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Sample records for pelo hiv descritores

  1. HIV

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Sumit; Sahoo, Soumya Swaroop; Jain, Rambilas; Khanna, Pardeep; Mehta, Bharti; Singh, Inderjeet

    2014-01-01

    Getting to zero: zero new HIV infections, zero deaths from AIDS-related illness, zero discrimination is the theme of World AIDS Day 2012. Given the spread of the epidemic today, getting to zero may sound difficult, but significant progress is underway. The total annual loss for the entire country due to HIV is 7% of GDP, which exceeds India’s annual health expenditure in 2004. The additional loss due to loss of labor income and increased medical expenditure as measured by the external transfers, account for 5% of the country’s health expenditure and 0.23% of GDP. Given that the HIV incidence rate is only 0.27% in India, these losses are quite staggering. Despite the remarkable achievements in development of anti-retroviral therapies against HIV and the recent advances in new prevention technologies, the rate of new HIV infections continue to outpace efforts on HIV prevention and control. Thus, the development of a safe and effective vaccine for prevention and control of AIDS remains a global public health priority and the greatest opportunity to eventually end the AIDS pandemic. PMID:24056755

  2. HIV Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Home > HIV/AIDS > What is HIV/AIDS? HIV/AIDS This information in Spanish ( en español ) HIV symptoms Photo courtesy of AIDS.gov More information ... and brain Return to top More information on HIV symptoms Explore other publications and websites Basic Information ...

  3. HIV Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat HIV infection (called antiretroviral therapy, or ART) the right way, every day and his or ... way, every day, the medicine to treat HIV (ART) reduces the amount of HIV (called “viral ...

  4. Women and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women and HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... HIV? What should pregnant women know about HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the ...

  5. Get Tested for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for HIV Browse Sections The Basics Overview What Is HIV? ... 1 of 7 sections The Basics: What Is HIV? What is HIV? HIV stands for human immunodeficiency ...

  6. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  7. HIV chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Douglas D.

    2001-04-01

    The use of chemotherapy to suppress replication of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has transformed the face of AIDS in the developed world. Pronounced reductions in illness and death have been achieved and healthcare utilization has diminished. HIV therapy has also provided many new insights into the pathogenesis and the viral and cellular dynamics of HIV infection. But challenges remain. Treatment does not suppress HIV replication in all patients, and the emergence of drug-resistant virus hinders subsequent treatment. Chronic therapy can also result in toxicity. These challenges prompt the search for new drugs and new therapeutic strategies to control chronic viral replication.

  8. HIV Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... pre-chewed by an HIV-infected person. The contamination occurs when infected blood from a caregiver’s mouth ... pre-chewed by an HIV-infected person. The contamination occurs when infected blood from a caregiver’s mouth ...

  9. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  10. HIV among Transgender People

    MedlinePlus

    ... of transgender Virginians . Richmond, VA: Virginia HIV Community Planning Committee and Virginia Department of Health; 2007. Accessed April 14, 2016. Additional ... HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS ...

  11. [HIV lipodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Snopková, S; Matýsková, M; Povolná, K; Polák, P; Husa, P

    2010-12-01

    Combined antiretroviral therapy results in extraordinary decrease of morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients and in an essential change of the HIV/AIDS disease prognosis. However, long-term intake of antiretroviral medicaments is related to occurrence of metabolic and morphological abnormalities, of which some have been combined into a new syndrome--the so called HIV lipodystrophy. The HIV lipodystrophy syndrome covers metabolic and morphological changes. Metabolic changes include dyslipidaemia with hypercholesterolaemia and/or hypertriglyceridaemia, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinaemia and hyperlaktataemia. Morphological changes have the nature of lipoatrophia (loss of subcutaneous fat--on the cheeks, on extremities, on buttocks and marked prominence of surface veins) or lipohypertrophia (growth of fat tissue--on the chest, in the dorsocervical area, lipomatosis of visceral tissues and organs, fat accumulation in the abdominal area). Several HIV lipodystrophy features are very similar to the metabolic syndrome of the general population. That is why this new syndrome represents a prospective risk of premature atherosclerosis and increase of the cardiovascular risk in young HIV positive individuals. The article mentions major presented studies dealing with the relation of antiretroviral treatment and the cardiovascular risk. The conclusions of the studies are not unequivocal--this is, among others, given by the reason that their length is short from the viewpoint of atherogenesis. The major risk of subclinical atherosclerosis acceleration seems to be related to the deep immunodeficiency and low number of CD4+ lymphocytes and florid, uncontrolled HIV infection with a high number of HIV-1 RNA copies actually circulating in the plasma. The question, whether metabolic and morphological changes related to HIV and cART carry a similar atherogenic potential as in the general population, remains open for future. PMID:21261108

  12. HIV among Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS ... HIV infection—National HIV Behavioral Surveillance, 20 U.S. cities, 2013 . HIV Surveillance Special Report 13 . Accessed January ...

  13. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Understanding HIV/AIDS AIDS was first reported in the United States in ... and has since become a major worldwide epidemic. AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus, or ...

  14. HIV Latency

    PubMed Central

    Siliciano, Robert F.; Greene, Warner C.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 can establish a state of latent infection at the level of individual T cells. Latently infected cells are rare in vivo and appear to arise when activated CD4+ T cells, the major targets cells for HIV-1, become infected and survive long enough to revert back to a resting memory state, which is nonpermissive for viral gene expression. Because latent virus resides in memory T cells, it persists indefinitely even in patients on potent antiretroviral therapy. This latent reservoir is recognized as a major barrier to curing HIV-1 infection. The molecular mechanisms of latency are complex and include the absence in resting CD4+ T cells of nuclear forms of key host transcription factors (e.g., NFκB and NFAT), the absence of Tat and associated host factors that promote efficient transcriptional elongation, epigenetic changes inhibiting HIV-1 gene expression, and transcriptional interference. The presence of a latent reservoir for HIV-1 helps explain the presence of very low levels of viremia in patients on antiretroviral therapy. These viruses are released from latently infected cells that have become activated and perhaps from other stable reservoirs but are blocked from additional rounds of replication by the drugs. Several approaches are under exploration for reactivating latent virus with the hope that this will allow elimination of the latent reservoir. PMID:22229121

  15. HIV Life Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Overview The HIV Life Cycle (Last updated 9/8/2016; last reviewed 9/8/2016) Key Points HIV gradually destroys the immune ... life cycle. What is the connection between the HIV life cycle and HIV medicines? Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ...

  16. Camp HIV.

    PubMed

    Grodeck, B

    1995-01-01

    Innovative retreats for HIV-positive travelers specialize in stress reduction and alternative healing. The author gives a first-hand account of experiencing a wellness vacation for the HIV-positive. Although wellness retreats are nothing new, a San Francisco-based travel company picked the island of Hawaii as the specialized testing ground. The retreats guarantee a safe environment with a dose of restoration. Individuals spend seven days at the retreat center, Kalani Honua. Stress management workshops focus on yoga, principles of meditation, psychic healings, acupressure, relationship and communication, and massage.

  17. Screening and diagnosis for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    HIV testing; HIV screening; HIV screening test; HIV confirmatory test ... Task Force. Final Update Summary: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection: Screening. July 2015. www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/ ...

  18. HIV Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... the right way, every day. If you have health insurance, your insurer is required to cover some medicines ... to treat HIV. If you don’t have health insurance, or you’re unable to afford your co- ...

  19. Preventing HIV with Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... information in Spanish ( en español ) Preventing HIV with medicine Get medicine right after you are exposed to ... to top More information on Preventing HIV with medicine Explore other publications and websites National HIV and ...

  20. Older People and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... common than they were before the use of anti-HIV drugs. It is difficult to know what is causing mental problems in older people with HIV. Is it normal aging, or is it HIV disease? Research studies have ...

  1. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    HIV infection; Infection - HIV; Human immunodeficiency virus; Acquired immune deficiency syndrome ... Symptoms related to acute HIV infection (when a person is first infected) can be similar to the flu or other viral illnesses. They include: Fever and ...

  2. How HIV Causes AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this: Main Content Area How HIV Causes AIDS HIV destroys CD4 positive (CD4+) T cells, which ... and disease, ultimately resulting in the development of AIDS. Most people who are infected with HIV can ...

  3. HIV/AIDS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enter ZIP code or city Follow Act Against AIDS Act Against AIDS @talkHIV Act Against AIDS Get Email Updates on AAA Anonymous Feedback HIV/AIDS Media Infographics Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets HIV/ ...

  4. HIV-AIDS Connection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area The HIV-AIDS Connection AIDS was first recognized in 1981 and ... is there overwhelming scientific consensus that HIV causes AIDS? Before HIV infection became widespread in the human ...

  5. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... at risk for serious infections and certain cancers. AIDS stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV most often spreads through unprotected sex with ...

  6. HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV infections. HIV infection is often diagnosed through rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), which detect the presence or absence of ... accuracy. It is important to note that serological tests detect antibodies produced ... pathogens, rather than direct detection of HIV itself. Most ...

  7. HIV testing in India.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Srikanth; Pereira, Michael; Tripathy, Sriram Prasad

    2012-06-01

    The National AIDS Control Organization (NACO) has initiated programs for HIV/AIDS control in India. Algorithms for HIV testing have been developed for India. NACO programs have resulted in HIV situation improving over the last decade.

  8. HIV Structural Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 102 HIV Structural Database (Web, free access)   The HIV Protease Structural Database is an archive of experimentally determined 3-D structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1), Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 (HIV-2) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Proteases and their complexes with inhibitors or products of substrate cleavage.

  9. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? HIV and AIDS KidsHealth > For Teens > HIV and AIDS Print A A A Text Size What's in ... in human history. HIV causes a condition called acquired immunodeficiency syndrome — better known as AIDS . HIV destroys a type ...

  10. Secondary HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Temoshok, L R; Frerichs, R R

    1998-06-01

    Primary HIV prevention, preventing HIV exposure among uninfected persons, has been the focus of much attention. However, secondary HIV prevention, preventing HIV transmission from infected people to their uninfected contacts, has not received as much interest or attention from HIV researchers, clinicians, and policymakers. The concept of secondary HIV prevention, as distinguished from primary prevention, is clarified, and the current and future strategies to further secondary HIV prevention efforts are explored. Secondary prevention strategies can be incorporated into comprehensive programs and result in shifts in attitudes and behaviors. This could reduce the size of the epidemic, while also benefiting the individual and his or her close relationships.

  11. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Lactic Acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV medicines. All HIV medicines in the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) drug class may cause lactic acidosis, but ... some HIV medicines. HIV medicines in the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) drug class can cause the body to ...

  12. Smoking and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... 28, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 803 Smoking and HIV WHY IS SMOKING MORE DANGEROUS FOR ... It can also worsen liver problems like hepatitis. Smoking and Side Effects People with HIV who smoke ...

  13. HIV and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Patient Education FAQs HIV and Pregnancy Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish HIV and Pregnancy FAQ113, December 2012 PDF Format ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  14. HIV and AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV positive have been tested ... to everyone in the world. When the person's immune system has weakened and more of the blood's T ...

  15. Older People and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many older people believe that HIV only affects younger people Most older people get little training in ... diseases among older people, as they do for younger people. Physicians may not diagnose HIV infection in ...

  16. Testing for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability (Biologics) HIV Home Test Kits Testing for HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  17. HIV and Cardiovascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... CVD. ART can increase blood fats (cholesterol and triglycerides, see fact sheet 123.) It can also help ... disease. HIV infection decreases good cholesterol and increases triglycerides. HIV causes inflammation. This can also contribute to ...

  18. Microbiome in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Salas, January T.; Chang, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV primary infection occurs at mucosa tissues, suggesting an intricate interplay between microbiome and HIV infection. Recent advanced technologies of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics allow researchers to explore nonculturable microbes including bacteria, virus and fungi and their association with diseases. HIV/SIV infection is associated with microbiome shifts and immune activation that may affect the outcome of disease progression. Similarly, altered microbiome and inflammation are associated with increased risks of HIV acquisition, suggesting the role of microbiome in HIV transmission. In this review, we will focus on microbiome in HIV infection at various mucosal compartments. Understanding the relationship between microbiome and HIV may offer insights into development of better strategies for HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25439273

  19. Reduce HIV Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Prevention (CDC) has used them as models, and Dr. Jemmott was invited to South Africa to help decrease HIV/AIDS there. "For the past 15 years, I have observed how the HIV/AIDS epidemic ...

  20. HIV and the menopause.

    PubMed

    Fan, Maria D; Maslow, Bat-Sheva; Santoro, Nanette; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2008-12-01

    Dramatic improvement in the survival of the HIV population has occurred with the ascendance of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In the foreseeable future, HIV-infected women who acquired disease during the peak years of the epidemic are expected to survive to experience menopause and even years beyond. The HIV epidemic may be viewed as 'mature', as its earlier victims become part of the geriatric population. Research about the process of menopause in HIV-infected women and, conversely, about HIV infection in women undergoing menopause is currently limited. Existing research suggests that the process of menopause is affected by HIV infection, inasmuch as infected women appear to experience menopause at an earlier age, with greater symptomatology, and with different reproductive hormone profiles compared with HIV-uninfected women. HIV infection also appears to affect bone mineral density, cardiovascular disease and cognition, with some age-related interactions. Lifestyle and demographic factors have pervasive importance for both HIV infection and the menopause in women. This article reviews the current state of knowledge about the menopausal process in HIV-infected women, and the common conditions in postmenopausal women that are likely to be affected by HIV infection. Clinicians should appreciate the potential role of HIV infection in caring for menopause-aged women. PMID:19037065

  1. HIV Disease: Current Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), newly characterized human retrovirus which causes chronic, progressive, immune deficiency disease, the most severe phase of which is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Reviews most important current epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic information about HIV and HIV disease and provides…

  2. Streamlining HIV Testing for HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Leigler, Teri; Kallas, Esper; Schechter, Mauro; Sharma, Usha; Glidden, David; Grant, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-testing algorithms for preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) should be optimized to minimize the risk of drug resistance, the time off PrEP required to evaluate false-positive screening results, and costs and to expedite the start of therapy for those confirmed to be infected. HIV rapid tests (RTs) for anti-HIV antibodies provide results in less than 1 h and can be conducted by nonlicensed staff at the point of care. In many regions, Western blot (WB) testing is required to confirm reactive RT results. WB testing, however, causes delays in diagnosis and adds expense. The iPrEx study evaluated the safety and efficacy of daily oral emtricitabine-tenofovir disoproxil fumarate among HIV-seronegative men and transgender women who have sex with men: HIV infection was assessed with two RTs plus WB confirmation, followed by HIV-1 plasma viral load testing. During the iPrEx study, there were 51,260 HIV status evaluations among 2,499 volunteers using RTs: 142 (0.28%) had concordant positive results (100% were eventually confirmed) and 19 (0.04%) had discordant results among 14 participants; 11 were eventually determined to be HIV infected. A streamlined approach using only one RT to screen and a second RT to confirm (without WB) would have had nearly the same accuracy. Discrepant RT results are best evaluated with nucleic acid testing, which would also increase sensitivity. PMID:25378570

  3. HIV and maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Eva; Jamieson, Denise J; Danel, Isabella

    2014-11-01

    The majority of the 17 million women globally that are estimated to be infected with HIV live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Worldwide, HIV-related causes contributed to 19 000-56 000 maternal deaths in 2011 (6%-20% of maternal deaths). HIV-infected pregnant women have two to 10 times the risk of dying during pregnancy and the postpartum period compared with uninfected pregnant women. Many of these deaths can be prevented with the implementation of high-quality obstetric care, prevention and treatment of common co-infections, and treatment of HIV with ART. The paper summarizes what is known about HIV disease progression in pregnancy, specific causes of HIV-related maternal deaths, and the potential impact of treatment with antiretroviral therapy on maternal mortality. Recommendations are proposed for improving maternal health and decreasing maternal mortality among HIV-infected women based on existing evidence.

  4. Basic HIV/AIDS Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Collapse All How many people are diagnosed with HIV each year in the United States? In 2014, ...

  5. HIV Medicines and Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV Medicines and Side Effects (Last updated 1/7/2016; last reviewed 1/7/2016) Key Points HIV medicines help people with ... will depend on a person’s individual needs. Can HIV medicines cause side effects? HIV medicines help people ...

  6. Types of HIV/AIDS Antiretroviral Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... reverse transcriptase (RT) from converting single-stranded HIV RNA into double-stranded HIV DNA―a process called ... RT, interfering with its ability to convert HIV RNA into HIV DNA Integrase Inhibitors block the HIV ...

  7. HIV/AIDS and Alcohol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) targets the body’s immune ... and often leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Each year in the United States, between 55, ...

  8. HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... Victoria Cargill talks to students about HIV and AIDS at the opening of a National Library of ...

  9. HIV, AIDS, and the Future

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV, AIDS, and the Future Past Issues / Summer 2009 Table ... and your loved ones from HIV/AIDS. The AIDS Memorial Quilt In 1987, a total of 1, ...

  10. Women and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... action on HIV/AIDS National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day – March 10 Programs Share your story Anonymous from Illinois says... Although I am HIV negative, I would like to share my story. ...

  11. HIV/AIDS in Women

    MedlinePlus

    HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus, kills or damages cells of the body's immune system. The most advanced stage of infection with HIV is AIDS, which stands for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV often ...

  12. Barriers to HIV Cure.

    PubMed

    Stein, J; Storcksdieck Genannt Bonsmann, M; Streeck, H

    2016-10-01

    Since the beginning of the epidemic, more than 70 million people have been infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and about 38 million have died from acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related illnesses. While the discovery of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the mid 90's has saved millions of lives, a complete eradication of HIV is still not possible as HIV can persist for decades in a small reservoir of latently infected cells. Once reactivated, these latently infected cells can actively produce viral particles. Recent studies suggest that several sanctuaries exist within infected individuals where HIV can remain undetected by the immune system. These cellular, anatomical and microanatomical viral reservoirs represent a major obstacle for the eradication of HIV. Here we review recent findings on potential sanctuaries of HIV and address potential avenues to overcome these immunological barriers. PMID:27620852

  13. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Hepatotoxicity

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Hepatotoxicity (Last updated 1/7/2016; last reviewed 1/7/2016) Key Points Hepatotoxicity means damage to the ... the liver can be life-threatening. What HIV medicines can cause hepatotoxicity? HIV medicines in the following ...

  14. [HIV and reproductive choices].

    PubMed

    Boer, K; de Vries, J W; de Beaufort, I E

    1995-05-13

    It is estimated that there are about 120-150 hemophilic men infected with HIV in the Netherlands as well as 1000 men infected via intravenous drug use. The majority of them are in reproductive age with relationships with seronegative women. In the event they want to have a child, artificial insemination with donor sperm (KID) is an option. In 1994 there were 147 instances of insemination of 66 women with the processed semen of HIV-positive men and no infection resulted. The annual risk of HIV infection was 7.2% of a woman engaging in unprotected intercourse, according to a prospective Italian study. The risk of HIV infection per contact was estimated at 0.1-5.6%. However, it is not yet proven that processed sperm of an HIV-seropositive man can produce a pregnancy without the risk of infecting the woman. The risk of transmission of HIV to the fetus is higher in artificial insemination of a seropositive woman with the sperm of her partner. In vitro fertilization is not a sure method either for the prevention of HIV infection of the mother because of the possibility of an egg cell being infected before fertilization. HIV-infected pregnant women face the problems of caring for HIV-infected offspring. For HIV discordant couples the advice is to use both condoms for the prevention of infection and oral contraceptives for the prevention of pregnancy. In the case of a lesbian relationship, if the partners want to have a child, HIV infection is still a factor because of previous heterosexual contacts.

  15. The RNA surveillance complex Pelo-Hbs1 is required for transposon silencing in the Drosophila germline

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fu; Zhao, Rui; Fang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Huanwei; Xuan, Yang; Ma, Yanting; Chen, Hongyan; Cai, Tao; Qi, Yijun; Xi, Rongwen

    2015-01-01

    Silencing of transposable elements (TEs) in the metazoan germline is critical for genome integrity and is primarily dependent on Piwi proteins and associated RNAs, which exert their function through both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Here, we report that the evolutionarily conserved Pelo (Dom34)-Hbs1 mRNA surveillance complex is required for transposon silencing in the Drosophila germline. In pelo mutant gonads, mRNAs and proteins of some selective TEs are up-regulated. Pelo is not required for piRNA biogenesis, and our studies suggest that Pelo may function at the translational level to silence TEs: This function requires interaction with Hbs1, and overexpression of RpS30a partially reverts TE-silencing defects in pelo mutants. Interestingly, TE silencing and spermatogenesis defects in pelo mutants can also effectively be rescued by expressing the mammalian ortholog of Pelo. We propose that the Pelo-Hbs1 surveillance complex provides another level of defense against the expression of TEs in the germline of Drosophila and possibly all metazoa. PMID:26124316

  16. Positive: HIV Affirmative Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kain, Craig D.

    At the end of the 1980s, counselors largely lacked an integrated approach to counseling people living with HIV disease. This book describes the experience of counseling this group of persons. The major premise here is that counselors who counsel HIV-positive clients must come to understand and affirm their clients' experiences. The text defines a…

  17. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoni, Michael H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents evidence describing benefits of behavioral interventions such as aerobic exercise training on both psychological and immunological functioning among high risk human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) seronegative and very early stage seropositive homosexual men. HIV-1 infection is cast as chronic disease for which early…

  18. HIV and Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeilly, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to plague many countries across the globe, including the United States, Africa, China and India. Children and adults have been infected with HIV, and both populations can present with communication disorders that coexist with the presence of the virus. The purpose of this paper is to present an…

  19. Overview of HIV.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Nancy; Koneru, Anne O'Brien; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2008-06-01

    This article provides an overview and reviews the HIV pandemic, the basic biology and immunology of the virus (e.g., genetic diversity of HIV and the viral life cycle), the phases of disease progression, modes of HIV transmission, HIV testing, immune response to the infection, and current therapeutic strategies. HIV is occurring in epidemic proportions, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. In the US, men who have sex with men account for over half of AIDS diagnoses; racial and ethnic minorities are disproportionally affected. Factors influencing the progression and severity of HIV infection include type of immune response, coinfection (e.g., another sexually transmitted infection, including hepatitis B or C), age and behavioral and psychosocial factors. Antiretroviral therapies can achieve reduction in blood levels of the HIV virus below the limits of detection by current technology. However, effective treatment requires adherence to therapy. Patient failure to adhere to treatment regimens results in detectible circulating virus and in HIV disease progression, and is the primary cause of drug resistance. In addition to research on the immunology and virology of the disease, other studies focus on behavioral and psychosocial factors that may affect medication adherence and risk behaviors. PMID:18541903

  20. Women and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... The impact of HIV is especially great among young women of color. More than one third of new ... legs. Abnormal pre-cancerous cell types related to cervical cancer are more frequent and severe in women who are HIV-positive. See fact sheet 510 ...

  1. Living with HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Infection with HIV is serious. But the outlook for people with HIV/AIDS is improving. If you are infected with HIV, there are many things you can do to ... health care provider who knows how to treat HIV. You may want to join a support group. ...

  2. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis with HIV.

    PubMed

    Talat, Humaira; Attarwala, Sharmeen; Saleem, Mubasshir

    2014-05-01

    Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) is a vector borne disease caused by various species of the Leishmania parasite. CL is endemic in the province of Balochistan in Pakistan. In certain instances a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-related immunocompromised is associated with atypical clinical presentation and occurrence of reactivated lesions of CL. Such presentations respond poorly to the standard treatment and frequent relapses are noted. We are reporting three cases of localized and disseminated CL due to Leishmania tropica which responded to meglumine antimoniate. Due to the fact that CL is endemic in Balochistan, we did not consider HIV infection as a causative organism. It was their presentation with history of weight loss and fever that prompted Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) tests for HIV, which turned out to be positive. CL is becoming visible as an opportunistic infection associated with HIV/AIDS and may even be the first symptom in HIV positive patients in an endemic area.

  3. HIV Vaccination, is Breakthrough Underway?

    PubMed

    Lu, Da-Yong; Wu, Hong-Ying; Lu, Ting-Ren; Xu, Bin; Ding, Jian

    2016-01-01

    After long defeats-almost no marked breakthrough in HIV vaccination campaign has been observed during the past two decades, and we still have not lost our faiths for the development of highly effective and low risk HIV vaccines. Many effective vaccines have been discovered and will certainly enter into the markets within the next 5 to 10 years. In order to promote HIV vaccine developments and clinical HIV therapeutic improvements, this perspective addresses the good and bad sides of currently available HIV vaccines, discusses many subjects of medical significance and finally provides up-to-date information in the field of HIV studies, in particular regarding vaccine developments and HIV pathogenesis.

  4. The HIV-1 transgenic rat model of neuroHIV

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Michael; Connaghan, Kaitlyn P.; Chang, Sulie L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ability of current combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) to limit the progression of HIV-1 to AIDS, HIV-positive individuals continue to experience neuroHIV in the form of HIV-associated neurological disorders (HAND), which can range from subtle to substantial neurocognitive impairment. NeuroHIV may also influence substance use, abuse, and dependence in HIV-positive individuals. Because of the nature of the virus, variables such as mental health co-morbidities make it difficult to study the interaction between HIV and substance abuse in human populations. Several rodent models have been developed in an attempt to study the transmission and pathogenesis of the HIV-1 virus. The HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat is a reliable model of neuroHIV because it mimics the condition of HIV-infected patients on cART. Research using this model supports the hypothesis that the presence of HIV-1 viral proteins in the central nervous system increases the sensitivity and susceptibility of HIV-positive individuals to substance abuse. PMID:25733103

  5. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  6. HIV/AIDS eradication

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Matthew D.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2013-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy can inhibit HIV replication in patients and prevent progression to AIDS. However, it is not curative. Here we provide an overview of what antiretroviral drugs do and how the virus persists during therapy in rare reservoirs, such as latently infected CD4+ T cells. We also outline several innovative methods that are currently under development to eradicate HIV from infected individuals. These strategies include gene therapy approaches intended to create an HIV-resistant immune system, and activation/elimination approaches directed towards flushing out latent virus. This latter approach could involve the use of novel chemically synthesized analogs of natural activating agents. PMID:23735743

  7. HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Saksena, Nitin K.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is associated with the development of neurocognitive disorders in many infected individuals, including a broad spectrum of motor impairments and cognitive deficits. Despite extensive research, the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) is still not clear. This review provides a comprehensive view of HAND, including HIV neuroinvasion, HAND diagnosis and different level of disturbances, influence of highly-active antiretroviral therapy to HIV-associated dementia (HAD), possible pathogenesis of HAD, etc. Together, this review will give a thorough and clear understanding of HAND, especially HAD, which will be vital for future research, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24470972

  8. HIV charge dropped.

    PubMed

    1997-07-25

    Guilford County Superior Court Judge James Webb ruled there was not enough evidence to convict HIV-positive [name removed] on charges of attempted murder and assault with a deadly weapon in connection with the rape of a 12-year-old girl. Prosecutors argued [name removed] knew he was HIV-positive when the rape occurred and defense attorney Randy Jones argued that there was no medical proof of [name removed]'s HIV status at the time of the attack. The judge dismissed the two charges against [name removed]. A jury later convicted [name removed] of statutory rape and taking indecent liberties with a minor. PMID:11364510

  9. [Development of HIV vaccines].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Riri

    2002-04-01

    An effective prophylactic vaccine should reduce frequency of new HIV infections in the target population and delay onset of immunodeficiency among those who become infected after vaccination. A variety of vaccine candidates have been developed, which induce neutralizing antibodies and/or cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. While many of those vaccine candidates exhibited some efficacy in primate model systems, their efficacy against natural HIV-1 infection can only be determined in large-scale phase III clinical trials. In this article, difficulties in HIV vaccine development will be discussed from scientific, technical, and business point of views. PMID:11968790

  10. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Anti-retroviral Drug Resistance Testing; ARV Resistance Testing Formal name: ...

  11. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... 448-4911 ( www.nccc.ucsf.edu ). HIV TESTING REQUIREMENTS FOR US TRAVELERS ENTERING FOREIGN COUNTRIES International travelers ... extended stay should review that country’s policies and requirements. This information is usually available from the consular ...

  12. Hepatitis C and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis C Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis C What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B . Hepatitis C and HIV About 25% of people living ...

  13. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis B Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis B What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis B and HIV About 10% of people living ...

  14. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... despite the fact that the person is infected ( false negative ). If an HIV antibody test is negative ... infection (around 28 days) and may give a false-negative result. ^ Back to top Is there anything ...

  15. Get Tested for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Beware: Online you can buy several HIV home test kits that are not approved by the FDA. Many ... This publication explains how the FDA-approved home test kit works, and warns consumers about purchasing home tests ...

  16. HIV and Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevalent among blacks as among whites. Viral Hepatitis Transmission People can be infected with the three most ... risk for HAV. • • New data suggest that sexual transmission of HCV among MSM with HIV occurs more ...

  17. Mouth Problems and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... orientation. This information is for people who have mouth (oral) problems related to HIV infection. It explains ... look like. It also describes where in the mouth they occur and how they are treated. They ...

  18. Children and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a different response to HIV infection. CD4 cell counts (see fact sheet 124) and viral load counts ( ... to ARVs. They have larger increases in CD4 cell counts and more diverse CD4 cells. They seem to ...

  19. HIV/AIDS Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... few years. But today, there are many effective medicines to fight the infection, and people with HIV ... healthier lives. There are five major types of medicines: Reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors - interfere with a critical ...

  20. HIV and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... FOR KIDNEY DISEASE? HIV MEDICATIONS AND THE KIDNEYS DIALYSIS AND KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION THE BOTTOM LINE WHY SHOULD ... disease (ESRD) or kidney failure. This can require dialysis or a kidney transplant. The rate of kidney ...

  1. HIV / AIDS and tourism.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, S

    1999-01-01

    Since it tends to be significantly affected by HIV/AIDS, the tourism sector is a likely target for HIV/AIDS interventions in many countries. The tourist industry is at particular risk from the pandemic because of the mobility of the work force, the presence of sex tourists, and the heavy reliance of many countries upon tourism revenues. Indeed, tourism is one of the largest and fastest growing industries in many countries. Some people have speculated that potential tourists' fear of AIDS could discourage them from visiting certain countries, while others have even suggested that tourism should be discouraged because the industry contributes to the spread of HIV/AIDS. When traveling, tourists often take risks that they would not take at home. They tend to drink more, use drugs more, and be generally more adventurous while on holiday. Such adventures often include taking sexual risks. When tourists have sex with prostitutes, hotel staff, and others in the local population, a bridge can be created for HIV to cross back and forth between the tourist's home country and the tourist destination. The author reviews selected studies on the relationship between HIV/AIDS and tourism. Overall, the existing literature offers no definitive evidence that AIDS has had any lasting impact upon the tourism industry anywhere in the world. Rather, promoting a healthy tourism industry and HIV/AIDS prevention are likely complementary in many ways. PMID:12349153

  2. HIV among transgendered people.

    PubMed

    Kenagy, G P

    2002-02-01

    This study explores HIV status and HIV-related risk factors among transgendered people. A needs assessment survey developed with the help of transgendered people was used to conduct face-to-face interviews with 81 transgendered persons, 49 male-to-females (MTFs) and 32 female-to-males (FTMs). The findings indicate that HIV/AIDS is a serious health concern facing the transgender community. The majority of respondents engaged in at least one high risk sexual activity during the past three months, were willing to have high risk sex in the future and did not believe they were susceptible to infection. FTMs have a significantly lower level of AIDS knowledge than MTFs (p < 0.01). Over half (56.7%) of FTMs have not been tested for HIV/AIDS. Efforts to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS among the transgender community are urgently needed. HIV/AIDS prevention must specifically target transgendered people, including FTMs who, despite being at risk, have been largely ignored.

  3. HIV ban in military.

    PubMed

    1995-06-16

    The Defense Department has written into its budget a proposal to discharge all HIV-positive members of the armed services. The House Committee on National Security has approved the fiscal 1996 defense budget with the ban included. Rep. Robert K. Dornan, R- Calif., contends that having HIV-positive service members in the military compromises the nation's readiness because, under Defense Department policy, they cannot be stationed abroad. However, only one-fifth of all service members on limited assignment have HIV, the others have diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. This shows the military's readiness to discriminate against HIV-positive individuals, according to William J. Freeman of the National Association of People with AIDS. Currently all recruits are tested for HIV; if they test positive, they are denied entry to the armed services. All service members are tested annually for HIV antibodies. In anticipation of cutbacks in military-related AIDS research due to the Republican control of Congress, the military has begun to eliminate most of the AIDS research it conducts. PMID:11362530

  4. Immunogenetics of HIV disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Maureen P.; Carrington, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Summary Host genetic factors are a major contributing factor to the inter-individual variation observed in response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and are linked to resistance to HIV infection among exposed individuals, as well as rate of disease progression and the likelihood of viral transmission. Of the genetic variants that have been shown to affect the natural history of HIV infection, the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I genes exhibit the strongest and most consistent association, underscoring a central role for CD8+ T cells in resistance to the virus. HLA proteins play important roles in T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity by presenting immunodominant HIV epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and CD4+ T cells. Genetic and functional data also indicate a function for HLA in natural killer (NK) cell-mediated innate immunity against HIV by interacting with killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). We review the HLA and KIR associations with HIV disease and discuss the mechanisms underlying these associations. PMID:23772624

  5. HIV / AIDS and tourism.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, S

    1999-01-01

    Since it tends to be significantly affected by HIV/AIDS, the tourism sector is a likely target for HIV/AIDS interventions in many countries. The tourist industry is at particular risk from the pandemic because of the mobility of the work force, the presence of sex tourists, and the heavy reliance of many countries upon tourism revenues. Indeed, tourism is one of the largest and fastest growing industries in many countries. Some people have speculated that potential tourists' fear of AIDS could discourage them from visiting certain countries, while others have even suggested that tourism should be discouraged because the industry contributes to the spread of HIV/AIDS. When traveling, tourists often take risks that they would not take at home. They tend to drink more, use drugs more, and be generally more adventurous while on holiday. Such adventures often include taking sexual risks. When tourists have sex with prostitutes, hotel staff, and others in the local population, a bridge can be created for HIV to cross back and forth between the tourist's home country and the tourist destination. The author reviews selected studies on the relationship between HIV/AIDS and tourism. Overall, the existing literature offers no definitive evidence that AIDS has had any lasting impact upon the tourism industry anywhere in the world. Rather, promoting a healthy tourism industry and HIV/AIDS prevention are likely complementary in many ways.

  6. Immunogenetics of HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, Maureen P; Carrington, Mary

    2013-07-01

    Host genetic factors are a major contributing factor to the inter-individual variation observed in response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and are linked to resistance to HIV infection among exposed individuals, as well as rate of disease progression and the likelihood of viral transmission. Of the genetic variants that have been shown to affect the natural history of HIV infection, the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I genes exhibit the strongest and most consistent association, underscoring a central role for CD8(+) T cells in resistance to the virus. HLA proteins play important roles in T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity by presenting immunodominant HIV epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and CD4(+) T cells. Genetic and functional data also indicate a function for HLA in natural killer cell-mediated innate immunity against HIV by interacting with killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). We review the HLA and KIR associations with HIV disease and discuss the mechanisms underlying these associations.

  7. HIV ban in military.

    PubMed

    1995-06-16

    The Defense Department has written into its budget a proposal to discharge all HIV-positive members of the armed services. The House Committee on National Security has approved the fiscal 1996 defense budget with the ban included. Rep. Robert K. Dornan, R- Calif., contends that having HIV-positive service members in the military compromises the nation's readiness because, under Defense Department policy, they cannot be stationed abroad. However, only one-fifth of all service members on limited assignment have HIV, the others have diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. This shows the military's readiness to discriminate against HIV-positive individuals, according to William J. Freeman of the National Association of People with AIDS. Currently all recruits are tested for HIV; if they test positive, they are denied entry to the armed services. All service members are tested annually for HIV antibodies. In anticipation of cutbacks in military-related AIDS research due to the Republican control of Congress, the military has begun to eliminate most of the AIDS research it conducts.

  8. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Rash

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Rash (Last updated 1/7/2016; last reviewed 1/7/2016) Key Points A rash is an irritated ... health care provider tells you to. What HIV medicines can cause a hypersensitivity reaction? Nevirapine (brand name: ...

  9. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Lipodystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Lipodystrophy (Last updated 9/13/2016; last reviewed 1/7/2016) Key Points Lipodystrophy refers to the changes ... loss on the face and leg . Which HIV medicines are linked to lipodystrophy? Although more research is ...

  10. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV and Diabetes (Last updated 9/13/2016; last reviewed 1/7/2016) Key Points Diabetes is a disease in ... are also infected with hepatitis C. What HIV medicines increase the risk of type 2 diabetes? Some ...

  11. Research Report: HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reports » HIV/AIDS » Letter from the Director HIV/AIDS Email Facebook Twitter Letter from the Director Human ... the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) — has been with us for three decades now. ...

  12. What Is HIV/AIDS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video Games Video Sharing Sites Webcasts/ Webinars Widgets Wikis Follow Us on New Media Virtual Office Hours ... HIV currently exists, but with proper treatment and medical care, HIV can be controlled. The medicine used ...

  13. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children & Teens Search Connect with NIDA : Google Plus Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Menu Home Drugs ... HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with drug abuse ...

  14. Answers about HIV Vaccine Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... a high risk for HIV. However, the heterosexual transmission of HIV is increasingly becoming a major source ... have a major impact on the rates of transmission and help in controlling the epidemic. A partially ...

  15. Creating a National HIV Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Spach, David H; Wood, Brian R; Karpenko, Andrew; Unruh, Kenton T; Kinney, Rebecca G; Roscoe, Clay; Nelson, John

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the HIV care provider workforce has not kept pace with an expanding HIV epidemic. To effectively address this HIV workforce shortage, a multipronged approach is needed that includes high-quality, easily accessible, up-to-date HIV education for trainees and practicing providers. Toward this objective, the University of Washington, in collaboration with the AIDS Education and Training Center National Coordinating Resource Center, is developing a modular, dynamic curriculum that addresses the entire spectrum of the HIV care continuum. Herein, we outline the general principles, content, organization, and features of this federally funded National HIV Curriculum, which allows for longitudinal, active, self-directed learning, as well as real-time evaluation, tracking, and feedback at the individual and group level. The online curriculum, which is in development, will provide a free, comprehensive, interactive HIV training and resource tool that can support national efforts to expand and strengthen the United States HIV clinical care workforce. PMID:27086188

  16. Treatments for HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS HIV medicines are giving women longer, healthier futures and new strength. While there's no cure for HIV, the treatments today allow women to live longer, fuller lives. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved many drugs for treating HIV. ...

  17. HIV sequence compendium 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Carla; Foley, Brian; Freed, Eric; Hahn, Beatrice; Marx, Preston; McCutchan, Francine; Mellors, John; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette

    2002-12-31

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. In these compendia we try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Traditionally, we present the sequence data themselves in the form of alignments: Section II, an alignment of a selection of HIV-1/SIVcpz full-length genomes (a lot of LAI-like sequences, for example, have been omitted because they are so similar that they bias the alignment); Section III, a combined HIV-1/HIV-2/SIV whole genome alignment; Sections IV–VI, amino acid alignments for HIV-1/SIV-cpz, HIV-2/SIV, and SIVagm. The HIV-2/SIV and SIVagm amino acid alignments are separate because the genetic distances between these groups are so great that presenting them in one alignment would make it very elongated because of the large number of gaps that have to be inserted. As always, tables with extensive background information gathered from the literature accompany the whole genome alignments. The collection of whole-gene sequences in the database is now large enough that we have abundant representation of most subtypes. For many subtypes, and especially for subtype B, a large number of sequences that span entire genes were not included in the printed alignments to conserve space. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov/content/hiv-db/ALIGN_CURRENT/ALIGN-INDEX.html. Importantly, all these alignments have been edited to include only one sequence per person, based on phylogenetic trees that were created for all of them, as well as on the literature. Because of the number of sequences available, we have decided to use a different selection principle this year, based on the epidemiological importance of the subtypes. Subtypes A–D and CRFs 01 and 02 are by far the most widespread variants, and for these (when available) we have included 8–10 representatives in the alignments. The other

  18. HIV in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Abrams, S

    1998-01-01

    This article explores the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southeast Asia. Prostitution and injecting drug use are two major factors in the appearance of HIV/AIDS in a country. But, it is the correct social network that assures its transmission to epidemic proportions. Heterosexual transmission in Cambodia, Myanmar, and Thailand is linked with prevalence among female sex workers and their clients. In Malaysia, the Ministry of Health responded immediately, but the number of new infections continued to increase. The failures suggest the need for more effective, intensive health education programs, outreach by nongovernmental organizations, and peer education at the grassroots level and in remote areas. Public health officials need to promote political change. International agencies could play an important role, if countries such as Myanmar, Cambodia, and Viet Nam were open to international exchanges. In Myanmar, political unrest has a priority over the need for aggressive health interventions. In Indonesia, the Islamic influence prevents recognition of the country's significant sex industry or the existence of a homosexual community. In Cambodia, health officials warned about the high number of sexual partners, high mobility rate, and low condom use, but HIV spread rapidly in the 1990s. Thailand initiated a 100% condom campaign to combat HIV prevalence in the 1990s, and HIV prevalence declined among sex workers and military recruits. Risk factors for rapid transmission include mobility, the number of sexual partners/sex worker, the proportion engaging in commercial sex, and the rate of regular condom use among sex workers. PMID:12294443

  19. HIV Sequence Compendium 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Brian Thomas; Leitner, Thomas Kenneth; Apetrei, Cristian; Hahn, Beatrice; Mizrachi, Ilene; Mullins, James; Rambaut, Andrew; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette Tina Marie

    2015-10-05

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. We try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2015. Hence, though it is published in 2015 and called the 2015 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2014 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing. In total, at the end of 2014, there were 624,121 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 7% since the previous year. This is the first year that the number of new sequences added to the database has decreased compared to the previous year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 5834 by end of 2014. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a fraction of these. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  20. HIV in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Abrams, S

    1998-01-01

    This article explores the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southeast Asia. Prostitution and injecting drug use are two major factors in the appearance of HIV/AIDS in a country. But, it is the correct social network that assures its transmission to epidemic proportions. Heterosexual transmission in Cambodia, Myanmar, and Thailand is linked with prevalence among female sex workers and their clients. In Malaysia, the Ministry of Health responded immediately, but the number of new infections continued to increase. The failures suggest the need for more effective, intensive health education programs, outreach by nongovernmental organizations, and peer education at the grassroots level and in remote areas. Public health officials need to promote political change. International agencies could play an important role, if countries such as Myanmar, Cambodia, and Viet Nam were open to international exchanges. In Myanmar, political unrest has a priority over the need for aggressive health interventions. In Indonesia, the Islamic influence prevents recognition of the country's significant sex industry or the existence of a homosexual community. In Cambodia, health officials warned about the high number of sexual partners, high mobility rate, and low condom use, but HIV spread rapidly in the 1990s. Thailand initiated a 100% condom campaign to combat HIV prevalence in the 1990s, and HIV prevalence declined among sex workers and military recruits. Risk factors for rapid transmission include mobility, the number of sexual partners/sex worker, the proportion engaging in commercial sex, and the rate of regular condom use among sex workers.

  1. Nutrition and HIV.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, B S

    1995-01-01

    Nutritional status directly affects immune competence; therefore, dietary supplements can be beneficial. Vitamin A, a fat-soluble nutrient obtained exogenously from animal protein or synthesized endogenously from carotenoids, is important in vision, epithelial tissue maintenance, reproduction, and growth. It is also an antioxidant, and can interfere with HIV-related oxidative destruction. Vitamin C, a water-soluble antioxidant important in hydroxylation reactions and required by erythrocytes for retrieving stored iron, can suppress HIV in vitro. However, this requires long-term administration, and its effect ceases upon termination of treatment. Vitamin E, fat-soluble tocopherols, can be found in plants, vegetable oils, milk, eggs, fish, meats, and cereals. A potent antioxidant because of its electron-donating ability, vitamin E reduces HIV replication. Deficiency reduces inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a) and protein kinase C, therefore limiting immunocompetence. Additionally, damaging side effects of AZT, normally reversed or minimized by vitamin E, may induce low leukocyte counts and anemia. Vitamin E acts synergistically with selenium, another antioxidant, to block the rate of lipid peroxidation. Its administration may reduce diarrhea, cramping, and weight loss, and may improve epithelial conditions and reduce the frequency of illness. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a sulfur-containing amino acid, inhibits HIV replication by raising serum glutathione levels through inhibition of TNF-a. Finally, HIV-infected patients should consider gluten-free diets during times of acute gastric distress. PMID:11362399

  2. [HIV 2012 : research update].

    PubMed

    Behrens, G M N

    2012-10-01

    HIV therapy is able to achieve complete viral suppression in up to 90% of patients. Thus, most patients will benefit from long-term effective and tolerable therapy combinations. Antiretroviral therapy, however, can still lead to side effects, is costly, and its success is dependent on sufficient health system resources and access to different drug combinations. Established tools in prevention and novel approaches to avoid spread of HIV infection are crucial to combat the epidemic. Recent advances in research about how drug regimens stop viral transmission ("treatment as prevention"), how the immune system defends against HIV (natural killer cells, broad neutralizing antibodies), and how cellular factors restrict viral replication are import milestones on the long way to stopping the global epidemic and to fostering vaccine development. PMID:22961071

  3. HIV-Associated Neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Anand, Kuljeet Singh; Wadhwa, Ankur; Garg, Jyoti; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Few cases of HIV and neurocysticercosis co-infection have been reported till date. The symptomatic manifestation of cysticercosis may be further reduced by interactions between the 2 disease processes. In patients with HIV, the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis is challenging and management must be individualized depending on the stage and the coexistent opportunistic conditions. We present 2 such cases. First was a 35-year-old driver seropositive for HIV-1 presented with complex partial seizures and a CD4 count of 530 cells/mm(3). The second case was a 40-year-old businessman with a CD4 count of 350 cells/mm(3). Both of them had multiple parenchymal lesions, with 1 being a large cystic lesion. Relatively high CD4 count and a positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay increased the likelihood for diagnosis and treatment. Both of our patients received cysticidal therapy, and none of them deteriorated with treatment.

  4. Advancing Biosocial Pedagogy for HIV Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Mark David McGregor

    2011-01-01

    This article develops the concept of biosocial pedagogy in HIV education for this era of expanding biomedical forms of HIV control. With reference to critical pedagogy and teaching and learning materials addressing HIV treatment and prevention, I explain how HIV education can problematize its own role in HIV control. I also discuss how educational…

  5. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Prevention HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials (Last updated 9/15/2015; last reviewed 9/15/2015) Key Points HIV/AIDS clinical trials are ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ...

  6. HIV: A Chronic Condition.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    By virtue of the success of anti-retroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has evolved into a chronic disease in which the typical complications of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are no longer the dominant problem. Rather than dealing with acute and potentially life-threatening complications, clinicians are now confronted with managing a chronic disease that, in the absence of a cure, will persist for many decades. (1) This review will focus on the longer term sequelae and consequences of chronic HIV infection. PMID:27584920

  7. Slowing heterosexual HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Ronald, A R

    1995-06-01

    HIV-1 is spreading rapidly through heterosexual intercourse in many societies. Slowing the transmission of this virus is the most urgent global public health priority. Our understanding of the biologic differences between societies that account for most vacancies in heterosexual HIV transmission are now understood. Effective interventions to slow transmission must be designed, implemented, and evaluated. Human and fiscal resources must be provided through a shared global effort. The consequences of failing to do so will lead to a world catastrophe of unprecedented magnitude. PMID:7673667

  8. Performance of rapid tests for discrimination between HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 infections.

    PubMed

    Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès; Bocobza, Jonathan; Brunet, Sylvie; Damond, Florence; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Barin, Francis

    2015-12-01

    Major differences exist between HIV-1 and HIV-2 in terms of epidemiology, pathogenicity, sensitivity to antiretrovirals. Determining the type of HIV infecting a patient is essential for management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of simple/rapid tests to differentiate between HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 infections. We analyzed 116 samples from patients infected with HIV-1 (n = 61), HIV-2 (n = 47), or HIV-1+HIV-2 (n = 8) at the chronic stage of infection. Each sample was tested with SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0, ImmunoFlow HIV1-HIV2, ImmunoFlow HIV1-HIV2 (WB), Genie III HIV-1/HIV-2, ImmunoComb HIV1&2 BiSpot. HIV-1, or HIV-2 single infection was identified with a sensitivity ranging from 90% to 100%. The ability to detect dual infection was less sensitive (12.5-100%). SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0, ImmunoFlow HIV1-HIV2, and Genie III were unable to detect HIV-1 group O infection in one, one and two cases, respectively. The specificity of detection of HIV-1, HIV-2, or HIV-1+HIV-2 antibodies differed greatly (36-100%). ImmunoComb BiSpot had the highest sensitivity values (99-100% for HIV-1, 98% for HIV-2, and 75-87.5% for dual infection) and specificity values (94-100% for HIV-1, 100% for HIV-2, and 97-100% for dual infection). In conclusion, this study showed that no single rapid test had a perfect sensitivity/specificity ratio, particularly in the case of the double infections.

