995. Currently, more than 4 million foreigners are resident in the country. The immigration process increases vulnerability. The most common route of HIV infection in the immigrant population and ethnic minorities is heterosexual transmission. The number of people living with HIV worldwide (39.5 million people in 2006) and the number of those dying from AIDS continues to increase. In 2006, there were an estimated 30,000 people living with HIV/AIDS in Spain. The number of cases of AIDS in immigrants has risen in the last few years. AIDS in immigrants from any country, and especially in those from sub-Saharan Africa, is associated with a greater frequency of tuberculosis disease. Knowledge of opportunistic pathogens with tropical distribution is required for a correct differential diagnosis. Throughout the European Union, the number of AIDS cases has progressively decreased since the introduction of highly effective anti- HIV treatment, but this decrease has been significantly lower in immigrants. The difference may be due to lower access to health systems caused by administrative, legal, cultural and linguistic barriers.

  20. [Epidemiology of HIV. Update].

    PubMed

    Dorrucci, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this decade, the global prevalence of HIV-1 infection stabilized at 0.8% (range: 0.7-0.9%). However, important regional differences in trends and mode of transmission: Sub-Saharan Africa is the most affected by HIV. Since 2001, the number of people with HIV in Eastern Europe and Central Asia increased from 650,000 to 1,5 million in 2007. Overall trends were stable in Central and Western Europe. Heterosexual and homosexual transmission accounts for the largest proportion in these regions. Transmission among injecting drug users has decreased. Similar trends have been observed in Italy: in 2007, there were 1,679 new diagnoses, equivalent to an incidence of 6,0 per 100,000 population. Over the years there has been a progressive increase in the proportion of diagnoses among women and in the median age at diagnosis, as well as changes in the exposure categories (i.e. a decrease in the proportion of injecting drug users and an increase in infections attributed to homosexual and heterosexual contacts). The era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has resulted in a reduction of morbidity and mortality. Before the advent of cART in 1996, the main causes of morbidity and mortality in people with HIV were the opportunistic infections and malignancies AIDS associated.

  1. HIV and the aging kidney.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Wyatt, Christina M

    2014-07-01

    To review unique considerations in the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of kidney disease in older adults with HIV. HIV infection may accelerate the course of kidney disease associated with traditional risk factors, such as diabetes, which are more common in older adults. The risks of acute and chronic kidney disease are increased both with HIV infection and with older age. Although the prevalence of chronic kidney disease is higher among HIV-infected adults than among HIV-negative adults, the mean age at diagnosis of end-stage renal disease is similar. Recent studies have supported the use of newer creatinine-based kidney function estimates in HIV-infected adults, although data in older adults are limited. These estimates are susceptible to artifact in the setting of newer medications that interfere with the secretion of creatinine, including cobicistat and dolutegravir. The management of kidney disease in older adults with HIV infection may be complicated by polypharmacy and increased risk for medication toxicity. With aging of the HIV-infected population, age-related comorbid conditions such as kidney disease are increasingly important causes of morbidity and mortality. Although recent data do not support premature aging of HIV-infected individuals with respect to kidney disease, the risk of acute and chronic kidney disease is increased by HIV infection and its treatment.

  2. HIV infection in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nancy; Holodniy, Mark

    2008-01-01

    In the US, an estimated 1 million people are infected with HIV, although one-third of this population are unaware of their diagnosis. While HIV infection is commonly thought to affect younger adults, there are an increasing number of patients over 50 years of age living with the condition. UNAIDS and WHO estimate that of the 40 million people living with HIV/AIDS in the world, approximately 2.8 million are 50 years and older. With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the mid-1990s, survival following HIV diagnosis has risen dramatically and HIV infection has evolved from an acute disease process to being managed as a chronic medical condition. As treated HIV-infected patients live longer and the number of new HIV diagnoses in older patients rise, clinicians need to be aware of these trends and become familiar with the management of HIV infection in the older patient. This article is intended for the general clinician, including geriatricians, and will review epidemiologic data and HIV treatment as well as provide a discussion on medical management issues affecting the older HIV-infected patient. PMID:18982916

  3. Biology of HIV Mucosal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review HIV-1 mucosal transmission plays a critical role in HIV-1 infection and AIDS pathogenesis. This review summarizes the latest advances in biological studies of HIV-1 mucosal transmission, highlighting the implications of these studies in the development of microbicides to prevent HIV-1 transmission. Recent findings New studies of initial HIV-1 infection using improved culture models updated the current view of mucosal transmission. Mechanistic studies enhanced our understanding of cell-cell transmission of HIV-1 mediated by the major target cells, including dendritic cells, CD4+ T cells, and macrophages. Increasing evidence indicated the significance of host factors and immune responses in HIV-1 mucosal infection and transmission. Summary Recent progress in HIV-1 mucosal infection and transmission enriches our knowledge of virus-host interactions and viral pathogenesis. Functional studies of HIV-1 interactions with host cells can provide new insights into the design of more effective approaches to combat HIV-1 infection and AIDS. PMID:18802490

  4. Immunology of pediatric HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Nicole H; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2013-07-01

    Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV's perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. HIV among Pregnant Women, Infants, and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partnerships for Care THRIVE Serostatus Approach Policy and Law Affordable Care Act Expanded Testing Initiative High-Impact ... of High-Impact Prevention Bibliography HIV and the Law State HIV Laws HIV-Specific Criminal Laws Laboratory ...

  6. HIV/AIDS - pregnancy and infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... immunodeficiency virus - children; Acquired immune deficiency syndrome - children; Pregnancy - HIV; Maternal HIV; Perinatal - HIV ... mother to the child. This can occur during pregnancy, childbirth, or when breastfeeding. Only blood, semen, vaginal ...

  7. What is a Therapeutic HIV Vaccine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Overview Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets What ... Send us an email What is a Therapeutic HIV Vaccine? Last Reviewed: August 16, 2017 Key Points ...

  8. What is a Preventive HIV Vaccine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Overview Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets What ... Send us an email What is a Preventive HIV Vaccine? Last Reviewed: August 16, 2017 Key Points ...

  9. HIV / AIDS: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: Symptoms , Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment Past Issues / ... Most people who have become recently infected with HIV will not have any symptoms. They may, however, ...

  10. HIV-2 infection in an American.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, T R; Polon, C; Schable, C A; VanDevanter, N; Rayfield, M A; Wallace, D; Stuart, A; Holmberg, S D

    1991-01-01

    HIV-2 is endemic in West Africa but rare elsewhere. In the USA there have been 18 reported cases of HIV-2 infection; most identified people have been West Africans. We recently diagnosed the first case of HIV-2 infection in a native-born US citizen, a woman whose serum was found to be reactive to anti-HIV-1 enzyme immunoassay (EIA) when she attempted to donate blood in 1986. Although both HIV-1- and HIV-2-specific EIAs were reactive, the anti-HIV-2 Western blot (WB) was positive, while the anti-HIV-1 WB was positive or indeterminate on different occasions. Synthetic peptide testing was reactive for HIV-2 but not HIV-1. HIV-2 DNA was detected using the polymerase chain reaction procedure. Although she had travelled to West Africa, it is unclear how she became infected with HIV-2.

  11. Microalbuminuria in HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hadigan, Colleen; Edwards, Elizabeth; Rosenberg, Alice; Purdy, Julia B.; Fleischman, Estee; Howard, Lilian; Mican, JoAnn M.; Sampath, Karmini; Oyalowo, Akinbowale; Johnson, Antoinette; Adler, Alexandra; Rehm, Catherine; Smith, Margo; Lai, Leon; Kopp, Jeffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Microalbuminuria is a marker for early kidney disease and cardiovascular risk. The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of microalbuminuria in an HIV-infected clinic population, to test the predictive value of a single urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) to identify persistent microalbuminuria and to examine covariates of microalbuminuria. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected subjects (n=182) without proteinuria (P/C ratio ≥0.5 g/g), elevated serum creatinine, diabetes, or chronic inflammatory conditions. Subjects completed three research visits within nine months. Microalbuminuria was defined as the geometric mean ACR of 25–355 mg/g for women and 17–250 mg/g for men. Results The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 14%. The negative predictive value of a single urine ACR determination was 98%, whereas the positive predictive value was only 74%. Microalbuminuria was similar among Black (15%) and non-Black (14%) subjects (p=0.8). Subjects with microalbuminuria were more likely to have hypertension (p=0.02) and metabolic syndrome (p=0.03). While duration of HIV infection and the level of HIV viremia were similar between groups, those with microalbuminuria were more likely to have a CD4 count <200 cells/μL (p=0.0003). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, the only significant independent predictors of microalbuminuria were low CD4 count (p=0.018) and current ritonavir exposure (p=0.04). Conclusion The prevalence of microalbuminuria in an HIV-infected clinic population was similar to earlier reports, and was associated with hypertension and impaired immune function. A single normal ACR determination effectively excludes microalbuminuria, whereas an elevated ACR requires confirmation. PMID:23615312

  12. Heterosexual transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A M; Laga, M

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments concerning heterosexual transmission of HIV (review of 1988 literature only) suggest improved understanding of the pattern of spread and role of risk behaviors and biological cofactors in its transmission. 3 distinct patterns if HIV infection are known: heterosexual spread in sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean, spread primarily among homosexuals and injecting drug users in Europe, North American and much of Latin America and Australia, and both homosexual and heterosexual transmission in Asia, the Pacific, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, where prevalence is low. In Africa an estimated 80% of cases are acquired heterosexually. Important risk factors are number of sex partners, sex with prostitutes, being a prostitute, being a sex partner of an infected person, and having a history of other sexually transmitted diseases. Prevalence rates have risen rapidly in Zaire and Kenya. In Africa, acquisition of HIV is related to sexual activity only. In contrast, in the U.S., heterosexual cases make up only 4% of all cases, and in Europe only 6%. Data on types of sexual transmission of HIV are mounting, in aggregate suggestive of a marked heterogeneity in infectivity and possibly susceptibility between individuals. Among couples where the man is positive, in some places individuals appear to be highly infective, notably those from Kinshasa, Zaire and Haiti, while other series of discordant couples the receptive partner remained seronegative for several years. Transmission from women to men appears to be less efficient than from men to women, as has been observed with other STDs such as gonorrhea. Biological cofactors implicated in enhanced HIV transmission appear to be advanced CDC Stage IV AIDS disease, with low T-helper lymphocyte counts and high antigenemia; concomitant STDS, especially those with genital ulceration; lack of circumcision; oral contraceptive use; practice of anal intercourse; inconsistent or no use of condoms. Theoretical models for

  13. HIV Sequence Compendium 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Carla; Foley, Brian; Leitner, Thomas; Apetrei, Christian; Hahn, Beatrice; Mizrachi, Ilene; Mullins, James; Rambaut, Andrew; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette

    2010-12-31

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. In these compendia we try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2010. Hence, though it is called the 2010 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2009 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing exponentially. In total, at the time of printing, there were 339,306 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 45% since last year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 2576 by end of 2009, reflecting a smaller increase than in previous years. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a small fraction of these. Included in the alignments are a small number of sequences representing each of the subtypes and the more prevalent circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) such as 01 and 02, as well as a few outgroup sequences (group O and N and SIV-CPZ). Of the rarer CRFs we included one representative each. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html. Reprints are available from our website in the form of both HTML and PDF files. As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  14. HIV-positive people, HIV-negative partners.

    PubMed

    Harmon, L; Volker, M

    1995-01-01

    More relationships exist today between HIV-positive and HIV-negative partners. This article explores the underlying dynamics that might account for this phenomenon. Codependency theories may explain these relationships for some couples. For other couples, it is suggested that positive-negative homosexual relationships may be influenced by both unhealthy and healthy gay developmental experiences as well as by a sense of compassion. The article addresses both HIV-positive people choosing HIV-negative partners and vice versa. Treatment issues for the various theories are discussed and recommendations are made.

  15. Arterial ischemic stroke in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Bryer, Alan; Lucas, Sebastian; Stanley, Alan; Allain, Theresa J.; Joekes, Elizabeth; Emsley, Hedley; Turnbull, Ian; Downey, Colin; Toh, Cheng-Hock; Brown, Kevin; Brown, David; Ison, Catherine; Smith, Colin; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Nath, Avindra; Heyderman, Robert S.; Connor, Myles D.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection, and potentially its treatment, increases the risk of an arterial ischemic stroke. Multiple etiologies and lack of clear case definitions inhibit progress in this field. Several etiologies, many treatable, are relevant to HIV-related stroke. To fully understand the mechanisms and the terminology used, a robust classification algorithm to help ascribe the various etiologies is needed. This consensus paper considers the strengths and limitations of current case definitions in the context of HIV infection. The case definitions for the major etiologies in HIV-related strokes were refined (e.g., varicella zoster vasculopathy and antiphospholipid syndrome) and in some instances new case definitions were described (e.g., HIV-associated vasculopathy). These case definitions provided a framework for an algorithm to help assign a final diagnosis, and help classify the subtypes of HIV etiology in ischemic stroke. PMID:27386505

  16. HIV and incarceration: dual epidemics.

    PubMed

    Wohl, David A; Rosen, David; Kaplan, Andrew H

    2006-05-01

    As a result of changes in the epidemiology of the HIV epidemic and in criminal justice policies over the past 2 decades, HIV infection in the United States has become concentrated in prisons and jails. The widespread incarceration of persons with or at risk for HIV infection has important public health ramifications, including but not limited to the intraprison spread of the virus. Incarceration, particularly of large numbers of men, can be socially disruptive and , in communities where incarceration is prevalent, can facilitate the spread of HIV infection. Interventions to enhance identification of infected inmates, prevention counseling, and treatment of inmates with HIV/AIDS are required to stem the contribution of incarceration to the spread of HIV infection.

  17. Potent Intratype Neutralizing Activity Distinguishes Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) from HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Özkaya Şahin, Gülşen; Holmgren, Birgitta; da Silva, Zacarias; Nielsen, Jens; Nowroozalizadeh, Salma; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Månsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Sören; Norrgren, Hans; Aaby, Peter

    2012-01-01

    HIV-2 has a lower pathogenicity and transmission rate than HIV-1. Neutralizing antibodies could be contributing to these observations. Here we explored side by side the potency and breadth of intratype and intertype neutralizing activity (NAc) in plasma of 20 HIV-1-, 20 HIV-2-, and 11 dually HIV-1/2 (HIV-D)-seropositive individuals from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Panels of primary isolates, five HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates, were tested in a plaque reduction assay using U87.CD4-CCR5 cells as targets. Intratype NAc in HIV-2 plasma was found to be considerably more potent and also broader than intratype NAc in HIV-1 plasma. This indicates that HIV-2-infected individuals display potent type-specific neutralizing antibodies, whereas such strong type-specific antibodies are absent in HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, the potency of intratype NAc was positively associated with the viral load of HIV-1 but not HIV-2, suggesting that NAc in HIV-1 infection is more antigen stimulation dependent than in HIV-2 infection, where plasma viral loads typically are at least 10-fold lower than in HIV-1 infection. Intertype NAc of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections was, instead, of low potency. HIV-D subjects had NAc to HIV-2 with similar high potency as singly HIV-2-infected individuals, whereas neutralization of HIV-1 remained poor, indicating that the difference in NAc between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections depends on the virus itself. We suggest that immunogenicity and/or antigenicity, meaning the neutralization phenotype, of HIV-2 is distinct from that of HIV-1 and that HIV-2 may display structures that favor triggering of potent neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:22072782

  18. Progression of HIV in haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Ragni, M V

    1998-07-01

    The recent elucidation of the life cycle and dynamics of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and technological advances in development of the HIV RNA PCR assay for sensitive detection of viral load have revolutionized the diagnosis, management, and treatment of HIV infection. Beginning with initial infection, there is unremitting, high-level viral replication that persists throughout the course of HIV infection. The measure of the amount of virus present in plasma, HIV viral load, is the single most important predictor of HIV progression, the best indicator of immune system decline, and the best guide for initiating and monitoring antiviral treatment. Further, HIV viral load has become the new yardstick against which other markers, including CD4 number, age, chemokine receptor mutations, cytotoxic T-cell responses, and neutralizing antibody titers are assessed. For individuals with haemophilia, additional 'markers' may have significant impact on the outcome of HIV disease. Chronic factor concentrate treatment has led to transfusion-associated hepatitis, co-infection with hepatitis C (HCV), and chronic liver disease. The latter may become accelerated with HIV progression and may lead to hepatotoxicity with antiviral drug therapy. Chronic factor concentrate treatment has also been associated with immunosuppression, including both B- and T-cell immune defects. In HIV(+) haemophilic men, this immune deficit has led to lower CD4 counts with HIV progression and poorer CD4 response to antiviral drugs than in gay men. The underlying haemophilic bleeding tendency may result in significant haemorrhage with HIV-associated immune thrombocytopenia and with protease inhibitor antiretroviral therapy. Although AIDS is the leading cause of death in this group, the reduction in the size of the haemophilia population over the next two centuries is estimated to be small, and survival should improve as better antiviral therapeutics are identified.

  19. Kinetic model of HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2007-10-15

    Recent experiments clarifying the details of exhaustion of CD8 T cells specific to various strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are indicative of slow irreversible (on a one-year time scale) deterioration of the immune system. The conventional models of HIV kinetics do not take this effect into account. Removing this shortcoming, we show the likely influence of such changes on the escape of HIV from control of the immune system.

  20. Other manifestations of HIV vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, N G; Beningfield, S J

    2009-05-01

    Descriptions of the numerous manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection affecting almost every organ system have abounded in recent publications. Multiple radiological, clinical and postmortem reports have recorded the cerebral, pulmonary, cardiac, renal, rheumatological and gastrointestinal pathologies in HIV-infected individuals, ranging from the bizarre to the mundane. Large-vessel HIV-related vascular manifestations have previously been reported in the surgical literature. We describe and review the manifestations of HIV-associated vasculopathy as it pertains to the cerebral, cardiovascular, mesenteric and renal circulations.

  1. HIV, Tat and dopamine transmission.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Peter J; Miller, Douglas R; Gamble-George, Joyonna; Yano, Hideaki; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2017-09-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a progressive infection that targets the immune system, affecting more than 37 million people around the world. While combinatorial antiretroviral therapy (cART) has lowered mortality rates and improved quality of life in infected individuals, the prevalence of HIV associated neurocognitive disorders is increasing and HIV associated cognitive decline remains prevalent. Recent research has suggested that HIV accessory proteins may be involved in this decline, and several studies have indicated that the HIV protein transactivator of transcription (Tat) can disrupt normal neuronal and glial function. Specifically, data indicate that Tat may directly impact dopaminergic neurotransmission, by modulating the function of the dopamine transporter and specifically damaging dopamine-rich regions of the CNS. HIV infection of the CNS has long been associated with dopaminergic dysfunction, but the mechanisms remain undefined. The specific effect(s) of Tat on dopaminergic neurotransmission may be, at least partially, a mechanism by which HIV infection directly or indirectly induces dopaminergic dysfunction. Therefore, precisely defining the specific effects of Tat on the dopaminergic system will help to elucidate the mechanisms by which HIV infection of the CNS induces neuropsychiatric, neurocognitive and neurological disorders that involve dopaminergic neurotransmission. Further, this will provide a discussion of the experiments needed to further these investigations, and may help to identify or develop new therapeutic approaches for the prevention or treatment of these disorders in HIV-infected individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Preventing HIV Infection in Women

    PubMed Central

    Adimora, Adaora A.; Ramirez, Catalina; Auerbach, Judith D.; Aral, Sevgi O.; Hodder, Sally; Wingood, Gina; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Bukusi, Elizabeth Anne

    2014-01-01

    Although the number of new infections has declined recently, women still constitute almost half of the world's 34 million people with HIV infection, and HIV remains the leading cause of death among women of reproductive age. Prevention research has made considerable progress during the past few years in addressing the biological, behavioral and social factors that influence women's vulnerability to HIV infection. Nevertheless, substantial work still must be done in order to implement scientific advancements and to resolve the many questions that remain. This article highlights some of the recent advances and persistent gaps in HIV prevention research for women and outlines key research and policy priorities. PMID:23764631

  3. HIV testing, staging, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Carla V; Horberg, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    HIV testing and incidence are stable, but trends for certain populations are concerning. Primary prevention must be reinvigorated and target vulnerable populations. Science and policy have progressed to improve the accuracy, speed, privacy, and affordability of HIV testing. More potent and much better tolerated HIV treatments and a multidisciplinary approach to care have increased adherence and viral suppression. Changes to health care law in the United States seek to expand the affordability and access of improved HIV diagnostics and treatment. Continued challenges include improving long-term outcomes in people on lifetime regimens, reducing comorbidities associated with those regimens, and preventing further transmission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Immunology of Pediatric HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive, exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV’s perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. PMID:23772619

  5. Body Shape Changes with HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Policies and Reports Provider Education Provider Education Home HIV Meds Updates Online Courses (CME) Case Studies Journal Articles Glossary Quick References Quick References Home Guidelines Integrated ...

  6. Validation of educational booklet for HIV/Aids prevention in older adults.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Luana Ibiapina; Lopes, Thais de Oliveira; Lira, Luciane Elise de Abreu; Feitoza, Sarah Maria de Sousa; Bessa, Maria Eliana Peixoto; Pereira, Maria Lúcia Duarte; Feitoza, Aline Rodrigues; Souza, Adriano Rodrigues de

    2017-01-01

    To describe the process of manufacturing and validation of an educational booklet for HIV/Aids prevention in older adults. Methodological study developed in two phases - manufacturing of the booklet and validation of the educational material by judges. The manufacturing process involved a situational diagnosis with older adults, and its result indicated gaps in the knowledge with respect to HIV/Aids. The validation process was performed by nine judges, selected by convenience. It was considered an agreement index of at least 0.80, analyzed through the content validity index. We opted for a dialogue between two older adults divided into three categories: myths and taboos; ignorance; and prevention and importance of diagnosis. The average of the items was 0.90. The suggestions made by the judges were observed and modified for the final version. The material had relevant content for the judges, in addition to being able to be used by health professionals in the education and clarification of issues on the subject. Descrever o processo de construção e validação de cartilha educativa para prevenção de HIV/Aids em idosos. Estudo metodológico desenvolvido em duas etapas - construção da cartilha e validação do material educativo por juízes. O processo de construção envolveu um diagnóstico situacional com idosos, cujo resultado apontou lacunas no conhecimento com relação ao HIV/Aids. Já o processo de validação foi realizado por nove juízes, selecionados por conveniência. Considerou-se uma concordância de no mínimo 0,80, analisado pelo índice de validade de conteúdo. Optou-se por um diálogo entre dois idosos dividido em três categorias: mitos e tabus; desconhecimento; e prevenção e importância do diagnóstico. A média dos itens foi de 0,90. As sugestões realizadas pelos juízes foram acatadas e modificadas para a versão final. O material apresentou conteúdo relevante para os juízes, além de poder ser utilizado pelos profissionais de sa

  7. HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Freed, E O

    2001-11-01

    In general terms, the replication cycle of lentiviruses, including HIV-1, closely resembles that of other retroviruses. There are, however, a number of unique aspects of HIV replication; for example, the HIVs and SIVs target receptors and coreceptors distinct from those used by other retroviruses. Lentiviruses encode a number of regulatory and accessory proteins not encoded by the genomes of the prototypical "simple" retroviruses. Of particular interest from the gene therapy perspective, lentiviruses possess the ability to productively infect some types of non-dividing cells. This chapter, while reiterating certain points discussed in Chapter 1, will attempt to focus on issues unique to HIV-1 replication. The HIV-1 genome encodes the major structural and non-structural proteins common to all replication-competent retroviruses (Fig. 1, and Chapter 1). From the 5'- to 3'-ends of the genome are found the gag (for group-specific antigen), pol (for polymerase), and env (for envelope glycoprotein) genes. The gag gene encodes a polyprotein precursor whose name, Pr55Gag, is based on its molecular weight. Pr55Gag is cleaved by the viral protease (PR) to the mature Gag proteins matrix (also known as MA or p17), capsid (CA or p24), nucleocapsid (NC or p7), and p6. Two spacer peptides, p2 and p1, are also generated upon Pr55Gag processing. The pol-encoded enzymes are initially synthesized as part of a large polyprotein precursor, Pr160GagPol, whose synthesis results from a rare frameshifting event during Pr55Gag translation. The individual pol-encoded enzymes, PR, reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN), are cleaved from Pr160GagPol by the viral PR. The envelope (Env) glycoproteins are also synthesized as a polyprotein precursor (Fig. 1). Unlike the Gag and Pol precursors, which are cleaved by the viral PR, the Env precursor, known as gp160, is processed by a cellular protease during Env trafficking to the cell surface, gp160 processing results in the generation of the

  8. HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Shau; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Reverse transcription and integration are the defining features of the Retroviridae; the common name “retrovirus” derives from the fact that these viruses use a virally encoded enzyme, reverse transcriptase (RT), to convert their RNA genomes into DNA. Reverse transcription is an essential step in retroviral replication. This article presents an overview of reverse transcription, briefly describes the structure and function of RT, provides an introduction to some of the cellular and viral factors that can affect reverse transcription, and discusses fidelity and recombination, two processes in which reverse transcription plays an important role. In keeping with the theme of the collection, the emphasis is on HIV-1 and HIV-1 RT. PMID:23028129

  9. [Cryptococcosis during HIV infection].

    PubMed

    El Fane, M; Badaoui, L; Ouladlahsen, A; Sodqi, M; Marih, L; Chakib, A; Marhoum El Filali, K

    2015-12-01

    Cryptococcosis is a cosmopolitan fungal serious condition due to an encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans. This is the systemic fungal infection the most common in HIV infection. This yeast is present in the environment and its main entrance in the body is the respiratory tract. Its gravity is linked to its tropism for the central nervous system. It generally affects subjects with severe deficit of cellular immunity and in particular, patients living with HIV. The diagnosis of neuromeningeal cryptococcosis is based on the detection of encapsulated yeasts at microscopic examination of cerebrospinal fluid, the detection of capsular polysaccharide antigen in serum or cerebrospinal fluid, but especially on the culture. A staging is always essential. The prognosis is severe. The control of intracranial hypertension is a major element of prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. HIV and refugees.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    The CARE International HIV prevention project with Rwandan refugees in the Benaco refugee camp, Tanzania, is recognized as a successful model for early HIV prevention and care in emergency settings. The project's activities include: 1) involving political and religious leaders; 2) coordinating activities with other organizations in the camp; 3) setting up a network of AIDS community educators and condom distribution points; 4) providing nursing care for people with AIDS in their camp "home"; 5) holding mass education activities; and 6) encouraging rape victims to get medical care and counseling. These intervention activities were initiated through weekly sporting events, income-generating activities for women, and Adolescent Health Days during which adolescents visited health clinics.

  11. HIV in military.

    PubMed

    1996-05-31

    The House of Representatives approved a defense authorization bill that requires the Pentagon to discharge service members who test positive for HIV antibodies. This is the second measure of its kind. Last year, Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-CA) pushed through Congress a similar measure that was repealed after encountering public opposition. President Clinton said he will veto the defense bill in its current form. The bill provides $13 billion in spending beyond the amount the Pentagon requested, resurrects plans for the Star Wars missile defense system, and rescinds Clinton's don't ask, don't tell policy toward gay men and lesbians in the military. Rep. Peter Torkildsen (R-MA) is confident that the HIV provision can be stricken when the bill goes to a House-Senate conference committee in a few weeks.

  12. HIV stigma among substance abusing people living with HIV/AIDS: implications for HIV treatment.

    PubMed

    Levi-Minzi, Maria A; Surratt, Hilary L

    2014-08-01

    HIV-related stigma has a major impact on quality of life and health among people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA). This study examines demographic, mental health, behavioral, contextual, and HIV care-related correlates of HIV stigma among 503 substance abusing PLWHA. Stigma was measured with the HIV Internalized Stigma Measure which has four subscales: stereotypes about HIV, self-acceptance, disclosure concerns, and social relationships. Severe substance dependence (55.3%) and depression (54.7%) were associated with higher HIV stigma across all domains. 49.9% of the sample reported antiretroviral (ARV) medication diversion (the unlawful sale and trading of ARV medications); diverters endorsed significantly higher stigma related to disclosure. 54.1% of the sample reported ≥95% ARV adherence; these individuals reported significantly lower stigma for self-acceptance, disclosure, and social relationships. Multivariate linear regression showed that depression and social support demonstrated significant main effects across stigma domains. Findings suggest that interventions to decrease HIV related stigma may be an important component of initiatives to increase engagement in HIV care.

  13. An HIV-Preventive Intervention for Youth Living with HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightfoot, Marguerita; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Tevendale, Heather

    2007-01-01

    As the number of youth infected with HIV rises, secondary prevention programs are needed to help youth living with HIV meet three goals: (1) increase self-care behaviors, medical adherence, and health-related interactions; (2) reduce transmission acts; and (3) enhance their quality of life. This article describes an intervention program for youth…

  14. Tuberculosis in HIV patient.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Bidhan Nidhi; Paudel, Punya; Paudel, Luna; Dhungana, Govinda; Amatya, Gyanendra Lal; Aryal, Choodamani; Kandel, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Strict monitoring ofanti tuberculosis therapy and antiretroviral therapyis crucial for proper management of TB/HIV co-infected patients. Between December 2006 and December 2008 a prospective observational study was conducted among 135 TB/HIV co-infected patients visiting antiretroviral therapy in Seti Zonal Hospital, Dhangadi. The diagnosed TB patients were subjected to ATT through directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS) and its response was evaluated as per WHO guidelines. Among 135 studied subjects, 97 (71.9%) were males and over 119 (88 %) of the patients were in the age group 21 to 50. Of the total TB cases 92 (68.1%) presented pulmonary TB and 37.20% of the Extra-pulmonary Tuberculosis cases were lymph node TB. 72 (53.33%) of them had completed ATT, 11 (8.2%) transfer out and 17 (12.6%) were default. Majority of the patients presented PTB, and lymph node TB was found to be the most common EPTB. Comparatively, high efficacy of ATT was found in HIV patients visiting this resource poor setting.

  15. Measuring HIV vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Suárez, C M

    2005-04-15

    Some HIV vaccine candidates have a potential VE I (vaccine efficacy for infectiousness) type effect, which tends to reduce the viral load and may reduce infectiousness of an infected individual. In general, the efficacy of this kind of vaccine is very difficult to assess because it requires information on contacts of vaccinated infected individuals, and current methods to estimate VE I rely on the time elapsed between infections of an individual and his/her sexual partner, thus making infection of the sexual partner necessary to assess the efficacy. To avoid behavioural changes that may affect the estimates, HIV status is kept undisclosed to participants, which raises many ethical questions. Here we present a method that allows immediate notification of HIV status to both members of a couple, reducing the risk of infection when one of them has not been infected and allowing immediate medical treatment. The method allows for estimation of any VE I and VE S (vaccine efficacy for susceptibility) effect, and it is robust to the most common situations found in these type of studies, namely: differential risk of participants, staggered enrollment and small sample sizes. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Measurement of Stigma in People with HIV: A Reexamination of the HIV Stigma Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunn, Janice Yanushka; Solomon, Sondra E.; Miller, Carol; Forehand, Rex

    2007-01-01

    Stigma associated with HIV infection can unfavorably impact the lives and behavior of people living with HIV/AIDS. The HIV Stigma Scale was designed to measure the perception of stigma by those who are HIV infected. Reanalysis of the psychometric properties of this scale was conducted in a new sample of 157 individuals living with HIV/AIDS in…

  17. Astrocytes as an HIV Reservoir: Mechanism of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Guan-Han; Henderson, Lisa; Nath, Avindra

    2016-01-01

    If we have any hope of achieving a cure for HIV infection, close attention to the cell types capable of getting infected with HIV is necessary. Of these cell types, astrocytes are the most ideal cell type for the formation of such a reservoir. These are long-lived cells with a very low turnover rate and are found in the brain and the gastrointestinal tract. Although astrocytes are evidently resistant to infection of cell-free HIV in vitro, these cells are efficiently infected via cell-tocell contact by which immature HIV virions bud off lymphocytes and have the ability to directly bind to CXCR4, triggering the process of fusion in the absence of CD4. In this review, we closely examine the evidence for HIV infection of astrocytes in the brain and the mechanisms for viral entry and regulation in this cell type, and discuss an approach for controlling this viral reservoir.

  18. HIV reservoirs as obstacles and opportunities for an HIV cure.

    PubMed

    Chun, Tae-Wook; Moir, Susan; Fauci, Anthony S

    2015-06-01

    The persistence of HIV reservoirs remains a formidable obstacle to achieving sustained virologic remission in HIV-infected individuals after antiretroviral therapy (ART) is discontinued, even if plasma viremia has been successfully suppressed for prolonged periods of time. Numerous approaches aimed at eradicating the virus, as well as maintaining its prolonged suppression in the absence of ART, have had little success. A better understanding of the pathophysiologic nature of HIV reservoirs and the impact of various interventions on their persistence is essential for the development of successful therapeutic strategies against HIV or the long-term control of infection. Here, we discuss the persistent HIV reservoir as a barrier to cure as well as the current therapeutic strategies aimed at eliminating or controlling the virus in the absence of ART.

  19. How you get HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    How you get HIV/AIDS Which body fluids contain HIV? HIV is a virus that lives in blood and other fluids in the body. Moving ... answers to any questions you have about HIV/AIDS. Your public health department and health care provider ...

  20. Overview of the landscape of HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Haase, Ashley T

    2014-06-01

    In this introductory essay on the landscape of HIV prevention, my intent is to provide context for the subsequent topics discussed at the Symposium on Hormone Regulation of the Mucosal Environment in the female reproductive tract (FRT) and the Prevention of HIV infection: FRT immunity, mucosal microenvironment and HIV prevention, and the risk and impact of hormonal contraceptives on HIV transmission.

  1. Trichomoniasis and HIV interactions: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kissinger, Patricia; Adamski, Alys

    2013-01-01

    Objective To discuss the epidemiology of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and HIV co-infections, the role of TV in acquisition and transmission of HIV, special treatment considerations for TV among women with HIV and the prevention of TV among HIV-infected persons. Design Systematic review. Data source Review of literature of EMBASE and PubMed databases from January 1990 to February 2013. Search keywords included TV, HIV co-infections, HIV acquisition, HIV transmission, HIV shedding, TV treatment, HIV and couples studies. Review method We included studies of any design that contained the selected search words and were published during the specified time frame. We then searched the reference lists of included papers for additional papers and included these when relevant. Results There is strong evidence that TV increases both transmission and acquisition of HIV among women, and that successful treatment for TV can reduce HIV genital shedding. Single dose metronidazole (MTZ) should no longer be used for HIV+ women with TV given the high rates of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis co-infections and other factors that may render MTZ less effective in HIV+ women. Prevention of TV among HIV+ persons is similar to among HIV, including promotion of condoms as well as regular screening and prompt treatment. There may be a role for expedited partner treatment for the prevention of repeat infections, but most repeat infections are clinical treatment failures. Diligence in screening and treating TV among both HIV− susceptible and HIV+ persons is an important public health strategy. PMID:23605851

  2. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.

    PubMed

    Clifford, David B; Ances, Beau M

    2013-11-01

    Neurological involvement in HIV is often associated with cognitive impairment. Although severe and progressive neurocognitive impairment has become rare in HIV clinics in the era of potent antiretroviral therapy, most patients with HIV worldwide have poor outcomes on formal neurocognitive tests. In this Review, we describe the manifestations of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder in the era of effective HIV therapy, outline diagnosis and treatment recommendations, and explore the research questions that remain. Although comorbid disorders, such as hepatitis C infection or epilepsy, might cause some impairment, their prevalence is insufficient to explain the frequency with which it is encountered. HIV disease markers, such as viral load and CD4 cell counts, are not strongly associated with ongoing impairment on treatment, whereas cardiovascular disease markers and inflammatory markers are. New cerebrospinal fluid and neuroimaging biomarkers are needed to detect and follow impairment. Ongoing research efforts to optimise HIV therapy within the CNS, and potentially to intervene in downstream mechanisms of neurotoxicity, remain important avenues for future investigation. Ultimately, the full control of virus in the brain is a necessary step in the goal of HIV eradication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. HIV Testing among Detained Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voisin, Dexter R.; Salazar, Laura F.; Crosby, Richard; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Yarber, William L.; Staples-Horne, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Published reports have not investigated the issue of voluntary HIV testing among detained youth, a population disproportionately infected with HIV compared to other adolescent groups. Data were collected from 467 sexually active detained adolescents in Georgia on demographic, environmental, and drug and sexual history variables, to explore…

  4. HIV/AIDS and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    If you have HIV/AIDS and find out you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant, you should let your health care provider know as soon as possible. Some HIV/AIDS medicines may harm your baby. Your health care ...

  5. Arkansas HIV/AIDS Report.

    PubMed

    1998-10-01

    The cumulative total of HIV cases is 4,110. Of that number, 2,481 meet the AIDS case definition. For the month ending July 12 of this year, there were 87 new HIV and 60 new AIDS cases reported. Of the 2,481 AIDS cases reported since 1983, 1210 (49%) have died of AIDS.

  6. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  7. HIV Testing among Detained Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voisin, Dexter R.; Salazar, Laura F.; Crosby, Richard; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Yarber, William L.; Staples-Horne, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Published reports have not investigated the issue of voluntary HIV testing among detained youth, a population disproportionately infected with HIV compared to other adolescent groups. Data were collected from 467 sexually active detained adolescents in Georgia on demographic, environmental, and drug and sexual history variables, to explore…

  8. Heterotopic pregnancy in HIV women.

    PubMed

    Savasi, Valeria; Antonazzo, Patrizio; Personeni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Heterotopic pregnancy occurs when intrauterine and ectopic pregnancy are concomitant; overall rate rises from 1/30.000 to 1.5/1000 in assisted reproductive technology pregnancies. HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) patients are at increased risk of heterotopic pregnancies due to the greater frequency of assisted reproductive technology and pelvic inflammatory disease. We report the first case of heterotopic pregnancy in HIV woman.