  9. Importance of an Early HIV Antibody Differentiation Immunoassay for Detection of Dual Infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2

    PubMed Central

    Zbinden, Andrea; Dürig, Roland; Shah, Cyril; Böni, Jürg; Schüpbach, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-2 is primarily endemic in West Africa and India, however, in time of global migration, a possible HIV-2 infection or co-infection with HIV-1 should be recognized right at the time of HIV diagnosis, in order to enable optimized antiretroviral treatment. Laboratory HIV testing consists of a combined HIV1/2/O antibody + antigen screening test and subsequent confirmation and type differentiation by a serological test formatted as a multi-line or multi-spot assay. CDC has proposed a revised alternative HIV diagnostic strategy which, in case of a reactive result in a combined HIV1/2/O antibody + antigen screening test, comprises an HIV-1 nucleic acid test (NAT) for HIV confirmation instead of an antibody differentiation immunoassay (ADI). Only a negative NAT must be further investigated by an ADI, thus saving expenses for ADI in most instances. We have investigated this alternative strategy with respect to its recognition of dual HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection. Methods and Results Anonymized data of HIV notifications of patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Switzerland between 2007 and 2014 were analysed retrospectively. In a total of 4'679 notifications, we found 35 HIV-2 infections, 9 (25.7%) of which were dually infected with HIV-1. In 7 of the 9 dual HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections, HIV-1 RNA testing at the time of HIV diagnosis was positive with concentrations from 102 to 94'300 copies/mL plasma. HIV-1 RNA data were not available for the other two cases. Conclusions The alternative CDC strategy would have missed the concomitant HIV-2 infection in at least 7, but probably even more, of the 9 dually infected patients, as the detectable HIV-1 RNA would have precluded a supplemental ADI. Early ADI is mandatory for diagnosis of dual HIV-1/HIV-2 infection and guidance of appropriate therapy. PMID:27310138

  10. Incorporation of chimeric HIV-SIV-Env and modified HIV-Env proteins into HIV pseudovirions

    SciTech Connect

    Devitt, Gerard; Emerson, Vanessa; Holtkotte, Denise; Pfeiffer, Tanya; Pisch, Thorsten; Bosch, Valerie . E-mail: v.bosch@dkfz.de

    2007-05-10

    Low level incorporation of the viral glycoprotein (Env) into human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) particles is a major drawback for vaccine strategies against HIV/AIDS in which HIV particles are used as immunogen. Within this study, we have examined two strategies aimed at achieving higher levels of Env incorporation into non-infectious pseudovirions (PVs). First, we have generated chimeric HIV/SIV Env proteins containing the truncated C-terminal tail region of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239-Env767{sup stop}, which mediates strongly increased incorporation of SIV-Env into SIV particles. In a second strategy, we have employed a truncated HIV-Env protein (Env-Tr752{sup N750K}) which we have previously demonstrated to be incorporated into HIV virions, generated in infected T-cells, to a higher level than that of Wt-HIV-Env. Although the chimeric HIV/SIV Env proteins were expressed at the cell surface and induced increased levels of cell-cell fusion in comparison to Wt-HIV-Env, they did not exhibit increased incorporation into either HIV-PVs or SIV-PVs. Only Env-Tr752{sup N750K} exhibited significantly higher (threefold) levels of incorporation into HIV-PVs, an improvement, which, although not dramatic, is worthwhile for the large-scale preparation of non-infectious PVs for vaccine studies aimed at inducing Env humoral responses.

  11. The Science of HIV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael

    This book is the first curriculum developed to bring cutting edge research on the HIV virus into science classrooms. The book and video are coordinated to provide a range of learning opportunities--labs, activities, readings, model design, guided discussions and, in the video, a way to see research in action. Both the book and video emphasize the…

  12. HIV Excess Cancers JNCI

    Cancer.gov

    In 2010, an estimated 7,760 new cancers were diagnosed among the nearly 900,000 Americans known to be living with HIV infection. According to the first comprehensive study in the United States, approximately half of these cancers were in excess of what wo

  13. Modeling HIV Cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelson, Alan; Conway, Jessica; Cao, Youfang

    A large effort is being made to find a means to cure HIV infection. I will present a dynamical model of post-treatment control (PTC) or ``functional cure'' of HIV-infection. Some patients treated with suppressive antiviral therapy have been taken off of therapy and then spontaneously control HIV infection such that the amount of virus in the circulation is maintained undetectable by clinical assays for years. The model explains PTC occurring in some patients by having a parameter regime in which the model exhibits bistability, with both a low and high steady state viral load being stable. The model makes a number of predictions about how to attain the low PTC steady state. Bistability in this model depends upon the immune response becoming exhausted when over stimulated. I will also present a generalization of the model in which immunotherapy can be used to reverse immune exhaustion and compare model predictions with experiments in SIV infected macaques given immunotherapy and then taken off of antiretroviral therapy. Lastly, if time permits, I will discuss one of the hurdles to true HIV eradication, latently infected cells, and present clinical trial data and a new model addressing pharmacological means of flushing out the latent reservoir. Supported by NIH Grants AI028433 and OD011095.

  14. China update: HIV increasing.

    PubMed

    Gil, V E

    1993-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS case rate in China increased 117% over the period 1990-1992, from 446 to 957 HIV infections. While the majority of cases in 1990 were localized in Yunnan among minority farmers and manual laborers, infection is now found in 19 provinces, counties, and urban areas over a wider spectrum of society. The concentration of cases among IV-drug users has decreased from 83.4% to 72.6%. HIV monitoring and prevention stations have been in place in the country since 1986. The government also encouraged special zones and semiautonomous cities as well as the World Health Organization to take steps to monitor and prevent the spread of HIV. While these effort have served to augment the degree of sex education previously provided, low budgets, bureaucracy, and ambivalence have impeded control efforts. Only 1.25 million of the 1.16 billion population has been serosampled over 8 years and 100,000 fewer serosamples were taken in 1992 compared to in 1991. Neither the general population nor health workers have sufficient knowledge about HIV/AIDS to prevent its continued spread. While gay men sampled in Beijing were better informed about transmission means and risk groups, over two thirds believed they were not at risk if they avoided having sex with foreigners. Recent economic reform measures allowing large movements of population from rural to urban areas, increased disposable income available for prostitutes, and greater exposure to alternative sexual norms and behaviors through the media and music further increase the risk of HIV transmission, especially among the younger generation. To counter these risks, an AIDS hotline for information and referrals has been established in Beijing which openly reaches out to the homosexual community and fields 8-12 calls/day. Training programs for doctors, counselors, professors, and social workers have been attended by people from more than 30 provinces and regions. In addition, modest research into sexual behavior is also being

  15. HIV / AIDS: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: Symptoms , Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment Past Issues / ... Most people who have become recently infected with HIV will not have any symptoms. They may, however, ...

  16. Dental caries in HIV-seropositive women.

    PubMed

    Phelan, J A; Mulligan, R; Nelson, E; Brunelle, J; Alves, M E A F; Navazesh, M; Greenspan, D

    2004-11-01

    Reports that compare dental caries indices in HIV-seropositive (HIV+) subjects with HIV-seronegative (HIV-) subjects are rare. The objective of this study was to determine if there was an association between HIV infection and dental caries among women enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study. Subjects included 538 HIV+ and 141 HIV- women at baseline and 242 HIV+ and 66 HIV- women at year 5. Caries indices included DMFS and DFS (coronal caries) and DFSrc (root caries). Cross-sectional analysis of coronal caries data revealed a 1.2-fold-higher caries prevalence among HIV+ women compared with HIV- women. Longitudinally, DMFS increased with increasing age and lower average stimulated salivary volume. Root caries results were not significant except for an overall increased DFSrc associated with smoking. Anti-retroviral therapy was not identified as a risk factor for dental caries.

  17. HIV and breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    1992-07-01

    Participants at a 1992 WHO/UNICEF consultation meeting on HIV transmission and breast feeding weigh the risk of death from AIDS with the risk of death from other causes. Breast feeding reduces the risk of death from diarrhea, pneumonia, and other infections. Artificial or inappropriate feeding contributes the most to the more than 3 million annual childhood deaths from diarrhea. The rising prevalence of HIV infection among women worldwide results in more and more cases of HIV-infected newborns. About 33% of infants born to HIV-infected. Some HIV transmission occurs through breast feeding, but breast feeding does not transmit HIV to most infants HIV-infected mothers. Participants recommend that, in areas where infectious diseases and malnutrition are the leading causes of death and infant mortality is high, health workers should advise all pregnant women, regardless of their HIV status, to breast feed. The infant's risk of HIV infection via breast milk tends to be lower than its risk of death from other causes and from not being breast fed. HIV-infected women who do have access to alternative feeding should talk to their health care providers to learn how to feed their infants safely. In areas where the leading cause of death is not infectious disease and infant mortality is low, participants recommend that health workers advise HIV-infected pregnant women to use a safe feeding alternative, e.g., bottle feeding. Yet, the women and their providers should not be influenced by commercial pressures to choose an alternative feeding method. Health care services in these areas should provide voluntary and confidential HIV testing and counseling. Participants stress the need to prevent women from becoming HIV-infected by providing them information about AIDS and how to protect themselves, increasing their participation in decision-making in sexual relationships, and improving their status in society. PMID:1477885

  18. HIV Sequence Compendium 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Carla; Foley, Brian; Leitner, Thomas; Apetrei, Christian; Hahn, Beatrice; Mizrachi, Ilene; Mullins, James; Rambaut, Andrew; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette

    2010-12-31

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. In these compendia we try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2010. Hence, though it is called the 2010 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2009 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing exponentially. In total, at the time of printing, there were 339,306 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 45% since last year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 2576 by end of 2009, reflecting a smaller increase than in previous years. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a small fraction of these. Included in the alignments are a small number of sequences representing each of the subtypes and the more prevalent circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) such as 01 and 02, as well as a few outgroup sequences (group O and N and SIV-CPZ). Of the rarer CRFs we included one representative each. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html. Reprints are available from our website in the form of both HTML and PDF files. As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  19. Heterosexual transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A M; Laga, M

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments concerning heterosexual transmission of HIV (review of 1988 literature only) suggest improved understanding of the pattern of spread and role of risk behaviors and biological cofactors in its transmission. 3 distinct patterns if HIV infection are known: heterosexual spread in sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean, spread primarily among homosexuals and injecting drug users in Europe, North American and much of Latin America and Australia, and both homosexual and heterosexual transmission in Asia, the Pacific, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, where prevalence is low. In Africa an estimated 80% of cases are acquired heterosexually. Important risk factors are number of sex partners, sex with prostitutes, being a prostitute, being a sex partner of an infected person, and having a history of other sexually transmitted diseases. Prevalence rates have risen rapidly in Zaire and Kenya. In Africa, acquisition of HIV is related to sexual activity only. In contrast, in the U.S., heterosexual cases make up only 4% of all cases, and in Europe only 6%. Data on types of sexual transmission of HIV are mounting, in aggregate suggestive of a marked heterogeneity in infectivity and possibly susceptibility between individuals. Among couples where the man is positive, in some places individuals appear to be highly infective, notably those from Kinshasa, Zaire and Haiti, while other series of discordant couples the receptive partner remained seronegative for several years. Transmission from women to men appears to be less efficient than from men to women, as has been observed with other STDs such as gonorrhea. Biological cofactors implicated in enhanced HIV transmission appear to be advanced CDC Stage IV AIDS disease, with low T-helper lymphocyte counts and high antigenemia; concomitant STDS, especially those with genital ulceration; lack of circumcision; oral contraceptive use; practice of anal intercourse; inconsistent or no use of condoms. Theoretical models for

  20. Raltegravir, an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Cecilia

    2008-08-01

    Merck & Co has developed and launched raltegravir, an HIV-1 integrase inhibitor for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in treatment-experienced adult patients who have evidence of viral replication and HIV-1 strains resistant to multiple antiretroviral agents. This drug is the lead from a series of integrase strand transfer inhibitors and, by April 2008, it had been launched in Canada, the US, the UK, France, Germany and Spain, and had been filed for approval in Japan.

  1. The epidemiology of HIV in India.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, U; Maniar, J K; Rübsamen-Waigmann, H

    1995-01-01

    India is the first country outside Africa where an HIV-2 epidemic is running in parallel to an HIV-1 epidemic, resulting in a significant proportion of double infections. HIV is spreading rapidly, mainly by heterosexual contact, but also among intravenous drug users. Genetic analyses of the HIV variants circulating in India point towards HIV-1 and HIV-2 having been introduced into the country recently.

  2. HIV: Cell Binding and Entry

    PubMed Central

    Wilen, Craig B.; Tilton, John C.; Doms, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The first step of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication cycle—binding and entry into the host cell—plays a major role in determining viral tropism and the ability of HIV to degrade the human immune system. HIV uses a complex series of steps to deliver its genome into the host cell cytoplasm while simultaneously evading the host immune response. To infect cells, the HIV protein envelope (Env) binds to the primary cellular receptor CD4 and then to a cellular coreceptor. This sequential binding triggers fusion of the viral and host cell membranes, initiating infection. Revealing the mechanism of HIV entry has profound implications for viral tropism, transmission, pathogenesis, and therapeutic intervention. Here, we provide an overview into the mechanism of HIV entry, provide historical context to key discoveries, discuss recent advances, and speculate on future directions in the field. PMID:22908191

  3. Arterial ischemic stroke in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Bryer, Alan; Lucas, Sebastian; Stanley, Alan; Allain, Theresa J.; Joekes, Elizabeth; Emsley, Hedley; Turnbull, Ian; Downey, Colin; Toh, Cheng-Hock; Brown, Kevin; Brown, David; Ison, Catherine; Smith, Colin; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Nath, Avindra; Heyderman, Robert S.; Connor, Myles D.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection, and potentially its treatment, increases the risk of an arterial ischemic stroke. Multiple etiologies and lack of clear case definitions inhibit progress in this field. Several etiologies, many treatable, are relevant to HIV-related stroke. To fully understand the mechanisms and the terminology used, a robust classification algorithm to help ascribe the various etiologies is needed. This consensus paper considers the strengths and limitations of current case definitions in the context of HIV infection. The case definitions for the major etiologies in HIV-related strokes were refined (e.g., varicella zoster vasculopathy and antiphospholipid syndrome) and in some instances new case definitions were described (e.g., HIV-associated vasculopathy). These case definitions provided a framework for an algorithm to help assign a final diagnosis, and help classify the subtypes of HIV etiology in ischemic stroke. PMID:27386505

  4. HIV and homosexuality in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rajabali, Alefiyah; Khan, Saeed; Warraich, Haider J; Khanani, Mohammad R; Ali, Syed H

    2008-08-01

    In Pakistan, seven times more men are reported to be infected with HIV than women. Among the Pakistani population, modes of HIV transmission include infection through sexual contact, contaminated blood and blood products, injecting drug use, and mother-to-child transmission. Although most sexual transmission of HIV results from unsafe heterosexual contact, homosexual and bisexual contact also represent important modes of transmission. According to unpublished reports, the prevalence of HIV among homosexual and bisexual Pakistani men is reaching alarming proportions. We describe the Pakistani homosexual and bisexual culture, review statistics regarding HIV prevalence and risk behaviour, and identify areas of improvement in the HIV policy with specific focus on men who have sex with men. PMID:18652997

  5. Kinetic model of HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2007-10-15

    Recent experiments clarifying the details of exhaustion of CD8 T cells specific to various strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are indicative of slow irreversible (on a one-year time scale) deterioration of the immune system. The conventional models of HIV kinetics do not take this effect into account. Removing this shortcoming, we show the likely influence of such changes on the escape of HIV from control of the immune system.

  6. Preventing HIV Infection in Women

    PubMed Central

    Adimora, Adaora A.; Ramirez, Catalina; Auerbach, Judith D.; Aral, Sevgi O.; Hodder, Sally; Wingood, Gina; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Bukusi, Elizabeth Anne

    2014-01-01

    Although the number of new infections has declined recently, women still constitute almost half of the world's 34 million people with HIV infection, and HIV remains the leading cause of death among women of reproductive age. Prevention research has made considerable progress during the past few years in addressing the biological, behavioral and social factors that influence women's vulnerability to HIV infection. Nevertheless, substantial work still must be done in order to implement scientific advancements and to resolve the many questions that remain. This article highlights some of the recent advances and persistent gaps in HIV prevention research for women and outlines key research and policy priorities. PMID:23764631

  7. Immunology of Pediatric HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive, exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV’s perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. PMID:23772619

  8. HIV and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Naicker, Saraladevi; Rahmanian, Sadaf; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a frequent complication of HIV infection, occurring in 3.5 - 48.5%, and occurs as a complication of HIV infection, other co-morbid disease and infections and as a consequence of therapy of HIV infection and its complications. The classic involvement of the kidney by HIV infection is HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), occurring typically in young adults of African ancestry with advanced HIV disease in association with APOL1 high-risk variants. HIV-immune complex disease is the second most common diagnosis obtained from biopsies of patients with HIV-CKD. CKD is mediated by factors related to the virus, host genetic predisposition and environmental factors. The host response to HIV infection may influence disease phenotype through activation of cytokine pathways. With the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART), there has been a decline in the incidence of HIVAN, with an increasing prevalence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Several studies have demonstrated the overall improvement in kidney function when initiating ART for HIV CKD. Progression to end stage kidney disease has been reported to be more likely when high grade proteinuria, severely reduced eGFR, hepatitis B and/C co-infection, diabetes mellitus, extensive glomerulosclerosis, and chronic interstitial fibrosis are present. Improved renal survival is associated with use of renin angiotensin system blockers and viral suppression. Many antiretroviral medications are partially or completely eliminated by the kidney and require dose adjustment in CKD. Certain drug classes, such as the protease inhibitors and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, are metabolized by the liver and do not require dose adjustment. HIV-infected patients requiring either hemo- or peritoneal dialysis, who are stable on ART, are achieving survival rates comparable to those of dialysis patients without HIV infection. Kidney transplantation has been performed successfully in HIV

  9. An HIV-Preventive Intervention for Youth Living with HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightfoot, Marguerita; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Tevendale, Heather

    2007-01-01

    As the number of youth infected with HIV rises, secondary prevention programs are needed to help youth living with HIV meet three goals: (1) increase self-care behaviors, medical adherence, and health-related interactions; (2) reduce transmission acts; and (3) enhance their quality of life. This article describes an intervention program for youth…

  10. HIV-infected mothers' experiences during their infants' HIV testing.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Maureen T

    2015-04-01

    Both survival with HIV and rates of perinatal HIV infection have significantly declined during the past decade, due to antiretroviral therapies that interrupt HIV transmission to the fetus and newborn. Although HIV is no longer routinely fatal to mothers or transmitted to fetuses, and the testing of newborns for HIV has been improved, evidence about HIV-infected mothers' experiences during the months of their infants' HIV testing predates these improvements. This qualitative study on 16 mothers was an analysis of interviews conducted several weeks after testing was completed and all infants had been determined to be uninfected. Mothers reported that their experiences evolved during the months of testing. Initial reactions included maternal trauma and guilt associated with infant testing. They then reported learning to cope with the roller coaster ride of repeated testing with the help of information from clinicians. By the end of the testing period, ambiguity began to resolve as they engaged in tentative maternal-infant attachment and expressed desire for a sense of normalcy. Need for support and fear of stigma persisted throughout. These findings expand current knowledge about this experience and suggest clinical strategies to guide HIV-infected women during this stressful period. PMID:25739368

  11. The kidney in HIV infection: beyond HIV-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are more common in HIV-infected persons than in the general population. AKI is associated with poor health outcomes, including increased risk of heart failure, cardiovascular events, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and mortality. The most common causes of AKI in HIV-infected persons are systemic infections and adverse drug effects. The prevalence of CKD is rising in the HIV-infected population and CKD is increasingly likely to be caused by comorbid conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, that frequently cause CKD in the general population. Guidelines for CKD screening in HIV-infected patients are being revised. It is currently recommended that all patients be screened for creatinine-based estimates of glomerular filtration rate and for urine protein at the time of HIV diagnosis. Annual screening is recommended for high-risk patients. Hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and kidney transplantation are all options for treating ESRD in HIV-infected patients. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis offer similar survival in HIV-infected patients with ESRD. In selected patients with well-controlled HIV infection, kidney transplantation is associated with survival intermediate between that in the overall transplant population and that among transplant recipients older than 65 years. This article summarizes a presentation by Christina M. Wyatt, MD, at the IAS-USA continuing medical education program held in Chicago in May 2012, describing AKI and CKD using case illustrations.

  12. Psychoneuroimmunology and HIV.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, B

    1995-01-01

    The field of psychoneuroimmunology has been evolving over the past thirty years and is based on connecting the mind and body using a concept known as hardiness. Hardiness generally consists of three main parameters: commitment, control, and challenge, but in working with HIV-infected patients, a fourth parameter, community, is added. Various mental health scales are used to assess how patients cope with stress; effects of stress on the immune system can also be assessed by determining proliferation of various types of lymphocytes. Various studies conducted on asymptomatic HIV-positive subjects prior to and following notification of HIV-1 antibody status measured immune system function in patients that were or were not involved in aerobic exercise or group, cognitive, or behavioral modification. Those who participated in interventions had lower or minimal decreases in immunologic parameters compared to controls. A University of Miami research team theorizes that in the absence of aerobic conditioning or behavioral restructuring, a cascade of events occurs which decreases the individual's immunologic endocrine and neuropathic functioning. The patients' hardiness is what keeps them from falling under a medical hex, that is, keeps them from allowing the person in power (the doctor) to take away their hope, which would cause the cascade to occur. Support groups are good ways to help patients develop hardiness within a trusting atmosphere.

  13. HIV DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    Craigie, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2012-01-01

    Retroviruses are distinguished from other viruses by two characteristic steps in the viral replication cycle. The first is reverse transcription, which results in the production of a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome, and the second is integration, which results in covalent attachment of the DNA copy to host cell DNA. The initial catalytic steps of the integration reaction are performed by the virus-encoded integrase (IN) protein. The chemistry of the IN-mediated DNA breaking and joining steps is well worked out, and structures of IN-DNA complexes have now clarified how the overall complex assembles. Methods developed during these studies were adapted for identification of IN inhibitors, which received FDA approval for use in patients in 2007. At the chromosomal level, HIV integration is strongly favored in active transcription units, which may promote efficient viral gene expression after integration. HIV IN binds to the cellular factor LEDGF/p75, which promotes efficient infection and tethers IN to favored target sites. The HIV integration machinery must also interact with many additional host factors during infection, including nuclear trafficking and pore proteins during nuclear entry, histones during initial target capture, and DNA repair proteins during completion of the DNA joining steps. Models for some of the molecular mechanisms involved have been proposed, but important details remain to be clarified. PMID:22762018

  14. [Pneumocystosis during HIV infection].

    PubMed

    El Fane, M; Sodqi, M; Oulad Lahsen, A; Chakib, A; Marih, L; Marhoum El Filali, K

    2016-08-01

    Pneumocystosis is an opportunistic disease caused by invasion of unicellular fungus Pneumocystic jirovecii which is responsible for febrile pneumonia among patients with cellular immunodeficiency especially those HIV infected. Despite the decreasing of its incidence due to the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, as well as anti-Pneumocystis prophylaxis among these patients, Pneumocystis pneumonia remains the first AIDS-defining event and a leading cause of mortality among HIV-infected patients. The usual radiological presentation is that of diffuse interstitial pneumonia. The diagnosis is confirmed by the detection of trophozoides and/or cysts P. jirovecii in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples using several staining techniques. The use of polymerase chain reaction in the BAL samples in conjunction with standard immunofluorescent or colorimetric tests have allowed for more has allowed for more rapid and accurate diagnosis. The standard regimen of treatment is the association of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole which has been utilized as an effective treatment with a favourable recovery. Early HIV diagnosis and antiretroviral therapy should reduce the incidence of this dreaded disease. PMID:27349824

  15. HIV-related violence.

    PubMed

    Abdale, F

    1999-10-01

    Statistics are seldom recorded on the incidence of HIV-related verbal or physical abuse. The New York Gay and Lesbian Anti-Violence Project (AVP), and San Francisco's Community United Against Violence are the only known programs to recognize and collect data on HIV-related violence. Psychological abuse, physical battery, harassment, and rape are all signs of domestic violence. Reluctance to report bias crimes is thought to stem from fear of discrimination and further violence. In addition, some community members are concerned that partner notification laws may foster more household violence, or discourage people from being tested. The repercussions of violence against people with HIV is evident, often resulting in depression, lack of sleep, and non-adherence to medication. Those victimized by violent situations can seek assistance in New York from AVP, which provides resources, counseling, legal aid and advocacy for victims. AVP also provides guidance and support through the process of criminal prosecution, and formulating a safety plan. A list of organizations that can assist victims of violence is provided, which includes contact information for each.

  16. Measuring HIV vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Suárez, C M

    2005-04-15

    Some HIV vaccine candidates have a potential VE I (vaccine efficacy for infectiousness) type effect, which tends to reduce the viral load and may reduce infectiousness of an infected individual. In general, the efficacy of this kind of vaccine is very difficult to assess because it requires information on contacts of vaccinated infected individuals, and current methods to estimate VE I rely on the time elapsed between infections of an individual and his/her sexual partner, thus making infection of the sexual partner necessary to assess the efficacy. To avoid behavioural changes that may affect the estimates, HIV status is kept undisclosed to participants, which raises many ethical questions. Here we present a method that allows immediate notification of HIV status to both members of a couple, reducing the risk of infection when one of them has not been infected and allowing immediate medical treatment. The method allows for estimation of any VE I and VE S (vaccine efficacy for susceptibility) effect, and it is robust to the most common situations found in these type of studies, namely: differential risk of participants, staggered enrollment and small sample sizes.

  17. HIV reservoirs as obstacles and opportunities for an HIV cure.

    PubMed

    Chun, Tae-Wook; Moir, Susan; Fauci, Anthony S

    2015-06-01

    The persistence of HIV reservoirs remains a formidable obstacle to achieving sustained virologic remission in HIV-infected individuals after antiretroviral therapy (ART) is discontinued, even if plasma viremia has been successfully suppressed for prolonged periods of time. Numerous approaches aimed at eradicating the virus, as well as maintaining its prolonged suppression in the absence of ART, have had little success. A better understanding of the pathophysiologic nature of HIV reservoirs and the impact of various interventions on their persistence is essential for the development of successful therapeutic strategies against HIV or the long-term control of infection. Here, we discuss the persistent HIV reservoir as a barrier to cure as well as the current therapeutic strategies aimed at eliminating or controlling the virus in the absence of ART.

  18. HIV-1 Capsid Stabilization Assay.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    The stability of the HIV-1 core in the cytoplasm is crucial for productive HIV-1 infection. Mutations that stabilize or destabilize the core showed defects in HIV-1 reverse transcription and infection. We developed a novel and simple assay to measure stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. This assay allowed us to demonstrate that cytosolic extracts strongly stabilize the HIV-1 core (Fricke et al., J Virol 87:10587-10597, 2013). By using our novel assay, one can measure the ability of different drugs to modulate the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes, such as PF74, CAP-1, IXN-053, cyclosporine A, Bi2, and the peptide CAI. We also found that purified CPSF6 (1-321) protein stabilizes in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes (Fricke et al., J Virol 87:10587-10597, 2013). Here we describe in detail the use of this capsid stability assay. We believe that our assay can be a powerful tool to assess HIV-1 capsid stability in vitro.

  19. International travel and HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    von Reyn, C. F.; Mann, J. M.; Chin, J.

    1990-01-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide problem, its prevalence and pattern vary from country to country. Accordingly, the risk to international travellers of acquiring HIV infection also varies widely in different parts of the world, and depends principally on their behaviour. The risk of sexual acquisition of HIV infection can be virtually eliminated by avoiding penetrative sexual intercourse with intravenous drug users and persons who have had multiple sexual partners (such as prostitutes) or reduced by the use of condoms. The risk of parenteral exposure to HIV can be reduced by avoiding parenteral drug use and behaviour that is likely to lead to injury (with its attendant risk of requiring blood transfusion) and by seeking medical facilities with adequate capabilities to screen blood donors for HIV and to sterilize instruments. HIV screening of international travellers is an ineffective, costly, and impractical public health strategy for limiting the worldwide spread of HIV infection. Travellers infected with HIV require specialized advice regarding health precautions, prophylactic medications, and immunization. PMID:2194689

  20. HIV vaccines: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Lema, D; Garcia, A; De Sanctis, J B

    2014-07-01

    The scope of the article is to review the different approaches that have been used for HIV vaccines. The review is based on articles retrieved by PubMed and clinical trials from 1990 up to date. The article discusses virus complexity, protective and non-protective immune responses against the virus, and the most important approaches for HIV vaccine development.

  1. HIV infection of the penis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deborah; Politch, Joseph A.; Pudney, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The penile foreskin, shaft, glans/corona, meatus and urethral introitus are all potential sites of HIV-1 acquisition in men. Circumcision decreases HIV infection in heterosexual men by 50–60%, indicating that the foreskin plays an important role, but that other sites are also involved. HIV target cells have been described throughout the male genital epithelium, but appear to be more accessible in the inner foreskin and urethral introitus, both of which are mucosal (wet) epithelia and infectable with HIV in vitro. Sexually transmitted co-infections can increase the risk of HIV infection at these and other sites by eroding the protective epithelial layer and by attracting and activating HIV target cells in the mucosal epithelium. The moist subpreputial cavity hosts a unique microbiome that may also play a role in HIV infection. Both innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms are operative in the lower male genital region. The penile urethral mucosa contains accumulations of IgA+ plasma cells and T lymphocytes, and may provide a responsive target for future mucosal vaccines to prevent HIV sexual transmission. PMID:21214659

  2. HIV/AIDS and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    If you have HIV/AIDS and find out you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant, you should let your health care provider know as soon as possible. Some HIV/AIDS medicines may harm your baby. Your health care ...

  3. HIV Testing among Detained Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voisin, Dexter R.; Salazar, Laura F.; Crosby, Richard; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Yarber, William L.; Staples-Horne, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Published reports have not investigated the issue of voluntary HIV testing among detained youth, a population disproportionately infected with HIV compared to other adolescent groups. Data were collected from 467 sexually active detained adolescents in Georgia on demographic, environmental, and drug and sexual history variables, to explore…

  4. Preventing HIV Infection among Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    This document notes that a recent threat to American's youth is the risk of infection from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It views youth at high risk for alcohol or other drug use as also being, in all probability, at highest risk for exposure to HIV, and suggests that programs set up to prevent adolescents from becoming involved with…

  5. Hyperthermia Stimulates HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42–45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38–40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity. PMID:22807676

  6. The future of HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Padian, Nancy S; Isbell, Michael T; Russell, Elizabeth S; Essex, M

    2012-08-01

    In the decades since the emergence of HIV, numerous approaches to prevent transmission have been tested with varying degrees of success. Because a highly effective vaccine will not be available within the next decade, it is increasingly clear that preventing new HIV infections will require successful implementation of promising behavioral and biomedical interventions in combination. These prevention packages must be sufficiently flexible to include a variety of evidence-based interventions that serve each dynamic population they target, particularly those who are most vulnerable. To optimize the impact of combination intervention packages, well-designed implementation science studies are vital. Efficacy in a clinical trial does not necessarily translate to effectiveness at the population-level, and prioritized research studies should investigate programmatic implementation and operations scale-up and new methods to monitor and evaluate these processes both for organization and cost-effectiveness. With an estimated 2.7 million people becoming newly infected with HIV in 2010, the prevention of HIV remains an urgent global health priority. Since the emergence of HIV/AIDS more than 30 years ago, the evidence base for HIV prevention has expanded and evolved. Here we explore the status of evidence-based HIV prevention, describing both the continuing challenges and the emerging opportunities to reduce HIV incidence. PMID:22772385

  7. How you get HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    How you get HIV/AIDS Which body fluids contain HIV? HIV is a virus that lives in blood and other fluids in the body. Moving ... answers to any questions you have about HIV/AIDS. Your public health department and health care provider ...

  8. Common oral lesions associated with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Navazesh, M; Lucatorto, F

    1993-09-01

    More than 40 different lesions involving head and neck areas have been associated with HIV infection. The oral cavity may manifest the first sign of HIV infection. Early detection of these conditions can lead to early diagnosis of HIV infection and subsequent appropriate management. Signs, symptoms and management of the most common HIV-associated oral lesions are discussed.

  9. HIV surveillance in complex emergencies.

    PubMed

    Salama, P; Dondero, T J

    2001-04-01

    Many studies have shown a positive association between both migration and temporary expatriation and HIV risk. This association is likely to be similar or even more pronounced for forced migrants. In general, HIV transmission in host-migrant or host-forced-migrant interactions depends on the maturity of the HIV epidemic in both the host and the migrant population, the relative seroprevalence of HIV in the host and the migrant population, the prevalence of other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that may facilitate transmission, and the level of sexual interaction between the two communities. Complex emergencies are the major cause of mass population movement today. In complex emergencies, additional factors such as sexual interaction between forced-migrant populations and the military; sexual violence; increasing commercial sex work; psychological trauma; and disruption of preventive and curative health services may increase the risk for HIV transmission. Despite recent success in preventing HIV infection in stable populations in selected developing countries, internally displaced persons and refugees (or forced migrants) have not been systematically included in HIV surveillance systems, nor consequently in prevention activities. Standard surveillance systems that rely on functioning health services may not provide useful data in many complex emergency settings. Secondary sources can provide some information in these settings. Little attempt has been made, however, to develop innovative HIV surveillance systems in countries affected by complex emergencies. Consequently, data on the HIV epidemic in these countries are scarce and HIV prevention programs are either not implemented or interventions are not effectively targeted. Second generation surveillance methods such as cross-sectional, population-based surveys can provide rapid information on HIV, STIs, and sexual behavior. The risks for stigmatization and breaches of confidentiality must be recognized

  10. Cardiovascular Disease, Statins, and HIV.

    PubMed

    Eckard, Allison Ross; Meissner, Eric G; Singh, Inderjit; McComsey, Grace A

    2016-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are at an increased risk of serious, non-AIDS-defining comorbidities, even in the setting of viral suppression with combination antiretroviral therapy. This increased risk is due in part to immune dysfunction and heightened inflammation and immune activation associated with chronic HIV infection. Statins have wide-reaching immunomodulatory effects, and their use in the HIV-infected population may be of particular benefit. In this article, we review the pathogenesis of increased inflammation during HIV infection and how it contributes to the risk of cardiovascular disease among HIV-infected individuals. We then we review the immunomodulatory effects of statins and how they may attenuate the risk of cardiovascular disease and other comorbidities in this unique patient population. PMID:27625435

  11. Creating genetic resistance to HIV.

    PubMed

    Burnett, John C; Zaia, John A; Rossi, John J

    2012-10-01

    HIV/AIDS remains a chronic and incurable disease, in spite of the notable successes of combination antiretroviral therapy. Gene therapy offers the prospect of creating genetic resistance to HIV that supplants the need for antiviral drugs. In sight of this goal, a variety of anti-HIV genes have reached clinical testing, including gene-editing enzymes, protein-based inhibitors, and RNA-based therapeutics. Combinations of therapeutic genes against viral and host targets are designed to improve the overall antiviral potency and reduce the likelihood of viral resistance. In cell-based therapies, therapeutic genes are expressed in gene modified T lymphocytes or in hematopoietic stem cells that generate an HIV-resistant immune system. Such strategies must promote the selective proliferation of the transplanted cells and the prolonged expression of therapeutic genes. This review focuses on the current advances and limitations in genetic therapies against HIV, including the status of several recent and ongoing clinical studies.

  12. HIV treatment in US prisons

    PubMed Central

    Wakeman, Sarah E; Rich, Josiah D

    2010-01-01

    Arguably one of the most marginalized populations in our society, prisoners bear a disproportionate burden of infectious diseases, particularly HIV. In addition, groups known to be at an inordinately higher risk of HIV, including minorities, the addicted, the mentally ill and the impoverished are overrepresented among incarcerated populations. This concentration of HIV among groups that have been historically difficult to reach, with limited intersections with healthcare, provides an opportunity for testing, diagnosis, treatment, linkage to care and prevention. Providing HIV care within correctional facilities poses unique challenges. Barriers to confidentiality, access to medication and prior records, and lack of comprehensive discharge planning can serve as obstacles to providing optimal care. This article discusses the public health implications and importance of providing HIV care to prisoners, and also discusses the practicalities of working within an environment that poses particular barriers to care. PMID:20953349

  13. New Approaches to HIV Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Development of a safe and effective vaccine for HIV is a major global priority. However, to date, efforts to design an HIV vaccine with methods used for development of other successful viral vaccines have not succeeded due to HIV diversity, HIV integration into the host genome, and ability of HIV to consistently evade anti-viral immune responses. Recent success in isolation of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs), discovery of mechanisms of bnAb induction, and in discovery of atypical mechanisms of CD8 T cell killing of HIV-infected cells, have opened new avenues for strategies for HIV vaccine design. PMID:26056742

  14. Notification following new positive HIV test results.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Lin A; Hutchinson, Angela B; Hollis, NaTasha D; Sansom, Stephanie L

    2016-09-01

    Client notification of a new HIV diagnosis is critical for timely access to treatment and reduction in behaviours associated with HIV infection. It is also an important input in HIV transmission and disease progression models. We used national, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-funded HIV testing events data collected through the National HIV Prevention Program Monitoring and Evaluation system to update estimates of the proportion of newly identified HIV-positives notified of their status. We compared estimates from 2008 to 2010 across test technologies, settings, and HIV risk groups. In 2010, notification following a positive rapid test was 99.6% compared with 99.3% in 2008. Notification following a positive conventional test was 81.5% in 2010 compared with 80.8% in 2008. To realise the full promise of early HIV diagnosis and treatment for the prevention of additional HIV cases, efforts to ensure prompt notification following a new HIV diagnosis will be crucial. PMID:26378191

  15. High Feasibility of Empiric HIV Treatment for Patients With Suspected Acute HIV in an Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kathleen R; Arora, Sanjay; Walsh, Kristin B; Lora, Meredith; Merjavy, Stephen; Livermore, Shanna; Menchine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Earlier intervention in acute HIV infection limits HIV reservoirs and may decrease HIV transmission. We developed criteria for empiric antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an emergency department (ED) routine HIV screening program. We assessed the feasibility and willingness of patients with suspected acute HIV infection in the ED to begin ART. A suspected acute HIV infection was defined as a positive HIV antigen antibody combination immunoassay with pending HIV-antibody differentiation test results and HIV RNA viral load. During the study period, there were 16 confirmed cases of acute HIV infection: 11 met our criteria for empiric ART and agreed to treatment, 10 were prescribed ART, and 1 left the ED against medical advice without a prescription for ART. Eight patients completed at least one follow-up visit. Empiric HIV treatment in an ED is feasible, well received by patients, and offers a unique entry point into the HIV care continuum. PMID:27028498

  16. Inhibitors of HIV-1 replication that inhibit HIV integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, W E; Reinecke, M G; Abdel-Malek, S; Jia, Q; Chow, S A

    1996-01-01

    HIV-1 replication depends on the viral enzyme integrase that mediates integration of a DNA copy of the virus into the host cell genome. This enzyme represents a novel target to which antiviral agents might be directed. Three compounds, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 1-methoxyoxalyl-3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and L-chicoric acid, inhibit HIV-1 integrase in biochemical assays at concentrations ranging from 0.06-0.66 microgram/ml; furthermore, these compounds inhibit HIV-1 replication in tissue culture at 1-4 microgram/ml. The toxic concentrations of these compounds are fully 100-fold greater than their antiviral concentrations. These compounds represent a potentially important new class of antiviral agents that may contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of viral integration. Thus, the dicaffeoylquinic acids are promising leads to new anti-HIV therapeutics and offer a significant advance in the search for new HIV enzyme targets as they are both specific for HIV-1 integrase and active against HIV-1 in tissue culture. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8692814

  17. Experiences of HIV stigma: the role of visible symptoms, HIV centrality and community attachment for people living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Brener, Loren; Callander, Denton; Slavin, Sean; de Wit, John

    2013-01-01

    For many people living with HIV (PLHIV), disclosure or concealment of their HIV status may be under their personal control; however, for PLHIV with visible symptoms of their illness, disclosure may no longer be a choice. Previous research suggests that those with visible HIV symptoms have poorer mental and physical health than those without visible HIV symptoms. This study aimed to extend these findings and assess the role of perceived centrality of HIV in the lives of PLHIV as well as the role of attachment to an HIV-positive community in understanding the negative effects on health and well-being for PLHIV with visible HIV symptoms. Participants were 697 PLHIV who completed an online survey that assessed symptom visibility, HIV-status disclosure, perceived stigma, health and well-being, how central HIV was to identity and HIV community attachment. Results indicate that those with visible symptoms experienced more HIV-related stigma and had poorer outcomes on a range of psychological and mental health measures than those who were able to conceal their stigma. These effects remained after controlling for length of time since diagnosis, time on HIV treatment, perceived health satisfaction and age. PLHIV with visible symptoms also reported that HIV was more central to their identity and reported greater attachment to an HIV-positive community. Furthermore, findings suggest that while HIV centrality appears to increase the negative effects of having visible symptoms associated with HIV, greater community attachment seems to ameliorate these effects. This suggests the need for a nuanced understanding of the implications of visible HIV symptoms for PLHIV. The study also highlights the potential benefits of HIV-positive community attachment in buffering PLHIV from the negative effect of visible HIV symptoms on their health and well-being.

  18. Spatiotemporal dynamics of HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, Matthew Carl

    Mathematical models of the dynamics of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have contributed to tremendous advances over the past 20 years. This thesis extends this previous work by exploring the importance of spatial heterogeneity in HIV infection both in vitro and in vivo in patients treated with highly-active antiretroviral therapy. Viral infections propagate locally in space, yet HIV infection has been widely regarded as equilibrated over the entire body of an infected patient. This dissertation constructs and explores a cellular automata model of viral spread at the cellular level. Coupling the automata to a blood compartment represented by a differential equation leads to a whole-body model of HIV infection that explicitly includes spatial effects at both the cellular and tissue levels. These models are tested by comparison with experimental data. A central prediction of the spatial model is that, due to competition between Brownian motion and viral lability, HIV infectivity increases with target cell density. This production is verified in a series of in vitro experiments in cell culture. The predicted independence of inhibitory concentrations of antiretoviral agents is verified for nevirapine, but azidothymidine inhibits HIV replication less efficiently in more dense cultures. These in vitro results suggest that systems allowing cell concentrations closer to tissue densities would better reflect virus replication kinetics, although standard measures of relative drug susceptibility may accurately reflect in vivo conditions. The coupled spatial model of in vivo dynamics is compared with novel mathematical analysis of experiments in HIV-infected patients. These analyses indicate that HIV DNA provides a useful marker of the size of long-lived cellular reservoirs of HIV. Levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood are predictive of the average rate of residual virus production after years of treatment, regardless of whether patients initiate therapy

  19. Nanomedicines for HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Siccardi, Marco; Martin, Philip; McDonald, Tom O; Liptrott, Neill J; Giardiello, Marco; Rannard, Steve; Owen, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    Heterogeneity in response to HIV treatments has been attributed to several causes including variability in pharmacokinetic exposure. Nanomedicine applications have a variety of advantages compared with traditional formulations, such as the potential to increase bioavailability and specifically target the site of action. Our group is focusing on the development of nanoformulations using a closed-loop design process in which nanoparticle optimization (disposition, activity and safety) is a continuous process based on experimental pharmacological data from in vitro and in vivo models. Solid drug nanoparticles, polymer-based drug-delivery carriers as well as nanoemulsions are nanomedicine options with potential application to improve antiretroviral deployment.

  20. Maternal HIV infection influences the microbiome of HIV-uninfected infants.

    PubMed

    Bender, Jeffrey M; Li, Fan; Martelly, Shoria; Byrt, Erin; Rouzier, Vanessa; Leo, Marguerite; Tobin, Nicole; Pannaraj, Pia S; Adisetiyo, Helty; Rollie, Adrienne; Santiskulvong, Chintda; Wang, Shaun; Autran, Chloe; Bode, Lars; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Kuhn, Louise; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2016-07-27

    More than 1 million HIV-exposed, uninfected infants are born annually to HIV-positive mothers worldwide. This growing population of infants experiences twice the mortality of HIV-unexposed infants. We found that although there were very few differences seen in the microbiomes of mothers with and without HIV infection, maternal HIV infection was associated with changes in the microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Furthermore, we observed that human breast milk oligosaccharides were associated with bacterial species in the infant microbiome. The disruption of the infant's microbiome associated with maternal HIV infection may contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants.

  1. Maternal HIV infection influences the microbiome of HIV-uninfected infants.

    PubMed

    Bender, Jeffrey M; Li, Fan; Martelly, Shoria; Byrt, Erin; Rouzier, Vanessa; Leo, Marguerite; Tobin, Nicole; Pannaraj, Pia S; Adisetiyo, Helty; Rollie, Adrienne; Santiskulvong, Chintda; Wang, Shaun; Autran, Chloe; Bode, Lars; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Kuhn, Louise; Aldrovandi, Grace M

    2016-07-27

    More than 1 million HIV-exposed, uninfected infants are born annually to HIV-positive mothers worldwide. This growing population of infants experiences twice the mortality of HIV-unexposed infants. We found that although there were very few differences seen in the microbiomes of mothers with and without HIV infection, maternal HIV infection was associated with changes in the microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. Furthermore, we observed that human breast milk oligosaccharides were associated with bacterial species in the infant microbiome. The disruption of the infant's microbiome associated with maternal HIV infection may contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. PMID:27464748

  2. Just Diagnosed: Next Steps After Testing Positive for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV baseline evaluation. What is an HIV baseline evaluation? An HIV baseline evaluation includes all the information ... lab tests are included in an HIV baseline evaluation? The following lab tests are included in an ...

  3. Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV during Childbirth

    MedlinePlus

    HIV and Pregnancy Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV During Childbirth (Last updated 8/17/2015; last ... the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV reduced during childbirth? During childbirth, women with HIV ...

  4. [HIV infection : Test and treatment].

    PubMed

    Rockstroh, J K; Wasmuth, J-C

    2016-08-01

    In Europe depending on the country 15-80 % of all individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are either not aware of the diagnosis or are diagnosed later. An early HIV diagnosis could, however, considerably improve the prognosis of individuals infected with HIV and decrease the risk of new infections; therefore, in the presence of indicator diseases, such as sexually transmitted diseases, oral thrush, herpes zoster and lymphoma, the performance of a HIV test is of utmost importance. A newly diagnosed HIV infection represents an indication for starting antiretroviral combination therapy independent of the clinical stage or CD4 cell count. A decline of the viral burden to below the limit of detection and subsequent continuous suppression of viral replication can prevent transition from HIV to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and if started early enough a normal life expectancy can be achieved. Challenges which remain in HIV therapy are the lifelong daily intake of medication and the complex long-term adverse effects. PMID:27368530

  5. Cohort Profile: The Bissau HIV Cohort-a cohort of HIV-1, HIV-2 and co-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, Sanne; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Oliveira, Inés; Medina, Candida; da Silva Té, David; Correira, Faustino Gomes; Erikstrup, Christian; Laursen, Alex Lund; Østergaard, Lars; Wejse, Christian

    2015-06-01

    The West African country Guinea-Bissau is home to the world's highest prevalence of HIV-2, and its HIV-1 prevalence is rising. Other chronic viral infections like human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and hepatitis B virus are common as well. The Bissau HIV Cohort was started in 2007 to gain new insights into the overall effect of introducing antiretroviral treatment in a treatment-naïve population with concomitant infection with three retroviruses (HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV-1) and tuberculosis. The cohort includes patients from the HIV clinic at Hospital Nacional Simão Mendes, the main hospital in Bissau, the capital of the country. From July 2007 to June 2013, 3762 HIV-infected patients (69% HIV-1, 18% HIV-2, 11% HIV-1/2 and 2% HIV type unknown) were included in the world's largest single-centre HIV-2 cohort. Demographic and clinical data are collected at baseline and every 6 months, together with CD4 cell count and routine biochemistry analyses. Plasma and cells are stored in a biobank in Denmark. The Bissau HIV Cohort is administered by the Bissau HIV Cohort study group. Potential collaborators are invited to contact the chair of the cohort study group, Christian Wejse, e-mail: [wejse@dadlnet.dk].

  6. Low-level Viremia Early in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Iris; Cummings, Vanessa; Fogel, Jessica M.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Clarke, William; Connor, Matthew B.; Griffith, Sam; Buchbinder, Susan; Shoptaw, Steven; del Rio, Carlos; Magnus, Manya; Mannheimer, Sharon; Wheeler, Darrell P.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2014-01-01

    HIV RNA levels are usually high early in HIV infection. In the HPTN 061 study, men were tested for HIV infection every six months; six (21.4%) of 28 men who acquired HIV infection during the study had low or undetectable HIV RNA at the time of HIV diagnosis. Antiretroviral drugs were not detected at the time of HIV diagnosis. False-negative HIV test results were obtained for two men using multiple assays. Antiretroviral drug resistance mutations were detected in HIV from one man. Additional studies are needed to identify factors associated with low HIV RNA levels during early HIV infection. PMID:25140905

  7. EFFECT OF HIV PREVENTION AND TREATMENT PROGRAM ON HIV AND HCV TRANSMISSION AND HIV MORTALITY AT AN INDONESIAN NARCOTIC PRISON.

    PubMed

    Nelwan, Erni J; Indrati, Agnes K; Isa, Ahmad; Triani, Nurlita; Alam, Nisaa Nur; Herlan, Maria S; Husen, Wahid; Pohan, Herdiman T; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Meheus, Andre; Van Crevel, Reinout; van der Ven, Andre Jam

    2015-09-01

    Validated data regarding HIV-transmission in prisons in developing countries is scarce. We examined sexual and injecting drug use behavior and HIV and HCV transmission in an Indonesian narcotic prison during the implementation of an HIV prevention and treatment program during 2004-2007 when the Banceuy Narcotic Prison in Indonesia conducted an HIV transmission prevention program to provide 1) HIV education, 2) voluntary HIV testing and counseling, 3) condom supply, 4) prevention of rape and sexual violence, 5) antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive prisoners and 6) methadone maintenance treatment. During a first survey that was conducted between 2007 and 2009, new prisoners entered Banceuy Narcotics Prison were voluntary tested for HIV and HCV-infection after written informed consent was obtained. Information regarding sexual and injecting risk behavior and physical status were also recorded at admission to the prison. Participants who tested negative for both HIV and HCV during the first survey were included in a second survey conducted during 2008-2011. During both surveys, data on mortality among HIV-seropositive patients were also recorded. All HIV-seropositive participants receive treatment for HIV. HIV/ AIDS-related deaths decreased: 43% in 2006, 18% in 2007, 9% in 2008 and 0% in 2009. No HIV and HCV seroconversion inside Banceuy Narcotic Prison were found after a median of 23 months imprisonment (maximum follow-up: 38 months). Total of 484.8 person-years observation was done. Participants reported HIV transmission risk-behavior in Banceuy Prison during the second survey was low. After implementation of HIV prevention and treatment program, no new HIV or HCV cases were detected and HIV-related mortality decreased. PMID:26863859

  8. EFFECT OF HIV PREVENTION AND TREATMENT PROGRAM ON HIV AND HCV TRANSMISSION AND HIV MORTALITY AT AN INDONESIAN NARCOTIC PRISON.

    PubMed

    Nelwan, Erni J; Indrati, Agnes K; Isa, Ahmad; Triani, Nurlita; Alam, Nisaa Nur; Herlan, Maria S; Husen, Wahid; Pohan, Herdiman T; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Meheus, Andre; Van Crevel, Reinout; van der Ven, Andre Jam

    2015-09-01

    Validated data regarding HIV-transmission in prisons in developing countries is scarce. We examined sexual and injecting drug use behavior and HIV and HCV transmission in an Indonesian narcotic prison during the implementation of an HIV prevention and treatment program during 2004-2007 when the Banceuy Narcotic Prison in Indonesia conducted an HIV transmission prevention program to provide 1) HIV education, 2) voluntary HIV testing and counseling, 3) condom supply, 4) prevention of rape and sexual violence, 5) antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive prisoners and 6) methadone maintenance treatment. During a first survey that was conducted between 2007 and 2009, new prisoners entered Banceuy Narcotics Prison were voluntary tested for HIV and HCV-infection after written informed consent was obtained. Information regarding sexual and injecting risk behavior and physical status were also recorded at admission to the prison. Participants who tested negative for both HIV and HCV during the first survey were included in a second survey conducted during 2008-2011. During both surveys, data on mortality among HIV-seropositive patients were also recorded. All HIV-seropositive participants receive treatment for HIV. HIV/ AIDS-related deaths decreased: 43% in 2006, 18% in 2007, 9% in 2008 and 0% in 2009. No HIV and HCV seroconversion inside Banceuy Narcotic Prison were found after a median of 23 months imprisonment (maximum follow-up: 38 months). Total of 484.8 person-years observation was done. Participants reported HIV transmission risk-behavior in Banceuy Prison during the second survey was low. After implementation of HIV prevention and treatment program, no new HIV or HCV cases were detected and HIV-related mortality decreased.

  9. Oral Complications of HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leao, Jair C.; Ribeiro, Camila M. B.; Carvalho, Alessandra A. T.; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  10. Regional Differences in Prevalence of HIV-1 Discordance in Africa and Enrollment of HIV-1 Discordant Couples into an HIV-1 Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lingappa, Jairam R.; Lambdin, Barrot; Bukusi, Elizabeth Ann; Ngure, Kenneth; Kavuma, Linda; Inambao, Mubiana; Kanweka, William; Allen, Susan; Kiarie, James N.; Makhema, Joseph; Were, Edwin; Manongi, Rachel; Coetzee, David; de Bruyn, Guy; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Magaret, Amalia; Mugo, Nelly; Mujugira, Andrew; Ndase, Patrick; Celum, Connie

    2008-01-01

    Background Most HIV-1 transmission in Africa occurs among HIV-1-discordant couples (one partner HIV-1 infected and one uninfected) who are unaware of their discordant HIV-1 serostatus. Given the high HIV-1 incidence among HIV-1 discordant couples and to assess efficacy of interventions for reducing HIV-1 transmission, HIV-1 discordant couples represent a critical target population for HIV-1 prevention interventions and prevention trials. Substantial regional differences exist in HIV-1 prevalence in Africa, but regional differences in HIV-1 discordance among African couples, has not previously been reported. Methodology/Principal Findings The Partners in Prevention HSV-2/HIV-1 Transmission Trial (“Partners HSV-2 Study”), the first large HIV-1 prevention trial in Africa involving HIV-1 discordant couples, completed enrollment in May 2007. Partners HSV-2 Study recruitment data from 12 sites from East and Southern Africa were used to assess HIV-1 discordance among couples accessing couples HIV-1 counseling and testing, and to correlate with enrollment of HIV-1 discordant couples. HIV-1 discordance at Partners HSV-2 Study sites ranged from 8–31% of couples tested from the community. Across all study sites and, among all couples with one HIV-1 infected partner, almost half (49%) of couples were HIV-1 discordant. Site-specific monthly enrollment of HIV-1 discordant couples into the clinical trial was not directly associated with prevalence of HIV-1 discordance, but was modestly correlated with national HIV-1 counseling and testing rates and access to palliative care/basic health care (r = 0.74, p = 0.09). Conclusions/Significance HIV-1 discordant couples are a critical target for HIV-1 prevention in Africa. In addition to community prevalence of HIV-1 discordance, national infrastructure for HIV-1 testing and healthcare delivery and effective community outreach strategies impact recruitment of HIV-1 discordant couples into HIV-1 prevention trials. PMID

  11. HIV / AIDS Network.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS Network and the Philippines Department of Health (DOH) collaborated to produce the AIDS Candlelight Memorial at the Philippine International Convention Center (PICC), May 1995, and World AIDS Day activities on December 1, 1995. After the memorial, a fashion show, "Body Shots," provided a channel for information on acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). On World AIDS Day, at the request of DOH, the Network provided speakers who lectured on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and AIDS in different government offices. Prior to World AIDS Day, the Network focused on strengthening its cohesiveness and building the capabilities of its member organizations through lectures and symposia during November. Network activities were coordinated by the Remedios AIDS Foundation with support from the other members of the Coordinating Council: Health Action Information Network (HAIN); Caritas; Kabalikat, Stop Trafficking of Pilopinos Foundation, Inc. (STOP);and the Library Foundation (TLF). The Coordinating Council elected for 1996 includes the Remedios AIDS Foundation, HAIN, Caritas, TLF, STOP, the Foundation for Adolescent Development (FAD), and the Salvation Army. PMID:12291699

  12. HIV is a disability: court protects HIV-positive people.

    PubMed

    Engle, L

    1998-07-01

    In Bragdon v. Abbott, the U.S. Supreme Court declared that HIV infection must be regarded as a physiological disorder with an immediate, constant, and detrimental effect and, therefore, satisfies the definition of a physical impairment during every stage of the disease. This decision places HIV-positive people under the protection of the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The Court took issue with the term asymptomatic, when it was used to characterize persistent clinical features or events associated with HIV infection. It was also decided that a physician's opinion regarding treating a HIV-positive person could not excuse discrimination, unless the opinion was actually based on medical or scientific fact. PMID:11365615

  13. Perspectives on menopause and women with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Andany, Nisha; Kennedy, V Logan; Aden, Muna; Loutfy, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Since the implementation of effective combination antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection has been transformed from a life-threatening condition into a chronic disease. As people with HIV are living longer, aging and its associated manifestations have become key priorities as part of HIV care. For women with HIV, menopause is an important part of aging to consider. Women currently represent more than one half of HIV-positive individuals worldwide. Given the vast proportion of women living with HIV who are, and will be, transitioning through age-related life events, the interaction between HIV infection and menopause must be addressed by clinicians and researchers. Menopause is a major clinical event that is universally experienced by women, but affects each individual woman uniquely. This transitional time in women’s lives has various clinical implications including physical and psychological symptoms, and accelerated development and progression of other age-related comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular disease, neurocognitive dysfunction, and bone mineral disease; all of which are potentially heightened by HIV or its treatment. Furthermore, within the context of HIV, there are the additional considerations of HIV acquisition and transmission risk, progression of infection, changes in antiretroviral pharmacokinetics, response, and toxicities. These menopausal manifestations and complications must be managed concurrently with HIV, while keeping in mind the potential influence of menopause on the prognosis of HIV infection itself. This results in additional complexity for clinicians caring for women living with HIV, and highlights the shifting paradigm in HIV care that must accompany this aging and evolving population. PMID:26834498

  14. FDA-Approved HIV Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... and acronyms) Brand Name FDA Approval Date Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) NRTIs block reverse transcriptase, an enzyme HIV ... AZT, ZDV) Retrovir March 19, 1987 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) NNRTIs bind to and later alter reverse ...

  15. Drugs That Fight HIV-1

    MedlinePlus

    ... program of the National Institutes of Health Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) NRTIs block reverse transcriptase, an enzyme HIV- ... these products are on last page.) Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) NNRTIs bind to and alter reverse transcriptase, ...

  16. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  17. Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic

    MedlinePlus

    ... UNAIDS. Global AIDS Update 2016; 2016. ← Return to text UNAIDS. 2016 Core Epidemiology Slides ; 2016. UNAIDS. AIDSinfo ... available at: http://aidsinfo.unaids.org/ . ← Return to text WHO/UNAIDS/UNICEF. Global update on HIV treatment ...

  18. HIV gene therapy research advances.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M

    2013-02-28

    In this issue of Blood, Tebas et al report antiviral effects in a clinical trial of multiple infusions of lentiviral vector–modified autologous CD4T lymphocytes in 17 HIV-infected patients aviremic on antiretroviral therapy (ART).

  19. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  20. Body Shape Changes with HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guidelines Hospital Quality Data Medical Inspector Patient Safety Organizations Administrative Clinical Quick Links Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here FAQ: Will HIV medicines cause changes to your fat and stomach? for Veterans and ...

  1. Fragment Screening and HIV Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Patel, Disha; Arnold, Eddy

    2013-01-01

    Fragment screening has proven to be a powerful alternative to traditional methods for drug discovery. Biophysical methods, such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance, are used to screen a diverse library of small molecule compounds. Although compounds identified via this approach have relatively weak affinity, they provide a good platform for lead development and are highly efficient binders with respect to their size. Fragment screening has been utilized for a wide-range of targets, including HIV-1 proteins. Here, we review the fragment screening studies targeting HIV-1 proteins using X-ray crystallography or surface plasmon resonance. These studies have successfully detected binding of novel fragments to either previously established or new sites on HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase. In addition, fragment screening against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been used as a tool to better understand the complex nature of ligand binding to a flexible target. PMID:21972022

  2. Family Wellness, Not HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Swendeman, Dallas; Flannery, Diane

    2010-01-01

    HIV exceptionalism (and disease-specific programs generally) garner both unbalanced funding and the most talented personnel, distorting local health priorities. In support of HIV exceptionalism, the successful mobilization of significant global health sector resources was not possible prior to HIV. Both sides of the debate have merits; rather than perpetuating polarization, we suggest that sustained improvements in global health require creating a prevention infrastructure to meet multiple health challenges experienced by local communities. We propose four fundamental shifts in HIV and disease prevention: (1) horizontally integrating prevention at one site locally, with priorities tailored to local health challenges and managed by local community leaders; (2) using a family wellness metaphor for services, not disease prevention; (3) implementing evidence-based prevention programs (EBPP) based on common principles, factors, and processes, rather than replication of specific programs; and (4) utilizing the expertise of private enterprise to re-design EBPP into highly attractive, engaging, and accessible experiences. PMID:19148744

  3. Tuberculosis and HIV infection worldwide.

    PubMed

    Murray, J F

    1995-12-01

    The incidence of HIV-associated tuberculosis is increasing worldwide and will continue to increase during the foreseeable future, especially in developing countries. HIV infection appears to increase the opportunity for M. tuberculosis to succeed in causing infection after inhalation into the lungs. Moreover, there is persuasive evidence that in the presence of HIV infection, new-onset tuberculous infection will progress rapidly to clinically significant disease and the likelihood that latent tuberculous infection will reactivate is enormously increased. The accelerating and amplifying influence of HIV infection is contributing to the increasing incidence of disease caused by multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Neither clinical or radiographic features reliably distinguish the majority of patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis from those who are non-HIV-infected. The remainder, however, may have atypical manifestations and be difficult to diagnose. Six months of chemotherapy with conventional antituberculosis drugs cures most patients, but many die during or after treatment of other AIDS-related complications.

  4. HIV/AIDS and blindness.

    PubMed Central

    Kestelyn, P. G.; Cunningham, E. T.

    2001-01-01

    Nearly 34 million people are currently living with HIV/AIDS: ocular complications are common, affecting 50% to 75% of all such patients at some point during the course of their illness. Cytomegalovirus retinitis is by far the most frequent cause of vision loss in patients with AIDS. Although the prevalence of cytomegalovirus retinitis is decreasing in industrialized countries because of the widespread availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy, between 10% and 20% of HIV-infected patients worldwide can be expected to lose vision in one or both eyes as a result of ocular cytomegalovirus infection. Less frequent but important causes of bilateral vision loss in patients with HIV/AIDS include varicella zoster virus and herpes simplex virus retinitis, HIV-related ischaemic microvasculopathy, ocular syphilis, ocular tuberculosis, cryptococcal meningitis, and ocular toxic or allergic drug reactions. At present, most patients with HIV/AIDS in developing countries who lose their vision have a very limited life expectancy. As antiretroviral therapy makes its way to these countries, however, both life expectancy and the prevalence of blindness related to HIV/AIDS can be expected to increase dramatically. PMID:11285664

  5. New Antiretroviral Treatment for HIV.

    PubMed

    Badowski, Melissa E; Pérez, Sarah E; Biagi, Mark; Littler, John A

    2016-09-01

    The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has set the global goal of ending the AIDS world epidemic by 2030. In order to end this epidemic they have established a 90-90-90 goal to be achieved by 2020, which may be problematic, especially in low- and middle-income countries. This goal includes 90% of individuals with HIV globally being diagnosed, on treatment, and virologically suppressed. Based on global estimates from 2014-2015, approximately 36.9 million individuals are living with HIV. Of those, 53% have been diagnosed with HIV, 41% are on antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 32% have viral suppression with <1000 copies/ml. Comprehensive approaches are needed to improve the number of people living with HIV (PLWH) who are diagnosed, linked, and engaged in care. Once PLWH are retained in care, treatment is key to both HIV prevention and transmission. The development and advancement of new ART is necessary to assist in reaching these goals by improving safety profiles, decreasing pill burden, improving quality of life and life expectancy, and creating new mechanisms to overcome resistance. The focus of this review is to highlight and review data for antiretroviral agents recently added to the market as well as discuss agents in various stages of development (new formulations and mechanisms of action). PMID:27539455

  6. Correlates and Experiences of HIV Stigma in Prisoners Living With HIV in Indonesia: A Mixed-Method Analysis.

    PubMed

    Culbert, Gabriel J; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Wulanyani, Ni Made Swasti; Wegman, Martin P; Waluyo, Agung; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-01-01

    In Indonesia, the syndemic nature of HIV, drug use, and incarceration may influence experiences of stigma for HIV-infected prisoners. This mixed-method study explores HIV stigma in prisoners living with HIV in Indonesia. Randomly selected male HIV-infected prisoners (n = 102) from two large prisons in Jakarta completed in-depth interviews and a structured HIV stigma survey. Quantitative results found four groups of HIV-infected prisoners with significantly higher HIV stigma levels, including those: (a) with drug-related offenses, (b) seeking help to decrease drug use, (c) diagnosed with HIV before the current incarceration, and (d) who had not disclosed their HIV status to family members or friends. Qualitative results highlighted the prominent role of HIV stigma in decisions to disclose HIV status to family members, partners, and other prisoners. Interventions should address HIV stigma in HIV-infected prisoners in Indonesia to achieve HIV treatment as prevention goals.

  7. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  8. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  9. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  10. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  11. HIV Risk Behavior and Access to Services: What Predicts HIV Testing among Heterosexually Active Homeless Men?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-01-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV…

  12. 42 CFR Appendix A to Part 130 - Definition of HIV Infection or HIV

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definition of HIV Infection or HIV A Appendix A to... PAYMENTS RICKY RAY HEMOPHILIA RELIEF FUND PROGRAM Pt. 130, App. A Appendix A to Part 130—Definition of HIV Infection or HIV ER31MY00.000 ER31MY00.001...

  13. Following an HIV Regimen: Steps to Take Before and After Starting HIV Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Following an HIV Regimen: Steps to Take Before and After Starting HIV Medicines (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) ... maintain long-term medication adherence. Before starting an HIV regimen, talk to your health care provider about ...

  14. A Small Dose of HIV? HIV Vaccine Mental Models and Risk Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Peter A.; Seiden, Danielle S.; Roberts, Kathleen J.; Kakinami, Lisa; Duan, Naihua

    2009-01-01

    Existing knowledge and beliefs related to HIV vaccines provide an important basis for the development of risk communication messages to support future HIV vaccine dissemination. This study explored HIV vaccine mental models among adults from segments of the population disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. Nine focus groups were conducted with…

  15. Validation of a Quantitative HIV Risk Prediction Tool Using a National HIV Testing Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Haukoos, Jason S.; Hopkins, Emily; Bucossi, Meggan M.; Lyons, Michael S.; Rothman, Richard E.; White, Douglas A.E.; Al-Tayyib, Alia A.; Bradley-Springer, Lucy; Campbell, Jonathon D.; Sabel, Allison L.; Thrun, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Routine screening is recommended for HIV detection. HIV risk estimation remains important. Our goal was to validate the Denver HIV Risk Score (DHRS) using a national cohort from the CDC. Patients ≥13 years of age were included, 4,830,941 HIV tests were performed, and 0.6% newly-diagnosed infections were identified. Of all visits, 9% were very low risk (HIV prevalence = 0.20%); 27% low risk (HIV prevalence = 0.17%); 41% moderate risk (HIV prevalence = 0.39%); 17% high risk (HIV prevalence = 1.19%); and 6% very high risk (HIV prevalence = 3.57%). The DHRS accurately categorized patients into different HIV risk groups. PMID:25585300

  16. HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis for women.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Anandi N; Rolle, Charlotte P; Gandhi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Women and girls comprise nearly half of HIV-infected individuals globally and 20% of new infections in the United States, indicating an urgent need to optimise HIV prevention options in this population. HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) - where antiretrovirals are administered to HIV-non-infected individuals at risk of HIV acquisition - is a promising, female-controlled HIV prevention strategy but has so far been underutilised in women. Clinical trial data demonstrate efficacy of daily oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) for reduction of HIV acquisition among women when used consistently. Limited HIV risk perception and suboptimal PrEP awareness among women and healthcare personnel are among the challenges with PrEP delivery for women. Future research into the development of new drugs and delivery systems, and integrating PrEP delivery with reproductive healthcare services, provide opportunities to optimise this prevention strategy for women. PMID:27482454

  17. Research on HIV Co-Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page Get email updates Order publications Featured Research The Path to a Cure for Hepatitis C ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Research on HIV Co-Infections HIV-infected people are ...

  18. HIV prevention: integrating biomedical and behevioral interventions.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Carlos

    Recommendations for HIV prevention in clinical care settings by an IAS-USA panel were recently published. They include recommendations on HIV testing, antiretroviral therapy initiation, risk-reduction counseling, and antiretroviral therapy adherence counseling for HIV-infected individuals. For individuals at risk for HIV infection, recommendations for preexposure prophylaxis, other risk-reduction strategies, adherence counseling, and postexposure prophylaxis are included. Many HIV-infected individuals in the United States are not fully engaged in HIV care and are not virologically suppressed, thus a crucial component of efforts to reduce HIV transmission is moving patients through the HIV care continuum. This article summarizes an IAS-USA continuing education webinar presented by Carlos del Rio, MD, in September 2014.

  19. Attracting and retaining nurses in HIV care.

    PubMed

    Puplampu, Gideon L; Olson, Karin; Ogilvie, Linda; Mayan, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Attracting and retaining nurses in HIV care is essential to treatment success, preventing the spread of HIV, slowing its progression, and improving the quality of life of people living with HIV. Despite the wealth of studies examining HIV care, few have focused on the factors that influenced nurses' choices to specialize in HIV care. We examined the factors that attracted and retained eight nurses currently working in HIV care in two large Canadian cities. Participants were primarily women between the ages of 20 and 60 years. Interviews were conducted between November 2010 and September 2011 using interpretive description, a qualitative design. Factors that influenced participants to focus their careers in HIV care included both attracting factors and retaining factors. Although more research is needed, this exploration of attracting and retaining factors may motivate others to specialize in HIV nursing, and thus help to promote adequate support for individuals suffering from the disease. PMID:23499392

  20. HIV among Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... among young Hispanic/Latino gay and bisexual men. Estimated New HIV Diagnoses Among the Most-Affected Subpopulations, ... of being exposed to HIV. A 2016 analysis estimated that there are nearly 4.5 million gay ...

  1. Telling Others You Are HIV Positive

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language: Fact Sheet 204 Telling Others You are HIV Positive WHAT ARE THE ISSUES? GENERAL GUIDELINES SPECIAL ... SPECIAL SITUATIONS People You May Have Exposed to HIV: It can be very difficult to disclose your ...

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection Information for adults A A ... weeks following exposure to HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus). Chronic infection with this virus can cause AIDS ( ...

  3. Risk Factors for HIV Transmission and Barriers to HIV Disclosure: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres F; Wallins, Amy; Toledo, Lauren; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y; Gillespie, Scott; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Youth carry the highest incidence of HIV infection in the United States. Understanding adolescent and young adult (AYA) perspectives on HIV transmission risk is important for targeted HIV prevention. We conducted a mixed methods study with HIV-infected and uninfected youth, ages 18-24 years, from Atlanta, GA. We provided self-administered surveys to HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected AYAs to identify risk factors for HIV acquisition. By means of computer-assisted thematic analyses, we examined transcribed focus group responses on HIV education, contributors to HIV transmission, and pre-sex HIV status disclosure. The 68 participants had the following characteristics: mean age 21.5 years (standard deviation: 1.8 years), 85% male, 90% black, 68% HIV-infected. HIV risk behaviors included the perception of condomless sex (Likert scale mean: 8.0) and transactional sex (88% of participants); no differences were noted by HIV status. Qualitative analyses revealed two main themes: (1) HIV risk factors among AYAs, and (2) barriers to discussing HIV status before sex. Participants felt the use of social media, need for immediate gratification, and lack of concern about HIV disease were risk factors for AYAs. Discussing HIV status with sex partners was uncommon. Key reasons included: fear of rejection, lack of confidentiality, discussion was unnecessary in temporary relationships, and disclosure negatively affecting the mood. HIV prevention strategies for AYAs should include improving condom use frequency and HIV disclosure skills, responsible utilization of social media, and education addressing HIV prevention including the risks of transactional sex.

  4. Risk Factors for HIV Transmission and Barriers to HIV Disclosure: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres F; Wallins, Amy; Toledo, Lauren; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y; Gillespie, Scott; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Youth carry the highest incidence of HIV infection in the United States. Understanding adolescent and young adult (AYA) perspectives on HIV transmission risk is important for targeted HIV prevention. We conducted a mixed methods study with HIV-infected and uninfected youth, ages 18-24 years, from Atlanta, GA. We provided self-administered surveys to HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected AYAs to identify risk factors for HIV acquisition. By means of computer-assisted thematic analyses, we examined transcribed focus group responses on HIV education, contributors to HIV transmission, and pre-sex HIV status disclosure. The 68 participants had the following characteristics: mean age 21.5 years (standard deviation: 1.8 years), 85% male, 90% black, 68% HIV-infected. HIV risk behaviors included the perception of condomless sex (Likert scale mean: 8.0) and transactional sex (88% of participants); no differences were noted by HIV status. Qualitative analyses revealed two main themes: (1) HIV risk factors among AYAs, and (2) barriers to discussing HIV status before sex. Participants felt the use of social media, need for immediate gratification, and lack of concern about HIV disease were risk factors for AYAs. Discussing HIV status with sex partners was uncommon. Key reasons included: fear of rejection, lack of confidentiality, discussion was unnecessary in temporary relationships, and disclosure negatively affecting the mood. HIV prevention strategies for AYAs should include improving condom use frequency and HIV disclosure skills, responsible utilization of social media, and education addressing HIV prevention including the risks of transactional sex. PMID:26588663

  5. Development of an "Impact of HIV" Instrument for HIV Survivors.

    PubMed

    Buscher, April L; Kallen, Michael A; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Giordano, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    As with cancer survivors, HIV-infected people may have unique physical, psychological, social, and existential challenges over their lifespans, yet no single instrument can assess such challenges. A newly created Impact of HIV Survey, modified from Zebrack's Impact of Cancer Scale, was developed and completed by 356 HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. Factor analyses confirmed seven scales within 38 items: Health Awareness, Positive Self-Evaluation, Positive Outlook, Value of Relationships, Negative Self-Evaluation-Outlook, Health Anxiety, and Body Changes (Cronbach's alphas range = 0.54-0.93). Participants scored high on health awareness, positive outlook, and value of relationships; high on health worry; and low on body image concerns. Patients with HIV for 15 years and longer tended to have higher positive self-evaluation scores and lower negative self-evaluation-outlook scores compared to those with HIV for a shorter duration. The initial survey version had good internal validity with potential utility in research and clinical care.

  6. Analysis of Host Gene Expression Profile in HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected T-Cells.

    PubMed

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Wood, Owen; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication is closely regulated by a complex pathway of host factors, many of them being determinants of cell tropism and host susceptibility to HIV infection. These host factors are known to exert a positive or negative influence on the replication of the two major types of HIV, HIV-1 and HIV-2, thereby modulating virus infectivity, host response to infection and ultimately disease progression profiles characteristic of these two types. Understanding the differential regulation of host cellular factors in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections will help us to understand the apparent differences in rates of disease progression and pathogenesis. This knowledge would aid in the discovery of new biomarkers that may serve as novel targets for therapy and diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the differential expression of host genes in response to HIV-1/HIV-2 infection. To achieve this, we analyzed the effects of HIV-1 (MN) and HIV-2 (ROD) infection on the expression of host factors in PBMC at the RNA level using the Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were identified and their biological functions determined. Host gene expression profiles were significantly changed. Gene expression profiling analysis identified a subset of differentially expressed genes in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Genes involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, immune cell proliferation and activation, cytokines, chemokines, and transcription factors were differentially expressed in HIV-1 infected cells. Relatively few genes were differentially expressed in cells infected with HIV-2.

  7. Analysis of Host Gene Expression Profile in HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Wood, Owen; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication is closely regulated by a complex pathway of host factors, many of them being determinants of cell tropism and host susceptibility to HIV infection. These host factors are known to exert a positive or negative influence on the replication of the two major types of HIV, HIV-1 and HIV-2, thereby modulating virus infectivity, host response to infection and ultimately disease progression profiles characteristic of these two types. Understanding the differential regulation of host cellular factors in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections will help us to understand the apparent differences in rates of disease progression and pathogenesis. This knowledge would aid in the discovery of new biomarkers that may serve as novel targets for therapy and diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the differential expression of host genes in response to HIV-1/HIV-2 infection. To achieve this, we analyzed the effects of HIV-1 (MN) and HIV-2 (ROD) infection on the expression of host factors in PBMC at the RNA level using the Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were identified and their biological functions determined. Host gene expression profiles were significantly changed. Gene expression profiling analysis identified a subset of differentially expressed genes in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Genes involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, immune cell proliferation and activation, cytokines, chemokines, and transcription factors were differentially expressed in HIV-1 infected cells. Relatively few genes were differentially expressed in cells infected with HIV-2. PMID:26821323

  8. Evaluation of two HIV antibody confirmatory assays: Geenius™ HIV1/2 Confirmatory Assay and the recomLine HIV-1 & HIV-2 IgG Line Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, I; Buus, C; Berger, A; Keppler, O T; Rabenau, H F

    2015-11-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of an HIV infection mainly depends on the detection of HIV-specific antibodies/HIV p24 antigen whereby different algorithms for the confirmation of reactive screening assays exist. The objective of the present study was to compare the performance of two supplemental HIV antibody confirmatory assays: the Geenius™ HIV1/2 Confirmatory Assay and the recomLine HIV-1 & HIV-2 IgG Line Immunoassay. Therefore 279 serum samples previously analyzed for HIV during routine diagnostics at the Institute for Medical Virology, National Reference Center for Retroviruses, University Hospital Frankfurt, were analyzed retrospectively. 96.8% samples had concordant results in both HIV confirmatory assays, whereby the Geenius Assay showed a discrimination rate of 100% while two HIV-1 samples were not typeable with the recomLine Assay. Overall assay sensitivity was 100% in both assays and specificity was 99.0% (recomLine Assay) and 93.4% (Geenius Assay), respectively. The κ-values for both assays indicated high agreement. Overall nine samples had discordant results from which four were from acutely EBV/CMV-infected patients and one from a patient with primary HIV-1 infection during seroconversion. In conclusion, both assays are well suited for the detection, confirmation and discrimination of HIV-1- and -2-specific antibodies.

  9. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  10. HIV control in vivo: Dynamical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumel, A. B.; Moghadas, S. M.

    2004-10-01

    A deterministic model for the immunological and therapeutic control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vivo is studied qualitatively. In addition to analyzing the local stability of the equilibria, the global stability of the infection-free equilibrium is established. The optimal efficacy level of anti-retroviral therapy needed to eradicate HIV from the body of an HIV-infected individual is obtained.

  11. HIV Education for Adult Literacy Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara E.

    This staff development package is designed to inform adult literacy practitioners about Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS/HIV) and to facilitate implementation of HIV education in adult literacy programs. It is intended to teach them to plan and implement HIV education for their adult literacy students and to…

  12. HIV Prevention Readiness in Undergraduates and Inmates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonio, Michael E.; And Others

    Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) transmission is increasingly an international priority. Education of high-risk populations, such as incarcerated individuals, is particularly important in thwarting the spread of HIV. To address this concern, the attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge of inmates concerning HIV and AIDS related issues are…

  13. HIV genetic information and clonal growth

    Cancer.gov

    Based on an analysis of blood cells from five HIV-infected individuals, NCI researchers have identified more than 2,400 HIV DNA insertion sites. Analysis of these sites showed that there is extensive clonal expansion (growth) of HIV infected cells.

  14. HIV and incarceration: prisons and detention

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The high prevalence of HIV infection among prisoners and pre-trial detainees, combined with overcrowding and sub-standard living conditions sometimes amounting to inhuman or degrading treatment in violation of international law, make prisons and other detention centres a high risk environment for the transmission of HIV. Ultimately, this contributes to HIV epidemics in the communities to which prisoners return upon their release. We reviewed the evidence regarding HIV prevalence, risk behaviours and transmission in prisons. We also reviewed evidence of the effectiveness of interventions and approaches to reduce the risk behaviours and, consequently, HIV transmission in prisons. A large number of studies report high levels of risk behaviour in prisons, and HIV transmission has been documented. There is a large body of evidence from countries around the world of what prison systems can do to prevent HIV transmission. In particular, condom distribution programmes, accompanied by measures to prevent the occurrence of rape and other forms of non-consensual sex, needle and syringe programmes and opioid substitution therapies, have proven effective at reducing HIV risk behaviours in a wide range of prison environments without resulting in negative consequences for the health of prison staff or prisoners. The introduction of these programmes in prisons is therefore warranted as part of comprehensive programmes to address HIV in prisons, including HIV education, voluntary HIV testing and counselling, and provision of antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive prisoners. In addition, however, action to reduce overcrowding and improve conditions in detention is urgently needed. PMID:21595957

  15. HIV extracellular Tat: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Loret, Erwann

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) eradication will require elimination of HIV infected cells. No antiretroviral treatments (ART) or vaccine approaches have been able to reduce significantly the level of HIV infected cells in peripheral blood. This inefficacy is generally explained by the presence of a major reservoir of latent HIV infected cells in the central nervous system (CNS) that would be a sanctuary where Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL) have no access and would refresh peripheral blood with activated HIV infected cells. In this review, the presence of a major reservoir in the CNS appears to be inconsistent with recent clinical studies measuring HIV DNA. The major reservoirs are gut tissue, rectal tissue and the peripheral blood where HIV infected cells survive in an environment containing CTL. Extracellular Tat might protect HIV infected cells from CTL due to its capacity to cross CTL membranes and trigger apoptosis. Evidences of Tat secretion from HIV infected cells are shown with the detection of Tat antibodies in different clinical studies. Presence of neutralizing Tat antibodies in cohorts of patients who were exposed to HIV but who are now seronegative is described. The conclusion of this review is that a vaccine eliciting neutralizing antibodies against Tat might significantly reduce the level of HIV infected cells, what ART or other vaccine approaches have been unable to achieve now. It could be a first step towards HIV eradication.

  16. HIV Infection and Children: A Medical Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Virginia

    1998-01-01

    Updates a 10-year medical overview on HIV/AIDS written for a Child Welfare League of America publication. Covers HIV transmission, diagnosis and treatment of HIV in infants, maternal treatment and testing, and advances and challenges, including new drug therapies. Concludes with recommendations on systems of care for affected families. (EV)

  17. How Parental HIV Affects Children. Research Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAND Corporation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The shadow cast by HIV reaches beyond individuals diagnosed with the condition. It touches the lives of family members, friends, coworkers, and many others. One group in particular that feels these effects keenly is the children of HIV-positive parents. With improved treatments that have extended the life expectancies of HIV-infected people and…

  18. HIV and infant feeding. Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    1995-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be passed to the infant during pregnancy, childbirth, or breast feeding. Most infants born to HIV positive mothers do not become infected with HIV. The virus is found in breast milk; available research suggests 1 out of 7 breast fed infants of HIV positive mothers will be infected from breast milk. Mothers with recent or advanced HIV infections have more virus in their body fluids, including breast milk; therefore, a baby is more likely to be infected if the mother becomes infected during pregnancy, childbirth, or breast feeding, or if she is ill with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related illnesses. If a baby is already infected, breast feeding will help the infant stay healthier longer. Health workers should discuss the benefits of breast feeding with all pregnant women. Information about the spread of HIV and sexually transmitted disease (STD) should be given; safe sex (condom use or abstinence) is important during pregnancy and breast feeding. If a woman's status is unknown, she should be encouraged to breast feed. In most communities, counselling and testing are unavailable. Where these services are available, the risk of infection through breast feeding should never be used to put pressure on a woman to take a test. Counselling prepares her for the possibility of being positive and allows her to make an informed choice about breast feeding. In some situations (especially if she herself is ill), a woman who knows she is HIV positive should not breast feed. However, alternatives may be unavailable, and the benefits may outweigh the risks. Health workers should assist the woman in making an informed choice. Issues to be considered include: 1) access to clean water and ability to pay for fuel or electricity to sterilize feeding utensils; 2) support from family or friends; 3) access to animal milk or shops that carry formula milk; and 4) ability to pay for formula or animal milk. To feed an infant for 6 months

  19. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Randolph, John T; DeGoey, David A

    2004-01-01

    There are currently (July, 2002) six protease inhibitors approved for the treatment of HIV infection, each of which can be classified as peptidomimetic in structure. These agents, when used in combination with other antiretroviral agents, produce a sustained decrease in viral load, often to levels below the limits of quantifiable detection, and a significant reconstitution of the immune system. Therapeutic regimens containing one or more HIV protease inhibitors thus provide a highly effective method for disease management. The important role of protease inhibitors in HIV therapy, combined with numerous challenges remaining in HIV treatment, have resulted in a continued effort both to optimize regimens using the existing agents and to identify new protease inhibitors that may provide unique properties. This review will provide an overview of the discovery and clinical trials of the currently approved HIV protease inhibitors, followed by an examination of important aspects of therapy, such as pharmacokinetic enhancement, resistance and side effects. A description of new peptidomimetic compounds currently being investigated in the clinic and in preclinical discovery will follow. PMID:15193140

  20. HIV prevention strategies in Africa.

    PubMed

    Menting, A

    2000-01-01

    This paper concerns the administration of governmental and nongovernmental programs for the prevention of HIV/AIDS in Africa. A 1986 government campaign in the prevention of HIV in Senegal has been initiated and has been guided consistently. The Society for Women and AIDS in Africa (SWAA) is a nongovernmental organization (NGO) which assembles young population, women, and communities, towards their goal to prevent HIV infection. Marocaine de Lutte Contre le SIDA (ALCS), another NGO in Morocco believes that early intervention and education could help prevent further spread of infection. ALCS focused on the education of sex workers and the use of condoms. They also work with a group of men to promote safe sex and tackle the need for better testing facilities. In Uganda, the focus of the organization is to control the high incidence found in couples with only one infected partner. Another organization incorporates accurate HIV/AIDS information during prayers and other religious activities. Another approach was adopted by teaching English in secondary schools with AIDS information, values on education, family, and employment as content. An NGO in Cape Town was established to form loose cooperative to exchange information and resources within the community. An ongoing nationwide campaign for HIV prevention and control especially among high-risk groups and an effort on STD treatment is being organized.

  1. HIV and female sex workers.

    PubMed

    Estébanez, P; Fitch, K; Nájera, R

    1993-01-01

    In this review of published findings on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and risk factors among female sex workers, we summarize the results of seroprevalence studies in different countries and discuss the different patterns of transmission among such workers in various geographical regions. The highest rates of HIV infection occur in sub-Saharan Africa, where the widespread existence of sexually transmitted diseases may play an important role in sustaining transmission. In Europe and North America injecting drug use continues to be the major factor associated with HIV infection among female sex workers, while in Latin America and parts of Asia there is a more mixed pattern of heterosexual and parenteral transmission from injecting drug use. Reviewed also are studies of the risk factors associated with HIV infection among female sex workers, such as drug use, sexual behaviour, the presence of sexually transmitted diseases, and condom use; in addition, we comment on some studies of the clients of sex workers. Finally, we propose directions that future research in this area might take and discuss various interventions that need to be undertaken to reduce HIV transmission among female sex workers.

  2. HIV and female sex workers.

    PubMed Central

    Estébanez, P.; Fitch, K.; Nájera, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this review of published findings on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and risk factors among female sex workers, we summarize the results of seroprevalence studies in different countries and discuss the different patterns of transmission among such workers in various geographical regions. The highest rates of HIV infection occur in sub-Saharan Africa, where the widespread existence of sexually transmitted diseases may play an important role in sustaining transmission. In Europe and North America injecting drug use continues to be the major factor associated with HIV infection among female sex workers, while in Latin America and parts of Asia there is a more mixed pattern of heterosexual and parenteral transmission from injecting drug use. Reviewed also are studies of the risk factors associated with HIV infection among female sex workers, such as drug use, sexual behaviour, the presence of sexually transmitted diseases, and condom use; in addition, we comment on some studies of the clients of sex workers. Finally, we propose directions that future research in this area might take and discuss various interventions that need to be undertaken to reduce HIV transmission among female sex workers. PMID:8324860

  3. HEFFICON: HIV Effectiveness Italian Conference.

    PubMed

    Antinori, Andrea; Andreoni, Massimo; Perno, Carlo Federico; Lazzarin, Adriano

    2015-04-01

    Since the first acquired immunodeficiency syndrome cases were reported in 1981, more than 1.5 million people have been diagnosed with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 in Europe, including more than 136,000 new HIV cases in 2013. Recent epidemiological data estimate an incidence of 5-10 newly diagnosed HIV infections per 100,000 population per year in Europe and an average prevalence of infection of 5.7 cases per 100,000 population. In the absence of an effective curative strategy for HIV, optimization of prevention policies and clinical management of HIV positive patients is fundamental to reduce the impact of the HIV pandemic on public health. Clinical trials represent an essential tool for translating research findings into routine clinical practice. Careful evaluation and planning of clinical trials are therefore mandatory in order to provide relevant information to clinicians. The HEFFICON Project was conceived to investigate and pinpoint methodological issues and critical points that need to be addressed in future clinical studies to increase the translation of experimental results to the real life environment.

  4. HIV surveillance by testing saliva.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A M; Parry, J V; Best, S J; Smith, A M; de Silva, M; Mortimer, P P

    1988-10-01

    Saliva specimens were tested for HIV antibody (anti-HIV) by an immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody capture radioimmunoassay (GACRIA) and three sensitive commercial assays. In tests on 460 seronegative subjects and 196 seropositive subjects GACRIA was 99.8% specific and 100% sensitive. The Wellcome HIV monoclonal and Abbott recombinant DNA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were also highly specific (99.8%, 100%) but they were less sensitive (90.9%, 82.0%). The Fujirebio particle agglutination assay was sensitive (97.8%) but its specificity was poor (84.1%). In testing saliva specimens from populations with an anti-HIV prevalence greater than 0.5%, sampling by GACRIA alone could provide a good estimate of the true prevalence. For true prevalences less than 0.5% good estimates could only be obtained if positive GACRIA reactions were confirmed by another independent salivary assay. Salivary testing for anti HIV is a convenient and potentially an accurate epidemiological tool.

  5. Identifying barriers to HIV testing: personal and contextual factors associated with late HIV testing.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Sandra; Richards, T Anne; Frank, Heidi; Wenzel, Conrad; Hsu, Ling Chin; Chin, Chi-Sheng Jennie; Murphy, Jessie; Dilley, James

    2011-07-01

    Late diagnosis of HIV is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Despite the availability of HIV testing, persons continue to test late in the course of HIV infection. We used the HIV/AIDS case registry of San Francisco Department of Public Health to identify and recruit 41 persons who developed AIDS within 12 months of their HIV diagnosis to participate in a qualitative and quantitative interview regarding late diagnosis of HIV. Thirty-one of the participants were diagnosed with HIV because of symptomatic disease and 50% of the participants were diagnosed with HIV and AIDS concurrently. Half of the subjects had not been tested for HIV prior to diagnosis. Fear was the most frequently cited barrier to testing. Other barriers included being unaware of improved HIV treatment, free/low cost care, and risk for HIV. Recommendations for health care providers to increase early diagnosis of HIV include routine ascertainment of HIV risk behaviors and testing histories, stronger recommendations for patients to be tested, and incorporating testing into routine medical care. Public health messages to increase testing include publicizing that (1) effective, tolerable, and low cost/free care for HIV is readily available, (2) early diagnosis of HIV improves health outcomes, (3) HIV can be transmitted to persons who engage in unprotected oral and insertive anal sex and unprotected receptive anal intercourse without ejaculation and from HIV-infected persons whose infection is well-controlled with antiretroviral therapy, (4) persons who may be infected based upon these behaviors should be tested following exposure, (5) HIV testing information will be kept private, and (6) encouraging friends and family to get HIV tested is beneficial. PMID:21424942

  6. Preventing the spread of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Perry, Nicky

    Approximately 96,000 people are living with HIV in the UK, a quarter of whom are unaware they are infected. While in some parts of the world the number of people newly infected with HIV has fallen, in the UK in 2011 there was a rise in the number of men who have sex with men being diagnosed. HIV prevention strategies are a public health priority, while ongoing research into HIV testing in all clinical settings remains a priority. This article explores preventive measures that can be used to reduce the spread of HIV and offers advice on how nurses can contribute to these.

  7. Vaccination in HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vaccines are critical components for protecting HIV-infected adults from an increasing number of preventable diseases. However, missed opportunities for vaccination among HIV-infected persons persist, likely due to concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of vaccines, as well as the changing nature of vaccine guidelines. In addition, the optimal timing of vaccination among HIV-infected adults in regards to HIV stage and receipt of antiretroviral therapy remain important questions. This article provides a review of the current recommendations regarding vaccines among HIV-infected adults and a comprehensive summary of the evidence-based literature of the benefits and risks of vaccines among this vulnerable population. PMID:25029589

  8. HIV Behavioral Research Online

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Tesoriero, James M.; Carballo-Dieguez, Alex; Hirshfield, Sabina; Remien, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    Internet access has caused a global revolution in the way people of all ages and genders interact. Many have turned to the Internet to seek love, companionship, and sex, prompting researchers to move behavioral studies online. The sexual behavior of men who have sex with men (MSM) has been more closely studied than that of any other group online given the abundance of gay-oriented websites and concerns about increasing transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Not only does the Internet provide a new medium for the conduct of behavioral research and for participant recruitment into an array of research studies, it has the as yet unrealized potential to reach huge numbers of MSM with innovative harm reduction and prevention messages tailored to individualized needs, interests, and risk behavior. Internet-based research on sexual behavior has many advantages in rapidity of recruitment of diverse samples which include individuals unreachable through conventional methods (i.e., non-gay identified and geographically and socially isolated MSM, etc.). Internet-based research also presents some new methodologic challenges in study design, participant recruitment, survey implementation, and interpretation of results. In addition, there are ethical issues unique to online research including difficulties in verifying informed consent, obstacles to surveying minors, and the ability to assure anonymity. This paper presents a review of Internet-based research on sexual behavior in MSM, a general discussion of the methodologic and ethical challenges of Internet-based research, and recommendations for future interdisciplinary research. PMID:16736356

  9. HIV-1 and HIV-2 differentially mature plasmacytoid dendritic cells into IFN-producing cells or APCs.

    PubMed

    Royle, Caroline M; Graham, David R; Sharma, Simone; Fuchs, Dietmar; Boasso, Adriano

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 causes a progressive impairment of immune function. HIV-2 is a naturally attenuated form of HIV, and HIV-2 patients display a slow-progressing disease. The leading hypothesis for the difference in disease phenotype between HIV-1 and HIV-2 is that more efficient T cell-mediated immunity allows for immune-mediated control of HIV-2 infection, similar to that observed in the minority of HIV-1-infected long-term nonprogressors. Understanding how HIV-1 and HIV-2 differentially influence the immune function may highlight critical mechanisms determining disease outcome. We investigated the effects of exposing primary human peripheral blood cells to HIV-1 or HIV-2 in vitro. HIV-2 induced a gene expression profile distinct from HIV-1, characterized by reduced type I IFN, despite similar upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes and viral restriction factors. HIV-2 favored plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) differentiation into cells with an APC phenotype rather than IFN-α-producing cells. HIV-2, but not HIV-1, inhibited IFN-α production in response to CpG-A. The balance between pDC maturation into IFN-α-producing cells or development of an APC phenotype differentiates the early response against HIV-1 and HIV-2. We propose that divergent paths of pDC differentiation driven by HIV-1 and HIV-2 cause the observed differences in pathogenicity between the two viruses.

  10. From Conceptualizing to Measuring HIV Stigma: A Review of HIV Stigma Mechanism Measures

    PubMed Central

    Chaudoir, Stephenie R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent analyses suggest that lack of clarity in the conceptualization and measurement of HIV stigma at an individual level is a significant barrier to HIV prevention and treatment efforts. In order to address this concern, we articulate a new framework designed to aid in clarifying the conceptualization and measurement of HIV stigma among individuals. The HIV Stigma Framework explores how the stigma of HIV elicits a series of stigma mechanisms, which in turn lead to deleterious outcomes for HIV uninfected and infected people. We then apply this framework to review measures developed to gauge the effect of HIV stigma since the beginning of the epidemic. Finally, we emphasize the utility of using three questions to guide future HIV stigma research: who is affected by, how are they affected by, and what are the outcomes of HIV stigma? PMID:19636699

  11. Risk, HIV, and STD prevention.

    PubMed

    1999-06-01

    The risk of becoming infected with HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is discussed. The concept of risk is defined in three ways: the risk of exposure to an infectious agent, the risk of infection after exposure, and the risk of severe consequences after infection. Determining the most effective STD prevention intervention for a person involves assessing his or her beliefs regarding each type of risk and adapting the discussion of STD prevention accordingly. Preventive behavior questions should be phrased conditionally to indicate both use, and lack of use, of precautionary behaviors. This will aid a counselor's assessment of a client's beliefs and the resultant behavior. Some STDs, such as herpes simplex and chlamydia, are more common than HIV, increase susceptibility to HIV by two to six times, and should not be omitted from the discussion of risk of infection.

  12. [Microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    López-Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Rafael; García, Federico; Eiros, José M; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl

    2007-12-01

    Currently, there are around 150,000 HIV-infected patients in Spain. This number, together with the fact that this disease is now a chronic condition since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, has generated an increasing demand on the clinical microbiology laboratories in our hospitals. This increase has occurred not only in the diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic diseases, but also in tests related to the diagnosis and therapeutic management of HIV infection. To meet this demand, the Sociedad de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clinica (Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) has updated its standard Procedure for the microbiological diagnosis of HIV infection. The main advances related to serological diagnosis, plasma viral load, and detection of resistance to antiretroviral drugs are reviewed in this version of the Procedure.

  13. HIV and the vaginal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Denenberg, R

    1997-01-01

    Vaginal health is related to the risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV and other STDs. Significant factors in that risk analysis include pH level, local immune factors, hormone levels, menstrual cycle, sexual maturity, the use of contraceptives, douching, and sexual practices. The vagina, if healthy, has a number of natural protections against HIV and STDs. Inflammation can contribute to increased disease susceptibility, and can be caused either by organisms or mechanical trauma. High levels of HIV in vaginal secretions are directly associated with high plasma levels, and there is some correlation to cervicovaginal secretions levels as well. Vaginal health can be enhanced by self-inspection, gynecological care, and prompt treatment of infections. A table details comfort measures for vaginal conditions.

  14. Dengue infections in HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Siong, Wong Chia; Ching, Tan Huey; Jong, Go Chi; Pang, Chan Siew; Vernon, Lee Jian Ming; Sin, Leo Yee

    2008-03-01

    A retrospective review of hospital admission records was conducted on patients who were admitted to the Communicable Disease Center (CDC)/Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2005. There were 5 HIV patients who were admitted with dengue infection during the study period. Their symptoms were generally mild and recovery was uneventful. None of the patients developed dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. The symptoms and signs of dengue infection in HIV patients are nonspecific. It is important for healthcare workers to maintain a high index of suspicion in order to make the diagnosis. Interactions between pathogenesis pathways or with antiviral treatments may have contributed to the apparently less severe dengue infections in HIV patients. This observation needs to be explored further.