  9. HIV infection of the penis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deborah; Politch, Joseph A.; Pudney, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The penile foreskin, shaft, glans/corona, meatus and urethral introitus are all potential sites of HIV-1 acquisition in men. Circumcision decreases HIV infection in heterosexual men by 50–60%, indicating that the foreskin plays an important role, but that other sites are also involved. HIV target cells have been described throughout the male genital epithelium, but appear to be more accessible in the inner foreskin and urethral introitus, both of which are mucosal (wet) epithelia and infectable with HIV in vitro. Sexually transmitted co-infections can increase the risk of HIV infection at these and other sites by eroding the protective epithelial layer and by attracting and activating HIV target cells in the mucosal epithelium. The moist subpreputial cavity hosts a unique microbiome that may also play a role in HIV infection. Both innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms are operative in the lower male genital region. The penile urethral mucosa contains accumulations of IgA+ plasma cells and T lymphocytes, and may provide a responsive target for future mucosal vaccines to prevent HIV sexual transmission. PMID:21214659

  10. Hyperthermia Stimulates HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42–45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38–40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity. PMID:22807676

  11. Neurocognitive Outcomes in Pediatric HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willen, Elizabeth J.

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive impairment has long been associated with the natural history of HIV among vertically infected children. In children, HIV may have a direct or indirect impact on the developing brain, may lead to global or highly specific consequences, and may be responsible for minor cognitive consequences or, conversely, long-term and severe disability.…

  12. HIV surveillance in complex emergencies.

    PubMed

    Salama, P; Dondero, T J

    2001-04-01

    Many studies have shown a positive association between both migration and temporary expatriation and HIV risk. This association is likely to be similar or even more pronounced for forced migrants. In general, HIV transmission in host-migrant or host-forced-migrant interactions depends on the maturity of the HIV epidemic in both the host and the migrant population, the relative seroprevalence of HIV in the host and the migrant population, the prevalence of other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that may facilitate transmission, and the level of sexual interaction between the two communities. Complex emergencies are the major cause of mass population movement today. In complex emergencies, additional factors such as sexual interaction between forced-migrant populations and the military; sexual violence; increasing commercial sex work; psychological trauma; and disruption of preventive and curative health services may increase the risk for HIV transmission. Despite recent success in preventing HIV infection in stable populations in selected developing countries, internally displaced persons and refugees (or forced migrants) have not been systematically included in HIV surveillance systems, nor consequently in prevention activities. Standard surveillance systems that rely on functioning health services may not provide useful data in many complex emergency settings. Secondary sources can provide some information in these settings. Little attempt has been made, however, to develop innovative HIV surveillance systems in countries affected by complex emergencies. Consequently, data on the HIV epidemic in these countries are scarce and HIV prevention programs are either not implemented or interventions are not effectively targeted. Second generation surveillance methods such as cross-sectional, population-based surveys can provide rapid information on HIV, STIs, and sexual behavior. The risks for stigmatization and breaches of confidentiality must be recognized

  13. New Approaches to HIV Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Development of a safe and effective vaccine for HIV is a major global priority. However, to date, efforts to design an HIV vaccine with methods used for development of other successful viral vaccines have not succeeded due to HIV diversity, HIV integration into the host genome, and ability of HIV to consistently evade anti-viral immune responses. Recent success in isolation of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs), discovery of mechanisms of bnAb induction, and in discovery of atypical mechanisms of CD8 T cell killing of HIV-infected cells, have opened new avenues for strategies for HIV vaccine design. PMID:26056742

  14. Creating genetic resistance to HIV.

    PubMed

    Burnett, John C; Zaia, John A; Rossi, John J

    2012-10-01

    HIV/AIDS remains a chronic and incurable disease, in spite of the notable successes of combination antiretroviral therapy. Gene therapy offers the prospect of creating genetic resistance to HIV that supplants the need for antiviral drugs. In sight of this goal, a variety of anti-HIV genes have reached clinical testing, including gene-editing enzymes, protein-based inhibitors, and RNA-based therapeutics. Combinations of therapeutic genes against viral and host targets are designed to improve the overall antiviral potency and reduce the likelihood of viral resistance. In cell-based therapies, therapeutic genes are expressed in gene modified T lymphocytes or in hematopoietic stem cells that generate an HIV-resistant immune system. Such strategies must promote the selective proliferation of the transplanted cells and the prolonged expression of therapeutic genes. This review focuses on the current advances and limitations in genetic therapies against HIV, including the status of several recent and ongoing clinical studies.

  15. Advances in HIV Microbicide Development

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Joanna S.; Easterhoff, David; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a way to control the spread of the global HIV pandemic. A microbicide, or topical drug applied to the mucosal environment to block transmission, is a promising HIV prevention strategy. The development of a safe and efficacious microbicide requires a thorough understanding of the mucosal environment and it's role in HIV transmission. Knowledge of the key events in viral infection identifies points at which the virus might be most effectively targeted by a microbicide. The cervicovaginal and rectal mucosa play an important role in the innate defense against HIV, and microbicides must not interfere with these functions. In this review we discuss the current research on HIV microbicide development. PMID:22098355

  16. Surrogacy commissioning fathers and HIV.

    PubMed

    Jordaan, Donrich W

    2013-10-11

    Surrogacy is not regulated by a single legal instrument only, nor is confirmation of a surrogacy agreement by the High Court an unqualified green light for the surrogacy process to proceed. In the context of the HIV status of the commissioning father, whose gametes are to be used for the conception of the child in pursuance of a surrogacy agreement, the intended in vitro fertilisation of the surrogate mother may only take place on condition that the commissioning father, and his semen, have been tested for HIV; that he has consented to his HIV status being made available to the surrogate mother, and if he is HIV-positive, that sperm washing will be used to minimise the risk of infection and that the surrogate mother has been informed of his HIV status, and given her informed consent. 

  17. Designing synthetic vaccines for HIV.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Haynes, Barton F; Danishefsky, Samuel J

    2015-06-01

    Despite three decades of intensive research efforts, the development of an effective prophylactic vaccine against HIV remains an unrealized goal in the global campaign to contain the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Recent characterization of novel epitopes for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies has fueled research in the design and synthesis of new, well-defined antigenic constructs for the development of HIV envelope-directed vaccines. The present review will cover previous and recent efforts toward the design of synthetic vaccines based on the HIV viral envelope glycoproteins, with special emphasis on examples from our own laboratories. The biological evaluation of some of the most representative vaccine candidates, in terms of their antigenicity and immunogenicity, will also be discussed to illustrate the current state-of-the-art toward the development of fully synthetic HIV vaccines.

  18. Polymeric anti-HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this review is to highlight the application of polymer therapeutics in an effort to curb the transmission and infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Following a description of the HIV life cycle, the use of approved antiretroviral drugs that inhibit critical steps in the HIV infection process is highlighted. After that, a comprehensive overview of the structure and inhibitory properties of polymeric anti-HIV therapeutic agents is presented. This overview will include inhibitors based on polysaccharides, synthetic polymers, dendritic polymers, polymer conjugates as well as polymeric DC-SIGN antagonists. The review will conclude with a section that discusses the applications of polymers and polymer conjugates as systemic and topical anti-HIV therapeutics.

  19. T CELL THERAPIES FOR HIV

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Sharon; Bollard, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has improved the quality of life for HIV+ individuals but efficacy requires strict adherence and treatment is not curative. Recently, the use of T cells as therapeutic agents have been in the spotlight in the settings of post-transplant opportunistic infections and cancer. Whether T cell therapy can be harnessed for treating HIV remains to be determined but there are a few studies that seek to answer that question. Infusion of ex vivo expanded HIV-specific T cells showed limited efficacy but no adverse events. Genetically modified T cells expressing CD4 chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) have recently been shown to have persistence that outperforms CARs used for cancers. Although the results have not yet been published for many clinical studies using T cells for HIV, preclinical studies and the clinical data that is available highlight the potential for T cell therapy to decrease or eliminate HIV patients’ dependency on ART. PMID:23557423

  20. Designing synthetic vaccines for HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite three decades of intensive research efforts, the development of an effective prophylactic vaccine against HIV remains an unrealized goal in the global campaign to contain the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Recent characterization of novel epitopes for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) has fueled research in the design and synthesis of new, well-defined antigenic constructs for the development of HIV envelope-directed vaccines. The present review will cover previous and recent efforts toward the design of synthetic vaccines based on the HIV viral envelope (Env) glycoproteins, with special emphasis on examples from our own laboratories. The biological evaluation of some of the most representative vaccine candidates, in terms of their antigenicity and immunogenicity, will also be discussed to illustrate the current state-of-the-art toward the development of fully synthetic HIV vaccines. PMID:25824661

  1. Energy expenditure in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kosmiski, Lisa

    2011-12-01

    Energy intake recommendations for adults should be based preferably on direct measurements of total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) in corresponding populations who are maintaining healthy body weight and satisfactory physical activity levels. During adolescence, pregnancy, and lactation, energy requirements should be based on TDEE plus the additional energy required to advance these physiologic states. With illness, energy expenditure and energy intake change, but nutritional intervention is not necessarily beneficial. This article reviews data on energy expenditure in HIV infection with a focus on adults, adolescents aged ≥14 y, and pregnant and lactating women. Resting energy expenditure (REE) in adults with untreated asymptomatic HIV is ~ 10% higher than in healthy control subjects. In asymptomatic adults receiving antiretroviral therapy, REE may be similarly increased. HIV wasting and secondary infections are also associated with increased REE. In contrast, TDEE is typically normal in asymptomatic HIV and decreased in HIV wasting and secondary infection. No direct measurements of REE or TDEE are available in adolescents or in pregnant or lactating women with HIV. On the basis of current data, energy intake may need to increase by ~ 10% in adults with asymptomatic HIV to maintain body weight. In adolescents and in pregnant and lactating women with asymptomatic HIV, energy requirements should approximate recommendations for their uninfected counterparts until further data are available. In the resource-rich world, the energy expenditure changes associated with HIV are unlikely to contribute to significant weight loss. More data are needed on energy expenditure in HIV-infected populations from developing nations, where concurrent malnutrition and coinfections are common.

  2. Hospitalization of people 50 years old or older living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Pio, Daiana Patrícia Marchetti; Reinato, Lilian Andreia Fleck; Lopes, Letícia Pimenta; Caliari, Juliano de Souza; Gir, Elucir

    2017-01-01

    Identify the rate and predictive factors of the hospitalization of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA), aged 50 years or older. A quantitative, cross-sectional study was conducted at two inpatient units specialized in infectious diseases in a teaching hospital. Data were gathered through individual interviews between August 2011 and February 2015. All ethical precepts were followed. Of the 532 admitted patients, 95 were PLHA 50 years old or older; 30.5% were admitted 3 to 4 times after being diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. Rate of hospitalization was 17.8%, and being 50 to 60 years old was a protective factor against hospitalization. Identificar a taxa e os fatores preditores para a hospitalização de pessoas vivendo com HIV/Aids (PVHA), com idade igual ou superior a 50 anos. Estudo quantitativo, transversal, realizado em duas unidades de internação especializadas em cuidados às doenças infecciosas, de um hospital universitário. A coleta de dados foi realizada por meio de entrevista individual, no período de agosto de 2011 a fevereiro de 2015. Todos os preceitos éticos foram contemplados. Das 532 internações, 95 eram de PVHA com idade igual ou superior a 50 anos; 56,8% receberam o diagnóstico de HIV/Aids antes de terem completado 50 anos de idade; 30,5% foram hospitalizadas de 3 a 4 vezes após o diagnóstico da infecção pelo HIV/Aids. A taxa de hospitalização foi de 17,8%, e a faixa etária de 50 a 60 anos foi fator de proteção para a hospitalização.

  3. HIV Interaction With Human Host: HIV-2 As a Model of a Less Virulent Infection.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel; Santos-Costa, Quirina

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 are the causal agents of AIDS. While similar in many ways, a significant amount of data suggests that HIV-2 is less virulent than HIV-1. In fact, HIV-2 infection is characterized by a longer asymptomatic stage and lower transmission rate, and the majority of HIV-2-infected patients can be classified as long-term non-progressors or elite controllers. The mechanisms underlying the ability of human host to naturally control HIV-2 infection are far from being completely understood. The identification of the differences between HIV-1 and HIV-2 interactions with human host cells could provide important insights into several aspects of retroviral pathogenesis that remain elusive, with significant implications for HIV vaccine development and therapy. In this review, we delve into some of the differences that notably distinguish HIV-2 from HIV-1, highlighting possible consequences in the pathogenesis and natural history of both infections.

  4. Following an HIV Regimen: Steps to Take Before and After Starting HIV Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets Following ... m. ET) Send us an email Following an HIV Regimen: Steps to Take Before and After Starting ...

  5. High Feasibility of Empiric HIV Treatment for Patients With Suspected Acute HIV in an Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kathleen R; Arora, Sanjay; Walsh, Kristin B; Lora, Meredith; Merjavy, Stephen; Livermore, Shanna; Menchine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Earlier intervention in acute HIV infection limits HIV reservoirs and may decrease HIV transmission. We developed criteria for empiric antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an emergency department (ED) routine HIV screening program. We assessed the feasibility and willingness of patients with suspected acute HIV infection in the ED to begin ART. A suspected acute HIV infection was defined as a positive HIV antigen antibody combination immunoassay with pending HIV-antibody differentiation test results and HIV RNA viral load. During the study period, there were 16 confirmed cases of acute HIV infection: 11 met our criteria for empiric ART and agreed to treatment, 10 were prescribed ART, and 1 left the ED against medical advice without a prescription for ART. Eight patients completed at least one follow-up visit. Empiric HIV treatment in an ED is feasible, well received by patients, and offers a unique entry point into the HIV care continuum.

  6. Estimation of HIV incidence in two Brazilian municipalities, 2013.

    PubMed

    Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann; Ferreira, Orlando da Costa; Brito, Ana Maria de; Luhm, Karin Regina; Ribeiro, Clea Elisa Lopes; Silva, Ana Maria; Cavalcanti, Ana Maria Salustiano; Ito, Tomoko Sasazawa; Raboni, Sonia Mara; Souza, Paulo Roberto Borges de; Pereira, Gerson Fernando Mendes

    2016-09-01

    estimação da incidência de HIV para a população total das cidades, as infecções recentes detectadas na pesquisa foram anualizadas e ponderadas pelo inverso da probabilidade de teste de HIV no ano de 2013 entre os casos infectados e não diagnosticados. Após a estimação da incidência de HIV para a população total, foram estimadas as taxas de incidência por sexo, faixa de idade e categoria de exposição. Em Recife, foram diagnosticados 902 indivíduos de 13 anos e mais com infecção de HIV. Desses, 528 foram incluídos no estudo, e a proporção estimada de infecções recentes foi de 13,1%. Em Curitiba, foram diagnosticadas 1.013 pessoas de 13 anos e mais, 497 participaram do estudo, e a proporção de infecções recentes foi de 10,5%. Em Recife, a taxa de incidência estimada foi de 53,1 por 100 mil habitantes de 13 anos e mais, enquanto em Curitiba, de 41,1 por 100 mil, com razão do sexo masculino para o feminino de 3,5 e 2,4, respectivamente. Foram evidenciadas elevadas taxas de incidência de HIV entre homens que fazem sexo com homens, de 1,47% em Recife e 0,92% em Curitiba. Os resultados obtidos nas duas cidades mostraram que o grupo dos homens que fazem sexo com homens está desproporcionalmente sujeito ao maior risco de novas infecções, e indicam que estratégias para controle da disseminação da epidemia nesse subgrupo populacional são essenciais e urgentes.

  7. Nutrition and HIV-Positive Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Kristen S.

    2003-01-01

    When an HIV-positive woman becomes pregnant, additional nutritional considerations are warranted. Compared to routine prenatal nutritional assessment and intervention, pregnant HIV-positive women have increased needs to promote a healthy outcome. This column contains information on HIV and pregnancy, nutrition and infection, and nutrition for HIV-positive pregnancy. This content can be integrated into childbirth education settings to improve care to women who are HIV-positive. PMID:17273329

  8. Tuberculosis control in people living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Magnabosco, Gabriela Tavares; Lopes, Lívia Maria; Andrade, Rubia Laine de Paula; Brunello, Maria Eugênia Firmino; Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2016-09-09

    to analyze the offering of health actions and services for the control of tuberculosis for people living with HIV/AIDS being followed up in the Specialized Care Services for HIV/AIDS in Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. quantitative, exploratory survey study. Participated 253 people living with HIV/AIDS followed up by this service, considering as inclusion criteria: individuals older than 18 years living in the city and not inmates. Data collection was conducted from January 2012 to May 2013 through interviews with the support of a specific instrument. Data were analyzed using indicators and a composite index. the offering of services for the control of tuberculosis in people living with HIV/AIDS by municipal services was considered as intermediate, reinforcing the need for better planning for comprehensive assistance, coordination of professionals in teams and among the services network, in addition to professional training and continuing education. it is necessary to implement strategies that promote shared actions between TB and HIV / AIDS programs and between different services in order to strengthen the local care network, aimed at producing an individualized care, comprehensive and responsive. analisar a oferta das ações e serviços de saúde para o controle da tuberculose nas pessoas vivendo com HIV/aids em seguimento pelos Serviços de Atenção Especializada ao HIV/aids de Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil. estudo quantitativo, exploratório, do tipo inquérito. Participaram 253 pessoas vivendo com HIV/aids em seguimento nos serviços, considerando os critérios de inclusão: indivíduos maiores de 18 anos, residentes no município e não pertencentes ao sistema prisional. A coleta de dados foi realizada no período de janeiro/2012 a maio/2013, por meio de entrevistas com apoio de um instrumento específico. Os dados foram analisados mediante indicadores e índice composto. a oferta de ações e serviços para o controle da tuberculose nas pessoas vivendo com HIV

  9. HIV Stigma and Social Capital in Women Living With HIV.

    PubMed

    Cuca, Yvette P; Asher, Alice; Okonsky, Jennifer; Kaihura, Alphoncina; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Webel, Allison

    Women living with HIV (WLWH) continue to experience HIV-related stigma. Social capital is one resource that could mitigate HIV stigma. Our cross-sectional study examined associations between social capital and HIV-related stigma in 135 WLWH in the San Francisco Bay Area. The mean age of study participants was 48 years; 60% were African American; 29% had less than a high school education; and 19% were employed. Age was significantly associated with perceived HIV stigma (p = .001), but total social capital was not. Women with lower Value of Life social capital scores had significantly higher total stigma scores (p = .010) and higher Negative Self-image stigma scores (p = .001). Women who felt less valued in their social worlds may have been more likely to perceive HIV stigma, which could have negative health consequences. This work begins to elucidate the possible relationships between social capital and perceived HIV stigma.

  10. Reward, attention, and HIV-related risk in HIV+ individuals.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian A; Kronemer, Sharif I; Rilee, Jessica J; Sacktor, Ned; Marvel, Cherie L

    2016-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is often contracted through engaging in risky reward-motivated behaviors such as needle sharing and unprotected sex. Understanding the factors that make an individual more vulnerable to succumbing to the temptation to engage in these risky behaviors is important to limiting the spread of HIV. One potential source of this vulnerability concerns the degree to which an individual is able to resist paying attention to irrelevant reward information. In the present study, we examine this possible link by characterizing individual differences in value-based attentional bias in a sample of HIV+ individuals with varying histories of risk-taking behavior. Participants learned associations between experimental stimuli and monetary reward outcome. The degree of attentional bias for these reward-associated stimuli, reflected in their ability to capture attention when presented as task-irrelevant distractors, was then assessed both immediately and six months following reward learning. Value-driven attentional capture was related to substance abuse history and non-planning impulsiveness during the time leading up to contraction of HIV as measured via self-report. These findings suggest a link between the ability to ignore reward-associated information and prior HIV-related risk-taking behavior. Additionally, particular aspects of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders were related to attentional bias, including motor deficits commonly associated with HIV-induced damage to the basal ganglia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reward, Attention, and HIV-related Risk in HIV+ Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Brian A.; Kronemer, Sharif I.; Rilee, Jessica J.; Sacktor, Ned; Marvel, Cherie L.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is often contracted through engaging in risky reward-motivated behaviors such as needle sharing and unprotected sex. Understanding the factors that make an individual more vulnerable to succumbing to the temptation to engage in these risky behaviors is important to limiting the spread of HIV. One potential source of this vulnerability concerns the degree to which an individual is able to resist paying attention to irrelevant reward information. In the present study, we examine this possible link by characterizing individual differences in value-based attentional bias in a sample of HIV+ individuals with varying histories of risk-taking behavior. Participants learned associations between experimental stimuli and monetary reward outcome. The degree of attentional bias for these reward-associated stimuli, reflected in their ability to capture attention when presented as task-irrelevant distractors, was then assessed both immediately and six months following reward learning. Value-driven attentional capture was related to substance abuse history and non-planning impulsiveness during the time leading up to contraction of HIV as measured via self report. These findings suggest a link between the ability to ignore reward-associated information and prior HIV-related risk-taking behavior. Additionally, particular aspects of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders were related to attentional bias, including motor deficits commonly associated with HIV-induced damage to the basal ganglia. PMID:26484383

  12. Lower levels of HIV RNA in semen in HIV-2 compared with HIV-1 infection: implications for differences in transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Hawes, Stephen E.; Agne, Habibatou D.; Stern, Joshua E.; Critchlow, Cathy W.; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Sow, Papa Salif

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives HIV-2 infection, in comparison with HIV-1, is characterized by lower plasma viral loads, slower CD4 cell count decline, decreased AIDS-related mortality, and lower rates of mother-to-child and sexual transmission. To gain further insight into why HIV-1 is more readily transmitted as compared with HIV-2, we analyzed semen and plasma HIV RNA levels in HIV-1 and HIV-2-positive men from Senegal. Design and methods Twenty-two HIV-1 and 10 HIV-2-infected subjects from the University of Dakar donated semen and blood samples for this analysis. HIV-1 and HIV-2 viral loads in semen and plasma were quantified using type-specific polymerase chain reaction assays. Results The mean age of the subjects was 37 and 40 years; mean CD4 cell count was 222 and 276 cells/µl and the mean plasma viral load was 4.7 and 3.0 log10 copies/ml for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively (P = 0.002). HIV RNA was detected in semen in 21 of 22 (95%) of HIV-1 and seven of 10 (70%) of HIV-2-infected subjects; P = 0.07). However, the levels of HIV RNA present in semen were markedly different between those with HIV-1 and HIV-2, with a mean of 4.4 log10 copies/ml among those with HIV-1 and a mean of 2.6 log10 copies/ml among those with HIV-2 (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, plasma viral load and HIV type, but not CD4 cell count, were independently predictive of semen viral load (P = 0.03, 0.05, 0.48, respectively) Conclusions These data suggest that differences in semen viral load between HIV-1 and HIV-2 may be in part responsible for the markedly different transmission rates of these two viruses. In addition, risk of male genital tract shedding strongly correlates with plasma viral loads. Interventions that decrease viral load may help decrease transmission of both HIV-1 and HIV-2. PMID:16549974

  13. Spatiotemporal dynamics of HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, Matthew Carl

    Mathematical models of the dynamics of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have contributed to tremendous advances over the past 20 years. This thesis extends this previous work by exploring the importance of spatial heterogeneity in HIV infection both in vitro and in vivo in patients treated with highly-active antiretroviral therapy. Viral infections propagate locally in space, yet HIV infection has been widely regarded as equilibrated over the entire body of an infected patient. This dissertation constructs and explores a cellular automata model of viral spread at the cellular level. Coupling the automata to a blood compartment represented by a differential equation leads to a whole-body model of HIV infection that explicitly includes spatial effects at both the cellular and tissue levels. These models are tested by comparison with experimental data. A central prediction of the spatial model is that, due to competition between Brownian motion and viral lability, HIV infectivity increases with target cell density. This production is verified in a series of in vitro experiments in cell culture. The predicted independence of inhibitory concentrations of antiretoviral agents is verified for nevirapine, but azidothymidine inhibits HIV replication less efficiently in more dense cultures. These in vitro results suggest that systems allowing cell concentrations closer to tissue densities would better reflect virus replication kinetics, although standard measures of relative drug susceptibility may accurately reflect in vivo conditions. The coupled spatial model of in vivo dynamics is compared with novel mathematical analysis of experiments in HIV-infected patients. These analyses indicate that HIV DNA provides a useful marker of the size of long-lived cellular reservoirs of HIV. Levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood are predictive of the average rate of residual virus production after years of treatment, regardless of whether patients initiate therapy

  14. HIV-HCV Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Amrita

    2006-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus are global health concerns. Due to shared routes of transmission, coinfection is common. Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the mid-1990s and the associated marked reduction in HIV-related mortality, the incidence of liver-related mortality in coinfected patients has risen significantly. This rise has led to increased research into the evaluation and management of the coinfected patient. This article reviews the epidemiology and evaluation of the coinfected patient and outlines the principles necessary for successful management of this challenging patient population.

  15. Just Diagnosed: Next Steps After Testing Positive for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Just Diagnosed: Next Steps After Testing Positive for HIV (Last updated 3/13/2017; last reviewed 3/ ... is the next step after testing positive for HIV? Testing positive for HIV often leaves a person ...

  16. Autoimmune diseases and HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Virot, Emilie; Duclos, Antoine; Adelaide, Leopold; Miailhes, Patrick; Hot, Arnaud; Ferry, Tristan; Seve, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To describe the clinical manifestations, treatments, prognosis, and prevalence of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. All HIV-infected patients managed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Lyon University Hospitals, France, between January 2003 and December 2013 and presenting an AD were retrospectively included. Thirty-six ADs were found among 5186 HIV-infected patients which represents a prevalence of 0.69% including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 15), inflammatory myositis (IM) (n = 4), sarcoidosis (n = 4), Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), myasthenia gravis (n = 2), Graves’ disease (n = 2), and 1 case of each following conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. One patient presented 2 ADs. Thirty patients were known to be HIV-infected when they developed an AD. The AD preceded HIV infection in 2 patients. GBS and HIV infection were diagnosed simultaneously in 3 cases. At AD diagnosis, CD4 T lymphocytes count were higher than 350/mm3 in 63% of patients, between 200 and 350/mm3 in 19% and less than 200/mm3 in 19%. Twenty patients benefited from immunosuppressant treatments, with a good tolerance. ADs during HIV infection are uncommon in this large French cohort. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sarcoidosis, IM, and GBS appear to be more frequent than in the general population. Immunosuppressant treatments seem to be effective and well tolerated. PMID:28121924

  17. Low-level Viremia Early in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Iris; Cummings, Vanessa; Fogel, Jessica M.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Clarke, William; Connor, Matthew B.; Griffith, Sam; Buchbinder, Susan; Shoptaw, Steven; del Rio, Carlos; Magnus, Manya; Mannheimer, Sharon; Wheeler, Darrell P.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2014-01-01

    HIV RNA levels are usually high early in HIV infection. In the HPTN 061 study, men were tested for HIV infection every six months; six (21.4%) of 28 men who acquired HIV infection during the study had low or undetectable HIV RNA at the time of HIV diagnosis. Antiretroviral drugs were not detected at the time of HIV diagnosis. False-negative HIV test results were obtained for two men using multiple assays. Antiretroviral drug resistance mutations were detected in HIV from one man. Additional studies are needed to identify factors associated with low HIV RNA levels during early HIV infection. PMID:25140905

  18. EFFECT OF HIV PREVENTION AND TREATMENT PROGRAM ON HIV AND HCV TRANSMISSION AND HIV MORTALITY AT AN INDONESIAN NARCOTIC PRISON.

    PubMed

    Nelwan, Erni J; Indrati, Agnes K; Isa, Ahmad; Triani, Nurlita; Alam, Nisaa Nur; Herlan, Maria S; Husen, Wahid; Pohan, Herdiman T; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Meheus, Andre; Van Crevel, Reinout; van der Ven, Andre Jam

    2015-09-01

    Validated data regarding HIV-transmission in prisons in developing countries is scarce. We examined sexual and injecting drug use behavior and HIV and HCV transmission in an Indonesian narcotic prison during the implementation of an HIV prevention and treatment program during 2004-2007 when the Banceuy Narcotic Prison in Indonesia conducted an HIV transmission prevention program to provide 1) HIV education, 2) voluntary HIV testing and counseling, 3) condom supply, 4) prevention of rape and sexual violence, 5) antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive prisoners and 6) methadone maintenance treatment. During a first survey that was conducted between 2007 and 2009, new prisoners entered Banceuy Narcotics Prison were voluntary tested for HIV and HCV-infection after written informed consent was obtained. Information regarding sexual and injecting risk behavior and physical status were also recorded at admission to the prison. Participants who tested negative for both HIV and HCV during the first survey were included in a second survey conducted during 2008-2011. During both surveys, data on mortality among HIV-seropositive patients were also recorded. All HIV-seropositive participants receive treatment for HIV. HIV/ AIDS-related deaths decreased: 43% in 2006, 18% in 2007, 9% in 2008 and 0% in 2009. No HIV and HCV seroconversion inside Banceuy Narcotic Prison were found after a median of 23 months imprisonment (maximum follow-up: 38 months). Total of 484.8 person-years observation was done. Participants reported HIV transmission risk-behavior in Banceuy Prison during the second survey was low. After implementation of HIV prevention and treatment program, no new HIV or HCV cases were detected and HIV-related mortality decreased.

  19. Oral Complications of HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leao, Jair C.; Ribeiro, Camila M. B.; Carvalho, Alessandra A. T.; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  20. HIV, EBV, and monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Mailankody, Sham; Landgren, Ola

    2013-10-24

    In this issue of Blood, Ouedraogo et al have investigated the role of HIV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication in the persistence of monoclonal gammopathy.1 It has been known for some time that patients with HIV infection have an increased incidence of monoclonal gammopathy and plasma cell dyscrasias.2,3 The exact mechanism of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with HIV infection is unknown, but in many patients the monoclonal gammopathy and other B-cell abnormalities can be reversed with antiretroviral therapy. However, a proportion of patients will have persistent monoclonal gammopathy.

  1. Methodology for HIV disinfectant testing.

    PubMed

    van Bueren, J

    1995-06-01

    Due to the variation in protocols from studies by different workers for the inactivation of HIV by chemical disinfectants, only limited comparisons of the results can be made. These variations include those which apply to disinfectant testing in general, such as the level of organic load and the form of neutralization of the disinfectant, and those which apply particularly to HIV inactivation, such as the method used to detect infectious virus. Our suspension and carrier tests to assess the efficacy of chemical disinfectants against HIV are described and problems with the interpretation and applicability of the results are discussed.

  2. HIV and drug allergy.

    PubMed

    Pirmohamed, M; Park, B K

    2001-08-01

    Drug-related rashes have been estimated to be 100 times more common in HIV-positive patients than in the general population. The reasons for this are not clear, but are likely to be multifactorial, and include changes in drug metabolism, oxidative stress, cytokine profiles and immune hyperactivation. HIV itself may also serve as a danger signal, leading to the development of an immune response rather than tolerance. Drugs that are implicated in causing hypersensitivity have changed since the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy. This is largely as a result of a decrease in the use of antimicrobials such as co-trimoxazole, and the introduction of new drugs of different classes, including abacavir, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors such as nevirapine, and protease inhibitors such as amprenavir. Laboratory evidence supporting a role of the immune system in the mechanism of co-trimoxazole hypersensitivity is available. However, this is not the case for the newer antiretrovirals; hypersensitivity to these agents is presumed to be immune-mediated based only on the symptomatology. It is essential that research be carried out into the mechanisms of hypersensitivity reactions associated with these important new classes of drugs so that their benefit-risk ratio can be improved, and lessons learned for future drug development.

  3. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Lipodystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... lipodystrophy can be upsetting and affect a person’s self-esteem. Because of lipodystrophy, a person may decide to ... Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents/Adverse Effects of Antiretroviral Agents From the Department ...

  4. The Promise of Antiretrovirals for HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Flash, Charlene; Krakower, Douglas; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    With an estimated 2.6 million new HIV infections diagnosed annually, the world needs new prevention strategies to partner with condom use, harm reduction approaches for injection drug users, and male circumcision. Antiretrovirals can reduce the risk of mother-to-child HIV transmission and limit HIV acquisition after occupational exposure. Macaque models and clinical trials demonstrate efficacy of oral or topical antiretrovirals used prior to HIV exposure to prevent HIV transmission, ie pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Early initiation of effective HIV treatment in serodiscordant couples results in a 96% decrease in HIV transmission. HIV testing to determine serostatus and identify undiagnosed persons is foundational to these approaches. The relative efficacy of different approaches, adherence, cost and long-term safety will affect uptake and impact of these strategies. Ongoing research will help characterize the role for oral and topical formulations and help quantify potential benefits in sub-populations at risk for HIV acquisition. PMID:22351302

  5. HIV Therapy, Metabolic Syndrome, and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Pao, Vivian; Lee, Grace A.; Grunfeld, Carl

    2011-01-01

    People with HIV infection have metabolic abnormalities that resemble metabolic syndrome (hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and insulin resistance), which is known to predict increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, there is not one underlying cause for these abnormalities and they are not linked to each other. Rather, individual abnormalities can be affected by the host response to HIV itself, specific HIV drugs, classes of HIV drugs, HIV-associated lipoatrophy, or restoration to health. Furthermore, one component of metabolic syndrome, increased waist circumference, occurs less frequently in HIV infection. Thus, HIV infection supports the concept that metabolic syndrome does not represent a syndrome based on a common underlying pathophysiology. As might be predicted from these findings, the prevalence of CVD is higher in people with HIV infection. It remains to be determined whether CVD rates in HIV infection are higher than might be predicted from traditional risk factors, including smoking. PMID:18366987

  6. Morphine Enhances HIV Infection of Neonatal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Mooney, Kathy; Song, Li; Wang, Xu; Guo, Chang-Jiang; Savani, Rashmin C.; Metzger, David S.; Douglas, Steven D.; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal transmission of HIV accounts for almost all new HIV infections in children. There is an increased risk of perinatal transmission of HIV with maternal illicit substance abuse. Little is known about neonatal immune system alteration and subsequent susceptibility to HIV infection after morphine exposure. We investigated the effects of morphine on HIV infection of neonatal monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Morphine significantly enhanced HIV infection of neonatal MDM. Morphine-induced HIV replication in neonatal MDM was completely suppressed by naltrexone, the opioid receptor antagonist. Morphine significantly up-regulated CCR5 receptor expression and inhibited the endogenous production of macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in neonatal MDM. Thus, morphine, most likely through alteration of β-chemokines and CCR5 receptor expression, enhances the susceptibility of neonatal MDM to HIV infection, and may have a cofactor role in perinatal HIV transmission and infection. PMID:12736382

  7. HIV Testing Characteristics Among Hispanic Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mindy; Malcolm, Lydia; Diaz-Albertini, Kristine; Klinoff, Vera A

    2016-02-01

    Hispanic adolescents are disproportionally impacted by HIV/AIDS. Among Hispanic people living with HIV, delayed testing and late entry into HIV care have been documented. The current study examined Hispanic adolescents' HIV testing characteristics and factors related to testing. Adolescents aged 13-16 (N = 223) completed a survey on HIV testing motivation, perceptions, and experience, sexual behavior, and substance use. Results indicate few adolescents (9%) had taken an HIV test. Among those who have not been tested, 32.5% expressed interest in testing. HIV testing was favorably perceived with 82.4% reported testing should be done with all youth or those are sexually active. Adolescents who had engaged in high risk behaviors (history of sexual intercourse, substance use) were more likely to have been tested or to express interest in testing. Given that HIV testing is positively perceived by Hispanic adolescents, prevention efforts should focus on minimizing barriers and enhancing accessibility to HIV screening.

  8. Developing strategies for HIV-1 eradication

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Christine M.; Blankson, Joel N.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses HIV-1 replication, transforming the outlook for infected patients. However, reservoirs of replication-competent forms of the virus persist during HAART, and when treatment is stopped, high rates of HIV-1 replication return. Recent insights into HIV-1 latency, as well as a report that HIV-1 infection was eradicated in one individual, have renewed interest in finding a cure for HIV-1 infection. Strategies for HIV-1 eradication include gene therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, stimulating host immunity to control HIV-1 replication, and targeting latent HIV-1 in resting memory CD4+ T cells. Future efforts should aim to provide better understanding of how to reconstitute the CD4+ T cell compartment with genetically engineered cells, exert immune control over HIV-1 replication, and identify and eliminate all viral reservoirs. PMID:22867874

  9. Perspectives on menopause and women with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Andany, Nisha; Kennedy, V Logan; Aden, Muna; Loutfy, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Since the implementation of effective combination antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection has been transformed from a life-threatening condition into a chronic disease. As people with HIV are living longer, aging and its associated manifestations have become key priorities as part of HIV care. For women with HIV, menopause is an important part of aging to consider. Women currently represent more than one half of HIV-positive individuals worldwide. Given the vast proportion of women living with HIV who are, and will be, transitioning through age-related life events, the interaction between HIV infection and menopause must be addressed by clinicians and researchers. Menopause is a major clinical event that is universally experienced by women, but affects each individual woman uniquely. This transitional time in women’s lives has various clinical implications including physical and psychological symptoms, and accelerated development and progression of other age-related comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular disease, neurocognitive dysfunction, and bone mineral disease; all of which are potentially heightened by HIV or its treatment. Furthermore, within the context of HIV, there are the additional considerations of HIV acquisition and transmission risk, progression of infection, changes in antiretroviral pharmacokinetics, response, and toxicities. These menopausal manifestations and complications must be managed concurrently with HIV, while keeping in mind the potential influence of menopause on the prognosis of HIV infection itself. This results in additional complexity for clinicians caring for women living with HIV, and highlights the shifting paradigm in HIV care that must accompany this aging and evolving population. PMID:26834498

  10. The Times, They are a-Changing: HOPE for HIV-to-HIV Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Ghady; Singh, Nina

    2017-09-01

    HIV-infected persons who achieve undetectable viral loads on antiretroviral therapy currently have near-normal lifespans. Liver disease is a major cause of non-AIDS-related deaths, and as a result of longer survival, the prevalence of end-stage renal disease in HIV is increasing. HIV-infected persons undergoing organ transplantation generally achieve comparable patient and graft survival rates compared to their HIV-uninfected counterparts, despite a nearly threefold increased risk of acute rejection. However, the ongoing shortage of suitable organs can limit transplantation as an option, and patients with HIV have higher waitlist mortality than others. One way to solve this problem would be to expand the donor pool to include HIV-infected individuals. The results of a South Africa study involving 27 HIV-to-HIV kidney transplants showed promise, with 3- and 5-year patient and graft survival rates similar to those of their HIV-uninfected counterparts. Similarly, individual cases of HIV-to-HIV liver transplantation from the United Kingdom and Switzerland have also shown good results. In the United States, HIV-to-HIV kidney and liver transplants are currently permitted only under a research protocol. Nevertheless, areas of ambiguity exist, including streamlining organ allocation practices, optimizing HIV-infected donor and recipient selection, managing donor-derived transmission of a resistant HIV strain, determining optimal immunosuppressive and antiretroviral regimens, and elucidating the incidence of rejection in HIV-to-HIV solid organ transplant recipients.