  15. Metabolic profiling during HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Montero, Catherine; Schinazi, Raymond F; Munger, Joshua; Kim, Baek

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated cellular metabolism profiles of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). First, HIV-2 GL-AN displays faster production kinetics and greater amounts of virus as compared to HIV-1s: YU-2, 89.6 and JR-CSF. Second, quantitative LC-MS/MS metabolomics analysis demonstrates very similar metabolic profiles in glycolysis and TCA cycle metabolic intermediates between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected macrophages, with a few notable exceptions. The most striking metabolic change in MDMs infected with HIV-2 relative to HIV-1-infected MDMs was the increased levels of quinolinate, a metabolite in the tryptophan catabolism pathway that has been linked to HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. Third, both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected MDMs showed elevated levels of ribose-5-phosphate, a key metabolic component in nucleotide biosynthesis. Finally, HIV-2 infected MDMs display increased dNTP concentrations as predicted by Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation. Collectively, these data show differential metabolic changes during HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection of macrophages.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen testing to detect HIV infection in female sex workers in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chan, R K; Ali, K; Thoe, S Y

    1995-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterised by seroconversion after a ¿window¿ period of 2 to 3 months. After this period antibodies are usually detectable by screening tests (enzyme immunoassay or particle agglutination) confirmed by Western blot analysis. We studied 1000 newly enrolled female sex workers who had not been previously tested for HIV to assess the usefulness of HIV antigen testing to improve the efficacy of HIV infection detection. Blood was taken at enrollment for HIV antigen and HIV antibody testing. The Abbott HIVAG-1 test was used to detect antigen; antibody detection was by the Abbott recombinant HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test, the Fujirebio Serodia-HIV particle agglutination (PA) test for screening, and the Diagnostic Biotechnology HIV Blot 2.2 Western blot (WB) test for antibody confirmation. Of the 1000 samples, 26 were positive for HIV antibody testing (26/26 for EIA, 25/25 for PA, 26/26 for WB), giving a prevalence rate of 2.6%, Of these 26 seropositive samples 1 was positive on HIV antigen testing. There were no samples which were antigen-positive and antibody-negative. HIV antigen testing does not add to increased efficacy of HIV detection among female sex workers in Singapore.

  17. Breast feeding and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Cutting, W A

    1992-10-01

    There are considerable data suggesting that breast milk and colostrum transmit HIV. The European Collaborative Study shows the risk of transmission of HIV from breast milk to infant to be about 28%. A study in Rwanda indicates that transmission is more likely to take place during viremia which occurs during primary HIV infection and later with progression to AIDS. Postnatal transmission in this study stood at about 60%. Breast feeding protects against diarrhea and respiratory infections. A study in Brazil demonstrates that infants who were not breast fed were at 14.2 and 3.6 higher risk of death from diarrhea and respiratory infections, respectively, than breast-fed infants. These risks are especially great where poverty, inadequate sanitation, and poor hygiene predominate. A study in Malaysia shows that infants living in a household with no piped water and no toilet and were not breast-fed faced a 5-fold risk of death after 1 week of age than breast-fed infants living under the same conditions. This risk continued to be high (2.5) for non-breast-fed infants living in a household with piped water and a toilet. In developed countries, affordable formula, clean water, and adequate facilities for sterilizing bottles allows HIV positive mothers to bottle feed their infants which should reduce the vertical transmission rate. In developing countries, however, bottle feeding is expensive and hazardous. Governments often cannot provide potable water and sanitation services. In addition, mathematical models demonstrate that for HIV positive mothers, the risk of infant death is lower in infants who breast feed than in those who do not. Thus, in those areas of the world where infectious diseases and malnutrition are the leading causes of infant death, health workers should promote breast feeding regardless of HIV status of the mothers. PMID:1422355

  18. HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, David B.; Ances, Beau M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neurological involvement in HIV is commonly associated with cognitive impairment. While severe and progressive neurocognitive impairment has become rare in HIV clinics in the era of potent antiretroviral therapy, a majority of HIV patients worldwide perform below expectations on formal neurocognitive tests. Co-morbid conditions contribute to impairment, but they are insufficient to explain the frequency of impairment encountered. HIV disease markers like current viral load and CD4 counts are no longer strongly associated with ongoing impairment on therapy, while cardiovascular disease markers and inflammatory markers appear more closely associated. Novel cerebrospinal fluid and neuroimaging biomarkers are needed to detect and follow impairment. Ongoing research to optimize HIV therapy within the central nervous system, and potentially to intervene in downstream mechanisms of neurotoxicity remain important avenues of future investigation. Ultimately, the full control of virus in the brain is a necessary step in the goal of HIV eradication. Weekly searches of English language publications referring to HIV neurocognitive impairment, HIV neuropathy, HIV myelopathy, HIV dementia, and HIV from 1988 to August 2013 were performed. In addition, the authors’ own files were manually searched. PMID:24156898

  19. Opportunity Knocks: HIV Prevention in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Thrun, Mark W

    2014-06-01

    Expansions in health care coverage, a comprehensive framework for HIV prevention and care, electronic medical records, and novel HIV prevention modalities create a current opportunity to change the trajectory of the HIV epidemic in the United States. HIV is increasingly disproportionately found in populations historically at higher risk, including gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender women, injection drug users, and persons of color. This underscores the need for providers to identify persons at higher risk for HIV and assure the provision of screening and prevention services. In turn, universal screening for HIV-testing every adolescent and adult at least once in their lifetime-will increasingly be necessary to find the infrequent cases of HIV in lower risk populations. In both these domains, primary care providers will play a unique role in complementing traditional providers of HIV prevention and care services by increasing the proportion of their patients who have been screened for HIV, opening dialogues around sexual health, including asking about sexual orientation and gender identity, and prescribing antivirals as pre- and postexposure prophylaxis for their non-HIV-infected patients. Primary care providers must understand and embrace their importance along the HIV prevention and care continuum. PMID:26789615

  20. HIV and Tuberculosis: a Deadly Human Syndemic

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Candice K.; Ernst, Joel D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: A syndemic is defined as the convergence of two or more diseases that act synergistically to magnify the burden of disease. The intersection and syndemic interaction between the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB) epidemics have had deadly consequences around the world. Without adequate control of the TB-HIV syndemic, the long-term TB elimination target set for 2050 will not be reached. There is an urgent need for additional resources and novel approaches for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of both HIV and TB. Moreover, multidisciplinary approaches that consider HIV and TB together, rather than as separate problems and diseases, will be necessary to prevent further worsening of the HIV-TB syndemic. This review examines current knowledge of the state and impact of the HIV-TB syndemic and reviews the epidemiological, clinical, cellular, and molecular interactions between HIV and TB. PMID:21482729

  1. [HIV in elderly women after travelling abroad].

    PubMed

    Jespersen, Sanne; Thorsteinsson, Kristina; David, Kim Peter; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Storgaard, Merete

    2016-05-01

    We report two cases of HIV infection among female travellers of older age. A Danish woman in her eighties was diagnosed with acute HIV infection after travelling to West Africa. A sexual history was not recorded before her third hospital visit. A West African woman in her seventies who had been living in Denmark for 40 years was diagnosed with advanced HIV after having been to West Africa for family visits. We want to emphasize that women of older age also have sex that may put them at risk of HIV, that febrile returning travellers should be tested for HIV, and that presence of HIV indicator diseases should lead to HIV testing. PMID:27137117

  2. Non-infectious Pulmonary Diseases and HIV.

    PubMed

    Triplette, M; Crothers, K; Attia, E F

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary complications remain among the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality for individuals with HIV despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and improvement in its efficacy and availability. The prevalence of non-infectious pulmonary diseases is rising in this population, reflecting both an increase in smoking and the independent risk associated with HIV. The unique mechanisms of pulmonary disease in these patients remain poorly understood, and direct effects of HIV, genetic predisposition, inflammatory pathways, and co-infections have all been implicated. Lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary hypertension are the most prevalent non-infectious pulmonary diseases in persons with HIV, and the risk of each of these diseases is higher among HIV-infected (HIV+) persons than in the general population. This review discusses the latest advances in the literature on these important complications of HIV infection. PMID:27121734

  3. HIV/AIDS, Drug Abuse Treatment, and the Correctional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipton, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses in-prison prevalence and transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Focuses on epidemiology in prison settings, the role of ethnicity and gender in transmission, screening for HIV, segregating the HIV-positive inmate, condom distribution, medical treatment for HIV-positive inmates, HIV education and prevention, and tuberculosis…

  4. Development and Validation of the HIV Medication Readiness Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, Louise; Tasca, Giorgio A.; Kowal, John; Corace, Kimberly; Cooper, Curtis L.; Angel, Jonathan B.; Garber, Gary; MacPherson, Paul A.; Cameron, D. William

    2007-01-01

    Excellent medication adherence (greater than 95%) is required for optimal HIV treatment success. This study aimed to develop and validate a brief scale to assess psychological readiness for successfully starting and adhering to HIV medications. HIV-positive men and women (N = 142) from an HIV outpatient clinic completed the proposed HIV Medication…

  5. HIV among African American Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS ... with men—National HIV Behavioral Surveillance, 20 U.S. cities, 2014 . HIV Surveillance Special Report 2016;15. Accessed ...

  6. Developing a Successful HIV Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Robert C

    2015-07-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome integration indicates that persistent sterilizing immunity will be needed for a successful vaccine candidate. This suggests a need for broad antibodies targeting the Env protein. Immunogens targeting gp120 have been developed that block infection in monkeys and mimic the modest success of the RV144 clinical trial in that protection is short-lived following a decline in antibody-depending cell-mediated cytotoxicity-like antibodies. Attempts to induce antibody persistence have been complicated by a loss of efficacy, presumably by increasing the number of HIV-target cells. The key seems to be achieving an immune balance.

  7. Curing HIV: Moving Forward Faster.

    PubMed

    Flores, Marcella; Johnston, Rowena

    2016-02-01

    There is enormous enthusiasm in the scientific community for finding a cure for HIV. Although much remains to be discovered regarding the mechanisms of viral persistence and how it may be disrupted, some assumptions regarding the goals of a cure, applicability to target populations, and what is required of the assays we employ, may lead to missed opportunities and discoveries and hamper the discovery of a product that will safely cure tens of millions of HIV-infected people around the world. The field will benefit from an awareness and critical interrogation of assumptions that may be implicit in their scientific pursuits. PMID:26862662

  8. Counseling for HIV Prevention: Clinical Interventions and HIV Antibody Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Donald H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes some developmental foundations for HIV counseling. Asserts that, in both formal sessions and moments of opportunity, educators, clinicians, and counselors can use the counseling relationship to promote healthy behavior change. This clinical process depends on careful self-appraisal, good counseling skills, and responsiveness to the…

  9. The prevalence of undiagnosed HIV serodiscordance among male couples presenting for HIV testing.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick S; Wall, Kristin M; O'Hara, Brandon; Jones, Jeb; Barnes, Jasper; DiClemente, Ralph; Hoff, Colleen; Scales, Lamont; Salazar, Laura F; Sanchez, Travis; White, Darcy; Wingood, Gina; Allen, Susan; Stephenson, Rob

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, a substantial proportion of HIV transmissions among men who have sex with men (MSM) arise from main sex partners. Couples voluntary HIV testing and counseling (CHTC) is used in many parts of the world with male-female couples, but CHTC has historically not been available in the U.S. and few data exist about the extent of HIV serodiscordance among U.S. male couples. We tested partners in 95 Atlanta male couples (190 men) for HIV. Eligible men were in a relationship for ≥3 months and were not known to be HIV-positive. We calculated the prevalence of couples that were seroconcordant HIV-negative, seroconcordant HIV-positive, or HIV serodiscordant. We evaluated differences in the prevalence of HIV serodiscordance by several dyadic characteristics (e.g., duration of relationship, sexual agreements, and history of anal intercourse in the relationship). Overall, among 190 men tested for HIV, 11 % (n = 20) were newly identified as HIV-positive. Among the 95 couples, 81 % (n = 77) were concordant HIV-negative, 17 % (n = 16) were HIV serodiscordant, and 2 % (n = 2) were concordant HIV-positive. Serodiscordance was not significantly associated with any evaluated dyadic characteristic. The prevalence of undiagnosed HIV serodiscordance among male couples in Atlanta is high. Offering testing to male couples may attract men with a high HIV seropositivity rate to utilize testing services. Based on the global evidence base for CHTC with heterosexual couples and the current evidence of substantial undiagnosed HIV serodiscordance among U.S. MSM, we recommend scale-up of CHTC services for MSM, with ongoing evaluation of acceptability and couples' serostatus outcomes.

  10. Stem cell transplantation in the context of HIV--how can we cure HIV infection?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Gerhard; Anderson, Joseph S

    2014-01-01

    All HIV target cells are derived from hematopoietic stem cells. More than two decades ago, a hypothesis was postulated that a cure for HIV may be possible by performing a transplant with HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem cells that would allow for an HIV-resistant immune system to arise. HIV-resistant stem cells could be generated by genetically modifying them with gene therapy vectors transferring anti-HIV genes. First attempts of stem cell gene therapy for HIV were carried out in the USA in the 1990s demonstrating safety, but also little efficacy at that time. The first demonstration that the postulated hypothesis was correct was the cure of an HIV-infected individual in Berlin in 2009 who received an allogeneic bone marrow transplant from a donor who lacked the CCR5 chemokine receptor, a naturally arising mutation rendering HIV target cells resistant to infection with macrophage tropic strains of HIV. In 2013, reports were published about a possible cure of HIV-infected individuals who received allogeneic bone marrow transplants with cells not resistant to HIV. We will review these stem cell transplant procedures and discuss their utility to provide a cure for HIV infection, including efficacious future stem cell gene therapy applications.

  11. HIV-related stigma among an urban sample of persons living with HIV at risk for dropping out of HIV-oriented primary medical care.

    PubMed

    Relf, Michael V; Rollins, Kate V

    2015-01-01

    HIV-related stigma is one of the greatest barriers to preventing and ending the HIV epidemic. The purpose of our study was to examine HIV-related stigma among urban adults voluntarily seeking HIV-oriented primary medical care and at risk for dropping out after enrolling. The baseline cross-sectional analysis of perceived HIV-related stigma upon enrolling in care examined the level of HIV-related stigma and its sub-domains: personalized, disclosure, negative self-image, and public attitudes. Our study also identified precursors of HIV-related stigma and associated outcomes. HIV-related stigma continues to be a significant problem for persons living with HIV; those perceiving higher levels of HIV-related stigma reported a poorer quality of life, both physically and mentally. The relationship between HIV-related stigma and mental health was closely connected in our sample. PMID:24881591

  12. Humanized Mouse Models of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Paul W.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2013-01-01

    Because of the limited tropism of HIV, in vivo modeling of this virus has been almost exclusively limited to other lentiviruses such as SIV that reproduce many important characteristics of HIV infection. However, there are significant genetic and biological differences among lentiviruses and some HIV-specific interventions are not effective against other lentiviruses in non-human hosts. For these reasons much emphasis has recently been placed on developing alternative animal models that support HIV replication and recapitulate key aspects of HIV infection and pathogenesis in humans. Humanized mice, CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cell transplanted immunodeficient mice and in particular mice also implanted with human thymic/liver tissue (BLT mice) that develop a functional human immune system, have been the focus of a great deal of attention as possible models to study virtually all aspects of HIV biology and pathogenesis. Humanized mice are systemically reconstituted with human lymphoid cells offering rapid, reliable and reproducible experimental systems for HIV research. Peripheral blood of humanized mice can be readily sampled longitudinally to assess reconstitution with human cells and to monitor HIV replication permitting the evaluation of multiple parameters of HIV infection such as viral load levels, CD4+ T cell depletion, immune activation, as well as the effects of therapeutic interventions. Of high relevance to HIV transmission is the extensive characterization and validation of the reconstitution with human lymphoid cells of the female reproductive tract and of the gastrointestinal tract of humanized BLT mice that renders them susceptible to both vaginal and rectal HIV infection. Other important attributes of all types of humanized mice include: 1) their small size and cost that make them broadly accessible; 2) multiple cohorts of humanized mice can be made from multiple human donors and each cohort has identical human cells, permitting control of

  13. HIV-1 antiretroviral drug therapy.

    PubMed

    Arts, Eric J; Hazuda, Daria J

    2012-04-01

    The most significant advance in the medical management of HIV-1 infection has been the treatment of patients with antiviral drugs, which can suppress HIV-1 replication to undetectable levels. The discovery of HIV-1 as the causative agent of AIDS together with an ever-increasing understanding of the virus replication cycle have been instrumental in this effort by providing researchers with the knowledge and tools required to prosecute drug discovery efforts focused on targeted inhibition with specific pharmacological agents. To date, an arsenal of 24 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs are available for treatment of HIV-1 infections. These drugs are distributed into six distinct classes based on their molecular mechanism and resistance profiles: (1) nucleoside-analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), (2) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), (3) integrase inhibitors, (4) protease inhibitors (PIs), (5) fusion inhibitors, and (6) coreceptor antagonists. In this article, we will review the basic principles of antiretroviral drug therapy, the mode of drug action, and the factors leading to treatment failure (i.e., drug resistance).

  14. Vulnerable to HIV / AIDS. Migration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, I

    1998-01-01

    This special report discusses the impact of globalization, patterns of migration in Southeast Asia, gender issues in migration, the links between migration and HIV/AIDS, and spatial mobility and social networks. Migrants are particularly marginalized in countries that blame migrants for transmission of infectious and communicable diseases and other social ills. Effective control of HIV/AIDS among migrant and native populations requires a multisectoral approach. Programs should critically review the privatization of health care services and challenge economic models that polarize the rich and the poor, men and women, North and South, and migrant and native. Programs should recognize the equality between locals and migrants in receipt of health services. Countermeasures should have input from migrants in order to reduce the conditions that increase vulnerability to HIV/AIDS. Gender-oriented research is needed to understand women's role in migration. Rapid assessment has obscured the human dimension of migrants' vulnerability to HIV. Condom promotion is not enough. Migration is a major consequence of globalization, which holds the promise, real or imagined, of prosperity for all. Mass migration can be fueled by explosive regional developments. In Southeast Asia, migration has been part of the process of economic development. The potential to emigrate increases with greater per capita income. "Tiger" economies have been labor importers. Safe sex is not practiced in many Asian countries because risk is not taken seriously. Migrants tend to be used as economic tools, without consideration of social adjustment and sex behavior among singles.

  15. HIV and co-infections

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Christina C; Crane, Megan; Zhou, JingLing; Mina, Michael; Post, Jeffrey J; Cameron, Barbara A; Lloyd, Andrew R; Jaworowski, Anthony; French, Martyn A; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite significant reductions in morbidity and mortality secondary to availability of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection still accounts for 1.5 million deaths annually. The majority of deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa where rates of opportunistic co-infections are disproportionately high. In this review, we discuss the immunopathogenesis of five common infections that cause significant morbidity in HIV-infected patients globally. These include co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Plasmodium falciparum. Specifically, we review the natural history of each co-infection in the setting of HIV, the specific immune defects induced by HIV, the effects of cART on the immune response to the co-infection, the pathogenesis of immune restoration disease (IRD) associated with each infection, and advances in the areas of prevention of each co-infection via vaccination. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and gaps for future research. PMID:23772618

  16. Troubled Adolescents and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, John O., Ed.; And Others

    This report on adolescents, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and Human Immune Virus (HIV) infection had its beginning in the Knowledge Development Workshop "Issues in the Prevention and Treatment of AIDS Among Adolescents with Serious Emotional Disturbance," held June 9-10, 1988 in the District of Columbia. These papers are included:…

  17. Metabolic disease in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jordan E; Currier, Judith S

    2013-11-01

    The treatment of metabolic disease is becoming an increasingly important component of the long-term management of patients with well controlled HIV on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Metabolic diseases probably develop at the intersection of traditional risk factors (such as obesity, tobacco use, and genetic predisposition) and HIV-specific and ART-specific contributors (including chronic inflammation and immune activation). This Review discusses present knowledge on adipose tissue dysfunction, insulin-glucose homoeostasis, lipid disturbances, and cardiovascular disease risk in people with HIV on ART. Although new antiretroviral drugs are believed to induce fewer short-term metabolic perturbations than do older drugs, the long-term effects of these drugs are not fully understood. Additionally, patients remain at increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other metabolic comorbidities. Research and treatment should focus on selection of ART that is both virologically effective and has minimum metabolic effects, minimisation of traditional risk factors for metabolic disease, and development of novel therapies to treat metabolic disease in patients with HIV, including use of anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory drugs.

  18. HIV Infection and Health Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Robin; Hardy, Leslie M.

    1990-01-01

    Describes issues facing policymakers dealing with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. Addresses six challenges for policymakers: (1) protecting people from discrimination; (2) designing testing and screening programs; (3) developing safe and effective antiviral drugs; (4) planning for future vaccine trials; (5) organizing and…

  19. HIV Testing among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, Daryl L.; And Others

    An increase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) throughout the world cuts across age, ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation groups. It is imperative that people find out if they are carrying the disease. Many still continue to engage in high risk behaviors in ignorance, putting themselves and their partners at risk. The relationships among fear…

  20. HIV/AIDS and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Research : Vaccines Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Vaccines What Are Vaccines and What Do They Do? A vaccine—also ... immune response against the disease. Is There a Vaccine for HIV? No. There is currently no vaccine ...

  1. HIV Protease Inhibitors and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Anuurad, Erdembileg; Bremer, Andrew; Berglund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the current scientific literature and recent clinical trials on HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and their potential role in the pathogenesis of lipodystrophy and metabolic disorders. Recent findings HIV PI treatment may affect the normal stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose and fat storage. Further, chronic inflammation from HIV infection and PI treatment trigger cellular homeostatic stress responses with adverse effects on intermediary metabolism. The physiologic outcome is such that total adipocyte storage capacity is decreased, and the remaining adipocytes resist further fat storage. This process leads to a pathologic cycle of lipodystrophy and lipotoxicity, a pro-atherogenic lipid profile, and a clinical phenotype of increased central body fat distribution similar to the metabolic syndrome. Summary PIs are a key component of antiretroviral therapy and have dramatically improved the life expectancy of HIV-infected individuals. However, they are also associated with abnormalities in glucose/lipid metabolism and body fat distribution. Further studies are needed to better define the pathogenesis of PI-associated metabolic and body fat changes and their potential treatment. PMID:20717021

  2. Adolescents, AIDS and HIV. Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resources for Educators, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This compilation of educational resources is designed for communities which have been either overlooked in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education efforts or disproportionately affected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. The materials listed target Blacks, Latinos, Asians and Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, young…

  3. Libya, HIV, and open communication.

    PubMed

    Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2006-01-01

    This year-end editorial discusses several points including the recent Libyan verdict sentencing five Bulgarian nurses and a Palestinian doctor to death for allegedly infecting 426 children with HIV. It also comments on the role played by open communication for bridging cultural misunderstandings and summarizes briefly Retrovirology's progress in 2006.

  4. HIV Infection and Homeless Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athey, Jean L.

    1991-01-01

    A literature review reveals that homeless adolescents are at extremely high risk for acquiring HIV infection. Sexual and drug use behaviors that put these adolescents at risk are described. New models of social, health, and mental health services for these youth are outlined. (GLR)

  5. HIV Infection Presenting with Dementia.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, K; Gupta, Avneet; Manoj, S; Seshadri, Kp

    2015-08-01

    We present a case of dementia in a young healthy individual. On evaluation he was detected to have HIV infection with low CD4 count and a high viral load. He had no opportunistic infections or any other AIDS defining illnesses. He recovered fully within 3 months of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27604445

  6. Tuberculosis and HIV infection: global perspectives.

    PubMed

    Murray, J F

    1997-09-01

    This paper reviews the epidemiological and clinical aspects of the interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV infection. The incidence of HIV-associated tuberculosis is increasing worldwide and is expected to increase further, especially in Africa and parts of Asia. HIV infection appears to increase the likelihood that tuberculous infection will occur after tubercle bacilli are inhaled into the lungs. Moreover, there is persuasive evidence that in the presence of HIV infection, new-onset tuberculous infection will progress rapidly to clinically significant disease and the probability that latent tuberculous infection will reactivate is enormously increased. The accelerating and amplifying influence of HIV infection is also contributing to the increasing incidence of disease caused by multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Neither clinical nor radiographic features reliably distinguish the majority of patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis from those who are non-HIV-infected. Some HIV-infected patients, however, have atypical manifestations and are difficult to diagnose. Chemotherapy for 6 months with conventional antituberculosis drugs cures most patients, but many died during or after treatment of other AIDS-related complications. HIV is contributing heavily to the worldwide increase in tuberculosis. There is also mounting evidence that tuberculosis accelerates the course of co-existing HIV disease.

  7. The crying need for an HIV statute.

    PubMed

    Grover, A

    1996-01-01

    By 2000, India will have the largest number of reported HIV cases in the world. 22,520 HIV cases and 2528 AIDS cases were reported in India during May 1986 to April 1996. However, the numbers of cases are greatly underestimated and the National AIDS Control Organization and the Indian Health Organization estimate more like 1.78 and 4.4 million HIV cases, respectively, in the country. Goa is the only state in India with a law on HIV. The 1988 Goa Public Health Amendment Act legislated the mandatory testing of people suspected to be infected with HIV and the forced isolation of people who test HIV-seropositive. The provision of mandatory isolation was later made discretionary. The government at the federal level has decided that the provision of relevant education is the best way to prevent the spread of HIV. Some people believe that education is enough and law reform does not help. The author, however, argues that an integrationist strategy based upon education as the central component of HIV prevention must be backed up by legislation to prevent the spread of HIV infection and strengthen the rights of HIV positive persons against forced testing, isolation, breach of confidentiality, and discrimination. India's current legal regime cannot protect these rights.

  8. HIV classification using coalescent theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ming; Letiner, Thomas K; Korber, Bette T

    2008-01-01

    Algorithms for subtype classification and breakpoint detection of HIV-I sequences are based on a classification system of HIV-l. Hence, their quality highly depend on this system. Due to the history of creation of the current HIV-I nomenclature, the current one contains inconsistencies like: The phylogenetic distance between the subtype B and D is remarkably small compared with other pairs of subtypes. In fact, it is more like the distance of a pair of subsubtypes Robertson et al. (2000); Subtypes E and I do not exist any more since they were discovered to be composed of recombinants Robertson et al. (2000); It is currently discussed whether -- instead of CRF02 being a recombinant of subtype A and G -- subtype G should be designated as a circulating recombination form (CRF) nd CRF02 as a subtype Abecasis et al. (2007); There are 8 complete and over 400 partial HIV genomes in the LANL-database which belong neither to a subtype nor to a CRF (denoted by U). Moreover, the current classification system is somehow arbitrary like all complex classification systems that were created manually. To this end, it is desirable to deduce the classification system of HIV systematically by an algorithm. Of course, this problem is not restricted to HIV, but applies to all fast mutating and recombining viruses. Our work addresses the simpler subproblem to score classifications of given input sequences of some virus species (classification denotes a partition of the input sequences in several subtypes and CRFs). To this end, we reconstruct ancestral recombination graphs (ARG) of the input sequences under restrictions determined by the given classification. These restritions are imposed in order to ensure that the reconstructed ARGs do not contradict the classification under consideration. Then, we find the ARG with maximal probability by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The probability of the most probable ARG is interpreted as a score for the classification. To our

  9. Drug and Alcohol Use -- A Significant Risk Factor for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Significant Risk Factor for HIV Drug and Alcohol Use - A Significant Risk Factor for HIV Email ... with HIV currently use drugs or binge on alcohol. Many people are unaware that the increased risk ...

  10. Brief Report: Macrophage Activation in HIV-2-Infected Patients Is Less Affected by Antiretroviral Treatment-sCD163 in HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/2 Dually Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Hønge, Bo L; Andersen, Morten N; Jespersen, Sanne; Medina, Candida; Correira, Faustino G; Jakobsen, Martin R; Laursen, Alex; Erikstrup, Christian; Møller, Holger J; Wejse, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The course of disease among HIV-2, HIV-1, and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients is different. We investigated the macrophage activation marker soluble CD163 (sCD163) dynamics in 212 HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1/2 dually infected patients. There were no differences in sCD163 levels at baseline or during follow-up without antiretroviral therapy (ART). At follow-up on ART, median sCD163 levels were decreased for HIV-1-infected patients (P < 0.001), but not among HIV-2 (P = 0.093) or HIV-1/2 dually infected patients (P = 0.145). The larger decrease in sCD163 levels among HIV-1-infected patients during ART may indicate an HIV type-dependent differential effect of ART on macrophage activation during HIV infection. PMID:26825178

  11. HIV/AIDS Epidemic in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vol. 30, No. 21; June 1981. ← Return to text CDC. HIV Surveillance Report, Diagnoses of HIV Infection ... Columbia, and 6 U.S. dependent areas. ← Return to text CDC. HIV in the United States: At a ...

  12. Tuberculosis: The Connection between TB and HIV (the AIDS Virus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force Tuberculosis: The Connection between TB and HIV Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Order this ... if I am infected with both TB and HIV? If you have HIV, it is important to ...

  13. Urological aspects of HIV and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Heyns, Chris F; Smit, Shaun G; van der Merwe, André; Zarrabi, Amir D

    2013-12-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-infected people has led to a dramatic decrease in the incidence of opportunistic infections and virus-related malignancies such as non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Kaposi sarcoma, but not cervical or anal cancer. Advanced-stage cervical cancer is associated with a high incidence of urological complications such as hydronephrosis, renal failure, and vesicovaginal fistula. Adult male circumcison can significantly reduce the risk of male HIV acquisition. Although HAART does not completely eradicate HIV, compliance with medication increases life expectancy. HIV infection or treatment can result in renal failure, which can be managed with dialysis and transplantation (as for HIV-negative patients). Although treatment for erectile dysfunction--including phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, intracavernosal injection therapy, and penile prosthesis--can increase the risk of HIV transmission, treatment decisions for men with erectile dysfunction should not be determined by HIV status. The challenges faced when administering chemotherapy to HIV-infected patients with cancer include late presentation, immunodeficiency, drug interactions, and adverse effects associated with compounded medications. Nonetheless, HIV-infected patients should receive the same cancer treatment as HIV-negative patients. The urologist is increasingly likely to encounter HIV-positive patients who present with the same urological problems as the general population, because HAART confers a prolonged life expectancy. Performing surgery in an HIV-infected individual raises safety issues for both the patient (if severely immunocompromised) and the surgeon, but the risk of HIV transmission from patients on fully suppressive HAART is small.

  14. Cardiovascular Diseases in HIV-infected Subjects (HIV-HEART Study)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-05-07

    Detection of Frequency, Severity and Progression of Cardiovascular Diseases in Patients With HIV-infection.; Effect on Cardiovascular Risk and Life Quality by Age, Gender, Classic Cardiovascular Risk Factors,; HIV-specific Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Cardiovascular Medication, Antiretroviral Medication

  15. Creating an African HIV Clinical Research and Prevention Trials Network: HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Anatoli; Price, Matt A.; Lakhi, Shabir; Karita, Etienne; Inambao, Mubiana; Sanders, Eduard J.; Anzala, Omu; Latka, Mary H.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Asiki, Gershim; Ssetaala, Ali; Ruzagira, Eugene; Allen, Susan; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Mutua, Gaudensia; Makkan, Heeran; Tichacek, Amanda; Brill, Ilene K.; Fast, Pat; Stevens, Gwynn; Chetty, Paramesh; Amornkul, Pauli N.; Gilmour, Jill

    2015-01-01

    HIV epidemiology informs prevention trial design and program planning. Nine clinical research centers (CRC) in sub-Saharan Africa conducted HIV observational epidemiology studies in populations at risk for HIV infection as part of an HIV prevention and vaccine trial network. Annual HIV incidence ranged from below 2% to above 10% and varied by CRC and risk group, with rates above 5% observed in Zambian men in an HIV-discordant relationship, Ugandan men from Lake Victoria fishing communities, men who have sex with men, and several cohorts of women. HIV incidence tended to fall after the first three months in the study and over calendar time. Among suspected transmission pairs, 28% of HIV infections were not from the reported partner. Volunteers with high incidence were successfully identified and enrolled into large scale cohort studies. Over a quarter of new cases in couples acquired infection from persons other than the suspected transmitting partner. PMID:25602351

  16. Responsibility for HIV prevention: patterns of attribution among HIV-seropositive gay and bisexual men.

    PubMed

    Offer, Claudine; Grinstead, Olga; Goldstein, Ellen; Mamary, Edward; Alvarado, Nicholas; Euren, Jason; Woods, William J

    2007-02-01

    The Seroconversion Narratives for AIDS Prevention (SNAP) study elicited narratives from recently infected seropositive gay and bisexual men that described the circumstances of their own seroconversion. This analysis of the narratives explored participants' attributions of responsibility for HIV prevention before and after they became infected. Before becoming infected with HIV, responsibility for prevention was often attributed to HIV-negative individuals themselves. These retrospective attributions revealed themes that included feelings of negligence, a sense of consequences, followed by regret. After seroconversion, responsibility for HIV prevention was primarily attributed to HIV-positive individuals themselves. Themes within these attributions included pledges to avoid HIV transmission, a strong sense of burden related to the possibility of infecting someone, and risk reduction strategies that they implemented in an attempt to avoid HIV transmission. Greater understanding of ideas related to responsibility has the potential to increase the effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions. PMID:17411387

  17. Differentiation between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 isolates by nonradioisotopic reverse transcriptase-typing assay.

    PubMed Central

    Urabe, T; Sano, K; Nakano, T; Odawara, F; Lee, M H; Otake, T; Okubo, S; Hayami, M; Misaki, H; Baba, M

    1994-01-01

    We tested whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) could be differentiated from HIV-2 by a reverse transcriptase (RT)-typing assay that measured the reduction of enzyme activity owing to specific antibody. RT-inhibiting antibody was examined for HIV type specificity by a new nonradioisotopic RT assay. Antibodies from four rabbits immunized with recombinant HIV-1 RT and from 23 HIV-1-seropositive individuals all specifically inhibited the enzyme activities of two HIV-1 strains (LAV-1 and GH-3), three zidovudine-resistant HIV-1 mutants, and a recombinant HIV-1 RT. However, none of these antisera affected the activities of six HIV-2 strains (GH-1, GH-2, GH-4, GH-5, GH-6, LAV-2ROD), Rous-associated virus type 2, and DNA polymerase I from Escherichia coli. In contrast, HIV-2 antibody from a rabbit immunized with disrupted GH-1 virions blocked the enzyme activities of the six HIV-2 strains but not those of the three HIV-1 strains, Rous-associated virus type 2, or DNA polymerase I. These results indicate that the antigenic domains of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RTs recognized by their inhibiting antibodies are distinct from each other and are highly conserved. Clinical HIV isolates from 18 HIV-1-seropositive individuals and 3 HIV-2-seropositive Ghanaian individuals were identified as HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively, by the nonradioisotopic RT-typing assay. Images PMID:7527425

  18. Uganda: Proposed bill would criminalize HIV transmission, force partners to reveal HIV-positive status.

    PubMed

    2009-05-01

    The Uganda government has introduced in Parliament an omnibus AIDS bill which aims to criminalize the "intentional or willful" transmission of HIV, introduce "routine" HIV testing for pregnant women, and require disclosure of one's HIV-positive status to one's spouse or partner. The bill also contains measures to protect the rights of people living with HIV/AIDS, including guaranteeing access to treatment and providing protection against discrimination.

  19. Efficient Identification of HIV Serodiscordant Couples by Existing HIV Testing Programs in South Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pilcher, Christopher D.; Bisol, Claudia Alquati; Paganella, Machline Paim; Vallabhaneni, Snigdha; da Motta, Leonardo Rapone; Kato, Sergio Kakuta; Sperhacke, Rosa Dea; Kallas, Esper G.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Diaz, Ricardo Sobhie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the feasibility of identifying HIV negative at risk individuals in HIV serodiscordant couples, during voluntary HIV testing in South Brazil. Methods We surveyed HIV testers at 4 public testing sites in Rio Grande do Sul. We obtained information on risk behaviors and sexual partnerships. HIV testing and testing for recent infection were performed; HIV prevalence and risk behaviors were assessed among subjects who reported having a steady partner who was HIV positive (serodiscordant group) and compared with the general testing population. Results Among 3100 patients, 490 (15.8%) reported being in a steady relationship with an HIV positive partner. New HIV infections were diagnosed in 23% of the serodiscordant group (vs. 13% in the general population, p = 0.01); among newly positive subjects, recent HIV infections were more frequent (23/86, 26.7%) among testers with positive partners than among the general testing group (52/334; 15.6%; p = 0.016). Less than half of the serodiscordant testers reported having used a condom during the last sexual intercourse with their HIV-positive partner. Participants with inconsistent condom use with steady partner were four times more likely to test positive for HIV compared to those who reported always using condoms with the steady partner (OR: 4.2; 95% CI: 2.3 to 7.5). Conclusion It is highly feasible to identify large numbers of HIV susceptible individuals who are in HIV serodiscordant relationships in South Brazil testing sites. Condom use within HIV serodiscordant couples is low in this setting, suggesting urgent need for biomedical prevention strategies to reduce HIV transmission. PMID:26562436

  20. HIV risk behavior and access to services: what predicts HIV testing among heterosexually active homeless men?

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Suzanne L; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-06-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV testing behavior of homeless men. This study examined the association between individual (HIV risk) and structural (service access) factors and past year HIV testing. Participants were a representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men interviewed from meal programs in the Skid Row region of Los Angeles. Logistic regression examined the association between past year HIV testing and demographic characteristics, HIV risk behavior, and access to other services in the Skid Row area in the past 30 days. Despite high rates of past year HIV testing, study participants also reported high rates of HIV risk behavior, suggesting there is still significant unmet need for HIV prevention among homeless men. Having recently used medical/dental services in the Skid Row area (OR: 1.91; CI: 1.09, 3.35), and being a military veteran (OR: 2.10; CI: 1.01-4.37) were significantly associated with HIV testing service utilization. HIV testing was not associated with HIV risk behavior, but rather with access to services and veteran status, the latter of which prior research has linked to increased service access. We suggest that programs encouraging general medical service access may be important for disseminating HIV testing services to this high-risk, vulnerable population. PMID:22676465

  1. Performance of 3 rapid tests for discrimination between HIV-1 and HIV-2 in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Bjarnason Obinah, Magnús Pétur; Jespersen, Sanne; Medina, Candida; Té, David da Silva; da Silva, Zacarias José; Østergaard, Lars; Laursen, Alex Lund; Wejse, Christian; Erikstrup, Christian

    2014-01-01

    As HIV-2 is intrinsically resistant to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, it is mandatory to discriminate between HIV types before initiating antiretroviral treatment. Guinea-Bissau has the world's highest prevalence of HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 dually infected individuals. We evaluated 3 rapid tests for discrimination between HIV-1, HIV-2, and dual infections among 219 patients from Guinea-Bissau by comparing with the gold standard (INNO-LIA). Genie III HIV-1/HIV-2 was the best performer with regard to discriminatory capacity (agreement 91.8%), followed by Immunoflow HIV1-HIV2 (agreement 90.9%) and SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 (agreement 84.5%). Our results underscore the need for evaluation of tests in relevant populations before implementation.

  2. A systematic review of measures of HIV/AIDS stigma in paediatric HIV-infected and HIV-affected populations

    PubMed Central

    McAteer, Carole Ian; Truong, Nhan-Ai Thi; Aluoch, Josephine; Deathe, Andrew Roland; Nyandiko, Winstone M; Marete, Irene; Vreeman, Rachel Christine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV-related stigma impacts the quality of life and care management of HIV-infected and HIV-affected individuals, but how we measure stigma and its impact on children and adolescents has less often been described. Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies that measured HIV-related stigma with a quantitative tool in paediatric HIV-infected and HIV-affected populations. Results and discussion Varying measures have been used to assess stigma in paediatric populations, with most studies utilizing the full or variant form of the HIV Stigma Scale that has been validated in adult populations and utilized with paediatric populations in Africa, Asia and the United States. Other common measures included the Perceived Public Stigma Against Children Affected by HIV, primarily utilized and validated in China. Few studies implored item validation techniques with the population of interest, although scales were used in a different cultural context from the origin of the scale. Conclusions Many stigma measures have been used to assess HIV stigma in paediatric populations, globally, but few have implored methods for cultural adaptation and content validity. PMID:27717409

  3. Progressive osseous destruction as a complication of HIV-periodontitis.

    PubMed

    SanGiacomo, T R; Tan, P M; Loggi, D G; Itkin, A B

    1990-10-01

    A pathologic condition is described, characterized by rampant necrosis of gingival mucosa, periodontium, and related osseous structures associated with systemic infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is believed that this condition is an extension beyond the normal clinical course of HIV-periodontitis (HIV-P) and manifests itself in three progressive stages: (1) HIV-associated gingivitis, (2) HIV-P, and (3) an extension of HIV-P to osseous necrosis. Two cases of osseous destruction attending HIV-P are reported, one of which led to initial diagnosis of HIV infection. They represent the final stage of disease progression with localized necrosis of gingiva, periodontium, and alveolar bone.

  4. A Descriptive Analysis of HIV Prevalence, HIV Service Uptake, and HIV-Related Risk Behaviour among Patients Attending a Mental Health Clinic in Rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Lommerse, Kinke; Stewart, Robert C.; Chilimba, Queen; van den Akker, Thomas; Lund, Crick

    2013-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and mental illness are interlinked health problems; mental illness may pose a risk for contracting HIV and HIV-positive individuals are at higher risk of mental illness. However, in countries with high HIV prevalence, the main focus of HIV-related health programmes is usually on prevention and treatment of somatic complications of HIV, and mental illness is not given high priority. We examined HIV prevalence, uptake of HIV services, and HIV-related risk behaviour among people attending a mental health clinic in rural Malawi. Methodology Semi-structured interviews were performed with patients capable to consent (94%), and with those accompanied by a capable caregiver who consented. HIV counselling and testing was offered to participants. Findings Among 174 participants, we collected 162 HIV test results (91%). HIV prevalence was 14.8%. Women were three times as likely to be HIV-positive compared to men. Two-thirds of participants reported having been tested for HIV prior to this study. The uptake of HIV-services among HIV-positive patients was low: 35% did not use recommended prophylactic therapy and 44% of patients not receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) had never been assessed for ART eligibility. The reported rate of sexual activity was 61%, and 9% of sexually active participants had multiple partners. Inconsistent condom use with stable (89%) and occasional (79%) sexual partners, and absence of knowledge of the HIV status of those partners (53%, 63%) indicate high levels of sexual risk behaviour. Conclusions HIV-prevalence among persons attending the clinic, particularly men, was lower than among the general population in a population survey. The rate of HIV testing was high, but there was low uptake of preventive measures and ART. This illustrates that HIV-positive individuals with mental illness or epilepsy constitute a vulnerable population. HIV programmes should include those with neuropsychiatric illness

  5. [Cervical cancer: particularities in HIV patients].

    PubMed

    Grellier, Noémie; Quéro, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. It represents one of the most challenging public health problems in developing countries. HIV-infected women have a higher risk of cervical cancer which is an AIDS defining cancer. Cervical cancer treatment in HIV-infected and non-infected women is the same. HIV naive women must be prescribed combination antiretroviral therapy at the moment of HIV cancer diagnosis. A close collaboration between oncologist and infectiologist is mandatory to optimize HIV treatment. Among HIV-infected women, PAP-smear screening for early detection and treatment of precancerous cervical lesions is recommended. HPV vaccination is also recommended with the same efficacy and safety profile as the general population.

  6. Recent update in HIV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Shin, So Youn

    2016-01-01

    Despite the tremendous efforts to develop a successful human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine, the quest for a safe and effective HIV vaccine seems to be remarkably long and winding. Disappointing results from previous clinical trials of VaxGen's AIDSVAXgp120 vaccine and MRKAd5 HIV-1 Gag/Pol/Nef vaccine emphasize that understanding the correlates of immune protection in HIV infection is the key to solve the puzzle. The modest vaccine efficacy from RV144 trial and the successive results obtained from the correlate of risk analysis have reinvigorated the HIV vaccine research field leading to various novel strategies. This paper will review the brief history and recent advances in HIV vaccine development. PMID:26866018

  7. Frequency and implications of HIV superinfection.

    PubMed

    Redd, Andrew D; Quinn, Thomas C; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2013-07-01

    HIV superinfection occurs when an individual with HIV is infected with a new distinct HIV viral strain. Superinfection has been reported throughout the world, and studies have recorded incidence rates of 0-7·7% per year. Use of next-generation sequencing has improved detection of superinfection, which can be transmitted by injecting drug use and sexual intercourse. Superinfection might have incidence rates comparable to those of initial HIV infection. Clinicians should encourage safe sexual and injecting drug use practices for HIV-infected patients because superinfection has detrimental effects on clinical outcomes and could pose a concern for large-scale antiretroviral treatment plans. The occurrence of superinfection has implications for vaccine research, since it seems initial HIV infection is not fully protective against a subsequent infection. Additional collaborative research could benefit care of patients and inform future vaccine design.

  8. The Global Transmission Network of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Joel O.; Leigh Brown, Andrew J.; Hepler, N. Lance; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Richman, Douglas D.; Smith, Davey M.; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is pandemic, but its contemporary global transmission network has not been characterized. A better understanding of the properties and dynamics of this network is essential for surveillance, prevention, and eventual eradication of HIV. Here, we apply a simple and computationally efficient network-based approach to all publicly available HIV polymerase sequences in the global database, revealing a contemporary picture of the spread of HIV-1 within and between countries. This approach automatically recovered well-characterized transmission clusters and extended other clusters thought to be contained within a single country across international borders. In addition, previously undescribed transmission clusters were discovered. Together, these clusters represent all known modes of HIV transmission. The extent of international linkage revealed by our comprehensive approach demonstrates the need to consider the global diversity of HIV, even when describing local epidemics. Finally, the speed of this method allows for near-real-time surveillance of the pandemic's progression. PMID:24151309

  9. HIV/AIDS, Undernutrition and Food Insecurity

    PubMed Central

    Ivers, Louise C; Cullen, Kimberly A; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Block, Steven; Coates, Jennifer; Webb, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Despite tremendous advances in HIV care and increased funding for treatment, morbidity and mortality from HIV/AIDS in developing countries remains unacceptably high. A major contributing factor is that globally over 800 million people remain chronically undernourished and the HIV epidemic largely overlaps with populations already suffering from low diet quality and quantity. We present an updated review of the relationship between HIV, nutritional deficiencies and food insecurity, and consider efforts to interrupt this cycle at a programmatic level. As HIV infection progresses, it causes a catabolic state and increased susceptibility to infection which are compounded by lack of caloric and other nutrient intake, leading to progressive worsening of malnutrition. Despite calls from national and international organizations to integrate HIV and nutrition programs, data are lacking on how such programs can be effectively implemented in resource-poor settings, on the optimum content and duration of nutrition support and on ideal target recipients. PMID:19725790

  10. How Uganda Reversed Its HIV Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Okware, Sam; Naamara, Warren; Sutherland, Don; Flanagan, Donna; Carael, Michel; Blas, Erik; Delay, Paul; Tarantola, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Uganda is one of only two countries in the world that has successfully reversed the course of its HIV epidemic. There remains much controversy about how Uganda's HIV prevalence declined in the 1990s. This article describes the prevention programs and activities that were implemented in Uganda during critical years in its HIV epidemic, 1987 to 1994. Multiple resources were aggregated to fuel HV prevention campaigns at multiple levels to a far greater degree than in neighboring countries. We conclude that the reversed direction of the HIV epidemic in Uganda was the direct result of these interventions and that other countries in the developing world could similarly prevent or reverse the escalation of HIV epidemics with greater availability of HIV prevention resources, and well designed programs that take efforts to a critical breadth and depth of effort. PMID:16858635

  11. Human Microbiome and HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yihong; Yang, Liying; Pei, Zhiheng; Poles, Michael; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of the human microbiome continues to grow rapidly; however, reports on changes in the microbiome after HIV infection are still limited. This review surveys the progress made in methodology associated with microbiome studies and highlights the remaining challenges to this field. Studies have shown that commensal oral, gut, vaginal, and penile bacteria are vital to the health of the human immune system. Our studies on crosstalk among oral and gastrointestinal soluble innate factors, HIV, and microbes indicated that the oral and gut microbiome was altered in the HIV-positive samples compared to the negative controls. The importance of understanding the bacterial component of HIV/AIDS, and likelihood of “crosstalk” between viral and bacterial pathogens, will help in understanding the role of the microbiome in HIV-infected individuals and facilitate identification of novel antiretroviral factors for use as novel diagnostics, microbicides, or therapeutics against HIV infection. PMID:22193889

  12. Benefits and costs of HIV testing.

    PubMed

    Bloom, D E; Glied, S

    1991-06-28

    The benefits and costs of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing in employment settings are examined from two points of view: that of private employers whose profitability may be affected by their testing policies and that of public policy-makers who may affect social welfare through their design of regulations related to HIV testing. The results reveal that HIV testing is clearly not cost-beneficial for most firms, although the benefits of HIV testing may outweigh the costs for some large firms that offer generous fringe-benefit packages and that recruit workers from populations in which the prevalence of HIV infection is high. The analysis also indicates that the testing decisions of unregulated employers are not likely to yield socially optimal economic outcomes and that existing state and federal legislation related to HIV testing in employment settings has been motivated primarily by concerns over social equity. PMID:1829547

  13. Peer effects in learning HIV results☆

    PubMed Central

    Godlonton, Susan; Thornton, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    How do neighbors positively or negatively influence individuals living in rural Malawi to learn their HIV results? Using data of location of homes and distance to neighbors, we measure the social network effects of neighbors’ learning their HIV results on individuals own learning. Using the fact that neighbors were randomly offered monetary incentives of varying amounts to learn their HIV results, we find positive effects of neighbors attending clinics on others living nearby: a 10 percentage point increase of the percentage of neighbors (approximately 2.4 individuals) learning their HIV results increases the probability of learning HIV results by 1.1 percentage points. The strongest network effects are among closest neighbors; we find no effect among religious social networks. We also find a negative interaction between direct cash incentives and peers: the effect of peers doubles among those who were not offered any individual financial incentive to learn their HIV results. PMID:22081739

  14. Strategies for universalistic and targeted HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, D C; Padian, N

    1997-10-01

    The controversy over "targeted" versus "universalistic" programs for HIV prevention has persisted throughout the history of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States and in some European countries. Building on previous analyses, we outline methods for integrating universalistic and targeted HIV prevention programming. The outline considers possible synergy between targeted and universalistic programs, rather than a forced choice between the two. Components within this framework include a continuum of the intensity of targeted programs, specification of local risk behavior populations, categories of risk behavior, and HIV seroprevalence within local risk-behavior populations. Given the scarce resources currently available, preventing all new HIV infections is not a realistic public health goal, but with better use of current scientific knowledge, it should be possible to greatly reduce the rate of new HIV infections. PMID:9358108

  15. Frequency of HIV Screening in the Veterans Health Administration: Implications for Early Diagnosis of HIV Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdiserri, Ronald O.; Rodriguez, Fred; Holodniy, Mark

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the frequency of HIV testing across the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the largest provider of HIV care in the United States. An electronic survey was used to determine the volume and location of HIV screening, confirmatory testing, rapid testing and laboratory consent policies in VA medical centers between October 1, 2005, and…

  16. Discriminatory capacity between HIV-1 and HIV-2 of the new rapid confirmation assay Geenius.

    PubMed

    Herssens, Natacha; Beelaert, Greet; Fransen, Katrien

    2014-11-01

    The currently used HIV confirmatory assays, Western blot and line immunoassay, are costly, complex and time-consuming. There is a need for cheaper, simpler and faster assays for use in high- and low-resource settings. Furthermore, it is necessary to differentiate between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection due to differences in disease progression, monitoring and treatment options. Because the new Geenius HIV 1/2 Confirmatory Assay (Bio-Rad) has a European Community (CE) label, this study focused on its differentiation capacity using serum/plasma specimens from established HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV untypable infections from the AIDS Reference Laboratory (ARL) of the Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM) in Belgium. The results were compared with ARL's standard algorithm for diagnosis of HIV-infection and the new interpretation criteria for discrimination of the INNO-LIA HIVI/II Score, Fujirebio, Ghent, Belgium (LIA). The study showed a performance comparable to that of the reference LIA, with an overall sensitivity of 99.3% and specificity of 98%. Differentiation capacity was much better for the Geenius assay, with 93.8% of samples identified correctly as HIV-1 or HIV-2. When the new interpretation criteria for the LIA were used, the differentiation capacity of LIA increased to 98.5%. The results show that the Geenius assay is a reliable and fast alternative for the confirmation and differentiation of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection in resource-rich and poor settings.

  17. Antiretroviral therapy for prevention of HIV transmission in HIV-discordant couples.

    PubMed

    Anglemyer, Andrew; Horvath, Tara; Rutherford, George

    2013-10-16

    CLINICAL QUESTION Does treating the HIV-infected partner in a serodiscordant couple reduce the risk of HIV transmission to the uninfected partner? BOTTOM LINE Compared with serodiscordant couples without treatment, couples in which the infected partner is treated with antiretroviral therapy have a lower risk of HIV transmission.

  18. Ending the Global HIV/AIDS Pandemic: The Critical Role of an HIV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Fauci, Anthony S.; Folkers, Gregory K.; Marston, Hilary D.

    2014-01-01

    While the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS pandemic continues, the incidence of HIV infections has fallen because of the deployment of antiretroviral drugs and multiple prevention modalities. To achieve a durable end to the pandemic, a vaccine remains essential. Recent advances in vaccinology offer new promise for an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:25151483

  19. AIDS Knowledge and HIV Stigma among Children Affected by HIV/AIDS in Rural China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lin, Xiuyun; Stanton, Bonita

    2011-01-01

    The current study was designed to assess the level of AIDS knowledge and its relationship with personal stigma toward people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) among children living in communities of high HIV prevalence in rural China. The data were collected in 2009 from 118 orphanage orphans (children who had lost both of their parents to HIV and…

  20. Intraindividual Variability in HIV Infection: Evidence for Greater Neurocognitive Dispersion in Older HIV Seropositive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Erin E.; Woods, Steven Paul; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Bondi, Mark W.; Grant, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Objective Both the prevalence and incidence of HIV infection among older adults are on the rise. Older adults are at increased risk of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, which has historically been characterized as an inconsistent or “spotty” pattern of deficits. Dispersion is a form of intraindividual variability (IIV) that is defined as within-person variability in performance across domains and has been associated with poorer neurocognitive functioning and incipient decline among healthy older adults. To our knowledge, no studies have yet examined dispersion in an aging HIV-infected sample. Methods For the current study we examined the hypothesis that age and HIV infection have synergistic effects on dispersion across a battery of clinical and experimental cognitive tasks. Our well-characterized sample comprised 126 HIV-seropositive individuals (HIV+) and 40 HIV-seronegative comparison individuals (HIV−), all of whom were administered a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Results Consistent with our hypothesis, an age by HIV serostatus interaction was observed, with the older HIV+ group demonstrating a higher level of dispersion relative to older HIV− and younger HIV+ individuals, even when potentially confounding demographic and medical factors were controlled. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that older HIV+ adults produce greater dispersion, or intraindividual variability in performance across a range of tests, which may be reflective of cognitive dyscontrol to which this population is vulnerable, perhaps driven by the combined effects of aging and HIV infection on prefrontostriatal systems. PMID:21574712

  1. HIV/AIDS Case Managers and Client HIV Status Disclosure: Perceived Client Needs, Practices, and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Klein, Susan J.; Kalichman, Moira O.; O'Connell, Daniel A.; Freedman, Jay A.; Eaton, Lisa; Cain, Demetria

    2007-01-01

    People living with HIV/AIDS often need assistance in deciding whether or how to disclose their HIV status to others, and case managers are in a unique position to offer this assistance. The current study surveyed 223 case managers providing services to people living with HIV/AIDS in New York State. The survey was conducted anonymously, and case…

  2. Group Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Rompa, David; Cage, Marjorie

    2005-01-01

    Results of a randomized controlled trial show that a behavioral intervention grounded in social cognitive theory reduces unprotected sexual behaviors among men and women living with HIV infection, with the greatest reductions in HIV transmission risk behaviors occurring with non-HIV-positive sex partners. In this article, the authors describe the…

  3. HIV Infection in the Elderly: Arising Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Globally there is an increase in the number of people living with HIV at an advanced age (50 years and above). This is mainly due to prolonged survival following the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Living with HIV at an advanced age has been shown to be associated with a number of challenges, both clinical and immunological. This minireview aims at discussing the challenges encountered by elderly HIV-infected patients. PMID:27595022

  4. Transmission of HIV in dialysis centre.

    PubMed

    Velandia, M; Fridkin, S K; Cárdenas, V; Boshell, J; Ramirez, G; Bland, L; Iglesias, A; Jarvis, W

    1995-06-01

    In August, 1993, 13 dialysis patients at one dialysis centre in Colombia, South America, were found to be HIV positive, and this prompted an epidemiological investigation. We carried out a cohort study of all dialysis centre patients during January, 1992 to December, 1993 (epidemic period) to determine risk factors for HIV seroconversion. Haemodialysis and medical records were reviewed, dialysis centre staff and surviving patients were interviewed, and dialysis practices were observed. Stored sera from all dialysis centre patients were tested for HIV antibody. 12 (52%) of 23 patients tested positive for HIV antibody by enzyme immunoassay and western blot during the epidemic period. Of the 23 tested, 9 (39%) converted from HIV antibody negative to positive (seroconverters) and 10 (44%) remained HIV negative (seronegatives). The HIV seroconversion rate was higher among patients dialysed at the centre while a new patient, who was HIV seropositive, was dialysed there (90% vs 0%; p < 0.01), or when the dialysis centre reprocessed access needles, dialysers, and bloodlines (60% vs 0%). While 2 of 9 HIV seroconverters had had sex with prostitutes, none had received unscreened blood products or had other HIV risk factors. No surgical or dental procedures were associated with HIV seroconversion. Dialysers were reprocessed separately with 5% formaldehyde and were labelled for use on the same patient. Access needles were reprocessed by soaking them in a common container with a low-level disinfectant, benzalkonium chloride; 4 pairs of needles were placed in one pan creating the potential for cross-contamination or use of one patient's needles on another patient. HIV transmission at the dialysis centre was confirmed. Improperly reprocessed patient-care equipment, most probably access needles, is the likely mechanism of transmission. This outbreak was discovered by accident and similar transmission may be occurring in many other countries where low-level disinfectants are used to

  5. HIV Infection in the Elderly: Arising Challenges.

    PubMed

    Mpondo, Bonaventura C T

    2016-01-01

    Globally there is an increase in the number of people living with HIV at an advanced age (50 years and above). This is mainly due to prolonged survival following the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Living with HIV at an advanced age has been shown to be associated with a number of challenges, both clinical and immunological. This minireview aims at discussing the challenges encountered by elderly HIV-infected patients. PMID:27595022

  6. Should the threat of HIV affect breastfeeding?

    PubMed

    Finger, W R

    1992-10-01

    About 33% of infants born to HIV positive women acquire HIV. Since breast milk has disease-protecting antibodies and diluting infant formula with unsafe water poses sizable health hazards, it is difficult for countries to set sound policy on breast feeding and for health workers to counsel HIV infected mothers and those at high risk of HIV infection. In 1985, US and UK public health officials advised HIV infected mothers to bottle feed. They eventually amended their position by claiming the guidelines only applied to the US and the UK where safe water is exists. WHO recommends that the only HIV infected women who should use a breast milk substitute are those in countries where infectious diseases are not the leading causes of infant death or those in countries with widespread malnutrition and infectious diseases which do cause infant death, but whose conditions would allow an appropriate alternative. In Rwanda, a study on HIV transmission via breast milk shows infants seroconvert during the same month as do the mothers. So the researchers advise mothers at high risk for seroconversion to not breast feed; yet all women in Rwanda are at high risk. In Haiti, where all women are also at such risk and have no breast milk substitutes, the HIV transmission rate among breast fed infants is 25%, equalling that of non breast fed infants in the US and Europe. A European and Australian study also reveals a higher risk of HIV transmission via breast milk in mothers who acquired HIV postpartum than in those who acquired it prenatally. Some research shows that 24% of the colostrum of HIV infected mothers has P24 antigen, while there is no P24 antigen in 4-day postpartum breast milk. Policymakers should develop an algorithm for health providers to use to advise mothers about the relative benefits and risks of breast feeding concerning HIV transmission. PMID:12286077

  7. Envelope gene evolution and HIV-1 neuropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Santiago, Fabián J.; Rivera-Amill, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    In the era of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) account for 40 to 56% of all HIV+ cases. During the acute stage of HIV-1 infection (<6 months), the virus invades and replicates within the central nervous system (CNS). Compared to peripheral tissues, the local CNS cell population expresses distinct levels of chemokine receptors, which levels exert selective pressure on the invading virus. HIV-1 envelope (env) sequences recovered from the brains and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of neurocognitively impaired HIV+ subjects often display higher nucleotide variability as compared to non-impaired HIV+ subjects. Specifically, env evolution provides HIV-1 with the strategies to evade host immune response, to reduce chemokine receptor dependence, to increase co-receptor binding efficiency, and to potentiate neurotoxicity. The evolution of env within the CNS leads to changes that may result in the emergence of novel isolates with neurotoxic and neurovirulent features. However, whether specific factors of HIV-1 evolution lead to the emergence of neurovirulent and neurotropic isolates remains ill-defined. HIV-1 env evolution is an ongoing phenomenon that occurs independently of neurological and neurocognitive disease severity; thus HIV env evolution may play a pivotal and reciprocal role in the etiology of HAND. Despite the use of cART, the reactivation of latent viral reservoirs represents a clinical challenge because of the replenishment of the viral pool that may subsequently lead to persistent infection. Therefore, gaining a more complete understanding of how HIV-1 env evolves over the course of the disease should be considered for the development of future therapies aimed at controlling CNS burden, diminishing persistent viremia, and eradicating viral reservoirs. Here we review the current literature on the role of HIV-1 env evolution in the setting of HAND disease progression and on the impact of cART on the dynamics of

  8. Macrophages and HIV-1: An Unhealthy Constellation.

    PubMed

    Sattentau, Quentin J; Stevenson, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Lentiviruses have a long-documented association with macrophages. Abundant evidence exists for in vitro and, in a tissue-specific manner, in vivo infection of macrophages by the primate lentiviruses HIV-1 and SIV. However, macrophage contribution to aspects of HIV-1 and SIV pathogenesis, and their role in viral persistence in individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy, remains unclear. Here we discuss recent evidence implicating macrophages in HIV-1-mediated disease and highlight directions for further investigation.

  9. Neuromuscular Diseases Associated with HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Robinson-Papp, Jessica; Simpson, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are common in HIV, occurring at all stages of disease and affecting all parts of the peripheral nervous system. These disorders have diverse etiologies including HIV itself, immune suppression and dysregulation, co-morbid illnesses and infections, and side effects of medications. In this article, we review the following HIV-associated conditions: distal symmetric polyneuropathy, inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, mononeuropathy multiplex, autonomic neuropathy, progressive polyradiculopathy due to cytomegalovirus, herpes zoster, myopathy and other rarer disorders. PMID:19771594

  10. Third phase of HIV decay measured.

    PubMed

    Bartnof, H S

    1997-09-01

    The concept of viral eradication has been seriously discussed since the advent of protease inhibitor therapy. Understanding the reservoirs of HIV in the body and the phases of replication and decay have been the subjects of ongoing research. A hypothetical third phase of HIV decay was recently measured at Johns Hopkins, and the half-life of HIV was estimated at 5.7 months. This measurement, based on CD4 cells, may be used to manage total treatment time until viral eradication. The estimated times will likely only be valid for those who started anti-HIV treatments soon after infection.

  11. [Is it possible to cure HIV infection?].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Carolina; Madrid, Nadia P; Moreno, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved the life expectancy in HIV-infected people, but it cannot cure the disease by itself. Several barriers have been identified for the cure of HIV infection, including a reservoir of latently infected cells, persistent viral replication in tissues, and anatomical sanctuaries. The main strategy proposed for the cure of HIV consists on the administration of drugs that, through the reactivation of latent HIV, would eliminate the cell reservoir. Ongoing clinical trials have shown the proof of concept, but the efficacy of these drugs in decreasing the reservoir size has not been proved so far.

  12. eHealth interventions for HIV prevention

    PubMed Central

    Noar, Seth M.; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly changing media landscape and proliferation of new technologies creates vast new opportunities for HIV prevention. The fast growth of the relatively new eHealth field is a testament to the excitement and promise of these new technologies. eHealth interventions in HIV prevention tested to date include computer- and Internet-based interventions; chat room interventions; text messaging interventions; and social media. The current article provides a brief review of these types of interventions in HIV prevention, including their unique advantages and evidence of efficacy. Implications for future research in the eHealth HIV prevention field are discussed. PMID:22519523

  13. [Is it possible to cure HIV infection?].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Carolina; Madrid, Nadia P; Moreno, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved the life expectancy in HIV-infected people, but it cannot cure the disease by itself. Several barriers have been identified for the cure of HIV infection, including a reservoir of latently infected cells, persistent viral replication in tissues, and anatomical sanctuaries. The main strategy proposed for the cure of HIV consists on the administration of drugs that, through the reactivation of latent HIV, would eliminate the cell reservoir. Ongoing clinical trials have shown the proof of concept, but the efficacy of these drugs in decreasing the reservoir size has not been proved so far. PMID:26365737

  14. HIV infection in females dependent on drugs.

    PubMed

    Wai, B H; Singh, S; Varma, S L

    1996-03-01

    One hundred and seventy-one drug-dependent females in a drug rehabilitation centre were studied to estimate the prevalence of HIV infection among them. Twenty-four (14%) were positive on the Western Blot test. The presence of HIV infection was significantly correlated with syphilis (p < 0.03) and age (p < 0.001); 83% of those who were HIV positive were intravenous drug users. The need for harm reduction programmes to prevent spread of HIV infection among injecting drug users is stressed. PMID:8867206

  15. Drawing conceptual linkages: property rights and HIV.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Priya

    2008-12-01

    An understanding of the impact of HIV/AIDS epidemic on broader social development necessitates a closer scrutiny of the relationship between HIV/AIDS and economic productivity. In this article, which is based on her presentation at a concurrent session at the conference, Priya Nanda describes the relationship between the widespread exclusion in developing countries of land ownership by women and their vulnerability to HIV and the effects of HIV. The author calls for more research on the complexity and diversity of land tenure systems and property laws.

  16. Sexual health for people living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Kathy; Ray, Sunanda

    2007-05-01

    Sexual health is defined in terms of well-being, but is challenged by the social, cultural and economic realities faced by women and men with HIV. A sexual rights approach puts women and men with HIV in charge of their sexual health. Accurate, accessible information to make informed choices and safe, pleasurable sexual relationships possible is best delivered through peer education and health professionals trained in empathetic approaches to sensitive issues. Young people with HIV especially need appropriate sex education and support for dealing with sexuality and self-identity with HIV. Women and men with HIV need condoms, appropriate services for sexually transmitted infections, sexual dysfunction and management of cervical and anogenital cancers. Interventions based on positive prevention, that combine protection of personal health with avoiding HIV/STI transmission to partners, are recommended. HIV counselling following a positive test has increased condom use and decreased coercive sex and outside sexual contacts among discordant couples. HIV treatment and care have reduced stigma and increased uptake of HIV testing and disclosure of positive status to partners. High adherence to antiretroviral therapy and safer sexual behaviour must go hand-in-hand. Sexual health services have worked with peer educators and volunteer groups to reach those at higher risk, such as sex workers. Technological advances in diagnosis of STIs, microbicide development and screening and vaccination for human papillomavirus must be available in developing countries and for those with the highest need globally.

  17. HIV infection and the gastrointestinal immune system

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, JM; Douek, DC

    2009-01-01

    There has recently been a resurgence of interest in the gastrointestinal pathology observed in patients infected with HIV. The gastrointestinal tract is a major site of HIV replication, which results in massive depletion of lamina propria CD4 T cells during acute infection. Highly active antiretroviral therapy leads to incomplete suppression of viral replication and substantially delayed and only partial restoration of gastrointestinal CD4 T cells. The gastrointestinal pathology associated with HIV infection comprises significant enteropathy with increased levels of inflammation and decreased levels of mucosal repair and regeneration. Assessment of gut mucosal immune system has provided novel directions for therapeutic interventions that modify the consequences of acute HIV infection. PMID:19079157

  18. Cancer prevention in HIV-infected populations.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Priscila H; Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo M; Yarchoan, Robert; Uldrick, Thomas S

    2016-02-01

    People living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer since the advent of effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). While cART substantially decreases the risk of developing some cancers, HIV-infected individuals remain at high risk for Kaposi sarcoma, lymphoma, and several solid tumors. Currently HIV-infected patients represent an aging group, and malignancies have become a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Tailored cancer-prevention strategies are needed for this population. In this review we describe the etiologic agents and pathogenesis of common malignancies in the setting of HIV, as well as current evidence for cancer prevention strategies and screening programs. PMID:26970136

  19. Antibodies for HIV Prevention in young women

    PubMed Central

    Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Baxter, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Young women in sub-Saharan Africa bear a disproportionate HIV burden. They urgently require new HIV prevention approaches that women can use. This review provides an overview of the use of antiretrovirals for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), highlighting some of the challenges with this technology and explores the potential role of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for HIV prevention in women. Recent findings Recent findings on the initial steps in viral entry and establishment of a productive local infectious nidus in the vaginal epithelium has provided important clues for HIV prevention in the female genital tract. Topical and oral formulations of antiretroviral drugs have been shown to prevent HIV infection in women with varying levels of success, depending principally on adherence. Further, a number of new broad and potent mAbs have been isolated over the last 5 years. Non-human primate studies demonstrate that broadly neutralizing HIV mAbs can protect rhesus macaques from SHIV infection. These findings have created newfound enthusiasm for passive immunization as a potential prevention strategy for women. Summary If potent broadly neutralising mAbs are effective in preventing HIV infection in women, it could fill an important gap in HIV prevention technologies for young women, especially in Africa. PMID:25700207

  20. Relationship characteristics and HIV transmission risk in same-sex male couples in HIV serodiscordant relationships.

    PubMed

    Starks, Tyrel J; Gamarel, Kristi E; Johnson, Mallory O

    2014-01-01

    Unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) remains a main risk factor for HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) and this is of particular concern for partners of HIV serodiscordant status. However, HIV transmission risk has been demonstrated to vary by the sexual position adopted among partners. Guided by interdependence theory, this study examined how relational factors were differentially associated with risk taking (HIV-positive/insertive and HIV-negative/receptive) and strategic positioning (HIV-positive/receptive and HIV-negative/insertive) UAI within serodiscordant same-sex male couples. HIV-positive men and their HIV-negative partners (n couples = 91; n individuals = 182) simultaneously but independently completed computerized questionnaires and HIV-positive men had blood drawn for viral load. A minority of couples (30 %) engaged in risk taking and/or strategic positioning unprotected anal sex. Results of multinomial logistic regression indicated that HIV-negative partners' levels of relationship commitment were positively associated with the odds of engaging in strategic positioning sexual behaviors. For HIV-negative partners, reports of relationship intimacy, and sexual satisfaction were negatively associated with odds of reporting risk taking behavior. In contrast, HIV-positive partners' reported sexual satisfaction was positively associated with odds of engaging in risk taking behavior. Findings suggested that aspects of relational quality may be differentially associated with sexual decision making for same-sex male couples in serodiscordant relationships. Study findings lend support for the incorporation of discussions of HIV risk reduction strategies, enhancing communication between partners, and support for general relationship functioning in HIV care.

  1. Macro-level Implicit HIV Prejudice and the Health of Community Residents with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Carol T.; Varni, Susan E.; Solomon, Sondra E.; DeSarno, Michael J.; Bunn, Janice Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examined how community levels of implicit HIV prejudice are associated with the psychological and physical well-being of people with HIV living in those same communities. It also examined whether community motivation to control prejudice and/or explicit HIV prejudice moderates the relationship of implicit prejudice and well-being. Methods Participants were 206 people with HIV living in 42 different communities in New England who completed measures that assessed psychological distress, thriving, and physical well-being. Telephone surveys of 347 residents of these same communities (selected via random digit dialing) were used to assess community explicit HIV prejudice and motivation to control HIV prejudice. These community residents then completed an on-line measure of implicit prejudice toward people with HIV, the Implicit Association Test (IAT, Greenwald et al., 1998). Results Multilevel analyses showed that higher community implicit HIV prejudice was associated with greater psychological distress among residents with HIV living in that community. The physical well-being of participants with HIV was negatively related to community implicit HIV prejudice in communities in which residents were unmotivated to control HIV prejudice or had high levels of explicit HIV prejudice. Conclusions These findings indicate that implicit prejudice of residents of real-world communities may create an environment that may impair the well-being of stigmatized people. Implicit prejudice can therefore be considered an element of macro-level or structural stigma. The discussion considered the possible role of implicit HIV prejudice on a community’s social capital as one pathway by which it compromises the well-being of residents with HIV. PMID:27505199

  2. Long-Range HIV Genotyping Using Viral RNA and Proviral DNA for Analysis of HIV Drug Resistance and HIV Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Novitsky, Vlad; Zahralban-Steele, Melissa; McLane, Mary Fran; Moyo, Sikhulile; van Widenfelt, Erik; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Makhema, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study was to improve the methodology of HIV genotyping for analysis of HIV drug resistance and HIV clustering. Using the protocol of Gall et al. (A. Gall, B. Ferns, C. Morris, S. Watson, M. Cotten, M. Robinson, N. Berry, D. Pillay, and P. Kellam, J Clin Microbiol 50:3838–3844, 2012, doi:10.1128/JCM.01516-12), we developed a robust methodology for amplification of two large fragments of viral genome covering about 80% of the unique HIV-1 genome sequence. Importantly, this method can be applied to both viral RNA and proviral DNA amplification templates, allowing genotyping in HIV-infected subjects with suppressed viral loads (e.g., subjects on antiretroviral therapy [ART]). The two amplicons cover critical regions across the HIV-1 genome (including pol and env), allowing analysis of mutations associated with resistance to protease inhibitors, reverse transcriptase inhibitors (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors [NRTIs] and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors [NNRTIs]), integrase strand transfer inhibitors, and virus entry inhibitors. The two amplicons generated span 7,124 bp, providing substantial sequence length and numbers of informative sites for comprehensive phylogenic analysis and greater refinement of viral linkage analyses in HIV prevention studies. The long-range HIV genotyping from proviral DNA was successful in about 90% of 212 targeted blood specimens collected in a cohort where the majority of patients had suppressed viral loads, including 65% of patients with undetectable levels of HIV-1 RNA loads. The generated amplicons could be sequenced by different methods, such as population Sanger sequencing, single-genome sequencing, or next-generation ultradeep sequencing. The developed method is cost-effective—the cost of the long-range HIV genotyping is under $140 per subject (by Sanger sequencing)—and has the potential to enable the scale up of public health HIV prevention interventions. PMID:26041893

  3. Long-Range HIV Genotyping Using Viral RNA and Proviral DNA for Analysis of HIV Drug Resistance and HIV Clustering.

    PubMed

    Novitsky, Vlad; Zahralban-Steele, Melissa; McLane, Mary Fran; Moyo, Sikhulile; van Widenfelt, Erik; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, M

    2015-08-01

    The goal of the study was to improve the methodology of HIV genotyping for analysis of HIV drug resistance and HIV clustering. Using the protocol of Gall et al. (A. Gall, B. Ferns, C. Morris, S. Watson, M. Cotten, M. Robinson, N. Berry, D. Pillay, and P. Kellam, J Clin Microbiol 50:3838-3844, 2012, doi:10.1128/JCM.01516-12), we developed a robust methodology for amplification of two large fragments of viral genome covering about 80% of the unique HIV-1 genome sequence. Importantly, this method can be applied to both viral RNA and proviral DNA amplification templates, allowing genotyping in HIV-infected subjects with suppressed viral loads (e.g., subjects on antiretroviral therapy [ART]). The two amplicons cover critical regions across the HIV-1 genome (including pol and env), allowing analysis of mutations associated with resistance to protease inhibitors, reverse transcriptase inhibitors (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors [NRTIs] and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors [NNRTIs]), integrase strand transfer inhibitors, and virus entry inhibitors. The two amplicons generated span 7,124 bp, providing substantial sequence length and numbers of informative sites for comprehensive phylogenic analysis and greater refinement of viral linkage analyses in HIV prevention studies. The long-range HIV genotyping from proviral DNA was successful in about 90% of 212 targeted blood specimens collected in a cohort where the majority of patients had suppressed viral loads, including 65% of patients with undetectable levels of HIV-1 RNA loads. The generated amplicons could be sequenced by different methods, such as population Sanger sequencing, single-genome sequencing, or next-generation ultradeep sequencing. The developed method is cost-effective-the cost of the long-range HIV genotyping is under $140 per subject (by Sanger sequencing)-and has the potential to enable the scale up of public health HIV prevention interventions. PMID:26041893

  4. Renal transplantation between HIV-positive donors and recipients justified.

    PubMed

    Muller, Elmi; Barday, Zunaid; Mendelson, Marc; Kahn, Delawir

    2012-03-02

    HIV infection was previously an absolute contraindication to renal transplantation. However, with the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), renal transplantation using HIV-negative donor kidneys has successfully been employed for HIV-infected patients with end-stage renal failure. In resource-limited countries, places on dialysis programmes are severely restricted; HIV-infected patients, like many others with co-morbidity, are often denied treatment. Kidneys (and other organs) from HIV-infected deceased donors are discarded. The transplantation of HIV-positive donor kidneys to HIV-infected recipients is now a viable alternative to chronic dialysis or transplantation of HIV-negative donor kidneys. This significantly increases the pool of donor kidneys to the advantage of HIV-positive and -negative patients. Arguments are presented that led to our initiation of renal transplantation from HIV-positive deceased donors to HIV-positive recipients at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town.

  5. GACPAT HIV 1 + 2: a simple, inexpensive assay to screen for, and discriminate between, anti-HIV 1 and anti-HIV 2.

    PubMed

    Parry, J V; Connell, J A; Reinbott, P; Garcia, A B; Avillez, F; Mortimer, P P

    1995-01-01

    A simple and cheap assay suitable for screening for anti-HIV 1 and anti-HIV 2 and discriminating between them was evaluated. In it specimens are incubated in U-bottomed microplate wells coated with anti-human IgG for 30 min at room temperature. After washing, 100 microliters of a 1 in 50 dilution of HIV 1-coated gelatin particles (Serodia-HIV 1/2, Fujirebio) are added. Settling patterns are read on the second day: A positive reaction is indicated by adherence of the particles and a negative by a button. The HIV 1 particles are then washed away and HIV 2 particles added. Anti-HIV 2 reaction patterns are read on the third day. To assess the performance of the modified "GACPAT HIV 1 + 2" assay a panel of 1,621 serum/plasma specimens was used. It comprised validated anti-HIV 1 positive (n = 220), anti-HIV 2 positive (n = 214), dual anti-HIV 1/anti-HIV 2 positive (n = 11), and anti-HIV negative (n = 1,176) serum/plasma specimens. All 434 specimens that contained anti-HIV 1 or anti-HIV 2 reacted positively with the homologous particles. The 11 dually positive specimens reacted positively with both HIV 1 and HIV 2 particles. Five (2.3%) anti-HIV 1 and five (2.3%) anti-HIV 2 positive specimens gave positive reactions with both particle types, but none of the five cross-reactive anti-HIV 2 specimens were dually reactive when the order of particle addition was reversed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders: The Relationship of HIV Infection with Physical and Social Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Tedaldi, Ellen M.; Minniti, Nancy L.; Fischer, Tracy

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) will undoubtedly increase with the improved longevity of HIV-infected persons. HIV infection, itself, as well as multiple physiologic and psychosocial factors can contribute to cognitive impairment and neurologic complications. These comorbidities confound the diagnosis, assessment, and interventions for neurocognitive disorders. In this review, we discuss the role of several key comorbid factors that may contribute significantly to the development and progression of HIV-related neurocognitive impairment, as well as the current status of diagnostic strategies aimed at identifying HIV-infected individuals with impaired cognition and future research priorities and challenges. PMID:25815329

  7. Disentangling reactions to HIV disclosure: effects of HIV status, sexual orientation, and disclosure recipients' gender.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stacie; Derlega, Valerian J; Woody, Alex; Lewis, Robin; Braitman, Abby L; Barbee, Anita; Winstead, Barbara A

    2014-02-01

    This experiment examined how reactions to HIV disclosure by a male stimulus person are influenced by the discloser's HIV status and sexual orientation as well as the disclosure recipient's gender. Participants (152 male and female college students) disclosed more intimately about themselves (revealing highly personal facts and personal feelings) when the man's HIV test result was positive versus negative. The effects of HIV status disclosure on participants' self-disclosure and social support were also moderated by the man's sexual orientation and participants' gender. The results document circumstances when HIV disclosure may lead to positive reactions instead of avoidance and exclusion.

  8. [Analysis of genetic recombination between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2].

    PubMed

    Motomura, Kazushi

    2009-03-01

    It is estimated that one million people are dually infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-I (HIV-1) and type-II (HIV-2) in West Africa and parts of India. HIV-1 and HIV-2 use the same receptor and coreceptors for entry into cells, and thus target the same cell populations in the host. Additionally, we first examined whether RNAs from HIV-1 and HIV-2 can be copackaged into the same virion. Therefore these properties suggest that in the dually infected population, it is likely that some cells can be infected by both HIV-1 and HIV-2, thereby providing opportunities for these two viruses to interact with each other. We constructed recombination assay system for measurement recombination frequencies and analyzed recombination rate between HIV-1 and HIV-2. We used modified near-full-length viruses that each contained a green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) with a different inactivating mutation. Thus, a functional gfp could be reconstituted via recombination, which was used to detect copackaging of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RNAs. In this study, approximately 0.2% of infection events generated the GFP phenotype. Therefore, the appearance of the GFP+ phenotype in the current system is approximately 35-fold lower than that between two homologous HIV-1 or HIV-2 viruses. We then mapped the general structures of the recombinant viruses and characterized the recombination junctions by DNA sequencing. We observed several different recombination patterns including those only had crossovers in gfp. The most common hybrid genomes had heterologous LTRs. Although infrequent, crossovers were also identified in the viral sequences. Such chimeric HIV-1 and HIV-2 viruses have yet to be observed in the infected population. It is unclear whether the lack of observed chimeras is due to the divergence between HIV-1 and HIV-2 being too great for such an event to occur, or whether such events could occur but have not yet been observed. Given the number of coinfected people, the potential for

  9. Towards smarter HIV laws: considerations for improving HIV-specific legislation in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Eba, Patrick Michael

    2016-05-01

    As of 31 July 2014, some 27 countries in sub-Saharan Africa had adopted HIV-specific legislation to respond to the legal challenges posed by the HIV epidemic. However, serious concerns raised about these laws have led to calls for their repeal and review. Through the theory of "smarter legislation", this article develops a framework for analysing the concerns relating to the process, content and implementation of HIV-specific laws. This theoretical framework provides specific guidance and considerations for reforming HIV-specific laws and for ensuring that they achieve their goals of creating enabling legal environments for the HIV response. PMID:27578351

  10. Stakeholder Engagement in HIV Cure Research: Lessons Learned from Other HIV Interventions and the Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ying-Ru; Chu, Carissa; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Excler, Jean-Louis; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-07-01

    Clinical and basic science advances have raised considerable hope for achieving an HIV cure by accelerating research. This research is dominated primarily by issues about the nature and design of current and future clinical trials. Stakeholder engagement for HIV cure remains in its early stages. Our analysis examines timing and mechanisms of historical stakeholder engagement in other HIV research areas for HIV-uninfected individuals [vaccine development and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)], and HIV-infected individuals (treatment as prevention, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and treatment of acute HIV infection) and articulate a plan for HIV cure stakeholder engagement. The experience from HIV vaccine development shows that early engagement of stakeholders helped manage expectations, mitigating the failure of several vaccine trials, while paving the way for subsequent trials. The relatively late engagement of HIV stakeholders in PrEP research may partly explain some of the implementation challenges. The treatment-related stakeholder engagement was strong and community-led from the onset and helped translation from research to implementation. We outline five steps to initiate and sustain stakeholder engagement in HIV cure research and conclude that stakeholder engagement represents a key investment in which stakeholders mutually agree to share knowledge, benefits, and risk of failure. Effective stakeholder engagement prevents misconceptions. As HIV cure research advances from early trials involving subjects with generally favorable prognosis to studies involving greater risk and uncertainty, success may depend on early and deliberate engagement of stakeholders.

  11. HIV Replication at Low Copy Number and its Correlation with the HIV Reservoir: A Clinical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Sarmati, Loredana; D'Ettorre, Gabriella; Parisi, Saverio Giuseppe; Andreoni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of combination therapy (antiretroviral therapy--ARV) is demonstrated by the high rates of viral suppression achieved in most treated HIV patients. Whereas contemporary treatments may continuously suppress HIV replication, they do not eliminate the latent reservoir, which can reactivate HIV infection if ARV is discontinued. The persistence of HIV proviral DNA and infectious viruses in CD4+ T cells and others cells has long been considered a major obstacle in eradicating the HIV virus in treated patients. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated the persistence of HIV replication at low copies in most patients on suppressive ARV. The source of this 'residual viraemia' and whether it declines over years of therapy remain unknown. Similarly, little is known regarding the biological relationships between the HIV reservoir and viral replication at low copies. The question of whether this 'residual viraemia' represents active replication or the release of non-productive virus from the reservoir has not been adequately resolved. From a clinical perspective, both the quantification of the HIV reservoir and the detection of low levels of replication in full-responder patients on prolonged ARV may provide important information regarding the effectiveness of treatment and the eradication of HIV. To date, the monitoring of these two parameters has been conducted only for research purposes; the routine use of standardised tests procedure is lacking. This review aims to assess the current data regarding the correlation between HIV replication at low copies and the HIV reservoir and to provide useful information for clinicians.

  12. Stakeholder Engagement in HIV Cure Research: Lessons Learned from Other HIV Interventions and the Way Forward

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Carissa; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Excler, Jean-Louis; Tucker, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clinical and basic science advances have raised considerable hope for achieving an HIV cure by accelerating research. This research is dominated primarily by issues about the nature and design of current and future clinical trials. Stakeholder engagement for HIV cure remains in its early stages. Our analysis examines timing and mechanisms of historical stakeholder engagement in other HIV research areas for HIV-uninfected individuals [vaccine development and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)], and HIV-infected individuals (treatment as prevention, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and treatment of acute HIV infection) and articulate a plan for HIV cure stakeholder engagement. The experience from HIV vaccine development shows that early engagement of stakeholders helped manage expectations, mitigating the failure of several vaccine trials, while paving the way for subsequent trials. The relatively late engagement of HIV stakeholders in PrEP research may partly explain some of the implementation challenges. The treatment-related stakeholder engagement was strong and community-led from the onset and helped translation from research to implementation. We outline five steps to initiate and sustain stakeholder engagement in HIV cure research and conclude that stakeholder engagement represents a key investment in which stakeholders mutually agree to share knowledge, benefits, and risk of failure. Effective stakeholder engagement prevents misconceptions. As HIV cure research advances from early trials involving subjects with generally favorable prognosis to studies involving greater risk and uncertainty, success may depend on early and deliberate engagement of stakeholders. PMID:26061668

  13. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-HIV Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection of Mucosal Tissue Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Yanille M.; Park, Seo Young

    2015-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nAbs) specific for HIV are being investigated for use in HIV prevention. Due to their ability to inhibit HIV attachment to and entry into target cells, nAbs may be suitable for use as topical HIV microbicides. As such, they would present an alternative intervention for individuals who may not benefit from using antiretroviral-based products for HIV prevention. We theorize that nAbs can inhibit viral transmission through mucosal tissue, thus reducing the incidence of HIV infection. The efficacy of the PG9, PG16, VRC01, and 4E10 antibodies was evaluated in an ex vivo human model of mucosal HIV transmission. nAbs reduced HIV transmission, causing 1.5- to 2-log10 reductions in HIV replication in ectocervical tissues and ≈3-log10 reductions in HIV replication in colonic tissues over 21 days. These antibodies demonstrated greater potency in colonic tissues, with a 50-fold higher dose being required to reduce transmission in ectocervical tissues. Importantly, nAbs retained their potency and reduced viral transmission in the presence of whole semen. No changes in tissue viability or immune activation were observed in colonic or ectocervical tissue after nAb exposure. Our data suggest that topically applied nAbs are safe and effective against HIV infection of mucosal tissue and support further development of nAbs as a topical microbicide that could be used for anal as well as vaginal protection. PMID:26596954

  14. HIV-exposed, uninfected infants: new global challenges in the era of paediatric HIV elimination.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ceri; Jones, Christine E; Prendergast, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The number of infants infected with HIV is declining with the rise in interventions for the elimination of paediatric HIV infection, but the number of uninfected infants exposed to HIV through their HIV-infected mothers is increasing. Interest in the health outcomes of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants has grown in the past decade, with several studies suggesting that these infants have increased mortality rates, increased infectious morbidity, and impaired growth compared with HIV-unexposed infants. However, heterogeneous results might reflect the inherent challenges in studies of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants, which need large populations with appropriate, contemporaneous comparison groups and repeated HIV testing throughout the period of breastfeeding. We review the effects of HIV exposure on mortality, morbidity, and growth, discuss the immunological abnormalities identified so far, and provide an overview of interventions that could be effective in this susceptible population. As the number of infants infected with HIV declines, the health needs of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants should be prioritised further, to ensure that post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals are achieved. PMID:27049574

  15. Preventing sexual transmission of HIV: anti-HIV bioregulatory and homeostatic components of commercial sexual lubricants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D; Lee, H; Poast, J; Cloyd, M W; Baron, S

    2004-01-01

    Certain safe over-the-counter (OTC) sexual lubricants such as Astroglide, KY Liquid, Replens, Vagisil, ViAmor, and Wet Stuff inhibit both cell-free HIV and the production of HIV by infected leukocytes in vitro even in the presence of seminal fluid. To identify which components of the lubricants were active against HIV, we tested five components (glycerin, methylparaben, propylparaben, polyquaternium-32, and propylene glycol). The paraben preservatives and propylene glycol in the lubricants did not inhibit HIV, while the common natural homeostatic metabolite, glycerin, and the thickener polyquaternium-32 did strongly inactivate infectious HIV and HIV-infected leukocytes. Activity against HIV and HIV-infected cells by glycerin was stable through 24 hours at 37 degrees C. Glycerin and polyquaternium-32 were active at minimum concentrations of approximately 2% and 0.01%, respectively--well within the highest FDA safety guidelines. Both active components disrupted infected leukocytes within 5 minutes which resulted in inhibition of infectious HIV production by infected leukocytes of greater than 25 to 100-fold. These components do not disrupt vaginal epithelial cells in vivo. These components also rapidly inactivate cell-free HIV by 10- to 30-fold. Thus, we may conclude that the active components of the OTC lubricants are glycerin and polyquaternium-32. Using these components, OTC sexual lubricants could be reformulated to optimize their anti-HIV activity. Furthermore, clinical trials of these lubricants and components seem to be indicated because of their FDA safety level, wide availability, and low cost.

  16. Stakeholder Engagement in HIV Cure Research: Lessons Learned from Other HIV Interventions and the Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ying-Ru; Chu, Carissa; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Excler, Jean-Louis; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-07-01

    Clinical and basic science advances have raised considerable hope for achieving an HIV cure by accelerating research. This research is dominated primarily by issues about the nature and design of current and future clinical trials. Stakeholder engagement for HIV cure remains in its early stages. Our analysis examines timing and mechanisms of historical stakeholder engagement in other HIV research areas for HIV-uninfected individuals [vaccine development and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)], and HIV-infected individuals (treatment as prevention, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and treatment of acute HIV infection) and articulate a plan for HIV cure stakeholder engagement. The experience from HIV vaccine development shows that early engagement of stakeholders helped manage expectations, mitigating the failure of several vaccine trials, while paving the way for subsequent trials. The relatively late engagement of HIV stakeholders in PrEP research may partly explain some of the implementation challenges. The treatment-related stakeholder engagement was strong and community-led from the onset and helped translation from research to implementation. We outline five steps to initiate and sustain stakeholder engagement in HIV cure research and conclude that stakeholder engagement represents a key investment in which stakeholders mutually agree to share knowledge, benefits, and risk of failure. Effective stakeholder engagement prevents misconceptions. As HIV cure research advances from early trials involving subjects with generally favorable prognosis to studies involving greater risk and uncertainty, success may depend on early and deliberate engagement of stakeholders. PMID:26061668

  17. Preventing sexual transmission of HIV: anti-HIV bioregulatory and homeostatic components of commercial sexual lubricants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D; Lee, H; Poast, J; Cloyd, M W; Baron, S

    2004-01-01

    Certain safe over-the-counter (OTC) sexual lubricants such as Astroglide, KY Liquid, Replens, Vagisil, ViAmor, and Wet Stuff inhibit both cell-free HIV and the production of HIV by infected leukocytes in vitro even in the presence of seminal fluid. To identify which components of the lubricants were active against HIV, we tested five components (glycerin, methylparaben, propylparaben, polyquaternium-32, and propylene glycol). The paraben preservatives and propylene glycol in the lubricants did not inhibit HIV, while the common natural homeostatic metabolite, glycerin, and the thickener polyquaternium-32 did strongly inactivate infectious HIV and HIV-infected leukocytes. Activity against HIV and HIV-infected cells by glycerin was stable through 24 hours at 37 degrees C. Glycerin and polyquaternium-32 were active at minimum concentrations of approximately 2% and 0.01%, respectively--well within the highest FDA safety guidelines. Both active components disrupted infected leukocytes within 5 minutes which resulted in inhibition of infectious HIV production by infected leukocytes of greater than 25 to 100-fold. These components do not disrupt vaginal epithelial cells in vivo. These components also rapidly inactivate cell-free HIV by 10- to 30-fold. Thus, we may conclude that the active components of the OTC lubricants are glycerin and polyquaternium-32. Using these components, OTC sexual lubricants could be reformulated to optimize their anti-HIV activity. Furthermore, clinical trials of these lubricants and components seem to be indicated because of their FDA safety level, wide availability, and low cost. PMID:15786693

  18. Innovation spread: lessons from HIV.

    PubMed

    Talbert-Slagle, Kristina; Berg, David; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2013-09-01

    Efficient spreading of evidence-based innovations among complex health systems remains an elusive goal despite extensive study in the social sciences. Biology provides a model of successful spread in viruses, which have evolved to spread with maximum efficiency using minimal resources. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) spread and identify five steps that are also common to a recent example of spread in complex health systems: reduction in door-to-balloon times for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We then describe a new model we have developed, called AIDED, which is based on mixed-methods research but informed by the conceptual framework of HIV spread among cells. The AIDED model contains five components: Assess, Innovate, Develop, Engage and Devolve, and can describe any one of the following: the spread of HIV among cells, the spread of practices to reduce door-to-balloon time for patients with STEMI and the spread of certain family health innovations in low- and middle-income countries. We suggest that by looking to the biological sciences for a model of spread that has been honed by evolution, we may have identified fundamental steps that are necessary and sufficient for efficient, low-cost spread of health innovations among complex health systems.

  19. HIV vaccine development and Africa.

    PubMed

    Pervane, Z

    2000-01-01

    The genetic variation of HIV poses a great problem in the development of a vaccine that will work against the viral subtypes that predominate in Africa. HIV-1 exists in as many as 10 subtypes and these subtypes have 20-30% inter-subtype variation, while differences within a subtype can differ up to 15%. Moreover, HIV differs from person to person; it creates so many different versions of itself, which overwhelms the person's immune system. However, many areas of the code are conserved or shared across subtypes. Focusing on these shared areas could help in the development of a vaccine that is effective against the subtype for which it is made. Current investigations focus on stripping away glycoproteins which act to secure the virus to the surface of T4 cell, an immune-system cell found in the blood. To test if this vaccine is effective on humans, it has to undergo 3 trial tests. Phase I and II trials involve a number of volunteers and are designed to test safety, check for harmful side effects, and measure immune responses. Phase III trials, or efficacy trials, involve a greater number of volunteers. It is designed to determine whether the vaccine actually works. Although human testing is fundamental in the process of determining whether a vaccine works, it faces difficult ethical questions.

  20. Hospital treatment of HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Ola, Samuel Olawale

    2006-12-01

    Treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria has progressed from the stage of inactivity, unconcern, abandonment and neglect to the present stage of holistic care involving treatment of the infection with Highly Active Anti Retroviral Agents, complications of the disease and side effects of antiretroviral therapy as well as that of human behavioural responses towards the disease with hope and promising outcome. The goal of the treatment is to prolong the patient's life while maintaining the best possible quality of health and life. It is now a continuum of care between the hospital and the different sectors of the community. Hospital treatment of patients with HIV-AIDS is complex and yet a simple task if there is healthy interaction of the patients and health care providers in a milieu of well equipped hospital setting with available treatment facilities for proper management of diseases. Similarly, for the care to achieve its goal, it requires a joint participation of the community and the commitment of the government not only on curtailment of the reservoir of HIV infection by antiretroviral therapy but total eradication of diseases, poverty and ignorance in all its entirety. PMID:18050774

  1. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  2. HIV Infection and High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Honor; Hoy, Jennifer; Woolley, Ian; Tchoua, Urbain; Bukrinsky, Michael; Dart, Anthony; Sviridov, Dmitri

    2008-01-01

    HIV infection and its treatment are associated with dyslipidemia, including hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Parameters of HDL metabolism in HIV-positive patients were investigated in a cross-sectional study. The following groups of subjects were selected: i) 25 treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients or HIV-infected patients on long therapy break, ii) 28 HIV-infected patients currently treated with protease inhibitors, and iii) 33 HIV-negative subjects. Compared to the HIV-negative group, all groups of HIV-infected patients were characterized by significantly elevated triglyceride and apolipoprotein B levels, mass and activity of lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (p<0.01). Total and LDL cholesterol was lower in treatment-naïve HIV-infected group only. HDL cholesterol and preβ1-HDL were significantly lower in all HIV-infected groups (p<0.05), while mean levels of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and ability of plasma to promote cholesterol efflux were similar in all groups. We found a positive correlation between apoA-I and levels of CD4+ cells (r2 = 0.3, p<0.001). Plasma level of phospholipid transfer protein was reduced in the group on antiretroviral therapy. Taken together these results suggest that HIV infection is associated with modified HDL metabolism re-directing cholesterol to the apoB-containing lipoproteins and likely reducing the functionality of reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:18054941

  3. Motivations to test for HIV among partners in concordant HIV-negative and HIV-discordant gay male couples.

    PubMed

    Beougher, Sean C; Bircher, Anja E; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Darbes, Lynae A; Mandic, Carmen Gómez; Neilands, Torsten B; Garcia, Carla C; Hoff, Colleen C

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies of HIV testing among gay men describe the motivations, facilitators and barriers, behaviors, and demographic characteristics of individuals who test. What little research focuses on HIV testing among gay men in relationships shows that they do not test regularly or, in some cases, at all-their motivations to test have not been investigated. With so little data on HIV testing for this population, and the continued privileging of individually focused approaches, gay men in relationships fall into a blind spot of research and prevention efforts. This study examined motivations to test for HIV using qualitative data from both partners in 20 gay male couples. Analysis revealed that the partners' motivations were either event-related (e.g., participants testing at the beginning of their relationship or HIV-negative participants in an HIV-discordant relationship testing after risky episode with their discordant primary partner) or partner-related (e.g., participants testing in response to a request or suggestion to test from their primary partner or participants testing out of concern for their primary partner's health and well-being). These data provide insight into relationship-oriented motivations to test for HIV for gay men in relationships and, in doing so, evidence their commitment to their primary partner and relationship. These motivations can be leveraged to increase HIV testing among gay men in relationships, a population that tests less often than single gay men, yet, until recently, has been underserved by prevention efforts.