  11. A conditionally replicating HIV-1 vector interferes with wild-type HIV-1 replication and spread.

    PubMed Central

    Dropulić, B; Hĕrmánková, M; Pitha, P M

    1996-01-01

    Defective-interfering viruses are known to modulate virus pathogenicity. We describe conditionally replicating HIV-1 (crHIV) vectors that interfere with wild-type HIV-1 (wt-HIV) replication and spread. crHIV vectors are defective-interfering HIV genomes that do not encode viral proteins and replicate only in the presence of wt-HIV helper virus. In cells that contain both wt-HIV and crHIV genomes, the latter are shown to have a selective advantage for packaging into progeny virions because they contain ribozymes that cleave wt-HIV RNA but not crHIV RNA. A crHIV vector containing a triple anti-U5 ribozyme significantly interferes with wt-HIV replication and spread. crHIV vectors are also shown to undergo the full viral replicative cycle after complementation with wt-HIV helper-virus. The application of defective interfering crHIV vectors may result in competition with wt-HIVs and decrease pathogenic viral loads in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8855316

  12. HIV shedding in the oral cavity: an assessment of HIV type, immunovirologic, demographic and oral factors

    PubMed Central

    Pavlinac, Patricia B; Hawes, Stephen E; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S; Gaye, Awa; N'Diaye, Charlotte F; Critchlow, Cathy W; Sow, Papa Salif; Feng, Qinghua; Kiviat, Nancy B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To quantify the prevalence and burden of HIV type 2 (HIV-2) and HIV-1 RNA in the oral cavity of antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV-infected Senegalese individuals and to identify correlates of oral HIV viral loads. Design A cross-sectional study of 163 HIV-1 and 27 HIV-2-infected antiretroviral therapy-naive Senegalese adults. Methods Participants received clinical and oral exams and provided blood and oral wash samples for viral load and plasma CD4 count ascertainment. Logistic and interval regression models were used to identify univariate and multivariable associations between presence and level of oral HIV RNA and various immunovirologic, local and demographic factors. Results Presence of detectable oral HIV RNA was less common in HIV-2-infected compared with HIV-1-infected study participants (33% vs 67%, OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.59). HIV type was no longer associated with oral shedding of HIV when plasma viral load was considered. Detection of oral HIV RNA was associated with increased plasma viral load in both HIV-1-infected and HIV-2-infected individuals (HIV-1, OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.61; HIV-2, OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.39). Oral HIV-1 detection was also associated with periodontal disease (OR 3.02, 95% CI 1.16 to 7.87). Conclusions Oral shedding of HIV-2 RNA is less common than HIV-1 RNA, a likely consequence of lower overall viral burden. Both systemic and local factors may contribute to shedding of HIV in the oral cavity. PMID:22250179

  13. Challenges and Clinical Decision-Making in HIV-to-HIV Transplantation: Insights From the HIV Literature.

    PubMed

    Boyarsky, B J; Durand, C M; Palella, F J; Segev, D L

    2015-08-01

    Life expectancy among HIV-infected (HIV+) individuals has improved dramatically with effective antiretroviral therapy. Consequently, chronic diseases such as end-stage liver and kidney disease are growing causes of morbidity and mortality. HIV+ individuals can have excellent outcomes after solid organ transplantation, and the need for transplantation in this population is increasing. However, there is a significant organ shortage, and HIV+ individuals experience higher mortality rates on transplant waitlists. In South Africa, the use of organs from HIV+ deceased donors (HIVDD) has been successful, but until recently federal law prohibited this practice in the United States. With the recognition that organs from HIVDD could fill a critical need, the HIV Organ Policy Equity (HOPE) Act was passed in November 2013, reversing the federal ban on the use of HIV+ donors for HIV+ recipients. In translating this policy into practice, the biologic risks of using HIV+ donors need to be carefully considered. In this mini-review, we explore relevant aspects of HIV virology, antiretroviral treatment, drug resistance, opportunistic infections and HIV-related organ dysfunction that are critical to a transplant team considering HIV-to-HIV transplantation.

  14. Is Expanded HIV Testing Associated with Earlier HIV Diagnosis? Results from an HIV Clinic in Guatemala City.

    PubMed

    Liggett, Alisha; Medina, Narda; Samayoa, Blanca; Mercado, Danicela; Castillo, Mirna; Argueta, Erwin; Anderson, Miguel; Anderson, Matthew; Arathoon, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    Most patients in Guatemala are diagnosed with advanced HIV disease. Patients that present late in the disease process may miss the morbidity and mortality benefits associated with early treatment and may unknowingly spread HIV to others. We examined trends in HIV detection and levels of immunosuppression at diagnosis from 2005 -2012 to determine if expanded HIV testing was associated with earlier detection of HIV. This study was conducted at the Clínica Familiar Luis Ángel García (CFLAG), a major HIV center associated with one of Guatemala's two national hospitals. HIV testing expanded rapidly after 2007 due to grants from the Global Fund which allowed for routine prenatal testing. This study examined existing hospital and clinic databases from to evaluate results from HIV tests performed, and baseline CD4 cells/mm(3) on all patients newly diagnosed with HIV infection from 2005 to 2012. We found a decline in the number of HIV positive tests over the study period despite an increase in the total number of tests performed. Sixty-two percent of HIV infected individuals had AIDS at diagnosis. We observed a decrease in median CD4 cells/mm(3) among the prenatal testees and no change in non-prenatal testees. Expanded HIV counseling and testing services in our clinic did not result in earlier HIV diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Pharmacotherapy of pediatric and adolescent HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Schuval, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection over the past two decades. Improved therapy has prolonged survival and improved clinical outcome for HIV-infected children and adults. Sixteen antiretroviral (ART) medications have been approved for use in pediatric HIV infection. The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has issued “Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection”, which provide detailed information on currently recommended antiretroviral therapies (ART). However, consultation with an HIV specialist is recommended as the current therapy of pediatric HIV therapy is complex and rapidly evolving. PMID:19707256

  16. Neurological Complications in Controlled HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Kate M; Brew, Bruce J

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, there have been great advances in therapies for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that have allowed suppression of the virus and its effects on the body. Despite this progress, neurological complications persist in HIV-infected individuals. In this review we consider the possible ways that HIV might cause neurotoxicity and neuroinflammation. We discuss the spectrum of neurological disorders caused by HIV and its treatment, with a particular focus on both HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and peripheral neuropathies. Since there has been a shift to HIV being a chronic illness, we also review the increasing prevalence of cerebrovascular disease and neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Neuropsychiatric complications of aging with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Crystal C.

    2015-01-01

    Persons over age 50 are not only aging with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection but also represent a high proportion of new HIV infections. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, including depression, cognitive impairment, and substance abuse, are very common in individuals infected with HIV. However, there is little understanding of the relationship between these HIV-related comorbid conditions in newly infected elderly patients compared to uninfected elderly and those who have survived after 20 years of HIV/AIDS. We summarize the current theories and research that link aging and HIV with psychiatric illnesses and identify emerging areas for improved research, treatment, and patient care. PMID:22644745

  18. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  19. HIV-1 subtypes in Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Stanojevic, Maja; Papa, Anna; Papadimitriou, Evagelia; Zerjav, Sonja; Jevtovic, Djordje; Salemovic, Dubravka; Jovanovic, Tanja; Antoniadis, Antonis

    2002-05-01

    To gain insight concerning the genetic diversity of HIV-1 viruses associated with the HIV-1 epidemic in Yugoslavia, 45 specimens from HIV-1-infected individuals were classified into subtypes by sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of the polymerase (pol) region of the viral genome. Forty-one of 45 specimens (91.2%) were identified as pol subtype B, 2 of 45 as subtype C (4.4%), 1 of 45 as CRF01_AE (2.2%), and 1 as CRF02_AG recombinant (2.2%). Nucleotide divergence among subtype B sequences was 4.8%. Results of this study show that among HIV-1-infected patients in Yugoslavia subtype B predominates (91.5%), whereas non-B subtypes are present at a low percentage, mostly related to travel abroad.

  20. HIV and General Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Capili, Bernadette; Anastasi, Joyce K.; Ogedegbe, Olugbenga

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing in HIV-infected people. Risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance have become common. CVD in HIV may also be related to non-traditional risk factors including accumulation of visceral fat, inflammation secondary to HIV, and effects of some antiretroviral drugs. This cross-sectional study described the CVD risk factors of 123 adults living with HIV and calculated the 10-year estimate for general cardiovascular risk score. Results showed that approximately 25% of the participants were considered to be at high risk for developing CVD in the next 10 years. Increased waist circumference and longer duration of smoking habit were associated with elevated general cardiovascular risk scores. Similar to the general population, most of the identified risks could be modified through lifestyle management. PMID:21277230

  1. Bone disease and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Amorosa, Valerianna; Tebas, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of bone demineralization among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients in the current therapeutic era has been described in multiple studies, sounding the alarm that we may expect an epidemic of fragility fractures in the future. However, despite noting high overall prevalences of osteopenia and osteoporosis, recent longitudinal studies that we review here have generally not observed accelerated bone loss during antiretroviral therapy beyond the initial period after treatment initiation. We discuss the continued progress toward understanding the mechanisms of HIV-associated bone loss, particularly the effects of HIV infection, antiretroviral therapy, and host immune factors on bone turnover. We summarize results of clinical trials published in the past year that studied the safety and efficacy of treatment of bone loss in HIV-infected patients and provide provisional opinions about who should be considered for bone disease screening and treatment.

  2. NK Cells in HIV Disease.

    PubMed

    Scully, Eileen; Alter, Galit

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in viral immunity. In the setting of HIV infection, epidemiologic and functional evidence support a role for NK cells in both protection from new infection and in viral control. Specifically, NK cells directly mediate immune pressure leading to virus evolution, and NK cell receptor genotypic profiles, clonal repertoires, and functional capacity have all been implicated in virus containment. In addition, indirect NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity has been linked to vaccine-induced protective immunity against HIV infection. With recent advances in our understanding of NK cell deficiency, development, memory-like responses, and editing of the adaptive immune system, the opportunities to direct and exploit NK cell antiviral immunity to target HIV have exponentially grown. In this review, we seek to highlight the intersections between discoveries in basic NK cell biology and the challenges of HIV chronic infection, vaccine development, and cure/eradication strategies.

  3. HIV: evolution of a pandemic.

    PubMed Central

    Hankins, C

    1995-01-01

    Although the prevalence of AIDS is still relatively low in many countries in Asia and the Pacific Rim, the rate of HIV transmission in this region continues to rise inexorably and will surpass that of sub-Saharan Africa by 1997. The challenge of mobilizing governments and communities to counter this largely invisible threat was the theme of the Third International Conference on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific, held in Chiang Mai, Thailand, in September 1995. Thailand has led the way with bold and far-reaching HIV prevention programs. Nevertheless, the long-term consequences of existing HIV infection in Thailand and elsewhere in Asia will be severe. Moreover, these repercussions will be felt globally as productivity is undermined, health care costs soar and purchasing power weakens. Supporting programs for HIV prevention and care abroad is thus an urgent matter of economic and political self-interest as well as a humanitarian imperative. PMID:7489554

  4. Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic

    MedlinePlus

    ... death among women of reproductive age. 9 Gender inequalities, differential access to service, and sexual violence increase ... funding to address HIV in low- and middle-income countries has come from major donor governments who ...

  5. Fragment screening and HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Joseph D; Patel, Disha; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Fragment screening has proven to be a powerful alternative to traditional methods for drug discovery. Biophysical methods, such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance, are used to screen a diverse library of small molecule compounds. Although compounds identified via this approach have relatively weak affinity, they provide a good platform for lead development and are highly efficient binders with respect to their size. Fragment screening has been utilized for a wide range of targets, including HIV-1 proteins. Here, we review the fragment screening studies targeting HIV-1 proteins using X-ray crystallography or surface plasmon resonance. These studies have successfully detected binding of novel fragments to either previously established or new sites on HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase. In addition, fragment screening against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been used as a tool to better understand the complex nature of ligand binding to a flexible target.

  6. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  7. When One Partner Is HIV+

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partner Is HIV+ Substance Abuse/Use Pregnancy & Childbirth Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) Blood Transfusions & ... can be sexually transmitted via blood, semen (cum), pre-seminal fluid (pre-cum), rectal fluid, and vaginal ...

  8. HIV and Nonischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Manga, Pravin; McCutcheon, Keir; Tsabedze, Nqoba; Vachiat, Ahmed; Zachariah, Don

    2017-01-03

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated heart disease encompasses a broad spectrum of diseases. HIV infection may involve the pericardium, myocardium, coronary arteries, pulmonary vasculature, and valves, as well as the systemic vasculature. Access to combination antiretroviral therapy, as well as health resources, has had a significant influence on the prevalence and severity of the effects on each cardiac structure. Investigations over the recent past have improved our understanding of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of HIV-associated cardiovascular disease. This review will focus on our current understanding of pathogenesis and risk factors associated with HIV infection and heart disease, and it will discuss relevant advances in diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  9. [HIV budding and Tsg101].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Jiro

    2005-12-01

    HIV, as well as many enveloped viruses, exits the cells by budding directly from the plasma membrane. HIV budding is dependent on a PTAP motif, which is located within the p6 domain of Gag. Recent studies have shown that the cellular protein Tsg101 binds to the PTAP L-domain motif of HIV p6 and facilitates the final stages of virus release. Tsg101 function in the cellular vacuolar protein sorting pathway, where they play central roles in selecting cargo for incorporation into vesicles that bud into the maturing endosome to create multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Vesicle budding into the MVB and viral budding at the plasma membrane are topologically equivalent, and the same machinery could catalyze both processes. It will be important to understand the mechanism of virus budding in detail, since virus budding may be a potential target for interference with HIV propagation.

  10. HIV vaccines: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Lema, D; Garcia, A; De Sanctis, J B

    2014-07-01

    The scope of the article is to review the different approaches that have been used for HIV vaccines. The review is based on articles retrieved by PubMed and clinical trials from 1990 up to date. The article discusses virus complexity, protective and non-protective immune responses against the virus, and the most important approaches for HIV vaccine development. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. HIV and AIDS in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Tasnim; Khan, Sharful Islam; Haseen, Fariha; Huq, Nafisa Lira; Henning, Lars; Pervez, Md. Moshtaq; Chowdhury, Mahbub Elahi; Sarafian, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    Bangladesh initiated an early response to the HIV epidemic starting in the mid-1980s. Since then, the res-ponse has been enhanced considerably, and many HIV-prevention interventions among the most at-risk populations and the general youth are being undertaken. Alongside prevention activities, gathering of data has been a key activity fostered by both the Government and individual development partners. This paper reviews available sources of data, including routine surveillance (HIV and behavioural among most at-risk populations), general population surveys, and various research studies with the aim to understand the dynamics of the HIV epidemic in Bangladesh. Available data show that the HIV epidemic is still at relatively low levels and is concentrated mainly among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Dhaka city. In addition, when the passively-reported cases were analyzed, another population group that appears to be especially vulnerable is migrant workers who leave their families and travel abroad for work. However, all sources of data confirm that risk behaviours that make individuals vulnerable to HIV are high—this is apparent within most at-risk populations and the general population (adult males and youth males and females). Based on the current activities and the sources of data, modelling exercises of the future of the HIV epidemic in Dhaka suggest that, if interventions are not enhanced further, Bangladesh is likely to start with an IDU-driven epidemic, similar to other neighbouring countries, which will then move to other population groups, including sex workers, males who have sex with males, clients of sex workers, and ultimately their families. This review reiterates the often repeated message that if Bangladesh wants to be an example of how to avert an HIV epidemic, it needs to act now using evidence-based programming. PMID:18831227

  12. Biologic Characterization of HIV-2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-27

    similarities in cell tropism, major antigenic cross-reactivity and genetic properties. Despite the similarities of HIV-2 to HIV-1 from a virological...pol antigens were recognized. Samples with antibodies to envelope antigens only, were classified as positive if two or more env antigens were...recognized (17). All nitrocellulose sheets impregnated with viral antigens were pre-tested with control sera to assure uniformity in serodiagnosis

  13. Cold urticaria and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, R Y; Schwartz, R A

    1993-10-01

    Three patients, all seropositive for HIV antibody, complained of swelling and pruritus on the head and limbs when exposed to the cold. All three had received zidovudine for significant CD4 cell depletion, but had no AIDS-defining illnesses. An ice-cube test was positive on each individual. There was no evidence of cold agglutinins, cryoglobulins, syphilis, or other concurrent diseases in any of the patients. This association may represent yet another allergic manifestation in HIV infection.

  14. HIV Antigens for Disease Intervention.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    and the transmembrane protein gp41 . HIV-1 vaccine development efforts conducted in this contract include developing strategies of modifying the...antigenicity of HIV envelope protein. The approaches adopted involve analysis of the possible function for N-linked glycosylation sites of gp 120 and gp41 ... gp41 . The role of N-linked sugars. a leucine zipper structure motif and the long cytoplasmic domain of gp4l in virus assembly, virus infectivity and

  15. Heterotopic pregnancy in HIV women

    PubMed Central

    Savasi, Valeria; Antonazzo, Patrizio; Personeni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Heterotopic pregnancy occurs when intrauterine and ectopic pregnancy are concomitant; overall rate rises from 1/30.000 to 1.5/1000 in assisted reproductive technology pregnancies. HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) patients are at increased risk of heterotopic pregnancies due to the greater frequency of assisted reproductive technology and pelvic inflammatory disease. We report the first case of heterotopic pregnancy in HIV woman. PMID:27928504

  16. Euphorbia Kansui Reactivates Latent HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Daniele C.; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2016-01-01

    While highly active anti-retroviral therapy has greatly improved the lives of HIV infected individuals, these treatments are unable to eradicate the virus. Current approaches to reactivate the virus have been limited by toxicity, lack of an orally available therapy, and limited responses in primary CD4+ T cells and in clinical trials. The PKC agonist ingenol, purified from Euphorbia plants, is a potent T cell activator and reactivates latent HIV. Euphorbia kansui itself has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat ascites, fluid retention, and cancer. We demonstrate that an extract of this plant, Euphorbia kansui, is capable of recapitulating T cell activation induced by the purified ingenol. Indeed, Euphorbia kansui induced expression of the early T cell activation marker CD69 and P-TEFb in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, Euphorbia kansui reactivated latent HIV in a CD4+ T cell model of latency and in HIV+ HAART suppressed PBMC. When combined with the other latency reversing agents, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui required to reactive HIV was reduced 10-fold and resulted in synergistic reactivation of latent HIV. We conclude that Euphorbia Euphorbia kansui reactivates latent HIV and activates CD4+ T cells. When used in combination with a latency reversing agent, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui is reduced; which suggests its application as a combination strategy to reactivate latent HIV while limiting the toxicity due to global T cell activation. As a natural product, which has been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years, Euphorbia kansui is attractive as a potential treatment strategy, particularly in resource poor countries with limited treatment options. Further clinical testing will be required to determine its safety with current anti-retroviral therapies. PMID:27977742

  17. Novel targets for HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Greene, Warner C; Debyser, Zeger; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Freed, Eric O; Stephens, Edward; Yonemoto, Wes; Buckheit, Robert W; Esté, José A; Cihlar, Tomas

    2008-12-01

    There are currently 25 drugs belonging to 6 different inhibitor classes approved for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, new anti-HIV agents are still needed to confront the emergence of drug resistance and various adverse effects associated with long-term use of antiretroviral therapy. The 21st International Conference on Antiviral Research, held in April 2008 in Montreal, Canada, therefore featured a special session focused on novel targets for HIV therapy. The session included presentations by world-renowned experts in HIV virology and covered a diverse array of potential targets for the development of new classes of HIV therapies. This review contains concise summaries of discussed topics that included Vif-APOBEC3G, LEDGF/p75, TRIM 5alpha, virus assembly and maturation, and Vpu. The described viral and host factors represent some of the most noted examples of recent scientific breakthroughs that are opening unexplored avenues to novel anti-HIV target discovery and validation, and should feed the antiretroviral drug development pipeline in the near future.

  18. Controversies in HIV cure research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy significantly reduces HIV viral burden and prolongs life, but does not cure HIV infection. The major scientific barrier to a cure is thought to be the persistence of the virus in cellular and/or anatomical reservoirs. Discussion Most efforts to date, including pharmaco, immuno or gene therapy, have failed to cure patients, with the notable exception of a stem cell transplant recipient commonly known as the Berlin patient. This case has revived interest in the potential to cure HIV infection and has highlighted the need to resolve critical questions in the basic, pre-clinical and clinical research spheres as they pertain specifically to efforts to eradicate HIV from the body of an infected person (a sterilizing cure) or at least render the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy obsolete (functional cure). This paper describes ongoing debates in each of these research spheres as they were presented and discussed at a satellite session that took place at the 6th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in Rome in July 2011. Summary The resolution of these debates may have important implications for the search for a cure, the most efficient ways to identify and test promising interventions, and ultimately the availability of such a cure to diverse groups of HIV patients around the world. PMID:22424402

  19. Controversies in HIV cure research.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Rowena; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise

    2012-03-16

    Antiretroviral therapy significantly reduces HIV viral burden and prolongs life, but does not cure HIV infection. The major scientific barrier to a cure is thought to be the persistence of the virus in cellular and/or anatomical reservoirs. Most efforts to date, including pharmaco, immuno or gene therapy, have failed to cure patients, with the notable exception of a stem cell transplant recipient commonly known as the Berlin patient. This case has revived interest in the potential to cure HIV infection and has highlighted the need to resolve critical questions in the basic, pre-clinical and clinical research spheres as they pertain specifically to efforts to eradicate HIV from the body of an infected person (a sterilizing cure) or at least render the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy obsolete (functional cure). This paper describes ongoing debates in each of these research spheres as they were presented and discussed at a satellite session that took place at the 6th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in Rome in July 2011. The resolution of these debates may have important implications for the search for a cure, the most efficient ways to identify and test promising interventions, and ultimately the availability of such a cure to diverse groups of HIV patients around the world.

  20. The pharmacoeconomics of HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Lynn, L A; Schulman, K A; Eisenberg, J M

    1992-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a major public health problem in all parts of the world. For the United States, federal spending on HIV disease for 1982 to 1989 was $US5.5 billion. Projections indicate that AIDS spending may reach 1.6% of total health expenditures in 1992, while the indirect costs of HIV infection may be 5 times as great as the direct costs. In the developing world, the cost per person with HIV infection may be 0.8- to 9-fold greater than the per capita gross national product (GNP). Pharmacoeconomic analysis has been used to assess 2 important therapeutic options in caring for HIV patients: zidovudine therapy for asymptomatic illness, and prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). The cost-effectiveness ratio for zidovudine therapy, $US6553 to $US70 526 per year of life saved, compares favourably with ratios for other medical therapies. Prophylaxis against Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia has been shown to be most efficient using oral dapsone or cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Pharmacological therapy for HIV is costly, however, and may limit the access to new therapies for patients in the developing world. Concurrent economic assessment of therapies during phase III trials may serve as an essential part of the research that will advance international efforts to combat this disease.

  1. HIV-associated Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Laurence; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Davis, J Lucian; den Boon, Saskia; Kovacs, Joseph; Meshnick, Steven; Miller, Robert F; Walzer, Peter D; Worodria, William; Masur, Henry

    2011-06-01

    During the past 30 years, major advances have been made in our understanding of HIV/AIDS and Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), but significant gaps remain. Pneumocystis is classified as a fungus and is host-species specific, but an understanding of its reservoir, mode of transmission, and pathogenesis is incomplete. PCP remains a frequent AIDS-defining diagnosis and is a frequent opportunistic pneumonia in the United States and in Europe, but comparable epidemiologic data from other areas of the world that are burdened with HIV/AIDS are limited. Pneumocystis cannot be cultured, and bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is the gold standard procedure to diagnose PCP, but noninvasive diagnostic tests and biomarkers show promise that must be validated. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is the recommended first-line treatment and prophylaxis regimen, but putative trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole drug resistance is an emerging concern. The International HIV-associated Opportunistic Pneumonias (IHOP) study was established to address these knowledge gaps. This review describes recent advances in the pathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of HIV-associated PCP and ongoing areas of clinical and translational research that are part of the IHOP study and the Longitudinal Studies of HIV-associated Lung Infections and Complications (Lung HIV).

  2. HIV/AIDS and blindness.

    PubMed Central

    Kestelyn, P. G.; Cunningham, E. T.

    2001-01-01

    Nearly 34 million people are currently living with HIV/AIDS: ocular complications are common, affecting 50% to 75% of all such patients at some point during the course of their illness. Cytomegalovirus retinitis is by far the most frequent cause of vision loss in patients with AIDS. Although the prevalence of cytomegalovirus retinitis is decreasing in industrialized countries because of the widespread availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy, between 10% and 20% of HIV-infected patients worldwide can be expected to lose vision in one or both eyes as a result of ocular cytomegalovirus infection. Less frequent but important causes of bilateral vision loss in patients with HIV/AIDS include varicella zoster virus and herpes simplex virus retinitis, HIV-related ischaemic microvasculopathy, ocular syphilis, ocular tuberculosis, cryptococcal meningitis, and ocular toxic or allergic drug reactions. At present, most patients with HIV/AIDS in developing countries who lose their vision have a very limited life expectancy. As antiretroviral therapy makes its way to these countries, however, both life expectancy and the prevalence of blindness related to HIV/AIDS can be expected to increase dramatically. PMID:11285664

  3. TB & HIV: the deadly intersection.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, D S

    1999-05-01

    About 2 billion people worldwide are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). TB is the leading cause of premature death in less industrialized countries, and 8 million more people become infected every year. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared TB a global emergency in 1993 and launched a series of prevention and vaccination programs. In spite of effective drug therapy and a vaccine, tuberculosis remains a major public health problem. The TB and HIV epidemics are closely intertwined, and the risk of TB disease progression is 100 times greater in HIV-positive individuals. TB is the leading cause of death among HIV-infected people worldwide, and virologic evidence suggests that the host immune response to TB may enhance HIV replication and accelerate the progression of HIV infection. The interaction between the two diseases was the subject of a conference called TB & HIV: Applying Advances to the Clinic, Public Health, and the World. Charts and tables show reported TB cases in the U.S., trends in TB cases among foreign-born persons in the U.S., and the country of origin for foreign-born persons with TB in the U.S. Several poster sessions from the conference are summarized. Strategies for dealing with the TB epidemic are outlined.

  4. Pharmacotherapy of Pediatric HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmanina, Natella; Phelps, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS With the ongoing epidemic of human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infections in the pediatric age group, the delivery of safe and effective antiretroviral therapy to children and adolescents is crucial to save the lives of millions of children worldwide. Antiretroviral drugs have been demonstrated to significantly decrease HIV-associated morbidity and mortality, assure normal growth and development, and improve survival and quality of life in children and adolescents. The immunologic response to HIV infection is closely related to the child’s development and creates age specific parameters for the evaluation of therapeutic response to antiretroviral therapy in pediatric HIV disease. In addition to the changes in immunological response to HIV infection, the development and maturation of organ systems involved in drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination determines significant changes in the pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs throughout the childhood. Multiple factors including age-specific adherence barriers, changes in social and economical surroundings, and psychological and sexual maturation affect the choices and outcomes of the treatment of pediatric HIV disease. In this chapter we will review the evolution of antiretroviral treatment from early infancy through adolescence. PMID:23036246

  5. STEREOTYPES ABOUT PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV: IMPLICATIONS FOR PERCEPTIONS OF HIV RISK AND TESTING FREQUENCY AMONG AT-RISK POPULATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Smith, Laramie R.; Chaudoir, Stephenie R.; Lee, I-Ching; Copenhaver, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    Although research continues to demonstrate that HIV stigma is associated with decreased HIV testing, the psychological processes implicated in this association remain unclear. The authors address this gap by differentiating between the HIV stigma mechanisms of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination. They hypothesize that HIV stereotypes specifically, more so than prejudice or discrimination, are associated with HIV testing among at-risk populations. Ninety-three HIV-negative people receiving methadone maintenance therapy at a clinic in the northeastern United States participated by completing a survey. Results demonstrated that HIV stereotypes are associated with HIV testing via the mediator of perceived HIV risk. As hypothesized, prejudice, discrimination, and objective HIV risk were not associated with perceived HIV risk. Differentiating between HIV stigma mechanisms in future work can provide critical insight into how to intervene in HIV stigma to increase HIV testing and improve HIV prevention among at-risk populations. PMID:23206205

  6. Correlates and Experiences of HIV Stigma in Prisoners Living with HIV in Indonesia: A Mixed Method Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Culbert, Gabriel J.; Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Wulanyani, Ni Made Swasti; Wegman, Martin P.; Waluyo, Agung; Altice, Frederick L.

    2015-01-01

    In Indonesia, the syndemic nature of HIV, drug use, and incarceration may influence experiences of stigma for HIV-infected prisoners. This mixed method study explores HIV stigma in prisoners living with HIV in Indonesia. Randomly selected male HIV-infected prisoners (n = 102) from two large prisons in Jakarta completed in-depth interviews and a structured HIV stigma survey. Quantitative results found 4 groups of HIV-infected prisoners with significantly higher HIV stigma levels, including those: (a) with drug-related offenses, (b) seeking help to decrease drug use, (c) diagnosed with HIV before the current incarceration, and (d) who had not disclosed their HIV status to family members or friends. Qualitative results highlighted the prominent role of HIV stigma in decisions to disclose HIV status to family members, partners, and other prisoners. Interventions should address HIV stigma in HIV-infected prisoners in Indonesia to achieve HIV treatment as prevention goals. PMID:26304049

  7. Stereotypes about people living with HIV: implications for perceptions of HIV risk and testing frequency among at-risk populations.

    PubMed

    Earnshaw, Valerie A; Smith, Laramie R; Chaudoir, Stephenie R; Lee, I-Ching; Copenhaver, Michael M

    2012-12-01

    Although research continues to demonstrate that HIV stigma is associated with decreased HIV testing, the psychological processes implicated in this association remain unclear. The authors address this gap by differentiating between the HIV stigma mechanisms of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination. They hypothesize that HIV stereotypes specifically, more so than prejudice or discrimination, are associated with HIV testing among at-risk populations. Ninety-three HIV-negative people receiving methadone maintenance therapy at a clinic in the northeastern United States participated by completing a survey. Results demonstrated that HIV stereotypes are associated with HIV testing via the mediator of perceived HIV risk. As hypothesized, prejudice, discrimination, and objective HIV risk were not associated with perceived HIV risk. Differentiating between HIV stigma mechanisms in future work can provide critical insight into how to intervene in HIV stigma to increase HIV testing and improve HIV prevention among at-risk populations.

  8. Lack of protection from HIV infection by the mutant HIV coreceptor CCR5 in intravenously HIV infected hemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Malo, A; Rommel, F; Bogner, J; Gruber, R; Schramm, W; Goebel, F D; Riethmüller, G; Wank, R

    1998-02-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is an important coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV strains. Homozygous carriers of the mutated CCR5 receptor with a 32 bp deletion (delta 32-CCR5) are highly protected against HIV infection. A protective effect has also been described for heterozygous individuals carrying both mutated and wildtype CCR5 receptors. We compared the frequency of the mutated delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in HIV positive patients infected by sexual contact (N = 160) with intravenously HIV infected hemophilic patients (N = 84) and HIV negative individuals (N = 421). We found no protective effect of delta 32-CCR5 HIV coreceptor in hemophilic patients (p = 0.0134). If proteins of plasma concentrates would be responsible for facilitating the entry of HIV macrophages by upregulation of the CCR5 wildtype receptor it would be of therapeutical interest to identify the responsible plasma proteins.

  9. HIV-1 outcompetes HIV-2 in dually infected Senegalese individuals with low CD4+ cell counts

    PubMed Central

    Raugi, Dana N.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.; Sow, Papa S.; Toure, Macoumba; Sall, Fatima; Gaye, Awa; N’doye, Ibra; Kiviat, Nancy B.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dual infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2, which is not uncommon in West Africa, has implications for transmission, progression, and antiretroviral therapy (ART). Few studies have examined viral dynamics in this setting. Our objective was to directly compare HIV-1 and HIV-2 viral loads and to examine whether this relationship is associated with CD4+ cell count. Study design This is a retrospective analysis of data from observational cohort studies. Methods We compared HIV-1 and HIV-2 viral loads from 65 dually infected, ART-naive Senegalese individuals. Participants provided blood, oral fluid, and cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) or semen samples for virologic and immunologic testing. We assessed relationships between HIV-1 and HIV-2 levels using linear regression with generalized estimating equations to account for multiple study visits. Results After adjusting for CD4+ cell count, age, sex, and commercial sex work, HIV-1 RNA levels were significantly higher than HIV-2 levels in semen, CVL, and oral fluids. Despite similar peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA levels among individuals with CD4+ cell counts above 500 cells/µl, individuals with CD4+ cell counts below 500 cells/µl had higher HIV-1 and lower HIV-2 DNA levels. Individuals with high CD4+ cell counts had higher mean HIV-1 plasma RNA viral loads than HIV-2, with HIV-1 levels significantly higher and HIV-2 levels trending toward lower mean viral loads among individuals with low CD4+ cell counts. Conclusion Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that with disease progression, HIV-1 outcompetes HIV-2 in dually infected individuals. This finding helps explain differences in prevalence and outcomes between HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-dual infection. PMID:23665777

  10. HIV Risk Behavior and Access to Services: What Predicts HIV Testing among Heterosexually Active Homeless Men?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-01-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV…

  11. Following an HIV Regimen: Steps to Take Before and After Starting HIV Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Following an HIV Regimen: Steps to Take Before and After Starting HIV Medicines (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) ... maintain long-term medication adherence. Before starting an HIV regimen, talk to your health care provider about ...

  12. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  13. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  14. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  15. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  16. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  17. Communication About HIV and Risk Behaviors Among Mothers Living With HIV and Their Early Adolescent Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Lucia F.; Dolezal, Curtis; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Traeger, Lara; Mellins, Claude A.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how mothers living with HIV communicate to their children about HIV risk. The current study explored communication between mothers and children about prevention and risk behaviors, the impact of maternal HIV infection and child knowledge of HIV, and concordance in reports from mothers and their children. The sample comprised…

  18. HIV Risk Behavior and Access to Services: What Predicts HIV Testing among Heterosexually Active Homeless Men?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-01-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV…

  19. A Small Dose of HIV? HIV Vaccine Mental Models and Risk Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Peter A.; Seiden, Danielle S.; Roberts, Kathleen J.; Kakinami, Lisa; Duan, Naihua

    2009-01-01

    Existing knowledge and beliefs related to HIV vaccines provide an important basis for the development of risk communication messages to support future HIV vaccine dissemination. This study explored HIV vaccine mental models among adults from segments of the population disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. Nine focus groups were conducted with…

  20. A Small Dose of HIV? HIV Vaccine Mental Models and Risk Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Peter A.; Seiden, Danielle S.; Roberts, Kathleen J.; Kakinami, Lisa; Duan, Naihua

    2009-01-01

    Existing knowledge and beliefs related to HIV vaccines provide an important basis for the development of risk communication messages to support future HIV vaccine dissemination. This study explored HIV vaccine mental models among adults from segments of the population disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. Nine focus groups were conducted with…

  1. People living with HIV in Estonia: engagement in HIV care in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Raag, Mait; Lutsar, Irja; Uusküla, Anneli

    2016-01-01

    Estonia had the highest rate of newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cases in the European Union (24.6/100,000) and an estimated adult HIV prevalence of 1.3% in 2013. HIV medical care, including antiretroviral therapy (ART), is free of charge for people living with HIV (PLHIV). To maximise the health benefits of HIV treatment, universal access should be achieved. Using data from surveillance and administrative databases and the treatment cascade model, we assessed the number of people infected with HIV, diagnosed with HIV, linked to HIV care, retained in HIV care, on ART, and with suppressed viral load (HIV-RNA: < 200 copies/mL). We identified that about one quarter of the 8,628 HIV-positive people estimated to live in Estonia in 2013 had not been diagnosed with HIV, and another quarter, although aware of their HIV-positive serostatus, had not accessed HIV medical care. Although altogether only 12–15% of all PLHIV in Estonia had achieved viral suppression, the main gap in HIV care in Estonia were the 58% of PLHIV who had accessed HIV medical care at least once after diagnosis but were not retained in care in 2013. PMID:27813471

  2. People living with HIV in Estonia: engagement in HIV care in 2013.

    PubMed

    Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Raag, Mait; Lutsar, Irja; Uusküla, Anneli

    2016-10-27

    Estonia had the highest rate of newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cases in the European Union (24.6/100,000) and an estimated adult HIV prevalence of 1.3% in 2013. HIV medical care, including antiretroviral therapy (ART), is free of charge for people living with HIV (PLHIV). To maximise the health benefits of HIV treatment, universal access should be achieved. Using data from surveillance and administrative databases and the treatment cascade model, we assessed the number of people infected with HIV, diagnosed with HIV, linked to HIV care, retained in HIV care, on ART, and with suppressed viral load (HIV-RNA: < 200 copies/mL). We identified that about one quarter of the 8,628 HIV-positive people estimated to live in Estonia in 2013 had not been diagnosed with HIV, and another quarter, although aware of their HIV-positive serostatus, had not accessed HIV medical care. Although altogether only 12-15% of all PLHIV in Estonia had achieved viral suppression, the main gap in HIV care in Estonia were the 58% of PLHIV who had accessed HIV medical care at least once after diagnosis but were not retained in care in 2013.

  3. [Ergotism and HIV].

    PubMed

    Finn, Bárbara C; Vadalá, Sabrina; Meraldi, Ana; Bruetman, Julio E; Martínez, Jorge V; Young, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Ergotism is a complication of acute intoxication and/or chronic abuse of ergot derivatives. It expresses itself through a vasomotor syndrome with peripheral vascular disease which frequently involves extremities. We report four cases of HIV-1 infected patients treated with antiretroviral drugs including boosted-protease inhibitors who had self-treated themselves with ergotamine. They developed peripheral vascular disease symptoms and their pulses where diminished or absent in the physical examination. Arterial Doppler confirmed diffused arterial spasm in two of them. Ergotism following ergotamine-protease inhibitors association was diagnosed. Patients were treated through the discontinuity of involved drugs (protease inhibitors and ergotamine), calcium blockers; antithrombotic prophylaxis with enoxaparine, antiaggregant therapy with acetylsalicylic acid, and one of them received pentoxifylline and vasodilator prostaglandins infusion, with amelioration of the symptoms. We discuss the clinical presentation of this drug interaction, difficult to diagnose properly without a strong suspicion of its existence.