  4. Motivations to test for HIV among partners in concordant HIV-negative and HIV-discordant gay male couples.

    PubMed

    Beougher, Sean C; Bircher, Anja E; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Darbes, Lynae A; Mandic, Carmen Gómez; Neilands, Torsten B; Garcia, Carla C; Hoff, Colleen C

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies of HIV testing among gay men describe the motivations, facilitators and barriers, behaviors, and demographic characteristics of individuals who test. What little research focuses on HIV testing among gay men in relationships shows that they do not test regularly or, in some cases, at all-their motivations to test have not been investigated. With so little data on HIV testing for this population, and the continued privileging of individually focused approaches, gay men in relationships fall into a blind spot of research and prevention efforts. This study examined motivations to test for HIV using qualitative data from both partners in 20 gay male couples. Analysis revealed that the partners' motivations were either event-related (e.g., participants testing at the beginning of their relationship or HIV-negative participants in an HIV-discordant relationship testing after risky episode with their discordant primary partner) or partner-related (e.g., participants testing in response to a request or suggestion to test from their primary partner or participants testing out of concern for their primary partner's health and well-being). These data provide insight into relationship-oriented motivations to test for HIV for gay men in relationships and, in doing so, evidence their commitment to their primary partner and relationship. These motivations can be leveraged to increase HIV testing among gay men in relationships, a population that tests less often than single gay men, yet, until recently, has been underserved by prevention efforts. PMID:25550145

  5. Breast Milk of HIV-Positive Mothers Has Potent and Species-Specific In Vivo HIV-Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Angela; Baker, Caroline; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Stamper, Lisa W.; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Permar, Sallie R.; Hinde, Katie; Kuhn, Louise; Bode, Lars; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the nutritional and health benefits of breast milk, breast milk can serve as a vector for mother-to-child HIV transmission. Most HIV-infected infants acquire HIV through breastfeeding. Paradoxically, most infants breastfed by HIV-positive women do not become infected. This is potentially attributed to anti-HIV factors in breast milk. Breast milk of HIV-negative women can inhibit HIV infection. However, the HIV-inhibitory activity of breast milk from HIV-positive mothers has not been evaluated. In addition, while significant differences in breast milk composition between transmitting and nontransmitting HIV-positive mothers have been correlated with transmission risk, the HIV-inhibitory activity of their breast milk has not been compared. This knowledge may significantly impact the design of prevention approaches in resource-limited settings that do not deny infants of HIV-positive women the health benefits of breast milk. Here, we utilized bone marrow/liver/thymus humanized mice to evaluate the in vivo HIV-inhibitory activity of breast milk obtained from HIV-positive transmitting and nontransmitting mothers. We also assessed the species specificity and biochemical characteristics of milk's in vivo HIV-inhibitory activity and its ability to inhibit other modes of HIV infection. Our results demonstrate that breast milk of HIV-positive mothers has potent HIV-inhibitory activity and indicate that breast milk can prevent multiple routes of infection. Most importantly, this activity is unique to human milk. Our results also suggest multiple factors in breast milk may contribute to its HIV-inhibitory activity. Collectively, our results support current recommendations that HIV-positive mothers in resource-limited settings exclusively breastfeed in combination with antiretroviral therapy. IMPORTANCE Approximately 240,000 children become infected with HIV annually, the majority via breastfeeding. Despite daily exposure to virus in breast milk, most infants

  6. Psychiatric disorders, HIV infection and HIV/hepatitis co-infection in the correctional setting.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, J G; Paar, D P; Wu, H; Giordano, T P; Murray, O; Raimer, B G; Avery, E N; Diamond, P M; Pulvino, J S

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and depression have long been associated with risk behaviors for HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). The US prison population is reported to have elevated rates of HIV, hepatitis and most psychiatric disorders. This study examined the association of six major psychiatric disorders with HIV mono-infection, HIV/HCV co-infection and HIV/HBV co-infection in one of the nation's largest prison populations. The study population consisted of 370,511 Texas Department of Criminal Justice inmates who were incarcerated for any duration between January 1, 2003 and July 1, 2006. Information on medical conditions and sociodemographic factors was obtained from an institution-wide electronic medical information system. Offenders diagnosed with HIV mono-infection, HIV/HCV, HIV/HBV and all HIV combined exhibited elevated rates of major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, non-schizophrenic psychotic disorder and any psychiatric disorder. In comparison to offenders with HIV mono-infection, those with HIV/HCV co-infection had an elevated prevalence of any psychiatric disorder. This cross-sectional study's finding of positive associations between psychiatric disease and both HIV infection and hepatitis co-infection among Texas prison inmates holds both clinical and public health relevance. It will be important for future investigations to examine the extent to which psychiatric disorders serve as a barrier to medical care, communication with clinicians and adherence to prescribed medical regimens among both HIV-mono-infected and HIV/hepatitis-co-infected inmates. PMID:18278623

  7. High Proportion of HIV Serodiscordance among HIV-Affected Married Couples in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Ikumi; Tanuma, Junko; Do, Cuong Duy; Doan, Tra Thu; Luu, Quynh Phuong; Nguyen, Lan Anh Thi; Vu, Tuong Van Thi; Nguyen, Tuan Quang; Tsuchiya, Naho; Shiino, Teiichiro; Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Pham, Thanh Thuy Thi; Ariyoshi, Koya; Oka, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about the state of HIV transmission among married couples in Vietnam. This study aims to clarify HIV serostatus in this group and elucidate risk factors for intra-marital HIV transmission. Methods In 2012, we enrolled a group of HIV-positive married men registered at the HIV outpatient clinic of a referral hospital in northern Vietnam, along with their wives. Sociodemographic, behavioural and clinical data were collected from men and wives. HIV serodiscordant couples were followed until March 2014 to determine seroconversion rate. A phylogenetic analysis was performed based on env V3 sequence to detail cluster formation among men. Results Of the 163 HIV-positive men enrolled in the study, 101 (62.0%) had wives testing HIV-negative. Half of men reported injecting drug use (IDU) as a likely transmission route. Couples reported a high incidence of unprotected sexual intercourse prior to diagnosis; the median (inter quartile range) was 4 (4–8) times per month. Only 17 couples (10.4%) reported using condoms during at least half these instances. Multivariable analysis revealed IDU history among men was independently associated with HIV-negative wives (adjusted OR 0.31; 95% CI 0.10–0.95, p=0.041). Phylogenetic analysis of 80 samples indicated CRF01_AE. Of these, 69 (86.3%) clustered with IDU-associated viruses from Vietnam. No HIV seroconversion was identified during a follow-up of 61 serodiscordant couples, with 126.5 person-years of observation during which HIV-infected men were on antiretroviral drug therapy (ART). Conclusion High HIV serodiscordance was observed among HIV-affected married couples in northern Vietnam. A large number of at-risk wives therefore remain HIV-negative and can be protected with measures including proper use of ART if couples are made aware of the serodiscordance through screening. PMID:25898138

  8. HIV-1 RNA quantification in CRF02_AG HIV-1 infection: too easy to make mistakes.

    PubMed

    Tatarelli, Paola; Taramasso, Lucia; Di Biagio, Antonio; Sticchi, Laura; Nigro, Nicola; Barresi, Renata; Viscoli, Claudio; Bruzzone, Bianca

    2016-04-01

    The number of patients newly infected by HIV-1 non-B subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) is increasing worldwide, including in the western countries. We report on a primary HIV-1 infection in a Caucasian patient. A routine quantitative assay (Nuclisens EasyQ HIV-1 2.0, BioMérieux SA) showed 6,700 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. A combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) consistent with low baseline HIV-1 RNA was started. Few days later, the analysis performed with REGA HIV-1 Subtyping Tool - Version 3.0 attributed the HIV-1 sequence to the CRF02_AG recombinant form. Therefore, a second real-time PCR assay was performed, using the Versant HIV-1 RNA 1.0 Assay (kPCR) (Siemens HealthCare Diagnostics) which revealed a HIV-1 RNA of 230,000 copies/ml. Consequently, the ongoing cART was potentiated. This case suggests that the wide genetic variability of HIV-1 subtypes may affect the capability of the commonly used assays to detect and accurately quantify HIV-1 RNA in non-B subtypes and CRFs. In presence of CRFs different commercial HIV-1 RNA tests should be performed to find the most reliable for viral load quantification at the diagnosis, because it influences the choice of cART, and during the follow-up. Indeed, international guidelines for HIV-1 infection management suggest to monitor patient' HIV-RNA with the same assay over the course of treatment. As different commercial tests can be performed in the same laboratory with considerable difficulty, the laboratory should select an assay that is suitable not only for the more prevalent strain, but also for less frequent ones that, nevertheless, can occur. Then, knowing and investigating the spread of non-B strains has essential clinical and laboratory implications. PMID:27196556

  9. Ocular manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, D A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of ocular complications and the clinical outcomes of these complications in patients with various stages of HIV infection. METHODS: Retrospective review of all HIV-infected patients seen in an AIDS ophthalmology clinic from November 1983 through December 31, 1992. RESULTS: Eleven-hundred sixty-three patients were seen for ophthalmologic evaluation. Of these, 781 had the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), 226 had symptomatic HIV infection (AIDs-related complex [ARC]), and 156 had asymptomatic HIV infection. Non-infectious HIV retinopathy was the most common ocular complication, affecting 50% of the patients with AIDS, 34% of the patients with ARC, and 3% of the patients with asymptomatic HIV infection. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis was the most common opportunistic ocular infection, affecting 37% of the patients with AIDS. Other opportunistic ocular infections, including ocular toxoplasmosis, varicella zoster virus retinitis, and Pneumocystis choroidopathy were all much less common, each occurring in < or = 1% of the patients with AIDS. Treatment of CMV retinitis with either foscarnet or ganciclovir was successful in initially controlling the retinitis. However, relapse represented a significant problem and required frequent re-inductions. As a consequence of the retinal damage associated with relapse, loss of visual acuity occurred. The median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse for all eyes with CMV retinitis was 13.4 months, and the median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse in the better eye was 21.1 months. At last follow-up, 75% of the patients had a final visual acuity of 20/40 or better in at least one eye. Retinal detachments were a frequent ophthalmologic complication of CMV retinitis with a cumulative probability of a retinal detachment in at least one eye of 57% at 12 months after the diagnosis of CMV retinitis. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus developed in 3% of the overall series and was seen in

  10. Framing expectations in early HIV cure research.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Karine; Henderson, Gail E; Margolis, David M

    2014-10-01

    Language used to describe clinical research represents a powerful opportunity to educate volunteers. In the case of HIV cure research there is an emerging need to manage expectations by using the term 'experiment'. Cure experiments are proof-of-concept studies designed to evaluate novel paradigms to reduce persistent HIV-1 reservoirs, without any expectation of medical benefit.

  11. HIV Immunology Goes Out On a Limb.

    PubMed

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Mascola, John R

    2016-05-17

    Vaccines against HIV most likely need to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. In this issue of Immunity, Poignard and colleagues describe the co-evolution of a broadly neutralizing antibody and the virus that triggered it, providing a template for HIV vaccine design. PMID:27192575

  12. CDC Vital Signs: HIV Care Saves Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the Affordable Care Act. Doctors, nurses, and health care systems can Test patients for HIV as a regular part of medical care. Counsel patients who do not have HIV on how to prevent ... or mental health services. Work with health departments to get and ...

  13. Identity Development in Adolescents Living with HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosek, Sybil G.; Harper, Gary W.; Robinson, W. LaVome

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to qualitatively explore how identity formation may be affected by the presence of HIV disease. Eight HIV-infected adolescents (three males, five females), aged 17-21, participated in a semi-structured interview that combined measures of identity development with open-ended, qualitative questions aimed at eliciting…

  14. Public Opinion, Public Policy, and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Jane

    1989-01-01

    A four-stage framework for considering the development of public policy in regard to the issue of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection is offered. The phases are denial, irrationality, acceptance, and the development of a rational response. Federal antidiscrimination policies which include persons with HIV infections as disabled are…

  15. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma in HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Theresa; Kyrollos, Maggy; Kravcik, Stephen

    2007-09-01

    A 55-year-old man who was recently diagnosed with HIV/AIDS developed multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules after starting highly active antiretroviral therapy. Workup confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. This is the first described case of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma in HIV/AIDS, and may represent a rare form of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. PMID:18923729

  16. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma in HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Theresa; Kyrollos, Maggy; Kravcik, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    A 55-year-old man who was recently diagnosed with HIV/AIDS developed multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules after starting highly active antiretroviral therapy. Workup confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. This is the first described case of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma in HIV/AIDS, and may represent a rare form of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. PMID:18923729

  17. Targeting HIV: old and new players.

    PubMed

    Pani, A; Loi, A G; Mura, M; Marceddu, T; La Colla, P; Marongiu, M E

    2002-03-01

    Despite the unprecedented successes in the therapy of HIV infection, AIDS remains a major world health problem being the first cause of death in Africa and the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. Rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants and severe side effects limit the efficacy of existing therapies. The intrinsic high variability of HIV calls for combining different drugs with distinct mode of action to achieve synergistic antiviral activity. Efforts are being made to develop agents addressing new steps in HIV replication and to optimize both antiviral activity and pharmacokinetic of the current drugs targeting reverse transcriptase and protease. The class of viral entry inhibitors is undergoing evaluation for both systemic and topical administration, and compounds targeting the fusion step may be the first to reach the market. Identification of compounds unambiguously affecting HIV replication by targeting integrase supports the potential of this crucial viral enzyme as a drug target. Targeting HIV gene regulation, which could also lead to cellular toxicity, may also become an important discovery strategy, provided that inhibitors with sufficient specificity are identified. In this review we will summarize the current understanding of the key steps in HIV life cycle in the context of representative inhibitors based on their modes of action. We then present a summary of compounds under clinical development, with the aim of providing a picture of the current potential for targeting HIV.

  18. Some Wisconsin Pupils Could Face HIV Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Joetta L.

    2004-01-01

    This article explores the issue on student HIV testing in Wisconsin. Wisconsin has enacted what appears to be the nation's first law requiring students to be tested for HIV, if teachers or other school employees can prove they were significantly exposed to the students' blood while on the job. The law, which critics view as an unwarranted…

  19. Modeling HIV Risk in Highly Vulnerable Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huba, G. J.; Panter, A. T.; Melchior, Lisa A.; Trevithick, Lee; Woods, Elizabeth R.; Wright, Eric; Feudo, Rudy; Tierney, Steven; Schneir, Arlene; Tenner, Adam; Remafedi, Gary; Greenberg, Brian; Sturdevant, Marsha; Goodman, Elizabeth; Hodgins, Antigone; Wallace, Michael; Brady, Russell E.; Singer, Barney; Marconi, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the structure of several HIV risk behaviors in an ethnically and geographically diverse sample of 8,251 clients from 10 innovative demonstration projects intended for adolescents living with, or at risk for, HIV. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified 2 risk factors for men (sexual intercourse with men and a…

  20. HIV/AIDS Prevention Program Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Hortensia; Barker, Marybeth; Cassisy, Theresa; Hardy-Fanta, Carol; Hereen, Tim; Levenson, Suzette; McCloskey, Lois; Melendez, Michael

    This report addresses the four research objectives that were established by the Massachusetts Primary Prevention Group (MPPG) and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health's HIV/AIDS Bureau. The objectives were to: (1) review and summarize literature that formally evaluated HIV prevention interventions; (2) describe how currently funded…

  1. Contraception for HIV-Infected Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Athena P; Mirza, Ayesha

    2016-09-01

    Access to high-quality reproductive health care is important for adolescents and young adults with HIV infection to prevent unintended pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections, and secondary transmission of HIV to partners and children. As perinatally HIV-infected children mature into adolescence and adulthood and new HIV infections among adolescents and young adults continue to occur in the United States, medical providers taking care of such individuals often face issues related to sexual and reproductive health. Challenges including drug interactions between several hormonal methods and antiretroviral agents make decisions regarding contraceptive options more complex for these adolescents. Dual protection, defined as the use of an effective contraceptive along with condoms, should be central to ongoing discussions with HIV-infected young women and couples wishing to avoid pregnancy. Last, reproductive health discussions need to be integrated with discussions on HIV care, because a reduction in plasma HIV viral load below the level of detection (an "undetectable viral load") is essential for the individual's health as well as for a reduction in HIV transmission to partners and children. PMID:27573084

  2. The future of the HIV pandemic.

    PubMed

    Grassly, Nicholas C; Garnett, Geoffrey P

    2005-05-01

    The emerging HIV epidemics in countries of Asia and Eastern Europe will contribute significantly to the future of the HIV pandemic. Forecasts of the scale of these epidemics are subject to massive uncertainty, however, mainly because of the sensitivity of predictions to small alterations in parameters that are difficult to estimate. In most of these countries, HIV is currently concentrated among vulnerable populations such as injecting drug users, sex workers and their clients, or men who have sex with men. This distribution suggests an alternative to disease forecasting based on the techniques of risk assessment routinely used by environmental epidemiologists. Exposure mapping, dose-response curves and the concept of acceptable risk are some of the tools that may be useful for HIV risk management. This approach is illustrated by a description of exposure in Indonesia and an assessment of currently accepted risk of death for different causes including HIV in the Russian Federation. Although inappropriate for forecasts of heterosexual HIV transmission, mathematical models are shown to be useful for making qualitative predictions about the relative importance of different behaviours for the spread of HIV over time and for interpreting observed trends in HIV prevalence from sentinel surveillance sites. PMID:15976879

  3. Enriching Student HIV Awareness by Digital Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duveskog, Marcus; Sutinen, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Secondary school students in Tanzania were involved in the development of a digital platform for HIV education and counseling. A major reason for the failure of most HIV and AIDS campaigns in Sub-Saharan Africa is the lack of understanding the social structures that maintain the actual cause of the problems. Having the target group as co-designers…

  4. Programmatic Implications of Acute and Early HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Amitabh B; Granich, Reuben M; Kato, Masaya; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Montaner, Julio S G; Williams, Brian G

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes acute, early, chronic, and late stages. Acute HIV infection lasts approximately 3 weeks and early HIV infection, which includes acute HIV infection, lasts approximately 7 weeks. Many testing and blood screening algorithms detect HIV antibodies about 3 weeks after HIV infection. Incidence estimates are based on results of modeling, cohort studies, surveillance, and/or assays. Viral load is the key modifiable risk factor for HIV transmission and peaks during acute and early HIV infection. Empirical evidence characterizing the impact of acute and early HIV infection on the spread of the HIV epidemic are limited. Time trends of HIV prevalence collected from concentrated and generalized epidemics suggest that acute and early HIV infection may have a limited role in population HIV transmission. Collectively, these data suggest that acute and early HIV infection is relatively short and does not currently require fundamentally different programmatic approaches to manage the HIV/AIDS epidemic in most settings. Research and surveillance will inform which epidemic contexts and phases may require tailored strategies for these stages of HIV infection.

  5. Virology, Immunology, and Clinical Course of HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutchan, J. Allen

    1990-01-01

    Presents overview of medical aspects of human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) disease. Addresses structure and replication of virus, current methods for detecting HIV-1 in infected persons, effects of the virus on immune system, and clinical course of HIV-1 disease. Emphasizes variable causes of progression through HIV-1 infection stages;…

  6. When to consider acute HIV infection in the differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Richard M; Hardwicke, Robin L; Grimes, Deanna E; DeGarmo, D Sean

    2016-01-16

    Patients presenting with fever, pharyngitis, and lymphadenopathy are likely to have mononucleosis; however, patients with acute HIV infection may present with similar symptoms. Acute HIV infection should be considered as a differential diagnosis if test results for mononucleosis are negative. This article describes when to order HIV testing and discusses the importance of early intervention for acute HIV infection. PMID:26678418

  7. Military HIV policy assessment in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anne Goldzier; Grillo, Michael P; Djibo, Djeneba Audrey; Hale, Braden; Shaffer, Richard A

    2014-07-01

    While HIV/AIDS continues to inflict a heavy toll on African militaries, the military commitment and leadership response has been inconsistent, as reflected by variable presence of a written HIV policy. The Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Program collaborates with most sub-Saharan military HIV/AIDS programs. In 2010, 28 invited countries (80%) completed a self-administered survey describing their program, including policy. Descriptive and nonparametric measures were calculated. The majority (57%) of respondents reported having a written military HIV policy. Of these, 86% included HIV testing, 88% required recruit testing, and 96% denied entry for those testing HIV-positive. Mandatory HIV testing was reported by 71%, occurring before deployments, peacekeeping missions, foreign training, and when clinically indicated. Southern African militaries were most likely to require HIV testing. The majority of militaries allowed deployment of HIV-positive personnel in-country, whereas few allowed foreign deployment. Most sub-Saharan militaries screen applicants for HIV and other diseases to determine duty fitness, resulting in near universal HIV negative recruit cohorts. No militaries discharge personnel from service if they acquire HIV. Legal challenges to military HIV policies may hinder finalization and dissemination of policies. Lack of HIV policies impedes routine testing and earlier care and treatment for HIV-infected personnel.

  8. Military HIV policy assessment in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anne Goldzier; Grillo, Michael P; Djibo, Djeneba Audrey; Hale, Braden; Shaffer, Richard A

    2014-07-01

    While HIV/AIDS continues to inflict a heavy toll on African militaries, the military commitment and leadership response has been inconsistent, as reflected by variable presence of a written HIV policy. The Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Program collaborates with most sub-Saharan military HIV/AIDS programs. In 2010, 28 invited countries (80%) completed a self-administered survey describing their program, including policy. Descriptive and nonparametric measures were calculated. The majority (57%) of respondents reported having a written military HIV policy. Of these, 86% included HIV testing, 88% required recruit testing, and 96% denied entry for those testing HIV-positive. Mandatory HIV testing was reported by 71%, occurring before deployments, peacekeeping missions, foreign training, and when clinically indicated. Southern African militaries were most likely to require HIV testing. The majority of militaries allowed deployment of HIV-positive personnel in-country, whereas few allowed foreign deployment. Most sub-Saharan militaries screen applicants for HIV and other diseases to determine duty fitness, resulting in near universal HIV negative recruit cohorts. No militaries discharge personnel from service if they acquire HIV. Legal challenges to military HIV policies may hinder finalization and dissemination of policies. Lack of HIV policies impedes routine testing and earlier care and treatment for HIV-infected personnel. PMID:25003863

  9. Moral Agency and the Sexual Transmission of HIV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Ann; Wolitski, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Sexual transmission of HIV occurs because an infected person has unprotected sex with a previously uninfected person. The majority of HIV infections are transmitted by individuals who are unaware of their infection, and most persons who are diagnosed with HIV significantly reduce or eliminate risk behaviors once they learn they have HIV. However,…

  10. HIV-specific IgG in cervicovaginal secretions of exposed HIV-uninfected female sexual partners of HIV-infected men.

    PubMed

    Buchacz, K; Parekh, B S; Padian, N S; van der Straten, A; Phillips, S; Jonte, J; Holmberg, S D

    2001-12-10

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific antibodies was examined in plasma and cervicovaginal (mucosal) samples of 24 HIV-exposed uninfected (EU) female sexual partners of HIV-infected men, and compared with findings in 18 HIV-infected and 15 low-risk HIV-uninfected women. Only HIV-infected women had detectable HIV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) (18 of 18) or HIV-IgA (6 of 18) in cervicovaginal samples by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). However, 3 of 24 EU women had positive Western blot (WB) for HIV-IgG in cervicovaginal secretions, while 2 of 24 EU women and 1 of 15 low-risk controls had indeterminate IgG-WB. EU women with positive or indeterminate IgG-WB in the cervicovaginal samples were similar in risk to the remaining EU women. None of the HIV-uninfected women had mucosal HIV-IgA. The findings suggest that some sexually or parenterally exposed HIV-uninfected women might develop low-level mucosal IgG responses. However, it appears unlikely that HIV-specific cervicovaginal antibodies play a major role in protection from HIV infection in this EU population. PMID:11788020

  11. Laser palliation of the HIV+ patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convissar, Robert A.

    2003-12-01

    Many oral manifestations of HIV infection can be used as markers for degree of immunosupression. These manifestations may be treated with antibiotics, analgesics, and antineoplastics, which may interact and interfere with antiviral agents used to treat the disease, and possibly exacerbate it. Dentists will see more HIV-infected patients as medical research transforms this disease into a chronic illness. Lasers have been shown to be effective instruments in palliation of oral manifestations of HIV infection. The use of lasers to palliate the painful symptoms of three oral manifestations of HIV infection is described. The advantages and benefits to both patient and dentist will be discussed. The paper does not address the use of lasers as a modality to treat or cure HIV infection -- only to palliate some of its symptoms.

  12. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  13. Therapies for HIV and viral hepatitis coinfection.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Curtis L

    2005-02-01

    The natural history of chronic viral hepatitis is altered by HIV coinfection. Liver fibrosis rates and clinical features of liver disease develop more rapidly. Although HIV-hepatitis C virus coinfected subjects may progress more rapidly to AIDS, this is probably explained by comorbid illness, substance abuse and socioeconomic circumstances. Safe and virologically active treatment of HIV-hepatitis B virus coinfection can be concurrently achieved by the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens containing lamivudine and/or tenofovir. In most cases, highly active antiretroviral therapy represents the most beneficial initial pharmaceutical intervention for HIV-hepatitisC virus coinfection. HepatitisC virus antiviral therapy should, in most cases, be reserved for those achieving HIV RNA suppression and immune restoration from highly active antiretroviral therapy or with nadir CD4 T-lymphocytes above 350 cells/microl. PMID:15757459

  14. Understanding the HIV / AIDS context in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, S; Khinani, R; Tariq, W U; Shah, S A

    1995-08-01

    Understanding the social context of sexual relations is important in understanding the AIDS epidemic. To date, however, no systematic studies on sexual behavior have been conducted in Pakistan. HIV has so far spread in the country through heterosexual contact and blood transfusions. Although the magnitude of the problem is difficult to determine, health authorities estimate that 10,000-12,000 people have been infected with HIV. This paper posits that rapid urbanization, together with the sex behavior of single migrant workers, deported HIV-infected expatriates, the exploitation of women, and the easy availability of narcotic drugs, especially in Karachi, are some important factors which may be responsible for the spread of HIV in Pakistan. Pakistan's population profile, patterns of HIV transmission, and government initiatives are discussed. The social context of sexual relations is also discussed in sections on laws relating to sexuality, the effects of urbanization, and marriage and sexual relations. PMID:12290783

  15. [Intravenous drug users and the HIV epidemic].

    PubMed

    Skretting, A

    1992-06-10

    Data are taken from a study of 1,765 arrested intravenous drug users at the Oslo Central Police Station. Intravenous drug users in Oslo seem to get themselves tested for HIV regularly. In 1990-91 the average number of HIV-tests was 5.3, and the time since last test was, an average, between eight and nine months. Most intravenous drug users do not share needles and syringes. The most important source of needles and syringes in Oslo is an ambulant bus which can be found in city centre at night. HIV-seropositive drug users seem to have more regular contact with treatment programmes than those who are HIV-seronegative. Most of the HIV-seropositive drug users who are under treatment are to be found in a few institutions.

  16. Neural correlates of HIV risk feelings

    PubMed Central

    Schmälzle, Ralf; Renner, Britta; Schupp, Harald T.

    2015-01-01

    Field studies on HIV risk perception suggest that people rely on impressions they have about the safety of their partner. The present fMRI study investigated the neural correlates of the intuitive perception of risk. First, during an implicit condition, participants viewed a series of unacquainted persons and performed a task unrelated to HIV risk. In the following explicit condition, participants evaluated the HIV risk for each presented person. Contrasting responses for high and low HIV risk revealed that risky stimuli evoked enhanced activity in the anterior insula and medial prefrontal regions, which are involved in salience processing and frequently activated by threatening and negative affect-related stimuli. Importantly, neural regions responding to explicit HIV risk judgments were also enhanced in the implicit condition, suggesting a neural mechanism for intuitive impressions of riskiness. Overall, these findings suggest the saliency network as neural correlate for the intuitive sensing of risk. PMID:24982263

  17. Advances in HIV Prevention for Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Muessig, Kathryn E.; Cohen, Myron S.

    2014-01-01

    Serodiscordant couples play an important role in maintaining the global HIV epidemic. This review summarizes biobehavioral and biomedical HIV prevention options for serodiscordant couples focusing on advances in 2013 and 2014, including World Health Organization guidelines and best-evidence for couples counseling, couples-based interventions, and the use of antiviral agents for prevention. In the past few years marked advances have been made in HIV prevention for serodiscordant couples and numerous ongoing studies are continuously expanding HIV prevention tools, especially in the area of pre-exposure prophylaxis. Uptake and adherence to antiviral therapy remains a key challenge. Additional research is needed to develop evidence-based interventions for couples, and especially for male-male couples. Randomized trials have demonstrated the prevention benefits of antiretroviral-based approaches among serodiscordant couples; however, residual transmission observed in recognized serodiscordant couples represents an important and resolvable challenge in HIV prevention. PMID:25145645

  18. Neural correlates of HIV risk feelings.

    PubMed

    Häcker, Frank E K; Schmälzle, Ralf; Renner, Britta; Schupp, Harald T

    2015-04-01

    Field studies on HIV risk perception suggest that people rely on impressions they have about the safety of their partner. The present fMRI study investigated the neural correlates of the intuitive perception of risk. First, during an implicit condition, participants viewed a series of unacquainted persons and performed a task unrelated to HIV risk. In the following explicit condition, participants evaluated the HIV risk for each presented person. Contrasting responses for high and low HIV risk revealed that risky stimuli evoked enhanced activity in the anterior insula and medial prefrontal regions, which are involved in salience processing and frequently activated by threatening and negative affect-related stimuli. Importantly, neural regions responding to explicit HIV risk judgments were also enhanced in the implicit condition, suggesting a neural mechanism for intuitive impressions of riskiness. Overall, these findings suggest the saliency network as neural correlate for the intuitive sensing of risk.

  19. Hypogonadism in the HIV-infected man.

    PubMed

    Rochira, Vincenzo; Guaraldi, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Androgen deficiency occurs frequently in men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Antiretroviral treatments had reduced the prevalence of male hypogonadism. The pathogenesis of testosterone (T) deficiency in HIV is multifactorial. Several mechanisms have been proposed; among them, drugs, fat redistribution, and a poor health status could explain the mechanism leading to gonadotropins inhibition and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The diagnosis of hypogonadism in HIV-infected men should be made based on clinical symptoms and a specific workup including T measurement. The interpretation of the results of biochemical testing is more difficult in men with HIV due to several confounding factors. T treatment should be offered to HIV-infected men with documented clinical hypogonadism and symptoms, especially if they are losing lean mass. PMID:25169563

  20. Rethinking Prevention of HIV Type 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Burns, David N.; Dieffenbach, Carl W.; Vermund, Sten H.

    2010-01-01

    Research on the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–1 infection is at a critical juncture. Major methodological challenges to performing prevention trials have emerged, and one after another promising biomedical interventions have failed to reduce the incidence of HIV-1 infection. Nevertheless, there is growing optimism that progress can be achieved in the near term. Mathematical modeling indicates that 2 new strategies, “test and treat” and preexposure prophylaxis, could have a major impact on the incidence of HIV-1 infection. Will our hopes be justified? We review the potential strengths and limitations of these antiretroviral “treatment as prevention” strategies and outline other new options for reducing the incidence of HIV-1 infection in the near term. By maximizing the potential of existing interventions, developing other effective strategies, and combining them in an optimal manner, we have the opportunity to bring the HIV-1 epidemic under control. PMID:20707698

  1. HIV, Aging, and Viral Coinfections: Taking the Long View.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Tamar H; Lo Re, Vincent; Justice, Amy C

    2016-10-01

    Viral suppression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with combination antiviral therapy (cART) has led to increasing longevity but has not enabled a complete return to health among aging HIV-infected individuals (HIV+). Viral coinfections are prevalent in the HIV+ host and are implicated in cancer, liver disease, and accelerated aging. We must move beyond a simplistic notion of HIV becoming a "chronic controllable illness" and develop an understanding of how viral suppression alters the natural history of HIV infection, especially at the intersection of HIV with other common viral coinfections in the context of an altered, aging immune system.

  2. A Review of Management of Inflammation in the HIV Population

    PubMed Central

    Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in antiretroviral therapy have drastically increased the life expectancy for those infected with HIV. Today, a new subgroup of older patients with long-term controlled HIV exists, and its populace is continuously mounting. Therefore, it is essential to understand the enduring effects of chronic suppressed HIV infection in order to further improve HIV management in these patients. This paper will examine the role of HIV in chronic inflammation and immune dysfunction, the dynamic interaction that exists between comorbidity and HIV, and the potential consequences of long-term antiretroviral therapy in an effort to provide the best management options for the virally suppressed HIV patient. PMID:27766258

  3. HIV, Aging, and Viral Coinfections: Taking the Long View.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Tamar H; Lo Re, Vincent; Justice, Amy C

    2016-10-01

    Viral suppression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with combination antiviral therapy (cART) has led to increasing longevity but has not enabled a complete return to health among aging HIV-infected individuals (HIV+). Viral coinfections are prevalent in the HIV+ host and are implicated in cancer, liver disease, and accelerated aging. We must move beyond a simplistic notion of HIV becoming a "chronic controllable illness" and develop an understanding of how viral suppression alters the natural history of HIV infection, especially at the intersection of HIV with other common viral coinfections in the context of an altered, aging immune system. PMID:27614654

  4. Potential anti-HIV agents from marine resources: an overview.

    PubMed

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-11-29

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is a global public health issue. Anti-HIV therapy involving chemical drugs has improved the life quality of HIV/AIDS patients. However, emergence of HIV drug resistance, side effects and the necessity for long-term anti-HIV treatment are the main reasons for failure of anti-HIV therapy. Therefore, it is essential to isolate novel anti-HIV therapeutics from natural resources. Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding marine-derived anti-HIV agents such as phlorotannins, sulfated chitooligosaccharides, sulfated polysaccharides, lectins and bioactive peptides. This contribution presents an overview of anti-HIV therapeutics derived from marine resources and their potential application in HIV therapy.

  5. Potential Anti-HIV Agents from Marine Resources: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is a global public health issue. Anti-HIV therapy involving chemical drugs has improved the life quality of HIV/AIDS patients. However, emergence of HIV drug resistance, side effects and the necessity for long-term anti-HIV treatment are the main reasons for failure of anti-HIV therapy. Therefore, it is essential to isolate novel anti-HIV therapeutics from natural resources. Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding marine-derived anti-HIV agents such as phlorotannins, sulfated chitooligosaccharides, sulfated polysaccharides, lectins and bioactive peptides. This contribution presents an overview of anti-HIV therapeutics derived from marine resources and their potential application in HIV therapy. PMID:21339954

  6. Naturally derived anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Asres, Kaleab; Seyoum, Ameha; Veeresham, Ciddi; Bucar, Franz; Gibbons, Simon

    2005-07-01

    The urgent need for new anti-HIV/AIDS drugs is a global concern. In addition to obvious economical and commercial hurdles, HIV/AIDS patients are faced with multifarious difficulties associated with the currently approved anti-HIV drugs. Adverse effects, the emergence of drug resistance and the narrow spectrum of activity have limited the therapeutic usefulness of the various reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors that are currently available on the market. This has driven many scientists to look for new anti-retrovirals with better efficacy, safety and affordability. As has always been the case in the search for cures, natural sources offer great promise. Several natural products, mostly of plant origin have been shown to possess promising activities that could assist in the prevention and/or amelioration of the disease. Many of these anti-HIV agents have other medicinal values as well, which afford them further prospective as novel leads for the development of new drugs that can deal with both the virus and the various disorders that characterize HIV/AIDS. The aim of this review is to report new discoveries and updates pertaining to anti-HIV natural products. In the review anti-HIV agents have been classified according to their chemical classes rather than their target in the HIV replicative cycle, which is the most frequently encountered approach. Perusal of the literature revealed that most of these promising naturally derived anti-HIV compounds are flavonoids, coumarins, terpenoids, alkaloids, polyphenols, polysaccharides or proteins. It is our strong conviction that the results and experiences with many of the anti-HIV natural products will inspire and motivate even more researchers to look for new leads from plants and other natural sources. PMID:16161055

  7. HIV/AIDS and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Bernardo M; Mota, Licia Maria H; Pileggi, Gecilmara S; Safe, Izabella P; Lacerda, Marcus V G

    2015-05-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an infectious disease caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It was first recognized in the United States in 1981, and the HIV/AIDS epidemic has since spread to affect all countries. The interface of HIV/AIDS with opportunistic infectious diseases is well characterized, but further research is required into the concurrence of other chronic diseases. The objective of this review was to identify possible interferences of HIV infection in the diagnosis and management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A review of the available evidence was conducted using the GRADE approach. Overall, the quality of evidence was low. Our main conclusions were: (1) the occurrence of rheumatoid-like arthritis in patients with HIV/AIDS is quite rare; therefore, it is not recommended that HIV infection be considered routinely as a differential diagnosis in this condition (C2); (2) HIV infection may lead to rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody positivity, but usually at low titers (C1); (3) RA might cause false-positive HIV serology and ELISA seems to be a more specific test for HIV in patients with RA (C2); (4) RA and AIDS may coexist, even in cases of severe immunosuppression (C1); (5) RA emergence may seldom occur during or after immune reconstitution (C1); and (6) there is insufficient safety data to recommend use of specific disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in RA patients with HIV/AIDS. Therefore, these drugs should be used cautiously (C1).

  8. 78 FR 43055 - Accelerating Improvements in HIV Prevention and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... July 18, 2013 Part III The President Executive Order 13649--Accelerating Improvements in HIV Prevention and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care Continuum Initiative #0; #0; #0; Presidential... Improvements in HIV Prevention and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care Continuum Initiative By...

  9. 78 FR 63990 - HIV/AIDS Bureau; Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Core Medical Services Waiver; Application Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... disease. This includes those who know their HIV status and are not in care as well as those individuals... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration HIV/AIDS Bureau; Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program... the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Treatment Extension Act of 2009 (Ryan White Program or RWHAP), requires...

  10. HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report: U.S. HIV and AIDS Cases Reported through December 2001. Year-End Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This report presents tables on: persons reported to be living with HIV infection and AIDS, by area and age group; AIDS cases and annual rates and HIV infection cases, by area and age group; male and female adult/adolescent annual AIDS and HIV infection rates; AIDS and HIV cases by age group, exposure category, and sex; male and female…

  11. Citron kinase enhances ubiquitination of HIV-1 Gag protein and intracellular HIV-1 budding.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jiwei; Zhao, Jianyuan; Sun, Lei; Mi, Zeyun; Cen, Shan

    2016-09-01

    Assembly and budding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles is a complex process involving a number of host proteins. We have previously reported that the RhoA effector citron kinase enhances HIV-1 production. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear. In this study, we found that citron kinase interacted with HIV-1 Gag protein via its zinc finger and leucine zipper domains. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that citron kinase induced viral particle assembly in multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Citron kinase enhanced ubiquitination of HIV-1 Gag protein. Knockdown of Nedd4L, a member of the HECT ubiquitin E3 ligase family, partly decreased the ability of citron kinase to enhance HIV-1 production and reduced ubiquitination of HIV-1 Gag. Interestingly, the function of citron kinase to promote HIV-1 budding was severely impaired when endogenous ALIX was knocked down. Overexpression of the AAA-type ATPase VPS4 eliminated citron-kinase-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 production. Our results suggest that citron kinase interacts with HIV-1 Gag and enhances HIV-1 production by promoting Gag ubiquitination and inducing viral release via the MVB pathway. PMID:27339686

  12. Knowledge of specific HIV transmission modes in relation to HIV infection in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Devon D

    2012-01-01

    Background: In prior research, Africans who knew about blood-borne risks were modestly less likely to be HIV-infected than those who were not aware of such risks. Objectives/Methods: I examined the association between knowledge of specific HIV transmission modes and prevalent HIV infection with data from the 2009 Mozambique AIDS Indicator Survey. Results: Respondents displayed high awareness of blood exposures and vaginal sex as modes of HIV transmission. However, only about half of respondents were aware of anal sex as a way HIV can be transmitted. After adjustments for demographics and sexual behaviors, respondents who knew that HIV could spread by contact with infected blood or by sharing injection needles or razor blades were less likely to be infected than those who did not know about these risks. Respondents who knew about sexual risks were as, or more, likely to be HIV infected as those who did not know about sexual risks. Also, children of HIV-uninfected mothers were less likely to be infected if their mothers were aware of blood-borne HIV risks than if their mothers were unaware. Conclusion: HIV education campaigns in Mozambique and elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa should include a focus on risks from blood exposures and anal sex. PMID:24358833

  13. The ethics of feedback of HIV test results in population-based surveys of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Maher, Dermot

    2013-12-01

    Population-based disease prevalence surveys raise ethical questions, including whether participants should be routinely told their test results. Ethical guidelines call for informing survey participants of any clinically relevant finding to enable appropriate management. However, in anonymous surveys of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, participants can "opt out" of being given their test results or are offered the chance to undergo voluntary HIV testing in local counselling and testing services. This is aimed at minimizing survey participation bias. Those who opt out of being given their HIV test results and who do not seek their results miss the opportunity to receive life-saving antiretroviral therapy. The justification for HIV surveys without routine feedback of results to participants is based on a public health utility argument: that the benefits of more rigorous survey methods - reduced participation bias - outweigh the benefits to individuals of knowing their HIV status. However, people with HIV infection have a strong immediate interest in knowing their HIV status. In consideration of the ethical value of showing respect for people and thereby alleviating suffering, an argument based on public health utility is not an appropriate justification. In anonymous HIV surveys as well as other prevalence surveys of treatable conditions in any setting, participation should be on the basis of routine individual feedback of results as an integral part of fully informed participation. Ensuring that surveys are ethically sound may stimulate participation, increase a broader uptake of HIV testing and reduce stigmatization of people who are HIV-positive.

  14. Effect of Cocaine on HIV Infection and Inflammasome Gene Expression Profile in HIV Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Garcia, Gabriella; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Sagar, Vidya; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Yndart, Adriana; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    We have observed significantly increased HIV infection in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine that could be due to the downregulation of BST2 restriction factor in these cells. In human inflammasome PCR array, among different involved in inflammasome formation, in HIV infected macrophages in the presence of cocaine, we have observed significant upregulation of NLRP3, AIM2 genes and downstream genes IL-1β and PTGS2. Whereas negative regulatory gene MEFV was upregulated, CD40LG and PYDC1 were significantly downregulated. Among various NOD like receptors, NOD2 was significantly upregulated in both HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated cells. In the downstream genes, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), CCL7 and IL-6 were significantly up regulated in HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages. We have also observed significant ROS production (in HIV and/or cocaine treated cells) which is one of the indirect-activators of inflammasomes formation. Further, we have observed early apoptosis in HIV alone and HIV plus cocaine treated macrophages which may be resultant of inflammasome formation and cspase-1 activation. These results indicate that in case of HIV infected macrophages exposed to cocaine, increased ROS production and IL-1β transcription serve as an activators for the formation of NLRP3 and AIM2 mediated inflammasomes that leads to caspase 1 mediated apoptosis. PMID:27321752

  15. A Novel Class of HIV-1 Antiviral Agents Targeting HIV via a SUMOylation-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Madu, Ikenna G; Li, Shirley; Li, Baozong; Li, Haitang; Chang, Tammy; Li, Yi-Jia; Vega, Ramir; Rossi, John; Yee, Jiing-Kuan; Zaia, John; Chen, Yuan

    2015-12-08

    We have recently identified a chemotype of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease (SENP) inhibitors. Prior to the discovery of their SENP inhibitory activity, these compounds were found to inhibit HIV replication, but with an unknown mechanism. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how these compounds inhibit HIV-1. We found that they do not affect HIV-1 viral production, but significantly inhibited the infectivity of the virus. Interestingly, virions produced from cells treated with these compounds could gain entry and carry out reverse transcription, but could not efficiently integrate into the host genome. This phenotype is different from the virus produced from cells treated with the class of anti-HIV-1 agents that inhibit HIV protease. Upon removal of the SUMO modification sites in the HIV-1 integrase, the compound no longer alters viral infectivity, indicating that the effect is related to SUMOylation of the HIV integrase. This study identifies a novel mechanism for inhibiting HIV-1 integration and a new class of small molecules that inhibits HIV-1 via such mechanism that may contribute a new strategy for cure of HIV-1 by inhibiting the production of infectious virions upon activation from latency.

  16. A Novel Class of HIV-1 Antiviral Agents Targeting HIV via a SUMOylation-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Li, Shirley; Li, Baozong; Li, Haitang; Chang, Tammy; Li, Yi-Jia; Vega, Ramir; Rossi, John; Yee, Jiing-Kuan; Zaia, John; Chen, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified a chemotype of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease (SENP) inhibitors. Prior to the discovery of their SENP inhibitory activity, these compounds were found to inhibit HIV replication, but with an unknown mechanism. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how these compounds inhibit HIV-1. We found that they do not affect HIV-1 viral production, but significantly inhibited the infectivity of the virus. Interestingly, virions produced from cells treated with these compounds could gain entry and carry out reverse transcription, but could not efficiently integrate into the host genome. This phenotype is different from the virus produced from cells treated with the class of anti-HIV-1 agents that inhibit HIV protease. Upon removal of the SUMO modification sites in the HIV-1 integrase, the compound no longer alters viral infectivity, indicating that the effect is related to SUMOylation of the HIV integrase. This study identifies a novel mechanism for inhibiting HIV-1 integration and a new class of small molecules that inhibits HIV-1 via such mechanism that may contribute a new strategy for cure of HIV-1 by inhibiting the production of infectious virions upon activation from latency. PMID:26643614

  17. Oral mucosal lesions and HIV viral load in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS).

    PubMed

    Greenspan, D; Komaroff, E; Redford, M; Phelan, J A; Navazesh, M; Alves, M E; Kamrath, H; Mulligan, R; Barr, C E; Greenspan, J S

    2000-09-01

    The prevalence of oral lesions was assessed in a five-center subset of the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) and correlated with other features of HIV disease. Oral examinations were performed by dental examiners on 729 women (577 HIV-positive and 152 HIV-negative) during baseline examination. Significant differences between the groups were found for the following oral lesions: pseudomembranous candidiasis, 6.1% and 2.0%, respectively; erythematous candidiasis, 6.41% and 0.7%, respectively; all oral candidiasis, pseudomembranous and/or erythematous, 13.7% and 3.3%, respectively. Hairy leukoplakia was observed in 6.1% of HIV-positive women. No significant differences were found for recurrent aphthous ulcers, herpes simplex lesions, or papillomas. Kaposi's sarcoma was seen in 0.5% of HIV-positive and 0% of HIV-negative women. Using multiple logistic regression models controlling for use of antiretrovirals and antifungals, in HIV-positive women the presence of oral candidiasis was associated with a CD4 count <200 cells/microl, cigarette smoking, and heroin/methadone use; the presence of hairy leukoplakia was not related to CD4 count but was associated with high viral load. Oral candidiasis and hairy leukoplakia are confirmed as being common features of HIV infection in women and appear to be associated with HIV viral load, immunosuppression, and various other behaviorally determined variables.

  18. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Thomas; Campbell, Mary S; Mullins, James I; Hughes, James P; Wong, Kim G; Raugi, Dana N; Scrensen, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  19. Complement and HIV-I infection/HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengming; Dai, Shen; Gordon, Jennifer; Qin, Xuebin

    2014-04-01

    The various neurological complications associated with HIV-1 infection, specifically HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist as a major public health burden worldwide. Despite the widespread use of anti-retroviral therapy, the prevalence of HAND is significantly high. HAND results from the direct effects of an HIV-1 infection as well as secondary effects of HIV-1-induced immune reaction and inflammatory response. Complement, a critical mediator of innate and acquired immunity, plays important roles in defeating many viral infections by the formation of a lytic pore or indirectly by opsonization and recruitment of phagocytes. While the role of complement in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and HAND has been previously recognized for over 15 years, it has been largely underestimated thus far. Complement can be activated through HIV-1 envelope proteins, mannose-binding lectins (MBL), and anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Complement not only fights against HIV-1 infection but also enhances HIV-1 infection. In addition, HIV-1 can hijack complement regulators such as CD59 and CD55 and can utilize these regulators and factor H to escape from complement attack. Normally, complement levels in brain are much lower than plasma levels and there is no or little complement deposition in brain cells. Interestingly, local production and deposition of complement are dramatically increased in HIV-1-infected brain, indicating that complement may contribute to the pathogenesis of HAND. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of complement in HIV-1 infection and HAND, as well as potential therapeutic approaches targeting the complement system for the treatment and eradications of HIV-1 infection.

  20. HBV/HIV coinfection is associated with poorer outcomes in hospitalized patients with HBV or HIV.

    PubMed

    Rajbhandari, R; Jun, T; Khalili, H; Chung, R T; Ananthakrishnan, A N

    2016-10-01

    We examined the impact of HBV/HIV coinfection on outcomes in hospitalized patients compared to those with HBV or HIV monoinfection. Using the 2011 US Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we identified patients who had been hospitalized with HBV or HIV monoinfection or HBV/HIV coinfection using ICD-9-CM codes. We compared liver-related admissions between the three groups. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of in-hospital mortality, length of stay and total charges. A total of 72 584 discharges with HBV monoinfection, 133 880 discharges with HIV monoinfection and 8156 discharges with HBV/HIV coinfection were included. HBV/HIV coinfection was associated with higher mortality compared to HBV monoinfection (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.30-2.15) but not when compared to HIV monoinfection (OR 1.22, 95% CI 0.96-1.54). However, the presence of HBV along with cirrhosis or complications of portal hypertension was associated with three times greater in-hospital mortality in patients with HIV compared to those without these complications (OR 3.00, 95% CI 1.80-5.02). Length of stay and total hospitalization charges were greater in the HBV-/HIV-coinfected group compared to the HBV monoinfection group (+1.53 days, P < 0.001; $17595, P < 0.001) and the HIV monoinfection group (+0.62 days, P = 0.034; $8840, P = 0.005). In conclusion, HBV/HIV coinfection is a risk factor for in-hospital mortality, particularly in liver-related admissions, compared to HBV monoinfection. Overall healthcare utilization from HBV/HIV coinfection is also higher than for either infection alone and higher than the national average for all hospitalizations, thus emphasizing the healthcare burden from these illnesses.

  1. In the aftermath: serial crisis intervention for people with HIV.

    PubMed

    Poindexter, C C

    1997-05-01

    Because the ever-changing course of HIV disease, including AIDS, represents a continuous series of unexpected stressors, repeated crisis intervention is appropriate for people who are HIV infected. HIV disease causes situational, developmental, social, and compound crises. People with HIV may experience episodic trauma over the course of the illness and consequently move in and out of equilibrium. Crisis intervention should be offered at every hazardous juncture. This article examines ways to use crisis intervention techniques to help people living with HIV.

  2. Patterns of HIV infection among native and refugee Afghans.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Amna S; Khanani, Muhammad R; Abidi, Syed H; Shah, Farida; Shahid, Aniqa; Ali, Syed H

    2011-07-17

    The current study was conducted to explore the origins of the HIV epidemics among the Afghan refugees in Pakistan and the native Afghans in Afghanistan. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV gag gene from 40 samples showed diverse HIV variants, originating from a number of countries. Intermixing of diverse HIV variants among Afghans may give rise to seeding of infections with rare HIV strains which may pose serious challenges for the treatment and control of infection. PMID:21516026

  3. Minor Contribution of Chimeric Host-HIV Readthrough Transcripts to the Level of HIV Cell-Associated gag RNA.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Alexander O; DeMaster, Laura K; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Reiss, Peter; O'Doherty, Una; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-11-11

    Cell-associated HIV unspliced RNA is an important marker of the viral reservoir. HIV gag RNA-specific assays are frequently used to monitor reservoir activation. Because HIV preferentially integrates into actively transcribed genes, some of the transcripts detected by these assays may not represent genuine HIV RNA but rather chimeric host-HIV readthrough transcripts. Here, we demonstrate that in HIV-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy, such host-derived transcripts do not significantly contribute to the HIV gag RNA level.

  4. Profile of the HIV epidemic in Cape Verde: molecular epidemiology and drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected patients from distinct islands of the archipelago.

    PubMed

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M; Guimarães, Monick L; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Morgado, Mariza G

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010-2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1-75) and 47 (IQR = 12-84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be implemented.

  5. Profile of the HIV Epidemic in Cape Verde: Molecular Epidemiology and Drug Resistance Mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected Patients from Distinct Islands of the Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M.; Guimarães, Monick L.; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Morgado, Mariza G.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010–2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1–75) and 47 (IQR = 12–84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be

  6. Profile of the HIV epidemic in Cape Verde: molecular epidemiology and drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected patients from distinct islands of the archipelago.

    PubMed

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M; Guimarães, Monick L; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Morgado, Mariza G

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010-2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1-75) and 47 (IQR = 12-84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be implemented

  7. HIV-2 Genetic Evolution in Patients with Advanced Disease Is Faster than That in Matched HIV-1 Patients▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Skar, Helena; Borrego, Pedro; Wallstrom, Timothy C.; Mild, Mattias; Marcelino, José Maria; Barroso, Helena; Taveira, Nuno; Leitner, Thomas; Albert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate and compare the evolutionary rates of HIV-2 and HIV-1. Two HIV-2 data sets from patients with advanced disease were compared to matched HIV-1 data sets. The estimated mean evolutionary rate of HIV-2 was significantly higher than the estimated rate of HIV-1, both in the gp125 and in the V3 region of the env gene. In addition, the rate of synonymous substitutions in gp125 was significantly higher for HIV-2 than for HIV-1, possibly indicating a shorter generation time or higher mutation rate of HIV-2. Thus, the lower virulence of HIV-2 does not appear to translate into a lower rate of evolution. PMID:20463072

  8. HIV thrives in ancient traditions.

    PubMed

    Shreedhar, J

    1995-01-01

    Participation in ancient traditions is facilitating the current spread of HIV through India. For most of the year, Koovagam is a typical Indian village. Each April on the night of the full moon, however, the Chittirai-Pournami festival is held in Koovagam, a celebration in homage to Aravan during which up to 2000 pilgrims from across the country engage in thousands of acts of unprotected sexual intercourse. Aravan is a man depicted in a Hindu tale who asked to experience sexual bliss before being sacrificed to the gods. To fulfill this last wish, the god Krishna is said to have assumed the form of a beautiful woman and had sexual intercourse with Aravan. Many of the festival participants are hijras, eunuchs and transsexuals who sell sex for a living. Hijras may be accompanied by men who serve as their sex partners and bodyguards. Surveys suggest that one-third of the 10,000 hijras in New Delhi may be infected with HIV. Other participants are known as dangas, men who are either married or single and appear to lead strictly heterosexual lives throughout the year except during the Chittirai-Pournami festival when they dress as women and sell sex to other men attending the festival. The panthis comprise another group of participants and tend to be either single or married men who attend the festival to have sex with the hijras and dangas for fees up to ten rupees, approximately US$0.50, per sexual encounter. Prostitution within the devadasi sect and the sale of young, virgin girls in the state of Andhra Pradesh to the highest male bidders are other examples of how ancient traditions are facilitating the current spread of HIV in India. PMID:12319989

  9. Expanded HIV testing coverage is associated with decreases in late HIV diagnoses, New York City, 2003 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ransome, Yusuf; Terzian, Arpi; Addison, Diane; Braunstein, Sarah; Myers, Julie; Abraham, Bisrat; Nash, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Objective Expanded HIV testing coverage could result in earlier diagnosis of HIV, along with reduced morbidity, mortality, and onward HIV transmission. Design Longitudinal analysis of aggregate, population-based surveillance data within New York City (NYC) ZIP codes. Methods We examined new HIV diagnoses and recent HIV testing to examine whether changes in recent HIV testing coverage (last 12 months) were associated with changes in late HIV diagnosis rates within NYC ZIP codes during 2003–2010, a period of expansion of HIV testing in NYC. Results Overall, recent HIV testing coverage increased from 23% to 31% during 2003–2010, while the rate of late HIV diagnoses decreased from 14.9 per 100,000 to 10.6 per 100,000 population. Within ZIP codes, each 10% absolute increase in recent HIV testing coverage was associated with a 2.5 per 100,000 absolute decrease in the late HIV diagnosis rate. ZIP codes with the largest changes in HIV testing coverage among men were more likely to have the largest (top quartile) declines in late HIV diagnosis rates among men (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]men=4.0; 95%CI=1.5–10.8), as compared with ZIP codes with no or small changes in HIV testing coverage. However, this association was not significant for women (aORwomen=1.4 95% CI=0.50–4.3). Significant geographic disparities in late HIV diagnosis rates persisted in 2009/10. Conclusions Increases in recent HIV testing coverage may have reduced late HIV diagnoses among men. Persistent geographic disparities underscore the need for continued expansion of HIV testing to promote earlier HIV diagnosis. PMID:26091296

  10. HIV medication-based urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Izzedine, Hassane; Lescure, François Xavier; Bonnet, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced renal calculi represent 1–2% of all renal calculi. In the last decade, drugs used for the treatment of HIV-infected patients have become the most frequent cause of drug-containing urinary calculi. Among these agents, protease inhibitors (PIs) are well known to induce kidney stones, especially indinavir and atazanavir, and more recently darunavir. Urolithiasis attributable to other PIs has also been reported in clinical cases such as those during non-PI use. Antiretroviral drug-induced calculi deserve consideration because most of them are potentially preventable. This article summarizes the diagnosis, epidemiology, prevention and management of antiretroviral drug-induced urolithiasis. PMID:25852859

  11. Parotid manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zeitlen, S; Shaha, A

    1991-08-01

    A lump in the parotid region is generally a salivary tumor unless proved otherwise. Recently with an epidemic of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex (ARC), a large number of pathologies are noticed in the parotid region. These conditions generally involve the intraparotid and periparotid lymph nodes. Hyperplastic lymphadenopathy and the benign lymphoepithelial lesions are the most common variants. Our knowledge regarding these new conditions is just evolving. There remains a therapeutic dilemma starting from observation only to local excision and superficial or total parotidectomy. These lesions must be kept in mind when we evaluate a patient with risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

  12. 'I can coexist with HIV': a qualitative study of perceptions of HIV cure among people living with HIV in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingyan; Wu, Feng; Henderson, Gail; Rennie, Stuart; Rich, Zachary C; Cheng, Yu; Hu, Fengyu; Cai, Weiping; Tucker, Joseph D

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about perceptions of HIV cure among people living with HIV (PLHIV), despite them being crucial stakeholders in ongoing HIV cure research. A qualitative research study was conducted in Guangzhou, China, to explore the perceptions of HIV cure among PLHIV in relation to their views on HIV treatment, stigma and social identity. We conducted in-depth interviews with 22 PLHIV from September 2014 to June 2015. Our qualitative data revealed three major themes: (1) Representations of HIV cure: PLHIV generally thought HIV cure was distant from them; (2) Possibility of HIV cure: ideas about the possibility of HIV cure ranged from optimism to scepticism and pessimism; and (3) Life without HIV cure: some participants had adjusted well to the chronic condition of HIV and ART adherence. Although some PLHIV looked forward to HIV being cured, most of the PLHIV in our study had little interest in it. On the contrary, many felt it is more important and realistic to have access to better ART medication and more education for the general public to decrease HIV stigma today rather than develop a cure for tomorrow.

  13. Herpes simplex virus type-2 stimulates HIV-1 replication in cervical tissues: implications for HIV-1 transmission and efficacy of anti-HIV-1 microbicides.

    PubMed

    Rollenhagen, C; Lathrop, M J; Macura, S L; Doncel, G F; Asin, S N

    2014-09-01

    Herpes Simplex virus Type-2 (HSV-2) increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition, yet the mechanism for this viral pathogen to regulate the susceptibility of the cervicovaginal mucosa to HIV-1 is virtually unknown. Using ex vivo human ectocervical tissue models, we report greater levels of HIV-1 reverse transcription, DNA integration, RNA expression, and virions release in HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected tissues compared with HIV-1 only infected tissues (P<0.05). Enhanced HIV-1 replication was associated with increased CD4, CCR5, and CD38 transcription (P<0.05) and increased number of CD4(+)/CCR5(+)/CD38(+) T cells in HIV-1/HSV-2 co-infected tissues compared with tissues infected with HIV-1 alone. Tenofovir (TFV) 1% gel, the leading microbicide candidate, demonstrated only partial protection against HIV-1, when applied vaginally before and after sexual intercourse. It is possible that mucosal inflammation, in particular that induced by HSV-2 infection, may have decreased TFV efficacy. HSV-2 upregulated the number of HIV-1-infected cells and elevated the concentration of TFV needed to decrease HIV-1 infection. Similarly, only high concentrations of TFV inhibited HSV-2 replication in HIV-1/HSV-2-infected tissues. Thus, HSV-2 co-infection and mucosal immune cell activation should be taken into consideration when designing preventative strategies for sexual transmission of HIV-1.

  14. Sexual behavior and risk practices of HIV positive and HIV negative Rwandan women

    PubMed Central

    ADEDIMEJI, Adebola A.; HOOVER, Donald R.; SHI, Qiuhu; GARD, Tracy; MUTIMURA, Eugene; SINAYOBYE, Jean d’Amour; COHEN, Mardge H.; ANASTOS, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    It is not well understood how infection with HIV and prior experience of sexual violence affects sexual behavior in African women. We describe factors influencing current sexual practices of Rwandan women living with or without HIV/AIDS. By design, 75% of participants were HIV positive and ~50% reported having experienced genocidal rape. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fit to describe demographic and clinical characteristics that influenced sexual behavior in the previous 6 months, condom use, history of transactional sex, and prior infection with a non-HIV sexually transmitted disease. Respondents’ age, where they lived, whether or not they lived with a husband or partner, experience of sexual trauma, CD4 count, CES-D and PTSD scores were strongly associated with risky sexual behavior and infection with non-HIV STI. HIV positive women with a history of sexual violence in the contexts of war and conflict may be susceptible to some high-risk sexual behaviors. PMID:25488169

  15. HIV prevention and low-income Chilean women: machismo, marianismo and HIV misconceptions.

    PubMed

    Cianelli, Rosina; Ferrer, Lilian; McElmurry, Beverly J

    2008-04-01

    Socio-cultural factors and HIV-related misinformation contribute to the increasing number of Chilean women living with HIV. In spite of this, and to date, few culturally specific prevention activities have been developed for this population. The goal of the present study was to elicit the perspectives of low-income Chilean women regarding HIV and relevant socio-cultural factors, as a forerunner to the development of a culturally appropriate intervention. As part of a mixed-methods study, fifty low-income Chilean women participated in a survey and twenty were selected to participate in prevention, in-depth interviews. Results show evidence of widespread misinformation and misconceptions related to HIV/AIDS. Machismo and marianismo offer major barriers to prevention programme development. Future HIV prevention should stress partner communication, empowerment and improving the education of women vulnerable to HIV.

  16. Sexual Behavior and Risk Practices of HIV Positive and HIV Negative Rwandan Women.

    PubMed

    Adedimeji, Adebola A; Hoover, Donald R; Shi, Qiuhu; Gard, Tracy; Mutimura, Eugene; Sinayobye, Jean d'Amour; Cohen, Mardge H; Anastos, Kathryn

    2015-07-01

    It is not well understood how infection with HIV and prior experience of sexual violence affects sexual behavior in African women. We describe factors influencing current sexual practices of Rwandan women living with or without HIV/AIDS. By design, 75 % of participants were HIV positive and ~50 % reported having experienced genocidal rape. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fit to describe demographic and clinical characteristics that influenced sexual behavior in the previous 6 months, condom use, history of transactional sex, and prior infection with a non-HIV sexually transmitted disease. Respondents' age, where they lived, whether or not they lived with a husband or partner, experience of sexual trauma, CD4 count, CES-D and PTSD scores were strongly associated with risky sexual behavior and infection with non-HIV STI. HIV positive women with a history of sexual violence in the contexts of war and conflict may be susceptible to some high-risk sexual behaviors.

  17. Thymic function in HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Kolte, Lilian

    2013-04-01

    This thesis is based on seven previously published articles. The work was performed during my employment at The Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, as a scholarship student from 2000-2001 and as a research assistant in the period 2004-2010. HIV-infection is characterized by CD4+ cell depletion. The differences between patients in the degree of CD4+ cell recovery upon treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may in part be due to differences in the supply of naïve CD4+ cells from the thymus. The thymus atrophies with increasing age for which reason the adult thymus was previously assumed to be without function. The aim of these investigations was to examine the role of the thymus in different aspects of HIV-infection: In adult HIV-infected patients, during HIV-positive pregnancy, and in HIV-exposed uninfected (HIV-EU) children born to HIV-infected mothers. Thymic size and output were determined in 25 adult HIV-infected patients receiving HAART and in 10 controls. Larger thymic size was associated with higher CD4 counts and higher thymic output. Furthermore, patients with abundant thymic tissue seemed to have broader immunological repertoires, compared with patients with minimal thymic tissue. The study supports the mounting evidence of a contribution by the adult thymus to immune reconstitution in HIV-infection. In a follow-up study conducted till 5 years of HAART, the importance of the thymus to the rate of cellular restoration was found to primarily lie within the first two years of HAART. The effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) was then investigated in a randomized, double-blinded placebo controlled trial in 46 adult HIV-infected patients on HAART. Daily treatment with a low dose of rhGH of 0.7mg for 40 weeks stimulated thymopoiesis as expressed by thymic size, density, and output strongly supporting the assumption that rhGH possesses the potential to stimulate the ageing thymus, holding

  18. An HIV vaccine: how and when?

    PubMed Central

    Esparza, J.

    2001-01-01

    The best long-term hope for controlling the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) pandemic is a safe, effective and affordable preventive vaccine, but its development has encountered unprecedented scientific challenges. The first phase I trial of an HIV vaccine was conducted in 1987. Subsequently, more than 30 candidate vaccines have been tested in over 60 phase I/II trials, involving approximately 10 000 healthy volunteers. Most of these trials have been conducted in the USA and Europe, but several have also been conducted in developing countries. The first phase III trials began in the USA in 1998 and in Thailand in 1999 to assess the efficacy of the first generation of HIV vaccines (based on the HIV envelope protein, gp120); the results will be available within the next 1-2 years. To accelerate the development of an HIV vaccine, additional candidate vaccines must be evaluated in parallel in both industrialized and developing countries. This will require international collaboration and coordination and critical ethical issues will need to be addressed. To ensure that future HIV vaccines contribute to the overall HIV/AIDS prevention effort, we should begin planning now on how best to use them. PMID:11799445

  19. Risk analysis. HIV / AIDS country profile: Nigeria.

    PubMed

    1997-02-01

    The World Health Organization estimated that 2.2% of Nigeria's adult population was infected with HIV by the end of 1995. A 1993-94 sentinel surveillance report found a 3.8% HIV seroprevalence level among sexually active Nigerians sampled. HIV prevalence is rising in the country. Incidence and prevalence data are presented on HIV and AIDS in sections on antenatal clinics, HIV-1 and HIV-2, group variations, regional variations, age variations, prostitutes, and infection by blood. The Nigerian government has projected that there could be 7 million people infected with HIV in the country by the year 2000. Background is presented on the economy, living standards, health, and population. Vulnerability is then considered with regard to population mobility, drug trafficking, the vulnerability of women, the international sex trade, the military presence in Liberia, sexual attitudes, poverty, and ignorance. The responses of the government and the domestic nongovernment sector are then presented followed by description of external assistance from the World Bank, the US Agency for International Development, the British Overseas Development Agency, the World Health Organization, the private sector, and the European Commission.

  20. HIV-1 Genetic Variability and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in antiretroviral therapy that have revolutionized HIV disease management, effective control of the HIV infection pandemic remains elusive. Beyond the classic non-B endemic areas, HIV-1 non-B subtype infections are sharply increasing in previous subtype B homogeneous areas such as Europe and North America. As already known, several studies have shown that, among non-B subtypes, subtypes C and D were found to be more aggressive in terms of disease progression. Luckily, the response to antiretrovirals against HIV-1 seems to be similar among different subtypes, but these results are mainly based on small or poorly designed studies. On the other hand, differences in rates of acquisition of resistance among non-B subtypes are already being observed. This different propensity, beyond the type of treatment regimens used, as well as access to viral load testing in non-B endemic areas seems to be due to HIV-1 clade specific peculiarities. Indeed, some non-B subtypes are proved to be more prone to develop resistance compared to B subtype. This phenomenon can be related to the presence of subtype-specific polymorphisms, different codon usage, and/or subtype-specific RNA templates. This review aims to provide a complete picture of HIV-1 genetic diversity and its implications for HIV-1 disease spread, effectiveness of therapies, and drug resistance development. PMID:23844315

  1. Transgender HIV prevention: a qualitative needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Bockting, W O; Robinson, B E; Rosser, B R

    1998-08-01

    Although clinical experience and preliminary research suggest that some transgender people are at significant risk for HIV, this stigmatized group has so far been largely ignored in HIV prevention. As part of the development of HIV prevention education targeting the transgender population, focus groups of selected transgender individuals assessed their HIV risks and prevention needs. Data were gathered in the following four areas: (1) the impact of HIV/AIDS on transgender persons; (2) risk factors; (3) information and services needed; and (4) recruitment strategies. Findings indicated that HIV/AIDS compounds stigmatization related to transgender identity, interferes with sexual experimentation during the transgender 'coming out' process, and may interfere with obtaining sex reassignment. Identified transgender-specific risk factors include: sexual identity conflict, shame and isolation, secrecy, search for affirmation, compulsive sexual behaviour, prostitution, and sharing needles while injecting hormones. Community involvement, peer education and affirmation of transgender identity were stressed as integral components of a successful intervention. Education of health professionals about transgender identity and sexuality and support groups for transgender people with HIV/AIDS are urgently needed.

  2. The HIV and AIDS Tribunal of Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Established under Section 25 of the HIV Prevention and Control Act of 2006, the HIV and AIDS Tribunal of Kenya is the only HIV-specific statutory body in the world with the mandate to adjudicate cases relating to violations of HIV-related human rights. Yet, very limited research has been done on this tribunal. Based on findings from a desk research and semi-structured interviews of key informants conducted in Kenya, this article analyzes the composition, mandate, procedures, practice, and cases of the tribunal with the aim to appreciate its contribution to the advancement of human rights in the context of HIV. It concludes that, after a sluggish start, the HIV and AIDS Tribunal of Kenya is now keeping its promise to advance the human rights of people living with and affected by HIV in Kenya, notably through addressing barriers to access to justice, swift ruling, and purposeful application of the law. The article, however, highlights various challenges still affecting the tribunal and its effectiveness, and cautions about the replication of this model in other jurisdictions without a full appraisal. PMID:27781008

  3. Government priorities for preventing HIV / AIDS.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, M

    1998-08-01

    No cure has been found for HIV/AIDS. Therefore, until one is found which is affordable and feasible for use in developing countries, preventing HIV infection is the best way to combat the HIV/AIDS pandemic. All of the many biological characteristics of HIV which affect its rate of spread in a population can be affected through individual behavior. The two most important behaviors which spread HIV are having sexual intercourse with an HIV-infected sex partner without using a condom and sharing unsterilized drug injecting equipment. Strategies to reduce risky behavior include providing information, lowering the costs of condom use and safe injecting behavior, and raising the costs of risky behavior. The costs of condom use include the financial and time costs of buying the condoms, the potential inconvenience and social embarrassment of buying and using them, and reduced pleasure among some users. IV drug users face the problems of getting into and remaining in drug treatment programs, and obtaining sterile injecting equipment. Government priorities in preventing HIV/AIDS and mobilizing political support against AIDS are discussed.

  4. ANAESTHETIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE HIV POSITIVE PARTURIENT

    PubMed Central

    Oluwabukola, Adesina; Adesina, Oladokun

    2009-01-01

    The HIV epidemic in children parallels that among women on account of perinatal transmission. A combination of antiretroviral therapy and elective caesarean section reduces the rate of vertical transmission to <2%. Elective caesarean section independent of antiretroviral therapy decreases the risk of HIV vertical transmission from mother to baby. However, a caesarean section is a major surgical intervention that has well-reported complications. Women infected with HIV have been reported to be more susceptible to such complications. The multi-organ nature of HIV poses challenges at the time of surgery and anesthesia. Preoperative evaluation will allow a good prediction for the perioperative risk of the HIV-patient. The anesthesiologist should be aware of the possible toxic side effects or the possible interaction of antiretroviral drugs with the anesthetics. Some of these adverse effects may mimic signs and symptoms of the HIV disease itself. Regional anesthesia has been shown to be associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in a wide range of patients, including HIV positive parturients. Finally, the possibility of transmission in the health care setting highlights the need for anesthetists to enforce rigorous infection control policies to protect themselves, other health workers and their patients. PMID:25161460

  5. Government urges early, aggressive treatment of HIV.

    PubMed

    1997-07-25

    June 19, 1997 marked the issuance of clinical guidelines for HIV treatment. The guidelines, issued by a panel convened by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Henry J. Kaiser Foundation, recommend treating the infection at an earlier stage and using a three-drug regimen that includes a protease inhibitor. Private insurers may be prompted to remove limits on the prescriptions patients may receive. The treatment guidelines are one of four documents released in June establishing a standard of care for HIV disease. Experts agreed that patients should have their viral loads and CD4+ T-cell counts measured immediately upon testing positive for HIV antibodies and triple-drug combinations should be given to everyone who meets the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) definition of AIDS. The four documents, Report of the NIH Panel to Define Principles of Therapy of HIV Infection, Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents, Guidelines for the Prevention of Opportunistic Infections in Persons with HIV, and Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection in 1997: Updated Recommendations of the International AIDS Society-USA Panel are available on the Internet and through other sources. PMID:11364505

  6. [Prevalence of HIV treatment in PHI].

    PubMed

    Wild, F; Finkenstädt, V

    2013-12-01

    The importance of HIV in PHI is examined on the basis of the "AIDS statistics" of the Association of PHI and pharmaceutical data from PHI. The observation period is from 2007 to 2011. We define a HIV case if a private insured person has submitted at least one HIV-related invoice (e.g., an antiretroviral drug) for reimbursement during the observation period. In 2011, 7,624 people in PHI received HIV therapy, that is 32% (+1888) more than in 2007. The number of new HIV cases in 2011 was 673, and thus 12% (-92) lower than in 2007. The proportion of people receiving antiretroviral therapy in PHI is higher than in the general population in Germany. HIV infections occur in all age groups, but peaks in the age group 41 to 50 years old. Men are affected more than women. In contrast, the number of HIV cases among 11- to 15-year-old girls is higher compared to boys of the same age. PMID:24400400

  7. The evolution of HIV: Inferences using phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Burton, Gregory F.; Crandall, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular phylogenetics has revolutionized the study of not only evolution but also disparate fields such as genomics, bioinformatics, epidemiology, ecology, microbiology, molecular biology and biochemistry. Particularly significant are its achievements in population genetics as a result of the development of coalescent theory, which have contributed to more accurate model-based parameter estimation and explicit hypothesis testing. The study of the evolution of many microorganisms, and HIV in particular, have benefited from these new methodologies. HIV is well suited for such sophisticated population analyses because of its large population sizes, short generation times, high substitution rates and relatively small genomes. All these factors make HIV an ideal and fascinating model to study molecular evolution in real time. Here we review the significant advances made in HIV evolution through the application of phylogenetic approaches. We first examine the relative roles of mutation and recombination on the molecular evolution of HIV and its adaptive response to drug therapy and tissue allocation. We then review some of the fundamental questions in HIV evolution in relation to its origin and diversification and describe some of the insights gained using phylogenies. Finally, we show how phylogenetic analysis has advanced our knowledge of HIV dynamics (i.e., phylodynamics). PMID:22138161

  8. AIDS impact special issue 2015: interpersonal factors associated with HIV partner disclosure among HIV-infected people in China.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu

    2016-01-01

    HIV partner disclosure may facilitate social support, improve psychological well-being among HIV-infected individuals, and promote HIV testing and HIV prevention among their sexual partners. A growing literature emphasizes the critical role of interpersonal factors may play in decision-making and practice regarding HIV partner disclosure. However, there is a dearth of empirical studies that investigate how interpersonal factors may be associated with HIV partner disclosure. Using cross-sectional data collected from 791 HIV-infected people in Guangxi China, we examined the associations between these two interpersonal factors (quality of relationship with partner and family communication) and HIV partner disclosure. Descriptive analysis, t-test analysis, and gender stratified GLM analysis were conducted. We find that disclosing HIV status to partners was significantly related to better quality of relationship with partners and open and effective family communication. Gender and partner HIV status might moderate the associations between interpersonal factors and HIV partner disclosure. Our findings suggest the importance of considering relationship quality and enhancing open and comfortable family communication in HIV disclosure interventions. Gender difference and partner HIV status should be also considered in HIV disclosure intervention to address the diverse needs of HIV-infected people.

  9. AIDS impact special issue 2015: interpersonal factors associated with HIV partner disclosure among HIV-infected people in China.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu

    2016-01-01

    HIV partner disclosure may facilitate social support, improve psychological well-being among HIV-infected individuals, and promote HIV testing and HIV prevention among their sexual partners. A growing literature emphasizes the critical role of interpersonal factors may play in decision-making and practice regarding HIV partner disclosure. However, there is a dearth of empirical studies that investigate how interpersonal factors may be associated with HIV partner disclosure. Using cross-sectional data collected from 791 HIV-infected people in Guangxi China, we examined the associations between these two interpersonal factors (quality of relationship with partner and family communication) and HIV partner disclosure. Descriptive analysis, t-test analysis, and gender stratified GLM analysis were conducted. We find that disclosing HIV status to partners was significantly related to better quality of relationship with partners and open and effective family communication. Gender and partner HIV status might moderate the associations between interpersonal factors and HIV partner disclosure. Our findings suggest the importance of considering relationship quality and enhancing open and comfortable family communication in HIV disclosure interventions. Gender difference and partner HIV status should be also considered in HIV disclosure intervention to address the diverse needs of HIV-infected people. PMID:26899370

  10. AIDS impact special issue 2015: interpersonal factors associated with HIV partner disclosure among HIV-infected people in China

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV partner disclosure may facilitate social support, improve psychological well-being among HIV-infected individuals, and promote HIV testing and HIV prevention among their sexual partners. A growing literature emphasizes the critical role of interpersonal factors may play in decision-making and practice regarding HIV partner disclosure. However, there is a dearth of empirical studies that investigate how interpersonal factors may be associated with HIV partner disclosure. Using cross-sectional data collected from 791 HIV-infected people in Guangxi China, we examined the associations between these two interpersonal factors (quality of relationship with partner and family communication) and HIV partner disclosure. Descriptive analysis, t-test analysis, and gender stratified GLM analysis were conducted. We find that disclosing HIV status to partners was significantly related to better quality of relationship with partners and open and effective family communication. Gender and partner HIV status might moderate the associations between interpersonal factors and HIV partner disclosure. Our findings suggest the importance of considering relationship quality and enhancing open and comfortable family communication in HIV disclosure interventions. Gender difference and partner HIV status should be also considered in HIV disclosure intervention to address the diverse needs of HIV-infected people. PMID:26899370

  11. Mice chronically infected with chimeric HIV resist peripheral and brain superinfection: a model of protective immunity to HIV.

    PubMed

    Kelschenbach, Jennifer L; Saini, Manisha; Hadas, Eran; Gu, Chao-Jiang; Chao, Wei; Bentsman, Galina; Hong, Jessie P; Hanke, Tomas; Sharer, Leroy R; Potash, Mary Jane; Volsky, David J

    2012-06-01

    Infection by some viruses induces immunity to reinfection, providing a means to identify protective epitopes. To investigate resistance to reinfection in an animal model of HIV disease and its control, we employed infection of mice with chimeric HIV, EcoHIV. When immunocompetent mice were infected by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of EcoHIV, they resisted subsequent secondary infection by IP injection, consistent with a systemic antiviral immune response. To investigate the potential role of these responses in restricting neurotropic HIV infection, we established a protocol for efficient EcoHIV expression in the brain following intracranial (IC) inoculation of virus. When mice were inoculated by IP injection and secondarily by IC injection, they also controlled EcoHIV replication in the brain. To investigate their role in EcoHIV antiviral responses, CD8+ T lymphocytes were isolated from spleens of EcoHIV infected and uninfected mice and adoptively transferred to isogenic recipients. Recipients of EcoHIV primed CD8+ cells resisted subsequent EcoHIV infection compared to recipients of cells from uninfected donors. CD8+ spleen cells from EcoHIV-infected mice also mounted modest but significant interferon-γ responses to two HIV Gag peptide pools. These findings suggest EcoHIV-infected mice may serve as a useful system to investigate the induction of anti-HIV protective immunity for eventual translation to human beings.

  12. What Older Adults Know about HIV/AIDS: Lessons from an HIV/AIDS Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, La Fleur F.

    2010-01-01

    Despite being one of the fastest growing segments of the HIV/AIDS caseload, persons age 50 and older have been largely neglected in terms of HIV/AIDS education. This study describes a project involving HIV-related health education for persons [greater than or equal] 50 in an urban area of Ohio. Data from 50 persons age [greater than or equal] 50…

  13. New ILO standard on HIV rejects discrimination against HIV-positive workers.

    PubMed

    Brands, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    2010 saw a significant development in advocating for enhanced rights protection of HIV-positive workers: the adoption of an International Labour Organisation (ILO) recommendation on HIV/AIDS in the employment sphere. In this article, based on a presentation made at AIDS 2010, Ronald Brands outlines the key components of the document and how it seeks to protect employees and job-seekers from discrimination on the grounds of real or perceived HIV status.

  14. New ILO standard on HIV rejects discrimination against HIV-positive workers.

    PubMed

    Brands, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    2010 saw a significant development in advocating for enhanced rights protection of HIV-positive workers: the adoption of an International Labour Organisation (ILO) recommendation on HIV/AIDS in the employment sphere. In this article, based on a presentation made at AIDS 2010, Ronald Brands outlines the key components of the document and how it seeks to protect employees and job-seekers from discrimination on the grounds of real or perceived HIV status. PMID:21413633

  15. Endorsement of compulsory HIV vaccination policy among populations at high risk of HIV exposure (LA VOICES).

    PubMed

    Newman, Peter A; Lee, Sung-Jae; Rudy, Ellen T; Diamant, Allison; Duan, Naihua; Nakazono, Terry; Nakazano, Terry; Cunningham, William E

    2014-06-01

    Compulsory vaccination is a frequently implemented policy option for ensuring comprehensive vaccine coverage. Ongoing controversies around human papillomavirus vaccine dissemination, and suboptimal coverage, suggest the value of assessing acceptability of compulsory vaccinations-particularly among likely target populations-in advance of their public availability to support evidence-informed interventions. With the first HIV vaccine to demonstrate partial efficacy in a large-scale clinical trial, we examined individual characteristics and attitudes associated with support for compulsory HIV vaccination policy among a diverse, representative sample of adults attending probable HIV vaccine dissemination venues in a large urban county. Participants were recruited using three-stage probability sampling from likely venues for future HIV vaccine dissemination. We used Audio-CASI to administer a 60-min structured questionnaire. Items included endorsement of compulsory HIV vaccination policy, sociodemographic characteristics, injecting drug use, vaccine attitudes and perceived HIV risk. Among 1,225 participants (mean age = 36.8 years; 55.6 % males, 37.6 % non-English speaking Hispanic, 78.8 % heterosexual, 25.7 % injection drug users), almost half (48.2 %) endorsed a compulsory HIV vaccination policy. Non-English speaking Hispanics compared to whites, participants with less than high school education, higher positive vaccine attitude scores and higher perceived HIV risk were significantly more likely, and people who inject drugs significantly less likely to endorse compulsory HIV vaccination. Public health interventions to promote positive vaccine attitudes and accurate perceptions of HIV risk among vulnerable populations, and strategies tailored for people who inject drugs, may build support for compulsory HIV vaccination policy and promote broad HIV vaccine coverage.

  16. HIV-Positive–to–HIV-Positive Kidney Transplantation — Results at 3 to 5 Years

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Elmi; Barday, Zunaid; Mendelson, Marc; Kahn, Delawir

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The outcome of kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive patients who receive organs from HIV-negative donors has been reported to be similar to the outcome in HIV-negative recipients. We report the outcomes at 3 to 5 years in HIV-positive patients who received kidneys from HIV-positive deceased donors. METHODS We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized study of kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients who had a CD4 T-cell count of 200 per cubic millimeter or higher and an undetectable plasma HIV RNA level. All the patients were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). The patients received kidneys from deceased donors who tested positive for HIV with the use of fourth-generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at the time of referral. All the donors either had received no ART previously or had received only first-line ART. RESULTS From September 2008 through February 2014, a total of 27 HIV-positive patients underwent kidney transplantation. Survivors were followed for a median of 2.4 years. The rate of survival among the patients was 84% at 1 year, 84% at 3 years, and 74% at 5 years. The corresponding rates of graft survival were 93%, 84%, and 84%. (If a patient died with a functioning graft, the calculation was performed as if the graft had survived.) Rejection rates were 8% at 1 year and 22% at 3 years. HIV infection remained well controlled, with undetectable virus in blood after the transplantation. CONCLUSIONS Kidney transplantation from an HIV-positive donor appears to be an additional treatment option for HIV-infected patients requiring renal-replacement therapy. PMID:25671253

  17. Improving HIV proteome annotation: new features of BioAfrica HIV Proteomics Resource

    PubMed Central

    Druce, Megan; Hulo, Chantal; Masson, Patrick; Sommer, Paula; Xenarios, Ioannis; Le Mercier, Philippe; De Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is one of the pathogens that cause the greatest global concern, with approximately 35 million people currently infected with HIV. Extensive HIV research has been performed, generating a large amount of HIV and host genomic data. However, no effective vaccine that protects the host from HIV infection is available and HIV is still spreading at an alarming rate, despite effective antiretroviral (ARV) treatment. In order to develop effective therapies, we need to expand our knowledge of the interaction between HIV and host proteins. In contrast to virus proteins, which often rapidly evolve drug resistance mutations, the host proteins are essentially invariant within all humans. Thus, if we can identify the host proteins needed for virus replication, such as those involved in transporting viral proteins to the cell surface, we have a chance of interrupting viral replication. There is no proteome resource that summarizes this interaction, making research on this subject a difficult enterprise. In order to fill this gap in knowledge, we curated a resource presents detailed annotation on the interaction between the HIV proteome and host proteins. Our resource was produced in collaboration with ViralZone and used manual curation techniques developed by UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. Our new website also used previous annotations of the BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteome Resource, which has been accessed by approximately 10 000 unique users a year since its inception in 2005. The novel features include a dedicated new page for each HIV protein, a graphic display of its function and a section on its interaction with host proteins. Our new webpages also add information on the genomic location of each HIV protein and the position of ARV drug resistance mutations. Our improved BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteome Resource fills a gap in the current knowledge of biocuration. Database URL: http://www.bioafrica.net/proteomics/HIVproteome.html PMID:27087306

  18. The role of social relationship in HIV healing and its implications in HIV cure in China

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shan; Nie, Jing-Bao; Tucker, Joseph; Rennie, Stuart; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    HIV is both a biomedical disease and a social phenomenon that is constructed in particular cultural contexts. A successful and humane HIV cure requires not only the science of eradicating pathogens, but also the art of healing to restore harmony between mind and body. Healing in the context of HIV cure will be both personal and interpersonal, biological and social, and will involve rebuilding connections between HIV patients and their social environment. Social conceptions of healing have been highlighted in many regions with rich non-biomedical healing traditions, including China. Based on an adapted theoretical model on social relationships and health, we address the essential role of social relations for HIV healing in Chinese cultural context, and propose several recommendations for reforming practices and policies regarding HIV healing. In general, family is still a core social unit in HIV patients’ medical journey from diagnosis to treatment. A positive patient–physician relationship based on mutual respect and trust also has critical impact on patients’ physical and mental health. Physicians may become a key or the main source of social support in circumstances when families are not actively engaged in healing. Reconnecting HIV patients with their communities should be a necessary component of HIV cure, as this will help patients engage more fully in the HIV healing process. We call for a family-centered approach in HIV healing intervention to strengthen patient–family ties; a series of policies to build up and sustain positive patient–physician ties; and multi-level strategies to empower patients and rebuild their bonds to community and larger society. We also call for more empirical research on how non-biomedical healing approaches in various cultural settings could (directly or indirectly) inform HIV cure research. PMID:27042386

  19. Improving HIV proteome annotation: new features of BioAfrica HIV Proteomics Resource.

    PubMed

    Druce, Megan; Hulo, Chantal; Masson, Patrick; Sommer, Paula; Xenarios, Ioannis; Le Mercier, Philippe; De Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is one of the pathogens that cause the greatest global concern, with approximately 35 million people currently infected with HIV. Extensive HIV research has been performed, generating a large amount of HIV and host genomic data. However, no effective vaccine that protects the host from HIV infection is available and HIV is still spreading at an alarming rate, despite effective antiretroviral (ARV) treatment. In order to develop effective therapies, we need to expand our knowledge of the interaction between HIV and host proteins. In contrast to virus proteins, which often rapidly evolve drug resistance mutations, the host proteins are essentially invariant within all humans. Thus, if we can identify the host proteins needed for virus replication, such as those involved in transporting viral proteins to the cell surface, we have a chance of interrupting viral replication. There is no proteome resource that summarizes this interaction, making research on this subject a difficult enterprise. In order to fill this gap in knowledge, we curated a resource presents detailed annotation on the interaction between the HIV proteome and host proteins. Our resource was produced in collaboration with ViralZone and used manual curation techniques developed by UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. Our new website also used previous annotations of the BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteome Resource, which has been accessed by approximately 10 000 unique users a year since its inception in 2005. The novel features include a dedicated new page for each HIV protein, a graphic display of its function and a section on its interaction with host proteins. Our new webpages also add information on the genomic location of each HIV protein and the position of ARV drug resistance mutations. Our improved BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteome Resource fills a gap in the current knowledge of biocuration.Database URL:http://www.bioafrica.net/proteomics/HIVproteome.html. PMID:27087306

  20. Neuroinflammation in treated HIV-positive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Cole, James H.; Boasso, Adriano; Greathead, Louise; Kelleher, Peter; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Kalk, Nicola; Bishop, Courtney; Gunn, Roger N.; Matthews, Paul M.; Winston, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of microglial activation on brain function and structure, and its relationship with peripheral inflammatory markers, in treated, HIV-positive individuals, using in vivo [11C]PBR28 PET (to measure the 18 kDa translocator protein [TSPO]). Methods: Cognitively healthy HIV-positive individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy and HIV-negative individuals (controls) underwent brain [11C]PBR28 PET and MRI. HIV-positive patients completed neuropsychological testing and CSF testing for chemokines. The concentration of bacterial ribosomal 16sDNA in plasma was measured as a marker of microbial translocation. Results: HIV-positive individuals showed global increases in TSPO expression compared to controls (corrected p < 0.01), with significant regional increases in the parietal (p = 0.001) and occipital (p = 0.046) lobes and in the globus pallidus (p = 0.035). TSPO binding in the hippocampus, amygdala, and thalamus were associated with poorer global cognitive performance in tasks assessing verbal and visual memory (p < 0.05). Increased TSPO binding was associated with increased brain white matter diffusion MRI mean diffusivity in HIV-positive individuals, a lower CD4/CD8 ratio, and both high pretreatment HIV RNA and plasma concentration ribosomal 16s DNA (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Cognitively healthy HIV-positive individuals show evidence for a chronically activated brain innate immune response and elevated blood markers of microbial translocation despite effective control of plasma viremia. Increased brain inflammation is associated with poorer cognitive performance and white matter microstructural pathology, suggesting a possible role in cognitive impairments found in some HIV-positive patients despite effective treatment. PMID:26911637

  1. Resilience among asylum seekers living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A small body of evidence demonstrates the challenges faced by migrant communities living with HIV but has yet to consider in-depth the experience of asylum seekers whose residency status is undetermined. The overall aim of our study was to explore the experiences of those who are both living with HIV and seeking asylum. This paper focuses on the stressors precipitated by the HIV diagnosis and by going through the asylum system; as well as participants’ resilience in responding to these stressors and the consequences for their health and wellbeing. Methods We conducted an ethnographic study. Fieldwork took place in the UK between 2008–2009 and included: 350 hours of observation at voluntary services providing support to black and minority ethnic groups living with HIV; 29 interviews and four focus group discussions with those who were seeking asylum and living with HIV; and 15 interviews with their health and social care providers. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method. Results There were three main stressors that threatened participants’ resilience. First, migration caused them to leave behind many resources (including social support). Second, stigmatising attitudes led their HIV diagnosis to be a taboo subject furthering their isolation. Third, they found themselves trapped in the asylum system, unable to influence the outcome of their case and reliant on HIV treatment to stay alive. Participants were, however, very resourceful in dealing with these experiences. Resilience processes included: staying busy, drawing on personal faith, and the support received through HIV care providers and voluntary organisations. Even so, their isolated existence meant participants had limited access to social resources, and their treatment in the asylum system had a profound impact on perceived health and wellbeing. Conclusions Asylum seekers living with HIV in the UK show immense resilience. However, their isolation means they are often unable

  2. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-08

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC{sub 50}), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC{sub 50}) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1{sub IIIB} were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  3. Crossing borders: HIV / AIDS and migrant communities.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    The annual National Council for International Health Private Volunteer Organization (PVO)/AIDS workshop took place June 30, 1994, in Arlington, Virginia. About 90 representatives of PVOs, domestic and international nongovernmental organizations (NGO), universities, and research organizations were in attendance. Speakers presented both domestic and international perspectives upon the relationship between migration trends and HIV transmission. The keynote address spelled out the UN High Commission on Refugees' policy on HIV/AIDS: refugees are not a risk group per se, and they should benefit from the same control measures as the general host population; there will be no mandatory HIV screening in any population; and the rights of HIV-positive refugees against being deported and for asylum and eventual repatriation need to be protected. The following issues were presented at the workshop: an overview of HIV/AIDS and migration issues; STD/HIV control and prevention; HIV/AIDS among highly mobile populations along the Thailand/Myanmar border; migration trends in Phnom Penh, Cambodia; migrant farmworkers working in the US; changes in sexual practices among Mexican migrants to the US and their impact on the risk of HIV transmission; the importance of understanding the epidemiology, health-care seeking behaviors, and health beliefs of immigrants; the ability of PVOs and NGOs to provide effective HIV/AIDS prevention for refugees and migrants; the impact of political instability and civil strife on population movements and the prevalence of high-risk behaviors; and the important considerations needed for work with special target populations such as adolescents, women, mobile seasonal migrants, and urban residents.

  4. HIV ISSUES AND MAPUCHES IN CHILE

    PubMed Central

    Cianelli, Rosina; Ferrer, Lilian; Cabieses, Báltica; Araya, Alejandra; Matsumoto, Cristina; Miner, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Chile is a country with an incipient HIV epidemic. Just as in other countries, disadvantaged groups in Chile are contributing to the increased incidence of the disease. The Mapuche indigenous population is one such group that has been affected by the spread of HIV. However, no prevention programs are tailored to the culturally specific needs of this community. In recognition of this discrepancy, an academic-community partnership was formed to develop an HIV educational module for a Mapuche community. The module was developed for use as part of an already established health-related program. The aims of the module were to identify perceptions about HIV among Mapuches and present information specific to HIV and its prevention. Focus was placed on cultural sensitivity. The module was carried out in connection with a first-aid course in an attempt to increase effectiveness of the intervention by working jointly with an established community program. Sixteen (16) Mapuches participated voluntarily and demonstrated some knowledge regarding HIV, but they lacked an overall understanding as to how it is transmitted and why prevention strategies are affective. Participants correctly identified sexual contact as a means of transmission, but when asked why, one person stated, “I just know it, I read it.” There were significant barriers to communication within the group, secondary to cultural practices related to age and gender. Major obstacles in controlling HIV are the lack of prevention strategies targeted to disadvantaged groups. The module developed for this intervention was the first effort of the Academic Community Partnership established between the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and the Mapuche group around HIV prevention. Continued collaboration between academia and affected communities as well as incorporating HIV information into established programs are effective strategies for delivering prevention information to disadvantaged populations and for

  5. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-01

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC(50)), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC(50)) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1(IIIB) were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  6. HIV antiviral drug resistance: patient comprehension.

    PubMed

    Racey, C Sarai; Zhang, Wendy; Brandson, Eirikka K; Fernandes, Kimberly A; Tzemis, Despina; Harrigan, P Richard; Montaner, Julio S G; Barrios, Rolando; Toy, Junine; Hogg, Robert S

    2010-07-01

    A patient's understanding and use of healthcare information can affect their decisions regarding treatment. Better patient understanding about HIV resistance may improve adherence to therapy, decrease population viral load and extend the use of first-line HIV therapies. We examined knowledge of developing HIV resistance and explored treatment outcomes in a cohort of HIV+ persons on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The longitudinal investigations into supportive and ancillary health services (LISA) cohort is a prospective study of HIV+ persons on HAART. A comprehensive interviewer-administrated survey collected socio-demographic variables. Drug resistance knowledge was determined using a three-part definition. Clinical markers were collected through linkage with the Drug Treatment Program (DTP) at the British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. Categorical variables were compared using Fisher's Exact Test and continuous variables using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Proportional odds logistic regression was performed for the adjusted multivariable analysis. Of 457 LISA participants, less than 4% completely defined HIV resistance and 20% reported that they had not discussed resistance with their physician. Overall, 61% of the cohort is >or=95% adherent based on prescription refills. Owing to small numbers pooling was preformed for analyses. The model showed that being younger (OR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.95-0.99), having greater than high school education (OR=1.64, 95% CI: 1.07-2.51), discussing medication with physicians (OR=3.67, 95% CI: 1.76-7.64), having high provider trust (OR=1.02, 95% CI: 1.01-1.03), and receiving one-to-one counseling by a pharmacist (OR=2.14, 95% CI: 1.41-3.24) are predictive of a complete or partial definition of HIV resistance. The probability of completely defining HIV resistance increased from 15.8 to 63.9% if respondents had discussed HIV medication with both a physician and a pharmacist. Although the understanding of HIV

  7. Migrant workers spreading HIV in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    1996-10-21

    Interruption of the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) across southeast Asian borders by legal and illegal migrant laborers is a major concern of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). ASEAN intends to move immediately to implement regional projects focused on education, information sharing, and improved surveillance. HIV transmission from laborers from poorer countries in search of jobs in economically booming regions underscores the global nature of the AIDS problem. Malaysia, for example, has over 1 million illegal workers. Moreover, many legal guest workers who enter Malaysia with letters from a physician stating they are not HIV-infected have falsified documents. PMID:12320478

  8. HIV-1 Superinfection Resembles Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sheward, Daniel J.; Ntale, Roman; Garrett, Nigel J.; Woodman, Zenda L.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Williamson, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of superinfection as a model to identify correlates of protection against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) depends on whether the superinfecting transmission resembles primary infection, which has not been established. Here, we characterize the genetic bottleneck in superinfected individuals for the first time. In all 3 cases, superinfection produced a spike in viral load and could be traced to a single, C-C chemokine receptor 5–tropic founder virus with shorter, less glycosylated variable regions than matched chronic viruses. These features are consistent with primary HIV transmission and provide support for the use of superinfection as a model to address correlates of protection against HIV. PMID:25754982

  9. Assessing the impact of HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, B D

    1990-03-01

    This article presents a definition of HIV disease as a four-stage process. The Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) (Bergner, Bobbitt, Carter, & Gilson, 1981) was used to measure behavioral dysfunction in a sample of 15 persons with Stage 3 or Stage 4 (symptomatic) HIV disease. The areas of work, leisure, cognitive behavior, and emotional behavior were found to be, on the average, most affected by HIV disease. A diagnosis of AIDS does not affect the severity of dysfunction. Functional deficits that are experienced for longer periods of time affect several behavioral categories on the SIP as well as on the overall SIP score.