  4. Travel, migration and HIV.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, S J; Hart, G J

    1993-01-01

    This is a review of recent publications on the subject of travel (taken in its widest sense) and HIV/AIDS. As with all epidemics caused by transmissible pathogens, AIDS has been seen in many countries as an imported problem. What this perspective fails to recognize is that with the explosion of international travel in the past thirty years it is virtually impossible to prevent the spread of infectious disease across international frontiers. Here we highlight the relative paucity of studies that describe or investigate the context in which sexual risk behaviour of travellers takes place, and suggest areas of further research which could increase understanding of the nature of sexual risk taking, and help in the design of health education programmes.

  5. Shifting the Paradigm: Using HIV Surveillance Data as a Foundation for Improving HIV Care and Preventing HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Patricia; Gardner, Lytt I; Buchacz, Kate; Garland, Pamela Morse; Mugavero, Michael J; Bosshart, Jeffrey T; Shouse, R Luke; Bertolli, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Context Reducing HIV incidence in the United States and improving health outcomes for people living with HIV hinge on improving access to highly effective treatment and overcoming barriers to continuous treatment. Using laboratory tests routinely reported for HIV surveillance to monitor individuals’ receipt of HIV care and contacting them to facilitate optimal care could help achieve these objectives. Historically, surveillance-based public health intervention with individuals for HIV control has been controversial because of concerns that risks to privacy and autonomy could outweigh benefits. But with the availability of lifesaving, transmission-interrupting treatment for HIV infection, some health departments have begun surveillance-based outreach to facilitate HIV medical care. Methods Guided by ethics frameworks, we explored the ethical arguments for changing the uses of HIV surveillance data. To identify ethical, procedural, and strategic considerations, we reviewed the activities of health departments that are using HIV surveillance data to contact persons identified as needing assistance with initiating or returning to care. Findings Although privacy concerns surrounding the uses of HIV surveillance data still exist, there are ethical concerns associated with not using HIV surveillance to maximize the benefits from HIV medical care and treatment. Early efforts to use surveillance data to facilitate optimal HIV medical care illustrate how the ethical burdens may vary depending on the local context and the specifics of implementation. Health departments laid the foundation for these activities by engaging stakeholders to gain their trust in sharing sensitive information; establishing or strengthening legal, policy and governance infrastructure; and developing communication and follow-up protocols that protect privacy. Conclusions We describe a shift toward using HIV surveillance to facilitate optimal HIV care. Health departments should review the

  6. HIV/AIDS and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch People living with HIV/AIDS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir As a ... Preventing fungal infections in people living with HIV/AIDS Fungi are difficult to avoid because they are ...

  7. CNS reservoirs for HIV: implications for eradication.

    PubMed

    Hellmuth, Joanna; Valcour, Victor; Spudich, Serena

    2015-04-01

    Controversy exists as to whether the central nervous system (CNS) serves as a reservoir site for HIV, in part reflecting the varying perspectives on what constitutes a 'reservoir' versus a mere site of latent viral integration. However, if the CNS proves to be a site of HIV persistence capable of replicating and reseeding the periphery, leading to failure of virological control, this privileged anatomical site would need dedicated consideration during the development of HIV cure strategies. In this review we discuss the current literature focused on the question of the CNS as a reservoir for HIV, covering the clinical evidence for continued CNS involvement despite suppressive therapy, the theorised dynamics of HIV integration into the CNS, as well as studies indicating that HIV can replicate independently and compartmentalise in the CNS. The unique cellular and anatomical sites of HIV integration in the CNS are also reviewed, as are the potential implications for HIV cure strategies.

  8. HIV May Double Odds of Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "A key factor appears to be chronic HIV- ... fellow, cardiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago; Michael Horberg, M.D., director, HIV/AIDS, Kaiser ...

  9. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) . This final recommendation statement applies to all ...

  10. HIV-associated resources on the internet.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Wendy S; del Rio, Carlos

    2009-12-01

    The Internet provides easy, widespread access to new developments in the field of medicine. The pace of HIV-related research is rapid and has global relevance, making the Internet a particularly well-suited technology for dissemination of information. The number of sites offering HIV-related information is vast, and the quality is variable. Nevertheless, access to reliable information can be a highly efficient method to acquire up-to-date knowledge about advances in HIV investigation. This review summarizes high-quality HIV-related Web sites, including sites that provide access to HIV-related guidelines, conferences with Web content, images, case studies, and clinical and scientific databases. Also included are HIV-related reference sites, Web sites for journals that publish regularly on HIV- and AIDS-related advances and epidemiology, and policy oriented sites. In addition, Web sites with materials for patient information and advocacy and specialty societies for HIV practitioners are listed.

  11. Attracting and retaining nurses in HIV care.

    PubMed

    Puplampu, Gideon L; Olson, Karin; Ogilvie, Linda; Mayan, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Attracting and retaining nurses in HIV care is essential to treatment success, preventing the spread of HIV, slowing its progression, and improving the quality of life of people living with HIV. Despite the wealth of studies examining HIV care, few have focused on the factors that influenced nurses' choices to specialize in HIV care. We examined the factors that attracted and retained eight nurses currently working in HIV care in two large Canadian cities. Participants were primarily women between the ages of 20 and 60 years. Interviews were conducted between November 2010 and September 2011 using interpretive description, a qualitative design. Factors that influenced participants to focus their careers in HIV care included both attracting factors and retaining factors. Although more research is needed, this exploration of attracting and retaining factors may motivate others to specialize in HIV nursing, and thus help to promote adequate support for individuals suffering from the disease.

  12. Coinfecting viruses as determinants of HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Lisco, Andrea; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2009-02-01

    The human body constitutes a balanced ecosystem of its own cells together with various microbes ("host-microbe ecosystem"). The transmission of HIV-1 and the progression of HIV disease in such an ecosystem are accompanied by de novo infection by other microbes or by activation of microbes that were present in the host in homeostatic equilibrium before HIV-1 infection. In recent years, data have accumulated on the interactions of these coinfecting microbes-viruses in particular-with HIV. Coinfecting viruses generate negative and positive signals that suppress or upregulate HIV-1. We suggest that the signals generated by these viruses may largely affect HIV transmission, pathogenesis, and evolution. The study of the mechanisms of HIV interaction with coinfecting viruses may indicate strategies to suppress positive signals, enhance negative signals, and lead to the development of new and original anti-HIV therapies.

  13. Vitamin D in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    JE, Lake; JS, Adams

    2013-01-01

    Observational studies have noted very high rates of low 25(OH)D (vitamin D) levels in both the general and HIV-infected populations. In HIV-infected patients, low 25(OH)D levels are likely a combination of both traditional risk factors and HIV- and antiretroviral therapy-specific contributors. Because of this unique risk profile, HIV-infected persons may be at greater risk for low 25(OH)D levels and frank deficiency and/or may respond to standard repletion regimens differently than HIV-uninfected patients. Currently, the optimal repletion and maintenance dosing regimens for HIV-infected patients remain unknown, as do potential benefits of supplementation that may be unique to the HIV-infected population. This paper reviews data published on HIV infection and vitamin D health in adults over the last year. PMID:21647555

  14. Trichomonas vaginalis, HIV, and African-Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Sorvillo, F.; Smith, L.; Kerndt, P.; Ash, L.

    2001-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis may be emerging as one of the most important cofactors in amplifying HIV transmission, particularly in African-American communities of the United States. In a person co-infected with HIV, the pathology induced by T. vaginalis infection can increase HIV shedding. Trichomonas infection may also act to expand the portal of entry for HIV in an HIV-negative person. Studies from Africa have suggested that T. vaginalis infection may increase the rate of HIV transmission by approximately twofold. Available data indicate that T. vaginalis is highly prevalent among African-Americans in major urban centers of the United States and is often the most common sexually transmitted infection in black women. Even if T. vaginalis increases the risk of HIV transmission by a small amount, this could translate into an important amplifying effect since Trichomonas is so common. Substantial HIV transmission may be attributable to T. vaginalis in African-American communities of the United States. PMID:11747718

  15. Black Americans Still Undertreated for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... status and are receiving treatment," said lead researcher Andre Dailey. He's an epidemiologist in the CDC's division ... the CDC's division of HIV/AIDS prevention. SOURCES: Andre Dailey, M.S.P.H., epidemiologist, division of HIV/ ...

  16. HIV RNA and proviral HIV DNA can be detected in semen after 6 months of antiretroviral therapy although HIV RNA is undetectable in blood.

    PubMed

    Du, Peiwei; Liu, An; Jiao, Yanmei; Liu, Cuie; Jiang, Taiyi; Zhu, Weijun; Zhu, Yunxia; Wu, Hao; Sun, Lijun

    2016-03-01

    The risk of sexual transmission of HIV is strongly correlated with amounts of genital HIV RNA. Few studies have reported amounts of HIV RNA and HIV DNA in semen in HIV-infected Chinese patients undergoing antiviral treatment (ART). In this observational study, the amounts of HIV RNA and HIV DNA in semen were assessed after six months of ART in HIV-infected Chinese individuals, when HIV RNA was undetectable in blood . This study included 19 HIV-infected Chinese men undergoing ART for six months. Amounts of HIV in paired semen and blood samples were assessed using real-time PCR. The C2-V5 region of the HIV envelope (env) genes was cloned and sequenced and genotype and co-receptor usage predicted based on the sequence. It was found that HIV RNA was undetectable in the plasma of most patients (17/19), whereas HIV RNA could be detected in the semen of most patients (16/19). HIV DNA could be detected in both semen and blood. Genetic diversity of HIV between the seminal and blood compartments was identified. Thus, amounts of HIV RNA and HIV DNA remain high in semen of HIV-infected Chinese patients after six months of ART treatment, even when HIV RNA was undetectable in blood.

  17. Marijuana effects on changes in brain structure and cognitive function among HIV+ and HIV- adults.

    PubMed

    Thames, April D; Kuhn, Taylor P; Williamson, Timothy J; Jones, Jacob D; Mahmood, Zanjbeel; Hammond, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The current study examined the independent and interactive effects of HIV and marijuana (MJ) use on brain structure and cognitive function among a sample of HIV-positive (HIV+) and HIV-negative (HIV-) individuals. Participants (HIV+, n=48; HIV-, n=29) individuals underwent cognitive testing, questionnaires about substance use, and brain MRI. The HIV+ group was clinically stable based upon current plasma CD4 count, 50% had undetectable viral load (i.e.,<20 copies/mL), and all were on a stable regimen of cART. For HIV+ and HIV- participants, higher levels of MJ use were associated with smaller volumes in the entorhinal cortex and fusiform gyrus. HIV status (but not MJ use) was associated with cingulate thickness, such that HIV+ participants evidenced smaller thickness of the cingulate, as compared to HIV- controls. Regarding neurocognitive functioning, there was a HIV*MJ interactive effect on global cognition, such that when the amount of MJ use was less than 1.43g per week, the HIV- group displayed significantly better neurocognitive performance than the HIV+ group (t=3.14, p=0.002). However, when MJ use reached 1.43g per week, there were no significant HIV group differences in global cognitive performance (t=1.39, p=0.168). Our results show independent and interactive effects of HIV and MJ on brain structure and cognition. However, our results do not support that HIV+ MJ users are at greater risk for adverse brain or cognitive outcomes compared to HIV- MJ users. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk Factors for HIV Transmission and Barriers to HIV Disclosure: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wallins, Amy; Toledo, Lauren; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Gillespie, Scott; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Youth carry the highest incidence of HIV infection in the United States. Understanding adolescent and young adult (AYA) perspectives on HIV transmission risk is important for targeted HIV prevention. We conducted a mixed methods study with HIV-infected and uninfected youth, ages 18–24 years, from Atlanta, GA. We provided self-administered surveys to HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected AYAs to identify risk factors for HIV acquisition. By means of computer-assisted thematic analyses, we examined transcribed focus group responses on HIV education, contributors to HIV transmission, and pre-sex HIV status disclosure. The 68 participants had the following characteristics: mean age 21.5 years (standard deviation: 1.8 years), 85% male, 90% black, 68% HIV-infected. HIV risk behaviors included the perception of condomless sex (Likert scale mean: 8.0) and transactional sex (88% of participants); no differences were noted by HIV status. Qualitative analyses revealed two main themes: (1) HIV risk factors among AYAs, and (2) barriers to discussing HIV status before sex. Participants felt the use of social media, need for immediate gratification, and lack of concern about HIV disease were risk factors for AYAs. Discussing HIV status with sex partners was uncommon. Key reasons included: fear of rejection, lack of confidentiality, discussion was unnecessary in temporary relationships, and disclosure negatively affecting the mood. HIV prevention strategies for AYAs should include improving condom use frequency and HIV disclosure skills, responsible utilization of social media, and education addressing HIV prevention including the risks of transactional sex. PMID:26588663

  19. Risk Factors for HIV Transmission and Barriers to HIV Disclosure: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres F; Wallins, Amy; Toledo, Lauren; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y; Gillespie, Scott; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Youth carry the highest incidence of HIV infection in the United States. Understanding adolescent and young adult (AYA) perspectives on HIV transmission risk is important for targeted HIV prevention. We conducted a mixed methods study with HIV-infected and uninfected youth, ages 18-24 years, from Atlanta, GA. We provided self-administered surveys to HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected AYAs to identify risk factors for HIV acquisition. By means of computer-assisted thematic analyses, we examined transcribed focus group responses on HIV education, contributors to HIV transmission, and pre-sex HIV status disclosure. The 68 participants had the following characteristics: mean age 21.5 years (standard deviation: 1.8 years), 85% male, 90% black, 68% HIV-infected. HIV risk behaviors included the perception of condomless sex (Likert scale mean: 8.0) and transactional sex (88% of participants); no differences were noted by HIV status. Qualitative analyses revealed two main themes: (1) HIV risk factors among AYAs, and (2) barriers to discussing HIV status before sex. Participants felt the use of social media, need for immediate gratification, and lack of concern about HIV disease were risk factors for AYAs. Discussing HIV status with sex partners was uncommon. Key reasons included: fear of rejection, lack of confidentiality, discussion was unnecessary in temporary relationships, and disclosure negatively affecting the mood. HIV prevention strategies for AYAs should include improving condom use frequency and HIV disclosure skills, responsible utilization of social media, and education addressing HIV prevention including the risks of transactional sex.

  20. Fatal disseminated toxoplasmosis during primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Liana; Gulletta, Maurizio; Coppini, Davide; Donzelli, Carla; Stellini, Roberto; Manca, Nino; Carosi, Giampiero; Matteelli, Alberto

    2007-03-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a well recognized manifestation of AIDS, but the disseminated disease is a rare condition and it has not been associated to HIV seroconversion to our knowledge. We describe a fatal episode of disseminated T. gondii acute infection with massive organ involvement during primary HIV infection. The serological data demonstrate primary T. gondii infection. The avidity index for HIV antibodies supports recent HIV-1 infection.

  1. Management of the metabolic effects of HIV and HIV drugs

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Todd T.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2012-01-01

    Morphologic and metabolic abnormalities, including subcutaneous adipose tissue wasting, central adipose tissue accumulation, dyslipidemia and disorders of glucose metabolism are common among HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and contribute to the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population. The pathogenesis of these disorders is due to complicated interactions between effects of chronic HIV infection, HAART medications, and patient factors, including genetic susceptibility. HAART has transformed HIV into a chronic condition for many patients and as a result the majority of HIV-infected patients in many areas of the developed world are ≥50 years. Since metabolic and cardiovascular diseases increase with aging, knowledge of the optimal management of these conditions is essential for practitioners caring for HIV-infected patients, including endocrine subspecialists. This Review highlights the clinical management of these disorders, focusing on the most recent evidence regarding the efficacy of treatment strategies, newly available medications and potential interactions between HAART medications and medications used to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:21931374

  2. HIV-specific CD8+ T cells and HIV eradication

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R. Brad; Walker, Bruce D.

    2016-01-01

    After the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to treat HIV infection, the next great frontier is to cure infected persons, a formidable challenge. HIV persists in a quiescent state in resting CD4+ T cells, where the replicative enzymes targeted by cART are not active. Although low levels of HIV transcripts are detectable in these resting cells, little to no viral protein is produced, rendering this reservoir difficult to detect by the host CD8+ T cell response. However, recent advances suggest that this state of latency might be pharmacologically reversed, resulting in viral protein expression without the adverse effects of massive cellular activation. Emerging data suggest that with this approach, infected cells will not die of viral cytopathic effects, but might be eliminated if HIV-specific CD8+ T cells can be effectively harnessed. Here, we address the antiviral properties of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells and how these cells might be harnessed to greater effect toward achieving viral eradication or a functional cure. PMID:26731469

  3. Adaptation of the HIV Stigma Scale in Spaniards with HIV.

    PubMed

    Fuster-RuizdeApodaca, Maria José; Molero, Fernando; Holgado, Francisco Pablo; Ubillos, Silvia

    2015-09-15

    The primary goal of this study was to adapt Berger, Ferrans, & Lahley (2001) HIV Stigma Scale in Spain, using Bunn, Solomon, Miller, & Forehand (2007) version. A second goal assessed whether the four-factor structure of the adapted scale could be explained by two higher-order dimensions, perceived external stigma and internalized stigma. A first qualitative study (N = 40 people with HIV, aged 28-59) was used to adapt the items and test content validity. A second quantitative study analyzed construct and criterion validity. In this study participants were 557 people with HIV, aged 18-76. The adapted HIV Stigma Scale for use in Spain (HSSS) showed a good internal consistency (α = .88) and good construct validity. Confirmatory Factor Analyses yielded a first-order, four-factor structure and a higher-order, bidimensional structure with the two expected factors (RMSEA = .051, 90% CI [.046, .056]; RMR = .073; GFI = .96; AGFI = .96; CFI = .98). Negative relations were found between stigma and quality of life (r = -.39; p < .01), self-efficacy to cope with stigma (r = -.50; p < .01) and the degree of HIV status disclosure (r = -.35; p < .01). Moreover, the people who had suffered AIDS-related opportunistic infections had a higher score in the Perceived External Stigma dimension than those who had not suffered them, t (493) = 3.02, p = .003, d = 0.26.

  4. HIV-2 infection and chemokine receptors usage - clues to reduced virulence of HIV-2.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel; Santos-Costa, Quirina; Moniz-Pereira, José

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) are the causative agents of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Without therapeutic intervention, HIV-1 or HIV-2 infections in humans are characterized by a gradual and irreversible immunologic failure that ultimately leads to the onset of a severe immunodeficiency that constitutes the hallmark of AIDS. In the last two decades AIDS has evolved into a global epidemic affecting millions of persons worldwide. Although sharing several identical properties, HIV-1 and HIV-2 have shown some important differences in vivo. In fact, a significant amount of epidemiologic, clinical and virologic data suggest that HIV-2 is in general less virulent than HIV-1. This reduced virulence is revealed by the longer asymptomatic period and the smaller transmission rate that characteristically are observed in HIV-2 infection. In this context, studies using HIV-2 as a model of a naturally less pathogenic infection could bring important new insights to HIV pathogenesis opening to new strategies to vaccines or therapeutic design. The reasons underlying the reduced pathogenicity of HIV-2 are still essentially unknown and surely are the outcome of a combination of distinct factors. In this review we will discuss the importance and the possible implications in HIV-2 pathogenesis, particularly during the asymptomatic period, of a less fitted interaction between viral envelope glycoproteins and cellular receptors that have been described in the way HIV-2 and HIV-1 use these receptors.

  5. Analysis of Host Gene Expression Profile in HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected T-Cells.

    PubMed

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Wood, Owen; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication is closely regulated by a complex pathway of host factors, many of them being determinants of cell tropism and host susceptibility to HIV infection. These host factors are known to exert a positive or negative influence on the replication of the two major types of HIV, HIV-1 and HIV-2, thereby modulating virus infectivity, host response to infection and ultimately disease progression profiles characteristic of these two types. Understanding the differential regulation of host cellular factors in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections will help us to understand the apparent differences in rates of disease progression and pathogenesis. This knowledge would aid in the discovery of new biomarkers that may serve as novel targets for therapy and diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the differential expression of host genes in response to HIV-1/HIV-2 infection. To achieve this, we analyzed the effects of HIV-1 (MN) and HIV-2 (ROD) infection on the expression of host factors in PBMC at the RNA level using the Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were identified and their biological functions determined. Host gene expression profiles were significantly changed. Gene expression profiling analysis identified a subset of differentially expressed genes in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Genes involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, immune cell proliferation and activation, cytokines, chemokines, and transcription factors were differentially expressed in HIV-1 infected cells. Relatively few genes were differentially expressed in cells infected with HIV-2.

  6. Analysis of Host Gene Expression Profile in HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Wood, Owen; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication is closely regulated by a complex pathway of host factors, many of them being determinants of cell tropism and host susceptibility to HIV infection. These host factors are known to exert a positive or negative influence on the replication of the two major types of HIV, HIV-1 and HIV-2, thereby modulating virus infectivity, host response to infection and ultimately disease progression profiles characteristic of these two types. Understanding the differential regulation of host cellular factors in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections will help us to understand the apparent differences in rates of disease progression and pathogenesis. This knowledge would aid in the discovery of new biomarkers that may serve as novel targets for therapy and diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the differential expression of host genes in response to HIV-1/HIV-2 infection. To achieve this, we analyzed the effects of HIV-1 (MN) and HIV-2 (ROD) infection on the expression of host factors in PBMC at the RNA level using the Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were identified and their biological functions determined. Host gene expression profiles were significantly changed. Gene expression profiling analysis identified a subset of differentially expressed genes in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Genes involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, immune cell proliferation and activation, cytokines, chemokines, and transcription factors were differentially expressed in HIV-1 infected cells. Relatively few genes were differentially expressed in cells infected with HIV-2. PMID:26821323

  7. HIV Infection and Children: A Medical Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Virginia

    1998-01-01

    Updates a 10-year medical overview on HIV/AIDS written for a Child Welfare League of America publication. Covers HIV transmission, diagnosis and treatment of HIV in infants, maternal treatment and testing, and advances and challenges, including new drug therapies. Concludes with recommendations on systems of care for affected families. (EV)

  8. HIV Testing on Campus: The Next Step.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Joanna

    1994-01-01

    Sees first phase in human immunodeficiency virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) prevention on many campuses to be focused on education. Calls second phase HIV testing for early diagnosis. Explains steps taken to implement HIV testing program on suburban campus and discusses student program evaluation. (Author/NB)

  9. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  10. HIV genetic information and clonal growth

    Cancer.gov

    Based on an analysis of blood cells from five HIV-infected individuals, NCI researchers have identified more than 2,400 HIV DNA insertion sites. Analysis of these sites showed that there is extensive clonal expansion (growth) of HIV infected cells.

  11. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one person to another. ... HIV) infection affect TB? The HIV, or the AIDS virus, helps TB germs make you sick because ...

  12. HIV Prevention Readiness in Undergraduates and Inmates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonio, Michael E.; And Others

    Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) transmission is increasingly an international priority. Education of high-risk populations, such as incarcerated individuals, is particularly important in thwarting the spread of HIV. To address this concern, the attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge of inmates concerning HIV and AIDS related issues are…

  13. HIV Education for Adult Literacy Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara E.

    This staff development package is designed to inform adult literacy practitioners about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS/HIV) and to facilitate implementation of HIV education in adult literacy programs. It is intended to teach them to plan and implement HIV education for their adult literacy students and to…

  14. Kill: boosting HIV-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, Lydie

    2016-07-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that purging the latent HIV reservoir in virally suppressed individuals will require both the induction of viral replication from its latent state and the elimination of these reactivated HIV-infected cells ('Shock and Kill' strategy). Boosting potent HIV-specific CD8 T cells is a promising way to achieve an HIV cure. Recent studies provided the rationale for developing immune interventions to increase the numbers, function and location of HIV-specific CD8 T cells to purge HIV reservoirs. Multiple approaches are being evaluated including very early suppression of HIV replication in acute infection, adoptive cell transfer, therapeutic vaccination or use of immunomodulatory molecules. New assays to measure the killing and antiviral function of induced HIV-specific CD8 T cells have been developed to assess the efficacy of these new approaches. The strategies combining HIV reactivation and immunobased therapies to boost HIV-specific CD8 T cells can be tested in in-vivo and in-silico models to accelerate the design of new clinical trials. New immunobased strategies are explored to boost HIV-specific CD8 T cells able to purge the HIV-infected cells with the ultimate goal of achieving spontaneous control of viral replication without antiretroviral treatment.

  15. HIV and incarceration: prisons and detention.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Ralf; Nowak, Manfred; Day, Marcus

    2011-05-19

    The high prevalence of HIV infection among prisoners and pre-trial detainees, combined with overcrowding and sub-standard living conditions sometimes amounting to inhuman or degrading treatment in violation of international law, make prisons and other detention centres a high risk environment for the transmission of HIV. Ultimately, this contributes to HIV epidemics in the communities to which prisoners return upon their release. We reviewed the evidence regarding HIV prevalence, risk behaviours and transmission in prisons. We also reviewed evidence of the effectiveness of interventions and approaches to reduce the risk behaviours and, consequently, HIV transmission in prisons. A large number of studies report high levels of risk behaviour in prisons, and HIV transmission has been documented. There is a large body of evidence from countries around the world of what prison systems can do to prevent HIV transmission. In particular, condom distribution programmes, accompanied by measures to prevent the occurrence of rape and other forms of non-consensual sex, needle and syringe programmes and opioid substitution therapies, have proven effective at reducing HIV risk behaviours in a wide range of prison environments without resulting in negative consequences for the health of prison staff or prisoners.The introduction of these programmes in prisons is therefore warranted as part of comprehensive programmes to address HIV in prisons, including HIV education, voluntary HIV testing and counselling, and provision of antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive prisoners. In addition, however, action to reduce overcrowding and improve conditions in detention is urgently needed.

  16. Relationship of vitamin D, HIV, HIV treatment, and lipid levels in the Women's Interagency HIV Study of HIV-infected and uninfected women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Janice B; Moore, Kelly L; Yin, Michael; Sharma, Anjali; Merenstein, Dan; Islam, Talat; Golub, Elizabeth T; Tien, Phyllis C; Adeyemi, Oluwatoyin M

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between vitamin D, lipids, HIV infection, and HIV treatment (±antiretroviral therapy [ART]) were investigated with Women's Interagency HIV Study data (n = 1758 middle-aged women) using multivariable regression. Sixty-three percent of women had vitamin D deficiency. Median 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH vitamin D) was highest in HIV-infected + ART-treated women (17 ng/mL; P < .001) and was the same in HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected women without ART (14 ng/mL). Vitamin D levels were lower if efavirenz (EFV) was included in ART (15 versus 19 ng/mL; P < .001). The most common lipid abnormality was high triglycerides (≥200 mg/dL) in HIV-infected + ART-treated women (13% versus 7% of HIV-infected without ART and 5% of HIV-uninfected; P < .001), with a positive relationship between 25-OH vitamin D and triglycerides (95% confidence interval 0.32-1.69; P < .01). No relationships between 25-OH vitamin D and cholesterol were detected. Vitamin D deficiency is common irrespective of HIV status but influenced by HIV treatment. Similarly, vitamin D levels were positively related to triglycerides only in ART-treated HIV-infected women and unrelated to cholesterol.

  17. Early and complete detection of HIV exposure.

    PubMed

    Jehuda-Cohen, T

    1993-10-01

    Currently, HIV diagnosis relies on serology. Yet in groups at high risk for HIV serology is not sufficient because of the window period between infection and seroconversion. There is a growing body of reports on HIV-infected yet seronegative individuals. Some tests have been developed to identify exposure to HIV by its effect on the cells of the immune system that would differentiate following exposure to the foreign antigens. Detection, in vitro, of HIV-specific B and T cells in seronegative, at risk individuals has been reported. In only some of these individuals was an HIV infection confirmed by other methods. These new assays to detect HIV immunity enable us to identify two new groups among seronegative, at risk individuals; namely those with immunity to HIV and a detectable HIV infection (silent carriers), and those with immunity and no proof of infection. Both groups have been exposed to HIV yet are not being detected by serology. Both might hold information on other forms of HIV immunity, possibly a protective one. Thus there could be an important role for other immunological assays in early detection of HIV exposure.

  18. HIV and incarceration: prisons and detention

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The high prevalence of HIV infection among prisoners and pre-trial detainees, combined with overcrowding and sub-standard living conditions sometimes amounting to inhuman or degrading treatment in violation of international law, make prisons and other detention centres a high risk environment for the transmission of HIV. Ultimately, this contributes to HIV epidemics in the communities to which prisoners return upon their release. We reviewed the evidence regarding HIV prevalence, risk behaviours and transmission in prisons. We also reviewed evidence of the effectiveness of interventions and approaches to reduce the risk behaviours and, consequently, HIV transmission in prisons. A large number of studies report high levels of risk behaviour in prisons, and HIV transmission has been documented. There is a large body of evidence from countries around the world of what prison systems can do to prevent HIV transmission. In particular, condom distribution programmes, accompanied by measures to prevent the occurrence of rape and other forms of non-consensual sex, needle and syringe programmes and opioid substitution therapies, have proven effective at reducing HIV risk behaviours in a wide range of prison environments without resulting in negative consequences for the health of prison staff or prisoners. The introduction of these programmes in prisons is therefore warranted as part of comprehensive programmes to address HIV in prisons, including HIV education, voluntary HIV testing and counselling, and provision of antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive prisoners. In addition, however, action to reduce overcrowding and improve conditions in detention is urgently needed. PMID:21595957

  19. How Parental HIV Affects Children. Research Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAND Corporation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The shadow cast by HIV reaches beyond individuals diagnosed with the condition. It touches the lives of family members, friends, coworkers, and many others. One group in particular that feels these effects keenly is the children of HIV-positive parents. With improved treatments that have extended the life expectancies of HIV-infected people and…

  20. How Parental HIV Affects Children. Research Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAND Corporation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The shadow cast by HIV reaches beyond individuals diagnosed with the condition. It touches the lives of family members, friends, coworkers, and many others. One group in particular that feels these effects keenly is the children of HIV-positive parents. With improved treatments that have extended the life expectancies of HIV-infected people and…

  1. Baseline Cellular HIV DNA Load Predicts HIV DNA Decline and Residual HIV Plasma Levels during Effective Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Andreis, Samantha; Mengoli, Carlo; Scaggiante, Renzo; Ferretto, Roberto; Manfrin, Vinicio; Cruciani, Mario; Giobbia, Mario; Boldrin, Caterina; Basso, Monica; Andreoni, Massimo; Palù, Giorgio; Sarmati, Loredana

    2012-01-01

    Cellular human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA may be considered a marker of disease progression with significant predictive power, but published data on its correlation with plasma HIV RNA levels and CD4 counts in acute and chronic patients are not conclusive. We evaluated a cohort of 180 patients naïve for antiretroviral therapy before the beginning of treatment and after a virological response in order to define the indicators correlated with HIV DNA load decrease until undetectability. The following variables were evaluated as continuous variables: age, CD4 cell count and log10 HIV DNA level at baseline and follow-up, and baseline log10 HIV RNA level. Primary HIV infection at the start of therapy, an HIV RNA level at follow-up of <2.5 copies/ml, origin, gender, and transmission risk were evaluated as binary variables. The decline of HIV DNA values during effective therapy was directly related to baseline HIV DNA and HIV RNA values, to an increase in the number of CD4 cells, and to the achievement of an HIV RNA load of <2.5 copies/ml. An undetectable cellular HIV DNA load was achieved by 21.6% of patients at the follow-up time point and correlated significantly with lower baseline cellular HIV DNA values and with being in the primary stage of infection when therapy started. In conclusion, early treatment facilitated the achievement of undetectable levels of plasma viremia and cellular HIV DNA and a better recovery of CD4 lymphocytes. HIV DNA levels before and during highly active antiretroviral therapy may be used as a new tool for monitoring treatment efficacy. PMID:22135262

  2. Missed opportunities for HIV control: Gaps in HIV testing for partners of people living with HIV in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Errea, Renato A.; Hoces, Daniel; Echevarria, Juan; González-Lagos, Elsa; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Based on the hypothesis that HIV programs struggle to deliver health services that harmonize necessities of treatment and prevention, we described the outcomes of routinely provided HIV testing to partners of people living with HIV (PLWH) through a secondary analysis of routine data collected at a public hospital in Lima, Peru. Methods Among PLWH enrolled in the study center’s HIV program between 2005 and 2014, we identified index cases (IC): PLWH who reported a unique partner not previously enrolled. We grouped partners according to their HIV status as reported by IC and collected data on HIV testing, clinical characteristics and admissions. The main outcome was the frequency of HIV testing among partners with reported unknown/seronegative HIV status. Results Out of 1586 PLWH who reported a unique partner at enrollment, 171 had a previously enrolled partner, leaving 1415 (89%) IC. HIV status of the partner was reported as unknown in 571 (40%), seronegative in 325 (23%) and seropositive in 519 (37%). Out of 896 partners in the unknown/seronegative group, 72 (8%) had HIV testing, 42/72 (58%) tested within three months of IC enrollment. Among the 49/72 (68%) who tested positive for HIV, 33 (67%) were enrolled in the HIV program. The proportion in WHO clinical stage IV was lower in enrolled partners compared to IC (37% vs 9%, p = 0.04). Non-tested partners (824) were likely reachable by the hospital, as 297/824 (36%) of their IC were admitted in the study center at least once, 51/243 (21%) female IC had received pregnancy care at the study center, and 401/692 (64%) of IC on antiretroviral therapy had achieved viral suppression, implying frequent visits to the hospital for pill pick-up. Conclusion In this setting, HIV testing of partners of PLWH was suboptimal, illustrating missed opportunities for HIV control. Integration of HIV strategies in primarily clinical-oriented services is a challenging need. PMID:28806412

  3. The effects of an HIV project on HIV and non-HIV services at local government clinics in urban Kampala.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Toru; Manabe, Yukari C; Etonu, Allan; Kyegombe, Nambusi; Muganzi, Alex; Coutinho, Alex; Peters, David H

    2011-03-09

    HIV/AIDS is a major public health concern in Uganda. There is widespread consensus that weak health systems hamper the effective provision of HIV/AIDS services. In recent years, the ways in which HIV/AIDS-focused programs interact with the delivery of other health services is often discussed, but the evidence as to whether HIV/AIDS programs strengthen or distort overall health services is limited. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a PEPFAR-funded HIV/AIDS program on six government-run general clinics in Kampala. Longitudinal information on the delivery of health services was collected at each clinic. Monthly changes in the volume of HIV and non-HIV services were analyzed by using multilevel models to examine the effect of an HIV/AIDS program on health service delivery. We also conducted a cross-sectional survey utilizing patient exit interviews to compare perceptions of the experiences of patients receiving HIV care and those receiving non-HIV care. All HIV service indicators showed a positive change after the HIV program began. In particular, the number of HIV lab tests (10.58, 95% Confidence Interval (C.I.): 5.92, 15.23) and the number of pregnant women diagnosed with HIV tests (0.52, 95%C.I.: 0.15, 0.90) increased significantly after the introduction of the project. For non-HIV/AIDS health services, TB lab tests (1.19, 95%C.I.: 0.25, 2.14) and diagnoses (0.34, 95%C.I.: 0.05, 0.64) increased significantly. Noticeable increases in trends were identified in pediatric care, including immunization (52.43, 95%C.I.: 32.42, 74.43), malaria lab tests (1.21, 95%C.I.: 0.67, 1.75), malaria diagnoses (7.10, 95%C.I.: 0.73, 13.46), and skin disease diagnoses (4.92, 95%C.I.: 2.19, 7.65). Patients' overall impressions were positive in both the HIV and non-HIV groups, with more than 90% responding favorably about their experiences. This study shows that when a collaboration is established to strengthen existing health systems, in addition to providing HIV

  4. Pregnancy and HIV.

    PubMed

    Blaney, C L

    1994-02-01

    As many as 30% of all pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa face the twin miseries of having AIDS and risking passing the disease on to their babies. More than a million children are currently infected with the virus, and it is likely that this figure will increase 10-fold by the year 2000. The best way to prevent HIV infections in children is to prevent it in their mothers. The best way for the mothers to prevent it is by maintaining a mutually monogamous sexual relationship with an uninfected partner and using condoms. If a woman is already pregnant and infected, counseling is essential so that the woman understands her risks. Many women continue their pregnancies, and between 14 and 39% of the infants become infected. Infection rates increase when the mother is in the later stages of the disease or when the mother has other sexually transmitted diseases. AIDS babies live short miserable lives, and AIDS mothers have great difficulty caring for their children. Good medical care can improve a mother's health and her baby's chances of survival, but good medical care or even good counseling is not available in many countries. In some countries, abortion is offered to AIDS mothers, but other countries have strict abortion laws. Physicians in these countries are considering whether or not to perform induced abortions for health reasons on HIV-infected women. During deliveries, physicians, midwives, and traditional birth attendants should use protective clothing if possible. In villages, midwives are advised to at least wash their hands and to avoid assisting a delivery if they have an open cut or sore. Sterile procedures after the birth and reducing birth complications that require transfusions will also help prevent the transmission of the disease. Breast feeding of babies of mothers with AIDS is recommended in areas where the primary causes of infant death are infectious disease and malnutrition. In other words, where the baby's chances of dying if they are not breast

  5. From prenatal HIV testing of the mother to prevention of sexual HIV transmission within the couple.

    PubMed

    Desgrées-du-Loû, Annabel; Brou, Hermann; Traore, Annick Tijou; Djohan, Gerard; Becquet, Renaud; Leroy, Valeriane

    2009-09-01

    The first step in preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) programmes is offering HIV counselling and testing to pregnant women. In developing countries where HIV testing remains rare, it represents a unique opportunity for many women to learn their HIV status. This prenatal HIV testing is not only the entry point to prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission, but also an occasion for women to sensitize their male partner to sexual risks. Here we explore if these women, HIV-tested as mothers, apply the prevention recommendations they also receive as women. In the Ditrame Plus PMTCT program in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, two cohorts of women (475 HIV-infected women and 400 HIV-negative women) were followed up two years after the pregnancy when they were offered prenatal HIV testing. In each cohort, we compared the proportion of women who communicated with their regular partner on sexual risks, prior to and after prenatal HIV testing. We analysed socio-demographic factors related to this communication. We measured two potential conjugal outcomes of women HIV testing: the level of condom use at sex resumption after delivery and the risk of union break-up. Prenatal HIV testing increased conjugal communication regarding sexual risks, whatever the woman's serostatus. This communication was less frequent for women in a polygamous union or not residing with their partner. Around 30% of women systematically used condoms at sex resumption. Among HIV infected ones, conjugal talk on sexual risks was related to improved condom use. After HIV testing, more HIV-infected women separated from their partners than HIV-uninfected women, despite very few negative reactions from the notified partners. In conclusion, offering prenatal HIV counselling and testing is an efficient tool for sensitizing women and their partners to HIV prevention. But sexual prevention in a conjugal context remains difficult and need to be specifically addressed.

  6. HIV and female sex workers.

    PubMed

    Estébanez, P; Fitch, K; Nájera, R

    1993-01-01

    In this review of published findings on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and risk factors among female sex workers, we summarize the results of seroprevalence studies in different countries and discuss the different patterns of transmission among such workers in various geographical regions. The highest rates of HIV infection occur in sub-Saharan Africa, where the widespread existence of sexually transmitted diseases may play an important role in sustaining transmission. In Europe and North America injecting drug use continues to be the major factor associated with HIV infection among female sex workers, while in Latin America and parts of Asia there is a more mixed pattern of heterosexual and parenteral transmission from injecting drug use. Reviewed also are studies of the risk factors associated with HIV infection among female sex workers, such as drug use, sexual behaviour, the presence of sexually transmitted diseases, and condom use; in addition, we comment on some studies of the clients of sex workers. Finally, we propose directions that future research in this area might take and discuss various interventions that need to be undertaken to reduce HIV transmission among female sex workers.

  7. HIV and female sex workers.

    PubMed Central

    Estébanez, P.; Fitch, K.; Nájera, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this review of published findings on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and risk factors among female sex workers, we summarize the results of seroprevalence studies in different countries and discuss the different patterns of transmission among such workers in various geographical regions. The highest rates of HIV infection occur in sub-Saharan Africa, where the widespread existence of sexually transmitted diseases may play an important role in sustaining transmission. In Europe and North America injecting drug use continues to be the major factor associated with HIV infection among female sex workers, while in Latin America and parts of Asia there is a more mixed pattern of heterosexual and parenteral transmission from injecting drug use. Reviewed also are studies of the risk factors associated with HIV infection among female sex workers, such as drug use, sexual behaviour, the presence of sexually transmitted diseases, and condom use; in addition, we comment on some studies of the clients of sex workers. Finally, we propose directions that future research in this area might take and discuss various interventions that need to be undertaken to reduce HIV transmission among female sex workers. PMID:8324860

  8. HIV-associated pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nunn, P

    1991-11-01

    The problems of diagnosis, treatment and management of tuberculosis associated with HIV infection in Africa are placed in perspective by the former director of the Kenya Medical Research Institute. Tuberculosis (TB) has increased as much as 3-fold in many African countries due to heightened susceptibility of HIV patients. HIV infection may both re-activate latent TB, which virtually all Africans harbor, or increase the likelihood of exogenous infection or re-infection by TB. In most of Africa diagnosis by stained sputum smear is standard: in late AIDS, this method may yield false negatives due to non-pulmonary TB, or pulmonary TB with a negative smear. Chest x-rays are also atypical, since cavitation of the upper zones is not as common, but lobar consolidation and lower zone involvement, and various unusual findings are likely. There is no evidence that mycobacterium avium intracellular has occurred in Africa. Treatment in Africa often centers on long-term thiazina (thiacetazone and isoniazid combined). HIV+ patients are more prone to skin rashes or even lethal epidermal neurolysis as a complication of treatment. Treated patients should be monitored for other symptoms such as diarrhea, recurrent fevers, other chest infections, cerebral space occupying lesions, urinary infections. Many can be treated with broad spectrum antibiotics such as chloramphenicol. Nursing HIV-infected young adults is an expensive and burdensome prospect for overworked and underpaid staff, but curing TB in AIDS patients is possible and worthwhile because of the public health advantages.

  9. Trauma-Informed HIV Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sales, Jessica M; Swartzendruber, Andrea; Phillips, Ashley L

    2016-12-01

    The high prevalence of trauma and its negative impact on health and health-promoting behaviors underscore the need for multi-level interventions to address trauma and its associated sequelae to improve physical and mental well-being in both HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected populations. Growing global awareness of the intersection of trauma and HIV has resulted in development and testing of interventions to address trauma in the context of HIV treatment and HIV prevention in the USA and globally. Despite increasing recognition of the widespread nature of trauma and the importance of trauma to HIV transmission around the globe, several gaps remain. Through a survey of the literature, we identified eight studies (published in the past 5 years) describing interventions to address the effects of trauma on HIV-related outcomes. In particular, this study focused on the levels of intervention, populations the interventions were designed to benefit, and types of trauma addressed in the interventions in the context of both HIV prevention and treatment. Remarkably absent from the HIV prevention, interventions reviewed were interventions designed to address violence experienced by men or transgender individuals, in the USA or globally. Given the pervasive nature of trauma experienced generally, but especially among individuals at heightened risk for HIV, future HIV prevention interventions universally should consider becoming trauma-informed. Widespread acknowledgement of the pervasive impact of gender-based violence on HIV outcomes among women has led to multiple calls for trauma-informed care (TIC) approaches to improve the effectiveness of HIV services for HIV-infected women. TIC approaches may be relevant for and should also be tested among men and all groups with high co-occurring epidemics of HIV and trauma (e.g., men who have sex with men (MSM), transgendered populations, injection drug users, sex workers), regardless of type of trauma experience.

  10. Operations research in HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anant

    2013-01-01

    Operations research is mainly applied to decision making in industries and corporations using quantitative methods to optimize production. The applications of operations research in social sciences research or health research in HIV, service delivery, and program performance improvement are minimal. Considering the complexity of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, it is imperative to learn from operations research in scaling up HIV treatment, prevention, and intervention in resource-poor settings. In this article the author discusses the methodological issues in operations research within the context of HIV/AIDS research. The author also suggests a framework for using operations research in the field of HIV/AIDS research and program intervention.

  11. Vaccination in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vaccines are critical components for protecting HIV-infected adults from an increasing number of preventable diseases. However, missed opportunities for vaccination among HIV-infected persons persist, likely due to concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of vaccines, as well as the changing nature of vaccine guidelines. In addition, the optimal timing of vaccination among HIV-infected adults in regards to HIV stage and receipt of antiretroviral therapy remain important questions. This article provides a review of the current recommendations regarding vaccines among HIV-infected adults and a comprehensive summary of the evidence-based literature of the benefits and risks of vaccines among this vulnerable population. PMID:25029589

  12. HIV DNA in circulating monocytes as a mechanism to dementia and other HIV complications

    PubMed Central

    Valcour, Victor G.; Shiramizu, Bruce T.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.

    2010-01-01

    It is broadly accepted that HIV DNA in lymphoid and myeloid cells persists despite combination antiretroviral therapy. Recognized as the Achilles heel to HIV eradication, the role of these peripheral reservoirs in HIV morbidity is less well developed. The burden of HIV DNA in peripheral mononuclear cells is linked to HIV disease outcomes such as time to AIDS diagnosis, survival, and CD4 T-lymphocyte counts. Monocytes are a minor HIV DNA reservoir, and the burden of HIV DNA in these cells appears to be linked to dementia, suggesting that residual infection in this subset is linked to tissue-related HIV complications. Since monocytes are likely involved in trafficking virus to the brain, there is a strong mechanistic link underlying this discovery. Herein, we summarize our current understanding of monocyte HIV DNA and central nervous system dysfunction in humans. We present a model to understand these relationships and suggest possible treatment approaches to be tested. PMID:20130221

  13. HIV risk behaviours and determinants among people living with HIV/AIDS in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Duong Cong; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Tuan, Nguyen Anh; Thang, Bui Duc; Long, Nguyen Thanh; Fylkesnes, Knut

    2009-12-01

    There is a potentially high risk of HIV spreading from people living with HIV/AIDS. We conducted a cross-sectional study to examine HIV risk behaviours and their determinants among people living with HIV/AIDS. Eighty-two percent had been sexually active. Sex with multiple partners was reported by 20% and consistent condom use by about one third. More than half of the participants (52%) reported having injected drugs during the previous month, and 35% of those had shared needles and syringes. Voluntary HIV testing and having received condoms or injection equipment from the local HIV prevention program, were found to be significantly associated with fewer HIV risk behaviours. Having learned recently about personal HIV status, multiple sex partners, low educational attainment and young age were found to be associated with higher HIV risk behaviours. Giving high priority to targeted preventive and support programmes is likely to be a highly cost-effective strategy.

  14. [Coreceptors of HIV infection and the development of HIV entry inhibitors: overview and targets].

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Hiroo

    2002-01-01

    In 1996 CXCR4 was identified as a coreceptor for HIV-1. This finding has lead to further identification of more than ten G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as coreceptors for HIV/SIV. Cell tropisms and coreceptor uses of HIV during the course of HIV infection are summarized. Promiscuous properties of correlations between chemokines and their chemokine receptor uses and also between variable amino acid sequences in the V3 region of HIV gp120 Env and HIV coreceptor uses are discussed. This promiscuous property of HIV-1 is claimed to be a possible cause of a difficulty in developing highly effective entry inhibitors and in addition to allow rapid appearance of immune escape HIV mutants. Representative agents that inhibit HIV entry with a special reference to inhibitors of coreceptor use and gp41 function are summarized. gp41 is discussed as a promising target for the development of effective entry inhibitors.

  15. Human rights, mental illness, and HIV: the Luthando Neropsychiatric HIV Clinic in Soweto, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Greg; Furin, Jennifer; Jeenah, Fatema; Moosa, M Y; Sivepersad, Reshmi; Kalafatis, Fran; Schoeman, Janine

    2011-12-15

    HIV is the leading infectious killer of adults in the world today and a majority of persons with HIV live in southern Africa. Mental illness is common among patients with HIV. Persons with HIV and mental illness, however, are often denied access to HIV treatment for a variety of reasons, including presumed non-adherence, potential drug interactions, and lack of coordinated care. The exclusion of the mentally ill from HIV care is a concerning human rights issue. This paper discusses some of the human rights issues in the care of patients with mental illness and HIV and describes a successful model for integrated care developed at the Luthando Neuropsychiatric HIV Clinic in Soweto, South Africa. The Luthando clinic has provided care to more than 500 patients and has been shown to be a successful model for other programs to improve HIV care among the mentally ill.

  16. Gender-based violence and HIV: relevance for HIV prevention in hyperendemic countries of southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Neil; Cockcroft, Anne; Shea, Bev

    2008-12-01

    Gender-based violence (GBV) is common in southern Africa. Here we use GBV to include sexual and non-sexual physical violence, emotional abuse, and forms of child sexual abuse. A sizeable literature now links GBV and HIV infection.Sexual violence can lead to HIV infection directly, as trauma increases the risk of transmission. More importantly, GBV increases HIV risk indirectly. Victims of childhood sexual abuse are more likely to be HIV positive, and to have high risk behaviours.GBV perpetrators are at risk of HIV infection, as their victims have often been victimised before and have a high risk of infection. Including perpetrators and victims, perhaps one third of the southern African population is involved in the GBV-HIV dynamic.A randomised controlled trial of income enhancement and gender training reduced GBV and HIV risk behaviours, and a trial of a learning programme reported a non-significant reduction in HIV incidence and reduction of male risk behaviours (primary prevention). Interventions among survivors of GBV can reduce their HIV risk (secondary prevention). Various strategies can reduce spread of HIV from infected GBV survivors (tertiary prevention). Dealing with GBV could have an important effect on the HIV epidemic.A policy shift is necessary. HIV prevention policy should recognise the direct and indirect implications of GBV for HIV prevention, the importance of perpetrator dynamics, and that reduction of GBV should be part of HIV prevention programmes. Effective interventions are likely to include a structural component, and a GBV awareness component.

  17. Chorioamnionitis in pregnancy: a comparative study of HIV-positive and HIV-negative parturients

    PubMed Central

    Ocheke, Amaka N; Agaba, Patricia A; Imade, Godwin E; Silas, Olugbenga A; Ajetunmobi, Olanrewaju I; Echejoh, Godwins; Ekere, Clement; Sendht, Ayuba; Bitrus, James; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Sagay, Atiene S

    2016-01-01

    Background Chorioamnionitis is an important risk factor for vertical transmission of HIV/AIDS. We compared the prevalence and correlates of chorioamnionitis in HIV-positive and HIV-negative pregnant women. Methods HIV-positive and -negative parturients were interviewed, examined and had their placenta examined histologically for chorioamnionitis. Data regarding HIV were also retrieved from their hospital records. Results A total of 298 parturients (150 HIV positive and 148 HIV negative) were enrolled. The two groups were similar in socio-demographic and obstetric parameters except for age. The prevalence of HCA was 57.1% in HIV-positive women and 61.6% in HIV-negative women (p = 0.43). HCA staging was associated with the number of intrapartum vaginal examinations in HIV-positive subjects and nulliparity in HIV-negative subjects. The number of intrapartum vaginal examinations and coitus in the week prior to delivery significantly affected the grade of HCA in HIV-negative subjects. Conclusion The prevalence of HCA in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative is high. Most variables did not affect the occurrence of histologic chorioamnionitis in both groups studied except number of intrapartum examinations, coitus in the preceding one week and nulliparity which were related to severity of the disease. PMID:25887063

  18. HIV-specific antibody-dependent phagocytosis matures during HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Johnston, Angus P R; Liu, Haiyin; Center, Robert J; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Kelleher, Anthony D; Stratov, Ivan; Kent, Stephen J; Kramski, Marit

    2014-09-01

    Antibody-dependent phagocytosis (ADP) is a potentially important immune mechanism to clear HIV. How HIV-specific ADP responses mature during HIV infection or in response to vaccinations administered, including the partially successful RV144 HIV vaccine, is not known. We established a modified ADP assay to measure internalisation of HIV antibody (Ab)-opsonised targets using a specific hybridisation internalisation probe. Labelled beads were coated with both biotinylated HIV gp140 envelope protein and a fluorescent internalisation probe, opsonised with Abs and incubated with a monocytic cell line. The fluorescence derived from the fluorescent internalisation probe on surface-bound beads, but not from internalised beads, was quenched by the addition of a complementary quencher probe. HIV Env-specific ADP was measured in 31 subjects during primary infection and early chronic HIV infection. Although ADP responses were present early during HIV infection, a significant increase in ADP responses in all 31 subjects studied was detected (P<0.001). However, when we tested 30 HIV-negative human subjects immunised with the Canarypox/gp120 vaccine regimen (subjects from the RV144 trial) we did not detect HIV-specific ADP activity. In conclusion, a modified assay was developed to measure HIV-specific ADP. Enhanced ADP responses early in the course of HIV infection were observed but no ADP activity was detected following the vaccinations administered in the RV144 trial. Improved vaccine regimens may be needed to capitalise on ADP-mediated immunity against HIV.

  19. Toward Automating HIV Identification: Machine Learning for Rapid Identification of HIV-Related Social Media Data.

    PubMed

    Young, Sean D; Yu, Wenchao; Wang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    "Social big data" from technologies such as social media, wearable devices, and online searches continue to grow and can be used as tools for HIV research. Although researchers can uncover patterns and insights associated with HIV trends and transmission, the review process is time consuming and resource intensive. Machine learning methods derived from computer science might be used to assist HIV domain experts by learning how to rapidly and accurately identify patterns associated with HIV from a large set of social data. Using an existing social media data set that was associated with HIV and coded by an HIV domain expert, we tested whether 4 commonly used machine learning methods could learn the patterns associated with HIV risk behavior. We used the 10-fold cross-validation method to examine the speed and accuracy of these models in applying that knowledge to detect HIV content in social media data. Logistic regression and random forest resulted in the highest accuracy in detecting HIV-related social data (85.3%), whereas the Ridge Regression Classifier resulted in the lowest accuracy. Logistic regression yielded the fastest processing time (16.98 seconds). Machine learning can enable social big data to become a new and important tool in HIV research, helping to create a new field of "digital HIV epidemiology." If a domain expert can identify patterns in social data associated with HIV risk or HIV transmission, machine learning models could quickly and accurately learn those associations and identify potential HIV patterns in large social data sets.

  20. Chorioamnionitis in pregnancy: a comparative study of HIV-positive and HIV-negative parturients.

    PubMed

    Ocheke, Amaka N; Agaba, Patricia A; Imade, Godwin E; Silas, Olugbenga A; Ajetunmobi, Olanrewaju I; Echejoh, Godwins; Ekere, Clement; Sendht, Ayuba; Bitrus, James; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Sagay, Atiene S

    2016-03-01

    Chorioamnionitis is an important risk factor for vertical transmission of HIV/AIDS. We compared the prevalence and correlates of histologic chorioamnionitis (HCA) in HIV-positive and HIV-negative pregnant women. HIV-positive and -negative parturients were interviewed, examined and had their placentas examined histologically for chorioamnionitis. Data regarding HIV were also retrieved from their hospital records. A total of 298 parturients (150 HIV positive and 148 HIV negative) were enrolled. The two groups were similar in socio-demographic and obstetric parameters except for age. The prevalence of HCA was 57.1% in HIV-positive women and 61.6% in HIV-negative women (p = 0.43). HCA staging was associated with the number of intrapartum vaginal examinations in HIV-positive subjects and nulliparity in HIV-negative subjects. The number of intrapartum vaginal examinations and coitus in the week prior to delivery significantly affected the grade of HCA in HIV-negative subjects. The prevalence of HCA in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative is high. Most variables did not affect the occurrence of HCA in both groups studied except number of intrapartum examinations, coitus in the preceding one week and nulliparity, which were related to severity of the disease. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Interactive Effects of Morphine on HIV Infection: Role in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pichili Vijaya Bhaskar; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Saxena, Shailendra K; Saiyed, Zainulabedin; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2012-01-01

    HIV epidemic continues to be a severe public health problem and concern within USA and across the globe with about 33 million people infected with HIV. The frequency of drug abuse among HIV infected patients is rapidly increasing and is another major issue since injection drug users are at a greater risk of developing HIV associated neurocognitive dysfunctions compared to non-drug users infected with HIV. Brain is a major target for many of the recreational drugs and HIV. Evidences suggest that opiate drug abuse is a risk factor in HIV infection, neural dysfunction and progression to AIDS. The information available on the role of morphine as a cofactor in the neuropathogenesis of HIV is scanty. This review summarizes the results that help in understanding the role of morphine use in HIV infection and neural dysfunction. Studies show that morphine enhances HIV-1 infection by suppressing IL-8, downregulating chemokines with reciprocal upregulation of HIV coreceptors. Morphine also activates MAPK signaling and downregulates cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Better understanding on the role of morphine in HIV infection and mechanisms through which morphine mediates its effects may help in devising novel therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection in opiate using HIV-infected population.

  2. Transgender women and HIV-related health disparities: falling off the HIV treatment cascade.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Hernandez, Dominica; Finneran, Stephanie; Price, Devon; Driver, Redd

    2017-09-05

    Background: Transgender women living with HIV infection experience poorer health outcomes across the HIV continuum of care. While disparities are well established, their underlying mechanisms are not well understood. This study examined the HIV continuum of care (also known as the HIV treatment cascade), including linkage and engagement in care and health status among transgender women and cisgender women and cisgender men living with HIV. Method: Case-control matching was applied to a cohort of 1101 people living with HIV; 70 transgender women living with HIV were matched on years since testing HIV positive with cisgender women and cisgender men. Participants provided measures indicative of the HIV treatment cascade that included linkage and engagement in care, receiving and adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART), and HIV viral suppression. Common correlates of HIV-related health status: depression symptoms, HIV-related stress, alcohol and drug use, healthcare conspiracy beliefs, medical mistrust, emotional social support and tangible social support, were also assessed. Results: Transgender women were significantly less likely to receive ART, were less adherent to ART and had poorer HIV viral suppression than cisgender persons. Multivariable models demonstrated that health disparities were predicted by transgender women having poorer tangible social support over and above the other correlates of health outcomes. Conclusion: Tangible support is amenable by interventions such as building and strengthening supportive networks and paraprofessional services. Socially supportive interventions should be considered critical in efforts to decrease HIV health disparities among transgender women.

  3. Metabolic profiling during HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hollenbaugh, Joseph A.; Montero, Catherine; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Munger, Joshua; Kim, Baek

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated cellular metabolism profiles of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). First, HIV-2 GL-AN displays faster production kinetics and greater amounts of virus as compared to HIV-1s: YU-2, 89.6 and JR-CSF. Second, quantitative LC–MS/MS metabolomics analysis demonstrates very similar metabolic profiles in glycolysis and TCA cycle metabolic intermediates between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected macrophages, with a few notable exceptions. The most striking metabolic change in MDMs infected with HIV-2 relative to HIV-1-infected MDMs was the increased levels of quinolinate, a metabolite in the tryptophan catabolism pathway that has been linked to HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. Third, both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected MDMs showed elevated levels of ribose-5-phosphate, a key metabolic component in nucleotide biosynthesis. Finally, HIV-2 infected MDMs display increased dNTP concentrations as predicted by Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation. Collectively, these data show differential metabolic changes during HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection of macrophages. PMID:26895248

  4. [Food habits among HIV patients].

    PubMed

    Parrilla Saldaña, Josefa; Muñoz Sánchez, Isabel; Peñalver Jiménez, Carmen; Castro Rodríguez, Encarnación; Quero Haro, Antonia; Largo García, Esperanza

    2003-01-01

    The authors analyze the eating habits of a group of 108 patients suffering from HIV. The authors elaborate a chart about the composition and distribution of foods which contains all the required food groups necessary for a complete diet. This food chart lists the variable of this study as well as the frequency of their consummation. Once this chart was drawn up, it was approved by the Nutrition and Dietetic Unit at the Virgen de Valma University Hospital. Among the results obtained, there is a relationship between the necessity these patients have regarding eating a complete diet and diverse nutrients that are easy to chew as well as an abundance of liquids. The article "Nutrition for Patients suffering from HIV" written by the same authors published in the Revista ROL de Enfermera 2002; 25(12):816-820, is recommended in order to have a more complete understanding of this topic, nutrition for patients suffering from HIV.

  5. [Microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    López-Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Rafael; García, Federico; Eiros, José M; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl

    2007-12-01

    Currently, there are around 150,000 HIV-infected patients in Spain. This number, together with the fact that this disease is now a chronic condition since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, has generated an increasing demand on the clinical microbiology laboratories in our hospitals. This increase has occurred not only in the diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic diseases, but also in tests related to the diagnosis and therapeutic management of HIV infection. To meet this demand, the Sociedad de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clinica (Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) has updated its standard Procedure for the microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection. The main advances related to serological diagnosis, plasma viral load, and detection of resistance to antiretroviral drugs are reviewed in this version of the Procedure.

  6. Oral health & HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Susan; Naidoo, Sudeshi; Berthold, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Oral lesions are common in women and children with HIV/AIDS and may decrease the overall quality of life in these patients because of pain, dry mouth, and difficulty in eating. An oral cavity screening is an easy, noninvasive, quick, and inexpensive procedure that provides nurses with invaluable information about the need for referral, treatment, and health education. Nurses can use the information obtained from a careful oral screening to decrease the symptoms experienced with oral lesions and optimize a patient's ability to chew and enjoy food. Common oral manifestations of HIV infection include fungal, viral, and bacterial infections, although neoplasms, periodontal disease, salivary gland disease, and lesions of uncertain origin are also seen. Oral lesions such as candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, herpetic ulcers, and Kaposi's sarcoma are often among the first symptoms of HIV infection.

  7. HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, David B.; Ances, Beau M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neurological involvement in HIV is commonly associated with cognitive impairment. While severe and progressive neurocognitive impairment has become rare in HIV clinics in the era of potent antiretroviral therapy, a majority of HIV patients worldwide perform below expectations on formal neurocognitive tests. Co-morbid conditions contribute to impairment, but they are insufficient to explain the frequency of impairment encountered. HIV disease markers like current viral load and CD4 counts are no longer strongly associated with ongoing impairment on therapy, while cardiovascular disease markers and inflammatory markers appear more closely associated. Novel cerebrospinal fluid and neuroimaging biomarkers are needed to detect and follow impairment. Ongoing research to optimize HIV therapy within the central nervous system, and potentially to intervene in downstream mechanisms of neurotoxicity remain important avenues of future investigation. Ultimately, the full control of virus in the brain is a necessary step in the goal of HIV eradication. Weekly searches of English language publications referring to HIV neurocognitive impairment, HIV neuropathy, HIV myelopathy, HIV dementia, and HIV from 1988 to August 2013 were performed. In addition, the authors’ own files were manually searched. PMID:24156898

  8. Molecular epidemiology of HIV: tracking AIDS pandemic.

    PubMed

    TakebE, Yutaka; Kusagawa, Shigeru; Motomura, Kazushi

    2004-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is a global threat to maternal and child health, especially in developing countries. It is estimated that 800 000 children are infected and 580 000 children die of AIDS-related illnesses every year. Molecular epidemiology has been a useful tool in analyzing the origin of HIV and tracking the course of global HIV spread. This article provides an overview of recent advances in the field of molecular epidemiology of HIV across the world, and discuss the biological implications. Based on the near full-length or partial nucleotide sequence information, the phylogeny and recombinant structure of HIV strains are analyzed. Using genotype classification of HIV as a molecular marker, the origin and the genesis of HIV epidemic are investigated. The HIV-1 group M, a major HIV group responsible for current AIDS pandemic, began its expansion in human population approximately 70 years ago and diversified rapidly over time, now comprising a number of different subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRF). Of note, recent studies revealed that new recombinant strains are arising continually, becoming a powerful force in the spread of HIV-1 across the globe. Global dissemination of HIV is a dramatic and deadly example of recent genome emergence and expansion. Molecular epidemiological investigation is expected to provide information critical for prevention and future vaccine strategies.

  9. Rapid HIV test in family practice.

    PubMed

    Poirier, C; Aymeric, S; Grammatico-Guillon, L; Lebeau, J P; Bernard, L; Le Bret, P; Le Moal, G; Gras, G

    2015-06-01

    The 2010-2014 HIV/AIDS French program recommends using HIV rapid diagnostic tests in family practice. Our aim was to assess the acceptability and feasibility of the RDT in family practice in France. The first part of this study was to determine the opinions of family practitioners (FPs) concerning the news guidelines for screening and the possible use of rapid HIV tests in their practice. The second part was a feasibility study of the actual use of rapid HIV tests given to FPs during six months. The third part was a qualitative analysis of experience feedback to determine the impediments to using rapid HIV tests. Seventy-seven percent of the 352 FPs interviewed were favorable to rapid HIV tests use. The three main impediments were: misinterpretation of test result, complexity of quality control, and lack of training: 23 of the 112 FPs having volunteered to evaluate the rapid HIV tests followed the required training session. Sixty-nine tests were handed out, and three rapid HIV tests were used; the qualitative study involved 12 FPs. The participants all agreed on the difficult use of rapid HIV tests in daily practice. The main reasons were: too few opportunities or requests for use, complex handling, difficulties in proposing the test, fear of having to announce seropositivity, significantly longer consultation. Although FPs are generally favorable to rapid HIV tests use in daily practice, the feasibility and contribution of rapid HIV tests are limited in family practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. [Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV-negative adults].

    PubMed

    Rouyer, M; Stoclin, A; Blanc, F-X

    2015-12-01

    In HIV-negative adults, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia can be observed when immunodeficiency is present, especially in case of drug-induced immune suppression (steroids, chemotherapy, transplantation). Clinical, radiological, and biological presentations are different in HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals with different immunodeficiency profiles. In HIV-negative patients, dyspnea occurs more quickly (median duration of 5 days to get a diagnosis), diagnosis is more difficult because of less Pneumocystis in bronchoalveolar lavage, and mortality is higher than in HIV-positive individuals. Lung CT-scan typically shows diffuse ground glass opacities, but peri-bronchovascular condensations or ground glass opacities clearly limited by interlobular septa can also be observed. Lymphopenia is common but CD4+ T-cells count is rarely performed. HIV-negative patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia are co-infected with bacteria, viruses or fungi in about 30% cases. Bronchoalveolar lavage is often more neutrophilic than in HIV-positive individuals. PCR and β-D-glucan have good sensitivity but poor specificity to diagnose Pneumocystis pneumonia. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole remains the first choice of treatment. Duration is 14 days in HIV-negative patients whereas it is typically of 21 days in HIV-positive individuals. Adjunctive corticosteroids are of beneficial effect in HIV-positive adult patients with substantial hypoxaemia but are not recommended in HIV-negative patients, as they could be deleterious in some individuals.

  11. HIV treatment cascade in tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Lessells, Richard J.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Globally, the number of deaths associated with tuberculosis (TB) and HIV coinfection remains unacceptably high. We review the evidence around the impact of strengthening the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients and explore recent findings about how best to deliver integrated TB/HIV services. Recent findings There is clear evidence that the timely provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality in TB/HIV coinfected adults. Despite this, globally in 2013, only around a third of known HIV-positive TB cases were treated with ART. Although there is some recent evidence exploring the barriers to achieve high coverage of HIV testing and ART initiation in TB patients, our understanding of which factors are most important and how best to address these within different health systems remains incomplete. There are some examples of good practice in the delivery of integrated TB/HIV services to improve the HIV treatment cascade. However, evidence of the impact of such strategies is of relatively low quality for informing integrated TB/HIV programming more broadly. In most settings, there remain barriers to higher-level organizational and functional integration. Summary There remains a need for commitment to patient-centred integrated TB/HIV care in countries affected by the dual epidemic. There is a need for better quality evidence around how best to deliver integrated services to strengthen the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients, both at primary healthcare level and within community settings. PMID:26352390

  12. Intermuscular and subcutaneous adipose tissue distributions differ in HIV+ versus HIV-men and women

    PubMed Central

    Dodell, G.B.; Kotler, D.P.; Engelson, E.S.; Ionescu, G.; Gimelshteyn, Y.; Pollack, A.; Gallagher, D.; Berglund, L.; Albu, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Loss of subcutaneous (SAT) with sparing of visceral (VAT) adipose tissue (AT) has been documented in HIV + men and women. Intermuscular AT (IMAT) rivals VAT in independent associations with cardiovascular risk. Objective To determine whether the size and distribution of IMAT differs in HIV+ vs. HIV- men and/or women. Design We used whole-body MRI to measure VAT, IMAT and four SAT compartments and compared them by HIV status using whole-body skeletal muscle (SM) or total AT (TAT) as co-variates in multi-ethnic groups of healthy HIV- (n=86) and stable HIV+ (n=76) men and women. Results The sizes of AT depots (adjusting for SM) did not differ by HIV status, except for smaller gluteal SAT (lower trunk, between L4-L5 to greater trochanter) in both sexes (P<0.05). The AT distribution (adjusting for TAT) was significantly different, with larger VAT (P<0.05) and smaller gluteal and limb SAT (P<0.05) in both HIV+ sexes; IMAT increased more with TAT in HIV+ vs. HIV- men (P<0.05 for slope interaction) but there were no significant differences in women. There were significant race by HIV interactions in AT distribution with more pronounced VAT differences in non-Hispanic white men and larger trunk SAT in African Americans HIV+ vs. HIV-. Conclusion The AT distribution differed markedly in HIV+ vs. HIV- with limb and lower body SAT representing a smaller proportion of TAT in HIV+ in both sexes and IMAT representing a larger proportion of TAT in HIV+ vs. HIV- men. PMID:21643551

  13. Atypical nervous system manifestations of HIV.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Jennifer; Venna, Nagagopal; Cho, Tracey A

    2011-07-01

    Despite the widespread success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in reducing morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection, HIV-associated neurologic disease remains prevalent. Although the virus is unable to infect neurons or muscle fibers directly, it can still injure these structures by a variety of mechanisms, many of which are yet to be elucidated. Additionally, antiretroviral medications used to treat HIV infection can cause damage to the nervous system both by direct toxicity and via modulation of host-virus interactions. Some neurologic complications of HIV infection are rarely seen and are poorly understood; nevertheless, they are important to recognize. In this review article, the authors focus on the uncommon neurologic manifestations of HIV infection, including mononeuropathies, inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies, motor neuron disease, polymyositis, diffuse infiltrative lymphocytosis syndrome, mononeuritis multiplex, HIV-associated neuromuscular weakness syndrome, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, and central nervous system HIV-escape meningoencephalomyelitis and myelitis. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  14. HIV and Tuberculosis: a Deadly Human Syndemic

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Candice K.; Ernst, Joel D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: A syndemic is defined as the convergence of two or more diseases that act synergistically to magnify the burden of disease. The intersection and syndemic interaction between the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB) epidemics have had deadly consequences around the world. Without adequate control of the TB-HIV syndemic, the long-term TB elimination target set for 2050 will not be reached. There is an urgent need for additional resources and novel approaches for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of both HIV and TB. Moreover, multidisciplinary approaches that consider HIV and TB together, rather than as separate problems and diseases, will be necessary to prevent further worsening of the HIV-TB syndemic. This review examines current knowledge of the state and impact of the HIV-TB syndemic and reviews the epidemiological, clinical, cellular, and molecular interactions between HIV and TB. PMID:21482729

  15. [Care for women with HIV: gender perspectives].

    PubMed

    Ko, Nai-Ying

    2011-12-01

    When women face social and cultural inequality they inevitably bear increased HIV infection risks. The success of antiretroviral therapies in suppressing HIV's viral load and prolonging patient lives has made HIV a treatable chronic disease. Given the same follow-up treatments, research shows no significant differences between men and women in terms of either clinical, immunological or virological parameters at baseline or mortality after one year of antiretroviral therapy. Also, advances in assisted reproductive technologies now makes having HIV-free children possible for HIV couples. Gender equality and human right are essential to effective HIV prevention. Nurses must take all appropriate measures to eliminate discrimination against women in HIV prevention, treatment and care programs in order to ensure equal gender access to critical healthcare services.

  16. Dental management of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Aldous, J A

    1990-11-01

    In 1981, a group of male homosexuals was found to have an immunological defect resulting in opportunistic infections. The pattern of symptoms became known as acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Much time and expense have been invested to study the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), prevent its spread, and find a cure for HIV infection. Fear of HIV infection has resulted in implementation of stricter infection control practices. Intervention by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has mandated procedures for infection control and waste disposal. Ethical questions and social problems have surfaced concerning the treatment of HIV-infected patients. Despite reports on infection control, literature concerning management of HIV-infected dental patients is limited. Misinformation has prevented the application of reliable information about the care of HIV-infected individuals. An accurate general knowledge of HIV infection is essential for optimal care of these patients.

  17. Unraveling the mystery of HIV medications.

    PubMed

    Turkoski, Beatrice B

    2006-01-01

    Today, millions of people around the globe are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This retrovirus attacks and renders ineffective the human immune system and leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), which leaves those with AIDS open to a variety of fatal infections. HIV knows no racial, gender, or age distinctions, and there is, as yet, no cure for HIV. However, after 25 years of research, there are three classes of medication that in various combinations may significantly slow the progress of HIV, thus improving and prolonging the life of infected individuals. Nurses in any practice arena will inevitably care for patients who are infected with HIV. With an understanding of HIV and the therapeutic benefits of antiretroviral medications, informed nurses have the opportunity and responsibility to educate infected persons in the appropriate use of antiretroviral drugs and the importance of preventing transmission of HIV to uninfected persons.

  18. Combination HIV Prevention: Significance, Challenges, and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M.; Vermund, Sten H.; Wasserheit, Judith N.

    2010-01-01

    No single HIV prevention strategy will be sufficient to control the HIV pandemic. However, a growing number of interventions have shown promise in partially protecting against HIV transmission and acquisition, including knowledge of HIV serostatus, behavioral risk reduction, condoms, male circumcision, needle exchange, treatment of curable sexually transmitted infections, and use of systemic and topical antiretroviral medications by both HIV-infected and uninfected persons. Designing the optimal package of interventions that matches the epidemiologic profile of a target population, delivering that package at the population level, and evaluating safety, acceptability, coverage, and effectiveness, all involve methodological challenges. Nonetheless, there is an unprecedented opportunity to develop “prevention packages” that combine various arrays of evidence-based strategies, tailored to the needs of diverse subgroups and targeted to achieve high coverage for a measurable reduction in population-level HIV transmission. HIV prevention strategies that combine partially effective interventions should be scaled up and evaluated. PMID:20941553

  19. Recovery of antigenically reactive HIV-2 cores.

    PubMed

    Chrystie, I L; Almeida, J D

    1989-03-01

    Negative staining studies of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been hampered by the fragile nature of the particles. Although detergent treatment is capable of releasing cores from HIV-2 particles, these are unstable and do not retain morphological integrity. Addition of glutaraldehyde will stabilise these structures but, if used at too high a concentration, will destroy their antigenicity. This study shows that if both detergent and glutaraldehyde are used in correct proportions, antigenically reactive cores can be recovered from HIV-2 cell cultures. More specifically we show that a mixture of 0.1% Nonidet P40 and 0.1% glutaraldehyde produces preparations of HIV-2 cores that are suitable for immune electron microscopy. These cores reacted positively, that is, formed immune complexes, with both human HIV-2 antisera and a mouse monoclonal antibody that, although directed against p24 (HIV-1), reacts also with p25 (HIV-2).

  20. Quantifying Ongoing HIV-1 Exposure in HIV-1–Serodiscordant Couples to Identify Individuals With Potential Host Resistance to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Mackelprang, Romel D.; Baeten, Jared M.; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie; Farquhar, Carey; de Bruyn, Guy; Essex, Max; McElrath, M. Juliana; Nakku-Joloba, Edith; Lingappa, Jairam R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Immunogenetic correlates of resistance to HIV-1 in HIV-1–exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals with consistently high exposure may inform HIV-1 prevention strategies. We developed a novel approach for quantifying HIV-1 exposure to identify individuals remaining HIV-1 uninfected despite persistent high exposure. Methods. We used longitudinal predictors of HIV-1 transmission in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples to score HIV-1 exposure and define HESN clusters with persistently high, low, and decreasing risk trajectories. The model was validated in an independent cohort of serodiscordant couples. We describe a statistical tool that can be applied to other HESN cohorts to identify individuals with high exposure to HIV-1. Results. HIV-1 exposure was best quantified by frequency of unprotected sex with, plasma HIV-1 RNA levels among, and presence of genital ulcer disease among HIV-1–infected partners and by age, pregnancy status, herpes simplex virus 2 serostatus, and male circumcision status among HESN participants. Overall, 14% of HESN individuals persistently had high HIV-1 exposure and exhibited a declining incidence of HIV-1 infection over time. Conclusions. A minority of HESN individuals from HIV-1–discordant couples had persistent high HIV-1 exposure over time. Decreasing incidence of infection in this group suggests these individuals were selected for resistance to HIV-1 and may be most appropriate for identifying biological correlates of natural host resistance to HIV-1 infection. PMID:22926009

  1. Home Economists in the Workplace: Formulating HIV/AIDS Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanberry, Anne M.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews facts about human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), HIV transmission, and prevention of HIV/AIDS; discusses risks for contracting HIV; reviews relevant legislation regarding the rights of employees, employers, and consumers; describes HIV/AIDS workplace policies and procedures; and presents implications…

  2. Development and Validation of the HIV Medication Readiness Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, Louise; Tasca, Giorgio A.; Kowal, John; Corace, Kimberly; Cooper, Curtis L.; Angel, Jonathan B.; Garber, Gary; MacPherson, Paul A.; Cameron, D. William

    2007-01-01

    Excellent medication adherence (greater than 95%) is required for optimal HIV treatment success. This study aimed to develop and validate a brief scale to assess psychological readiness for successfully starting and adhering to HIV medications. HIV-positive men and women (N = 142) from an HIV outpatient clinic completed the proposed HIV Medication…

  3. HIV/AIDS, Drug Abuse Treatment, and the Correctional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipton, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses in-prison prevalence and transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Focuses on epidemiology in prison settings, the role of ethnicity and gender in transmission, screening for HIV, segregating the HIV-positive inmate, condom distribution, medical treatment for HIV-positive inmates, HIV education and prevention, and tuberculosis…

  4. Development and Validation of the HIV Medication Readiness Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, Louise; Tasca, Giorgio A.; Kowal, John; Corace, Kimberly; Cooper, Curtis L.; Angel, Jonathan B.; Garber, Gary; MacPherson, Paul A.; Cameron, D. William

    2007-01-01

    Excellent medication adherence (greater than 95%) is required for optimal HIV treatment success. This study aimed to develop and validate a brief scale to assess psychological readiness for successfully starting and adhering to HIV medications. HIV-positive men and women (N = 142) from an HIV outpatient clinic completed the proposed HIV Medication…

  5. HIV/AIDS, Drug Abuse Treatment, and the Correctional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipton, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses in-prison prevalence and transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Focuses on epidemiology in prison settings, the role of ethnicity and gender in transmission, screening for HIV, segregating the HIV-positive inmate, condom distribution, medical treatment for HIV-positive inmates, HIV education and prevention, and tuberculosis…

  6. Developing a Successful HIV Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Robert C

    2015-07-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome integration indicates that persistent sterilizing immunity will be needed for a successful vaccine candidate. This suggests a need for broad antibodies targeting the Env protein. Immunogens targeting gp120 have been developed that block infection in monkeys and mimic the modest success of the RV144 clinical trial in that protection is short-lived following a decline in antibody-depending cell-mediated cytotoxicity-like antibodies. Attempts to induce antibody persistence have been complicated by a loss of efficacy, presumably by increasing the number of HIV-target cells. The key seems to be achieving an immune balance.

  7. HIV infection and cardiovascular disease in women.

    PubMed

    Womack, Julie A; Chang, Chung-Chou H; So-Armah, Kaku A; Alcorn, Charles; Baker, Jason V; Brown, Sheldon T; Budoff, Matthew; Butt, Adeel A; Gibert, Cynthia; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Gottdiener, John; Gottlieb, Stephen; Justice, Amy C; Leaf, David; McGinnis, Kathleen; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Sico, Jason; Skanderson, Melissa; Tindle, Hilary; Tracy, Russell P; Warner, Alberta; Freiberg, Matthew S

    2014-10-16

    HIV infection is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in men. Whether HIV is an independent risk factor for CVD in women has not yet been established. We analyzed data from the Veterans Aging Cohort Study on 2187 women (32% HIV infected [HIV(+)]) who were free of CVD at baseline. Participants were followed from their first clinical encounter on or after April 01, 2003 until a CVD event, death, or the last follow-up date (December 31, 2009). The primary outcome was CVD (acute myocardial infarction [AMI], unstable angina, ischemic stroke, and heart failure). CVD events were defined using clinical data, International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes, and/or death certificate data. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the association between HIV and incident CVD, adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, lipids, smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, renal disease, obesity, hepatitis C, and substance use/abuse. Median follow-up time was 6.0 years. Mean age at baseline of HIV(+) and HIV uninfected (HIV(-)) women was 44.0 versus 43.2 years (P<0.05). Median time to CVD event was 3.1 versus 3.7 years (P=0.11). There were 86 incident CVD events (53%, HIV(+)): AMI, 13%; unstable angina, 8%; ischemic stroke, 22%; and heart failure, 57%. Incident CVD/1000 person-years was significantly higher among HIV(+) (13.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]=10.1, 18.1) than HIV(-) women (5.3; 95% CI=3.9, 7.3; P<0.001). HIV(+) women had an increased risk of CVD, compared to HIV(-) (hazard ratio=2.8; 95% CI=1.7, 4.6; P<0.001). HIV is associated with an increased risk of CVD in women. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  8. Bipolar disorder is associated with HIV transmission risk behavior among patients in treatment for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Christina S.; Bevilacqua, Lisa A.; Key, Mary D.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined HIV transmission risk behavior among 63 patients with bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and no mood disorder (NMD); half had substance use disorders (SUDs). Patients with BD were more likely than others to report unprotected intercourse with HIV-negative partners and < 95% adherence to antiretroviral medications. In multivariate models, BD and SUD were independent predictors of both risk behaviors. Participants with poorer medication adherence were more likely to have detectable HIV viral loads and unprotected intercourse with HIV-negative partners. Patients with BD deserve careful evaluation and HIV prevention services to reduce HIV transmission risk behaviors. PMID:22614744

  9. Facilitators and Barriers to HIV Status Disclosure Among HIV-positive MSM Age 50 and Older

    PubMed Central

    Halkitis, Perry N; Kingdon, Molly J.; Barton, Staci; Eddy, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Objective Most HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) ages 50 and older feel a responsibility to protect their sex partners from HIV transmission risk. For some, this is enacted through HIV disclosure, for others, this is realized through reduced risk behaviors. Methods To examine this, we analyzed interviews of 23 HIV-positive MSM ages 50 and older. Results We identified several contextual, relational, and psychosocial factors that served as either barriers or facilitators to HIV disclosure. Conclusions Our findings suggest HIV status disclosure is multifaceted and continues to impact sexual communication in the lives of MSM as they enter middle age. PMID:28496563

  10. HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infection among voluntary counselling and testing subjects at a regional hospital in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Nsagha, D S; Njunda, A L; Kamga, H L F; Assob, J C N; Bongkem, E A

    2012-09-01

    HIV/AIDS is a major public health problem in Cameroon which had a prevalence of 5.1% in 2010 with 141 new infections per day. The fear of voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) is an obstacle to HIV prevention. To determine the prevalence of HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infection among people attending a health facility for VCT. Venous blood was collected from participants using aseptic techniques in a descriptive observational cross-sectional study. DETERMINE HIV-1/2 and SD BIOLINE HIV-1/2 3.0 qualitative tests were used for the detection of HIV-1 and HIV-2 in their sera. Range and consistency checks were carried out on the data and analysed using Epi-Info. Of 290 individuals tested, 78(26.9%) were positive for HIV-1 and HIV-2. Among the 78 HIV positive individuals, 62 (79.5%) had HIV-1, 1(1.3%) had HIV-2 and 15(19.2%) had concurrent HIV-1/ HIV-2. Among those infected, 57(73.1%) were females including 21(26.9%) males. HIV-1 is the major cause of AIDS and VCT is well accepted. Co-infection with HIV-1/HIV-2 may lead to anti-retroviral drug resistance. VCT should be encouraged so that positive cases can initiate therapy on time to stay ahead of anti-retroviral drug resistance.

  11. HIV stigma: perceptions from HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in a community dental clinic

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Steven; A. York, Jill; DePinto, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background. In the medical sense, stigma has been defined as the collection of negative attitudes and beliefs that are directed at people living with a particular condition or disease process. A cohort study was conducted to explore the HIV stigma that is perceived by HIV-positive individuals versus that perceived by the general population within a community-based dental clinic. Methods. Two separate and independent cross-sectional surveys, the Berger Stigma Scale and the Rutgers-Modified Berger Stigma Scale, were employed in order to analyze the stigma factors of an HIV-positive population versus an HIV-negative general population, respectively. The HIV stigma factors studied included personalized stigma, disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and concern with public attitudes. Results. The total stigma scale scores for the studied HIV-positive population were significantly lower than the total stigma scale scores for the studied HIV-negative population (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Interestingly, there is a misplaced expectation by the general population that HIV-positive individuals experience more stigma than the HIV-positive population in the clinic actually reported. Interventions to reduce HIV stigma should be an integral component of comprehensive care for all patients. PMID:28096954

  12. HIV stigma: perceptions from HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in a community dental clinic.

    PubMed

    Toth, Steven; A York, Jill; DePinto, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background. In the medical sense, stigma has been defined as the collection of negative attitudes and beliefs that are directed at people living with a particular condition or disease process. A cohort study was conducted to explore the HIV stigma that is perceived by HIV-positive individuals versus that perceived by the general population within a community-based dental clinic. Methods. Two separate and independent cross-sectional surveys, the Berger Stigma Scale and the Rutgers-Modified Berger Stigma Scale, were employed in order to analyze the stigma factors of an HIV-positive population versus an HIV-negative general population, respectively. The HIV stigma factors studied included personalized stigma, disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and concern with public attitudes. Results. The total stigma scale scores for the studied HIV-positive population were significantly lower than the total stigma scale scores for the studied HIV-negative population (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Interestingly, there is a misplaced expectation by the general population that HIV-positive individuals experience more stigma than the HIV-positive population in the clinic actually reported. Interventions to reduce HIV stigma should be an integral component of comprehensive care for all patients.

  13. Neighborhood Social Capital in Relation to Late HIV Diagnosis, Linkage to HIV Care, and HIV Care Engagement.

    PubMed

    Ransome, Yusuf; Kawachi, Ichiro; Dean, Lorraine T

    2017-03-01

    High neighborhood social capital could facilitate earlier diagnosis of HIV and higher rates of linkage and HIV care engagement. Multivariate analysis was used to examine whether social capital (social cohesion, social participation, and collective engagement) in 2004/2006 was associated with lower 5-year average (2007-2011) prevalence of (a) late HIV diagnosis, (b) linked to HIV care, and (c) engaged in HIV care within Philadelphia, PA, United States. Census tracts (N = 332). Higher average neighborhood social participation was associated with higher prevalence of late HIV diagnosis (b = 1.37, se = 0.32, p < 0.001), linked to HIV care (b = 1.13, se = 0.20, p < 0.001) and lower prevalence of engaged in HIV care (b = -1.16, se = 0.30, p < 0.001). Higher collective engagement was associated with lower prevalence of linked to HIV care (b = -0.62, se = 0.32, p < 0.05).The findings of different directions of associations among social capital indicators and HIV-related outcomes underscore the need for more nuanced research on the topic that include longitudinal assessment across key populations.

  14. Leukocyte Telomere Length in HIV-Infected and HIV-Exposed Uninfected Children: Shorter Telomeres with Uncontrolled HIV Viremia

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Hélène C. F.; Soudeyns, Hugo; Thorne, Anona; Alimenti, Ariane; Lamarre, Valérie; Maan, Evelyn J.; Sattha, Beheroze; Singer, Joel; Lapointe, Normand; Money, Deborah M.; Forbes, John

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) used in HIV antiretroviral therapy can inhibit human telomerase reverse transcriptase. We therefore investigated whether in utero or childhood exposure to NRTIs affects leukocyte telomere length (LTL), a marker of cellular aging. Methods In this cross-sectional CARMA cohort study, we investigated factors associated with LTL in HIV -1-infected (HIV+) children (n = 94), HIV-1-exposed uninfected (HEU) children who were exposed to antiretroviral therapy (ART) perinatally (n = 177), and HIV-unexposed uninfected (HIV−) control children (n = 104) aged 0–19 years. Univariate followed by multivariate linear regression models were used to examine relationships of explanatory variables with LTL for: a) all subjects, b) HIV+/HEU children only, and c) HIV+ children only. Results After adjusting for age and gender, there was no difference in LTL between the 3 groups, when considering children of all ages together. In multivariate models, older age and male gender were associated with shorter LTL. For the HIV+ group alone, having a detectable HIV viral load was also strongly associated with shorter LTL (p = 0.007). Conclusions In this large study, group rates of LTL attrition were similar for HIV+, HEU and HIV− children. No associations between children’s LTL and their perinatal ART exposure or HIV status were seen in linear regression models. However, the association between having a detectable HIV viral load and shorter LTL suggests that uncontrolled HIV viremia rather than duration of ART exposure may be associated with acceleration of blood telomere attrition. PMID:22815702

  15. Fears about HIV transmission in families with an HIV-infected parent: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Burton O; Bogart, Laura M; Corona, Rosalie; Ryan, Gery; Schuster, Mark A

    2008-11-01

    Children of HIV-infected parents may be affected by their parents' disease even if not infected themselves. Because of advances in HIV treatment that have reduced the risk for vertical HIV transmission from mother to child, more HIV-infected adults are having children. Few studies have examined whether families with an HIV-infected parent experience fears about transmission to children and how they address such fears. In this article, we describe transmission-related fears in families with an HIV-infected parent. We used semistructured qualitative interviews, conducted in person from March 2004 to March 2005, with 33 HIV-infected parents, 27 minor children who were 9 to 17 years of age, 19 adult children, and 15 caregivers (adult family members or friends who helped care for the children and/or parents) to investigate their fears about HIV transmission. The parents are a subset from the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study, a study of people in care for HIV throughout the United States. We analyzed the interview transcripts for themes related to transmission fears. In many of the families, participants identified >or=1 HIV transmission-related fear. Themes included specific fears related to blood contact, bathroom items, kissing/hugging, and food. Families addressed their fears by educating children about modes of HIV transmission and establishing rules or taking precautions to reduce the risk for HIV transmission in the household. HIV-infected parents were also concerned about catching opportunistic infections from a sick child. Many of the fears experienced by HIV-infected parents and their children were based on misconceptions about modes of HIV transmission. Pediatricians and others who treat these children may be able to offer counseling to allay fears that family members have about household transmission of HIV.

  16. Willingness of Kenyan HIV-1 serodiscordant couples to use antiretroviral based HIV-1 prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Heffron, Renee; Ngure, Kenneth; Mugo, Nelly; Celum, Connie; Kurth, Ann; Curran, Kathryn; Baeten, Jared M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral treatment (ART) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) have demonstrated efficacy as new HIV-1 prevention approaches for HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. Methods Among Kenyan HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual couples participating in a clinical trial of PrEP, we conducted a cross-sectional study and used descriptive statistical methods to explore couples' willingness to use antiretrovirals for HIV-1 prevention. The study was conducted prior to July 2011, when studies among heterosexual populations reported that ART and PrEP reduced HIV-1 risk. Results For 181 couples in which the HIV-1 infected partner had a CD4 count ≥350 cells/μL and had not yet initiated ART (and thus did not qualify for ART under Kenyan guidelines), 60.2% of HIV-1 infected partners (69.4% of men and 57.9% of women) were willing to use early ART (at CD4 ≥350 cells/μL) for HIV-1 prevention. Among HIV-1 uninfected partners, 92.7% (93.8% of men and 86.1% of women) reported willingness to use PrEP. When given a hypothetical choice of early ART or PrEP for HIV-1 prevention, 52.5% of HIV-1 infected participants would prefer to initiate ART early and 56.9% of HIV-1 uninfected participants would prefer to use PrEP. Conclusions Nearly 40% of Kenyan HIV-1 infected individuals in known HIV-1 serodiscordant partnerships reported reservations about early ART initiation for HIV-1 prevention. PrEP interest in this PrEP-experienced population was high. Strategies to achieve high uptake and sustained adherence to ART and PrEP for HIV-1 prevention in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples will require responding to couples' preferences for prevention strategies. PMID:22595872

  17. HIV-1 and HIV-2 prevalence and associated risk factors among postnatal women in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, J H; Nathoo, K J; Hargrove, J W; Iliff, P J; Mutasa, K E; Moulton, L H; Chidawanyika, H; Malaba, L C; Zijenah, L S; Zvandasara, P; Ntozini, R; Zunguza, C D; Ward, B J

    2007-08-01

    Studies of antenatal women form the predominant source of data on HIV-1 prevalence in Africa. Identifying factors associated with prevalent HIV is important in targeting diagnostic services and care. Between November 1997 and January 2000, 14,110 postnatal women from Harare, Zimbabwe were tested by ELISAs reactive to both HIV-1 and HIV-2; a subset of positive samples was confirmed with assays specific for HIV-1 and HIV-2. Baseline characteristics were elicited and modelled to identify risk factors for prevalent HIV infection. HIV-1 and HIV-2 prevalences were 32.0% (95% CI 31.2-32.8) and 1.3% (95% CI 1.1-1.5), respectively; 4% of HIV-1-positive and 99% of HIV-2-positive women were co-infected. HIV-1 prevalence increased from 0% among 14-year-olds to >45% among women aged 29-31 years, then fell to <20% among those aged>40 years. In multivariate analyses, prevalence increased with parity, was lower in married women than in single women, divorcees and widows, and higher in women with the lowest incomes and those professing no religion. Adjusted HIV-1 prevalence increased during 1998 and decreased during 1999. Age modified the effects of parity, home ownership and parental education. Among older women, prevalence was greater for women who were not homeowners. Among younger women, prevalence increased with parity and low parental education. None of these factors distinguished women co-infected with HIV-2 from those infected with HIV-1 alone. Prevalent HIV-1 infection is associated with financial insecurity and weak psychosocial support. The ZVITAMBO study apparently spanned the peak of the HIV-1 epidemic among reproductive women in Harare.

  18. Misleading sexual partners about HIV status among persons living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Benotsch, Eric G; Rodríguez, Vivian M; Hood, Kristina; Lance, Shannon Perschbacher; Green, Marisa; Martin, Aaron M; Thrun, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Most people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) disclose their serostatus to their sexual partners and take steps to protect their partners from HIV. Prior research indicates that some PLWHA portray themselves to their sexual partners as HIV-negative or otherwise misrepresent their HIV status. The aim of this study was to document the prevalence of misleading sexual partners about HIV status and to identify factors associated with misleading. A sample of 310 PLWHA completed a self-administered questionnaire assessing demographic information, disclosure, HIV knowledge, HIV altruism, psychopathy, and sexual risk behavior. Participants were also asked "Since you were diagnosed as having HIV, have you ever misled a sexual partner about your HIV status?" Overall, 18.6% of participants indicated that they had misled a sexual partner. Those who had misled a partner at some point since their diagnosis reported more current HIV transmission risk behaviors, including unprotected anal or vaginal sex with a partner who was HIV-negative or whose HIV status was unknown. Participants who had misled a partner did not differ from those who had not in terms of demographic characteristics. Individuals who had misled a partner scored significantly lower on a measure of HIV knowledge than those who had not misled a partner. HIV altruism and psychopathy were associated with sexual risk behavior, but did not differ between those who had misled and those who had not. Disclosure of HIV status can reduce HIV transmission, but only if people are candid. Interventions aimed at increasing knowledge and accurate disclosure may reduce the spread of HIV.

  19. Introduction of HIV-2 and multiple HIV-1 subtypes to Lebanon.

    PubMed Central

    Pieniazek, D.; Baggs, J.; Hu, D. J.; Matar, G. M.; Abdelnoor, A. M.; Mokhbat, J. E.; Uwaydah, M.; Bizri, A. R.; Ramos, A.; Janini, L. M.; Tanuri, A.; Fridlund, C.; Schable, C.; Heyndrickx, L.; Rayfield, M. A.; Heneine, W.

    1998-01-01

    HIV genetic variability, phylogenetic relationships, and transmission dynamics were analyzed in 26 HIV-infected patients from Lebanon. Twenty-five specimens were identified as HIV-1 and one as HIV-2 subtype B. The 25 strains were classified into six env-C2-V3 HIV-1 subtypes: B (n = 10), A (n = 11), C (n = 1), D (n = 1), G (n = 1), and unclassifiable. Potential recombinants combining parts of viral regions from different subtypes Aenv/Dpol/Agag, Genv/Apol, and the unclassifiable-subtype(env)/unclassifiable-subtype(pol)/Agag were found in three patients. Epidemiologic analysis of travel histories and behavioral risks indicated that HIV-1 and HIV-2 subtypes reflected HIV strains prevalent in countries visited by patients or their sex partners. Spread of complex HIV-subtype distribution patterns to regions where HIV is not endemic may be more common than previously thought. Blood screening for both HIV-1 and HIV-2 in Lebanon is recommended to protect the blood supply. HIV subtype data provide information for vaccine development. PMID:9866744

  20. Lung cancer incidence and mortality among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Meredith S.; Cole, Stephen R.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Kirk, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To examine the impact of HIV on lung cancer incidence and survival. Design Prospective study of 2,495 HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected injection drug users in Baltimore, MD. Methods Cancer data were obtained from the Maryland Cancer Registry. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for lung cancer in two strata of packs smoked per day by HIV serostatus, and for mortality by HIV serostatus. Results HIV-infected participants had twice the risk (HR=2.3; 95% CI: 1.1-5.1) of lung cancer. There was no evidence of an interaction between HIV and packs of cigarettes smoked per day (p-interaction=0.18). Compared to participants who smoked <1.43 packs per day, among HIV-uninfected individuals lung cancer risk was six times greater (HR=5.9; 95% CI 2.1-17) and among HIV-infected individuals lung cancer risk was doubled (HR=2.1; 95% CI 0.63-6.8) in persons who smoked ≥1.43 per day. Additionally, HIV was associated with four times the risk of death (HR=3.8; 95% CI 0.92-15) in lung cancer cases. Conclusions HIV was associated with increased risk of lung cancer, after adjusting for smoking. However, no evidence was observed for synergistic effects of HIV and smoking. Further, HIV was associated with poorer lung cancer survival, after accounting for cancer stage. PMID:20838223

  1. HIV symptom distress and smoking outcome expectancies among HIV+ smokers: a pilot test.

    PubMed

    Grover, Kristin W; Gonzalez, Adam; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Smoking occurs at high rates among people with HIV/AIDS, but little attention has been paid to understanding the nature of tobacco use among HIV+ smokers, especially the role that HIV symptoms may play in cognitive smoking processes. Accordingly, the present investigation examined the relation between HIV symptom distress (i.e., the degree to which HIV symptoms are bothersome) and smoking outcome expectancies. Fifty-seven HIV+ adult smokers (82.50% male; M(age)=47.18; 45.6% White, 28.1% Black, 17.5% Hispanic) were recruited from AIDS service organizations and hospital-based clinics. On average, participants reported knowing their HIV+ status for 16 years and the majority of participants reported that they acquired HIV through unprotected sex (66.6%). Participants completed measures pertaining to HIV symptoms, smoking behavior, and smoking outcome expectancies. HIV symptom distress was positively related to negative reinforcement, negative consequences, and positive reinforcement smoking outcome expectancies after accounting for relevant covariates. The present research suggests that HIV symptom distress may play an important role in understanding smoking outcome expectancies for smokers with HIV/AIDS. Clinical implications for HIV+ smokers are discussed, including the importance of developing effective smoking cessation treatments that meet the unique needs of this group of smokers.

  2. HIV disclosure in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Degroote, S; Vogelaers, D; Koeck, R; Borms, R; De Meulemeester, L; Vandijck, D

    2014-06-01

    As HIV is currently a chronic and manageable disease, an increasing amount of people living with HIV (PLHIV) are (again) active on the labour market. Since research on this topic is scarce, this study aimed to explore experiences of PLHIV in the workplace, especially concerning disclosure and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. A questionnaire was developed and validated in collaboration with Sensoa (Flemish expertise centre for sexual health) and participants were recruited using flyers and announcements on websites. A total of 54 PLHIV completed the questionnaire, among whom 50 (92·6%) males. Half of the participants did not disclose their HIV status in the workplace, mostly due to being afraid of social or professional consequences. Those who disclosed, reported no changes in the workplace or even reported receiving more empathy. A minority of participants have to take antiretroviral medication at work and they reported no particular problems related to medication intake. Despite improved solidarity and information campaigns, many PLHIV still do not disclose their HIV status in the workplace, most frequently due to fear for discrimination. More actions are warranted, as well as addressing possible self-stigma. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in the workplace posed little or no problems.

  3. HIV Testing among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, Daryl L.; And Others

    An increase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) throughout the world cuts across age, ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation groups. It is imperative that people find out if they are carrying the disease. Many still continue to engage in high risk behaviors in ignorance, putting themselves and their partners at risk. The relationships among fear…

  4. Silencing HIV-1 In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Frank

    2008-08-22

    RNA interference holds great promise for antiviral therapy, but delivering effective quantities of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into the right target cells in vivo represents a major challenge. Kumar et al. (2008) now report a technique to target siRNAs specifically to T cells to suppress viral infection in a humanized mouse model of HIV/AIDS.

  5. [Regenerative nodular hyperplasia in HIV].

    PubMed

    González, Ramiro Javier Romo; Chaves, Emiliano; Mullen, Eduardo; Copello, Hercilia

    2011-12-01

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver is a rare condition. We describe here the case of a patient with HIV who presented with a clinical syndrome of portal hypertension. After multiple evaluations the diagnosis was recognized by the histology. The findings were attributed to the prolonged use of didanosine.

  6. Vulnerable to HIV / AIDS. Migration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, I

    1998-01-01

    This special report discusses the impact of globalization, patterns of migration in Southeast Asia, gender issues in migration, the links between migration and HIV/AIDS, and spatial mobility and social networks. Migrants are particularly marginalized in countries that blame migrants for transmission of infectious and communicable diseases and other social ills. Effective control of HIV/AIDS among migrant and native populations requires a multisectoral approach. Programs should critically review the privatization of health care services and challenge economic models that polarize the rich and the poor, men and women, North and South, and migrant and native. Programs should recognize the equality between locals and migrants in receipt of health services. Countermeasures should have input from migrants in order to reduce the conditions that increase vulnerability to HIV/AIDS. Gender-oriented research is needed to understand women's role in migration. Rapid assessment has obscured the human dimension of migrants' vulnerability to HIV. Condom promotion is not enough. Migration is a major consequence of globalization, which holds the promise, real or imagined, of prosperity for all. Mass migration can be fueled by explosive regional developments. In Southeast Asia, migration has been part of the process of economic development. The potential to emigrate increases with greater per capita income. "Tiger" economies have been labor importers. Safe sex is not practiced in many Asian countries because risk is not taken seriously. Migrants tend to be used as economic tools, without consideration of social adjustment and sex behavior among singles.

  7. [HIV infection in northwestern Sardinia].

    PubMed

    Cherchi, G B; Mura, M S; Calia, M G; Gakis, C; Ginanneschi, R; Zara, G M; Flumene, A; Andreoni, G

    1987-01-01

    The prevalence of anti HIV antibodies was investigated in the sera of 150 drug addicts and of 62 patients not drug addicts hospitalized in the Institute of Infectious diseases of the University of Sassari in the years 1980-86. No seropositivity was detected in not drug addicts patients in the years of observation and in the drug addict ones in the years 1980-81-82. The seropositivity discovered in 1983 in 24% of drug addicts raised to 75% in the first 8 months of 1986. As regards the prevalence of anti HIV antibodies in 1986 the sera of different categories were investigated. Seropositivity was detected in 55% of 20 drug addicts prisoners, in 6.25% of 16 homosexual men, 13 of which prisoners and 3 drug addicts, in 3.7% of 27 transfused individuals, 26 of which under dyalitical treatment, and in 33.3% of sexual partners of HIV positive patients. Anti HIV antibodies were not detected in the sera of 20 laboratory workers, 22 prisoners with a negative history for homosexuality and drug addiction, 45 prison guards and 100 individuals taken at random from general population. The stages of infection in 27 drug addicts were classified according to Atlanta CDC criteria as follows: 63% of cases asymptomatic, 22.2% persistent generalized lymphoadenopathy, 7.4% minor clinical features, 3.7% serious clinical picture, 3.7% full clinical picture of AIDS.

  8. HIV and co-infections

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Christina C; Crane, Megan; Zhou, JingLing; Mina, Michael; Post, Jeffrey J; Cameron, Barbara A; Lloyd, Andrew R; Jaworowski, Anthony; French, Martyn A; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite significant reductions in morbidity and mortality secondary to availability of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection still accounts for 1.5 million deaths annually. The majority of deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa where rates of opportunistic co-infections are disproportionately high. In this review, we discuss the immunopathogenesis of five common infections that cause significant morbidity in HIV-infected patients globally. These include co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Plasmodium falciparum. Specifically, we review the natural history of each co-infection in the setting of HIV, the specific immune defects induced by HIV, the effects of cART on the immune response to the co-infection, the pathogenesis of immune restoration disease (IRD) associated with each infection, and advances in the areas of prevention of each co-infection via vaccination. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and gaps for future research. PMID:23772618

  9. Troubled Adolescents and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, John O., Ed.; And Others

    This report on adolescents, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and Human Immune Virus (HIV) infection had its beginning in the Knowledge Development Workshop "Issues in the Prevention and Treatment of AIDS Among Adolescents with Serious Emotional Disturbance," held June 9-10, 1988 in the District of Columbia. These papers are included:…

  10. Adolescents, AIDS and HIV. Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resources for Educators, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This compilation of educational resources is designed for communities which have been either overlooked in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education efforts or disproportionately affected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. The materials listed target Blacks, Latinos, Asians and Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, young…

  11. HIV Infection and Health Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Robin; Hardy, Leslie M.

    1990-01-01

    Describes issues facing policymakers dealing with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. Addresses six challenges for policymakers: (1) protecting people from discrimination; (2) designing testing and screening programs; (3) developing safe and effective antiviral drugs; (4) planning for future vaccine trials; (5) organizing and…

  12. HIV Infection and Health Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Robin; Hardy, Leslie M.

    1990-01-01

    Describes issues facing policymakers dealing with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. Addresses six challenges for policymakers: (1) protecting people from discrimination; (2) designing testing and screening programs; (3) developing safe and effective antiviral drugs; (4) planning for future vaccine trials; (5) organizing and…

  13. Immunosenescence and aging in HIV.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, Chris

    2014-07-01

    During this era of unprecedented antiretroviral therapeutic efficacy, there is hope for successfully treated individuals to achieve a longevity approaching that of the general population. However, the recent identification of a higher incidence of cardiovascular, bone, metabolic, neurocognitive and other aging comorbidities is of major concern and may compromise that ability. The purpose of this review is to focus on the dynamic process of immune remodelling, known as immune senescence, which occurs during HIV infection, and how it impacts on long-term comorbidities. Early aging in those with HIV appears to stem from persistent chronic inflammation and residual immune activation despite successful antiretroviral therapy. Multiple similarities exist between the T-cell-senescent phenotypes found in many chronic autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, including HIV disease, and the elderly. The immune risk phenotype is linked to poor clinical outcomes in the elderly and may also have clinical consequences in those with HIV. Immune senescence results in functional impairments of immunity and a reduced ability to adapt to metabolic stress. Understanding the factors driving the development of immune senescence is critical for the development of strategies to prevent early aging.

  14. Potential use of rapamycin in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Donia, Marco; McCubrey, James A; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2010-01-01

    The strong need for the development of alternative anti-HIV agents is primarily due to the emergence of strain-resistant viruses, the need for sustained adherence to complex treatment regimens and the toxicity of currently used antiviral drugs. This review analyzes proof of concept studies indicating that the immunomodulatory drug rapamycin (RAPA) possesses anti-HIV properties both in vitro and in vivo that qualifies it as a potential new anti-HIV drug. It represents a literature review of published studies that evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of RAPA in HIV. RAPA represses HIV-1 replication in vitro through different mechanisms including, but not limited, to down regulation of CCR5. In addition RAPA synergistically enhances the anti-HIV activity of entry inhibitors such as vicriviroc, aplaviroc and enfuvirtide in vitro. RAPA also inhibits HIV-1 infection in human peripheral blood leucocytes-SCID reconstituted mice. In addition, a prospective nonrandomized trial of HIV patient series receiving RAPA monotherapy after liver transplantation indicated significantly better control of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication among patients taking RAPA monotherapy. Taken together, the evidence presented in this review suggests that RAPA may be a useful drug that should be evaluated for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:21175433

  15. Prevalence and correlates of HIV serostatus disclosure.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Megan E; Richardson-Alston, Gwangi; Ayoub, Melissa; Magnus, Manya; Peterman, Thomas A; Kissinger, Patricia

    2003-09-01

    A study of HIV-positive individuals in New Orleans, Louisiana, found that the majority of patients disclosed to their main partners and family members, but less than one fourth disclosed to any casual sex partner. Older age and lower CD4 cell counts were associated with disclosure. The goal was to describe patterns of HIV serostatus disclosure among a diverse sample of patients at an HIV outpatient clinic in New Orleans, Louisiana. A convenience sample of HIV-seropositive patients provided information about disclosure of seropositivity, demographics, date of HIV diagnosis, CD4 cell count, mode of HIV acquisition, and sexual activity since HIV diagnosis. The 269 persons disclosed their HIV status to people in the following categories: main sex partner (74.2%), casual sex partner (24.8%), immediate family member (69.8%), other relative (27.0%), or friend (26.4%). Adolescents were less likely than adults to disclose to a main partner, immediate family member, or a friend. Immunosuppressed persons were more likely than nonimmunosuppressed persons to disclose to a main partner, immediate family member, or another relative. Many HIV-infected individuals delay disclosure until their disease has progressed. Interventions such as partner notification and skill-building to facilitate appropriate HIV disclosure are needed.

  16. HIV CARE FOR GEOGRAPHICALLY MOBILE POPULATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barbara S.; Garduño, L. Sergio; Reyes, Emily V.; Valiño, Raziel; Rojas, Rita; Donastorg, Yeycy; Brudney, Karen; Hirsch, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between mobility and HIV risk is well recognized, but what happens to those same individuals, once infected, as they transition to living with HIV? Does mobility affect their transition into HIV care? If so, do mobile and non-mobile populations achieve similar success with HIV treatment? The definition of mobility has changed over the centuries to encompass a complex phenotype including permanent migration, frequent travel, circular migration, and distance from HIV treatment centers. The heterogeneity of these definitions leads to discordant findings. Investigations show that mobility has an impact on HIV risk, but fewer data exist on the impact of geographic mobility on HIV care and treatment. This review will examine existing data on the impact of geographic mobility on access to and maintenance in HIV care and on adherence to antiretroviral therapy. It will also expand the concept of mobility to include data on the impact of the distance from residence to clinic on HIV care and treatment adherence. Our conclusions are that the existing literature is limited by varying definitions of mobility and the inherent oversimplification necessary to apply a “mobility measure” in a statistical analysis. The impact of mobility on HIV treatment outcomes deserves further exploration to both define the phenomenon and target interventions to these at-risk populations. PMID:21598261

  17. [HIV/AIDS and law in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2016-11-01

    The legal aspects of HIV/AIDS are mirrored by the statistical data. The aim of the author is to show the effect of HIV/AIDS on today's Hungarian society. Analysis of data issued by the National Center for Epidemiology in Hungary and those to be found in the professional literature, as well as analysis of the Hungarian legal practice. Hungarian courts tend to impose a lighter punishment on a perpetrator diagnosed with AIDS than on a healthy perpetrator. According to the data issued by the Hungarian Epidemiological Center, in 1985, 16 HIV-contaminated persons were registered in Hungary; in 1995, 81, in 2005, 107, whilst in 2015, 201 HIV-contaminated persons were registered in Hungary. In 2005, 10 of the 107 HIV-contaminated persons were anonymous, whilst, in 2015, 37 of the 201 HIV-contaminated persons were anonymous. According to the known data of not anonymous HIV-contaminated persons, the number of males predominates largely over the number of females and this has been the case during the past decades. In Hungary, only a small proportion of the HIV-contaminated persons have died: the number of males predominates over the number of females. As to HIV/AIDS, latency poses problems in the field of healthcare prevention and legal prevention. It seems to be important to protect data relating to healthcare, though the data protection should not impede the prevention of HIV/AIDS. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(47), 1884-1890.

  18. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Among Youth in the US

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV Among Youth in the US Protecting a Generation Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... MMWR) CDC Feature - HIV Among Youth: Protecting a Generation HIV Among Youth: Protecting a Generation – What ...

  19. Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV and Pregnancy Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets ... an email Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV Last Reviewed: May 16, 2017 Key Points Mother- ...

  20. Women and HIV/AIDS in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... particularly Black women, are disproportionately affected by HIV, accounting for the majority of new HIV infections, women ... estimated new HIV infections among women, while only accounting for 13% of the female population; white women ...

  1. Breast milk transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nduati, R; John, G

    1995-12-01

    Breast milk provides infants and children immunologic, nutritional, and child spacing benefits. Yet it also transmits some viruses, for example, HIV-1. The World Health Organization recommends that, in conditions with poor access to breast milk substitutes, HIV-positive women should still breast feed due to the nutritional and infectious risk of artificial feeding. It appears that breast fed infants experience a slower progression of AIDS and death. Vertical transmission of HIV-1 may occur during pregnancy, at delivery, or through breast milk. The HIV-1 transmission rate via breast milk from acutely infected women is estimated to be 29-36%. A meta-analysis of case reports and small case series of women with chronic HIV-1 infection indicated a breast feeding transmission rate of 14%. Studies suggest that the likelihood of HIV-1 transmission via breast milk increases as duration of breast feeding increases. Infants with detectable HIV-1 DNA tend to have mothers whose absolute CD4 counts are less than 400 and have severe vitamin A deficiency. Breast milk has HIV-1 specific immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM). It appears that HIV-1 elicits a local immune response. Breast milk of HIV-1 positive mothers with non-infected children tends to still have IgM and IgA until 18 months. Potential risk factors for breast milk transmission of HIV-1 include cracked nipples and mastitis in the mother; oral thrush, malnutrition, inflammation of the lips, and mucosal compromise in the infant; and vigorous suction of the neonate and use of the wrong equipment for suctioning. Inhibiting factors of HIV-1 in breast milk are bovine and human lactoferrin and a membrane associated protein that attaches to the CD4 receptor and thus prevents attachment of the HIV antigen gp120 to the CD4 receptor on T-cells.

  2. [Discussion of HIV control and prevention strategies].

    PubMed

    Lyu, P

    2016-10-06

    Expansion of HIV testing and ART treatment are core strategies for achieving the ambitious global goal of ending the HIV epidemic by the end of 2030, and achieving the "90-90-90" target by 2020. In China, great progress in HIV control and prevention has been made; however, there is room to enhance the effectiveness of HIV-related strategies. In addition, some implemented strategies have not achieved their expected output. To confront the challenge of sexual transmission of HIV, which is the main route of transmission in China, more targeted HIV prevention strategies that lead to their expected outcomes are essential. It is important to strengthen existing strategies that have been proved effective. However, it is also critical to create innovative strategies, and there are five approaches to achieve this. First, a holistic perspective should be adopted, to better understand the current situation and problems. This means intervention strategies should give serious consideration of how to meet the sociocultural needs of target populations rather than merely carry out behavioral interventions. Second, community-based HIV prevention settings should have more important roles in providing HIV-related health care services. Moreover, to improve the effectiveness of these strategies, a problem-led working style should be integrated into HIV prevention measures overall. Third, thoroughly analyzing characteristics of the current HIV epidemic using more evidence-based considerations must be undertaken, to better control HIV sexual transmission. Fourth, continued improvement of AIDS prevention and control mechanisms is needed, to ensure their sustainable development. Last, it is necessary to involve more NGOs in HIV prevention work by strengthening their management and working capacities to provide HIV-related services. Also needed is further improvement in both technical and management capacities, so as to build a stable basis for effective response.

  3. HIV classification using coalescent theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming; Letiner, Thomas K; Korber, Bette T

    2008-01-01

    Algorithms for subtype classification and breakpoint detection of HIV-I sequences are based on a classification system of HIV-l. Hence, their quality highly depend on this system. Due to the history of creation of the current HIV-I nomenclature, the current one contains inconsistencies like: The phylogenetic distance between the subtype B and D is remarkably small compared with other pairs of subtypes. In fact, it is more like the distance of a pair of subsubtypes Robertson et al. (2000); Subtypes E and I do not exist any more since they were discovered to be composed of recombinants Robertson et al. (2000); It is currently discussed whether -- instead of CRF02 being a recombinant of subtype A and G -- subtype G should be designated as a circulating recombination form (CRF) nd CRF02 as a subtype Abecasis et al. (2007); There are 8 complete and over 400 partial HIV genomes in the LANL-database which belong neither to a subtype nor to a CRF (denoted by U). Moreover, the current classification system is somehow arbitrary like all complex classification systems that were created manually. To this end, it is desirable to deduce the classification system of HIV systematically by an algorithm. Of course, this problem is not restricted to HIV, but applies to all fast mutating and recombining viruses. Our work addresses the simpler subproblem to score classifications of given input sequences of some virus species (classification denotes a partition of the input sequences in several subtypes and CRFs). To this end, we reconstruct ancestral recombination graphs (ARG) of the input sequences under restrictions determined by the given classification. These restritions are imposed in order to ensure that the reconstructed ARGs do not contradict the classification under consideration. Then, we find the ARG with maximal probability by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The probability of the most probable ARG is interpreted as a score for the classification. To our

  4. Brief Report: A Qualitative Analysis of Discussions about HIV in Families of Parents with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cowgill, Burton O.; Bogart, Laura M.; Parra, Michelle T.; Ryan, Gery; Elliott, Marc N.; Park, Susan K.; Patch, Jennifer; Schuster, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore communication about HIV prevention, risk behaviors, and transmission in families affected by HIV. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 33 parents with HIV, 27 children (9- to 17-years old), and 19 adult children (≥18-years old) across the U.S. Coders reviewed transcripts, identified themes, and coded transcripts. Results Youth felt uncomfortable discussing HIV with their parent who has HIV because they worried about upsetting and reminding the parent of his/her illness. Adult children reported learning about HIV prevention by watching how the illness affected their parents. Few siblings reported talking with one another about HIV because they worried about upsetting their brother/sister and about their sibling unintentionally disclosing the parent's illness to others. Conclusions Discussions between youth and their parent with HIV and their siblings vary, highlighting the need for further research in this area. PMID:19028715

  5. Great Expectations: HIV Risk Behaviors and Misperceptions of Low HIV Risk among Incarcerated Men.

    PubMed

    Golin, C E; Barkley, B G; Biddell, C; Wohl, D A; Rosen, D L

    2017-03-30

    Incarcerated populations have relatively high HIV prevalence but little has been reported about their aggregate HIV risk behaviors or perceptions of risk. A random selection of HIV-negative men (n = 855) entering a US state prison system were surveyed to assess five risk behaviors and his self-perceived HIV risk. Using multivariate logistic regression, we identified factors associated with having elevated actual but low perceived risk (EALPR). Of the 826 men with complete data, 88% were at elevated risk. While 64% of the sample had risk perceptions concordant with their actual risk, 14% had EALPR (with the remainder at low actual but high perceived risk). EALPR rates were lower in those with a pre-incarceration HIV test but higher for those with a negative prison entry HIV test. HIV testing counseling should assess for discordance between actual and perceived risk and communicate the continued risk of HIV despite a negative result.

  6. Creating an African HIV Clinical Research and Prevention Trials Network: HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Anatoli; Price, Matt A.; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Inambao, Mubiana; Sanders, Eduard J.; Anzala, Omu; Latka, Mary H.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Asiki, Gershim; Ssetaala, Ali; Ruzagira, Eugene; Allen, Susan; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Mutua, Gaudensia; Makkan, Heeran; Tichacek, Amanda; Brill, Ilene K.; Fast, Pat; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Amornkul, Pauli N.; Gilmour, Jill

    2015-01-01

    HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner. PMID:25602351

  7. Suggested running head: Personal HIV Knowledge, appointment adherence and HIV outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Deborah; Cook, Ryan; Rodriguez, Allan; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna

    2012-01-01

    HIV knowledge may impact patient access, understanding, and utilization of HIV medical information. This study explored the relationship between personal HIV knowledge, appointment adherence and treatment outcomes. HIV-infected individuals (n = 210) were assessed on factors related to HIV knowledge and appointment adherence. Adherence data and laboratory values were extracted from medical records. HIV knowledge was measured by participants’ knowledge of their CD4 count and viral load (VL) and adherence was defined as attendance at > 75% of appointments. Two thirds of participants were adherent, but only one third knew their CD4 count and VL. Controlling for time since last appointment, HIV knowledge more than doubled the odds of appointment adherence. In combination with relationship with provider, knowledge predicted increased CD4 count and increased odds of an undetectable VL by almost five times. Personal HIV knowledge may be a valuable indicator of engagement in care and may also facilitate improved treatment outcomes. PMID:23143751

  8. Creating an African HIV clinical research and prevention trials network: HIV prevalence, incidence and transmission.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Anatoli; Price, Matt A; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Inambao, Mubiana; Sanders, Eduard J; Anzala, Omu; Latka, Mary H; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Asiki, Gershim; Ssetaala, Ali; Ruzagira, Eugene; Allen, Susan; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Mutua, Gaudensia; Makkan, Heeran; Tichacek, Amanda; Brill, Ilene K; Fast, Pat; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Amornkul, Pauli N; Gilmour, Jill

    2015-01-01

    HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner.

  9. Cardiovascular Diseases in HIV-infected Subjects (HIV-HEART Study)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-05-07

    Detection of Frequency, Severity and Progression of Cardiovascular Diseases in Patients With HIV-infection.; Effect on Cardiovascular Risk and Life Quality by Age, Gender, Classic Cardiovascular Risk Factors,; HIV-specific Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Cardiovascular Medication, Antiretroviral Medication

  10. HIV-specific changes in the motor performance of HIV-positive intravenous drug abusers.

    PubMed

    von Giesen, H J; Hefter, H; Roick, H; Mauss, S; Arendt, G

    1994-12-01

    Motor tests comprising the analysis of postural tremor, most rapid voluntary alternating index finger movements (MRAM) and the rise time of most rapid index finger extensions (CT) allow us to quantify HIV-associated minor motor deficits electrophysiologically. The electrophysiological results in 57 HIV-positive individuals who acquired HIV infection by intravenous drug abuse (IVDA) were compared with those of 57 matched HIV-positive homosexuals and 98 HIV-negative controls to evaluate a possible additional influence of IVDA on motor performance. Motor deficits showed no differences between HIV-positive i.v. drug abusers and homosexuals, revealing a highly significant slowing of MRAM and prolongation of CT to an almost identical extent. Thus, in HIV-infected individuals minor motor deficits are characteristic early signs of subclinical central nervous system involvement regardless of the mode of HIV infection.

  11. CCR5 and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Blanpain, Cédric; Libert, Frédérick; Vassart, Gilbert; Parmentier, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play a crucial role in the trafficking of leukocyte populations across the body, and are involved in the development of a large variety of human diseases. CCR5 is the main coreceptor used by macrophage (M)-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2, which are responsible for viral transmission. CCR5 therefore plays an essential role in HIV pathogenesis. A number of inflammatory CC-chemokines, including MIP-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta, RANTES, MCP-2, and HCC-1[9-74] act as CCR5 agonists, while MCP-3 is a natural antagonist of the receptor. CCR5 is mainly expressed in memory T-cells, macrophages, and immature dendritic cells, and is upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines. It is coupled to the Gi class of heterotrimeric G-proteins, and inhibits cAMP production, stimulates Ca2+ release, and activates PI3-kinase and MAP kinases, as well as other tyrosine kinase cascades. A mutant allele of CCR5, CCR5 delta 32 is frequent in populations of European origin, and encodes a nonfunctional truncated protein that is not transported to the cell surface. Homozygotes for the delta 32 allele exhibit a strong, although incomplete, resistance to HIV infection, whereas heterozygotes display delayed progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Many other alleles, affecting the primary structure of CCR5 or its promoter have been described, some of which lead to nonfunctional receptors or otherwise influence AIDS progression. CCR5 is considered as a drug target in the field of HIV, but also in a growing number of inflammatory diseases. Modified chemokines, monoclonal antibodies and small chemical antagonists, as well as a number of gene therapy approaches have been developed in this frame.

  12. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Cuba: description and tentative explanation of its low HIV prevalence.

    PubMed

    de Arazoza, Héctor; Joanes, Jose; Lounes, Rachid; Legeai, Camille; Clémençon, Stéphan; Pérez, Jorge; Auvert, Bertran

    2007-11-09

    The Cuban HIV/AIDS epidemic has the lowest prevalence rate of the Caribbean region. The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Cuba and to explore the reasons for this low prevalence. Data were obtained from the Cuban HIV/AIDS programme established in 1983. This programme has an extensive adult HIV testing policy, including testing of all pregnant women. HIV and AIDS cases have been recorded since 1986. Persons found to be HIV-positive are interviewed on their sexual behaviour and partners. Tracing and voluntary testing of these partners are organised. Epidemiological description of this epidemic was obtained from analysis of this data set. Using elementary mathematical analyses, we estimated the coverage of the detection system (percentage of HIV-positive adults detected) and the average period between HIV infection and detection. Estimated HIV prevalence rates were corrected to account for the coverage. HIV prevalence has increased since 1996. In 2005, the prevalence among pregnant women was 1.2 per 10,000 (16/137000). Estimated HIV prevalence among 15- to 49-year-olds was 8.1 per 10,000 (4913/6065000; 95%CI: 7.9 per 10,000 - 8.3 per 10,000). Most (77%) of the HIV-positive adults were men, most (85.1%) of the detected HIV-positive men were reported as having sex with men (MSM), and most of the HIV-positive women reported having had sex with MSM. The average period between HIV infection and detection was estimated to be 2.1 years (IQR = 1.7 - 2.2 years). We estimated that, for the year 2005, 79.6% (IQR: 77.3 - 81.4%) of the HIV-positive persons were detected. MSM drive the HIV epidemic in Cuba. The extensive HIV testing policy may be an important factor in explaining the low HIV prevalence. To reduce the HIV epidemic in Cuba, the epidemic among MSM should be addressed. To understand this epidemic further, data on sexual behaviour should be collected. Now that antiretroviral therapy is more widely available, the Cuban policy

  13. Prevalence and characteristics of HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV coinfections in Tuscany.

    PubMed

    Puglia, Monia; Stasi, Cristina; Da Frè, Monica; Voller, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide about 30% of HIV-infected patients are coinfected with HCV or HBV. The HIV/HCV coinfection is more common in individuals who have a history of drug addiction. The aims of this study were to assess the HCV and HBV prevalence in HIV-infected patients and analyze their characteristics. We considered the new HIV diagnoses notified by the regional surveillance system of Tuscany from 2009 to 2013. Descriptive analyses were conducted on the socio-demographic characteristics, routes of transmission, and reason to perform the test. In coinfected patients we assessed the risk for being late presenter (LP) or the risk of having AIDS. In 5 years of surveillance a total of 1354 new HIV diagnoses were notified: 1188 (87.7%) were HIV alone, 106 (7.8%) HIV/HCV, 56 (4.1%) HIV/HBV, and 4 (0.33%) HIV/HCV/HBV. The main risk factor was injection drug use in 52.8% of HCV/HIV cases, while in HIV/HBV patients the main risk factor was sexual exposure. HIV/HBV coinfected patients showed worse clinical and immunological features than HIV and HIV/HCV patients: 78.6% had CD4 count less than 350mm(-3) (vs. 54.6% and 62.1%, respectively) and 39.4% had AIDS (vs 20.7% and 7.6%). The risk for being LP triples for HIV/HBV (OR 2.98; 95% IC: 1.56-5.70) than patients with HIV alone. We have observed less advanced disease in HIV and HCV-HIV patients compared with HBV-HIV coinfected patients. Moreover, our results show a higher prevalence of HIV/HCV among drug addicts and in the age-group 35-59, corresponding to those born in years considered most at risk for addiction. This study also confirms the finding of a less advanced HIV disease in HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Surveillance of recent HIV infections among newly diagnosed HIV cases in Germany between 2008 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Alexandra; Hauser, Andrea; Zimmermann, Ruth; Santos-Hövener, Claudia; Bätzing-Feigenbaum, Jörg; Wildner, Stephan; Kücherer, Claudia; Bannert, Norbert; Hamouda, Osamah; Bremer, Viviane; Bartmeyer, Barbara

    2017-07-11

    The HIV surveillance system in Germany is based on mandatory, anonymous notification of newly diagnosed HIV cases by laboratories. Because the time between HIV infection and the diagnosis of HIV varies widely between persons, it is difficult to determine the number of cases of recent HIV infection among newly diagnosed cases of HIV. In Germany, the BED-capture-enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA) has been used to distinguish between recent and long-standing HIV infection. The aim of this analysis is to report the proportion of cases of recent HIV infection among newly diagnosed cases in Germany between 2008 and 2014 and to identify factors associated with recent infections. A sample of voluntary laboratories among all HIV diagnostic laboratories was recruited. Residual blood from HIV diagnostic tests was spotted on filter paper as dried serum or dried plasma spots and was sent along with the notification form of the HIV cases. The BED-CEIA test was performed. A case was defined as recent HIV infection with a BED-CEIA test result of less than 0.8 normalized optical density, with the exclusion of CDC stage C. The proportion of recent newly diagnosed HIV infections among different groups (such as transmission groups, gender or age groups) was calculated. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with recent HIV infection and to identify subpopulations with high proportions of recent HIV infections. Approximately 10,257 newly diagnosed cases were tested for recency using the BED-CEIA. In total, 3084 (30.4%) of those were recently infected with HIV. The highest proportion of recent HIV infections was found among men who had sex with men (MSM) (35%) and persons between 18 and 25 years of age (43.0%). Logistic regression revealed that female German intravenous drug users with a recent HIV infection had a higher chance of being detected than German MSM (OR 2.27). Surveillance of recent HIV infection is a useful additional tool to monitor the HIV epidemic in

  15. HIV Disclosure and Transmission Risks to Sex Partners Among HIV-Positive Men

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Moira O.; Cherry, Chauncey; Grebler, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Disclosure of HIV-positive status to sex partners is critical to protecting uninfected partners. In addition, people living with HIV often risk criminal prosecution when they do not inform sex partners of their HIV status. The current study examined factors associated with nondisclosure of HIV status by men living with HIV in Atlanta, GA (92% African African, mean age = 43.8), who engage in condomless sex with uninfected sex partners. Sexually active HIV-positive men (N = 538) completed daily electronic sexual behavior assessments over the course of 28 days and completed computerized interviews, drug testing, medication adherence assessments, and HIV viral load retrieved from medical records. Results showed that 166 (30%) men had engaged in condomless vaginal or anal intercourse with an HIV-uninfected or unknown HIV status sex partner to whom they had not disclosed their HIV status. Men who engaged in nondisclosed condomless sex were less adherent to their HIV treatment, more likely to have unsuppressed HIV, demonstrated poorer disclosure self-efficacy, enacted fewer risk reduction communication skills, and held more beliefs that people with HIV are less infectious when treated with antiretroviral therapy. We conclude that undisclosed HIV status is common and related to condomless sex with uninfected partners. Men who engage in nondisclosed condomless sex may also be more infectious given their nonadherence and viral load. Interventions are needed in HIV treatment as prevention contexts that attend to disclosure laws and enhance disclosure self-efficacy, improve risk reduction communication skills, and increase understanding of HIV infectiousness. PMID:27158850

  16. HIV risk behavior and access to services: what predicts HIV testing among heterosexually active homeless men?

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Suzanne L; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-06-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV testing behavior of homeless men. This study examined the association between individual (HIV risk) and structural (service access) factors and past year HIV testing. Participants were a representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men interviewed from meal programs in the Skid Row region of Los Angeles. Logistic regression examined the association between past year HIV testing and demographic characteristics, HIV risk behavior, and access to other services in the Skid Row area in the past 30 days. Despite high rates of past year HIV testing, study participants also reported high rates of HIV risk behavior, suggesting there is still significant unmet need for HIV prevention among homeless men. Having recently used medical/dental services in the Skid Row area (OR: 1.91; CI: 1.09, 3.35), and being a military veteran (OR: 2.10; CI: 1.01-4.37) were significantly associated with HIV testing service utilization. HIV testing was not associated with HIV risk behavior, but rather with access to services and veteran status, the latter of which prior research has linked to increased service access. We suggest that programs encouraging general medical service access may be important for disseminating HIV testing services to this high-risk, vulnerable population.

  17. Ginkgolic acid inhibits HIV protease activity and HIV infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jian-Ming; Yan, Shaoyu; Jamaluddin, Saha; Weakley, Sarah M.; Liang, Zhengdong; Siwak, Edward B.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Several HIV protease mutations, which are resistant to clinical HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), have been identified. There is a great need for second-generation PIs with different chemical structures and/or with an alternative mode of inhibition. Ginkgolic acid is a natural herbal substance and a major component of the lipid fraction in the nutshells of the Ginkgo biloba tree. The objective of this study was to determine whether ginkgolic acid could inhibit HIV protease activity in a cell free system and HIV infection in human cells. Material/Methods Purified ginkgolic acid and recombinant HIV-1 HXB2 KIIA protease were used for the HIV protease activity assay. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used for HIV infection (HIV-1SF162 virus), determined by a p24gag ELISA. Cytotoxicity was also determined. Results Ginkgolic acid (31.2 μg/ml) inhibited HIV protease activity by 60%, compared with the negative control, and the effect was concentration-dependent. In addition, ginkgolic acid treatment (50 and 100 μg/ml) effectively inhibited the HIV infection at day 7 in a concentration-dependent manner. Ginkgolic acid at a concentration of up to 150 μg/ml demonstrated very limited cytotoxicity. Conclusions Ginkgolic acid effectively inhibits HIV protease activity in a cell free system and HIV infection in PBMCs without significant cytotoxicity. Ginkgolic acid may inhibit HIV protease through different mechanisms than current FDA-approved HIV PI drugs. These properties of ginkgolic acid make it a promising therapy for HIV infection, especially as the clinical problem of viral resistance to HIV PIs continues to grow. PMID:22847190

  18. Frequent HIV Testing: Impact on HIV Risk Among Chinese Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Qian, Han-Zhu; Ruan, Yuhua; Wu, Pingsheng; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Jia, Yujiang; Yin, Lu; Lu, Hongyan; He, Xiong; Shao, Yiming; Vermund, Sten H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic continues to expand among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. The NIMH Project Accept/HPTN 043 trial suggested a borderline significant trend towards HIV incidence reduction among persons with higher testing rates. Methods We assessed HIV testing histories and infection status among a community-based Beijing MSM. HIV serostatus was lab-confirmed. We ascertained demographic/behavioral factors via questionnaire-based interviews. Associations of prior HIV testing with odds of current HIV infection were assessed, seeking improved like-with-like risk comparisons through multivariable logistic regression analysis with propensity score adjustment and restricted cubic spline modeling. Results Among 3,588 participants, 12.7% were HIV-infected; 70.8 % reported having ever tested for HIV. Compared to MSM who never tested, those ever testing had a 41% reduction in the odds of being HIV-positive (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.48, 0.74). Higher HIV testing frequencies were associated with a decreasing trend in the odds of being infected with HIV vs. a referent group with no prior testing (>6 tests [aOR: 0.27; 95%CI: 0.18, 0.41]; 4–6 [aOR: 0.55; 95%CI: 0.39, 0.78]; 2–3 [aOR: 0.61; 95%CI: 0.45, 0.82]; P for trend <0.001). The multivariable adjusted model with restricted cubic spline of HIV testing frequency showed a higher frequency of prior HIV testing associated with lower odds of HIV infection, particularly among men with ≥10 lifetime male sexual partners. Conclusions Using risk probability adjustments to enable less biased comparisons, frequent HIV testing was associated with a lower HIV odds among Chinese MSM. PMID:27003496

  19. Sequencing of Gag/Env association with HIV genotyping resolution and HIV-related epidemiologic studies of HIV in China.

    PubMed

    Ren, L; Wang, H W; Xu, Y; Feng, Y; Zhang, H F; Wang, K H

    2016-10-24

    HIV genotyping has led to conflicting results between laboratories. Therefore, identifying the most accurate gene combinations to sequence remains a priority. Datasets of Chinese HIV subtypes based on several markers and deposited in PubMed, Metstr, CNKI, and VIP databases between 2000 and 2015 were studied. In total, 9177 cases of amplification-positive samples from 26 provinces of China were collected and used to classify HIV subtypes based on eight individual genes or a combination thereof. CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC and B were the prevalent HIV subtypes in China, accounting for 84.07% of all genotypes. Gag/Env sequencing classified a greater number of HIV subtypes compared to other genes or combination of gene fragments. The geographical distribution of Gag and Gag/Env genotypes was similar to that observed with all genetic markers. Further principal component analysis showed a significantly different geographical distribution pattern of HIV in China for HIV genotypes detected with Gag/Env, which was in line with the distribution of all HIV genotypes in China. Gag/Env sequences had the highest diversity of the eight markers studied, followed by Gag and Gag/Pol/Env; Pol/Env polymorphisms were the least divergent. Gag/Env can serve as a high-resolution marker for HIV genotyping.

  20. A systematic review of measures of HIV/AIDS stigma in paediatric HIV-infected and HIV-affected populations

    PubMed Central

    McAteer, Carole Ian; Truong, Nhan-Ai Thi; Aluoch, Josephine; Deathe, Andrew Roland; Nyandiko, Winstone M; Marete, Irene; Vreeman, Rachel Christine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV-related stigma impacts the quality of life and care management of HIV-infected and HIV-affected individuals, but how we measure stigma and its impact on children and adolescents has less often been described. Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies that measured HIV-related stigma with a quantitative tool in paediatric HIV-infected and HIV-affected populations. Results and discussion Varying measures have been used to assess stigma in paediatric populations, with most studies utilizing the full or variant form of the HIV Stigma Scale that has been validated in adult populations and utilized with paediatric populations in Africa, Asia and the United States. Other common measures included the Perceived Public Stigma Against Children Affected by HIV, primarily utilized and validated in China. Few studies implored item validation techniques with the population of interest, although scales were used in a different cultural context from the origin of the scale. Conclusions Many stigma measures have been used to assess HIV stigma in paediatric populations, globally, but few have implored methods for cultural adaptation and content validity. PMID:27717409

  1. Frequency of HIV Screening in the Veterans Health Administration: Implications for Early Diagnosis of HIV Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdiserri, Ronald O.; Rodriguez, Fred; Holodniy, Mark

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the frequency of HIV testing across the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the largest provider of HIV care in the United States. An electronic survey was used to determine the volume and location of HIV screening, confirmatory testing, rapid testing and laboratory consent policies in VA medical centers between October 1, 2005, and…

  2. Developing the HIV workforce: a case study of a training model for inexperienced HIV providers.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kathleen R; Wong, Annie; Espinoza, Lilia; Ryu, Jenica; Chacko, Ron; Fisher, Dixie; Gates, Jerry D

    2012-11-01

    HIV patients in a rural California community were inconsistently receiving optimum HIV care. A local primary care physician assumed the care of these patients and contacted an experienced HIV provider for assistance. This report describes a three-step onsite training program that was implemented and the ensuing successful patient outcomes.

  3. HIV Prevention Capacity Building: A Framework for Strengthening and Sustaining HIV Prevention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motamed, Cathy; de Palomo, Frank Beadle; Pritchett, Joy; Wahlstrom, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    To combat the HIV epidemic, health service providers and public health professionals must use the best possible science and proven program models to reach and influence HIV-positive individuals and others at high risk of becoming infected. The large number and complexity of approaches that are necessary to institute and maintain HIV prevention…

  4. Group Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Rompa, David; Cage, Marjorie

    2005-01-01

    Results of a randomized controlled trial show that a behavioral intervention grounded in social cognitive theory reduces unprotected sexual behaviors among men and women living with HIV infection, with the greatest reductions in HIV transmission risk behaviors occurring with non-HIV-positive sex partners. In this article, the authors describe the…

  5. AIDS Knowledge and HIV Stigma among Children Affected by HIV/AIDS in Rural China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lin, Xiuyun; Stanton, Bonita

    2011-01-01

    The current study was designed to assess the level of AIDS knowledge and its relationship with personal stigma toward people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) among children living in communities of high HIV prevalence in rural China. The data were collected in 2009 from 118 orphanage orphans (children who had lost both of their parents to HIV and…

  6. HIV/AIDS Case Managers and Client HIV Status Disclosure: Perceived Client Needs, Practices, and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Klein, Susan J.; Kalichman, Moira O.; O'Connell, Daniel A.; Freedman, Jay A.; Eaton, Lisa; Cain, Demetria

    2007-01-01

    People living with HIV/AIDS often need assistance in deciding whether or how to disclose their HIV status to others, and case managers are in a unique position to offer this assistance. The current study surveyed 223 case managers providing services to people living with HIV/AIDS in New York State. The survey was conducted anonymously, and case…

  7. CD25 preselective anti-HIV vectors for improved HIV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Lawson, Je'tai; Chen, Rachel X; Bauer, Gerhard; Nolta, Jan A; Anderson, Joseph S

    2012-12-01

    As HIV continues to be a global public health problem with no effective vaccine available, new and innovative therapies, including HIV gene therapies, need to be developed. Due to low transduction efficiencies that lead to low in vivo gene marking, therapeutically relevant efficacy of HIV gene therapy has been difficult to achieve in a clinical setting. Methods to improve the transplantation of enriched populations of anti-HIV vector-transduced cells may greatly increase the in vivo efficacy of HIV gene therapies. Here we describe the development of preselective anti-HIV lentiviral vectors that allow for the purification of vector-transduced cells to achieve an enriched population of HIV-resistant cells. A selectable protein, human CD25, not normally found on CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), was incorporated into a triple combination anti-HIV lentiviral vector. Upon purification of cells transduced with the preselective anti-HIV vector, safety was demonstrated in CD34+ HPCs and in HPC-derived macrophages in vitro. Upon challenge with HIV-1, improved efficacy was observed in purified preselective anti-HIV vector-transduced macrophages compared to unpurified cells. These proof-of-concept results highlight the potential use of this method to improve HIV stem cell gene therapy for future clinical applications.

  8. HIV/AIDS Case Managers and Client HIV Status Disclosure: Perceived Client Needs, Practices, and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Klein, Susan J.; Kalichman, Moira O.; O'Connell, Daniel A.; Freedman, Jay A.; Eaton, Lisa; Cain, Demetria

    2007-01-01

    People living with HIV/AIDS often need assistance in deciding whether or how to disclose their HIV status to others, and case managers are in a unique position to offer this assistance. The current study surveyed 223 case managers providing services to people living with HIV/AIDS in New York State. The survey was conducted anonymously, and case…

  9. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among HIV+ People: Research Synthesis and Implications for HIV Care

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, Rae A.; Vanable, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is prevalent among HIV+ individuals despite the success of antiretroviral treatments and limited evidence of CAM's safety and efficacy. To characterize the potential impact of CAM use on HIV care, we conducted a systematic review of 40 studies of CAM use among HIV+ people. The goals of this review are to: (a) describe the demographic, biomedical, psychosocial, and health behavior correlates of CAM use; (b) characterize patient-reported reasons for CAM use; and (c) identify methodological and conceptual limitations of the reviewed studies. Findings confirm that a high proportion of HIV+ individuals report CAM use (M = 60%). Overall, CAM use is more common among HIV+ individuals who are men who have sex with men (MSM), non-minority, better educated, and less impoverished. CAM use is also associated with greater HIV symptom severity and longer disease duration. HIV+ CAM users commonly report that they use CAM to prevent or alleviate HIV-related symptoms, reduce treatment side-effects, and improve quality of life. Findings regarding the association between CAM use, psychosocial adjustment, and adherence to conventional HIV medications are mixed. While the reviewed studies are instrumental in describing the characteristics of HIV+ CAM users, this literature lacks a conceptual framework to identify causal factors involved in the decision to use CAM or explain implications of CAM use for conventional HIV care. To address this concern, we propose the use of health behavior theory and discuss implications of review findings for HIV care providers. PMID:18608078

  10. Elevated substance P levels in HIV-infected women in comparison to HIV-negative women.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Steven D; Cnaan, Avital; Lynch, Kevin G; Benton, Tami; Zhao, Huaqing; Gettes, David R; Evans, Dwight L

    2008-03-01

    Substance P and its receptor (neurokinin-1R) are potent modulators of neuroimmunoregulation and HIV/AIDS infection. We previously demonstrated that HIV-seropositive men had significantly higher substance P levels compared to uninfected controls. We now demonstrate that substance P plasma levels are significantly higher in HIV-infected women in comparison to uninfected control women.

  11. Group Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Rompa, David; Cage, Marjorie

    2005-01-01

    Results of a randomized controlled trial show that a behavioral intervention grounded in social cognitive theory reduces unprotected sexual behaviors among men and women living with HIV infection, with the greatest reductions in HIV transmission risk behaviors occurring with non-HIV-positive sex partners. In this article, the authors describe the…

  12. Imaging lung manifestations of HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Allen, Carolyn M; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan H; Irion, Klaus L; Al Ghanem, Sarah; Gouda, Alaa; Khan, Ali Nawaz

    2010-10-01

    Advances in our understanding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have led to improved care and incremental increases in survival. However, the pulmonary manifestations of HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Respiratory complaints are not infrequent in patients who are HIV positive. The great majority of lung complications of HIV/AIDS are of infectious etiology but neoplasm, interstitial pneumonias, Kaposi sarcoma and lymphomas add significantly to patient morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of lung of complications associated with HIV. Accurate diagnosis is based on an understanding of the pathogenesis of the processes involved and their imaging findings. Imaging also plays an important role in selection of the most appropriate site for tissue sampling, staging of disease and follow-ups. We present images of lung manifestations of HIV/AIDS, describing the salient features and the differential diagnosis.

  13. HIV/AIDS, Undernutrition and Food Insecurity

    PubMed Central

    Ivers, Louise C; Cullen, Kimberly A; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Block, Steven; Coates, Jennifer; Webb, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Despite tremendous advances in HIV care and increased funding for treatment, morbidity and mortality from HIV/AIDS in developing countries remains unacceptably high. A major contributing factor is that globally over 800 million people remain chronically undernourished and the HIV epidemic largely overlaps with populations already suffering from low diet quality and quantity. We present an updated review of the relationship between HIV, nutritional deficiencies and food insecurity, and consider efforts to interrupt this cycle at a programmatic level. As HIV infection progresses, it causes a catabolic state and increased susceptibility to infection which are compounded by lack of caloric and other nutrient intake, leading to progressive worsening of malnutrition. Despite calls from national and international organizations to integrate HIV and nutrition programs, data are lacking on how such programs can be effectively implemented in resource-poor settings, on the optimum content and duration of nutrition support and on ideal target recipients. PMID:19725790

  14. Strategies for universalistic and targeted HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, D C; Padian, N

    1997-10-01

    The controversy over "targeted" versus "universalistic" programs for HIV prevention has persisted throughout the history of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States and in some European countries. Building on previous analyses, we outline methods for integrating universalistic and targeted HIV prevention programming. The outline considers possible synergy between targeted and universalistic programs, rather than a forced choice between the two. Components within this framework include a continuum of the intensity of targeted programs, specification of local risk behavior populations, categories of risk behavior, and HIV seroprevalence within local risk-behavior populations. Given the scarce resources currently available, preventing all new HIV infections is not a realistic public health goal, but with better use of current scientific knowledge, it should be possible to greatly reduce the rate of new HIV infections.

  15. Emerging Pediatric HIV Epidemic Related to Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zencovich, Militza; Gushulak, Brian D.

    2006-01-01

    In 2002, Canada introduced routine, mandatory HIV antibody screening for all residency applicants, including selected children. We report screening results from January 2002 to February 2005. Thirty-six pediatric HIV cases were detected (14/100,000 applicants); 94% of infected children were eligible to arrive in Canada. Thirty-two of the affected children were from Africa, and maternal infection was the main risk factor. Only 4 (11%) of the children had received antiretroviral therapy. In countries of low HIV incidence, migration-related imported infection in children may be an emerging epidemic. The early identification of HIV-infected immigrant women permits intervention to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission. Routine HIV testing as a component of the medical examination of immigrants has national and international health policy and programmatic implications. PMID:16704809

  16. Recent update in HIV vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous efforts to develop a successful human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine, the quest for a safe and effective HIV vaccine seems to be remarkably long and winding. Disappointing results from previous clinical trials of VaxGen's AIDSVAXgp120 vaccine and MRKAd5 HIV-1 Gag/Pol/Nef vaccine emphasize that understanding the correlates of immune protection in HIV infection is the key to solve the puzzle. The modest vaccine efficacy from RV144 trial and the successive results obtained from the correlate of risk analysis have reinvigorated the HIV vaccine research field leading to various novel strategies. This paper will review the brief history and recent advances in HIV vaccine development. PMID:26866018

  17. No. 185-HIV Screening in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Keenan-Lindsay, Lisa; Yudin, Mark H

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to provide recommendations to obstetric health care providers and to minimize practice variations for HIV screening, while taking provincial and territorial recommendations into account. The risk of transmission of HIV from mother to fetus is significant if the mother is not treated. The primary outcome of screening for and treating HIV in pregnancy is a marked decrease in the rate of vertical transmission of HIV from mother to fetus. Secondary outcomes include confirmation of HIV infection in the woman, which allows optimization of her health and long-term management. The Cochrane Library and Medline were searched for English-language articles published related to HIV screening and pregnancy. Additional articles were identified through the references of these articles. All study types were reviewed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. HIV-associated multicentric Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Deepa; Mitsuyasu, Ronald

    2011-09-01

    HIV-associated multicentric Castleman disease (HIV MCD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder, the incidence of which appears to be increasing in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era. Current knowledge of the disease is limited and this review will discuss what is known about the pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and prognosis of HIV MCD. HIV MCD has been shown to be associated with infection with human herpesvirus-8. Vascular endothelial growth factor and the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) are also thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of MCD. Currently, rituximab is often used alone or in combination with chemotherapy for treatment of MCD. Novel monoclonal antibodies targeting IL-6 and the IL-6 receptor are also being studied for the management of this disease. Because HIV MCD is an uncommon diagnosis, comprehensive clinical studies have not been done, and understanding of the disease is incomplete. Further studies are needed to make definitive conclusions regarding optimal treatment of HIV MCD.

  19. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies for HIV Eradication.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-02-01

    Passive transfer of antibodies has long been considered a potential treatment modality for infectious diseases, including HIV. Early efforts to use antibodies to suppress HIV replication, however, were largely unsuccessful, as the antibodies that were studied neutralized only a relatively narrow spectrum of viral strains and were not very potent. Recent advances have led to the discovery of a large portfolio of human monoclonal antibodies that are broadly neutralizing across many HIV-1 subtypes and are also substantially more potent. These antibodies target multiple different epitopes on the HIV envelope, thus allowing for the development of antibody combinations. In this review, we discuss the application of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for HIV treatment and HIV eradication strategies. We highlight bNAbs that target key epitopes, such as the CD4 binding site and the V2/V3-glycan-dependent sites, and we discuss several bNAbs that are currently in the clinical development pipeline.

  20. Comprehensive HIV Prevention for Transgender Persons.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Mary Spink; Finlayson, Teresa J; Pitts, Nicole L; Keatley, JoAnne

    2017-02-01

    Transgender persons are at high risk for HIV infection, but prevention efforts specifically targeting these people have been minimal. Part of the challenge of HIV prevention for transgender populations is that numerous individual, interpersonal, social, and structural factors contribute to their risk. By combining HIV prevention services with complementary medical, legal, and psychosocial services, transgender persons' HIV risk behaviors, risk determinants, and overall health can be affected simultaneously. For maximum health impact, comprehensive HIV prevention for transgender persons warrants efforts targeted to various impact levels-socioeconomic factors, decision-making contexts, long-lasting protections, clinical interventions, and counseling and education. We present current HIV prevention efforts that reach transgender persons and present others for future consideration.

  1. HIV Testing, Subjective Beliefs and Economic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Rebecca L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of learning HIV status on economic behavior among rural Malawians. According to economic life-cycle models, if learning HIV results is informative about additional years of life, being diagnosed HIV-positive or negative should predict changes in consumption, investment and savings behavior with important micro and macro-economic implications. Using an experiment that randomly assigned incentives to learn HIV results, I find that while learning HIV results had short term effects on subjective belief of HIV infection, these differences did not persist after two years. Consistent with this, there were relatively few differences two years later in savings, income, expenditures, and employment between those who learned and did not learn their status. PMID:24369439

  2. [Stroke in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Lino, Ireneia; Sousa, António; Correia, José

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) is changing. New drug treatments have reduced morbidity and mortality of this disease, therefore it is necessary to start treating the HIV infection as a chronical disease. The association of the stroke with the HIV infection was inicially thought to be a result of other opportunistic infeccions and tumors. However, the vascular disease associated with HIV infection has been a subject of research and debate. New evidence shows that the vascular diseases could be a threat for the pacients doing highly active antirretroviral therapy (HAART). In this paper, we review the association between the HIV infection and stroke. Furthermore, we have done an analysis of the risk for the stroke on pacients with HIV infection considering the changes of the infection spectrum by the introduction of HAART.

  3. Human microbiome and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Deepak; Li, Yihong; Yang, Liying; Pei, Zhiheng; Poles, Michael; Abrams, William R; Malamud, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Understanding of the human microbiome continues to grow rapidly; however, reports on changes in the microbiome after HIV infection are still limited. This review surveys the progress made in methodology associated with microbiome studies and highlights the remaining challenges to this field. Studies have shown that commensal oral, gut, vaginal, and penile bacteria are vital to the health of the human immune system. Our studies on crosstalk among oral and gastrointestinal soluble innate factors, HIV, and microbes indicated that the oral and gut microbiome was altered in the HIV-positive samples compared to the negative controls. The importance of understanding the bacterial component of HIV/AIDS, and likelihood of "crosstalk" between viral and bacterial pathogens, will help in understanding the role of the microbiome in HIV-infected individuals and facilitate identification of novel antiretroviral factors for use as novel diagnostics, microbicides, or therapeutics against HIV infection.

  4. HIV/AIDS, undernutrition, and food insecurity.

    PubMed

    Ivers, Louise C; Cullen, Kimberly A; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Block, Steven; Coates, Jennifer; Webb, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    Despite tremendous advances in care for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and increased funding for treatment, morbidity and mortality due to HIV/AIDS in developing countries remains unacceptably high. A major contributing factor is that >800 million people remain chronically undernourished globally, and the HIV epidemic largely overlaps with populations already experiencing low diet quality and quantity. Here, we present an updated review of the relationship between HIV infection, nutritional deficiencies, and food insecurity and consider efforts to interrupt this cycle at a programmatic level. As HIV infection progresses, it causes a catabolic state and increased susceptibility to other infections, which are compounded by a lack of caloric and other nutrient intake, leading to progressive worsening of malnutrition. Despite calls from national and international organizations to integrate HIV and nutritional programs, data are lacking on how such programs can be effectively implemented in resource-poor settings, on the optimum content and duration of nutritional support, and on ideal target recipients.

  5. Diagnosis of Acute HIV Infection in Connecticut

    PubMed Central

    DUBROW, ROBERT; SIKKEMA, KATHLEEN J.; MAYER, KENNETH H.; BRUCE, R. DOUGLAS; JULIAN, PAMELA; RODRIGUEZ, IRMA; BECKWITH, CURT; ROOME, AARON; DUNNE, DANA; BOEVING, ALEXANDRA; KIDDER, THOMAS J.; JENKINS, HEIDI; DOBSON, MICHAEL; BECKER, JOSEPH; MERSON, MICHAEL H.

    2011-01-01

    Acute HIV infection (AHI) is the earliest stage of HIV disease, when plasma HIV viremia, but not HIV antibodies, can be detected. Acute HIV infection often presents as a nonspecific viral syndrome. However, its diagnosis, which enables linkage to early medical care and limits further HIV transmission, is seldom made. We describe the experience of Yale's Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS with AHI diagnosis in Connecticut, as a participating center in the National Institute of Mental Health Multisite AHI Study. We sought to identify AHI cases by clinical referrals and by screening for AHI at two substance abuse care facilities and an STD clinic: We identified one case by referral and one through screening of 590 persons. Screening for AHI is feasible and probably cost effective. Primary care providers should include AHI in the differential diagnosis when patients present with a nonspecific viral syndrome. PMID:19637661

  6. Frequency and implications of HIV superinfection.

    PubMed

    Redd, Andrew D; Quinn, Thomas C; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2013-07-01

    HIV superinfection occurs when an individual with HIV is infected with a new distinct HIV viral strain. Superinfection has been reported throughout the world, and studies have recorded incidence rates of 0-7·7% per year. Use of next-generation sequencing has improved detection of superinfection, which can be transmitted by injecting drug use and sexual intercourse. Superinfection might have incidence rates comparable to those of initial HIV infection. Clinicians should encourage safe sexual and injecting drug use practices for HIV-infected patients because superinfection has detrimental effects on clinical outcomes and could pose a concern for large-scale antiretroviral treatment plans. The occurrence of superinfection has implications for vaccine research, since it seems initial HIV infection is not fully protective against a subsequent infection. Additional collaborative research could benefit care of patients and inform future vaccine design.

  7. Human Microbiome and HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yihong; Yang, Liying; Pei, Zhiheng; Poles, Michael; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of the human microbiome continues to grow rapidly; however, reports on changes in the microbiome after HIV infection are still limited. This review surveys the progress made in methodology associated with microbiome studies and highlights the remaining challenges to this field. Studies have shown that commensal oral, gut, vaginal, and penile bacteria are vital to the health of the human immune system. Our studies on crosstalk among oral and gastrointestinal soluble innate factors, HIV, and microbes indicated that the oral and gut microbiome was altered in the HIV-positive samples compared to the negative controls. The importance of understanding the bacterial component of HIV/AIDS, and likelihood of “crosstalk” between viral and bacterial pathogens, will help in understanding the role of the microbiome in HIV-infected individuals and facilitate identification of novel antiretroviral factors for use as novel diagnostics, microbicides, or therapeutics against HIV infection. PMID:22193889

  8. Applying HIV testing guidelines in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Megan R; Fogler, Jess; Weber, Shannon; Goldschmidt, Ronald H

    2009-12-15

    An estimated one fourth of persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are not aware they are infected. Early diagnosis of HIV has the potential to ensure optimal outcomes for infected persons and to limit the spread of the virus. Important barriers to testing among physicians include insufficient time, reimbursement issues, and lack of patient acceptance. Current HIV testing guidelines address many of these barriers by making the testing process more streamlined and less stigmatizing. The opt-out consent process has been shown to improve test acceptance. Formal pretest counseling and written consent are no longer recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nevertheless, pretest discussions provide an opportunity to give information about HIV, address fears of discrimination, and identify ongoing high-risk activities. With increased HIV screening in the primary care setting, more persons with HIV could be identified earlier, receive timely and appropriate care, and get treatment to prevent clinical progression and transmission.

  9. Immigration and HIV infection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Loue, S; Oppenheim, S

    1994-02-01

    This pilot study was conducted to determine areas in which additional education regarding the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is needed by the undocumented and recently immigrated HIV-infected population, and to obtain preliminary information on the ability of this community to access medical treatment for HIV. Information regarding health status, immigration status, and the use of medical services was obtained from all HIV-infected undocumented and recently immigrated individuals who sought services from a Southern California nonprofit agency between July 1, 1990 and December 31, 1990. A total of 54 such individuals presented for services. Thirteen individuals reported participating in shared needle usage for the administration of medication or vitamins, in addition to other known risk factors for HIV. Only one of these 13 individuals had access to nonemergency medical care. Additional research is necessary to determine the reasons for these needle sharing behaviors. Educational outreach is needed to address these behaviors as a possible risk factor for HIV transmission.

  10. Recent update in HIV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Shin, So Youn

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous efforts to develop a successful human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine, the quest for a safe and effective HIV vaccine seems to be remarkably long and winding. Disappointing results from previous clinical trials of VaxGen's AIDSVAXgp120 vaccine and MRKAd5 HIV-1 Gag/Pol/Nef vaccine emphasize that understanding the correlates of immune protection in HIV infection is the key to solve the puzzle. The modest vaccine efficacy from RV144 trial and the successive results obtained from the correlate of risk analysis have reinvigorated the HIV vaccine research field leading to various novel strategies. This paper will review the brief history and recent advances in HIV vaccine development.

  11. Perceived HIV-Associated Stigma among HIV-Seropositive Men: Psychometric Study of HIV Stigma Scale.

    PubMed

    Valle, Adrian; Treviño, Ana Cecilia; Zambrano, Farith Francisco; Urriola, Karla Elizabeth; Sánchez, Luis Antonio; Elizondo, Jesus Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    To assess the internal consistency and factor structure of the abridged Spanish version of the Berger HIV Stigma Scale (HSS-21), to provide evidence for its convergent and discriminant validity, and to describe perceived stigma in an urban population from northeast Mexico. Seventy-five HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) were recruited. Participants answered the Spanish versions of three Likert-type scales: HSS-21, Robsenberg's self-esteem scale, and the abbreviated version of the Zung's Depression Scale. HSS-21 showed high reliability and validity; its factor structure included four components: concern with public attitudes; negative self-image; disclosure concerns; and enacted stigma. The level of stigma was high in 27 out of 75 (36%) participants; nevertheless, the score found in the component related to disclosure concerns indicated high level of stigma in 68% of participants. The score of HSS-21 was positively correlated with the score of depression and negatively correlated with the score of self-esteem. Results demonstrated high reliability for the HSS-21; correlations with other scales supported its validity. This scale demonstrated to be a practical tool for assessing stigma among Mexican HIV-positive MSM. High level of stigma was found only in the factor related to disclosure concerns. Identifying HIV-associated stigma through a short, reliable, and validated instrument will allow the development of interventions that cope and manage stigma in HIV-positive MSM. HSS-21 distinguishes between different dimensions of stigma and will contribute to a better understanding of this phenomenon.

  12. [Human defensins: prophylaxis and therapy against HIV?].

    PubMed

    Prado-Montes de Oca, Ernesto

    2006-01-01

    Human defensins are endogenous antimicrobial peptides with prophylactic and therapeutic potential against HIV. The ability of defensins to bind the HIV envelope could be exploited to design topic agents that block viral entry into exposed mucosa. Additionally, their capacity to inhibit viral replication, complement system activation, dendritic and memory T cells chemoattraction, together with peptide engineering could bring about new and better antiretroviral drugs. Clinical trials could be demonstrated the efficacy of defensins against HIV in clinical practice.

  13. Macrophages and HIV-1: An Unhealthy Constellation.

    PubMed

    Sattentau, Quentin J; Stevenson, Mario

    2016-03-09

    Lentiviruses have a long-documented association with macrophages. Abundant evidence exists for in vitro and, in a tissue-specific manner, in vivo infection of macrophages by the primate lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, macrophage contribution to aspects of HIV-1 and SIV pathogenesis, and their role in viral persistence in individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy, remains unclear. Here we discuss recent evidence implicating macrophages in HIV-1-mediated disease and highlight directions for further investigation.

  14. The ethics of talking about 'HIV cure'.

    PubMed

    Rennie, Stuart; Siedner, Mark; Tucker, Joseph D; Moodley, Keymanthri

    2015-03-27

    In 2008, researchers reported that Timothy Brown (the 'Berlin Patient'), a man with HIV infection and leukemia, received a stem-cell transplant that removed HIV from his body as far as can be detected. In 2013, an infant born with HIV infection received anti-retroviral treatment shortly after birth, but was then lost to the health care system for the next six months. When tested for HIV upon return, the child (the 'Mississippi Baby') had no detectable viral load despite cessation of treatment. These remarkable clinical developments have helped reinvigorate the field of 'HIV cure' research. Although this research field is largely in a pre-clinical phase, talk about curing HIV has become a regular feature in the global mass media. This paper explores the language of HIV cure from philosophical, ethical and historical perspectives. Examination of currently influential definitions of 'functional' and 'sterilizing' HIV cure reveal that these conceptualizations are more complicated than they seem. Cure is often understood in narrowly biomedical terms in isolation from the social and psychological dimensions of illness. Contemporary notions of HIV cure also inherit some of the epistemic problems traditionally associated with cures for other health conditions, such as cancer. Efforts to gain greater conceptual clarity about cure lead to the normative question of how 'HIV cure research' ought to be talked about. We argue that attention to basic concepts ethically matter in this context, and identify advantages as well as potential pitfalls of how different HIV/AIDS stakeholders may make use of the concept of cure. While concepts other than cure (such as remission) may be appropriate in clinical contexts, use of the word cure may be justified for other important purposes in the struggle against HIV/AIDS.

  15. Smoking, HIV, and risk of pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Westreich, Daniel; Cates, Jordan; Cohen, Mardge; Weber, Kathleen M; Seidman, Dominika; Cropsey, Karen; Wright, Rodney; Milam, Joel; Young, Mary A; Mehta, C Christina; Gustafson, Deborah R; Golub, Elizabeth T; Fischl, Margaret A; Adimora, Adaora A

    2017-02-20

    Cigarette smoking during pregnancy increases risks of poor pregnancy outcomes including miscarriage and stillbirth (pregnancy loss), but the effect of smoking on pregnancy loss among HIV-infected women has not been explored. Here, investigated the impact of smoking on risk of pregnancy loss among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women, and estimated the potential impact of realistic smoking cessation interventions on risk of pregnancy loss among HIV-positive women. We analyzed pregnancy outcomes in HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study between 1994 and 2014. We estimated effects of current smoking at or immediately before pregnancy on pregnancy loss; we controlled for confounding using regression approaches, and estimated potential impact of realistic smoking cessation interventions using a semiparametric g-formula approach. Analysis examined 1033 pregnancies among 659 women. The effect of smoking on pregnancy loss differed dramatically by HIV status: adjusted for confounding, the risk difference comparing current smokers to current nonsmokers was 19.2% (95% confidence limit 10.9-27.5%) in HIV-positive women and 9.7% (95% confidence limit 0.0-19.4%) in HIV-negative women. These results were robust to sensitivity analyses. We estimated that we would need to offer a realistic smoking cessation intervention to 36 women to prevent one pregnancy loss. Smoking is a highly prevalent exposure with important consequences for pregnancy in HIV-positive pregnant women in the United States, even in the presence of potent highly active antiretroviral therapy. This evidence supports greater efforts to promote smoking cessation interventions among HIV-positive women, especially those who desire to become pregnant.

  16. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  17. HIV, HPV, and microbiota: partners in crime?

    PubMed

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Vásquez-Domínguez, Emilia; Pérez-Molina, José Antonio; Sainz, Talía; de Benito, Amparo; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Gosalbes, María José; Moreno, Santiago

    2017-02-20

    Altered interplay between gut mucosa and dysbiotic bacteria during HIV infection seems to fuel chronic immune dysfunction and might explain the excess rates of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal cancer in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we show in HIV-infected MSM undergoing screening for HPV-related cancer that specific fecal and mucosal bacteria are able to predict the existence of precancerous anal lesions. If confirmed, these bacterial biomarkers could be exploited either as diagnostic tools or therapeutic targets.

  18. Plunging ranula in young HIV patient.

    PubMed

    Hershkin, Adam T; Miller, Edward J

    2007-11-01

    The case of a 15-year-old African-American male with congenital HIV on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) therapy with a plunging ranula who was treated with surgical removal of the offending sublingual gland and suffered no complications. This case may serve as an example that young HIV patients with this pathologic condition should be expected to have a similar course as a non-HIV patient.

  19. Oral microbiome in HIV-associated periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Julian, Marc; Guillén, Yolanda; Peterson, Jessica; Reznik, David; Harris, Erica V; Joseph, Sandeep J; Rivera, Javier; Kannanganat, Sunil; Amara, Rama; Nguyen, Minh Ly; Mutembo, Simon; Paredes, Roger; Read, Timothy D; Marconi, Vincent C

    2017-03-01

    HIV-associated periodontal diseases (PD) could serve as a source of chronic inflammation. Here, we sought to characterize the oral microbial signatures of HIV+ and HIV- individuals at different levels of PD severity.This cross-sectional study included both HIV+ and HIV- patients with varying degrees of PD. Two tooth, 2 cheek, and 1 saliva samples were obtained for microbiome analysis. Mothur/SILVADB were used to classify sequences. R/Bioconductor (Vegan, PhyloSeq, and DESeq2) was employed to assess overall microbiome structure differences and differential abundance of bacterial genera between groups. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to assess immune activation in CD4 and CD8 cell populations.Around 250 cheek, tooth, and saliva samples from 50 participants (40 HIV+ and 10 HIV-) were included. Severity of PD was classified clinically as None/Mild (N), Moderate (M), and Severe (S) with 18 (36%), 16 (32%), and 16 (32%) participants in each category, respectively. Globally, ordination analysis demonstrated clustering by anatomic site (R2 = 0.25, P < 0.001). HIV status and PD severity showed a statistically significant impact on microbiome composition but only accounted for a combined 2% of variation. HIV+ samples were enriched in genera Abiotrophia, Neisseria, Kingella, and unclassified Neisseriaceae and depleted in Leptotrichia and Selenomonas. The Neisseria genus was consistently enriched in HIV+ participants regardless of sampling site and PD level. Immune markers were altered in HIV+ participants but did not show association with the oral microbiome.HIV-associated changes in oral microbiome result in subtle microbial signatures along different stages of PD that are common in independent oral anatomic sites.

  20. Identify needs of women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Jelliman, Pauline

    This article reports on the development of the Between the Sheets project for women living with HIV. It began with an event that provided a forum to address their unmet needs concerning sexual activity and related issues. Development was informed by a focus group of women with HIV, some of whom also presented their personal stories. Attendees' evaluations have identified further unmet needs and ways HIV services might adapt to better meet the needs of these individuals.

  1. Smoking, HIV, and risk of pregnancy loss

    PubMed Central

    Westreich, Daniel; Cates, Jordan; Cohen, Mardge; Weber, Kathleen M.; Seidman, Dominika; Cropsey, Karen; Wright, Rodney; Milam, Joel; Young, Mary A.; Mehta, C. Christina; Gustafson, Deborah R.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Fischl, Margaret A.; Adimora, Adaora A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Cigarette smoking during pregnancy increases risks of poor pregnancy outcomes including miscarriage and stillbirth (pregnancy loss), but the effect of smoking on pregnancy loss among HIV-infected women has not been explored. Here, investigated the impact of smoking on risk of pregnancy loss among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women, and estimated the potential impact of realistic smoking cessation interventions on risk of pregnancy loss among HIV-positive women. Design: We analyzed pregnancy outcomes in HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study between 1994 and 2014. Methods: We estimated effects of current smoking at or immediately before pregnancy on pregnancy loss; we controlled for confounding using regression approaches, and estimated potential impact of realistic smoking cessation interventions using a semiparametric g-formula approach. Results: Analysis examined 1033 pregnancies among 659 women. The effect of smoking on pregnancy loss differed dramatically by HIV status: adjusted for confounding, the risk difference comparing current smokers to current nonsmokers was 19.2% (95% confidence limit 10.9–27.5%) in HIV-positive women and 9.7% (95% confidence limit 0.0–19.4%) in HIV-negative women. These results were robust to sensitivity analyses. We estimated that we would need to offer a realistic smoking cessation intervention to 36 women to prevent one pregnancy loss. Conclusion: Smoking is a highly prevalent exposure with important consequences for pregnancy in HIV-positive pregnant women in the United States, even in the presence of potent highly active antiretroviral therapy. This evidence supports greater efforts to promote smoking cessation interventions among HIV-positive women, especially those who desire to become pregnant. PMID:27902507

  2. Neuromuscular Diseases Associated with HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Simpson, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are common in HIV, occurring at all stages of disease and affecting all parts of the peripheral nervous system. These disorders have diverse etiologies including HIV itself, immune suppression and dysregulation, co-morbid illnesses and infections, and side effects of medications. In this article, we review the following HIV-associated conditions: distal symmetric polyneuropathy, inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex, autonomic neuropathy, progressive polyradiculopathy due to cytomegalovirus, herpes zoster, myopathy and other rarer disorders. PMID:19771594

  3. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is one of the presumptive causes of CD4+ T cell depletion during HIV infection and progression to AIDS. However, the precise role of HIV-1 in this process remains unexplained. HIV-1 protease (PR) has been suggested as a possible factor, but a direct link between HIV-1 PR enzymatic activity and apoptosis has not been established. Results Here, we show that expression of active HIV-1 PR induces death in HeLa and HEK-293 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This conclusion is based on in vivo observations of the direct localization of HIV-1 PR in mitochondria, a key player in triggering apoptosis. Moreover, we observed an HIV-1 PR concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and the role of HIV-1 PR in activation of caspase 9, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In addition, in vitro data demonstrated that HIV-1 PR mediates cleavage of mitochondrial proteins Tom22, VDAC and ANT, leading to release of AIF and Hsp60 proteins. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we also identified a new HIV-1 PR interaction partner, breast carcinoma-associated protein 3 (BCA3). We found that BCA3 accelerates p53 transcriptional activity on the bax promoter, thus elevating the cellular level of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Conclusion In summary, our results describe the involvement of HIV-1 PR in apoptosis, which is caused either by a direct effect of HIV-1 PR on mitochondrial membrane integrity or by its interaction with cellular protein BCA3. PMID:24886575

  4. Update on HIV dementia and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Brew, Bruce J; Chan, Phillip

    2014-08-01

    The introduction of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) has dramatically reduced the risk of central nervous system opportunistic infection and severe dementia secondary to HIV infection in the last two decades. However, a milder form of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remains prevalent in the cART era and has a significant impact on patients' quality of life. In this review, we outline updated research findings on investigating and monitoring cognitive impairment in HAND patients. The outcomes of recent research on the pathogenesis of HAND and how it overlaps with neurodegenerative diseases are discussed. Lastly, there is a brief discussion of the results of clinical trials using a brain-penetrating cART regimen.

  5. Embedding HIV Mentoring Programs in HIV Research Networks.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M Isabel; Wheeler, Darrell P; Alfonso, Sarah V

    2016-09-01

    Responding to the demands of the HIV/AIDS epidemic necessitates a diverse scientific and clinical workforce trained in applying interdisciplinary research approaches to address the epidemic domestically and internationally. Ensuring diversity in our workforce requires concerted efforts. Yet, the majority of graduate and post-graduate programs are ill-equipped to provide this type of training. Research networks, the HPTN, HVTN, CFAR and ATN, are uniquely positioned to implement interdisciplinary mentoring programs and all four have done so. We describe these programs, the nuts and bolts of program implementation and efforts to recruit and retain diversity scholars. We outline some inherent challenges such as competing demands for network resources or tension in aligning scholars' research agenda with that of the networks. We argue that the benefits to be gained from continuing these programs far outweigh their costs and that these programs are an essential component of a comprehensive strategy for developing the future HIV research workforce.

  6. High HIV prevalence, suboptimal HIV testing, and low knowledge of HIV-positive serostatus among injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    PubMed

    Niccolai, Linda M; Toussova, Olga V; Verevochkin, Sergei V; Barbour, Russell; Heimer, Robert; Kozlov, Andrei P

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to estimate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence and testing patterns among injection drug users (IDUs) in St. Petersburg, Russia. HIV prevalence among 387 IDUs in the sample was 50%. Correlates of HIV-positive serostatus included unemployment, recent unsafe injections, and history/current sexually transmitted infection. Seventy-six percent had been HIV tested, but only 22% of those who did not report HIV-positive serostatus had been tested in the past 12 months and received their test result. Correlates of this measure included recent doctor visit and having been in prison or jail among men. Among the 193 HIV-infected participants, 36% were aware of their HIV-positive serostatus. HIV prevalence is high and continuing to increase in this population. Adequate coverage of HIV testing has not been achieved, resulting in poor knowledge of positive serostatus. Efforts are needed to better understand motivating and deterring factors for HIV testing in this setting.

  7. STD patients’ preferences for HIV prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Jose G; Jones, Deborah L; Weiss, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to explore the knowledge of and preferences regarding effective biomedical interventions among high risk individuals attending a sexually transmitted diseases clinic, and to examine the effect of a brief information intervention on preference. Participants completed a baseline assessment, attended a presentation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention methods, and completed a postintervention assessment. Outcome measures included: demographics and sexual risk factors, self-perceived HIV risk, and knowledge and attitudes regarding new biomedical methods of HIV prevention. After the baseline evaluation, participants were provided with information on new biomedical prevention strategies. Participants were given the option to review the information by reading a pamphlet or by viewing a brief video containing the same information. Participants (n=97) were female (n=51) and male (n=46). At baseline, only a small minority of participants were aware of the newer biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection. Postintervention, 40% endorsed having heard about the use of HIV medications to prevent HIV infection; 72% had heard that male circumcision can decrease the risk of acquiring HIV infection in men; and 73% endorsed knowledge of the potential role of microbicides in decreasing the risk of acquiring HIV. Following the intervention, the most preferred prevention method was male condoms, followed by preexposure prophylaxis, and microbicides. The least preferred methods were male circumcision and female condoms. This study provides preliminary information on knowledge and attitudes regarding newer biomedical interventions to protect against HIV infection. PMID:25540597

  8. Oral manifestations of HIV disease: A review.

    PubMed

    Aškinytė, Daiva; Matulionytė, Raimonda; Rimkevičius, Arūnas

    2015-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to plague the world. Evaluation of oral health status is important at every stage in the management of HIV disease. Oral health services and professionals can contribute effectively to the control of HIV/AIDS through health education, patient care, infection control and surveillance. Dental professionals have an important task of determining accurate diagnosis of oral manifestations and choosing proper treatment for each case. This review provides information on HIV associated orofacial lesions, their clinical presentation and up to date treatment strategies.

  9. HIV criminalisation and sex work in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jeffreys, Elena; Matthews, Kane; Thomas, Alina

    2010-05-01

    In 2008, Scarlet Alliance, the Australian Sex Workers Association, carried out a needs assessment among sex workers living with HIV in Australia. The research showed that HIV positive sex workers experience discrimination from within the community, are criminalised for sex work and subject to disclosure laws in some states and territories, and face stigma perpetrated by the media. Supported by legislation, they have an almost insurmountable lack of access to policy development due to disclosure and confidentiality issues, and have expressed ongoing frustration at the lack of leadership on the intersecting issues of HIV and sex work. A high profile prosecution of a sex worker living with HIV coincided with the duration of the needs assessment project. The research gave a voice to sex workers living with HIV and highlighted the levels of institutionalised marginalisation and stigmatisation they experience. Criminalisation of sex work, of people living with HIV, and of sex workers living with HIV is at the core of this discrimination and must be challenged. Scarlet Alliance advocates for the decriminalisation of sex work across all jurisdictions in Australia. This will deliver rights to sex workers living with HIV and create a more equitable and productive environment for HIV prevention and public health generally.

  10. HIV Diagnosis and Treatment through Advanced Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Zulfiqar, Hafiza Fizzah; Javed, Aneeqa; Sumbal; Afroze, Bakht; Ali, Qurban; Akbar, Khadija; Nadeem, Tariq; Rana, Muhammad Adeel; Nazar, Zaheer Ahmad; Nasir, Idrees Ahmad; Husnain, Tayyab

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the chief contributor to global burden of disease. In 2010, HIV was the fifth leading cause of disability-adjusted life years in people of all ages and leading cause for people aged 30–44 years. It is classified as a member of the family Retroviridae and genus Lentivirus based on the biological, morphological, and genetic properties. It infects different cells of the immune system, such as CD4+ T cells (T-helper cells), dendritic cells, and macrophages. HIV has two subtypes: HIV-1 and HIV-2. Among these strains, HIV-1 is the most virulent and pathogenic. Advanced diagnostic methods are exploring new ways of treatment and contributing in the reduction of HIV cases. The diagnostic techniques like PCR, rapid test, EIA, p24 antigen, and western blot have markedly upgraded the diagnosis of HIV. Antiretroviral therapy and vaccines are promising candidates in providing therapeutic and preventive regimes, respectively. Invention of CRISPR/Cas9 is a breakthrough in the field of HIV disease management. PMID:28326304

  11. eHealth interventions for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Noar, Seth M; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly changing media landscape and proliferation of new technologies creates vast new opportunities for HIV prevention. The fast growth of the relatively new eHealth field is a testament to the excitement and promise of these new technologies. eHealth interventions in HIV prevention tested to date include computer- and Internet-based interventions; chat room interventions; text messaging interventions; and social media. The current article provides a brief review of these types of interventions in HIV prevention, including their unique advantages and evidence of efficacy. Implications for future research in the eHealth HIV prevention field are discussed.

  12. Novel Cell and Gene Therapies for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hoxie, James A.; June, Carl H.

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy dramatically improves survival in HIV-infected patients. However, persistence of HIV in reservoirs has necessitated lifelong treatment that can be complicated by cumulative toxicities, incomplete immune restoration, and the emergence of drug-resistant escape mutants. Cell and gene therapies offer the promise of preventing progressive HIV infection by interfering with HIV replication in the absence of chronic antiviral therapy. Individuals homozygous for a deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5Δ32) are largely resistant to infection from R5-topic HIV-1 strains, which are most commonly transmitted. A recent report that an HIV-infected patient with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia was effectively cured from HIV infection after transplantation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC) from a CCR5Δ32 homozygous donor has generated renewed interest in developing treatment strategies that target viral reservoirs and generate HIV resistance in a patient’s own cells. Although the development of cell-based and gene transfer therapies has been slow, progress in a number of areas is evident. Advances in the fields of gene-targeting strategies, T-cell-based approaches, and HSCs have been encouraging, and a series of ongoing and planned trials to establish proof of concept for strategies that could lead to successful cell and gene therapies for HIV are under way. The eventual goal of these studies is to eliminate latent viral reservoirs and the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy. PMID:23028130

  13. Drawing conceptual linkages: property rights and HIV.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Priya

    2008-12-01

    An understanding of the impact of HIV/AIDS epidemic on broader social development necessitates a closer scrutiny of the relationship between HIV/AIDS and economic productivity. In this article, which is based on her presentation at a concurrent session at the conference, Priya Nanda describes the relationship between the widespread exclusion in developing countries of land ownership by women and their vulnerability to HIV and the effects of HIV. The author calls for more research on the complexity and diversity of land tenure systems and property laws.

  14. Heroin dependence and HIV infection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chawarski, Marek C; Mazlan, Mahmud; Schottenfeld, Richard S

    2006-04-01

    Malaysia is experiencing severe problems with heroin dependence and HIV infection. This, study evaluated drug use and other HIV risk behaviors and their association with HIV and other infectious diseases in heroin-dependent subjects enrolled in a clinical trial of drug abuse treatment in Muar, Malaysia. Baseline assessment of treatment-seeking subjects (n=177) included the Addiction Severity Index; AIDS Risk Inventory; serological tests for HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C; and chest X-ray. All of the subjects were male; 67.8% were Malays, 28.8% Chinese, and 2.3%. Indian. Subjects had a mean (SD) age of 37.2 (9.1) years and 14.4 (8.5) years of using heroin; 76.3% reported lifetime injection drug use (IDU), and 41.5% reported current IDU; 30 of 156 (19.2%) tested HIV positive, 143 of 159 (89.9%) tested hepatitis C positive, and 25 of 159 (15.7%) had radiological evidence of pulmonary tuberbulosis. Malay subjects had a significantly higher prevalence of current IDU, needle sharing (p<0.01), and HIV infection (p<0.05) compared with Chinese subjects. Lifetime IDU, needle sharing, lack of consistent condom use, and Malay ethnicity were significantly associated with HIV infection. The high prevalence of HIV infection among heroin-dependent individuals, in Malaysia supports the important of interventions to reduce the major risk factors for HIV, including IDU, needle sharing, and unprotected sex.

  15. The HIV-1 epidemic in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Puren, A J

    2002-01-01

    The first reported cases of HIV-1 infection in South Africa occurred in 1982. Two distinct HIV-1 epidemic patterns were recognized. Initially the infection was prevalent in white males who had sex with males. The HIV-1 clade B was associated with this group. By 1989, the second epidemic was recognized primarily in the black population. Infections in this case were mainly heterosexual in origin. The HIV-1 clade involved was mainly C. The national HIV-1 sero-prevalence in antenatal attendees was less than 1% in 1990 and by 1994 this figure had risen to 7.5%. The most recent antenatal surveillance for HIV-1 sero-prevalence in 1999 revealed the following. The national prevalence rate for 1999 was 22.4% compared with the 1998 rate of 22.8%. The data highlighted the profound effect the epidemic had and will have on the disease burden in South Africa and by extension on the social and economic fronts. This view was emphasised by the impact HIV-1 infection had on tuberculosis. For example, sentinel surveys have attributed 44% of tuberculosis cases to HIV-1 infection. Moreover, the high prevalence of sexually transmitted infections will certainly exacerbate the HIV-1 epidemic.

  16. Cancer Prevention in HIV-Infected Populations

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Priscila H.; Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo M.; Yarchoan, Robert; Uldrick, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer since the advent of effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). While cART substantially decreases the risk of developing some cancers, HIV-infected individuals remain at high risk for Kaposi sarcoma, lymphoma and several solid tumors. Currently HIV-infected patients represent an aging group, and malignancies have become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Tailored cancer-prevention strategies are needed for this population. In this review we describe the etiologic agents and pathogenesis of common malignancies in the setting of HIV, as well as current evidence for cancer prevention strategies and screening programs. PMID:26970136

  17. HIV infection in females dependent on drugs.

    PubMed

    Wai, B H; Singh, S; Varma, S L

    1996-03-01

    One hundred and seventy-one drug-dependent females in a drug rehabilitation centre were studied to estimate the prevalence of HIV infection among them. Twenty-four (14%) were positive on the Western Blot test. The presence of HIV infection was significantly correlated with syphilis (p < 0.03) and age (p < 0.001); 83% of those who were HIV positive were intravenous drug users. The need for harm reduction programmes to prevent spread of HIV infection among injecting drug users is stressed.

  18. HIV and pregnancy: considerations for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Lachat, Maryanne F; Scott, Carol A; Relf, Michael V

    2006-01-01

    This article describes current nursing practice for pregnant women with HIV. In the United States, the number of new cases of HIV continues to rise in women of childbearing age. Women often learn of their HIV status when a pregnancy involves them in the healthcare delivery system. Since the manifestation of the disease in 1981, there have been significant advances in treatment, and now, among pregnant women testing positive for HIV, the risk of perinatal transmission can be decreased to 1% with pharmacologic intervention. Yet, HIV disease poses many new challenges to the woman testing positive who is considering pregnancy or who is already pregnant. The progression of the symptoms of AIDS is similar to the common symptoms of pregnancy; the HIV medications may also cause these symptoms. Adherence to the HIV medication regime is necessary for ongoing viral suppression, for missed doses can initiate drug resistance and the whole categories of antiretroviral drugs may become ineffective. Additionally, the HIV stigma continues to impact those infected and interferes with the access to healthcare. HIV poses a major challenge for the nurse caring for the childbearing woman.

  19. HIV increases HCV-induced hepatocyte apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae Young; Shao, Run-Xuan; Lin, Wenyu; Weinberg, Ethan; Chung, Woo Jin; Tsai, Wei Lun; Zhao, Hong; Goto, Kaku; Zhang, Leiliang; Mendez-Navarro, Jorge; Jilg, Nikolaus; Peng, Lee F.; Brockman, Mark A.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims HCV related liver disease is one of the most important complications in persons with HIV, with accelerated fibrosis progression in coinfected persons compared to those with HCV alone. We hypothesized that HIV coinfection increases HCV related hepatocyte apoptosis and that HCV and HIV influence TRAIL signaling in hepatocytes. Methods We analyzed the effect of HIV on JFH1-infected Huh 7.5.1 cells. Apoptosis was measured by Caspase-Glo 3/7 assay and Western blot for cleaved PARP. TRAIL, TRAIL receptor 1 (DR4) and 2 (DR5) mRNA and protein levels were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. We also investigated activation of caspase pathways using caspase inhibitors and assessed expression of Bid and cytochrome C. Results We found increased caspase 3/7 activity and cleaved PARP in JFH1 HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells in the presence of heat-inactivated HIV compared to Huh7.5.1 cells infected with JFH1 or exposed to heat-inactivated HIV alone. Both DR4 and DR5 mRNA and protein expression were increased in JFH1-infected cells in the presence of inactivated HIV compared to Huh7.5.1 cells infected with JFH1 or exposed to heat-inactivated HIV alone. Pancaspase, Caspase-8, and caspase-9 inhibition blocked apoptosis induced by HCV, inactivated HIV and HCV plus inactivated HIV. A caspase-9 inhibitor blocked apoptosis induced by HCV, HIV and HCV-HIV comparably to pancaspase and caspase-8 inhibitors. HCV induced the activation of Bid cleavage and cytochrome C release. The addition of HIV substantially augmented this induction. Conclusions Our findings indicate that hepatocyte apoptosis is increased in the presence of HCV and HIV compared to HCV or HIV alone, and that this increase is mediated by DR4 and DR5 up-regulation. They provide an additional mechanism for the observed accelerated liver disease progression observed in HCV-HIV coinfection. PMID:21146890

  20. Rational Development of Radiopharmaceuticals for HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Maldarelli, Frank; Eckelman, William C; Neumann, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    The global battle against HIV-1 would benefit from a sensitive and specific radiopharmaceutical to localize HIV-infected cells. Ideally, this probe would be able to identify latently infected host cells containing replication competent HIV sequences. Clinical and research applications would include assessment of reservoirs, informing clinical management by facilitating assessment of burden of infection in different compartments, monitoring disease progression and monitoring response to therapy. A “rational” development approach could facilitate efficient identification of an appropriate targeted radiopharmaceutical. Rational development starts with understanding characteristics of the disease that can be effectively targeted and then engineering radiopharmaceuticals to hone in on an appropriate target, which in the case of HIV-1 (HIV) might be an HIV-specific product on or in the host cell, a differentially expressed gene product, an integrated DNA sequence specific enzymatic activity, part of the inflammatory response, or a combination of these. This is different from the current approach that starts with a radiopharmaceutical for a target associated with a disease, mostly from autopsy studies, without a strong rationale for the potential to impact patient care. At present, no targeted therapies are available for HIV latency, although a number of approaches are under study. Here we discuss requirements for a radiopharmaceutical useful in strategies targeting persistently infected cells. The radiopharmaceutical for HIV should be developed based on HIV biology, studied in an animal model and then in humans, and ultimately used in clinical and research settings. PMID:24607432