  10. The T-Cell Response to HIV

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Bruce; McMichael, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    HIV is a disease in which the original clinical observations of severe opportunistic infections gave the first clues regarding the underlying pathology, namely that HIV is essentially an infection of the immune system. HIV infects and deletes CD4+ T cells that normally coordinate the adaptive T- and B-cell response to defend against intracellular pathogens. The immune defect is immediate and profound: At the time of acute infection with an AIDS virus, typically more than half of the gut-associated CD4+ T cells are depleted, leaving a damaged immune system to contend with a life-long infection. PMID:23002014

  11. Reducing the cost of HIV antibody testing.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, H; Maskill, W; Emmanuel, J; Fauquex, A; Sato, P; Heymann, D

    1993-07-10

    Available tests to detect antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have a range of applications, and injudicious selection and inappropriate use can add a significant financial burden to budgets for AIDS programmes in developing countries. There are several ways by which the cost of HIV antibody testing can be reduced; they include use of tests appropriate for existing laboratory capabilities; adoption of cost-effective testing strategies; pooling of serum samples before testing; and ensuring best possible purchase prices. Each approach can significantly reduce the cost of HIV antibody testing alone or in combination, which increases the potential sustainability of antibody testing programmes, even in settings of limited resources. PMID:8100916

  12. HIV in India: the Jogini culture

    PubMed Central

    Borick, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Jogini is the name for a female sexually exploited temple attendant and is used interchangeably with Devadasi in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India. Jogini are twice more likely than other women who are used for sexual intercourse in India to be HIV positive, and their rate of mortality from HIV is 10 times the total mortality rate for all women in India. The four states in India with the most Jogini also have the highest prevalence of HIV. The following case is unfortunately typical of the Jogini and sheds light on a potentially disastrous public health problem in rural South India. PMID:25015167

  13. The role of enacted stigma in parental HIV disclosure among HIV-infected parents in China

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong; Tang, Zhenzhu; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    Existing studies have delineated that HIV-infected parents face numerous challenges in disclosing their HIV infection to the children (“parental HIV disclosure”), and practices of parental HIV disclosure vary with individual characteristics, family contexts, and social environment. Using cross-sectional data from 1254 HIV-infected parents who had children aged 5–16 years in southwest China, the current study examined the association of parental HIV disclosure with mental health and medication adherence among parents and explored the possible effect of enacted stigma on such association. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that parents who had experienced disclosure to children reported higher level enacted stigma, worse mental health conditions, and poorer medication adherence. Enacted stigma partially mediated the associations between disclosure and both mental health and medication adherence after controlling basic background characteristics. Our findings highlight the importance of providing appropriate disclosure-related training and counseling service among HIV-infected parents. In a social setting where HIV-related stigma is still persistent, disclosure intervention should address and reduce stigma and discrimination in the practice of parental HIV disclosure. PMID:26616123

  14. HIV-related stigma in a sample of HIV-affected older female African American caregivers

    PubMed

    Poindexter; Linsk

    1999-01-01

    Older women of color increasingly act as informal caregivers for adults and children with HIV disease. Nineteen older female (mostly African American) informal caregivers of HIV-infected individuals participated in qualitative interviews to explore their experiences with HIV-related stigma. Perceived and directly experienced stigma were examined in the context of disclosure of the presence of HIV disease. Overt HIV-related stigma was rarely experienced by these respondents, primarily because they had not widely disclosed the presence of HIV in the family and therefore had not given anyone the opportunity to ostracize or judge them. HIV-related stigma was internalized, so that disclosure decisions were based on their anticipation of censure. There also was evidence of associative stigma and of stigma management. The findings suggest the need for social work practitioners to increase awareness of the needs of stigmatized, isolated HIV-affected caregivers. Practitioners should conduct aggressive outreach and strive to provide more support to this often invisible population of caregivers to HIV-infected people. PMID:9922729

  15. Parental HIV disclosure: from perspectives of children affected by HIV in Henan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junfeng; Li, Xiaoming; Qiao, Shan; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhang, Liying; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    Culturally and developmentally appropriate parental HIV disclosure (i.e., parents disclose their HIV infection to children) has been shown to be closely related with the well-being of both HIV-infected parents and their children. However, current practices and effects of parental HIV disclosure remain poorly understood in low- and middle-income countries including China. Quantitative data from 626 children affected by parental HIV (orphans and vulnerable children) in Henan, China, were collected in 2011 to examine children's perceptions and knowledge regarding their parents' HIV disclosure practices and to assess the associations of these practices with children's demographic and psychosocial factors. The data in the current study revealed that only a small proportion of children learned parental HIV infection from their parents (direct disclosure), and many of these disclosure seemed being unplanned. Among the children who were not told by their parents, at least 95% of them either knew parental illness from others (indirect disclosure) or from their own observations or suspicions. The children reported similar disclosure practices by fathers and mothers. There were minimum differences between disclosed and nondisclosed children on a number of psychosocial measures. The findings support the notion that parental HIV disclosure is a complex process and can only be beneficial if it is carefully planned. The data in the current study suggest the needs for the culturally and developmentally appropriate approach in parental HIV disclosure in order to maximize both short- and long-term benefits to children, parents, and family functioning.

  16. Integrating HIV Care and HIV Prevention: Legal, Policy, and Programmatic Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Remien, Robert H.; Berkman, Alan; Myer, Landon; Bastos, Francisco I.; Kagee, Ashraf; El-Sadr, Wafaa

    2009-01-01

    Since the start of the HIV epidemic we have witnessed significant advances in our understanding of the impact of HIV disease worldwide. Further, breakthroughs in treatment and the rapid expansion of HIV care and treatment programs in heavily impacted countries over the past five years are potentially critical assets in a comprehensive approach to controlling the continued spread of HIV globally. A strategic approach to controlling the epidemic requires continued and comparable expansion and integration of care, treatment, and prevention programs. As every new infection involves transmission, whether vertically or horizontally, from a person already living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), integration of HIV prevention into HIV care settings has the potential to prevent thousands of new infections, as well as improve the lives of PLWHAs. In this paper, we highlight how to better utilize opportunities created by the antiretroviral (ARV) roll-out to achieve more effective prevention, particularly in Sub Saharan Africa. We offer specific recommendations for action in the domains of healthcare policy and practice in order to better utilize the advances in HIV treatment to advance HIV prevention. PMID:18641470

  17. Late HIV testing in a cohort of HIV-infected patients followed in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Tossas-Milligan, Katherine Y.; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F.; Mayor, Angel M.; Fernandez-Santos, Diana M.; Dworkin, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Late HIV testing (LT) defined as an AIDS diagnosis within a year of first positive HIV test is associated with higher HIV transmission, lower HAART effectiveness, and worse outcomes. Latinos represent 36% of LT in the US, yet research concerning LT among HIV cases in Puerto Rico is scarce. Methods Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with LT and Cochran-Armitage test to describe LT trends in an HIV infected cohort followed at a specialized HIV clinic in Puerto Rico. Results From 2000 to 2011, 47% of eligible patients were LT, with lower median CD4 count (54 vs. 420 cells/mm3) and higher median HIV viral load counts (253,680 vs. 23,700 copies/mL), when compared to non-LT patients. LT prevalence decreased significantly, from 47% in 2000 to 37% in 2011. In a mutually adjusted logistic regression model, males, older age at enrolment and past history of IDU significantly increased LT odds whereas history of amphetamine use decreased LT odds. Stratified by mode of transmission, only men who have sex with men (MSM), had a significant reduction in the proportion of LT, from 67% in 2000 to 33% in 2011. Conclusion These results suggest a gap in early HIV detection in Puerto Rico that decreased only among MSM. A closer evaluation of HIV testing guideline implementation among non MSM in the Island is needed. PMID:26356739

  18. Neuropathogenesis of HIV: from initial neuroinvasion to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND).

    PubMed

    Zayyad, Zaina; Spudich, Serena

    2015-03-01

    Early in the HIV epidemic, the central nervous system (CNS) was recognized as a target of infection and injury in the advanced stages of disease. Though the most severe forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) related to severe immunosuppression are rare in the current era of widespread combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), evidence now supports pathological involvement of the CNS throughout the course of infection. Recent work suggests that the stage for HIV neuropathogenesis may be set with initial viral entry into the CNS, followed by initiation of pathogenetic processes including neuroinflammation and neurotoxicity, and establishment of local, compartmentalized HIV replication that may reflect a tissue reservoir for HIV. Key questions still exist as to when HIV establishes local infection in the CNS, which CNS cells are the primary targets of HIV, and what mechanistic processes underlie the injury to neurons that produce clinical symptoms of HAND. Advances in these areas will provide opportunities for improved treatment of patients with established HAND, prevention of neurological disease in those with early stage infection, and understanding of HIV tissue reservoirs that will aid efforts at HIV eradication.

  19. A national surveillance system for newly acquired HIV infection in Australia. National HIV Surveillance Committee.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, A M; Gertig, D M; Crofts, N; Kaldor, J M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to describe the establishment of a national surveillance system for newly acquired human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and present the first 3 years' results. METHODS. All new cases of diagnosed HIV infection were reported to the national HIV surveillance center through state and territory health authorities. Information sought on each case included evidence of whether the infection had been newly acquired, defined by the diagnosis of HIV seroconversion illness or by the report of a negative or indeterminate HIV antibody test result occurring within the 12 months prior to diagnosis of infection. RESULTS. Of 3602 reported cases of HIV infection in adults and adolescents newly diagnosed in Australia between 1991 and 1993, 11.4% were identified as newly acquired. The majority (85%) of cases of newly diagnosed HIV infection occurred among men who reported homosexual contact, and 15% of these cases were identified as newly acquired. Average age at diagnosis was 31 years for cases of newly acquired infection and 34 years for other cases. CONCLUSIONS. Surveillance for newly acquired HIV infection has been established at a national level in Australia and provides valuable information for planning primary HIV prevention programs. PMID:7998631

  20. An exploratory study of HIV-prevention advocacy by persons in HIV care in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Tumwine, Christopher; Nannungi, Annet; Ssegujja, Eric; Nekesa, Nicolate; Ssali, Sarah; Atuyambe, Lynn; Ryan, Gery; Wagner, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    To explore how people living with HIV (PLHIV) and in care encourage others to adopt HIV-protective behaviours, we conducted in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 40 HIV clinic patients in Kampala, Uganda. Content analysis was used to examine the message content, trigger events, and outcomes of HIV-prevention advocacy events initiated by the HIV clients with members of their social networks. The content themes included encouraging specific behaviours, such as HIV testing and treatment, condom use and non-promiscuity, as well as more general cautionary messages about protecting oneself from HIV infection. Common triggers for bringing up HIV-prevention advocacy information in a discussion or conversation included: wanting to prevent the targeted person from ‘falling into the same problems,’ wanting to benefit oneself with regard to avoiding re-infection, out of concern that the target would engage in higher-risk behaviour, due to observed changes in the target’s health, and to convey information after receiving treatment at the clinic. The participants mostly reported positive or neutral responses to these advocacy events; negative responses were rare. Interventions to empower PLHIV to be agents of change could represent a new frontier for HIV prevention. PMID:24910590

  1. Parental HIV disclosure: from perspectives of children affected by HIV in Henan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junfeng; Li, Xiaoming; Qiao, Shan; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhang, Liying; Stanton, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    Culturally and developmentally appropriate parental HIV disclosure (i.e., parents disclose their HIV infection to children) has been shown to be closely related with the well-being of both HIV-infected parents and their children. However, current practices and effects of parental HIV disclosure remain poorly understood in low- and middle-income countries including China. Quantitative data from 626 children affected by parental HIV (orphans and vulnerable children) in Henan, China, were collected in 2011 to examine children's perceptions and knowledge regarding their parents' HIV disclosure practices and to assess the associations of these practices with children's demographic and psychosocial factors. The data in the current study revealed that only a small proportion of children learned parental HIV infection from their parents (direct disclosure), and many of these disclosure seemed being unplanned. Among the children who were not told by their parents, at least 95% of them either knew parental illness from others (indirect disclosure) or from their own observations or suspicions. The children reported similar disclosure practices by fathers and mothers. There were minimum differences between disclosed and nondisclosed children on a number of psychosocial measures. The findings support the notion that parental HIV disclosure is a complex process and can only be beneficial if it is carefully planned. The data in the current study suggest the needs for the culturally and developmentally appropriate approach in parental HIV disclosure in order to maximize both short- and long-term benefits to children, parents, and family functioning. PMID:25465533

  2. Neuropathogenesis of HIV: from initial neuroinvasion to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND).

    PubMed

    Zayyad, Zaina; Spudich, Serena

    2015-03-01

    Early in the HIV epidemic, the central nervous system (CNS) was recognized as a target of infection and injury in the advanced stages of disease. Though the most severe forms of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) related to severe immunosuppression are rare in the current era of widespread combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), evidence now supports pathological involvement of the CNS throughout the course of infection. Recent work suggests that the stage for HIV neuropathogenesis may be set with initial viral entry into the CNS, followed by initiation of pathogenetic processes including neuroinflammation and neurotoxicity, and establishment of local, compartmentalized HIV replication that may reflect a tissue reservoir for HIV. Key questions still exist as to when HIV establishes local infection in the CNS, which CNS cells are the primary targets of HIV, and what mechanistic processes underlie the injury to neurons that produce clinical symptoms of HAND. Advances in these areas will provide opportunities for improved treatment of patients with established HAND, prevention of neurological disease in those with early stage infection, and understanding of HIV tissue reservoirs that will aid efforts at HIV eradication. PMID:25604237

  3. The Spanish HIV BioBank: a model of cooperative HIV research

    PubMed Central

    García-Merino, Isabel; de las Cuevas, Natividad; Jiménez, José Luis; Gallego, Jorge; Gómez, Coral; Prieto, Cristina; Serramía, Ma Jesús; Lorente, Raquel; Muñoz-Fernández, Ma Ángeles

    2009-01-01

    Background The collection of samples from HIV-infected patients is the beginning of the chain of translational research. To carry out quality research that could eventually end in a personalized treatment for HIV, it is essential to guarantee the availability, quality and traceability of samples, under a strict system of quality management. Methods The Spanish HIV BioBank was created with the objectives of processing, storing and providing distinct samples from HIV/AIDS patients, categorized according to strictly defined characteristics, free of charge to research projects. Strict compliance to ethical norms is always guaranteed. Results At the moment, the HIV BioBank possesses nearly 50,000 vials containing different prospective longitudinal study sample types. More than 1,700 of these samples are now used in 19 national and international research projects. Conclusion The HIV BioBank represents a novel approach to HIV research that might be of general interest not only for basic and clinical research teams working on HIV, but also for those groups trying to establish large networks focused on research on specific clinical problems. It also represents a model to stimulate cooperative research among large numbers of research groups working as a network on specific clinical problems. The main objective of this article is to show the structure and function of the HIV BioBank that allow it to very efficiently release samples to different research project not only in Spain but also in other countries. PMID:19272145

  4. Can money prevent the spread of HIV? A review of cash payments for HIV prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pettifor, Audrey; MacPhail, Catherine; Nguyen, Nadia; Rosenberg, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Cash payments to improve health outcomes have been used for many years, however, their use for HIV prevention is new and the impact not yet well understood. We provide a brief background on the rationale behind using cash to improve health outcomes, review current studies completed or underway using cash for prevention of sexual transmission of HIV, and outline some key considerations on the use of cash payments to prevent HIV infections. We searched the literature for studies that implemented cash transfer programs and measured HIV or HIV-related outcomes. We identified 16 studies meeting our criteria; 10 are completed. The majority of studies have been conducted with adolescents in developing countries and payments are focused on addressing structural risk factors such as poverty. Most have seen reductions in sexual behavior and one large trial has documented a difference in HIV prevalence between young women getting cash transfers and those not. Cash transfer programs focused on changing risky sexual behaviors to reduce HIV risk suggest promise. The context in which programs are situated, the purpose of the cash transfer, and the population will all affect the impact of such programs; ongoing RCTs with HIV incidence endpoints will shed more light on the efficacy of cash payments as strategy for HIV prevention. PMID:22760738

  5. [Endocrine abnormalities in HIV infections].

    PubMed

    Verges, B; Chavanet, P; Desgres, J; Kisterman, J P; Waldner, A; Vaillant, G; Portier, H; Brun, J M; Putelat, R

    The finding of endocrine gland lesions at pathological examination in AIDS and reports of several cases of endocrine disease in patients with this syndrome have prompted us to study endocrine functions in 63 patients (51 men, 12 women) with HIV-1 infection. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) classification system, 13 of these patients were stage CDC II, 27 stage CDC III and 23 stage CDC IV. We explored the adrenocortical function (ACTH, immediate tetracosactrin test) and the thyroid function (free T3 and T4 levels, TRH on TSH test) in all 63 patients. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (testosterone levels, LHRH test) and prolactin secretion (THR test) were explored in the 51 men. The results obtained showed early peripheral testicular insufficiency at stage CDC II and early pituitary gland abnormalities with hypersecretion of ACTH and prolactin also at stage CDC II. On the other hand, adrenocortical and pituitary abnormalities were not frequently found. The physiopathology of the endocrine abnormalities observed in HIV-1-infected patients remains unclear, but one may suspect that it involves interleukin-1 since this protein factor has recently been shown to stimulate the corticotropin-releasing hormone secretion and to act directly on the glycoprotein capsule of the virus (gp 120) whose structure is similar to that of some neurohormones.

  6. Risk appraisal and HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Odets, W

    1996-09-01

    Previous HIV prevention efforts, particularly for gay men, focused largely on the elimination of risk through condom use or abstinence. However, as evidenced by current levels of new HIV seroconversions, gay men are still practicing unprotected anal sex. Many public health officials previously attributed this behavior to continued ignorance, chemically-induced impairment, malice, or psychopathology. Evidence now demonstrates that these factors have had little influence on risky behaviors. Researchers are finding that what is absent from the risk elimination strategy are the feelings about trust, intimacy, and sexual communication. Exercising harm reduction approaches that weigh the relative value of the activity and the costs of taking the risks is a better strategy. Client-centered counseling is a key means of facilitating this harm reduction approach. Designed to address some of the psychosocial issues, client-centered counseling takes into account an individual's experience of the risks and benefits involved, and allows the client to weigh personal values against potential risks. However, the strategy can be flawed when educators are not properly trained. Counselors and educators may find client-centered approaches uncomfortable if they have not examined their own value systems. Respect for clients, their values, and their efforts are necessary for effective client-centered counseling.

  7. HIV, prisoners, and human rights.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Leonard S; Amon, Joseph J; McLemore, Megan; Eba, Patrick; Dolan, Kate; Lines, Rick; Beyrer, Chris

    2016-09-17

    Worldwide, a disproportionate burden of HIV, tuberculosis, and hepatitis is present among current and former prisoners. This problem results from laws, policies, and policing practices that unjustly and discriminatorily detain individuals and fail to ensure continuity of prevention, care, and treatment upon detention, throughout imprisonment, and upon release. These government actions, and the failure to ensure humane prison conditions, constitute violations of human rights to be free of discrimination and cruel and inhuman treatment, to due process of law, and to health. Although interventions to prevent and treat HIV, tuberculosis, hepatitis, and drug dependence have proven successful in prisons and are required by international law, they commonly are not available. Prison health services are often not governed by ministries responsible for national public health programmes, and prison officials are often unwilling to implement effective prevention measures such as needle exchange, condom distribution, and opioid substitution therapy in custodial settings, often based on mistaken ideas about their incompatibility with prison security. In nearly all countries, prisoners face stigma and social marginalisation upon release and frequently are unable to access health and social support services. Reforms in criminal law, policing practices, and justice systems to reduce imprisonment, reforms in the organisation and management of prisons and their health services, and greater investment of resources are needed. PMID:27427457

  8. [the epidemiology of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Chêne, G

    1999-10-15

    By the end of 1998, estimates indicate that 33.4 millions people were infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus. Over two-thirds of these people live in Sub-Saharian Africa, where HIV has mostly spread through sex between men and women. Today, the epidemic is spreading rapidly in the southern countries of Africa. One-fifth of infected people live in South and South-East Asia, where the epidemic was identified from 1992, mostly in intra-venous drug injectors, sex workers and their clients. In Latin America (4% of infected people), men who have sex with men and drug injectors are the transmission categories mostly concerned. Countries of North America and western Europe concentrated 2.7% of infected people. HIV incidence is stable and AIDS cases in many industrialized countries are falling. AIDS is one of the ten first causes of death in the world; early testing and prevention should remain a high priority in all countries over the world.

  9. Significant impact of non-B HIV-1 variants genetic diversity in Gabon on plasma HIV-1 RNA quantitation.

    PubMed

    Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Mabika-Mabika, Arsène; Alalade, Patrick; Mongo, Arnaud Delis; Sica, Jeanne; Liégeois, Florian; Rouet, François

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of HIV-1 RNA viral load assays are lacking in Central Africa. The main objective of our study was to assess the reliability of HIV-1 RNA results obtained with three different assays for samples collected in Gabon. A total of 137 plasma specimens were assessed for HIV-1 RNA using the Abbott RealTime HIV-1® and Nuclisens HIV-1 EasyQ® version 2.0 assays. It included HIV-1 non-B samples (n = 113) representing six subtypes, 10 CRFs and 18 URFs from patients infected with HIV-1 and treated with antiretrovirals that were found HIV-1 RNA positive (≥300 copies/ml) with the Generic HIV viral load® assay; and samples (n = 24) from untreated individuals infected with HIV-1 but showing undetectable (<300 copies/ml) results with the Biocentric kit. For samples found positive with the Generic HIV viral load® test, correlation coefficients obtained between the three techniques were relatively low (R = 0.65 between Generic HIV viral load® and Abbott RealTime HIV-1®, 0.50 between Generic HIV viral load® and Nuclisens HIV-1 EasyQ®, and 0.66 between Abbott RealTime HIV-1® and Nuclisens HIV-1 EasyQ®). Discrepancies by at least one log10 were obtained for 19.6%, 33.7%, and 20% of samples, respectively, irrespective of genotype. Most of samples (22/24) from untreated study patients, found negative with the Biocentric kit, were also found negative with the two other techniques. In Central Africa, HIV-1 genetic diversity remains challenging for viral load testing. Further studies are required in the same area to confirm the presence of HIV-1 strains that are not amplified with at least two different viral load assays.

  10. HIV/AIDS: a minority health issue.

    PubMed

    Cargill, Victoria A; Stone, Valerie E

    2005-07-01

    HIV infection among racial and ethnic minorities is an ongoing health crisis. The disproportionate impact of HIV infection on racial and ethnic minorities has affected communities already struggling with many social and economic challenges, such as poverty, substance abuse, homelessness,unequal access to health care, and unequal treatment once in the health care system. Superimposed on these challenges is HIV infection, the transmission of which is facilitated by many of these factors. Although the epidemic is disproportionately affecting all racial and ethnic minorities, within these minority populations women are particularly affected. The care and management of racial and ethnic minorities who have HIV infection has been complicated by the unequal access to health care and the unequal treatment once enrolled in health care. Health insurance status, lack of concordance between the race of the patient and the provider, and satisfaction with the quality of their care all impact on treatment outcomes in this population. In addition, the provider must be aware of the many comorbid conditions that may affect the delivery of care to minority patients living with HIV infection: depression, substance and alcohol abuse, and posttraumatic stress disorders. The impact of these comorbid conditions on the therapeutic relationship, including treatment and adherence, warrants screening for these disorders and treating them when identified. Because the patient provider relationship has been repeatedly identified as a predictor of higher adherence, developing and maintaining a strong therapeutic alliance is critical. Participation of racial and ethnic minorities in HIV clinical trials, as in other disease states, has been very poor. Racial and ethnic minorities have been chronically underrepresented in HIV clinical trials, despite their overrepresentation in the HIV epidemiology. This underrepresentation seems to be the result of a combination of factors including (1) provider

  11. Maximizing the impact of HIV prevention efforts: Interventions for couples

    PubMed Central

    Medley, Amy; Baggaley, Rachel; Bachanas, Pamela; Cohen, Myron; Shaffer, Nathan; Lo, Ying-Ru

    2015-01-01

    Despite efforts to increase access to HIV testing and counseling services, population coverage remains low. As a result, many people in sub-Saharan Africa do not know their own HIV status or the status of their sex partner(s). Recent evidence, however, indicates that as many as half of HIV-positive individuals in ongoing sexual relationships have an HIV-negative partner and that a significant proportion of new HIV infections in generalized epidemics occur within serodiscordant couples. Integrating couples HIV testing and counseling (CHTC) into routine clinic- and community-based services can significantly increase the number of couples where the status of both partners is known. Offering couples a set of evidence-based interventions once their HIV status has been determined can significantly reduce HIV incidence within couples and if implemented with sufficient scale and coverage, potentially reduce population-level HIV incidence as well. This article describes these interventions and their potential benefits. PMID:23656251

  12. HLA-associated susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Fabio, G; Scorza, R; Lazzarin, A; Marchini, M; Zarantonello, M; D'Arminio, A; Marchisio, P; Plebani, A; Luzzati, R; Costigliola, P

    1992-01-01

    We studied HLA antigen distribution of 50 heterosexual partners of HIV+ drug abusers with more than 1 year of sexual exposure to HIV, 36 children born to seropositive mothers and 61 haemophiliac patients exposed to presumably infectious clotting factor concentrates. B52 and B44 antigens were associated with HIV resistance while B51 was associated with HIV susceptibility. Forty-nine HIV+ drug abusers, spouses of heterosexual partners studied and 25 HIV+ mothers of the children were also typed. DR11 phenotype was associated with infectiousness of HIV+ subjects. Our data suggest that the HLA region controls susceptibility to infection with HIV and infectiousness of HIV+ subjects in different risk groups. PMID:1733633

  13. Veterans’ Perspectives on Interventions to Improve Retention in HIV Care

    PubMed Central

    Kertz, Barbara L.; Cully, Jeffery A.; Stanley, Melinda A.; Davila, Jessica A.; Dang, Bich N.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Giordano, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Poor retention in HIV medical care is associated with increased mortality among patients with HIV/AIDS. Developing new interventions to improve retention in HIV primary care is needed. The Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) is the largest single provider of HIV care in the US. We sought to understand what veterans would want in an intervention to improve retention in VA HIV care. We conducted 18 one-on-one interviews and 15 outpatient focus groups with 46 patients living with HIV infection from the Michael E. DeBakey VAMC (MEDVAMC). Analysis identified three focus areas for improving retention in care: developing an HIV friendly clinic environment, providing mental health and substance use treatment concurrent with HIV care and encouraging peer support from other Veterans with HIV. PMID:26829641

  14. Targeting the latent reservoir to achieve functional HIV cure

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Daniele C.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2016-01-01

    While highly active anti-retroviral therapy has greatly improved the lives of HIV-infected individuals, current treatments are unable to completely eradicate the virus. This is due to the presence of HIV latently infected cells which harbor transcriptionally silent HIV. Latent HIV does not replicate or produce viral proteins, thereby preventing efficient targeting by anti-retroviral drugs. Strategies to target the HIV latent reservoir include viral reactivation, enhancing host defense mechanisms, keeping latent HIV silent, and using gene therapy techniques to knock out or reactivate latent HIV. While research into each of these areas has yielded promising results, currently no one mechanism eradicates latent HIV. Instead, combinations of these approaches should be considered for a potential HIV functional cure. PMID:27303638

  15. Exploring the Concept of HIV-Related Stigma

    PubMed Central

    Florom-Smith, Aubrey L.; De Santis, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND HIV infection is a chronic, manageable illness. Despite advances in the care and treatment of people living with HIV infection, HIV-related stigma remains a challenge to HIV testing, care, and prevention. Numerous studies have documented the impact of HIV-related stigma among various groups of people living with HIV infection, but the concept of HIV-related stigma remains unclear. PURPOSE Concept exploration of HIV-related stigma via an integrative literature review was conducted in order to examine the existing knowledge base of this concept. METHODS Search engines were employed to review the existing knowledge base of this concept. CONCLUSION After the integrative literature review, an analysis of HIV-related stigma emerged. Implications for future concept analysis, research, and practice are included. PMID:22861652

  16. Prime, Shock, and Kill: Priming CD4 T Cells from HIV Patients with a BCL-2 Antagonist before HIV Reactivation Reduces HIV Reservoir Size

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Nathan W.; Sainski, Amy M.; Dai, Haiming; Natesampillai, Sekar; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Bren, Gary D.; de Araujo Correia, Maria Cristina Miranda; Sampath, Rahul; Rizza, Stacey A.; O'Brien, Daniel; Yao, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding how some HIV-infected cells resist the cytotoxicity of HIV replication is crucial to enabling HIV cure efforts. HIV killing of CD4 T cells that replicate HIV can involve HIV protease-mediated cleavage of procaspase 8 to generate a fragment (Casp8p41) that directly binds and activates the mitochondrial proapoptotic protein BAK. Here, we demonstrate that Casp8p41 also binds with nanomolar affinity to the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, which sequesters Casp8p41 and prevents apoptosis. Further, we show that central memory CD4 T cells (TCM) from HIV-infected individuals have heightened expression of BCL-2 relative to procaspase 8, possibly explaining the persistence of HIV-infected TCM despite generation of Casp8p41. Consistent with this hypothesis, the selective BCL-2 antagonist venetoclax induced minimal killing of uninfected CD4 T cells but markedly increased the death of CD4 T cells and diminished cell-associated HIV DNA when CD4 T cells from antiretroviral therapy (ART)-suppressed HIV patients were induced with αCD3/αCD28 to reactivate HIV ex vivo. Thus, priming CD4 T cells from ART suppressed HIV patients with a BCL-2 antagonist, followed by HIV reactivation, achieves reductions in cell-associated HIV DNA, whereas HIV reactivation alone does not. IMPORTANCE HIV infection is incurable due to a long-lived reservoir of HIV+ memory CD4 T cells, and no clinically relevant interventions have been identified that reduce the number of these HIV DNA-containing cells. Since postintegration HIV replication can result in HIV protease generation of Casp8p41, which activates BAK, causing infected CD4 T cell death, we sought to determine whether this occurs in memory CD4 T cells. Here, we demonstrate that memory CD4 T cells can generate Casp8p41 and yet are intrinsically resistant to death induced by diverse stimuli, including Casp8p41. Furthermore, BCL-2 expression is relatively increased in these cells and directly binds and inhibits Casp8p41's

  17. Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emission Data in Perinatally HIV-Infected and HIV-Exposed but Uninfected Children and Adolescents in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Torre, Peter; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Zeldow, Bret; Williams, Paige; Hoffman, Howard J.; Siberry, George K.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of perinatal HIV infection and exposure on sub-clinical auditory function can be measured with distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). DPOAEs were obtained at four frequency bins (1, 2, 3, and 4 kHz) and categorized by a signal-to-noise ratio. HIV infection was not associated with poorer DPOAEs. Among HIV-infected children, HIV viral load ≥400 copies/mL had significantly lower odds of better DPOAEs. PMID:25742077

  18. Combination HIV prevention options for young women in Africa.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Cheryl; Abdool Karim, Salim

    2016-07-01

    Although the number of new HIV infections has declined by over 30% in the past decade, the number of people who acquire HIV each year remains unacceptably high. In 2014 the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) estimated that there were about 2 million new HIV infections. The virus continues to spread, particularly in key populations, such as men who have sex with men (MSM), transgender individuals, sex workers and people who inject drugs. In Africa, young women have the highest HIV incidence rates. Scaling up known efficacious HIV prevention strategies for these groups at high risk is therefore a high priority. HIV prevention has generally been targeted at HIV-negative individuals or in some instances, entire communities. Prevention efforts are, however, shifting from a narrow focus on HIV-uninfected persons to a continuum of prevention that includes both HIV-negative and HIV-positive individuals. Given that a single HIV prevention intervention is unlikely to be able to alter the epidemic trajectory as HIV epidemics in communities are complex and comprise a mosaic of different risk factors and different routes of transmission, there is need to provide combination prevention. Hence, a mix of behavioural, biomedical and structural HIV prevention options is likely to be needed to alter the course of the HIV epidemic. The combination of HIV prevention interventions needed will vary depending on cultural context, the population targeted and the stage of the epidemic. This paper reviews the available HIV prevention strategies for young women and discusses new HIV prevention approaches in development. PMID:27399041

  19. Belief in a Cure for HIV Infection Associated with Greater HIV Risk Behaviour among HIV Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misovich, Stephen J.; Fisher, Jeffrey D.; Fisher, William A.

    1999-01-01

    Investigated the extent to which HIV seropositive men who have sex with men (MSM) believe that HIV is now, or will soon be, curable. Survey results indicate that belief in a cure for HIV is present among many seropositive MSM, and this belief relates to both recent risk behavior and intention to engage in risky behaviors. (SM)

  20. An assessment of global Internet-based HIV/AIDS media coverage: implications for United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS' Global Media HIV/AIDS initiative.

    PubMed

    Anema, A; Freifeld, C C; Druyts, E; Montaner, J S G; Hogg, R S; Brownstein, J S

    2010-01-01

    No studies to date have assessed the quantity of HIV/AIDS-related media on the Internet. We assessed the quantity of language-specific HIV/AIDS Internet-based news coverage, and the correlation between country-specific HIV/AIDS news coverage and HIV/AIDS prevalence. Internet-based HIV/AIDS news articles were queried from Google News Archives for 168 countries, for the year 2007, in the nine most commonly spoken languages worldwide. English, French and Spanish sources had the greatest number of HIV/AIDS-related articles, representing 134,000 (0.70%), 11,200 (0.65%) and 24,300 (0.49%) of all news articles, respectively. A strong association between country-specific HIV/AIDS news coverage and HIV/AIDS prevalence was found, Spearman's rank correlation: 0.6 (P < 0.001). Among countries with elevated HIV/AIDS prevalence (> or =10%), the volume of HIV/AIDS-specific media was highest in Swaziland (15.9%) and Malawi (13.2%), and lowest in South Africa (4.8%) and Namibia (4.9%). Increased media attention should be placed on countries with high HIV/AIDS prevalence and limited HIV/AIDS-specific news coverage.

  1. Comparison of a conventional HIV 1/2 line immunoassay with a rapid confirmatory HIV 1/2 assay.

    PubMed

    Tinguely, Caroline; Schild-Spycher, Therese; Bahador, Zahra; Gowland, Peter; Stolz, Martin; Niederhauser, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    The performance of the rapid confirmatory HIV 1/2 assay Geenius was compared with the conventional HIV 1/2 line immunoblot (INNO-LIA HIV I/II Score). One hundred HIV 1/2 confirmed positive samples from donors and patients and 136 negative screening samples from blood donors were evaluated with both assays. A 20 member performance panel consisting of different HIV 1 and 2 subtypes was also analysed. Ninety-nine of the confirmed HIV positive samples were positive with both assays. One sample was positive with the INNO-LIA HIV I/II Score but indeterminate with the Geenius HIV 1/2. From 136 negative blood donor samples (negative with a combo HIV assay and a highly sensitive ID-NAT), 125 were concordant negative. Six and five samples were incorrectly indeterminate with the INNO-LIA HIV I/II Score and the Geenius HIV 1/2, respectively. One sample was weak positive with the INNO-LIA HIV I/II Score but negative with the Geenius HIV 1/2. The 20 member performance showed equivalent results with both assays. The rapid assay showed a comparable sensitivity and specificity for confirmation for positive and negative HIV donor and patient samples as well for a 20 member performance panel.

  2. Dating, marriage, and parenthood for HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men: normalizing perspectives on everyday life with HIV.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Francisco; Sheehan, Diana M; Gonzalez, Arnaldo

    2015-03-01

    HIV-positive men are living long and healthier lives while managing HIV as a chronic illness. Although research has extensively documented the experiences of illness of people living with HIV, dating, marriage, and fatherhood among heterosexual Latino men has not been examined. To address this gap, this study used a qualitative study design to examine patterns and strategies for dating, marriage, and parenthood among 24 HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men living in Boston. The findings in our study indicate that an HIV diagnosis does not necessarily deter men from having an active sexual life, marrying, or having children. In fact, for some of the men, engaging in these social and life-changing events is part of moving on and normalizing life with HIV; these men planned for, achieved, and interpreted these events in the context of establishing normalcy with HIV. Although the HIV diagnosis discouraged some men from engaging in sexual relations, getting married, or having children, others fulfilled these desires with strategies aimed to reconciling their HIV status in their personal life, including dating or marrying HIV-positive women only. Additional important themes identified in this study include the decision to disclose HIV status to new sexual partners as well as the decision to accept the risk of HIV transmission to a child or partner in order to fulfill desires of fatherhood. Understanding the personal struggles, decision-making patterns, and needs of HIV-positive heterosexual men can aid in designing interventions that support healthy living with HIV.

  3. Assessment of Recent HIV-1 Infection by a Line Immunoassay for HIV-1/2 Confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Schüpbach, Jörg; Gebhardt, Martin D; Tomasik, Zuzana; Niederhauser, Christoph; Yerly, Sabine; Bürgisser, Philippe; Matter, Lukas; Gorgievski, Meri; Dubs, Rolf; Schultze, Detlev; Steffen, Ingrid; Andreutti, Corinne; Martinetti, Gladys; Güntert, Bruno; Staub, Roger; Daneel, Synove; Vernazza, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the number of recent HIV infections is important for epidemiologic surveillance. Over the past decade approaches have been developed to estimate this number by testing HIV-seropositive specimens with assays that discriminate the lower concentration and avidity of HIV antibodies in early infection. We have investigated whether this “recency” information can also be gained from an HIV confirmatory assay. Methods and Findings The ability of a line immunoassay (INNO-LIA HIV I/II Score, Innogenetics) to distinguish recent from older HIV-1 infection was evaluated in comparison with the Calypte HIV-1 BED Incidence enzyme immunoassay (BED-EIA). Both tests were conducted prospectively in all HIV infections newly diagnosed in Switzerland from July 2005 to June 2006. Clinical and laboratory information indicative of recent or older infection was obtained from physicians at the time of HIV diagnosis and used as the reference standard. BED-EIA and various recency algorithms utilizing the antibody reaction to INNO-LIA's five HIV-1 antigen bands were evaluated by logistic regression analysis. A total of 765 HIV-1 infections, 748 (97.8%) with complete test results, were newly diagnosed during the study. A negative or indeterminate HIV antibody assay at diagnosis, symptoms of primary HIV infection, or a negative HIV test during the past 12 mo classified 195 infections (26.1%) as recent (≤ 12 mo). Symptoms of CDC stages B or C classified 161 infections as older (21.5%), and 392 patients with no symptoms remained unclassified. BED-EIA ruled 65% of the 195 recent infections as recent and 80% of the 161 older infections as older. Two INNO-LIA algorithms showed 50% and 40% sensitivity combined with 95% and 99% specificity, respectively. Estimation of recent infection in the entire study population, based on actual results of the three tests and adjusted for a test's sensitivity and specificity, yielded 37% for BED-EIA compared to 35% and 33% for the two

  4. Risk of Anal Cancer in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Individuals in North America

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Bryan; Justice, Amy C.; Engels, Eric; Gill, M. John; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Bosch, Ronald J.; Brooks, John T.; Napravnik, Sonia; Hessol, Nancy A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Klein, Marina B.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Saag, Michael S.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Press, Natasha; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Dubrow, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), although few have evaluated rates separately for men who have sex with men (MSM), other men, and women. There are also conflicting data regarding calendar trends. Methods. In a study involving 13 cohorts from North America with follow-up between 1996 and 2007, we compared anal cancer incidence rates among 34 189 HIV-infected (55% MSM, 19% other men, 26% women) and 114 260 HIV-uninfected individuals (90% men). Results. Among men, the unadjusted anal cancer incidence rates per 100 000 person-years were 131 for HIV-infected MSM, 46 for other HIV-infected men, and 2 for HIV-uninfected men, corresponding to demographically adjusted rate ratios (RRs) of 80.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 42.7–151.1) for HIV-infected MSM and 26.7 (95% CI, 11.5–61.7) for other HIV-infected men compared with HIV-uninfected men. HIV-infected women had an anal cancer rate of 30/100 000 person-years, and no cases were observed for HIV-uninfected women. In a multivariable Poisson regression model, among HIV-infected individuals, the risk was higher for MSM compared with other men (RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8–6.0), but no difference was observed comparing women with other men (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5–2.2). In comparison with the period 2000–2003, HIV-infected individuals had an adjusted RR of 0.5 (95% CI, .3–.9) in 1996–1999 and 0.9 (95% CI, .6–1.2) in 2004–2007. Conclusions. Anal cancer rates were substantially higher for HIV-infected MSM, other men, and women compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, suggesting a need for universal prevention efforts. Rates increased after the early antiretroviral therapy era and then plateaued. PMID:22291097

  5. Indeterminate and discrepant rapid HIV test results in couples' HIV testing and counselling centres in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many HIV voluntary testing and counselling centres in Africa use rapid antibody tests, in parallel or in sequence, to establish same-day HIV status. The interpretation of indeterminate or discrepant results between different rapid tests on one sample poses a challenge. We investigated the use of an algorithm using three serial rapid HIV tests in cohabiting couples to resolve unclear serostatuses. Methods Heterosexual couples visited the Rwanda Zambia HIV Research Group testing centres in Kigali, Rwanda, and Lusaka, Zambia, to assess HIV infection status. Individuals with unclear HIV rapid antibody test results (indeterminate) or discrepant results were asked to return for repeat testing to resolve HIV status. If either partner of a couple tested positive or indeterminate with the screening test, both partners were tested with a confirmatory test. Individuals with indeterminate or discrepant results were further tested with a tie-breaker and monthly retesting. HIV-RNA viral load was determined when HIV status was not resolved by follow-up rapid testing. Individuals were classified based on two of three initial tests as "Positive", "Negative" or "Other". Follow-up testing and/or HIV-RNA viral load testing determined them as "Infected", "Uninfected" or "Unresolved". Results Of 45,820 individuals tested as couples, 2.3% (4.1% of couples) had at least one discrepant or indeterminate rapid result. A total of 65% of those individuals had follow-up testing and of those individuals initially classified as "Negative" by three initial rapid tests, less than 1% were resolved as "Infected". In contrast, of those individuals with at least one discrepant or indeterminate result who were initially classified as "Positive", only 46% were resolved as "Infected", while the remainder was resolved as "Uninfected" (46%) or "Unresolved" (8%). A positive HIV serostatus of one of the partners was a strong predictor of infection in the other partner as 48% of individuals who

  6. Prevalence and Correlates of HIV Infection and HIV Testing Among Transgender Women in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Logie, Carmen H; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Wang, Ying; Jones, Nicolette; Levermore, Kandasi; Neil, Ava; Ellis, Tyrone; Bryan, Nicolette; Harker, Sheldon; Marshall, Annecka; Newman, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    Transgender women are overrepresented in the Caribbean HIV epidemic. The study objective was to examine correlates of HIV infection and HIV testing among transgender women in Jamaica. We implemented a cross-sectional survey with transgender women in Kingston and Ocho Rios, Jamaica. We conducted multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with HIV testing and HIV infection. Among 137 transgender women [mean age 24.0; standard deviation (SD) 5.5], three-quarters (n = 103, 75.7%) had received an HIV test. Of these, one-quarter (n = 26, 25.2%) were HIV positive. In multivariable analyses, HIV testing was associated with: perceived HIV risk [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.42, confidence interval (CI) 1.36-4.28], depression (AOR 1.34, CI 1.01-1.77), forced sex (AOR 3.83, CI 1.42-10.35), physical abuse (AOR 4.11, CI 1.44-11.72), perceived transgender stigma (AOR 1.23, 1.06-1.42), having a healthcare provider (AOR 5.89, CI 1.46-23.77), and lower HIV-related stigma (AOR 0.96, CI 0.92-0.99), incarceration (AOR 0.28, CI 0.10-0.78), and drug use (AOR 0.74, CI 0.58-0.95). HIV infection was associated with the following: homelessness (AOR 5.94, CI 1.27-27.74), perceived HIV risk (AOR 1.67, CI 1.02-2.72), depression (AOR 1.39, CI 1.06-1.82), STI history (AOR 56.79, CI 5.12-630.33), perceived (AOR 1.26, CI 1.06-1.51) and enacted (AOR 1.16, CI 1.04-1.29) transgender stigma, forced sex (AOR 4.14, CI 1.49-11.51), physical abuse (AOR 3.75, CI 1.39-10.12), and lower self-rated health (AOR 0.55, CI 0.30-0.98) and social support (AOR 0.79, CI 0.64-0.97). Transgender women in Jamaica experience high HIV infection rates and suboptimal HIV testing. Combination HIV prevention approaches should address transgender women's social and structural vulnerabilities. PMID:27610463

  7. Homophobia, stigma and HIV in Jamaican prisons

    PubMed Central

    Andrinopoulos, Katherine; Figueroa, J Peter; Kerrigan, Deanna; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2010-01-01

    Success in addressing HIV and AIDS among men who have sex with men, a key population in the global epidemic, is impeded by homophobia. Homophobia as a barrier to HIV prevention and AIDS treatment is a particularly acute problem in the prison setting. In this qualitative study, we explore HIV and AIDS, stigma, and homosexuality in the largest all male prison in Jamaica by conducting iterative in-depth interviews with 25 inmates. Participant narratives unveil a purposeful manipulation of beliefs related to homosexuality that impedes an effective response to HIV and AIDS both in prison and wider society. Findings indicate that homophobia is both a social construction and a tangible tool used to leverage power and a sense of solidarity in a larger political and economic landscape. This use of homophobia may not be unique to Jamaica, and is an important issue to address in other low and middle income post-colonialist societies. PMID:20972916

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for HIV cure.

    PubMed

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    The apparent cure of an HIV-infected person following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an allogeneic donor homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 mutation has stimulated the search for strategies to eradicate HIV or to induce long-term remission without requiring ongoing antiretroviral therapy. A variety of approaches, including allogeneic HSCT from CCR5-deficient donors and autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells, are currently under investigation. This Review covers the experience with HSCT in HIV infection to date and provides a survey of ongoing work in the field. The challenges of developing HSCT for HIV cure in the context of safe, effective, and convenient once-daily antiretroviral therapy are also discussed.

  9. Macaque models of enhanced susceptibility to HIV.

    PubMed

    Henning, Tara R; McNicholl, Janet M; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A; Kersh, Ellen N

    2015-01-01

    There are few nonhuman primate models of enhanced HIV susceptibility. Such models can improve comprehension of HIV acquisition risk factors and provide rigorous testing platforms for preclinical prevention strategies. This paper reviews past, current, and proposed research on macaque HIV acquisition risk models and identifies areas where modeling is significantly lacking. We compare different experimental approaches and provide practical considerations for designing macaque susceptibility studies. Modifiable (mucosal and systemic coinfections, hormonal contraception, and rectal lubricants) and non-modifiable (hormonal fluctuations) risk factors are highlighted. Risk acquisition models via vaginal, rectal, and penile challenge routes are discussed. There is no consensus on the best statistical model for evaluating increased susceptibility, and additional research is required. The use of enhanced susceptibility macaque models would benefit multiple facets of the HIV research field, including basic acquisition and pathogenesis studies as well as the vaccine and other biomedical preventions pipeline.

  10. Approaches to preventative and therapeutic HIV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gray, Glenda E; Laher, Fatima; Lazarus, Erica; Ensoli, Barbara; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Novel strategies are being researched to discover vaccines to prevent and treat HIV-1. Non-efficacious preventative vaccine approaches include bivalent recombinant gp120 alone, HIV gene insertion into an Adenovirus 5 (Ad5) virus vector and the DNA prime/Ad5 boost vaccine regimen. However, the ALVAC-HIV prime/AIDSVAX® B/E gp120 boost regimen showed 31.2% efficacy at 3.5 years, and is being investigated as clade C constructs with an additional boost. Likewise, although multiple therapeutic vaccines have failed in the past, in a non-placebo controlled trial, a Tat vaccine demonstrated immune cell restoration, reduction of immune activation, and reduced HIV-1 DNA viral load. Monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization or treatment show promise, with VRC01 entering advanced clinical trials.

  11. Point of Care Technologies for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hewlett, Indira K.

    2014-01-01

    Effective prevention of HIV/AIDS requires early diagnosis, initiation of therapy, and regular plasma viral load monitoring of the infected individual. In addition, incidence estimation using accurate and sensitive assays is needed to facilitate HIV prevention efforts in the public health setting. Therefore, more affordable and accessible point-of-care (POC) technologies capable of providing early diagnosis, HIV viral load measurements, and CD4 counts in settings where HIV is most prevalent are needed to enable appropriate intervention strategies and ultimately stop transmission of the virus within these populations to achieve the future goal of an AIDS-free generation. This review discusses the available and emerging POC technologies for future application to these unmet public health needs. PMID:24579041

  12. HIV Infection Seems to Affect Nervous System

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a clinical fellow in the department of neurology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). " ... early [HIV] infection." Valcour is a professor of neurology at UCSF. "Additionally, the ubiquity of symptoms in ...

  13. Black Americans and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... need for trusted information on national health issues… Zika Virus ACA Marketplaces Prescription ... Americans have been disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS since the epidemic’s beginning, and that disparity has deepened over time. ...

  14. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2011-08-26

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity.

  15. HIV and AIDS: Know the Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe HIV and AIDS: Know the Facts Treatments Work, but Prevention Is ... than 30 years since a disease now called AIDS was first recognized in the United States. Back ...

  16. State dental boards and mandatory HIV testing.

    PubMed

    DiAngelis, A J; Born, D O; Hill, A J

    1992-01-01

    Public and professional debate over what, if any, action should be taken by state regulatory agencies regarding AIDS and the HIV status of dentists has increased in recent months. To determine if state boards had workable policies in place or were considering such policies, a telephone survey of all state boards was undertaken. All boards participated, although three provided only limited information. As of early 1992, only two boards required evidence of immunity to HVB for relicensure and none require evidence of seronegativity to HIV for relicensure. Twelve percent of the boards anticipate such requirements within two years. None have mandatory HIV testing, but 13 percent anticipate such requirements in the near future. The authors conclude that while few agencies have taken more than tentative steps toward rigorous HIV testing or restrictions, most are aware of much closer public scrutiny. More restrictions seem likely as these agencies attempt to balance public and professional rights and responsibilities. PMID:1337950

  17. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of this screening: (1) Everyone aged 15 to ... the disease to other people. Potential Benefits and Harms of Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The ...

  18. Minority Women's Health: HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS more than women of other races include: Poverty — One in 4 African-American women lives in poverty, which is strongly linked to HIV risk. People living in poverty also get lower-quality health care in general, ...

  19. Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  20. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination