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Sample records for pelvic muscle training

  1. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22258946 . Dumoulin C, Hay-Smith J. Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20091581 . Herderschee R, Hay-Smith EJC, Herbison GP, Roovers JP, Heineman MJ. Feedback ...

  2. [Pelvic floor muscle training and pelvic floor disorders in women].

    PubMed

    Thubert, T; Bakker, E; Fritel, X

    2015-05-01

    Our goal is to provide an update on the results of pelvic floor rehabilitation in the treatment of urinary incontinence and genital prolapse symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle training allows a reduction of urinary incontinence symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle contractions supervised by a healthcare professional allow cure in half cases of stress urinary incontinence. Viewing this contraction through biofeedback improves outcomes, but this effect could also be due by a more intensive and prolonged program with the physiotherapist. The place of electrostimulation remains unclear. The results obtained with vaginal cones are similar to pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback or electrostimulation. It is not known whether pelvic floor muscle training has an effect after one year. In case of stress urinary incontinence, supervised pelvic floor muscle training avoids surgery in half of the cases at 1-year follow-up. Pelvic floor muscle training is the first-line treatment of post-partum urinary incontinence. Its preventive effect is uncertain. Pelvic floor muscle training may reduce the symptoms associated with genital prolapse. In conclusion, pelvic floor rehabilitation supervised by a physiotherapist is an effective short-term treatment to reduce the symptoms of urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse.

  3. Pelvic floor muscle training in males: practical applications.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Andrew L

    2014-07-01

    The pelvic floor muscles are vital to male genitourinary health. Pelvic floor muscle training may prove helpful in a variety of clinical circumstances: stress urinary incontinence that follows prostate surgery, overactive bladder, postvoid dribbling, erectile dysfunction, ejaculation issues including premature ejaculation, and pelvic pain due to levator muscle spasm.

  4. The status of pelvic floor muscle training for women

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Andrea; Stothers, Lynn; Macnab, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    There is no consensus on the amount of exercise necessary to improve pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function. We reviewed the pathophysiology of PFM dysfunction and the evolution of PFM training regimens since Kegel introduced the concept of pelvic floor awareness and the benefits of strength. This paper also describes the similarities and differences between PFM and other muscular groups, reviews the physiology of muscle contraction and principles of muscle fitness and exercise benefits and presents the range of protocols designed to strengthen the PFM and improve function. We also discuss the potential application of new technology and methodologies. The design of PFM training logically requires multiple factors to be considered in each patient. Research that defines measures to objectively quantify the degree of dysfunction and the efficacy of training would be beneficial. The application of new technologies may help this process. PMID:21191506

  5. Does pelvic floor muscle training abolish symptoms of urinary incontinence? A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Celiker Tosun, O; Kaya Mutlu, E; Ergenoglu, A M; Yeniel, A O; Tosun, G; Malkoc, M; Askar, N; Itil, I M

    2015-06-01

    To determine whether symptoms of urinary incontinence is reduced by pelvic floor muscle training, to determine whether urinary incontinence can be totally eliminated by strengthening the pelvic floor muscle to grade 5 on the Oxford scale. Prospective randomized controlled clinical trial. Outpatient urogynecology department. One hundred thirty cases with stress and mixed urinary incontinence. All participants were randomly allocated to the pelvic floor muscle training group or control group. A 12-week home based exercise program, prescribed individually, was performed by the pelvic floor muscle training group. Urinary incontinence symptoms (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7, Urogenital Distress Inventory-6, bladder diary, stop test and pad test) were assessed, and the pelvic floor muscle strength was measured for (PERFECT testing, perineometric and ultrasound) all participants before and after 12 weeks of treatment. The pelvic floor muscle training group had significant improvement in their symptoms of urinary incontinence (P=0.001) and an increase in pelvic floor muscle strength (P=0.001, by the dependent t test) compared with the control group. All the symptoms of urinary incontinence were significantly decreased in the patients that had reached pelvic floor muscle strength of grade 5 and continued the pelvic floor muscle training (P<0.05). The study demonstrated that pelvic floor muscle training is effective in reducing the symptoms of stress and mixed urinary incontinence and in increasing pelvic floor muscle strength. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles after 6-week biofeedback training in nulliparous continent women.

    PubMed

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Smykla, Agnieszka; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Błaszczak, Edward; Sobota, Grzegorz; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a 6-week sEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training program on pelvic floor muscle activity in young continent women. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Biofeedback training was continued for 6 weeks, 3 times a week. Muscle strenghtening and endurance exercises were performed alternately. SEMG (surface electromyography) measurements were recorded on four different occasions: before training started, after the third week of training, after the sixth week of training, and one month after training ended. A 6-week sEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training program significantly decreased the resting activity of the pelvic floor muscles in supine lying and standing. The ability to relax the pelvic floor muscles after a sustained 60-second contraction improved significantly after the 6-week training in both positions. SEMG-biofeedback training program did not seem to affect the activity of the pelvic floor muscles or muscle fatigue during voluntary pelvic floor muscle contractions. SEMG-biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training might be recommended for physiotherapists to improve the effectiveness of their relaxation techniques.

  7. Virtual reality: a proposal for pelvic floor muscle training.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Simone; Martinho, Natalia Miguel; Silva, Valéria Regina; Marques, Joseane; Carvalho, Leonardo C; Riccetto, Cássio

    2015-11-01

    This video's proposal was to present one of the pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training programs, used in our research, that we designed as a virtual reality intervention protocol and investigated its effects on PFM contractility. Two clinical, controlled and prospective studies were conducted, one with 19 nulliparous women without urinary symptoms, who were evaluated by both electromyography and digital palpation (DP) and another with 27 postmenopausal women with mixed urinary symptoms (assessed by both ICIQ UI-SF and ICIQ-OAB), evaluated by vaginal dynamometry and DP, with a total of 46 women in both studies. This protocol was designed so that the participant would play a video game, seated on a pressure base platform, while commanding it through her pelvic movements. Using a virtual reality game, five activities were performed during 30 min, twice a week, with a total of 10 sessions. A significant increase in PFM strength was found in both the nulliparous (p = 0.0001) and the postmenopausal (p = 0.0001) groups of women, as ascertained by DP. A significant increase in postmenopausal women's muscle strength and endurance assessed by dynamometry (p = 0.05) and a concomitant decrease in their urinary symptoms, were observed. This virtual reality program promoted an increase in PFM contractility and a decrease in postmenopausal urinary symptoms.

  8. Ingenuity for enabling the habituation of pelvic floor muscle training

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Akiko; Kakiuchi, Masayoshi; Matsumoto, Emi; Nozaki, Sonoko

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To clarify factors contributing to habituation of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) for urinary incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] We included 13 healthy females and examined diurnal and nocturnal urination frequency at initial program participation and at 3 months. The survey used the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF), a 10-level self-assessment of anxiety associated with urinary incontinence, and a 10-level self-evaluation of PFMT understanding and skill acquisition. We evaluated PFMT practice at home and postures that facilitated PFMT. The practice of PFMT at home was surveyed during a 3-month period. [Results] Compared to baseline, the level of skill acquisition assessed by the ICIQ-SF and PFMT according to the 10-level self-evaluation improved significantly at 3 months. The rate of PFMT sessions performed at home per week was high. The number of times PFMT was performed per day was positively correlated with level of understanding and acquisition of skills pertaining to PFMT, according to the 10-level self-assessment. [Conclusion] By incorporating behavior modification techniques appropriate for urinary incontinence and by increasing the level of understanding regarding incontinence and PFMT, as well as the level of skill acquisition, self-efficacy increased. This may have motivated habituation of PFMT. PMID:28878449

  9. Do stages of menopause affect the outcomes of pelvic floor muscle training?

    PubMed

    Tosun, Özge Çeliker; Mutlu, Ebru Kaya; Tosun, Gökhan; Ergenoğlu, Ahmet Mete; Yeniel, Ahmet Özgur; Malkoç, Mehtap; Aşkar, Niyazi; İtil, İsmail Mete

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of our study is to determine whether there is a difference in pelvic floor muscle strength attributable to pelvic floor muscle training conducted during different stages of menopause. One hundred twenty-two women with stress urinary incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence were included in this prospective controlled study. The participants included in this study were separated into three groups according to the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop staging system as follows: group 1 (n = 41): stages -3 and -2; group 2 (n = 32): stages +1 and -1; and group 3 (n = 30): stage +2. All three groups were provided an individual home exercise program throughout the 12-week study. Pelvic floor muscle strength before and after the 12-week treatment was measured in all participants (using the PERFECT [power, endurance, number of repetitions, and number of fast (1-s) contractions; every contraction is timed] scheme, perineometry, transabdominal ultrasound, Brink scale, pad test, and stop test). Data were analyzed using analysis of variance. There were no statistically significant differences in pre-exercise training pelvic floor muscle strength parameters among the three groups. After 12 weeks, there were statistically significant increases in PERFECT scheme, Brink scale, perineometry, and ultrasound values. In contrast, there were significant decreases in stop test and 1-hour pad test values observed in the three groups (P = 0.001, dependent t test). In comparison with the other groups, group 1 demonstrated statistically significant improvements in the following postexercise training parameters: power, repetition, speed, Brink vertical displacement, and stop test. The lowest increase was observed in group 2 (P < 0.05). Strength increase can be achieved at all stages of menopause with pelvic floor muscle training, but the rates of increase vary according to the menopausal stage of the participants. Women in the late menopausal transition and early menopause are

  10. Brain Mechanisms Underlying Urge Incontinence and its Response to Pelvic Floor Muscle Training.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Derek; Clarkson, Becky; Tadic, Stasa D; Resnick, Neil M

    2015-09-01

    Urge urinary incontinence is a major problem, especially in the elderly, and to our knowledge the underlying mechanisms of disease and therapy are unknown. We used biofeedback assisted pelvic floor muscle training and functional brain imaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging) to investigate cerebral mechanisms, aiming to improve the understanding of brain-bladder control and therapy. Before receiving biofeedback assisted pelvic floor muscle training functionally intact, older community dwelling women with urge urinary incontinence as well as normal controls underwent comprehensive clinical and bladder diary evaluation, urodynamic testing and brain functional magnetic resonance imaging. Evaluation was repeated after pelvic floor muscle training in those with urge urinary incontinence. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was done to determine the brain reaction to rapid bladder filling with urgency. Of 65 subjects with urge urinary incontinence 28 responded to biofeedback assisted pelvic floor muscle training with 50% or greater improvement of urge urinary incontinence frequency on diary. However, responders and nonresponders displayed 2 patterns of brain reaction. In pattern 1 in responders before pelvic floor muscle training the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and the adjacent supplementary motor area were activated as well as the insula. After the training dorsal anterior cingulate cortex/supplementary motor area activation diminished and there was a trend toward medial prefrontal cortex deactivation. In pattern 2 in nonresponders before pelvic floor muscle training the medial prefrontal cortex was deactivated, which changed little after the training. In older women with urge urinary incontinence there appears to be 2 patterns of brain reaction to bladder filling and they seem to predict the response and nonresponse to biofeedback assisted pelvic floor muscle training. Moreover, decreased cingulate activation appears to be a consequence of the improvement

  11. Effect of depression and anxiety on the success of pelvic floor muscle training for pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z A; Whittal, C; Mansol, S; Osborne, Lisa A; Reed, P; Emery, S

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of the psychiatric symptoms of anxiety and depression, as assessed by validated questionnaires on the success of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). A prospective observational study was carried out by the Uro-gynaecological Physiotherapy Department at the Singleton Hospital, Swansea. A total of 108 consecutive women with pelvic floor dysfunction were referred for physiotherapy and admitted to the 6-month physiotherapy programme. They underwent subjective and objective assessments of their pelvic floor and psychological health at the beginning and end of the programme. A strong correlation was noted between the severity of anxiety and depression symptoms and the severity of their pelvic floor dysfunction. Following physiotherapy, apart from sexual function, all domains of pelvic floor dysfunction showed significant improvement. Based on the severity of their anxiety/depression symptoms, the patients were stratified into three groups. The group of patients that benefitted most had either no or only mild anxiety/depression. This study raises the question of whether a targeted approach should be undertaken for managing patients who, in addition to their pelvic floor dysfunction, demonstrate psychiatric symptoms.

  12. Maternal blood pressure and heart rate response to pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cristine H; Naldoni, Luciane M V; Ribeiro, Juliana Dos Santos; Meirelles, Maria Cristina C C; Cavalli, Ricardo de Carvalho; Bø, Kari

    2014-07-01

    To assess whether maternal blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) change significantly in response to pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy. Longitudinal exploratory study with repeated measurements. Twenty-seven nulliparous healthy women of mean age 23.3 years (range 18-36) and mean body mass index 23.4 (range 23.1-29.5). Individual supervised pelvic floor muscle training from gestational week 20 till 36 with assessment of BP and HR at gestational weeks 20, 24, 28, 32 and 36. Systolic and diastolic BP was measured before and after each training session and HR was monitored during each session. Pelvic floor muscle training did not change BP. 77% (n = 21) of participants exceeded 70% of estimated maximum HR during at least one session. The time for exceeding 70% of estimated maximum HR was between 2.2 and 3.2 % of the total exercise session. Increases in BP and HR from gestational weeks 20 till 36 were within normal limits for pregnant women. Pelvic floor muscle training in nulliparous sedentary pregnant women does not increase BP. It significantly increases HR during the exercise sessions, but only for a limited period of time and with no negative long-term effect on BP or HR. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  13. Does antenatal pelvic floor muscle training affect the outcome of labour? A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Agur, Wael; Steggles, Pippin; Waterfield, Malcolm; Freeman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    It is thought that antenatal pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) might produce a strong pelvic floor resulting in prolonged labour, whilst some believe it produces well-controlled muscles that facilitate rotation of the foetal head and shortens the duration of labour. This secondary analysis (of a previously published randomised controlled trial) assesses the labour and delivery details of 268 primigravidae who were originally randomised at approximately 20 weeks gestation to supervised PFMT or a control group. Between the two groups, there was no difference in the duration of the second stage of labour or in the need for instrumental delivery. PFMT does not appear to facilitate or obstruct labour.

  14. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Newman, Diane K

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been recommended for urinary incontinence since first described by obstetrician gynecologist Dr. Arnold Kegel more than six decades ago. These exercises are performed to strengthen pelvic floor muscles, provide urethral support to prevent urine leakage, and suppress urgency. In clinical urology practice, expert clinicians also teach patients how to relax the muscle to improve bladder emptying and relieve pelvic pain caused by muscle spasm. When treating lower urinary tract symptoms, an exercise training program combined with biofeedback therapy has been recommended as first-line treatment. This article provides clinical application of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback as a technique to enhance pelvic floor muscle training.

  15. Effect of pelvic floor muscle training compared with watchful waiting in older women with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse: randomised controlled trial in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Wiegersma, Marian; Panman, Chantal M C R; Kollen, Boudewijn J; Berger, Marjolein Y; Lisman-Van Leeuwen, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of pelvic floor muscle training and watchful waiting on pelvic floor symptoms in a primary care population of women aged 55 years and over with symptomatic mild pelvic organ prolapse. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Dutch primary care. Participants Women aged 55 years or over with symptomatic mild prolapse (leading edge above the hymen) were identified by screening. Exclusion criteria were current prolapse treatment or treatment in the previous year, malignancy of pelvic organs, current treatment for another gynaecological disorder, severe/terminal illness, impaired mobility, cognitive impairment, and insufficient command of the Dutch language. Interventions Pelvic floor muscle training versus watchful waiting. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was change in bladder, bowel, and pelvic floor symptoms measured with the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20), three months after the start of treatment. Secondary outcomes were changes in condition specific and general quality of life, sexual function, degree of prolapse, pelvic floor muscle function, and patients’ perceived change in symptoms. Results Of the 287 women who were randomised to pelvic floor muscle training (n=145) or watchful waiting (n=142), 250 (87%) completed follow-up. Participants in the intervention group improved by (on average) 9.1 (95% confidence interval 2.8 to 15.4) points more on the PFDI-20 than did participants in the watchful waiting group (P=0.005). Of women in the pelvic floor muscle training group, 57% (82/145) reported an improvement in overall symptoms from the start of the study compared with 13% (18/142) in the watchful waiting group (P<0.001). Other secondary outcomes showed no significant difference between the groups. Conclusions Although pelvic floor muscle training led to a significantly greater improvement in PFDI-20 score, the difference between the groups was below the presumed level of clinical relevance (15 points

  16. Pelvic floor muscle training for secondary prevention of pelvic organ prolapse (PREVPROL): a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Suzanne; Glazener, Cathryn; McClurg, Doreen; Macarthur, Christine; Elders, Andrew; Herbison, Peter; Wilson, Don; Toozs-Hobson, Philip; Hemming, Christine; Hay-Smith, Jean; Collins, Marissa; Dickson, Sylvia; Logan, Janet

    2017-01-28

    Pelvic floor muscle training can reduce prolapse severity and symptoms in women seeking treatment. We aimed to assess whether this intervention could also be effective in secondary prevention of prolapse and the need for future treatment. We did this multicentre, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial at three centres in New Zealand and the UK. Women from a longitudinal study of pelvic floor function after childbirth were potentially eligible for inclusion. Women of any age who had stage 1-3 prolapse, but had not sought treatment, were randomly assigned (1:1), via remote computer allocation, to receive either one-to-one pelvic floor muscle training (five physiotherapy appointments over 16 weeks, and annual review) plus Pilates-based pelvic floor muscle training classes and a DVD for home use (intervention group), or a prolapse lifestyle advice leaflet (control group). Randomisation was minimised by centre, parity (three or less vs more than three deliveries), prolapse stage (above the hymen vs at or beyond the hymen), and delivery method (any vaginal vs all caesarean sections). Women and intervention physiotherapists could not be masked to group allocation, but allocation was masked from data entry researchers and from the trial statistician until after database lock. The primary outcome was self-reported prolapse symptoms (Pelvic Organ Prolapse Symptom Score [POP-SS]) at 2 years. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01171846. Between Dec 21, 2008, and Feb 24, 2010, in New Zealand, and Oct 27, 2010, and Sept 5, 2011, in the UK, we randomly assigned 414 women to the intervention group (n=207) or the control group (n=207). One participant in each group was excluded after randomisation, leaving 412 women for analysis. At baseline, 399 (97%) women had prolapse above or at the level of the hymen. The mean POP-SS score at 2 years was 3·2 (SD 3·4) in the intervention group versus 4·2 (SD 4·4) in the

  17. Influence of Hamstring Muscles Extensibility on Spinal Curvatures and Pelvic Tilt in Highly Trained Cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Muyor, José M.; Alacid, Fernando; López-Miñarro, Pedro A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of hamstring muscles extensibility in standing, maximal trunk flexion with knees extended and on the bicycle in lower handlebar-hands position of highly trained cyclists. Ninety-six cyclists were recruited for the study (mean ± SD, age: 30.36 ± 5.98 years). Sagittal spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt were measured in the standing position, maximal trunk flexion with knees extended (sit-and-reach test) and while sitting on a bicycle in lower handlebar-hand position using a Spinal Mouse system. Hamstring muscles extensibility was determined in both legs by passive straight leg raise test (PSLR). The sample was divided into three groups according to PSLR angle: (1) reduced extensibility (PSLR < 80º; n = 30), (2) moderate hamstring extensibility group (PSLR = 80º – 90º; n = 35), and (3) high hamstring extensibility (PSLR = > 90º; n = 31). ANOVA analysis showed significant differences among groups for thoracic (p < 0.001) and pelvic tilt (p < 0.001) angles in the sit-and-reach test. No differences were found between groups for standing and on the bicycle position. Post hoc analysis showed significant differences in all pairwise comparisons for thoracic angle (p < 0.01) and pelvic angle (p < 0.001) in the sit-and-reach test. No differences were found in lumbar angle in any posture. In conclusion, the hamstring muscles extensibility influence the thoracic and pelvic postures when maximal trunk flexion with knees extended is performed, but not when cyclists are seated on their bicycles PMID:23486997

  18. Does pelvic floor muscle training improve female sexual function? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge; Dwyer, Peter L; Davidson, Melissa; De Souza, Alison; Ugarte, Julio Alvarez; Frawley, Helena C

    2015-12-01

    We performed a review of the literature reporting on the effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on female sexual function (SF). Pubmed (from 1946 to December 2014), Ovid Medline (from 1946 to December 2014), CINAHL (from 1937 to December 2014), PsycINFO (from 1805 to December 2014), Scopus and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched by two independent reviewers. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the impact of PFMT on women's SF published in English were included. Methodological quality was scored using the PEDro scale. Data were analysed qualitatively and interpreted. A total of 1341 women were included in the eight RCTs covered by this review. The studies were published between 1997 and 2014. Methodological scores were between 4 and 7. The sample included derived from heterogeneous populations of women. In only one study was SF the primary outcome measure. Pelvic floor dysfunction was an inclusion criterion in the majority of studies. Most studies reported a significant improvement in SF score after PFMT between control and intervention groups. Although most studies indicated an improvement of at least one sexual variable in women with pelvic floor dysfunction, and one study demonstrated an improvement in SF in postpartum women selected independently of their continence status, the results need to be interpreted with caution. High-quality RCTs specifically designed to investigate the impact of PFMT on women's SF are required.

  19. Pelvic floor muscle training improves quality of life of women with urinary incontinence: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hiu Lan; Chan, Symphorosa Shing Chee; Law, Tracy Sze Man; Cheung, Rachel Yau Kar; Chung, Tony Kwok Hung

    2013-06-01

    Women suffering from urinary incontinence have impaired quality of life (QoL). Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) has been recommended to be the first-line treatment for them. This study evaluated the role of (PFMT) in women with urinary incontinence. All women suffering from urinary incontinence without pelvic organ prolapse who attended the urogynaecology unit of a university hospital from January 2009 to June 2010 were recruited. Urinary symptoms and impact on QoL were assessed using the Chinese validated Urogenital Distress Inventory short form (UDI-6) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire short form (IIQ-7) before and after PFMT. Urodynamic studies (UDS) were used to differentiate the diagnoses of urinary incontinence. Three hundred and seventy-two women, aged 52.3 ± 10.8 years and practised PFMT for 9.9 ± 7.3 months, completed the study. Over 65% recorded improvement in both UDI-6 and IIQ-7. Stratified for urodynamic diagnosis, stress incontinence group and those who had no UDS abnormality had significant improvement in their urinary symptoms and QoL after PFMT. UDI-6 and IIQ-7 also improved significantly after PFMT in groups where the clinical presentation was stress incontinence, overactive bladder symptoms or mixed urinary incontinence. Age was not associated with a significant difference in the response to PFMT. Pelvic floor muscle training appears to be an effective first-line intervention for improving urinary symptoms and QoL of women presenting with urinary incontinence. Future studies on long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness are also required. © 2013 The Authors ANZJOG © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training in treating urinary incontinence in women: A current review.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, E; Rubio-Arias, J A; Ávila-Gandía, V; Ramos-Campo, D J; López-Román, J

    2016-06-01

    To analyse the content of various published studies related to physical exercise and its effects on urinary incontinence and to determine the effectiveness of pelvic floor training programmes. We conducted a search in the databases of PubMed, CINAHL, the Cochrane Plus Library, The Cochrane Library, WOS and SPORTDiscus and a manual search in the Google Scholar metasearcher using the search descriptors for documents published in the last 10 years in Spanish or English. The documents needed to have an abstract or complete text on the treatment of urinary incontinence in female athletes and in women in general. We selected 3 full-text articles on treating urinary incontinence in female athletes and 6 full-text articles and 1 abstract on treating urinary incontinence in women in general. The 9 studies included in the review achieved positive results, i.e., there was improvement in the disease in all of the studies. Physical exercise, specifically pelvic floor muscle training programmes, has positive effects on urinary incontinence. This type of training has been shown to be an effective programme for treating urinary incontinence, especially stress urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Pelvic floor muscle training to improve urinary incontinence in young, nulliparous sport students: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Da Roza, Thuane; de Araujo, Maíta Poli; Viana, Rui; Viana, Sara; Jorge, Renato Natal; Bø, Kari; Mascarenhas, Teresa

    2012-08-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is prevalent in sport students. We hypothesized that pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) can improve pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength and symptoms of UI in this group of physically active women. Sixteen sport students with UI participated in this pre-post test pilot study. However, only seven of them, mean age 20.0 ± 0.8 years, completed the 8-week program. Activity level was measured by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF). The outcome measure was the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ UI SF). PFM strength was measured by manometry as maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Vaginal resting pressure improved by 17.4 cmH(2)O (SD 6.7), p = 0.04 and MVC by 16.4 cmH(2)O (SD 5.8), p = 0.04. ICIQ UI SF score, frequency, and amount of leakage showed statistically significant improvement. PFMT increased PFM strength and reduced frequency and amount of UI episodes in sport students that completed an 8-week PFMT program. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm these results.

  2. Involuntary reflexive pelvic floor muscle training in addition to standard training versus standard training alone for women with stress urinary incontinence: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Luginbuehl, Helena; Lehmann, Corinne; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Kuhn, Annette; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2015-11-17

    Pelvic floor muscle training is effective and recommended as first-line therapy for female patients with stress urinary incontinence. However, standard pelvic floor physiotherapy concentrates on voluntary contractions even though the situations provoking stress urinary incontinence (for example, sneezing, coughing, running) require involuntary fast reflexive pelvic floor muscle contractions. Training procedures for involuntary reflexive muscle contractions are widely implemented in rehabilitation and sports but not yet in pelvic floor rehabilitation. Therefore, the research group developed a training protocol including standard physiotherapy and in addition focused on involuntary reflexive pelvic floor muscle contractions. The aim of the planned study is to compare this newly developed physiotherapy program (experimental group) and the standard physiotherapy program (control group) regarding their effect on stress urinary incontinence. The working hypothesis is that the experimental group focusing on involuntary reflexive muscle contractions will have a higher improvement of continence measured by the International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire Urinary Incontinence (short form), and - regarding secondary and tertiary outcomes - higher pelvic floor muscle activity during stress urinary incontinence provoking activities, better pad-test results, higher quality of life scores (International Consultation on Incontinence Modular Questionnaire) and higher intravaginal muscle strength (digitally tested) from before to after the intervention phase. This study is designed as a prospective, triple-blinded (participant, investigator, outcome assessor), randomized controlled trial with two physiotherapy intervention groups with a 6-month follow-up including 48 stress urinary incontinent women per group. For both groups the intervention will last 16 weeks and will include 9 personal physiotherapy consultations and 78 short home training sessions (weeks 1

  3. Training through gametherapy promotes coactivation of the pelvic floor and abdominal muscles in young women, nulliparous and continents

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Valeria Regina; Riccetto, Cássio; Martinho, Natalia Miguel; Marques, Joseane; Carvalho, Leonardo Cesar; Botelho, Simone

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction and objectives: Several studies have been investigated co-activation can enhance the effectveness of PFM training protocols allowing preventive and therapeutic goals in pelvic floor dysfunctions. The objective of the present study was to investigate if an abdominal-pelvic protocol of training (APT) using gametherapy would allow co-activation of PFM and transversus abdominis/oblique internal (TrA/OI) muscles. Patients and methods: Twenty-five nulliparous, continent, young females, with median age 24.76 (±3.76) years were evaluated using digital palpation (DP) of PFM and surface electromyography of PFM and TrA/OI simultaneously, during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), alternating PFM and TrA/OI contraction requests. All women participated on a supervised program of APT using gametherapy, that included exercises of pelvic mobilization associated to contraction of TrA/OI muscles oriented by virtual games, for 30 minutes, three times a week, in a total of 10 sessions. Electromyographic data were processed and analyzed by ANOVA - analysis of variance. Results: When MVC of TrA/OI was solicited, it was observed simultaneous increase of electromyographic activity of PFM (p=0.001) following ATP. However, EMG activity did not change significantly during MVC of PFM. Conclusion: Training using gametherapy allowed better co-activation of pelvic floor muscles in response to contraction of TrA, in young nulliparous and continent women. PMID:27564290

  4. Training through gametherapy promotes coactivation of the pelvic floor and abdominal muscles in young women, nulliparous and continents.

    PubMed

    Silva, Valeria Regina; Riccetto, Cássio Luis Zanettini; Martinho, Natalia Miguel; Marques, Joseane; Carvalho, Leonardo Cesar; Botelho, Simone

    2016-01-01

    several studies have been investigated co-activation can enhance the effectveness of PFM training protocols allowing preventive and therapeutic goals in pelvic floor dysfunctions. The objective of the present study was to investigate if an abdominal-pelvic protocol of training (APT) using gametherapy would allow co-activation of PFM and transversus abdominis/oblique internal (TrA/OI) muscles. Twenty-five nulliparous, continent, young females, with median age 24.76 (±3.76) years were evaluated using digital palpation (DP) of PFM and surfasse electromyography of PFM and TrA/OI simultaneously, during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), alternating PFM and TrA/OI contraction requests. All women participated on a supervised program of APT using gametherapy, that included exercises of pelvic mobilization associated to contraction of TrA/OI muscles oriented by virtual games, for 30 minutes, three times a week, in a total of 10 sessions. Electromyographic data were processed and analyzed by ANOVA - analysis of variance. When MVC of TrA/OI was solicited, it was observed simultaneous increase of electromyographic activity of PFM (p=0.001) following ATP. However, EMG activity did not change significantly during MVC of PFM. Training using gametherapy allowed better co-activation of pelvic floor muscles in response to contraction of TrA, in young nulliparous and continent women. Copyright© by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  5. A Comparative Study of Whole Body Vibration Training and Pelvic Floor Muscle Training on Women's Stress Urinary Incontinence: Three- Month Follow- Up

    PubMed Central

    Farzinmehr, Azizeh; Moezy, Azar; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Kashanian, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether Whole Body Vibration Training (WBVT) is effective at improving pelvic floor muscles strength in women with Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI). Materials and methods: The study was designed as a randomized clinical trial. 43 women with SUI were randomly assigned in two groups; WBVT and Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT) and received interventions for four weeks. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength, quality of life and incontinence intensity were evaluated. All measurements were conducted pre and post intervention and also after 3 months in all participants. The ANOVA and the independent sample t test were applied respectively to determine the differences in each group and between the groups. Results: This study showed the WBVT protocol in this study was effective in pelvic floor muscles strength similar to PFMT, and also in reducing the severity of incontinence and increasing I-QOL questionnaire score. We found significant differences in each group pre and post intervention (p = 0.0001); but no significant difference in comparison of two groups' outcomes. Also after three-month follow up, there was no significant difference between groups. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed the beneficial effects of WBVT in improving pelvic floor muscles strength and quality of life in patients with urinary incontinence in four-week treatment period and after three months follow up. PMID:27047560

  6. Feasibility and acceptability of couple counselling and pelvic floor muscle training after operation for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Randi V; E Bidstrup, Pernille; Hvarness, Helle; Bagi, Per; Friis Lippert, Elisabeth; Permild, Rikke; Giraldi, Annamaria; Lawaetz, Agnethe; Krause, Eva; Due, Ulla; Johansen, Christoffer

    2017-02-01

    Radical prostatectomy is often followed by long-lasting erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence, with adverse effects on the quality of life and intimate relationship of patients and partners. We developed the ProCan intervention to ameliorate sexual and urological dysfunction after radical prostatectomy and examined its feasibility, acceptability and changes in sexual function. Between May 2014 and October 2014, seven couples attending the Department of Urology, Rigshospitalet, were included 3-4 weeks after radical prostatectomy in the ProCan intervention, which consists of up to six couple counselling sessions, group instruction in pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), up to three individual PFMT sessions and a DVD home training program. We examined its feasibility on the basis of the recruitment rate, adherence to and acceptability of the intervention, the response rate and changes in erectile and sexual functioning measured on the International Index of Erectile Function at baseline and at eight and 12 months. The recruitment rate was 14%. One couple withdrew, six couples attended 1-4 counselling sessions, and all patients attended PFMT until continence was achieved. The response rate on outcomes was 85% for patients and 71% for partners. The couples reported that counselling improved their sex life but it did not improve their ability to talk openly about sex. Most patients found that the physiotherapist improved their motivation and the quality and intensity of PFMT. Erectile dysfunction improved from severe at baseline to moderate at eight months' follow-up, and mean sexual functioning improved from 18.4 to 37.1 points at eight months' follow-up, but decreased slightly to 31.4 at 12 months. Our results suggest that the recruitment procedure should be adapted and minor revisions are needed in the intervention. The key components, couple counselling and PFMT, were well accepted and achievable for the patients.

  7. Operations and Pelvic Muscle Training in the Management of Apical Support Loss (OPTIMAL) Trial: Design and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Matthew D.; Brubaker, Linda; Menefee, Shawn; Norton, Peggy; Borello-France, Diane; Varner, Edward; Schaffer, Joseph; Weidner, Alison; Xu, Xiao; Spino, Cathie; Weber, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The primary aims of this trial are: 1) to compare surgical outcomes following sacrospinous ligament fixation to uterosacral vaginal vault suspension in women undergoing vaginal surgery for apical or uterine pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence and 2) to examine the effects of a structured perioperative program consisting of behavioral techniques and pelvic floor muscle training compared to usual care. This trial is performed through the Pelvic Floor Disorders Network (PFDN), which is funded by National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Subjects will be enrolled from hospitals associated with seven PFDN clinical centers across the United States. A centralized biostatistical coordinating center will oversee data collection and analysis. Two approaches will be investigated simultaneously using a 2×2 randomized factorial design: a surgical intervention (sacrospinous ligament fixation versus uterosacral vaginal vault suspension) and a perioperative behavioral intervention (behavioral and pelvic floor muscle training versus usual care). Surgeons have standardized essential components of each surgical procedure and have met specific standards of expertise. Providers of the behavioral intervention have undergone standardized training. Anatomic, functional, and health-related quality of life outcomes will be assessed using validated measures by researchers blinded to all randomization assignments. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed using prospectively collected data on health care costs and resource utilization. The primary surgical endpoint is a composite outcome defined by anatomic recurrence, recurrence of bothersome vaginal prolapse symptoms and/or retreatment and will be assessed 2 years after the index surgery. Endpoints for the behavioral intervention include both short-term (6-month) improvement in urinary symptoms and long-term (2-year) improvement in anatomic outcomes and prolapse symptoms. This article describes the

  8. Beneficial effects of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training in patients with urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy: A systematic review and metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Lan-Fang; Liao, Yuan-Mei; Lai, Fu-Chih; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2016-08-01

    This systematic review and metaanalysis compared the effects of biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training with those of pelvic floor muscle training alone in patients with urinary incontinence after radical prostetactomy. A review and metaanalysis study design. The metaanalysis was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and MetaAnalyses guidelines. A systematic search of PubMed/Medline OVID, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Library, BioMed Central, Web of Science, Chinese Electronic Periodical Services, Chinese Journal and Thesis Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure was performed for retrieving records. For determining the effects of training type on urinary incontinence, randomized controlled trials on biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training with or without electrical stimulation were compared with those on pelvic floor muscle training with or without electrical stimulation, respectively, in the metaanalysis. The Cochrane Collaboration tool in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions 5.1.0 was used to assess the methodological quality of the included trials. Subjective and objective measurement of urinary incontinence improvement and the quality of life were the primary and secondary outcome measures, respectively. Data were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software 2.0. In addition, subgroup analyses and metaregression were performed to explore the possible sources of heterogeneity. Thirteen randomized controlled trials involving 1108 patients with prostatectomy incontinence were included. The immediate-, intermediate-, and long-term effects of objectively measured biofeedback-assisted pelvic floor muscle training on urinary incontinence were significant (mean effect size=-0.316, -0.335, and -0.294; 95% CI: -0.589 to -0.043, -0.552 to -0.118 and -0.535 to -0.053; p=0.023, 0.002, and 0.017, respectively) when compared

  9. Changes in Transversus Abdominis Muscle Thickness after Lumbo-Pelvic Core Stabilization Training among Chronic Low Back Pain Individuals.

    PubMed

    Leonard, J H; Paungmali, A; Sitilertpisan, P; Pirunsan, U; Uthaikhup, S

    2015-01-01

    Lumbo-pelvic core stabilization training (LPST) is one of the therapeutic exercises common in practice for rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. This study was carried out to examine the therapeutic effects of LPST on the muscle thickness of transversus abdominis (TrA) at rest and during contraction among patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. A total of 25 participants (7 males and 18 females) with chronic non-specific low back pain participated in a within-subject, repeated measures, double-blinded, placebo-controlled comparisons trial. The participants received three different types of experimental therapeutic training conditions which includes the lumbo-pelvic core stabilization training (LPST), the placebo treatment with passive cycling (PC) and a controlled intervention with rest (CI). The interventions were carried out by randomization with 48 hours between the sessions. The effectiveness of interventions was studied by measuring the changes in muscle thickness of TrA at rest and during contraction using a real time ultrasonography. Repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated that the LPST provided significant therapeutic benefits as measured by an increase in the muscle thickness of the TrA at rest (p<0.05) and during contraction (p<0.01). The percentage change of the muscle thickness observed during LPST was significantly higher (p<0.01) when compared to the other two experimental training conditions. The findings indicated that the LPST might provide therapeutic benefits by increasing the muscle thickness and function of TrA. Therefore, it is suggested that LPST technique should be considered as part of management program for treatment of low back pain.

  10. Effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) during pregnancy on bladder neck descend and delivery.

    PubMed

    Lekskulchai, Orawan; Wanichsetakul, Preecha

    2014-08-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) are commonly recommended during pregnancy and after birth for both prevention and treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Stress urinary incontinence has long been presumed to be associated with urethral hypermobility. Pregnancy and delivery are known cause of increasing bladder neck descent (BND). The present study aimed to determine the effect of antenatal PFME on bladder neck descent in nulliparous pregnancy. 219 nulliparous women pregnant between 8-12 weeks were interviewed and then underwent transperineal ultrasound. Of the total, 108 women were randomly assigned to a PFMT group, while 111 women to a control group. The latter group received routine antenatal care. For the intervention group, patients were taught about PFMT using visual biofeedback by transperineal ultrasound. The PFMT regimen comprised a series of 15 contractions, and each contraction was heldfor 5 seconds, with 5 seconds rest between each contraction. Patients were asked to repeat this regimen for 3 times after each meal. At second trimester, third trimester, 3-month postpartum and 6-month postpartum, the subjects in both groups were interviewed and then underwent another ultrasound assessment. Transperineal ultrasound was performed after bladder emptying, with the patient in the supine position. Bladder neck position was measured at rest and on maximal valsava, and the differences yielded a numerical valueforBND. The sample size was calculated with apower of80% p<0.05 was considered significant. SPSS 15. Ofor windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois) was used for statistical analyses. Demographic characteristics did not differ significantly between PFMT and control groups, showing effective randomization. Mean age was 26.95±3.94 and 26.51±5.41 years for PFMT and control group, respectively (p = 0.49). There were no significant differences in bladder symptoms between the two groups at the first visit. In the first trimester, the average BND of the

  11. Pelvic muscles during rest: responses to pelvic muscle exercise.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C; Dougherty, M C; Yarandi, H

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study pelvic muscle changes in the resting phase between voluntary contractions (during pelvic muscle assessment) and in response to pelvic muscle exercise (PME) through secondary analysis of data. The sample consisted of healthy women (N = 38) aged 35 to 54. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference in resting pressure within each assessment (F = 2.92, p < .04). A significant difference in resting pressures within subjects was found (F = 3.54, p < .02). Within-subject variance suggests exercises performed without a warmup may result in incomplete relaxation prior to contraction. Significant change between baseline and Level 1 of the graded PME program suggests slow relaxation of untrained muscles. Increases in resting pressure at Levels 3 and 4 may be a more accurate reflection of muscle hypertrophy. The results of this research indicate that care should be taken in establishing the point from which changes during contractions are measured. It is recommended that the resting pressure be used. Exercise continued for more than 3 or 4 weeks accounts for nearly all strength gains and explains the increases in resting pressure at PME Levels 3 and 4.

  12. [Impact of pelvic floor muscle training on prevention of perineal pain and dyspareunia in postpartum].

    PubMed

    Battut, A; Nizard, J

    2016-03-01

    Assessing the impact of perineal rehabilitation and massage on perineal pain and dyspareunia in the postpartum period, between 15days and 12months after delivery. We conducted an exhaustive review of the literature concerning pelvic floor rehabilitation in the postpartum between 1987 and May 2015, grading data by levels of evidence (LOE) according to the methodology recommendations for clinical guidelines. Pelvic floor rehabilitation in the postpartum is not associated with a decreased prevalence of perineal pain and dyspareunia at 1year (LOE3). The practice of digital perineal massage during the third trimester of pregnancy is not associated with decreased prevalence at 3-month postpartum of perineal pain or dyspareunia (RR=0.64; 95% CI [0.39-1.08] and RR=0.96; 95% CI [0.84-1.08], respectively), except for women who have delivered vaginally (RR=0.45; 95% CI [0,24-0.87]) (LOE2). The practice of digital perineal massage or application of warm packs in the second stage of labor does not reduce perineal pain (RR=0.93; 95% CI [0.66-1.32]) or dyspareunia (RR=0.99; 95% CI [0.74-1.34]) at 3-month postpartum (LOE2). There is no evidence of long-term benefit of perineal rehabilitation and perineal massage on perineal pain and dyspareunia in the year following childbirth. Further studies are needed to accurately assess the impact of therapeutic strategies proposed in France. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of training by virtual reality or gym ball on pelvic floor muscle strength in postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Natalia M; Silva, Valéria R; Marques, Joseane; Carvalho, Leonardo C; Iunes, Denise H; Botelho, Simone

    2016-03-22

    To evaluate the effectiveness of abdominopelvic training by virtual reality compared to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) using a gym ball (a previously tested and efficient protocol) on postmenopausal women's pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 60 postmenopausal women, randomly allocated into two groups: Abdominopelvic training by virtual reality - APT_VR (n=30) and PFMT using a gym ball - PFMT_GB (n=30). Both types of training were supervised by the same physical therapist, during 10 sessions each, for 30 minutes. The participants' PFM strength was evaluated by digital palpation and vaginal dynamometry, considering three different parameters: maximum strength, average strength and endurance. An intention-to-treat approach was used to analyze the participants according to original groups. No significant between-group differences were observed in most analyzed parameters. The outcome endurance was higher in the APT_VR group (p=0.003; effect size=0.89; mean difference=1.37; 95% CI=0.46 to 2.28). Both protocols have improved the overall PFM strength, suggesting that both are equally beneficial and can be used in clinical practice. Muscle endurance was higher in patients who trained using virtual reality.

  14. The effects of training by virtual reality or gym ball on pelvic floor muscle strength in postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Natalia M; Silva, Valéria R; Marques, Joseane; Carvalho, Leonardo C; Iunes, Denise H; Botelho, Simone

    2016-03-22

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of abdominopelvic training by virtual reality compared to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) using a gym ball (a previously tested and efficient protocol) on postmenopausal women's pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength. Method A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 60 postmenopausal women, randomly allocated into two groups: Abdominopelvic training by virtual reality - APT_VR (n=30) and PFMT using a gym ball - PFMT_GB (n=30). Both types of training were supervised by the same physical therapist, during 10 sessions each, for 30 minutes. The participants' PFM strength was evaluated by digital palpation and vaginal dynamometry, considering three different parameters: maximum strength, average strength andendurance. An intention-to-treat approach was used to analyze the participants according to original groups. Results No significant between-group differences were observed in most analyzed parameters. The outcome endurance was higher in the APT_VR group (p=0.003; effect size=0.89; mean difference=1.37; 95% CI=0.46 to 2.28). Conclusion Both protocols have improved the overall PFM strength, suggesting that both are equally beneficial and can be used in clinical practice. Muscle endurance was higher in patients who trained using virtual reality.

  15. The effects of training by virtual reality or gym ball on pelvic floor muscle strength in postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Martinho, Natalia M.; Silva, Valéria R.; Marques, Joseane; Carvalho, Leonardo C.; Iunes, Denise H.; Botelho, Simone

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of abdominopelvic training by virtual reality compared to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) using a gym ball (a previously tested and efficient protocol) on postmenopausal women’s pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength. Method A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 60 postmenopausal women, randomly allocated into two groups: Abdominopelvic training by virtual reality – APT_VR (n=30) and PFMT using a gym ball – PFMT_GB (n=30). Both types of training were supervised by the same physical therapist, during 10 sessions each, for 30 minutes. The participants’ PFM strength was evaluated by digital palpation and vaginal dynamometry, considering three different parameters: maximum strength, average strength and endurance. An intention-to-treat approach was used to analyze the participants according to original groups. Results No significant between-group differences were observed in most analyzed parameters. The outcome endurance was higher in the APT_VR group (p=0.003; effect size=0.89; mean difference=1.37; 95% CI=0.46 to 2.28). Conclusion Both protocols have improved the overall PFM strength, suggesting that both are equally beneficial and can be used in clinical practice. Muscle endurance was higher in patients who trained using virtual reality. PMID:27437716

  16. A pilot study on the use of acupuncture or pelvic floor muscle training for mixed urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Mona; Alræk, Terje; Mdala, Ibrahimu; Klovning, Atle

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the feasibility and acceptability of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) acupuncture and pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) in reducing symptoms and bothersomeness in women with mixed urinary incontinence (MUI); and to estimate the sample size for a full scale trial. Methods Thirty-four women with MUI were randomly assigned to either 12 sessions of TCM acupuncture, 12 sessions of PFMT, or to a waiting list control group. Outcome measures included an assessment of interest to participate in the trial, identification of successful recruitment strategies, the appropriateness of eligibility criteria, and compliance with treatment. Clinical outcomes were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks, and included the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF), expectations of treatment effect, and adverse events. Results Recruitment was feasible and randomisation worked adequately by means of SurveyMonkey. SurveyMonkey does not permit stratification by ICIQ-UI SF baseline score. Fourteen of 22 women found the treatment options acceptable. The dropout rate was high, especially in the control group (6/12). Outcome forms were completed by 20 of 34 women. The median (IQR) changes of the ICIQ-UI SF scores in the acupuncture, physiotherapy, and waiting list group were 5.5 (2.3 to 6.8), 1.0 (−3.0 to 4.5), and 1.5 (−1.5 to 3.0), respectively, suggesting the need for a full scale trial. Conclusions Women with MUI were willing to participate in this study. There is a need for adjusting eligibility criteria. A sample size of 129 women, 43 in three arms, is required. No major adverse events occurred. PMID:26362793

  17. Pelvic floor muscle training and adjunctive therapies for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Patricia B; Grimmer, Karen A; Deenadayalan, Yamini

    2006-01-01

    Background Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a prevalent and costly condition which may be treated surgically or by physical therapy. The aim of this review was to systematically assess the literature and present the best available evidence for the efficacy and effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) performed alone and together with adjunctive therapies (eg biofeedback, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones) for the treatment of female SUI. Methods All major electronic sources of relevant information were systematically searched to identify peer-reviewed English language abstracts or papers published between 1995 and 2005. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and other study designs eg non-randomised trials, cohort studies, case series, were considered for this review in order to source all the available evidence relevant to clinical practice. Studies of adult women with a urodynamic or clinical diagnosis of SUI were eligible for inclusion. Excluded were studies of women who were pregnant, immediately post-partum or with a diagnosis of mixed or urge incontinence. Studies with a PFMT protocol alone and in combination with adjunctive physical therapies were considered. Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of each study, its level of evidence and the methodological quality. Due to the heterogeneity of study designs, the results are presented in narrative format. Results Twenty four studies, including 17 RCTs and seven non-RCTs, met the inclusion criteria. The methodological quality of the studies varied but lower quality scores did not necessarily indicate studies from lower levels of evidence. This review found consistent evidence from a number of high quality RCTs that PFMT alone and in combination with adjunctive therapies is effective treatment for women with SUI with rates of 'cure' and 'cure/improvement' up to 73% and 97% respectively. The contribution of adjunctive therapies is unclear and there is limited evidence about treatment

  18. There is not yet strong evidence that exercise regimens other than pelvic floor muscle training can reduce stress urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bø, Kari; Herbert, Robert D

    2013-09-01

    What evidence is there for alternative exercises to specific pelvic floor muscle training for treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women? A systematic review was conducted with searches of PubMed and PEDro to January 2013. The quality of randomised trials was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Each type of exercise was classified as being in a Development Phase, Testing Phase, or Refinement and Dissemination Phase. Women with stress or mixed urinary incontinence with predominantly stress urinary incontinence. Exercise regimens other than pelvic floor muscle training. The primary outcome was urinary leakage. Seven randomised controlled trials were found: three on abdominal training, two on the Paula method, and two on Pilates exercise. The methodological quality score ranged between 4 and 8 with a mean of 5.7. There was no convincing evidence for the effect of these exercise regimens so they remain in the Testing Phase. Because no randomised trials were found for posture correction, breathing exercise, yoga, Tai Chi, and general fitness training, these were classified as being in the Development Phase. There is not yet strong evidence that alternative exercise regimens can reduce urinary leakage in women with stress urinary incontinence. Alternative exercise regimens should not yet be recommended for use in clinical practice for women with stress urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2013 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  19. Pre-operative training induces changes in the histomorphometry and muscle function of the pelvic floor in patients with indication of radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Trujillo, A; Carbonell-González, J; Martínez-Blanco, A; Díaz-Hung, A; Muñoz, C A; Ramírez-Vélez, R

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of preoperative pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on histomorphometry, muscle function, urinary continence and quality of life of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP). A prospective intervention clinical study was designed in 16 patients with indication of RP who were randomized into two groups. The Control Group received routine pre-surgical education (hygienic-dietary measures). The intervention group received a training session with supervised PFMT, three times a day, for four weeks, 30 days before the PR. Muscle function of the external urethral sphincter, contraction pressure of the levator ani, urinary continence and quality of life related to health (HRQoL) were evaluated before and after the intervention. At the end of the intervention and day of the surgery, samples of residual muscle tissue were obtained from the external sphincter muscle of the urethra for histomorphometric analysis. After the intervention, those participants who carried out PFMT showed an increase in the cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers of the external urethral sphincter (1,313 ± 1,075 μm(2)vs. 1,056 ± 844 μm(2), P=.03) and higher pressure contraction of the levator ani (F=9.188; P=.010). After catheter removal, 62% of patients in the experimental group and 37% in the control group showed no incontinence. After removal of the catheter, 75% of the experimental group did not require any pad compared to 25% in the control group (p=NS). There were no significant differences between the two groups in any of the HRQoL domains studied. Pre-surgical PFMT in patients with RP indication induces changes in the histology and function of the pelvic floor muscles, without changes in urogenital function and HRQoL. These results provide new evidence regarding the benefit of PFMT in preventing RP associated complications. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Pelvic floor muscle training added to another active treatment versus the same active treatment alone for urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Ayeleke, Reuben Olugbenga; Hay-Smith, E Jean C; Omar, Muhammad Imran

    2013-11-20

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is a first-line conservative treatment for urinary incontinence in women. Other active treatments include: physical therapies (e.g. vaginal cones); behavioural therapies (e.g. bladder training); electrical or magnetic stimulation; mechanical devices (e.g. continence pessaries); drug therapies (e.g. anticholinergics (solifenacin, oxybutynin, etc.) and duloxetine); and surgical interventions including sling procedures and colposuspension. This systematic review evaluated the effects of adding PFMT to any other active treatment for urinary incontinence in women To compare the effects of pelvic floor muscle training combined with another active treatment versus the same active treatment alone in the management of women with urinary incontinence. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, MEDLINE in process, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings (searched 28 February 2013), EMBASE (January 1947 to 2013 Week 9), CINAHL (January 1982 to 5 March 2013), ClinicalTrials.gov (searched 30 May 2013), WHO ICTRP (searched 3 June 2013) and the reference lists of relevant articles. We included randomised or quasi-randomised trials with two or more arms in women with clinical or urodynamic evidence of stress urinary incontinence, urgency urinary incontinence or mixed urinary incontinence. One arm of the trial included PFMT added to another active treatment; the other arm included the same active treatment alone. Two review authors independently assessed trials for eligibility and methodological quality and resolved any disagreement by discussion or consultation with a third party. We extracted and processed data in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Other potential sources of bias we incorporated into the 'Risk of bias' tables were ethical approval

  1. A comparative study of pelvic floor muscle training in women with multiple sclerosis: its impact on lower urinary tract symptoms and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Lúcio, Adélia Correia; Perissinoto, Maria Carolina; Natalin, Ricardo Aydar; Prudente, Alessandro; Damasceno, Benito Pereira; D'ancona, Carlos Arturo Levi

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare pelvic floor muscle training and a sham procedure for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms and quality of life in women with multiple sclerosis. METHODS: Thirty-five female patients with multiple sclerosis were randomized into two groups: a treatment group (n = 18) and a sham group (n = 17). The evaluation included use of the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form, and Qualiveen questionnaire. The intervention was performed twice per week for 12 weeks in both groups. The treatment group underwent pelvic floor muscle training with assistance from a vaginal perineometer and instructions to practice the exercises daily at home. The sham group received a treatment consisting of introducing a perineometer inside the vagina with no exercises required. Pre- and post-intervention data were recorded. RESULTS: The evaluation results of the two groups were similar at baseline. At the end of the treatment, the treatment group reported fewer storage and voiding symptoms than the sham group. Furthermore, the differences found between the groups were significant improvements in the following scores in the treatment group: Overactive Bladder Questionnaire, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form, and the General Quality of Life, and Specific Impact of Urinary Problems domains of the Qualiveen questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: The improvement of lower urinary tract symptoms had a positive effect on the quality of life of women with multiple sclerosis who underwent pelvic floor muscle training, as the disease-specific of quality of life questionnaires demonstrated. This study reinforces the importance of assessing quality of life to judge the effectiveness of a treatment intervention. PMID:22179160

  2. Internet-based treatment of stress urinary incontinence: a randomised controlled study with focus on pelvic floor muscle training.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, Malin; Umefjord, Göran; Stenlund, Hans; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard; Samuelsson, Eva

    2013-08-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) affects 10-35% of women, and it is sometimes very distressful. Pelvic floor exercises are the first line of treatment, but access barriers or embarrassment may prevent women from seeking help. There is a need for new, simple, and effective ways to deliver treatment. Management of SUI without face-to-face contact is possible, and Internet-based treatment is a new, promising treatment alternative. To compare two treatment programmes for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) without face-to-face contact: one Internet-based and one sent by post. Randomised, controlled trial conducted in Sweden 2009-2011. Computer-generated block-randomisation, allocation by independent administrator. No 'blinding'. The study included 250 community-dwelling women aged 18-70 years, with SUI ≥1 time/week. Consecutive online recruitment. The women had 3 months of either; (i) An Internet-based treatment programme (124 women), including e-mail support and cognitive behavioural therapy assignments or (ii) A treatment programme sent by post (126). Both programmes focused mainly on pelvic floor muscle training. symptom-score (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form, ICIQ-UI SF) and condition-specific quality of life (ICIQ-Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life, ICIQ-LUTSQoL). (i) Patient Global Impression of Improvement, (ii) Incontinence aids, (iii) Patient satisfaction, (iv) Health-specific QoL (EQ5D-Visual Analogue Scale), and (v) Incontinence episode frequency. Follow-up after 4 months via self-assessed postal questionnaires. In all, 12% (30 women) were lost to follow-up. Intention-to-treat analysis showed highly significant improvements (P < 0.001) with large effect sizes (>0.8) with both interventions, but there were no significant differences between groups in primary outcomes. The mean (sd) changes in symptom-score were: Internet 3.4 (3.4), Postal 2.9 (3

  3. The effect of antenatal pelvic floor muscle training on labor and delivery outcomes: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Du, Yihui; Xu, Li; Ding, Lilu; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Zhiping

    2015-10-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) has been widely used to prevent and treat urinary incontinence; however, the possible effect of antenatal PFMT on labor and delivery is still not clear. The purpose of the study was to investigate the possible effect of antenatal PFMT on labor and delivery. A systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted in accordance with the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled studies of an obstetric population who had done antenatal PFMT met the inclusion criteria. Data about labor and delivery outcomes included the first stage of labor, the second stage of labor, episiotomy, instrumental delivery, and perineal laceration. The nine English and four Chinese databases were searched from their inception through November 6, 2014. Fixed or random effects models were selected based on study heterogeneity. The weighted mean differences (WMDs) and odds ratios (ORs) with the corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the association between PFMT and the labor and delivery outcomes. Twelve studies were identified, involving a total of 2,243 women, in which 1,108 were PFMT and 1,135 controls. They indicated that PFMT during pregnancy significantly shortened the first and second stage of labor in the primigravida (WMD = -28.33, 95 % CI: -42.43 to -14.23, I(2) = 0.0 % , and WMD = -10.41, 95 % CI: -18.38 to -2.44, I(2) = 64.0 % respectively). In the subgroup analysis on the second stage of labor, heterogeneity decreased for subgroups of China and European countries (I(2) = 0.0 %, P = 0.768 and I(2) = 0.0 %, P = 0.750 respectively), but statistically significant association only existed in the subgroup of China (WMD = -17.42, 95 % CI: -23.41 to -11.43). When evaluating the effect on the rates of episiotomy, instrumental delivery and perineal laceration, the meta-analysis showed that the results were

  4. Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Women With Stress Urinary Incontinence Causes Hypertrophy of the Urethral Sphincters and Reduces Bladder Neck Mobility During Coughing

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Linda; Varette, Kevin; Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; Harvey, Marie-Andree; Baker, Kevin; Sauerbrei, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a 12-week pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training program on urethral morphology and mobility in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods Forty women with SUI were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the treatment group received 12 weekly physiotherapy sessions during which they learned how to properly contract their pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) and a home exercise program was prescribed, reviewed, and progressed; the control group received no treatment. Before and after the 12-week study period, ultrasound imaging was used to evaluate bladder neck position and mobility during coughing and Valsalva maneuver in supine and in standing, as well as urethral morphology. Secondary outcome measures included a 3-day bladder diary, 30-min pad test, the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6). Results The women in the treatment group demonstrated reduced bladder neck mobility during coughing and increased cross-sectional area of their urethra after as compared to before the training. These changes were not evident in the control group. No differences in the resting position of the bladder neck or in bladder neck excursion during Valsalva maneuver were noted in either group. Concomitantly the women in the treatment group demonstrated significant improvements in the 3-day bladder diary and IIQ-7 after the PFM training and improved significantly more than the control group. Conclusion Physiotherapist-supervised PFM training reduces bladder neck motion during coughing, and results in hypertrophy of the urethral sphincter in women who present with SUI. PMID:23861324

  5. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training for overactive bladder syndrome in women: results of a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Scaldazza, Carlo Vecchioli; Morosetti, Carolina; Giampieretti, Rosita; Lorenzetti, Rossana; Baroni, Marinella

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction This study compared percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training (ES + PFMT) in women with overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). Materials and Methods 60 women with OAB were enrolled. Patients were randomized into two groups. In group A, women underwent ES with PFMT, in group B women underwent PTNS. Results A statistically significant reduction in the number of daily micturitions, episodes of nocturia and urge incontinence was found in the two groups but the difference was more substantial in women treated with PTNS; voided volume increased in both groups. Quality of life improved in both groups, whereas patient perception of urgency improved only in women treated with PTNS. Global impression of improvement revealed a greater satisfaction in patients treated with PTNS. Conclusion This study demonstrates the effectiveness of PTNS and ES with PFMT in women with OAB, but greater improvements were found with PTNS. PMID:28124534

  6. Pelvic-Floor-Muscle Training Adherence: Tools, Measurements and Strategies-2011 ICS State-of-the-Science Seminar Research Paper II of IV.

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, Chantal; Alewijnse, Dianne; Bo, Kari; Hagen, Suzanne; Stark, Diane; Van Kampen, Marijke; Herbert, Julia; Hay-Smith, Jean; Frawley, Helena; McClurg, Doreen; Dean, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    This paper on pelvic-floor-muscle training (PFMT) adherence, the second of four from the International Continence Society's 2011 State-of-the-Science Conference, aims to (1) identify and collate current adherence outcome measures, (2) report the determinants of adherence, (3) report on PFMT adherence strategies, and (4) make actionable clinical and research recommendations. Data were amassed from a literature review and an expert panel (2011 conference), following consensus statement methodology. Experts in pelvic floor dysfunction collated and synthesized the evidence and expert opinions on PFMT adherence for urinary incontinence (UI) and lower bowel dysfunction in men and women and pelvic organ prolapse in women. The literature was scarce for most of the studied populations except for limited research on women with UI. Exercise diaries were the most widely-used adherence outcome measure, PFMT adherence was inconsistently monitored and inadequately reported. Determinants: Research, mostly secondary analyses of RCTs, suggested that intention to adhere, self-efficacy expectations, attitudes towards the exercises, perceived benefits and a high social pressure to engage in PFMT impacted adherence. Few trials studied and compared adherence strategies. A structured PFMT programme, an enthusiastic physiotherapist, audio prompts, use of established theories of behavior change, and user-consultations seem to increase adherence. The literature on adherence outcome measures, determinants and strategies remains scarce for the studied populations with PFM dysfunction, except in women with UI. Although some current adherence findings can be applied to clinical practice, more effective and standardized research is urgently needed across all the sub-populations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Scoping review of adherence promotion theories in pelvic floor muscle training - 2011 ICS state-of-the-science seminar research paper i of iv.

    PubMed

    McClurg, Doreen; Frawley, Helena; Hay-Smith, Jean; Dean, Sarah; Chen, Shu-Yueh; Chiarelli, Pauline; Mair, Frances; Dumoulin, Chantale

    2015-09-01

    This paper, the first of four emanating from the International Continence Society's 2011 State-of-the-Science Seminar on pelvic-floor-muscle training (PFMT) adherence, aimed to summarize the literature on theoretical models to promote PFMT adherence, as identified in the research, or suggested by the seminar's expert panel, and recommends future directions for clinical practice and research. Existing literature on theories of health behavior were identified through a conventional subject search of electronic databases, reference-list checking, and input from the expert panel. A core eligibility criterion was that the study included a theoretical model to underpin adherence strategies used in an intervention to promote PFM training/exercise. A brief critique of 12 theoretical models/theories is provided and, were appropriate, their use in PFMT adherence strategies identified or examples of possible uses in future studies outlined. A better theoretical-based understanding of interventions to promote PFMT adherence through changes in health behaviors is required. The results of this scoping review and expert opinions identified several promising models. Future research should explicitly map the theories behind interventions that are thought to improve adherence in various populations (e.g., perinatal women to prevent or lessen urinary incontinence). In addition, identified behavioral theories applied to PFMT require a process whereby their impact can be evaluated. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Association between pelvic muscle mass and canine hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cardinet, G H; Kass, P H; Wallace, L J; Guffy, M M

    1997-05-15

    To investigate the relationship between pelvic muscle mass and development and expression of canine hip dysplasia (CHD). Prospective study. 5 Greyhounds with anatomically normal hip joints, 59 German Shepherd Dogs (23 with CHD, 24 with near-normal hip joints, and 12 with normal hip joints), and 18 German Shepherd Dog-Greyhound crossbreeds (7 with CHD, 6 with near-normal hip joints, and 5 with normal hip joints) between 12 and 47 months old in which pelvic muscle mass was evaluated. Pectineal muscle and hip joint development were evaluated in 25 German Shepherd Dogs at 8 and 16 or 24 weeks of age. For evaluation of pelvic muscle mass, individual pelvic muscles were weighed and hip joints were assigned a score on the basis of severity of degenerative changes. For evaluation of pectineal muscle development, muscle sections were stained and examined. Pelvic muscle mass was greatest in Greyhounds, intermediate in crossbred dogs, and smallest in German Shepherd Dogs. Differences in pelvic muscle mass among breeds were attributable to differences in weights of individual muscles. Hip score was negatively correlated with pelvic muscle mass and weights of selected pelvic muscles. Dogs with pectineal hypotrophy at 8 weeks of age had type-2 muscle fiber paucity or muscle fiber-type grouping at 16 or 24 weeks of age. At 8 weeks of age, hip joints were composed of multiple centers of ossification, and the acetabulum was largely cartilaginous. By 24 weeks of age, the pelvic bones were largely, although incompletely, fused. Diminished pelvic muscle mass in dogs with CHD and altered muscle fiber size and composition in 8-week-old dogs that subsequently develop CHD strongly suggest that abnormalities of pelvic musculature are associated with development of CHD. The complex development of the hip joint from multiple centers of ossification may make the joint susceptible to abnormal modeling forces that would result from abnormalities in pelvic muscle mass.

  9. Efficacy of Boswellia serrata L. and Cyperus scariosus L. plus pelvic floor muscle training in stress incontinence in women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Arkalgud Rangaswamy, Padmaja; Sultana, Arshiya; Rahman, Khaleequr; Nagapattinam, Sumana

    2014-11-01

    To determine the efficacy of combining of Boswellia serrata L. resin and the root of Cyperus scariosus L. plus PFMT in reproductive age women with stress urinary incontinence. A prospective, single-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was conducted. The patients were randomized to receive orally either combination of equal quantity of B. serrata and C. scariosus (2g) (n = 30) or placebo (n = 30) respectively twice daily for 8 weeks in addition to pelvic floor muscle training in both groups. The outcome was one hour pad test. The results were analyzed using parametric and nonparametric test. The improvement in the test and control group was 60% and 37% respectively. Between the group comparison was statistically significant (P = 0.035). The intra group comparison of one hour pad test was statistically significant in both groups (P < 0.001). No adverse effects were noted. The test group was more effective than control group in women with SUI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Barriers and enablers to the provision and receipt of preoperative pelvic floor muscle training for men having radical prostatectomy: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Strong evidence exists to support preoperative pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) to reduce the severity and duration of urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy. Receipt of preoperative PFMT amongst men having radical prostatectomy in Western Sydney, however, is suboptimal. This study was undertaken to investigate barriers and enablers to provision/receipt of preoperative PFMT from the perspectives of potential referrers to and providers of PFMT, and of men having radical prostatectomy. Methods A qualitative research design was used. Semi-structured, one-to-one interviews were conducted with participants from three groups: (i) current and potential referrers to PFMT, including urological cancer surgeons, urological cancer nurses and general practitioners (n = 11); (ii) current and potential providers of PFMT across public and private sector hospital and outpatient settings, including physiotherapists and continence nurses (n = 14); and (iii) men having had radical prostatectomy at a specific public and co-located private hospital in Western Sydney (n = 13). Interview schedules were developed using Michie’s theoretical domains for investigating the implementation of evidence-based practice, and allowed participants to identify potential and actual barriers and enablers to preoperative PFMT. Transcribed interview data were analysed using a framework approach, and key themes were identified. Results Participant groups concurred that a recommendation for PFMT from the urological cancer surgeon, accompanied with a referral to a specific provider, was a key enabler of preoperative PFMT. Perceived barriers varied between participant groups and across public and private healthcare settings. Perceptions of financial cost of private sector PFMT, limited knowledge amongst referrers of public sector providers of PFMT, and limited awareness amongst patients of the benefits of PFMT were all posited to contribute to suboptimal PFMT provision and

  11. Pelvic floor muscle training included in a pregnancy exercise program is effective in primary prevention of urinary incontinence: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, Mireia; Gonzalez-Cerron, Silvia; Montejo, Rocío; Barakat, Rubén

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) taught in a general exercise class during pregnancy on the prevention of urinary incontinence (UI) in nulliparous continent pregnant women. This was a unicenter two armed randomized controlled trial. One hundred sixty-nine women were randomized by a central computer system to an exercise group (EG) (exercise class including PFMT) (n = 73) or a control group (CG) (n = 96). 10.1% loss to follow-up: 10 from EG and 7 from CG. The intervention consisted of 70-75 sessions (22 weeks, three times per week, 55-60 min/session including 10 min of PFMT). The CG received usual care (which included follow up by midwifes including information about PFMT). Questions on prevalence and degree of UI were posed before (week 10-14) and after intervention (week 36-39) using the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF). At the end of the intervention, there was a statistically significant difference in favor of the EG. Reported frequency of UI [Never: CG: 54/60.7%, EG: 60/95.2% (P < 0.001)]. Amount of leakage [None: CG: 45/60.7%, EG: 60/95.2% (P < 0.001)]. There was also a statistically significant difference in ICIQ-UI SF Score between groups after the intervention period [CG: 2.7 (SD 4.1), EG: 0.2 (SD 1.2) (P < 0.001)]. The estimated effect size was 0.8. PFMT taught in a general exercise class three times per week for at least 22 weeks, without former assessment of ability to perform a correct contraction was effective in primary prevention of UI in primiparous pregnant women. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effect of pelvic floor muscle exercises on pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Han, DongWook; Ha, Misook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the correlation between pelvic floor muscle strength and pulmonary function. In particular, we examined whether pelvic floor muscle exercises can improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] Thirty female college students aged 19–21 with no history of nervous or musculoskeletal system injury were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. [Methods] For the pulmonary function test, spirometry items included forced vital capacity and maximal voluntary ventilation. Pelvic floor muscle exercises consisted of Kegel exercises performed three times daily for 4 weeks. [Results] Kegel exercises performed in the experimental group significantly improved forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, PER, FEF 25–75%, IC, and maximum voluntary ventilation compared to no improvement in the control group. [Conclusion] Kegel exercises significantly improved pulmonary function. When abdominal pressure increased, pelvic floor muscles performed contraction at the same time. Therefore, we recommend that the use of pelvic floor muscle exercises be considered for improving pulmonary function. PMID:26644681

  13. Evaluation of the levator ani and pelvic wall muscles in levator ani syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hull, Margaret; Corton, Marlene M

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a difficult problem to evaluate and treat. Knowledge of the pelvic floor and pelvic wall muscles may enable the provider to identify levator ani spasm syndrome, a possible cause of chronic pelvic pain.

  14. Path analysis for adherence to pelvic floor muscle exercise among women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Yueh; Tzeng, Ya-Ling

    2009-06-01

    This study developed and tested the accuracy of a model designed to predict adherence to a pelvic floor muscle exercise regimen by Taiwanese women with urinary incontinence. The sample was composed of 106 women treated for urinary incontinence at urban hospitals in central and northern Taiwan from April 2000 to March 2003. All participants had practiced prescribed pelvic floor muscle exercises for at least 6 weeks at the time they completed study measures, which included adherence to pelvic floor muscle exercise, self-efficacy for the exercise, knowledge of the exercise, attitudes toward the exercise, dyadic cohesion, perceived benefits of the exercise, and severity of urine loss. After stepwise multiple regression analysis, a path analysis was conducted, with significant paths retained as modifiers. Self-efficacy for pelvic floor muscle exercise strongly and directly affected adherence to the exercise regimen. Attitudes toward the exercise, dyadic cohesion, and perceived benefits of the exercise affected adherence when mediated by self-efficacy for pelvic floor muscle exercise. Severity of urine loss also directly affected adherence. Exercise knowledge affected neither self-efficacy nor adherence. The model fit the data and accounted for 40% of adherence variance. Findings affirm the significant role of self-efficacy in predicting adherence to pelvic floor muscle exercise. Thus, self-efficacy for exercise can be an indicator for nurses to tailor exercise-training programs for women with urinary incontinence. Nurses can use the study findings to develop interventions to increase women's adherence to the exercise.

  15. Effect of hip abduction exercise with manual pelvic fixation on recruitment of deep trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Hyuk; Lim, Tae Hong; Park, So Hyun; Kim, Cheol Seung; Jang, Sung Ho; Cho, Yun Woo; Kim, Kook Ju; Choi, Hwa Soon; Ahn, Sang Ho

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether side-lying hip abduction exercise while applying manual pelvic fixation is more effective than hip abduction without manual pelvic fixation for promoting deep trunk muscle activity. This is a cross-sectional study comparing deep trunk muscle activation between hip abduction exercise without and with manual pelvic fixation in ten participants. Muscle activation was measured using fine-wire and surface electromyography. Hip abduction with manual pelvic fixation was found to result in significantly more recruitment of all studied deep trunk muscles except the ipsilateral obliquus externus compared with hip abduction without manual pelvic fixation (P < 0.05). The greatest increased activation was seen in the ipsilateral deep and superficial multifidus. The increase in deep multifidus percentage of maximal voluntary contraction was greater than that of the rectus abdominis, the obliquus externus, the transversuus abdominis/obliquus internus, the lumbar erector spinae, the superficial multifidus, and the gluteus medius (P < 0.05). The superficial multifidus percentage of maximal voluntary contraction was significantly increased over that of the rectus abdominis and the obliquus externus (P < 0.05). Moderate correlation between deep and superficial multifidus activation was found (Pearson correlation coefficient, 0.537). Hip abduction training in the side-lying position while applying manual pelvic fixation seems to be more effective for recruiting deep trunk muscles for dynamic lumbar spinal stabilization.

  16. "How-To" Guide to Pelvic Floor Muscle Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Katie B

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist the clinician in recognizing pelvic floor muscle dysfunction in women with vulvar symptoms, to provide general treatment algorithms, and to facilitate understanding of the scientific rationale behind appropriate treatment. In short, this paper is meant to provide a "how-to" guide to pelvic floor pain management for the Ob/Gyn.

  17. Development and Evolution of the Muscles of the Pelvic Fin

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Nicholas J.; Hall, Thomas E.; Don, Emily K.; Berger, Silke; Boisvert, Catherine A.; Neyt, Christine; Ericsson, Rolf; Joss, Jean; Gurevich, David B.; Currie, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Locomotor strategies in terrestrial tetrapods have evolved from the utilisation of sinusoidal contractions of axial musculature, evident in ancestral fish species, to the reliance on powerful and complex limb muscles to provide propulsive force. Within tetrapods, a hindlimb-dominant locomotor strategy predominates, and its evolution is considered critical for the evident success of the tetrapod transition onto land. Here, we determine the developmental mechanisms of pelvic fin muscle formation in living fish species at critical points within the vertebrate phylogeny and reveal a stepwise modification from a primitive to a more derived mode of pelvic fin muscle formation. A distinct process generates pelvic fin muscle in bony fishes that incorporates both primitive and derived characteristics of vertebrate appendicular muscle formation. We propose that the adoption of the fully derived mode of hindlimb muscle formation from this bimodal character state is an evolutionary innovation that was critical to the success of the tetrapod transition. PMID:21990962

  18. Assessment of pelvic floor muscle pressure in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Borin, Lílian Cristina Marques da Silva; Nunes, Fabiana Roberta; Guirro, Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the pressure of the pelvic floor muscles in female athletes and the associated signs and symptoms of stress urinary incontinence. A prospective observational study. An academic institution, primary level of clinical care. Forty women between 18 and 30 years of age divided into 4 groups: 10 volleyball players, 10 handball players, 10 basketball players, and 10 nonathletes. The measurement of intracavity pressure was performed with use of a perineometer. The volunteers were instructed to perform 3 maximum isometric contractions of the perineum, held for 4 seconds. Data regarding specific training and urinary symptoms were collected through a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance, with a significance level of 5%. The Spearman correlation was used to verify the degree of association between variables related to training, urinary symptoms, and perineal pressure. The average (standard deviation) perineal pressure for nonathletes was 6.73 ± 1.91 mm Hg. The average perineal pressure for handball players was 5.55 ± 1.43 mm Hg; for volleyball players, 4.36 ± 1.43 mm Hg; and for basketball players, 3.65 ± 1.35 mm Hg. Statistically significant differences were found in the perineal pressure of volleyball (P = .009) and basketball players (P = .039) compared with nonathletes. The number of games per year, strength training, and on-court workout correlated significantly with perineal pressure (Spearman correlation coefficient [Rs] of -0.512 for the 3 variables). Urine leakage through effort and nocturia correlated moderately with perineal pressure (Rs of -0.51 and -0.54, respectively). A strong correlation was found between urinary frequency and perineal pressure (Rs of -0.85). Analysis of these data suggests that perineal pressure is decreased in female athletes compared with nonathlete women. A lower perineal pressure correlates with increased symptoms of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor dysfunction. Copyright © 2013

  19. Effects of Stabilization Exercises Focusing on Pelvic Floor Muscles on Low Back Pain and Urinary Incontinence in Women.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Fariba; Mohammadi, Khadijeh; Amir Sasan, Ramin; Niko Kheslat, Saeed; Oskouei, Ali E

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of stabilization exercises focusing on pelvic floor muscles on both low back pain (LBP) and urinary incontinence (UI) in women suffering from chronic nonspecific LBP. In a randomized clinical trial, 60 women, ranging from 45 to 60 years old, with chronic nonspecific LBP and stress UI were recruited. They were randomly assigned to the control group (n = 30) that received routine physiotherapy modalities and regular exercises, or the training group (n = 30) that received routine physiotherapy modalities and stabilization exercises focusing on pelvic floor muscle (12 weeks). Clinical characteristics of the study subjects including UI intensity and quality of life assessed by International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form questionnaire, functional disability assessed by Oswestry disability index scores, pain intensity, pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance, and transverses abdominis muscle strength were measured before and after treatment. Functional disability and pain intensity were significantly decreased in control (P < .05) and training groups (P < .05), with no significant difference between the groups after treatment. However, UI intensity was smaller for the training group (P < .05). Pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance, and transverses abdominis muscle strength were statistically increased in the training group compared with those in the control group (P < .05). Stabilization exercises focusing on pelvic floor muscle improves stress UI as well as LBP in women with chronic nonspecific LBP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Internet-based treatment of stress urinary incontinence: 1- and 2-year results of a randomized controlled trial with a focus on pelvic floor muscle training

    PubMed Central

    Sjöström, Malin; Umefjord, Göran; Stenlund, Hans; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard; Samuelsson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the long-term effects of two non-face-to-face treatment programmes for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) based on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). Subjects and Methods The present study was a randomized controlled trial with online recruitment of 250 community-dwelling women aged 18–70 years with SUI ≥ one time/week. Diagnosis was based on validated self-assessed questionnaires, 2-day bladder diary and telephone interview with a urotherapist. Consecutive computer-generated block randomization was carried out with allocation by an independent administrator to 3 months of treatment with either an internet-based treatment programme (n = 124) or a programme sent by post (n = 126). Both interventions focused mainly on PFMT. The internet group received continuous e-mail support from a urotherapist, whereas the postal group trained on their own. Follow-up was performed after 1 and 2 years via self-assessed postal questionnaires. The primary outcomes were symptom severity (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form [ICIQ-UI SF]) and condition-specific quality of life (ICIQ-Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life [ICIQ-LUTSqol]). Secondary outcomes were the Patient Global Impression of Improvement, health-specific quality of life (EQ-visual analogue scale [EQ-VAS]), use of incontinence aids, and satisfaction with treatment. There was no face-to-face contact with the participants at any time. Analysis was based on intention-to-treat. Results We lost 32.4% (81/250) of participants to follow-up after 1 year and 38.0% (95/250) after 2 years. With both interventions, we observed highly significant (P < 0.001) improvements with large effect sizes (>0.8) for symptoms and condition-specific quality of life (QoL) after 1 and 2 years, respectively. No significant differences were found between the groups. The mean (sd) changes in symptom score were 3.7 (3.3) for the internet group and 3.2 (3.4) for the postal group (P = 0

  1. Internet-based treatment of stress urinary incontinence: 1- and 2-year results of a randomized controlled trial with a focus on pelvic floor muscle training.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, Malin; Umefjord, Göran; Stenlund, Hans; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard; Samuelsson, Eva

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the long-term effects of two non-face-to-face treatment programmes for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) based on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). The present study was a randomized controlled trial with online recruitment of 250 community-dwelling women aged 18-70 years with SUI ≥ one time/week. Diagnosis was based on validated self-assessed questionnaires, 2-day bladder diary and telephone interview with a urotherapist. Consecutive computer-generated block randomization was carried out with allocation by an independent administrator to 3 months of treatment with either an internet-based treatment programme (n = 124) or a programme sent by post (n = 126). Both interventions focused mainly on PFMT. The internet group received continuous e-mail support from a urotherapist, whereas the postal group trained on their own. Follow-up was performed after 1 and 2 years via self-assessed postal questionnaires. The primary outcomes were symptom severity (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form [ICIQ-UI SF]) and condition-specific quality of life (ICIQ-Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life [ICIQ-LUTSqol]). Secondary outcomes were the Patient Global Impression of Improvement, health-specific quality of life (EQ-visual analogue scale [EQ-VAS]), use of incontinence aids, and satisfaction with treatment. There was no face-to-face contact with the participants at any time. Analysis was based on intention-to-treat. We lost 32.4% (81/250) of participants to follow-up after 1 year and 38.0% (95/250) after 2 years. With both interventions, we observed highly significant (P < 0.001) improvements with large effect sizes (>0.8) for symptoms and condition-specific quality of life (QoL) after 1 and 2 years, respectively. No significant differences were found between the groups. The mean (sd) changes in symptom score were 3.7 (3.3) for the internet group and 3.2 (3.4) for the postal group (P = 0.47) after 1 year, and 3.6 (3.5) for the

  2. Evaluation of pelvic floor muscle strength before and after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy and early outcomes on urinary continence.

    PubMed

    Manley, Lauren; Gibson, Luke; Papa, Nathan; Beharry, Bhawanie Koonj; Johnson, Liana; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) assessment and training before and after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) in improving PFM strength and urinary continence. We performed an analysis of a database of patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed by two urologists from 2011 to 2013. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activation and strength were graded by a trained pelvic floor physiotherapist. Patients were given an exercise program, grouped according to the strength of their pelvic floor as graded by assessment, to complete before and after surgery. PFM strength was recorded preoperatively, 4 days post-catheter removal and 4 weeks post-catheter removal. Continence was recorded at 4 weeks postop and was defined as the requirement of no continence aids. A total of 98 patients had RARP and a preoperative physiotherapy assessment plus postoperative appointments at around 1 and 4 weeks post-RARP. The majority of men improved their PFM strength regardless of preoperative strength with no significant predictors of postoperative strength found. Age was the only significant predictor of postoperative incontinence. In this pilot study, a majority of patients increased their pelvic floor strength with time. Pelvic floor physiotherapy is an important modifiable patient factor, which does have an impact in improving patients' urinary continence by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles. Patient age influences response to pelvic floor physiotherapy.

  3. Pelvic floor muscle biometry and pelvic organ mobility in East Asian and Caucasian nulliparae.

    PubMed

    Cheung, R Y K; Shek, K L; Chan, S S C; Chung, T K H; Dietz, H P

    2015-05-01

    To compare the differences in levator ani muscle biometry and hiatal dimensions between pregnant nulliparous Caucasian and East Asian women. Offline analysis of three/four-dimensional ultrasound volume data obtained from two groups of pregnant nulliparous women, Caucasian and East Asian, was performed. Volume acquisition was performed in the late third trimester using the same method in both groups, in the context of two prospective observational studies with identical entry criteria. Pelvic organ descent and levator hiatal dimensions were assessed using the volumes acquired on Valsalva maneuver, and pubovisceral muscle thickness was measured from the volumes obtained on pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC). Datasets of 200 East Asian and 168 Caucasian women were analyzed. Compared with Caucasian women, East Asian women had a significantly lower body mass index. All indices of pelvic organ descent were significantly higher in the Caucasian group than in the East Asian group. The difference, expressed as a percentage, in levator hiatal area on both Valsalva maneuver and PFMC was markedly greater in Caucasian (32% vs. 19%; P < 0.001) than in East Asian (24% vs. 20%; P = 0.01) women. After controlling for potential confounders using multivariate regression analysis, racial origin remained the only significant factor associated with differences in pelvic organ descent and hiatal dimensions. The thickness and area of pubovisceral muscle were significantly higher in the East Asian group. Pregnant women of East Asian racial origin have a thicker pubovisceral muscle, smaller hiatus and less mobility of pelvic organs than do pregnant Caucasian women. Copyright © 2014 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effects of Pelvic and Core Strength Training on High School Cross-Country Race Times.

    PubMed

    Clark, Anne W; Goedeke, Maggie K; Cunningham, Saengchoy R; Rockwell, Derek E; Lehecka, Bryan J; Manske, Robert C; Smith, Barbara S

    2017-08-01

    Clark, AW, Goedeke, MK, Cunningham, SR, Rockwell, DE, Lehecka, BJ, Manske, RC, and Smith, BS. Effects of pelvic and core strength training on high school cross-country race times. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2289-2295, 2017-There is only limited research examining the effect of pelvic and core strength training on running performance. Pelvic and core muscle fatigue is believed to contribute to excess motion along frontal and transverse planes which decreases efficiency in normal sagittal plane running motions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether adding a 6-week pelvic and core strengthening program resulted in decreased race times in high school cross-country runners. Thirty-five high school cross-country runners (14-19 years old) from 2 high schools were randomly assigned to a strengthening group (experimental) or a nonstrengthening group (control). All participants completed 4 standardized isometric strength tests for hip abductors, adductors, extensors, and core musculature in a test-retest design. The experimental group performed a 6-week pelvic and core strengthening program along with their normal training. Participants in the control group performed their normal training without additional pelvic and core strengthening. Baseline, 3-week, and 6-week race times were collected using a repeated measures design. No significant interaction between experimental and control groups regarding decreasing race times and increasing pelvic and core musculature strength occurred over the 6-week study period. Both groups increased strength and decreased overall race times. Clinically significant findings reveal a 6-week pelvic and core stability strengthening program 3 times a week in addition to coach led team training may help decrease race times.

  5. A shell finite element model of the pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    d'Aulignac, D; Martins, J A C; Pires, E B; Mascarenhas, T; Jorge, R M Natal

    2005-10-01

    The pelvic floor gives support to the organs in the abdominal cavity. Using the dataset made public in (Janda et al. J. Biomech. (2003) 36(6), pp. 749-757), we have reconstructed the geometry of one of the most important parts of the pelvic floor, the levator ani, using NURB surfaces. Once the surface is triangulated, the corresponding mesh is used in a finite element analysis with shell elements. Based on the 3D behavior of the muscle we have constructed a shell that takes into account the direction of the muscle fibers and the incompressibility of the tissue. The constitutive model for the isotropic strain energy and the passive strain energy stored in the fibers is adapted from Humphrey's model for cardiac muscles. To this the active behavior of the skeletal muscle is added. We present preliminary results of a simulation of the levator ani muscle under pressure and with active contraction. This research aims at helping simulate the damages to the pelvic floor that can occur after childbirth.

  6. Assessment of pelvic floor muscles in women with deep endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Dos Bispo, Ana Paula Santos; Ploger, Christine; Loureiro, Alessandra Fernandes; Sato, Hélio; Kolpeman, Alexander; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Schor, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    To assess function and prevalence of spasms and trigger points of the pelvic floor muscles in women with deep endometriosis. One hundred and four (104) patients were assessed. Group 1 (G1) was composed of 52 subjects diagnosed with deep endometriosis proven by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); Group 2 (G2) was composed of 52 women with no signs of endometriosis. Subjects from both G1 and G2 were seen at the Division of Pelvic Pain and Endometriosis and at Center for Prevention of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, both at Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP), respectively. A full physical therapy evaluation was carried out, including medical history, presence of dyspareunia and physical examination, which included detailed evaluation of pelvic floor muscles and occurrence of muscle spasm, trigger point and muscle function. The average age of the subjects in the study group was 36.4 and 30.9 years in the control group (p = 0.002). A greater prevalence of deep dyspareunia was found in the subjects in the endometriosis group when compared to the control group (p = 0.010). Women in G1 had higher prevalence of muscle spasms. In this group, 53.9 % had spasms-compared to only 17.3 % of women in G2 (p < 0.001). On the other hand, no significant difference between the groups (p = 0.153) was found while searching for the presence of trigger points. Women with deep endometriosis have increased prevalence of pelvic floor muscle spasms when compared to the control group.

  7. Modeling the contraction of the pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernanda Sofia Quintela da Silva; Parente, Marco Paulo Lages; Rocha, Paulo Alexandre Gomes Gonçalves; Saraiva, Maria Teresa da Quinta E Costa de Mascarenhas; Ramos, Isabel Maria Amorim Pereira; Natal Jorge, Renato Manuel

    2016-01-01

    We performed numerical simulation of voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles to evaluate the resulting displacements of the organs and muscles. Structures were segmented in Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Different material properties and constitutive models were attributed. The Finite Element Method was applied, and displacements were compared with dynamic MRI findings. Numerical simulation showed muscle magnitude displacement ranging from 0 to 7.9 mm, more evident in the posterior area. Accordingly, the anorectum moved more than the uterus and bladder. Dynamic MRI showed less 0.2 mm and 4.1 mm muscle dislocation in the anterior and cranial directions, respectively. Applications of this model include evaluating muscle impairment, subject-specific mesh implant planning, or effectiveness of rehabilitation.

  8. Cortical Activation Associated with Muscle Synergies of the Human Male Pelvic Floor

    PubMed Central

    Asavasopon, Skulpan; Rana, Manku; Kirages, Daniel J.; Yani, Moheb S.; Fisher, Beth E.; Hwang, Darryl H.; Lohman, Everett B.; Berk, Lee S.

    2014-01-01

    Human pelvic floor muscles have been shown to operate synergistically with a wide variety of muscles, which has been suggested to be an important contributor to continence and pelvic stability during functional tasks. However, the neural mechanism of pelvic floor muscle synergies remains unknown. Here, we test the hypothesis that activation in motor cortical regions associated with pelvic floor activation are part of the neural substrate for such synergies. We first use electromyographic recordings to extend previous findings and demonstrate that pelvic floor muscles activate synergistically during voluntary activation of gluteal muscles, but not during voluntary activation of finger muscles. We then show, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), that a region of the medial wall of the precentral gyrus consistently activates during both voluntary pelvic floor muscle activation and voluntary gluteal activation, but not during voluntary finger activation. We finally confirm, using transcranial magnetic stimulation, that the fMRI-identified medial wall region is likely to generate pelvic floor muscle activation. Thus, muscle synergies of the human male pelvic floor appear to involve activation of motor cortical areas associated with pelvic floor control. PMID:25297107

  9. Cortical activation associated with muscle synergies of the human male pelvic floor.

    PubMed

    Asavasopon, Skulpan; Rana, Manku; Kirages, Daniel J; Yani, Moheb S; Fisher, Beth E; Hwang, Darryl H; Lohman, Everett B; Berk, Lee S; Kutch, Jason J

    2014-10-08

    Human pelvic floor muscles have been shown to operate synergistically with a wide variety of muscles, which has been suggested to be an important contributor to continence and pelvic stability during functional tasks. However, the neural mechanism of pelvic floor muscle synergies remains unknown. Here, we test the hypothesis that activation in motor cortical regions associated with pelvic floor activation are part of the neural substrate for such synergies. We first use electromyographic recordings to extend previous findings and demonstrate that pelvic floor muscles activate synergistically during voluntary activation of gluteal muscles, but not during voluntary activation of finger muscles. We then show, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), that a region of the medial wall of the precentral gyrus consistently activates during both voluntary pelvic floor muscle activation and voluntary gluteal activation, but not during voluntary finger activation. We finally confirm, using transcranial magnetic stimulation, that the fMRI-identified medial wall region is likely to generate pelvic floor muscle activation. Thus, muscle synergies of the human male pelvic floor appear to involve activation of motor cortical areas associated with pelvic floor control.

  10. Muscle function of the pelvic floor in healthy, puerperal women with pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Castro-Pardiñas, M A; Torres-Lacomba, M; Navarro-Brazález, B

    2017-05-01

    To understand the function of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) at different ages in healthy women and in puerperal women with pelvic floor dysfunctions (PFD) and to ascertain whether there are differences among them. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2016 and included 177 women, 70 of whom had no symptoms of PFD, 53 primiparous mothers in late postpartum and 54 with PFD. The function of the PFM was measured through vaginal palpation (quality of the contraction); manometry (force); dynamometer (tone, strength, and response to stretching), and surface electromyography (neuromuscular activity and resistance). The healthy women showed superior values for PFM tone, maximum strength, neuromuscular activity and resistance than the puerperal mothers and the women with PFD (P<.01). The puerperal women and those with PFD showed similar functional PFM values (P>.05). The muscle function of the healthy women did not vary significantly with age, except in the case of tone, which was lower in the women older than 46 years (P=.004). Age and births decrease the baseline tone of the PFM in healthy women. Therefore, lower strength, resistance and neuromuscular activity appear to be the main difference between the PFM of women with PFD and the PFM of healthy women. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of pelvic position and vibration frequency on muscle activation during whole body vibration in quiet standing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong-Hwi; Seo, Hye-Jung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation related to postural stability depending on the pelvic position and frequency of whole body vibration (WBV) during quiet standing, and to identify the most effective training conditions that elicit the highest neuromuscular responses. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this single-group, repeated-measures study in which surface electromyography (EMG) data for the upper trapezius, rectus abdominis, external oblique abdominis, erector spinae, gluteus maximus, rectus femoris, semitendinosus, and medial gastrocnemius were collected at three frequencies (0 Hz, 10 Hz, and 20 Hz) of WBV and three pelvic positions (neutral, anterior tilt, posterior tilt) for each subject during quiet standing. [Results] The EMG activities of all the recorded muscles showed significant differences between the three frequencies of WBV and three pelvic positions during quiet standing. [Conclusion] The study findings suggest that a higher WBV frequency (20 Hz) should be used to strengthen most muscles, and that using the posterior pelvic tilt during WBV is much more effective at strengthening and training muscles related to core stability. PMID:25995555

  12. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  13. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  14. Association between pelvic floor muscle trauma and pelvic organ prolapse 20 years after delivery.

    PubMed

    Volløyhaug, Ingrid; Mørkved, Siv; Salvesen, Kjell Å

    2016-01-01

    It is known that pelvic floor muscle trauma (PFMT) after vaginal delivery is associated with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) symptoms (sPOP) and signs (POP-Q ≥2) in patient populations. Our aims were to establish the prevalence and investigate a possible association between PFMT and sPOP and POP-Q ≥2 in healthy women 20 years after their first delivery. During 2013 and 2014 we conducted a cross-sectional study among 847 women who delivered their first child between 1990 and 1997. Women responded to a postal questionnaire and were offered a clinical examination including prolapse grading and pelvic floor ultrasonography. The main outcome measures were sPOP, POP-Q ≥2 and PFMT, defined by levator avulsion or a levator hiatal area on Valsalva manoeuvre of >40 cm(2) on ultrasonography. Of the 847 eligible women, 608 (72 %) were examined. Data on POP symptoms, POP-Q stage, levator avulsion and levator hiatal area were available in 598, 608, 606 and 554 women, respectively, and of these 75 (13%) had sPOP, 275 (45%) had POP-Q ≥2, 113 (19 %) had levator avulsion and 164 (30%) had a levator hiatal area >40 cm(2). Levator avulsion was associated with POP-Q ≥2 with an odds ratio (OR) of 9.91 and a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 5.73 - 17.13, and with sPOP (OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.34 - 3.91). Levator hiatal area >40 cm(2) was associated with POP-Q ≥2 (OR 6.98, 95% CI 4.54, - 10.74) and sPOP (OR 3.28, 95 % CI 1.96 - 5.50). Many healthy women selected from the general population have symptoms and signs of POP 20 years after their first delivery, and PFMT is associated with POP-Q ≥2 and sPOP.

  15. Pelvic Belt Effects on Pelvic Morphometry, Muscle Activity and Body Balance in Patients with Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Soisson, Odette; Lube, Juliane; Germano, Andresa; Hammer, Karl-Heinz; Josten, Christoph; Sichting, Freddy; Winkler, Dirk; Milani, Thomas L.; Hammer, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is frequently involved in low back and pelvic girdle pain. However, morphometrical and functional characteristics related to SIJ pain are poorly defined. Pelvic belts represent one treatment option, but evidence still lacks as to their pain-reducing effects and the mechanisms involved. Addressing these two issues, this case-controlled study compares morphometric, functional and clinical data in SIJ patients and healthy controls and evaluates the effects of short-term pelvic belt application. Methods Morphometric and functional data pertaining to pelvic belt effects were compared in 17 SIJ patients and 17 controls. Lumbar spine and pelvis morphometries were obtained from 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Functional electromyography data of pelvis and leg muscles and center of pressure excursions were measured in one-leg stance. The numerical rating scale was used to evaluate immediate pain-reducing effects. Results Pelvic morphometry was largely unaltered in SIJ patients and also by pelvic belt application. The angle of lumbar lateral flexion was significantly larger in SIJ patients without belt application. Muscle activity and center of pressure were unaffected by SIJ pain or by belt application in one-leg stance. Nine of 17 patients reported decreased pain intensities under moderate belt application, four reported no change and four reported increased pain intensity. For the entire population investigated here, this qualitative description was not confirmed on a statistical significant level. Discussion Minute changes were observed in the alignment of the lumbar spine in the frontal plane in SIJ patients. The potential pain-decreasing effects of pelvic belts could not be attributed to altered muscle activity, pelvic morphometry or body balance in a static short-term application. Long-term belt effects will therefore be of prospective interest. PMID:25781325

  16. Impact of vaginal parity and aging on the architectural design of pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    Alperin, Marianna; Cook, Mark; Tuttle, Lori J; Esparza, Mary C; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    Vaginal delivery and aging are key risk factors for pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, which is a critical component of pelvic floor disorders. However, alterations in the pelvic floor muscle intrinsic structure that lead to muscle dysfunction because of childbirth and aging remain elusive. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of vaginal deliveries and aging on human cadaveric pelvic floor muscle architecture, which is the strongest predictor of active muscle function. Coccygeus, iliococcygeus, and pubovisceralis were obtained from younger donors who were ≤51 years old, vaginally nulliparous (n = 5) and vaginally parous (n = 6) and older donors who were >51 years old, vaginally nulliparous (n = 6) and vaginally parous (n = 6), all of whom had no history of pelvic floor disorders. Architectural parameters, which are predictive of muscle's excursion and force-generating capacity, were determined with the use of validated methods. Intramuscular collagen content was quantified by hydroxyproline assay. Main effects of parity and aging and the interactions were determined with the use of 2-way analysis of variance, with Tukey's post-hoc testing and a significance level of .05. The mean age of younger and older donors differed by approximately 40 years (P = .001) but was similar between nulliparous and parous donors within each age group (P > .9). The median parity was 2 (range, 1-3) in younger and older vaginally parous groups (P = .7). The main impact of parity was increased fiber length in the more proximal coccygeus (P = .03) and iliococcygeus (P = .04). Aging changes manifested as decreased physiologic cross-sectional area across all pelvic floor muscles (P < .05), which substantially exceeded the age-related decline in muscle mass. The physiologic cross-sectional area was lower in younger vaginally parous, compared with younger vaginally nulliparous, pelvic floor muscles; however, the differences did not reach statistical significance

  17. Postural response of the pelvic floor and abdominal muscles in women with and without incontinence.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michelle D; Coppieters, Michel W; Hodges, Paul W

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether activity of the pelvic floor (PF) and abdominal muscles differs between continent and incontinent women in response to a postural perturbation with a moderately full or empty bladder. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the PF and abdominal muscles was recorded with surface electrodes prior to and after a postural perturbation in which a 1 kg weight was dropped 30 cm into a bucket held by the subject. Perturbations were applied to the trunk in trials in which the timing of the weight drop was unknown (unexpected) or predictable (expected). Trials were performed with the bladder empty, and when the subject reported a sensation of moderate bladder fullness after drinking between 200 and 1,000 ml of water. Women with incontinence demonstrated increased PF EMG compared to continent women both prior to and during the postural response associated with unexpected loading. In addition, obliquus externus abdominis EMG was increased in incontinent women during these trials. When the bladder was moderately full, PF EMG decreased, whereas abdominal muscle EMG tended to increase. These data suggest that women with incontinence have increased PF and abdominal muscle activity associated with postural perturbations. This finding challenges the clinical assumption that incontinence is associated with reduced PF muscle activity, and suggests that training control and coordination of abdominal muscle activity may be important in treatment of this condition. The contrasting effects of increased bladder volume on PF and abdominal muscle EMG are likely to present further challenges to the maintenance of continence.

  18. Pelvic floor muscle function, pelvic floor dysfunction and diastasis recti abdominis: Prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bø, Kari; Hilde, Gunvor; Tennfjord, Merete Kolberg; Sperstad, Jorun Bakken; Engh, Marie Ellstrøm

    2017-03-01

    Compare vaginal resting pressure (VRP), pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength, and endurance in women with and without diastasis recti abdominis at gestational week 21 and at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months postpartum. Furthermore, to compare prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in the two groups at the same assessment points. This is a prospective cohort study following 300 nulliparous pregnant women giving birth at a public university hospital. VRP, PFM strength, and endurance were measured with vaginal manometry. ICIQ-UI-SF questionnaire and POP-Q were used to assess UI and POP. Diastasis recti abdominis was diagnosed with palpation of  ≥2 fingerbreadths 4.5 cm above, at, or 4.5 cm below the umbilicus. At gestational week 21 women with diastasis recti abdominis had statistically significant greater VRP (mean difference 3.06 cm H2 O [95%CI: 0.70; 5.42]), PFM strength (mean difference 5.09 cm H2 O [95%CI: 0.76; 9.42]) and PFM muscle endurance (mean difference 47.08 cm H2 O sec [95%CI: 15.18; 78.99]) than women with no diastasis. There were no statistically significant differences between women with and without diastasis in any PFM variables at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months postpartum. No significant difference was found in prevalence of UI in women with and without diastasis at any assessment points. Six weeks postpartum 15.9% of women without diastasis had POP versus 4.1% in the group with diastasis (P = 0.001). Women with diastasis were not more likely to have weaker PFM or more UI or POP. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:716-721, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A three-dimensional muscle activity imaging technique for assessing pelvic muscle function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingchun; Wang, Dan; Timm, Gerald W.

    2010-11-01

    A novel multi-channel surface electromyography (EMG)-based three-dimensional muscle activity imaging (MAI) technique has been developed by combining the bioelectrical source reconstruction approach and subject-specific finite element modeling approach. Internal muscle activities are modeled by a current density distribution and estimated from the intra-vaginal surface EMG signals with the aid of a weighted minimum norm estimation algorithm. The MAI technique was employed to minimally invasively reconstruct electrical activity in the pelvic floor muscles and urethral sphincter from multi-channel intra-vaginal surface EMG recordings. A series of computer simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of the present MAI technique. With appropriate numerical modeling and inverse estimation techniques, we have demonstrated the capability of the MAI technique to accurately reconstruct internal muscle activities from surface EMG recordings. This MAI technique combined with traditional EMG signal analysis techniques is being used to study etiologic factors associated with stress urinary incontinence in women by correlating functional status of muscles characterized from the intra-vaginal surface EMG measurements with the specific pelvic muscle groups that generated these signals. The developed MAI technique described herein holds promise for eliminating the need to place needle electrodes into muscles to obtain accurate EMG recordings in some clinical applications.

  20. Analysis of muscle activity during active pelvic tilting in sagittal plane

    PubMed Central

    TAKAKI, Sho; KANEOKA, Koji; OKUBO, Yu; OTSUKA, Satoru; TATSUMURA, Masaki; SHIINA, Itsuo; MIYAKAWA, Shumpei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pelvic tilting is performed to improve lumbopelvic flexibility or retrain the motor control of local muscles. However, few studies investigated the activity of local muscles during pelvic tilting. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activity during anterior and posterior pelvic tilting. Method: Twelve healthy males (age, 22.6 ± 1.4 years) participated. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted into the bilateral lumbar multifidus (MF) and transversus abdominis (TrA). Surface electrodes were used to record activity of the bilateral rectus abdominis, external oblique, and erector spinae (ES), and the unilateral right latissimus dorsi, gluteus maximus, semitendinosus, and rectus femoris muscles. The electromyographic activities during anterior and posterior pelvic tilting in a standing position were recorded and expressed as a percentage of the maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC) for each muscle. Results: The activities of the bilateral MF (right: 23.9 ± 15.9 %MVC, left: 23.9 ± 15.1 %MVC) and right ES (19.0 ± 13.3 %MVC) were significantly greater than those of the other muscles during anterior pelvic tilting. The activity of the left TrA (14.8 ± 16.4 %MVC) was significantly greater than that of the other muscles during posterior pelvic tilting. Conclusions: The results suggested that the MF and ES are related to anterior pelvic tilting. The activity of the TrA, which was classified as a local muscle, was greater during posterior pelvic tilting. This study indicated that local muscles such as the MF and TrA may be related to pelvic tilting. PMID:28289581

  1. Methods of training using pelvic trainers.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ran

    2006-03-01

    During the past decade, the clinical applications of laparoscopic surgery in urology have been growing steadily. The laparoscopic version of various procedures, such as nephrectomy, is becoming the standard of care. This has led to an increased need for laparoscopic training in urology and focused the attention on the various modalities for laparoscopic skill acquisition. The common training modalities for laparoscopy are box trainers, animal and cadaveric laparoscopy, and virtual reality simulators. Each modality carries its own benefits to the practicing surgeon. The box trainers are the first practiced and are basic training simulators. They were first designed to help with training in basic laparoscopic skills and to assist surgeons in getting acquainted with instruments. However, these simple boxes are being upgraded constantly by tissue- and organ-specific models, allowing the surgeon to train in a convenient and cost-effective environment. This article describes the ways to work with box trainers, from basic skills to advanced laparoscopic tasks, and discusses the contribution of these trainers to real surgery as well as their role in defining criterion levels of surgical performance.

  2. Patients with Pelvic Floor Muscle Spasm Have a Superior Response to Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy at Specialized Centers.

    PubMed

    Polackwich, Alan Scott; Li, Jianbo; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a common condition that often requires multimodal therapy. Patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome have a high incidence of pelvic floor spasm, which can be treated with pelvic floor physical therapy. However, this is a specialized skill. We compared outcomes of pelvic floor physical therapy as part of multimodal therapy in patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome between those treated at our institution and elsewhere. We identified patients from our chronic pelvic pain syndrome registry with pelvic floor spasm who were seen between 2010 and 2014 for more than 1 visit. Patient phenotype was assessed with the UPOINT system and symptom severity was determined by the National Institutes of Health CPSI. A 6-point decrease in CPSI was used to define patient improvement. A total of 82 patients fit the study criteria. Mean age was 41.6 years (range 19 to 75) and median symptom duration was 24 months (range 3 to 240). Mean CPSI was 26.8 (range 10 to 41), the median number of positive UPOINT domains was 3 (range 1 to 6) and 27 patients (32.9%) were treated locally. At followup 9 patients had refused pelvic floor physical therapy, and 24 and 48 had undergone pelvic floor physical therapy elsewhere and at CCF, respectively. The mean change in CPSI was 1.11 ± 4.1 in patients who refused, -3.46 ± 6.7 in those treated elsewhere and -11.3 ± 7.0 in those treated at CCF (p <0.0001). Individual improvement was seen in 1 patient (11%) who refused, 10 (42%) treated elsewhere and 38 (79.2%) treated at CCF (p <0.0001). On multivariable analysis only physical therapy at CCF (OR 4.23, p = 0.002) and symptom duration (OR 0.52, p = 0.03) predicted improvement. Pelvic floor physical therapy can be effective for chronic pelvic pain syndrome in patients with pelvic floor spasm. However, the outcome depends on specialty training and experience of therapists. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  3. Pregnancy-induced adaptations in intramuscular extracellular matrix of rat pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    Alperin, Marianna; Kaddis, Timothy; Pichika, Rajeswari; Esparza, Mary C; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-08-01

    Birth trauma to pelvic floor muscles is a major risk factor for pelvic floor disorders. Intramuscular extracellular matrix determines muscle stiffness, supports contractile component, and shields myofibers from mechanical strain. Our goal was to determine whether pregnancy alters extracellular matrix mechanical and biochemical properties in a rat model, which may provide insights into the pathogenesis of pelvic floor muscle birth injury. To examine whether pregnancy effects were unique to pelvic floor muscles, we also studied a hind limb muscle. Passive mechanical properties of coccygeus, iliocaudalis, pubocaudalis, and tibialis anterior were compared among 3-month old Sprague-Dawley virgin, late-pregnant, and postpartum rats. Muscle tangent stiffness was calculated as the slope of the stress-sarcomere length curve between 2.5 and 4.0 μm, obtained from a stress-relaxation protocol at a bundle level. Elastin and collagen isoform concentrations were quantified by the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Enzymatic and glycosylated collagen crosslinks were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Data were compared by the use of repeated-measures, 2-way analysis of variance with Tukey post-hoc testing. Correlations between mechanical and biochemical parameters were assessed by linear regressions. Significance was set to P < .05. Results are reported as mean ± SEM. Pregnancy significantly increased stiffness in coccygeus (P < .05) and pubocaudalis (P < .0001) relative to virgin controls, with no change in iliocaudalis. Postpartum, pelvic floor muscle stiffness did not differ from virgins (P > .3). A substantial increase in collagen V in coccygeus and pubocaudalis was observed in late-pregnant, compared with virgin, animals, (P < .001). Enzymatic crosslinks decreased in coccygeus (P < .0001) and pubocaudalis (P < .02) in pregnancy, whereas glycosylated crosslinks were significantly elevated in late-pregnant rats in all pelvic floor muscles (P

  4. Isotretinoin-induced acute severe myopathy involving pelvic girdle muscles: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sameem, Farah; Semira

    2016-01-01

    Oral isotretinoin has been in widespread use for more than three decades. It causes numerous side effects; skin and mucous membrane being commonly involved. Musculoskeletal adverse effects are also known to occur, but pelvic girdle myopathy is rarely reported. We report myopathy involving pelvic girdle muscles in a young male who received oral isotretinoin for folliculitis decalvans. PMID:27721552

  5. Muscle architecture and functional anatomy of the pelvic limb of the ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Smith, N C; Wilson, A M; Jespers, K J; Payne, R C

    2006-12-01

    The functional anatomy of the pelvic limb of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) was investigated in order to assess musculoskeletal specialization related to locomotor performance. The pelvic limbs of ten ostriches were dissected and detailed measurements of all muscle tendon units of the pelvic limb were made, including muscle mass, muscle length, fascicle length, pennation angle, tendon mass and tendon length. From these measurements other muscle properties such as muscle volume, physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), tendon cross-sectional area, maximum isometric muscle force and tendon stress were derived, using standard relationships and published muscle data. Larger muscles tended to be located more proximally and had longer fascicle lengths and lower pennation angles. This led to an expected proximal to distal reduction in total muscle mass. An exception to this trend was the gastrocnemius muscle, which was found to have the largest volume and PCSA and also had the highest capacity for both force and power production. Generally high-power muscles were located more proximally in the limb, while some small distal muscles (tibialis cranialis and flexor perforatus digiti III), with short fibres, were found to have very high force generation capacities. The greatest proportion of pelvic muscle volume was for the hip extensors, while the highest capacity for force generation was observed in the extensors of the ankle, many of which were also in series with long tendons and thus were functionally suited to elastic energy storage.

  6. Myofascial origins of low back pain. 3. Pelvic and lower extremity muscles.

    PubMed

    Simons, D G; Travell, J G

    1983-02-01

    Gluteal, pelvic, and lower extremity muscles are common sites of origin of myofascial low back pain. Trigger points (TPs) in the gluteus maximus and medius muscles refer pain locally to the gluteal and sacral regions, while those in the gluteus minimus are likely to refer pain down the lower extremity as far as the ankle on the same side. TPs in intrapelvic muscles refer pain chiefly to the pelvic region. Besides producing referred myofascial pain, TPs in the piriformis muscle can cause symptoms of entrapment of the peroneal portion or all of the sciatic nerve. TPs in the soleus muscle may refer pain to the sacroiliac joint.

  7. Neural control of the female urethral and anal rhabdosphincters and pelvic floor muscles

    PubMed Central

    de Groat, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The urethral rhabdosphincter and pelvic floor muscles are important in maintenance of urinary continence and in preventing descent of pelvic organs [i.e., pelvic organ prolapse (POP)]. Despite its clinical importance and complexity, a comprehensive review of neural control of the rhabdosphincter and pelvic floor muscles is lacking. The present review places historical and recent basic science findings on neural control into the context of functional anatomy of the pelvic muscles and their coordination with visceral function and correlates basic science findings with clinical findings when possible. This review briefly describes the striated muscles of the pelvis and then provides details on the peripheral innervation and, in particular, the contributions of the pudendal and levator ani nerves to the function of the various pelvic muscles. The locations and unique phenotypic characteristics of rhabdosphincter motor neurons located in Onuf's nucleus, and levator ani motor neurons located diffusely in the sacral ventral horn, are provided along with the locations and phenotypes of primary afferent neurons that convey sensory information from these muscles. Spinal and supraspinal pathways mediating excitatory and inhibitory inputs to the motor neurons are described; the relative contributions of the nerves to urethral function and their involvement in POP and incontinence are discussed. Finally, a detailed summary of the neurochemical anatomy of Onuf's nucleus and the pharmacological control of the rhabdosphincter are provided. PMID:20484700

  8. Numerical simulation of the damage evolution in the pelvic floor muscles during childbirth.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Dulce A; Parente, Marco P L; Calvo, Begoña; Mascarenhas, Teresa; Natal Jorge, Renato M

    2016-02-29

    Several studies have shown that pelvic floor injuries during a vaginal delivery can be considered a significant factor in the development of pelvic floor dysfunction. Such disorders include a group of conditions affecting women like urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and fecal incontinence. Numerical simulations are valuable tools that are contributing to the clarification of the mechanisms behind pelvic floor disorders. The aim of this work is to propose a mechanical model implemented in the finite element method context to estimate the damage in the pelvic floor muscles by mechanical effects during a vaginal delivery of a fetus in vertex presentation and occipitoanterior position. The constitutive model adopted has already been successfully used in the simulation of childbirth and the structural damage model added has previously been applied to characterize the damage process in biological soft tissues undergoing finite deformations. The constitutive parameters were fit to experimental data available in the literature and the final proposed material model is suitable to estimate the mechanical damage in the pelvic floor muscle during a vaginal delivery. The computational model predicts that even an apparently uneventful vaginal delivery inflicts injuries to the pelvic floor muscles, particularly during the extension of the fetus head, having been obtained more than 10% of damaged fibers. As a clinical evidence, the present work allows to conclude that the puborectalis component of the levator ani muscle is the most prone to damage.

  9. Strength and endurance of the pelvic floor muscles in continent women: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Quartly, Emma; Hallam, Taryn; Kilbreath, Sharon; Refshauge, Kathryn

    2010-12-01

    To describe the maximal strength and endurance of the pelvic floor muscles in a cohort of women with no history of incontinence; and to determine the effect of age, parity, hormonal status, previous gynaecological surgery and regular performance of pelvic floor muscle exercises on the strength and endurance of these muscles. Preliminary cross-sectional observational study. Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Australia. Twenty-eight women aged 19 to 58 years, 16 of whom were under 40 years of age. Participants were excluded if they had a history of incontinence or were currently menstruating. Pelvic floor muscle strength assessed using a perineometer, and pelvic floor muscle endurance above 60% of maximal voluntary contraction. The effect of age, parity, hormonal status, previous gynaecological surgery and regular performance of pelvic floor muscle exercises on the strength and endurance of these muscles. Maximum strength of the pelvic floor muscles was not correlated with endurance (r=0.21, P=0.290) or age (r=-0.31, P=0.107); however, it was influenced by parity (r=-0.44, P=0.020). Endurance was significantly and positively correlated with age (r=0.38, P=0.048). This study provides preliminary data that age and parity may be important factors in pelvic floor muscle performance in women who are continent. A larger study that considers the variability associated with these variables will provide useful guidelines for prescription of exercise. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiparity modifies contractile properties of pelvic muscles affecting the genesis of vaginal pressure in rabbits.

    PubMed

    López-Juárez, Rhode; Zempoalteca, René; Corona-Quintanilla, Dora Luz; Jiménez-Estrada, Ismael; Castelán, Francisco; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita

    2017-05-24

    To characterize the contractile properties of the bulbospongiosus (Bsm), isquiocavernosus (Ism), and pubococcygeus muscles (Pcm), and their involvement in the genesis of vaginal pressure in nulliparous and multiparous rabbits. Age-matched nulliparous and multiparous rabbits were used to record the isometric contractile responses of each muscle as well as the intravaginal pressure evoked by single square electrical pulses and stimulation trains of ascending frequency. To establish significant differences between groups, two-tail unpaired Student t tests were carried out. The linear correlation between intravaginal pressure and muscle contractile force was analyzed with Pearson correlation tests. For all cases, a P ≤ 0.05 was set as statistically significant. Multiparity decreased the contractile force of Bsm and Ism generated by high-frequency stimulation trains. The normalized force of the Pcm increased when evoked at 1, 4, and 10 Hz while this decreased at higher frequencies (20, 50, and 100 Hz). The contraction of both Bsm and Ism raised particularly the pressure on the perineal vagina while that of the Pcm increased the pressure in the pelvic vagina. Such a functional segregation is still present in multiparous rabbits albeit it was modified. Multiparity induces changes in the contractile responses of Bsm, Ism, and Pcm, which alterates the vaginal pressure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Multiparity causes uncoordinated activity of pelvic- and perineal-striated muscles and urodynamic changes in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Mendoza-Martínez, Germán; Corona-Quintanilla, Dora Luz; Fajardo, Víctor; Rodríguez-Antolín, Jorge; Castelán, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    Temporal and coordinated activation of pelvic- (pubococcygeous) and perineal- (bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus) striated muscles occurs during micturition in female rabbits. We have hypothesized that the coordinated activation of pelvic and perineal muscles is modified during the micturition of young multiparous rabbits. Young virgin and multiparous female chinchilla rabbits were used to simultaneously record cystometrograms and electromyograms of the pubococcygeous, ischocavernosus, and bulbospongiosus muscles. Bladder function was assessed using standard urodynamic variables. The temporal coordination of pelvic- and perineal-striated muscle activity was changed in multiparous rabbits. The cystometrogram recordings were different than those obtained from virgin rabbits, as seen in alterations of the threshold volume, the residual volume, the voiding duration, and the maximum pressure. In rabbits, we find that multiparity causes uncoordinated activity of pubococcygeous, ischiocavernosus, and bulbospongiosus muscles and modifies the urodynamics.

  12. Tissue Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) Increase Pelvic Floor Muscle Mass in Ovariectomized Mice.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Suriyan; Sullivan, Ryan D; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Tillmann, Heather; Getzenberg, Robert H; Narayanan, Ramesh

    2017-03-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a prevalent condition, is represented by an involuntary leakage of urine that results, at least in part, from weakened or damaged pelvic floor muscles and is triggered by physical stress. Current treatment options are limited with no oral therapies available. The pelvic floor is rich in androgen receptor and molecules with anabolic activity including selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may serve as therapeutic options for individuals with SUI. In this study, two SARMs (GTx-024 and GTx-027) were evaluated in a post-menopausal animal model in order to determine their effect on pelvic floor muscles. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and their pelvic muscles allowed to regress. The animals were then treated with vehicle or doses of GTx-024 or GTx-027. Animal total body weight, lean body mass, and pelvic floor muscle weights were measured along with the expression of genes associated with muscle catabolism. Treatment with the SARMs resulted in a restoration of the pelvic muscles to the sham-operated weight. Coordinately, the induction of genes associated with muscle catabolism was inhibited. Although a trend was observed towards an increase in total lean body mass in the SARM-treated groups, no significant differences were detected. Treatment of an ovariectomized mouse model with SARMs resulted in an increase in pelvic floor muscles, which may translate to an improvement of symptoms associated with SUI and serves as the basis for evaluating their clinical use. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 640-646, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. IMPACT OF VAGINAL PARITY AND AGING ON THE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN OF PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLES

    PubMed Central

    Alperin, Marianna; Cook, Mark; Tuttle, Lori J.; Esparza, Mary C.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vaginal delivery and aging are key risk factors for pelvic floor muscle dysfunction, which is a critical component of pelvic floor disorders. However, alterations in the PFM intrinsic structure due to childbirth and aging that lead to muscle dysfunction remain elusive. Objectives To determine the impact of vaginal deliveries and aging on human cadaveric PFM architecture, the strongest predictor of active muscle function. Study Design Coccygeus, iliococcygeus and pubovisceralis were obtained from younger, ≤ 51 years, vaginally nulliparous (N=5) and vaginally parous (N=6), and older, >51 years, vaginally nulliparous (N=6) and vaginally parous (N=6) donors without history of PFDs. Architectural parameters, predictive of muscle’s excursion and force-generating capacity, were determined using validated methods. Intramuscular collagen content was quantified by hydroxyproline assay. Main effects of parity and aging and the interactions were determined using two-way ANOVA, with Tukey’s post-hoc testing with significance level of 0.05. Results The mean age of younger and older donors differed by ~40 years (P=0.001), but was similar between nulliparous and parous donors within each age group (P>0.9). Median parity was 2 (range 1–3) in younger and older vaginally parous groups, P=0.7. The main impact of parity was increased fiber length in the more proximal coccygeus (P=0.03), and iliococcygeus (P=0.04). Aging changes manifested as decreased physiological cross sectional area across all pelvic floor muscles, P<0.05, which substantially exceeded the age-related decline in muscle mass. Physiological cross sectional area was lower in younger vaginally parous, compared to younger vaginally nulliparous pelvic floor muscles, however the differences did not reach statistical significance. Pelvic floor muscles’ collagen content was not altered by parity, but increased dramatically with aging, P<0.05. Conclusions Increased fiber length in more proximal pelvic

  14. Lumbo-pelvic stability and electromyography of abdominal muscles in ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Negrão Filho, R de Faria; Silva, L Alves; Monteiro, T Lombardi; Alves, N; de Carvalho, A Cesinando; de Azevedo, F Mícolis

    2009-01-01

    Evaluating the ability to rectify and maintain lumbar adjustment can contribute toward the understanding of the behavior of abdominal muscles and their participation in the stability of pelvic muscles in dancers during the posterior pelvic tilt and double straight leg lowering tests. Nine healthy volunteers (male and female ballet dancers; age mean: 25.9 +/- 7.37 years) underwent maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC), isometric voluntary contraction at 50% of MIVC, posterior pelvic tilt (PPT) and double straight leg lowering (DSLL) tests. The tests were carried out in a single day, with 3 repetitions each. During the tests, electromygraphic signals of the rectus abdominis, obliquus internus and obliquus externus were recorded. The signal acquisition system was made up of bipolar surface electrodes, electrogoniometer and an electromechanic device (pressure sensor), which were connected to a signal conditioner module. Root mean square values of each muscle during the DSLL and PPT were converted into percentage of activation of 50% MIVC. Lower back pressure was submitted to the same process. ANOVA with repeated measures was performed, with the level of significance set at p < 0.05. The results revealed that all dancers were able to maintain posterior pelvic tilt and there was trend toward greater activation of the bilateral obliquus internus muscle. In an attempt to keep the pelvic region stabilized during DSLL, there was a greater contribution from the obliquus externus muscle in relation to other abdominal muscles.

  15. Effect of Individual Strengthening Exercises for Anterior Pelvic Tilt Muscles on Back Pain, Pelvic Angle, and Lumbar ROMs of a LBP Patient with Flat Back.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2013-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of individual strengthening exercises for the anterior pelvic tilt muscles on back pain, pelvic tilt angle, and lumbar ROM of a low back pain (LBP) patient with flat back. [Subject] A 37 year-old male, who complained of LBP pain at L3-5 levels with flat back, participated. [Methods] He performed the individual strengthening exercises for anterior pelvic tilt muscles (erector spinae,iliopsoas, rectus femoris). [Results] Pelvic tilt angles of the right and left sides were recovered to normal ranges. His lumbar ROMs increased, and low back pain decreased. [Conclusion] We suggest that individual resistance exercises are a necessary approach for effective and fast strengthening of pelvic anterior tilt muscles in LBP with flat back.

  16. Chronic pelvic pain arising from dysfunctional stabilizing muscles of the hip joint and pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Wook; Lim, Chang Hun; Han, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is a very annoying condition that is responsible for substantial suffering and medical expense. But dealing with this pain can be tough, because there are numerous possible causes for the pelvic pain such as urologic, gynecologic, gastrointestinal, neurologic, or musculoskeletal problems. Of these, musculoskeletal problem may be a primary cause of chronic pelvic pain in patients with a preceding trauma to the low back, pelvis, or lower extremities. Here, we report the case of a 54-year-old female patient with severe chronic pelvic pain after a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) accident that was successfully managed with image-guided trigger point injections on several pelvic stabilizing muscles. PMID:27738508

  17. Chronic pelvic pain arising from dysfunctional stabilizing muscles of the hip joint and pelvis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Wook; Lim, Chang Hun; Han, Jae Young; Kim, Woong Mo

    2016-10-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is a very annoying condition that is responsible for substantial suffering and medical expense. But dealing with this pain can be tough, because there are numerous possible causes for the pelvic pain such as urologic, gynecologic, gastrointestinal, neurologic, or musculoskeletal problems. Of these, musculoskeletal problem may be a primary cause of chronic pelvic pain in patients with a preceding trauma to the low back, pelvis, or lower extremities. Here, we report the case of a 54-year-old female patient with severe chronic pelvic pain after a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) accident that was successfully managed with image-guided trigger point injections on several pelvic stabilizing muscles.

  18. Pelvic floor muscle contraction and abdominal hollowing during walking can selectively activate local trunk stabilizing muscles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Young; Baek, Seung Ok; Cho, Yun Woo; Lim, Tae Hong; Jones, Rodney; Ahn, Sang Ho

    2016-11-21

    Trunk muscle exercises are widely performed, and many studies have been performed to examine their effects on low back pains. However, the effect of trunk muscles activations during walking with pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) and abdominal hollowing (AH) has not been clarified. To investigate whether walking with PFMC and AH is more effective for promoting local trunk muscle activation than walking without PFMC and AH. Twenty healthy men (28.9 ± 3.14 years, 177.2 ± 4.25 cm, 72.1 ± 6.39 kg, body mass index 22.78 ± 2.38 kg/m2) were participated in this study. Surface electrodes were attached over the multifidus (MF), lumbar erector spinae (LES), thoracic erector spinae (TES), transverse abdominus-internal oblique abdominals (TrA-IO), external oblique abdominals (EO), and rectus abdominus (RA). The amplitudes of electromyographic signals were measured during a normal walking with and without PFMC and AH. PFMC and AH while walking was found to result in significant bilateral increases in the normalized maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of MFs and TrA-IOs (p< 0.05). Ratios of local muscle activity to global muscle activities were increased while performing PFMC and AH during normal walking. Bilateral TrA-IO/EO activity ratios were significantly increased by PFMC and AH (p< 0.05). Performance of the PFMC and AH during walking resulted in significantly more recruitment of local trunk muscles. This study suggests that PFMC and AH during normal daily walking improves activation of muscles responsible for spinal dynamic stabilization and might be useful if integrated into low back disability and pain physical rehabilitation efforts.

  19. Effectiveness of a pelvic floor muscle exercise program on urinary incontinence following childbirth.

    PubMed

    Haddow, Gaby; Watts, Robin; Robertson, Jeanette

    2005-05-01

    /or frequency of exercising. These factors may have affected the overall results of the review. However, wherever possible, tests for heterogeneity were carried out to determine if studies should be combined in meta-analyses and in other cases the results' limitations are acknowledged. Implications for practice  In terms of the effectiveness of PFME programs, the results of this review indicate that urinary incontinence following childbirth can be improved by performing PFME and that any form of a specific PFME program appears to improve exercising frequency. However, the value of individual components of PFME programs, such as take-home materials, reminder telephone calls and feedback of exercising effectiveness, is less clear. • Encourage women to undertake both antenatal and post-natal PFME (E1). • Pay particular attention to women with antenatal and post-natal urinary incontinence in providing advice and PFME instruction (E1). • To encourage adherence and continuation, PFME education programs should be multifaceted with a number of components, rather than only supplying an information booklet (E4). • Include PFME as a specific program in all antenatal and post-natal care, incorporating at least two individual instruction sessions into the program (E1). • Provide post-partum contact, particularly for those discharged early, either by telephone, electronic or home visits (E4). • Design pelvic floor muscle home exercise programs that are realistic given the demands on a mother and that can be incorporated into her daily routine in terms of number and frequency. Two or more training sessions per week are recommended (E4). • Health professionals working with women in the post-partum period should ask about symptoms of incontinence to ensure assistance is offered to those experiencing urinary incontinence (E4).

  20. Ventilatory muscle training in kyphoscoliosis.

    PubMed

    Hornstein, S; Inman, S; Ledsome, J R

    1987-11-01

    Cardiorespiratory failure is the usual cause of death in severe kyphoscoliosis. The pathophysiology of this mechanism will be reviewed. Ventilatory muscle training (VMT), a relatively new respiratory technique, has been shown to improve the strength and endurance of the ventilatory muscles. It is known that stronger, endurance trained ventilatory muscles will guard against ventilatory muscle fatigue which may lead to respiratory failure. The actual technique is described with documentation of two representative cases. Case 1 showed a 63% increase in maximum inspiratory mouth pressure (PiMax) and an increased ability to walk and climb stairs with comfort. Case 2 used VMT as an adjunct to her weaning protocol from a portable ventilator. She progressed from full-time to nocturnal ventilator assistance in 1 month.

  1. Reduced Pelvic Floor Muscle Tone Predisposes to Persistence of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms after Puerperium

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Chandana; Khan, Mahjabeen; Ballala, Kirthinath; Kamath, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant primiparous women at term were enrolled in the study. ICIQ-FLUTS questionnaire was used to find out prevalence of LUTS. MOS was used to assess pelvic floor muscle strength. Women were followed up after 8–10 weeks of delivery to find out remission or persistence of these symptoms. We found that increased frequency of micturition was the most common (82%) LUTS seen in primiparous women at term. More than half (51%) of these women who complained of LUTS had a poor pelvic floor muscle tone (MOS grade 3). Out of those who had symptoms during pregnancy 11% remained symptomatic even after puerperium. Interestingly 61% of those with persistence of symptoms demonstrated a very poor pelvic floor muscle tone at term (MOS grade 2), while the remaining 39% also had a tone of only MOS grade 3. Thus women with LUTS during pregnancy should be screened for their pelvic floor muscle tone with simple MOS system which will help to predict the persistence of these symptoms later on. Women with a low score (three or less) should be triaged for regular pelvic floor muscle exercises. PMID:27119044

  2. Using a stopwatch to assess pelvic muscle strength in the urine stream interruption test.

    PubMed

    Sampselle, C M

    1993-01-01

    Pelvic muscle strength is important in maintaining urinary continence. The urine stream interruption test provides a simple measure of pelvic muscle strength. This study evaluated the accuracy of the test as adapted for clinical use. Women (n = 75) were tested according to standardized protocol. The test was simultaneously timed using a uroflowmeter (for research purposes) and a stopwatch (a technique more feasible in the practice setting). The stopwatch-timed urine stream interruption test was consistent with the uroflowmeter score (r = 0.90, p < 0.00) and demonstrated adequate repeatability (r = -0.69, p < 0.00). The stopwatch test was related to a digital measure of pelvic muscle strength (r = -0.49, p = 0.00), i.e., women with greater pelvic muscle strength were able to interrupt the stream of urine more quickly. Significantly less involuntary urine loss was seen in women whose stopwatch test score was two seconds or less as compared with those whose scores were greater than two seconds (t = -4.83, p = < 0.00, df = 73). Clinicians can use the urine stream interruption test as a baseline measure and as a tool to assess changes in pelvic muscle strength.

  3. Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Hopman, Wim P.M.; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: {<=}30 Gy to the IAS; {<=}10 Gy to the EAS; {<=}50 Gy to the PRM; and {<=}40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are

  4. The effects of a pelvic belt on trunk and lower extremity muscles in the bridge position

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Wu, Yan-Ting; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a pelvic belt on the activities of trunk and lower extremity muscles in normal adults. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 normal individuals without a history of orthopedic problems. The pelvic compression belt (The Com-Pressor, OPTP, Minneapolis, MN, USA) was an adjustable body belt with four elastic compression bands that provide stabilizing pressure and was designed to adjust the amount of force applied and to alter sites of compression. The body belt was placed below the anterior superior iliac spine, and stabilizing pressure was applied to the belt using the elastic compression bands in the bridge position after confirming the site of compression. [Results] The subjects showed a significant decrease in muscle activation in the erector spinae, oblique internus abdominis, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris while wearing the pelvic belt. [Conclusion] The use of a pelvic compression belt with external pelvic compression might improve pelvic joint stability and alter neuromotor control of the lumbopelvic and thigh muscles. PMID:28174437

  5. Functional mapping of the pelvic floor and sphincter muscles from high-density surface EMG recordings.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yun; He, Jinbao; Khavari, Rose; Boone, Timothy B; Zhang, Yingchun

    2016-11-01

    Knowledge of the innervation of pelvic floor and sphincter muscles is of great importance to understanding the pathophysiology of female pelvic floor dysfunctions. This report presents our high-density intravaginal and intrarectal electromyography (EMG) probes and a comprehensive innervation zone (IZ) imaging technique based on high-density EMG readings to characterize the IZ distribution. Both intravaginal and intrarectal probes are covered with a high-density surface electromyography electrode grid (8 × 8). Surface EMG signals were acquired in ten healthy women performing maximum voluntary contractions of their pelvic floor. EMG decomposition was performed to separate motor-unit action potentials (MUAPs) and then localize their IZs. High-density surface EMG signals were successfully acquired over the vaginal and rectal surfaces. The propagation patterns of muscle activity were clearly visualized for multiple muscle groups of the pelvic floor and anal sphincter. During each contraction, up to 218 and 456 repetitions of motor units were detected by the vaginal and rectal probes, respectively. MUAPs were separated with their IZs identified at various orientations and depths. The proposed probes are capable of providing a comprehensive mapping of IZs of the pelvic floor and sphincter muscles. They can be employed as diagnostic and preventative tools in clinical practices.

  6. Efficacy of transvaginal biofeedback and electrical stimulation in women with urinary urgency and frequency and associated pelvic floor muscle spasm.

    PubMed

    Bendaña, Emma E; Belarmino, James M; Dinh, Jenny H; Cook, Cynthia L; Murray, Brian P; Feustel, Paul J; De, Elise J B

    2009-01-01

    Women with urinary urgency and frequency may also have pelvic floor muscle spasm. Transvaginal biofeedback (TVBF) and electrical stimulation (EStim) is a treatment modality that has been used to treat vaginismus and chronic pelvic pain. In this study, TVBF/EStim was evaluated in women with pelvic floor muscle spasm associated with urinary symptoms. Fifty-two women underwent therapy with TVBF/EStim and reported a mean symptom improvement of 64.5%.

  7. Comparison of pelvic floor muscle strength evaluations in nulliparous and primiparous women: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Mônica Orsi; Sousa, Vanessa Oliveira; Gameiro, Luiz Felipe; Muchailh, Rosana Carneiro; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Amaro, João Luiz

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength of nulliparous and primiparous women. METHODS: A total of 100 women were prospectively distributed into two groups: Group 1 (G1) (n = 50) included healthy nulliparous women, and Group 2 (G2) (n = 50) included healthy primiparous women. Pelvic floor muscle strength was subjectively evaluated using transvaginal digital palpation. Pelvic floor muscle strength was objectively assessed using a portable perineometer. All of the parameters were evaluated simultaneously in G1 and were evaluated in G2 during the 20th and 36th weeks of pregnancy and 45 days after delivery. RESULTS: In G2, 14 women were excluded because they left the study before the follow-up evaluation. The median age was 23 years in G1 and 22 years in G2; there was no significant difference between the groups. The average body mass index was 21.7 kg/m2 in G1 and 25.0 kg/m2 in G2; there was a significant difference between the groups (p = 0.0004). In G2, transvaginal digital palpation evaluation showed significant impairments of pelvic floor muscle strength at the 36th week of pregnancy (p = 0.0006) and 45 days after vaginal delivery (p = 0.0001) compared to G1. Objective evaluations of pelvic floor muscle strength in G2 revealed a significant decrease 45 days after vaginal delivery compared to nulliparous patients. CONCLUSION: Pregnancy and vaginal delivery may cause weakness of the pelvic floor muscles. PMID:21915489

  8. Leg length inequality, pelvic tilt and lumbar back muscle activity during standing.

    PubMed

    Vink, P; Kamphuisen, H A

    1989-05-01

    The influence of an artificial leg length discrepancy on lateral pelvic tilt and on activity of the intrinsic lumbar back muscles was investigated. An artificial leg length discrepancy of up to 50 mm was created by putting boards of different height under the right foot. Lateral pelvic tilt increased linearly with increasing artificial leg length discrepancies. The rectified and averaged e.m.g. of the intrinsic lumbar back muscles showed a small increase at the longer leg side. It increased non-linearly with an increment in slope above a certain artificial leg length discrepancy (mean 34 mm).

  9. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs when the tissue and muscles of the pelvic floor no longer support the pelvic organs resulting in ... organ prolapse. Supporting muscles and tissue of the pelvic floor may become torn or stretched because of labor ...

  10. Pelvic floor muscle exercise for fecal incontinence quality of life after coloanal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shu-Ling; Lin, Yu-Hua; Yang, Hsing-Yu; Kao, Chia-Chan; Tung, Hong-Yu; Wei, Li-Hsiang

    2016-09-01

    To assess the efficacy of pelvic floor muscle exercise for enhancing fecal incontinence quality of life after coloanal anastomosis in colorectal cancer patients. Methods of improving incontinence have been evaluated in many countries, but never in a Taiwan population. A longitudinal experimental study. Fifty-two colorectal cancer patients who had received colostomy closure and coloanal anastomosis surgery were recruited from a general hospital in southern Taiwan and randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 26) or a control group (n = 26). Both groups received routine postoperative care. However, the experimental group received private consultations, educational DVDs and pamphlets to instruct them in performing pelvic flow muscle exercise. In all participants, the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale was used to measure quality of life before discharge and at one, two, three, six and nine months after discharge. Generalised estimating equations were used to compare longitudinal effects between the two groups. The generalised estimating equations revealed that all participants had significantly improved Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale scores at two, three, six and nine months after discharge. Compared to the controls, however, the experimental group had significantly higher scores at two, three, and six months after discharge. Patient education in pelvic floor muscle exercise positively affects Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale scores in patients who have received coloanal anastomosis. Early education in pelvic floor muscle exercise can improve management of fecal incontinence symptoms after coloanal anastomosis and can improve quality of life. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Evaluating pelvic examination training: does faculty involvement make a difference? A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Archana; Ebert, Gary; Brug, Pamela; Swee, David; Ananth, Cande V

    2010-10-01

    As medical schools continue to strive to deliver high quality education with diminishing resources, the need to evaluate long-standing teaching techniques becomes imperative. The use of gynecological teaching associates to teach pelvic exam skills to medical students is an example of an education intervention that deserves thorough evaluation. The objective was to evaluate effects of two pelvic examination training methods on OB/GYN clerkship students with respect to costs, students' performance, and perception. During the academic year 2007-08, 106 medical students were randomized to receive either pelvic examination training by a gynecological teaching associate (GTA) alone or a standardized patient (SP) accompanied by an obstetrics and gynecology faculty member. Students participated in an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) and completed questionnaires regarding the educational intervention at the end of the clerkship. The two training methods produced comparable OSCE scores, and students in both groups felt more confident after training and found the training sessions to be valuable. There was a significant cost-savings associated with using GTAs for pelvic exam training. Faculty time and effort need not be utilized for pelvic exam training exercises, since using GTAs for pelvic exam training produces comparable results.

  12. How well can levator ani muscle morphology on 3D pelvic floor ultrasound predict the levator ani muscle function?

    PubMed Central

    Rostaminia, G.; Peck, J. D.; Quiroz, L. H.; Shobeiri, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis The aim of our study was to assess the performance of levator ani muscle deficiency (LAD) evaluated by 3D endovaginal ultrasound (EVUS) to detect pelvic floor muscle function as assessed by digital examination. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted among 77 patients referred to our urogynecology clinic for pelvic floor dysfunction symptoms. Patients underwent physical examinations including digital pelvic muscle strength assessment using the Modified Oxford scale (MOS). EVUS volumes were evaluated and levator ani muscles were scored according to a validated LAD scoring system. MOS scores were categorized as nonfunctional (scores 0–1) and functional (scores 2–5). Results Mean age of participants was 56 (SD± 12.5) and 71% were menopausal. Overall, 32.5% had nonfunctional muscle strength and 44.2% were classified as having significant LAD. LAD identified by ultrasound had a sensitivity of 60% (95% CI 41%–79%) for detecting nonfunctional muscle and a specificity of 63% (95% CI 50%–77%) for detecting functional muscle. Overall, LAD demonstrated fair ability to discriminate between patient with and without poor muscle function (area under the ROC curve = 0.70 (95% CI 0.58–0.83). Among patients with an LAD score of 16–18, representing almost total muscle avulsion, 70% had nonfunctional MOS scores. Whereas, in patients with normal/minimal LAD (scores of 0–4), 89.5% had functional MOS scores Conclusions LAD and MOS scales were moderately negatively correlated Among patients with normal morphology or the most severe muscle deficiency, LAD scores can identify the majority of patients with functional or non-functional MOS scores, respectively. PMID:25246297

  13. Determining the Posture and Vibration Frequency that Maximize Pelvic Floor Muscle Activity During Whole-Body Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juhyun; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the electromyogram (EMG) response of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) to whole-body vibration (WBV) while using different body posture and vibration frequencies. Material/Methods Thirteen healthy adults (7 men, 6 women) voluntarily participated in this cross-sectional study in which EMG data from PFM were collected in a total of 12 trials for each subject (4 body postures, 3 vibration frequencies). Pelvic floor EMG activity was recorded using an anal probe. The rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was assessed with a modified Borg scale. Results We found that vibration frequency, body posture, and muscle stimulated had a significant effect on the EMG response. The PFM had high activation at 12 Hz and 26 Hz (p<0.05). PFM activation significantly increased with knee flexion (p<0.05). The RPE significantly increased with increased frequency (p<0.05). Conclusions The knee flexion angle of 40° at 12 Hz frequency can be readily promoted in improving muscle activation during WBV, and exercise would be performed effectively. Based on the results of the present investigation, sports trainers and physiotherapists may be able to optimize PFM training programs involving WBV. PMID:27787476

  14. Effects of radiation therapy on the structure and function of the pelvic floor muscles of patients with cancer in the pelvic area: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Stéphanie; Ouellet, Marie-Pier; Moffet, Hélène; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Dumoulin, Chantale

    2016-04-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is often recommended in the treatment of pelvic cancers. Following RT, a high prevalence of pelvic floor dysfunctions (urinary incontinence, dyspareunia, and fecal incontinence) is reported. However, changes in pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) after RT remain unclear. The purpose of this review was to systematically document the effects of RT on the PFM structure and function in patients with cancer in the pelvic area. An electronic literature search using Pubmed Central, CINAHL, Embase, and SCOPUS was performed from date of inception up to June 2014. The following keywords were used: radiotherapy, muscle tissue, and pelvic floor. Two reviewers selected the studies in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement (PRISMA). Out of the 369 articles screened, 13 met all eligibility criteria. The methodological quality was assessed using the QualSyst scoring system, and standardized mean differences were calculated. Thirteen studies fulfilled all inclusion criteria, from which four were of good methodological quality. One presented strong evidence that RT affects PFM structure in men treated for prostate cancer. Four presented high-level evidence that RT affects PFM function in patients treated for rectal cancer. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity and lack of descriptive statistics. There is some evidence that RT has detrimental impacts on both PFMs' structure and function. A better understanding of muscle damage and dysfunction following RT treatment will improve pelvic floor rehabilitation and, potentially, prevention of its detrimental impacts.

  15. The effect of pelvic floor muscle exercises program on sexual self-efficacy in primiparous women after delivery

    PubMed Central

    Golmakani, Nahid; Zare, Zahra; Khadem, Nayereh; Shareh, Hossein; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selection and acceptance of appropriate sexual behavior and sexual function are made difficult by low sexual self-efficacy in the postpartum period. The general purpose of this research is to define the effects of an 8-week pelvic floor muscle exercise program on sexual self-efficacy in primiparous women after childbirth. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was performed on 79 primiparous women who referred to health care centers, Mashhad, Iran in 2013, 8 weeks after delivery, to receive health care services. They were selected by easy sampling. The samples were randomly assigned to either intervention or control group. The intervention group was trained in Kegel exercises for 8 weeks. Both groups were evaluated at 4 and 8 weeks. Data collection tools included: Demographic information, sexual self-efficacy, and Brink scale. Data were analyzed using repeated measures, Friedman test, t-test, and Mann–Whitney test. Results: The results showed significant increase in pelvic floor muscle strength in the intervention group at 4 and 8 weeks after exercises (P < 0.0001), but no significant difference was observed in the control group (P = 0.368). There was a significant increase in sexual self-efficacy in the intervention (P < 0.0001) and control groups (P = 0.001) at 4 and 8 weeks after the start of the study. Comparison of the two groups showed a significant difference in sexual self-efficacy after they performed these exercises (P = 0.001). Conclusions: The findings showed that 8-week pelvic muscle exercises increase the sexual self-efficacy in women after delivery. PMID:26120335

  16. Reconstruction of Large Perineal and Pelvic Wounds Using Gracilis Muscle Flaps.

    PubMed

    Chong, Tae W; Balch, Glen C; Kehoe, Siobhan M; Margulis, Vitaly; Saint-Cyr, Michel

    2015-10-01

    The reconstruction of large defects after abdominoperineal resections and pelvic exenterations has traditionally been accomplished with vertical rectus myocutaneous flaps (VRAMs). For patients requiring two ostomies, robot-assisted abdominoperineal resections (APRs), and to avoid the morbidity of a VRAM harvest, the authors have used the gracilis muscle flap to reconstruct the large dead space in these patients. A retrospective analysis of 16 consecutive APRs (10 with concomitant pelvic exenterations) reconstructed with gracilis flaps during a 2-year period was performed. Gracilis muscle flaps were used to obliterate the dead space after primary skin closure was ensured with adduction of the legs. All 16 patients had locally advanced cancers and had received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. Of these 16 patients, 10 had pelvic exenterations. All the patients had reconstruction with gracilis flaps (6 bilateral flaps). One major wound complication in the perineum occurred as a result of an anastomotic leak in the pelvis, but this was managed with conservative dressing changes. Three patients had skin separation in the perineum greater than 5 mm with intact subcutaneous closure. No patients required operative debridement or revision of their perineal reconstruction. No perineal hernias or gross dehiscence of the skin closure occurred. Large pelvic and perineal reconstructions can be safely accomplished with gracilis muscle flaps and should be considered as an alternative to abdominal-based flaps.

  17. Effects of nonlinear muscle elasticity on pelvic floor mechanics during vaginal childbirth.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinshan; Kruger, Jennifer A; Nash, Martyn P; Nielsen, Poul M F

    2010-11-01

    The role of the pelvic floor soft tissues during the second stage of labor, particularly the levator ani muscle, has attracted much interest recently. It has been postulated that the passage of the fetal head through the pelvis may cause excessive stretching of the levator ani muscle, which may lead to pelvic floor dysfunction and pelvic organ prolapse later in life. In order to study the complex biomechanical interactions between the levator ani muscle and the fetal head during the second stage of labor, finite element models have been developed for quantitative analysis of this process. In this study we have simulated vaginal delivery using individual-specific anatomical computer models of the pelvic floor interacting with a fetal head model with minimal restrictions placed upon its motion. Two constitutive relations were considered for the levator ani muscle (of exponential and neo-Hookean forms). For comparison purposes, the exponential relation was chosen to exhibit much greater stiffening at higher strains beyond the range of the experimental data. We demonstrated that increased nonlinearity in the elastic response of the tissues leads to considerably higher (56%) estimated force required for delivery, accompanied by a more homogeneous spatial distribution of maximum principal stretch ratio across the muscle. These results indicate that the form of constitutive relation beyond the presently available experimental data markedly affects the estimated function of the levator ani muscle during vaginal delivery, due to the large strains that occur. Further experimental data at higher strains are necessary in order to more reliably characterize the constitutive behavior required for modeling vaginal childbirth.

  18. High prevalence of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction in hospitalized elderly women with urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Talasz, Helena; Jansen, Stephan C; Kofler, Markus; Lechleitner, Monika

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in hospitalized elderly women with urinary incontinence (UI). A cross-sectional study was performed using data of 704 patients, routinely collected by means of a clinical UI assessment. Only 25.5% of the patients were able to perform normal PFM contractions (Oxford grading scale score ≥3); 74.5% were unable to contract their PFM or showed weak PFM activity without circular contraction or elevation of the vagina. Vulvovaginal mucosal dystrophy was noted in 84% of the patients. A significant positive correlation of PFM function was found to cognitive status (MMSE score), mobility (Tinetti performance score), and history of previous PFM training; a negative correlation of PFM function was found to patients' age and vulvovaginal mucosal dystrophy, and no significant correlation to body mass index, parity, or history of hysterectomy. Targeted clinical UI assessment including digital vaginal palpation should be performed in all incontinent elderly women in order to detect PFM dysfunction and to optimize therapeutic measures.

  19. Comparison of pelvic floor muscle strength in nulliparous women and those with normal vaginal delivery and cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Afshari, Poorandokht; Dabagh, Fariba; Iravani, Mina; Abedi, Parvin

    2017-08-01

    Weakness of the pelvic floor is quite common among women, and may occur following childbirth. The aim of this study was to compare pelvic floor muscle strength in women of reproductive age who were nulliparous or who had a cesarean section or normal vaginal delivery. In this cross-sectional study, 341 women including 96 nulliparous women, 73 women with a history of normal vaginal delivery with and without episiotomy, and 172 women with a history of elective or emergency cesarean section were recruited randomly from public health centers in Ahvaz, Iran. Data were collected using a sociodemographic questionnaire and a checklist was used to record weight, height, body mass index, and pelvic floor muscle strength. Pelvic floor muscle strength was measured with the woman in the lithotomy position using a Peritron 9300 V perineometer. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, the least significant difference test and the chi-squared test. The nulliparous women had the highest mean pelvic muscle strength (55.62 ± 15.86 cm H2O). Women who had vaginal delivery with episiotomy had the lowest pelvic muscle strength (32.71 ± 14 cm H2O). In nulliparous women pelvic floor muscle strength was higher than in women who had normal vaginal delivery with episiotomy (p < 0.001), but was not significantly different from that in women with normal vaginal delivery without episiotomy or in women with cesarean section (elective or emergency, p = 0.245). Nulliparous women had the highest pelvic floor muscle strength and there was no significant difference in pelvic floor muscle strength between women with normal vaginal delivery and those with cesarean section.

  20. Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy after Aerobic Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Adam R.; Harber, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests aerobic exercise training has minimal effect on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise-countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss. PMID:24508740

  1. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy after aerobic exercise training.

    PubMed

    Konopka, Adam R; Harber, Matthew P

    2014-04-01

    Current dogma suggests that aerobic exercise training has minimal effects on skeletal muscle size. We and others have demonstrated that aerobic exercise acutely and chronically alters protein metabolism and induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy. These findings promote an antithesis to the status quo by providing novel perspective on skeletal muscle mass regulation and insight into exercise countermeasures for populations prone to muscle loss.

  2. The role of pelvic and perineal striated muscles in urethral function during micturition in female rabbits.

    PubMed

    Corona-Quintanilla, Dora L; Zempoalteca, René; Arteaga, Lourdes; Castelán, Francisco; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the role of pelvic and perineal striated muscles on urethral function during micturition. Pubococcygeus, or both bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscles were electrically stimulated during the voiding phase of micturition, and bladder and urethral pressure were simultaneously recorded in urethane anesthetized female rabbits. Bladder and urethral function were assessed measuring urodynamic and urethral pressure variables obtained before and during the stimulation of muscles. Two-tail paired t-tests were carried out in order to determine significant differences (P < 0.05) between groups. Electric stimulation of the pubococcygeus during voiding decreased voiding efficiency and voided volume, whereas residual volume, the duration of voiding, the interval between bladder contraction and urethral resistance increased. Simultaneously, there was an increase in maximum urethral pressure, as well as an increase in the pressure to return to baseline and in the pressure required to close the urethra. Electrical stimulation of bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscles increased voiding efficiency, voiding duration, and the maximal pressure in bladder. Meanwhile, the maximal urethral pressure, the time related to the rise of urethral pressure, and the urethral pressure required to close the urethra decreased. The stimulation of pelvic and perineal muscles have opposing roles in urethral function during micturition. Pubococcygeus muscles facilitate urethral closure, while they inhibit bladder contraction. In contrast, bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscles prevent urethral contraction while they promote bladder contraction. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Can application of a pelvic belt change injured hamstring muscle activity?

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Ashokan; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Woodley, Stephanie; Sole, Gisela

    2012-02-01

    Hamstring injuries are commonly reported in various sports involving sprinting, high-velocity running and kicking. Aberrant biomechanics and neuromotor control of the lumbopelvic and thigh segments have been reported to play a significant role in hamstring injury incidence and recurrence. Recent evidence suggests that external pelvic compression (EPC) applied with a pelvic belt can augment the stability of the pelvic joints, and alter neuromotor control of the lumbopelvic and thigh muscles in individuals with and without (somatic) lumbopelvic and groin dysfunction. However, the effects of EPC on neuromotor control of injured hamstring muscles remain unknown. We have explored the putative neuromotor link between the lumbopelvic segment and hamstring muscles, and generated hypotheses based on plausible mechanisms through which EPC could affect injured hamstring muscle strength and recruitment. Recent guidelines argue that rehabilitation of hamstring injuries should follow a multi-modal approach and include strategies to improve stability and neuromotor control of the lumbopelvic segment. Further investigations exploring these hypotheses would confirm whether EPC could be recommended as an assessment, intervention and rehabilitation tool for hamstring injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Training effects on muscle fatigue in man.

    PubMed

    Duchateau, J; Hainaut, K

    1984-01-01

    Effects of 3 months training, on electrical and mechanical failures during fatigue, were studied in human adductor pollicis muscle. Eight subjects carried out a daily training program of 10 series of 20 fast (0.5 s) voluntary contractions, against a load equivalent to 30-40% of the muscle maximal force. Contractile properties in control and trained muscles are tested by delivering supramaximal electrical pulses (30 Hz) to the motor nerve, thereby triggering series of 60 1-s contractions separated by 1-s intervals. Training produces significant increase in tension development during a 30 Hz isometric tetanus (+ 13%; P less than 0.001). Concimitant rates of tension development and of relaxation are respectively augmented by + 18% (P less than 0.001) and + 12% (P less than 0.001). No significant change of surface muscle action potential (SAP) is observed after training. The considerable loss of force recorded during fatigue in control muscles (-36%) is significantly smaller (P less than 0.001) after training (-17%). Slowing of tension development and of tension relaxation, observed during fatigue in control muscles (respectively -47% and -79%) is smaller after training (respectively -28% and -65%). Analysis of electrical failure indicates that training significantly (P less than 0.01) reduces augmentation of muscle SAP duration and area recorded during fatigue. Comparison of time courses of mechanical and electrical failures in control and trained muscles, supports the idea that intracellular processes play the major role in tension decay associated with fatigue in human adductor pollicis muscle.

  5. Stabilization of lumbo-pelvic region and electromyography of the abdominal muscles.

    PubMed

    Filho, R de F N; de Brito Silva, P; Ito, M A; Alves, N; Padovan, C R; Mícolis de Azevedo, F

    2006-01-01

    It is usual to find athletes that can perform de curl up test easily, but are unable to maintain the stabilization of the low back during the double straight leg lowering (DSLL). In spite of having strong abdominal muscles, its stabilization role seems not to be effective. Thus, the purpose of this study was to verify the relation among individuals with strong abdominal muscles and: the ability in perform posterior pelvic tilt (PPT); the ability to stabilize the low back during the DSLL and the eletromyographic activity of the abdominal muscles. Eighteen male subjects (aged 19.27 +/- 3.5), without history of muscle skeletal dysfunction, performed both the PPT and DSLL tests. During these tests electromyographic signals of the rectus abdominis (RA), obliquus internus abdominis (OI) and obliquus externus abdominis (OE) were recorded, the angle of the hip and the pressure under the low back were measured. The results of analyses of variance (ANOVA) show that most volunteers accomplished the PPT test, actively flattening the low back with regular or good quality. However, none of them was able to stabilize the low back during the DSLL test. During the PPT test all abdominal muscle portions analysed were activated without significant differences. In an attempt of maintaining the lumbo-pelvic region stabilized during the DSLL, it was observed a tendency of higher bilateral activation of OE when compared to RA and OI muscle portions between 70 and 20 degrees of hip flexion.

  6. Hip Rotations Influence Electromyographic Activity of Gluteus Medius Muscle During Pelvic Drop Exercise.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Renan Lima; Facchini, Joana Hoverter; de Freitas, Diego Galace; Callegaric, Bianca; Amado João, Sílvia Maria

    2016-08-24

    Pelvic drop exercises are often used to strengthen the gluteus medius muscle with the aim of increasing or prioritizing its recruitment. However, the effect of hip rotation on the performance of the action of the gluteus medius is unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of hip rotation on the recruitment of the gluteus medius muscle, tensor fasciae latae and quadratus lumborum. Seventeen healthy subjects performed two sets of four repetitions of pelvic drop exercise in random order with lateral (PDLR), medial (PDMR) and neutral (PDN) rotation of the hip. The electromyographic activity of the gluteus medius muscle (GM), tensor fasciae latae (TFL) and quadratus lumborum (QL) were evaluated using surface electromyography (sEMG). The results showed significant increases in activation of the GM with medial and neutral rotation compared with lateral rotation (p = 0.03, p = 0.01, respectively) and there was no difference between medial and neutral rotation (p=1.00). There was no difference in electromyographic activity of the tensor fasciae latae and quadratus lumborum in any of the positions. The GM:TFL ratio was the same in all analyzed positions. Regarding the GM:QL ratio, there was a significant increase with medial rotation compared with lateral rotation (p=0.02). Pelvic drop exercises are more efficient for activating the gluteus medius when the hip is in medial rotation and neutral position.

  7. Can women correctly contract their pelvic floor muscles without formal instruction?

    PubMed

    Henderson, Joseph Welles; Wang, Siqing; Egger, Marlene J; Masters, Maria; Nygaard, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    It is unknown how many women presenting for primary care can appropriately contract their pelvic floor muscle (PFM) or whether this ability differs between women with or without pelvic floor disorders. We sought to describe the proportion of women who initially incorrectly contract the PFM and how many can learn after basic instruction. This cross-sectional study enrolled 779 women presenting to community-based primary care practices. During PFM assessment, research nurses recorded whether women could correctly contract their PFM after a brief verbal cue. We defined pelvic organ prolapse (POP) as prolapse to or beyond the hymen and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) as a score of greater than equal 3 on the Incontinence Severity Index. Pelvic floor muscle contraction was done correctly on first attempt in 85.5%, 83.4%, 68.6%, and 85.8% of women with POP, SUI, both POP and SUI, and neither POP nor SUI, respectively (P=0.01 for difference between POP and SUI versus neither POP nor SUI). Of 120 women who initially incorrectly contracted the PFM, 94 women (78%) learned after brief instruction. Women with POP were less likely to learn than women with neither POP nor SUI (54.3% vs 85.7%, P=0.001). Increasing vaginal delivery and decreasing caffeine intake (but not age or other demographic factors) were associated with incorrect PFM contraction; only decreased caffeine intake remained significant on multivariable analysis. Most women with no or mild pelvic floor disorders can correctly contract their PFM after a simple verbal cue, suggesting that population-based prevention interventions can be initiated without clinical confirmation of correct PFM technique.

  8. The evaluation of pelvic floor muscle strength in women with pelvic floor dysfunction: A reliability and correlation study.

    PubMed

    Navarro Brazález, Beatriz; Torres Lacomba, María; de la Villa, Pedro; Sánchez Sánchez, Beatriz; Prieto Gómez, Virginia; Asúnsolo Del Barco, Ángel; McLean, Linda

    2017-04-28

    The purposes of this study were: (i) to evaluate the reliability of vaginal palpation, vaginal manometry, vaginal dynamometry; and surface (transperineal) electromyography (sEMG), when evaluating pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength and/or activation; and (ii) to determine the associations among PFM strength measured using these assessments. One hundred and fifty women with pelvic floor disorders participated on one occasion, and 20 women returned for the same investigations by two different raters on 3 different days. At each session, PFM strength was assessed using palpation (both the modified Oxford Grading Scale and the Levator ani testing), manometry, and dynamometry; and PFM activation was assessed using sEMG. The interrater reliability of manometry, dynamometry, and sEMG (both root-mean-square [RMS] and integral average) was high (Lin's Concordance Correlation Coefficient [CCC] = 0.95, 0.93, 0.91, 0.86, respectively), whereas the interrater reliability of both palpation grading scales was low (Cohen's Kappa [k] = 0.27-0.38). The intrarater reliability of manometry (CCC = 0.96), and dynamometry (CCC = 0.96) were high, whereas intrarater reliability of both palpation scales (k = 0.78 for both), and of sEMG (CCC = 0.79 vs 0.80 for RMS vs integral average) was moderate. The Bland-Altman plot showed good inter and intrarater agreement, with little random variability for all instruments. The correlations among palpation, manometry, and dynamometry were moderate (coefficient of determination [r(2) ] ranged from 0.52 to 0.75), however, transperineal sEMG amplitude was only weakly correlated with all measures of strength (r(2)  = 0.23-0.30). Manometry and dynamometry are more reliable tools than vaginal palpation for the assessment of PFM strength in women with pelvic floor disorders, especially when different raters are involved. The different PFM strength measures used clinically are moderately correlated; whereas, PFM activation recorded

  9. Musculoskeletal anatomy of the pelvic fin of Polypterus: implications for phylogenetic distribution and homology of pre- and postaxial pelvic appendicular muscles.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Julia L; Johnston, Peter S; Esteve-Altava, Borja; Diogo, Rui

    2017-04-01

    As a member of the most basal clade of extant ray-finned fishes (actinopterygians) and of one of the most basal clades of osteichthyans (bony fishes + tetrapods), Polypterus can provide insights into the ancestral anatomy of both ray-finned and lobe-finned fishes, including those that gave rise to tetrapods. The pectoral fin of Polypterus has been well described but, surprisingly, neither the bones nor the muscles of the pelvic fin are well known. We stained and dissected the pelvic fin of Polypterus senegalus and Polypterus delhezi to offer a detailed description of its musculoskeletal anatomy. In addition to the previously described adductor and abductor muscles, we found preaxial and postaxial muscles similar to those in the pectoral fin of members of this genus. The presence of pre- and postaxial muscles in both the pectoral and pelvic fins of Polypterus, combined with recent descriptions of similar muscles in the lobe-finned fishes Latimeria and Neoceratodus, suggests that they were present in the most recent common ancestor of bony fishes. These results have crucial implications for the evolution of appendicular muscles in both fish and tetrapods. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  10. Association of antepartum vitamin D levels with postpartum pelvic floor muscle strength and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Aydogmus, S; Kelekci, S; Aydogmus, H; Demir, M; Yilmaz, B; Sutcu, R

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin D affects skeletal muscle strength and functions via various mechanisms. Strength and/or functional dysfunctions of the pelvic floor muscles may be associated with the distortion of pelvic floor functions. We hypothesized that vitamin D deficiency may contribute to pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) by affecting pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy on postpartum PFMS. This cross-sectional study was conducted in a university hospital. One hundred and eighty pregnant women were admitted to our hospital in their third trimester and compared with 156 healthy nulliparous women. Venous blood samples for examining vitamin D levels were taken from each participant and stored at -80 °C. At 8-10 weeks postpartum, patients were invited to the hospital, asked about their PFD symptoms, and PFMS was measured using a perineometer. There was no statistical significance among groups regarding mean age, maternal age, and weight at delivery. Postpartum PFMS and duration in vitamin D-deficient women were significantly lower than those without the deficiency. Vitamin D-deficient vaginal delivery cases (group I) had a postpartum PFMS average of 21.96 ± 7.91 cm-H₂O, nonvitamin D-deficient normal delivery cases (group III) had a PFMS of 29.66 ± 10.3 cm-H₂O (p = 0.001). In the cesarean delivery groups, vitamin D-deficient (group II) and nonvitamin D-deficient (group IV) cases had PFMS values of 32.23 ± 9.66 and 35.53 ± 15.58 cm-H₂O respectively (p = 0.258). Lower vitamin D levels in the third trimester correlates with decreased PFMS.

  11. Two anatomic resources of canine pelvic limb muscles based on CT and MRI.

    PubMed

    Sunico, Sarena K; Hamel, Corentin; Styner, Martin; Robertson, Ian D; Kornegay, Joe N; Bettini, Chris; Parks, Jerry; Wilber, Kathy; Smallwood, J Edgar; Thrall, Donald E

    2012-01-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and three-dimensional (3D) modeling software provide the tools necessary to create sophisticated, interactive anatomic resources that can assist in the interpretation of MR images of extremities, and learning the structure and function of limb musculature. Modeling provides advantages over dissection or consultation of print atlases because of the associated speed, flexibility, 3D nature, and elimination of superimposed arrows and labels. Our goals were to create a diagnostic atlas of pelvic limb muscles that will facilitate interpretation of MR images of patients with muscle injury and to create a 3D model of the canine pelvic limb musculature to facilitate anatomic learning. To create these resources, we used structural segmentation of MR images, a process that groups image pixels into anatomically meaningful regions. The Diagnostic Atlas is an interactive, multiplanar, web-based MR atlas of the canine pelvic limb musculature that was created by manually segmenting clinically analogous MR sequences. Higher resolution volumetric MR and computed tomography (CT) data were segmented into separately labeled volumes of data and then transformed into a multilayered 3D computer model. The 3D Model serves as a resource for students of gross anatomy, encouraging integrative learning with its highly interactive and selective display capabilities. For clinicians, the 3D Model also serves to bridge the gap between topographic and tomographic anatomy, displaying both formats alongside, or even superimposed over each other. Both projects are hosted on an open-access website, http://3dvetanatomy.ncsu.edu/

  12. Muscle training for bone strength.

    PubMed

    Suominen, Harri

    2006-04-01

    The main function of bone is to provide the mechanical integrity for locomotion and protection; accordingly, bone mass and architecture are adjusted to control the strains produced by mechanical load and muscular activity. Age-related patterns involve peak bone mass during growth, a plateau in adulthood, and bone loss during aging. The decline in bone mass and structural integrity results in increased risk of fractures, particularly in post-menopausal women. Athletes competing in strength and power events, such as weight-lifting and jumping, have superior bone mass and structure compared with their untrained counterparts in all age groups. Exercise seems to be most effective during rapid growth, the average gain in bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) in controlled trials being of the order of 2-5% per year. The net gain of BMD after exercise interventions among older people is modest, at a level of 1-3% per year, but it is not clear whether positive effects can be maintained over a longer time. Although aerobic exercise is important in maintaining overall health, the resistance type of muscle training may be more applicable to the basic rules of bone adaptation and site-specific effects of exercise, have more favorable effects in maintaining or improving bone mass and architecture, and be safe and feasible for older people. It has been suggested that there is an opportunity for resistance training, for improved effects on BMD in postmenopausal women in bones which have less daily loading. In addition to BMC and BMD, bone geometry and mass distribution may also change as a result of training and other treatment, such as hormonal replacement therapy, thereby further improving bone strength and reducing fracture risk. Appropriate training regimens may reduce the risk of falls and the severity of fall-related injuries, and also constitute potential therapy to improve functional ability and the quality of life in osteoporotic patients. However, further research

  13. Effects of Pilates Training on Lumbo-Pelvic Stability and Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Phrompaet, Sureeporn; Paungmali, Aatit; Pirunsan, Ubon; Sitilertpisan, Patraporn

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to assess and compare the effects of Pilates exercise on flexibility and lumbo-pelvic movement control between the Pilates training and control groups. Methods A randomized single-blinded controlled design was utilized in the study. Forty healthy male and female volunteers (mean age 31.65±6.21 years) were randomly divided into Pilates-based training (20 subjects) and the control groups (20 subjects). The Pilates group attended 45-minute training sessions, 2 times per week, for a period of 8 weeks. Flexibility and lumbo-pelvic stability tests were determined as outcome measures using a standard “sit and reach test” and “pressure biofeedback” respectively at 0, 4 and 8 weeks of the study. Results The results showed that the Pilates training group improved flexibility significantly (P<0.001) during time intervals. This effect was also significantly greater than the control group for both 4 weeks and 8 weeks of the training period (P<0.001). There were 65% and 85% of the subjects from Pilates group passing the lumbo-pelvic stability test at 4 and 8 weeks of training periods respectively. No subjects from the control group passed the test at any stages. Conclusions Pilates can be used as an adjunctive exercise program to improve flexibility, enhance control-mobility of trunk and pelvic segments. It may also prevent and attenuate the predisposition to axial musculoskeletal injury. PMID:22375213

  14. Concentration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the pelvic floor muscles: an experimental comparative rat model.

    PubMed

    Chin, Hung-Yen; Changchien, Eileen; Lin, Mei-Fung; Chiang, Chi-Hsin; Wang, Chin-Jung

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is to explore non-steroid anti-inflammation drugs (NSAIDs) potency for pelvic floor muscle pain by measuring local concentration in a rat model. We used nine NSAIDs, including nabumetone, naproxen, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam, diclofenac potassium, etodolac, indomethacin, and sulindac, and 9 groups of female Wister rats. Each group of rats was fed with one kind of NSAID (2 mg/mL) for three consecutive days. Thereafter, one mL of blood and one gram of pelvic floor muscle were taken to measure drug pharmacokinetics, including partition coefficient, lipophilicity, elimination of half-life (T1/2) and muscle/plasma converting ratio (Css, muscle/Css, plasma). Diclofenac potassium had the lowest T1/2 and the highest mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma (1.9 hours and 0.85±0.53, respectively). The mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma of sulindac, naproxen and ibuprofen were lower than other experimental NSAIDs. Diclofenac potassium had the highest disposition in pelvic floor muscle in a rat model. The finding implies that diclofenac potassium might be the choice for pain relief in pelvic muscle.

  15. Concentration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in the Pelvic Floor Muscles: An Experimental Comparative Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Hung-Yen; Changchien, Eileen; Lin, Mei-Fung; Chiang, Chi-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to explore non-steroid anti-inflammation drugs (NSAIDs) potency for pelvic floor muscle pain by measuring local concentration in a rat model. Materials and Methods We used nine NSAIDs, including nabumetone, naproxen, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam, diclofenac potassium, etodolac, indomethacin, and sulindac, and 9 groups of female Wister rats. Each group of rats was fed with one kind of NSAID (2 mg/mL) for three consecutive days. Thereafter, one mL of blood and one gram of pelvic floor muscle were taken to measure drug pharmacokinetics, including partition coefficient, lipophilicity, elimination of half-life (T1/2) and muscle/plasma converting ratio (Css, muscle/Css, plasma). Results Diclofenac potassium had the lowest T1/2 and the highest mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma (1.9 hours and 0.85±0.53, respectively). The mean Css, muscle/Css, plasma of sulindac, naproxen and ibuprofen were lower than other experimental NSAIDs. Conclusion Diclofenac potassium had the highest disposition in pelvic floor muscle in a rat model. The finding implies that diclofenac potassium might be the choice for pain relief in pelvic muscle. PMID:24954342

  16. The impact of the pelvic floor muscles on dynamic ventilation maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hankyu; Hwang, Byoungha; Kim, Yeoungsung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) on dynamic ventilation maneuvers. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 19 healthy female adults in their 20s who consented to participate in the present study. Electromyography (EMG) was used to examine respiratory muscle activity, and a spirometer was used to examine vital capacity before and during contraction of the PFM. [Results] There were statistically significant differences in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), transverse abdominis/internal oblique (TrA/IO), and maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV) when the PFM was contracted. [Conclusion] Contraction of the PFM can be effective in promoting activation of the respiratory muscles and vital capacity. Therefore, the PFM should be considered to improve the effects of respiratory activity. PMID:26644664

  17. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of a pelvic wedge and belt on the medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed a pelvic wedge and belt and investigated their effects on the selective activation of medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion. [Subjects and Methods] Nine adults were enrolled. The participants performed exercises without and with the pelvic wedge and belt, and the electromyographic activities of the medial and lateral hamstring muscles were recorded. [Results] The activity of the medial hamstring was increased significantly when using the pelvic wedge and belt, while the activity of the lateral hamstring did not differ significantly. [Conclusion] The pelvic wedge and belt provide a self-locked position during knee flexion in the prone position. Prone knee flexion in this position is an effective self-exercise for balanced strengthening of the medial hamstring. PMID:28210048

  19. The influence of the material properties on the biomechanical behavior of the pelvic floor muscles during vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Parente, M P L; Natal Jorge, R M; Mascarenhas, T; Fernandes, A A; Martins, J A C

    2009-06-19

    In this work, a finite element model intends to represent the effects that the passage of a fetal head can induce on the muscles of the pelvic floor, from a mechanical point of view. The finite element method is a valuable tool, that is contributing to the clarification of the mechanisms behind pelvic floor disorders related to vaginal deliveries, although some care is necessary in order to obtain correct results. The present work shows how the variation of the material parameters, used in the constitutive model, can affect the obtained results from a finite element simulation. The constitutive equation adopted in this work for the pelvic floor muscles is a modified form of the incompressible transversely isotropic hyperelastic model proposed earlier by Humphrey and Yin. Results for the pelvic floor strain and stresses obtained during the passage of the fetus head are presented. The results show the importance of the material parameters and the need for a correct constitutive model.

  20. Initial experience using a pelvic emergency simulator to train reduction in blood loss.

    PubMed

    Pohlemann, Tim; Culemann, Ulf; Holstein, Joerg H

    2012-08-01

    Because the average exposure of surgeons to pelvic injuries with life-threatening hemorrhage is decreasing, training opportunities are necessary to prepare surgeons for the rare but highly demanding emergency situations. We have developed a novel pelvic emergency simulator to train surgeons in controlling blood loss. We (1) described the design and use of the simulator; and (2) determined whether the simulator correctly identified proper and improper mechanical stabilization and bleeding control. The device contained two tube systems. The tubes of the first system were passed through the disrupted sacroiliac joint and the symphysis. By reduction (manual traction on the leg) and compression (application of the C-clamp) of the disrupted pelvis, the tubes were pinched by the synthetic bones leading to a stop of simulated blood flow through the tubes of the first system. The tubes of the second system ended in a foam representing the presacral and paravesical venous plexus. By correct preperitoneal packing, the flow into the foam was stopped. Simulated bleeding was monitored by quantifying flow out of a fluid reservoir and flow into fluid samplers. The pelvic emergency simulator has been used for eight training sessions since 2002. Bleeding control by packing was achieved after 6 ± 3 minutes. Total simulated blood loss during the training session was 1296 ± 892 mL. Our data suggest the simulator can be used as a tool to train surgeons to reduce blood loss in severe pelvic ring injuries.

  1. Simulation training for breast and pelvic physical examination: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dilaveri, C A; Szostek, J H; Wang, A T; Cook, D A

    2013-09-01

    Breast and pelvic examinations are challenging intimate examinations. Technology-based simulation may help to overcome these challenges. To synthesise the evidence regarding the effectiveness of technology-based simulation training for breast and pelvic examination. Our systematic search included MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Scopus, and key journals and review articles; the date of the last search was January 2012. Original research studies evaluating technology-enhanced simulation of breast and pelvic examination to teach learners, compared with no intervention or with other educational activities. The reviewers evaluated study eligibility and abstracted data on methodological quality, learners, instructional design, and outcomes, and used random-effects models to pool weighted effect sizes. In total, 11 272 articles were identified for screening, and 22 studies were eligible, enrolling 2036 trainees. In eight studies comparing simulation for breast examination training with no intervention, simulation was associated with a significant improvement in skill, with a pooled effect size of 0.86 (95% CI 0.52-1.19; P < 0.001). Four studies comparing simulation training for pelvic examination with no intervention had a large and significant benefit, with a pooled effect size of 1.18 (95% CI 0.40-1.96; P = 0.003). Among breast examination simulation studies, dynamic models providing feedback were associated with improved outcomes. In pelvic examination simulation studies, the addition of a standardised patient to the simulation model and the use of an electronic model with enhanced feedback improved outcomes. In comparison with no intervention, breast and pelvic examination simulation training is associated with moderate to large effects for skills outcomes. Enhanced feedback appears to improve learning. © 2013 RCOG.

  2. Is there a difference in the electromyographic activity of the pelvic floor muscles across the phases of the menstrual cycle?

    PubMed Central

    Micussi, Maria Thereza; Freitas, Rodrigo Pegado; Angelo, Priscylla Helouyse; Soares, Elvira Maria; Lemos, Telma Maria; Maranhão, Técia Maria

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the electrical activity of the pelvic floor muscle in women during the follicular, ovulatory, and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle and its correlation with estradiol and total testosterone levels. [Subjects and Methods] This cross-sectional study involved 30 women with ovulatory menstrual cycles. Total testosterone and estradiol levels were measured and the muscle tone and maximum voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles were evaluated using surface electromyography. [Results] Muscle tone was significantly lower during the follicular (21.1±3.3 μV) and ovulatory (27.1±5.9 μV) phases than the luteal phase (30.4±4.1 μV). The maximum voluntary contraction was not different across phases. The estradiol level on the 7th day of the menstrual cycle showed a strong positive correlation with muscle tone and maximum voluntary contraction, and the testosterone level was positively correlated with muscle tone on the 21st day. [Conclusion] Women have better muscle tone during the luteal phase. The muscle tone and maximum voluntary contraction were strongly correlated with the estradiol level on the 7th day, and the muscle tone was correlated with the testosterone level on the 21st day of the menstrual cycle. These findings suggest that hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle alter pelvic floor muscle activity. PMID:26311960

  3. Single muscle fiber adaptations with marathon training.

    PubMed

    Trappe, Scott; Harber, Matthew; Creer, Andrew; Gallagher, Philip; Slivka, Dustin; Minchev, Kiril; Whitsett, David

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the effects of marathon training on single muscle fiber contractile function in a group of recreational runners. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the gastrocnemius muscle of seven individuals (22 +/- 1 yr, 177 +/- 3 cm, and 68 +/- 2 kg) before, after 13 wk of run training, and after 3 wk of taper. Slow-twitch myosin heavy chain [(MHC) I] and fast-twitch (MHC IIa) muscle fibers were analyzed for size, strength (P(o)), speed (V(o)), and power. The run training program led to the successful completion of a marathon (range 3 h 56 min to 5 h 35 min). Oxygen uptake during submaximal running and citrate synthase activity were improved (P < 0.05) with the training program. Muscle fiber size declined (P < 0.05) by approximately 20% in both fiber types after training. P(o) was maintained in both fiber types with training and increased (P < 0.05) by 18% in the MHC IIa fibers after taper. This resulted in >60% increase (P < 0.05) in force per cross-sectional area in both fiber types. Fiber V(o) increased (P < 0.05) by 28% in MHC I fibers with training and was unchanged in MHC IIa fibers. Peak power increased (P < 0.05) in MHC I and IIa fibers after training with a further increase (P < 0.05) in MHC IIa fiber power after taper. These data show that marathon training decreased slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fiber size but that it maintained or improved the functional profile of these fibers. A taper period before the marathon further improved the functional profile of the muscle, which was targeted to the fast-twitch muscle fibers.

  4. Assessment of Kegel pelvic muscle exercise performance after brief verbal instruction.

    PubMed

    Bump, R C; Hurt, W G; Fantl, J A; Wyman, J F

    1991-08-01

    Forty-seven women had urethral pressure profile determinations performed at rest and during a Kegel pelvic muscle contraction, after brief standardized verbal instruction. Twenty-three (49%) had an ideal Kegel effort--a significant increase in the force of urethral closure without an appreciable Valsalva effort. Twelve subjects (25%) displayed a Kegel technique that could potentially promote incontinence. Age, parity, weight, estrogen deprivation, prior continence surgery or hysterectomy, and passive urethral function did not predict a successful effort. We concluded that simple verbal or written instruction does not represent adequate preparation for a patient who is about to start a Kegel exercise program.

  5. Effects of Respiratory Muscle Strength Training in Classically Trained Singers.

    PubMed

    Ray, Christin; Trudeau, Michael D; McCoy, Scott

    2017-09-25

    Many voice pedagogy practices revolve around the notion of controlling airflow and lung volumes and focus heavily on the concepts of breath support and breath control. Despite this emphasis, the effects of increased respiratory muscle strength on airflow and phonation patterns in trained singers remain unknown. This study addressed whether singers could increase respiratory muscle strength with progressive threshold training and whether respiratory muscle strength increases had measurable effect on voice outcomes. A single-subject design was used to answer the research questions. Improved breath support was hypothesized to manifest in differences in airflow and phonetogram characteristics. Six graduate-level singing students were recruited to complete the protocol, which consisted of a baseline phase followed by either inspiratory muscle strength training followed by expiratory muscle strength training or vice versa. Results showed that these singers had increased respiratory muscle strength after completing the training program. Consistent changes in measures of aerodynamics and voice were not present among subjects, although some individual changes were noted. Future research may focus on the effects of respiratory muscle strength training in less advanced singers. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Architectural design of the pelvic floor is consistent with muscle functional subspecialization.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, Lori J; Nguyen, Olivia T; Cook, Mark S; Alperin, Marianna; Shah, Sameer B; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2014-02-01

    Skeletal muscle architecture is the strongest predictor of a muscle's functional capacity. The purpose of this study was to define the architectural properties of the deep muscles of the female pelvic floor (PFMs) to elucidate their structure-function relationships. PFMs coccygeus (C), iliococcygeus (IC), and pubovisceral (PV) were harvested en bloc from ten fixed human cadavers (mean age 85 years, range 55-102). Fundamental architectural parameters of skeletal muscles [physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), normalized fiber length, and sarcomere length (L(s))] were determined using validated methods. PCSA predicts muscle-force production, and normalized fiber length is related to muscle excursion. These parameters were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc t tests, as appropriate. Significance was set to α = 0.05. PFMs were thinner than expected based on data reported from imaging studies and in vivo palpation. Significant differences in fiber length were observed across PFMs: C = 5.29 ± 0.32 cm, IC = 7.55 ± 0.46 cm, PV = 10.45 ± 0.67 cm (p < 0.001). Average L(s) of all PFMs was short relative to the optimal L(s) of 2.7 μm of other human skeletal muscles: C = 2.05 ± 0.02 μm, IC = 2.02 ± 0.02 μm, PC/PR = 2.07 ± 0.01 μm (p = <0.001 compared with 2.7 μm; p = 0.15 between PFMs, power = 0.46). Average PCSA was very small compared with other human muscles, with no significant difference between individual PFMs: C = 0.71 ± 0.06 cm(2), IC = 0.63 ± 0.04 cm(2), PV = 0.59 ± 0.05 cm(2) (p = 0.21, power = 0.27). Overall, C had shortest fibers, making it a good stabilizer. PV demonstrated the longest fibers, suggesting that it functions to produce large excursions. PFM design shows individual muscles demonstrating differential architecture, corresponding to specialized function in the pelvic floor.

  7. Functional anatomy and muscle moment arms of the pelvic limb of an elite sprinting athlete: the racing greyhound (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Williams, S B; Wilson, A M; Rhodes, L; Andrews, J; Payne, R C

    2008-10-01

    We provide quantitative anatomical data on the muscle-tendon architecture and geometry of the pelvic limb of an elite sprint athlete, the racing greyhound. Specifically, muscle masses, muscle lengths, fascicle lengths, pennation angles and muscle moment arms were measured. Maximum isometric force and power of muscles, the maximum muscle torque at joints and tendon stress and strain were estimated. We compare data with that published for a generalized breed of canid, and other cursorial mammals such as the horse and hare. The pelvic limb of the racing greyhound had a relatively large volume of hip extensor muscle, which is likely to be required for power production. Per unit body mass, some pelvic limb muscles were relatively larger than those in less specialized canines, and many hip extensor muscles had longer fascicle lengths. It was estimated that substantial extensor moments could be created about the tarsus and hip of the greyhound allowing high power output and potential for rapid acceleration. The racing greyhound hence possesses substantial specializations for enhanced sprint performance.

  8. Respiratory muscles training in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Crisafulli, Ernesto; Costi, Stefania; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Clini, Enrico M

    2007-01-01

    It is known that respiratory muscles undergo adaptation in response to overload stimuli during exercise training in stable COPD patients, thus resulting in significant increase of respiratory muscle function as well as the individual’s improvements. The present article reviews the most updated evidence with regard to the use of respiratory muscle training (RMT) methods in COPD patients. Basically, three types of RMT (resistive training, pressure threshold loading, and normocapnic hyperpnea) have been reported. Frequency, duration, and intensity of exercise must be carefully considered for a training effect. In contrast with the plentitude of existing data inherent to inspiratory muscle training (IMT), literature is still lacking in showing clinical and physiological studies related to expiratory muscle training (EMT). In particular, while it seems that IMT is slightly superior to EMT in providing additional benefits other than respiratory muscle function such as a reduction in dyspnea, both the effects and the safety of EMT is still to be definitively elucidated in patients with COPD. PMID:18044062

  9. Reliability of the ultrasound measurements of abdominal muscles activity when activated with and without pelvic floor muscles contraction.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Nahid; Rasouli, Omid; Arab, Amir Massoud; Khademi, Khosro; Samani, Elham Neisani

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic co-activation of the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles (PFM) has been shown in literature. Some studies have assessed the reliability of ultrasound measures of the abdominal muscles. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of ultrasound measurements of transverses abdominis (TrA) and obliquus internus (OI) muscles during different conditions (PFM contraction, abdominal hollowing manoeuvre (AHM) with and without PFM contraction) in participants with and without chronic low back pain (LBP). 21 participants (9 with LBP, 12 healthy) participated in the study. The reliability of thickness measurements at rest and during each condition and thickness changes and percentage of this changes at different conditions were assessed. The results showed high reliability of the thickness measurement at rest and during each condition of TrA and OI muscles, moderate to substantial reliability for the thickness change and percentage of thickness change of TrA, and fair to moderate reliability of the thickness change and percentage of thickness change of OI in both groups. Ultrasound imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscle activity with and without PFM contraction.

  10. Male pelvic floor: history and update.

    PubMed

    Dorey, Grace

    2005-08-01

    Our understanding of the male pelvic floor has evolved over more than 2,000 years. Gradually medical science has sought to dispel ancient myths and untruths. The male pelvic floor has many diverse functions. Importantly, it helps to support the abdominal contents, maintains urinary and fecal continence, and plays a major role in gaining and maintaining penile erection. Weakness of the male pelvic floor muscles may cause urinary and fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Function may be restored in each of these areas by a comprehensive pelvic floor muscle training program. Spasm of the pelvic floor muscles may produce pain and require relaxation techniques. Additional research is needed to add further evidence to our knowledge base.

  11. EMGs Analysis of Lumbar, Pelvic and Leg Muscles in Leg Length Discrepancy Adolescents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotelo-Barroso, Fernando; Márquez-Gamiño, Sergio; Caudillo-Cisneros, Cipriana

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate differences in surface electromyography (EMGs) activity of lumbar, pelvic and leg muscles in adolescents with and without LLD. EMGs activity records were taken during rest and maximal isometric voluntary contractions (MIVC). Peak to peak amplitude (PPA), mean rectified voltage (MRV) and root mean square (RMS), were analyzed. Statistical differences between short and large sides of LLD adolescents, were found (p<0.05). Higher values occurred in shorter limb muscles. No significative differences were found between left and right legs of the control subjects. When EMGs values were compared between short and large sides of LLD subjects with ipsilateral sides of controls, selective, statistically different EMGs values were exhibited. It is suggested that adaptative behavior to secondary biomechanical and/or neural changes occurred, even when none clinical symptoms were reported. The observations were remarked by the absence of EMGs differences between right and left sides of control subjects.

  12. Pregnant women's awareness, knowledge and beliefs about pelvic floor muscles: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Hill, Anne-Marie; McPhail, Steven M; Wilson, Judith M; Berlach, Richard G

    2017-03-14

    Pregnant women benefit from completing pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFMEs). The aims of the study were to evaluate pregnant women's levels of awareness, knowledge, and beliefs about the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) and PFMEs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Respondents were pregnant women over the age of 18 years who attended antenatal clinics in Western Australia (WA). Questionnaire items measured awareness and knowledge about PFMs, confidence and beliefs about engaging in PFMEs, and attendance at antenatal education (ANE) classes. Chi-squared tests examined potential associations between questionnaire items and respondent characteristics. Mean gestation of respondents (n = 633 out of 850; 74% response rate) was 28.7 (+7.8) weeks and 50% were giving birth for the first time. Although 76% of respondents knew that PFMs can prevent urinary incontinence, only 27% knew that they prevented faecal incontinence and 41% thought it was normal to leak urine when pregnant. Only n = 72 (11%) were practicing PFMEs. Respondents who had attended ANE (28%) were significantly more knowledgeable about pelvic floor function (p < .001) and significantly less likely to believe that leaking urine during pregnancy was normal (p = 0.02), compared with those who had not attended ANE. Respondents who did not speak English at home (18%) were significantly less knowledgeable about PFMs and PFMEs, and significantly less likely to have attended, or planned to attend, ANE classes. Pregnant women require more health education regarding PFMs. Education should be provided using diverse modes, especially for women from migrant backgrounds and women who do not plan to attend formal ANE classes.

  13. The relationship between postpartum levator ani muscle avulsion and signs and symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    van Delft, K; Sultan, A H; Thakar, R; Schwertner-Tiepelmann, N; Kluivers, K

    2014-08-01

    To establish the relationship between postpartum levator ani muscle (LAM) avulsion and signs and/or symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD). Observational longitudinal cohort study. District General University Hospital, UK. Primigravida at 36 weeks' gestation and 3 months postpartum. Pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) and pelvic organ prolapse were assessed clinically using validated methods. Transperineal ultrasound was performed to identify LAM avulsion and measure hiatus dimensions. Validated questionnaires evaluated sexual function, urinary and faecal incontinence. PFD signs and symptoms related to LAM avulsion. Two hundred and sixty nine primigravida without LAM avulsion participated and 71% (n = 191) returned postpartum. LAM avulsion was found in 21% of vaginal deliveries (n = 30, 95%CI 15.1-28.4%). Women with minor and major avulsion had worse PFMS (P < 0.038) and more anterior compartment prolapse (maximum stage 2; P < 0.024). Antenatal hiatus antero-posterior diameter on ultrasound was significantly smaller in women sustaining avulsion (P = 0.011). Postnatal measurements were significantly increased following avulsion. Women with major avulsion were less sexually active at both antenatal and postnatal periods (P < 0.030). These women had more postnatal urinary incontinence and symptoms such as reduced vaginal sensation and 'too loose vagina'. No postnatal differences were found for faecal incontinence, prolapse symptoms or quality of life. The correlation of differences in variables was only slight-fair with avulsion severity. Twenty one percent of women sustain LAM avulsion during their first vaginal delivery with significant impact on signs and symptoms of PFD. As avulsion has been described as the missing link in the development of prolapse; longer term follow-up is vital. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  14. Architectural design of the pelvic floor is consistent with muscle functional subspecialization

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Lori J.; Nguyen, Olivia T.; Cook, Mark S.; Alperin, Marianna; Shah, Sameer B.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Skeletal muscle architecture is the strongest predictor of a muscle’s functional capacity. The purpose of this study was to define the architectural properties of the deep muscles of the female pelvic floor (PFMs) to elucidate their structure–function relationships. Methods PFMs coccygeus (C), iliococcygeus (IC), and pubovisceral (PV) were harvested en bloc from ten fixed human cadavers (mean age 85 years, range 55–102). Fundamental architectural parameters of skeletal muscles [physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), normalized fiber length, and sarcomere length (Ls)] were determined using validated methods. PCSA predicts muscle-force production, and normalized fiber length is related to muscle excursion. These parameters were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc t tests, as appropriate. Significance was set to α=0.05. Results PFMs were thinner than expected based on data reported from imaging studies and in vivo palpation. Significant differences in fiber length were observed across PFMs: C=5.29±0.32 cm, IC=7.55±0.46 cm, PV=10.45±0.67 cm (p<0.001). Average Ls of all PFMs was short relative to the optimal Ls of 2.7 µm of other human skeletal muscles: C=2.05±0.02 µm, IC=2.02±0.02 µm, PC/PR=2.07±0.01 µm (p=<0.001 compared with 2.7 µm; p=0.15 between PFMs, power=0.46). Average PCSA was very small compared with other human muscles, with no significant difference between individual PFMs: C=0.71±0.06 cm2, IC=0.63±0.04 cm2, PV=0.59±0.05 cm2 (p=0.21, power=0.27). Overall, C had shortest fibers, making it a good stabilizer. PV demonstrated the longest fibers, suggesting that it functions to produce large excursions. Conclusions PFM design shows individual muscles demonstrating differential architecture, corresponding to specialized function in the pelvic floor. PMID:23903821

  15. Inferring muscle functional roles of the ostrich pelvic limb during walking and running using computer optimization

    PubMed Central

    Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their cursorial background, ostriches (Struthio camelus) walk and run with high metabolic economy, can reach very fast running speeds and quickly execute cutting manoeuvres. These capabilities are believed to be a result of their ability to coordinate muscles to take advantage of specialized passive limb structures. This study aimed to infer the functional roles of ostrich pelvic limb muscles during gait. Existing gait data were combined with a newly developed musculoskeletal model to generate simulations of ostrich walking and running that predict muscle excitations, force and mechanical work. Consistent with previous avian electromyography studies, predicted excitation patterns showed that individual muscles tended to be excited primarily during only stance or swing. Work and force estimates show that ostrich gaits are partially hip-driven with the bi-articular hip–knee muscles driving stance mechanics. Conversely, the knee extensors acted as brakes, absorbing energy. The digital extensors generated large amounts of both negative and positive mechanical work, with increased magnitudes during running, providing further evidence that ostriches make extensive use of tendinous elastic energy storage to improve economy. The simulations also highlight the need to carefully consider non-muscular soft tissues that may play a role in ostrich gait. PMID:27146688

  16. Pelvic floor muscle injuries 6 weeks post partum-an intra- and inter-rater study.

    PubMed

    Staer-Jensen, Jette; Siafarikas, Franziska; Hilde, Gunvor; Braekken, Ingeborg H; Bø, Kari; Engh, Marie Ellström

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate intra- and inter-rater reliability when diagnosing major defects, and inter-rater reliability of diagnosing minor defects and muscle thickness of the pubovisceral muscle in primiparous women 6 weeks after vaginal delivery, using 3D/4D transperineal ultrasound. Forty primiparous women were assessed using 3D/4D transperineal ultrasound. Volumes were acquired at maximal pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction, and diagnosis of muscle defects were done using tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) of the axial plane. Thickness was measured in three central levels of TUI. The stored volumes were analyzed offline by two investigators blinded to each others' results and the women's clinical data. Cohen's kappa (κ) and percentual agreement were calculated for defects, intraclass correlations coefficient (ICC) with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for thickness. Excellent intra-rater values were found for all major defects. Inter-rater values for bilateral and right-sided defects were excellent, and good for left-sided. Agreement for minor defects was poor. Measuring thickness ICC of 0.72 was found for the left side and 0.48 for the right side, although up to half of the cases had to be excluded owing to poor demarcation of the muscle. Tomographic ultrasound imaging of the axial plane using three central slices seems to be a reliable tool for detecting major pubovisceral muscle defects shortly after childbirth. Minor defects showed low reliability. Muscle thickness measurements showed moderate reliability, but too many cases had to be excluded for this to be a useful method for determining muscle thinning 6 weeks after delivery. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Relationship among vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of female pelvic floor muscles

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Vanessa S.; Hirakawa, Humberto S.; Oliveira, Ana B.; Driusso, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The proper evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) is essential for choosing the correct treatment. Currently, there is no gold standard for the assessment of female PFM function. Objective: To determine the correlation between vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of the female PFM. Method: This cross-sectional study evaluated 80 women between 18 and 35 years of age who were nulliparous and had no pelvic floor dysfunction. PFM function was assessed based on digital palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, electromyographic activity, bilateral diameter of the bulbocavernosus muscles and the amount of bladder neck movement during voluntary PFM contraction using transperineal bi-dimensional ultrasound. The Pearson correlation was used for statistical analysis (p<0.05). Results: There was a strong positive correlation between PFM function and PFM contraction pressure (0.90). In addition, there was a moderate positive correlation between these two variables and PFM electromyographic activity (0.59 and 0.63, respectively) and movement of the bladder neck in relation to the pubic symphysis (0.51 and 0.60, respectively). Conclusions: This study showed that there was a correlation between vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of the PFM in nulliparous women. The strong correlation between digital palpation and PFM contraction pressure indicated that perineometry could easily be replaced by PFM digital palpation in the absence of equipment. PMID:25372005

  18. Relationship among vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of female pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vanessa S; Hirakawa, Humberto S; Oliveira, Ana B; Driusso, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The proper evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) is essential for choosing the correct treatment. Currently, there is no gold standard for the assessment of female PFM function. To determine the correlation between vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of the female PFM. This cross-sectional study evaluated 80 women between 18 and 35 years of age who were nulliparous and had no pelvic floor dysfunction. PFM function was assessed based on digital palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, electromyographic activity, bilateral diameter of the bulbocavernosus muscles and the amount of bladder neck movement during voluntary PFM contraction using transperineal bi-dimensional ultrasound. The Pearson correlation was used for statistical analysis (p<0.05). There was a strong positive correlation between PFM function and PFM contraction pressure (0.90). In addition, there was a moderate positive correlation between these two variables and PFM electromyographic activity (0.59 and 0.63, respectively) and movement of the bladder neck in relation to the pubic symphysis (0.51 and 0.60, respectively). This study showed that there was a correlation between vaginal palpation, vaginal squeeze pressure, and electromyographic and ultrasonographic variables of the PFM in nulliparous women. The strong correlation between digital palpation and PFM contraction pressure indicated that perineometry could easily be replaced by PFM digital palpation in the absence of equipment.

  19. Functional anatomy and muscle moment arms of the pelvic limb of an elite sprinting athlete: the racing greyhound (Canis familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S B; Wilson, A M; Rhodes, L; Andrews, J; Payne, R C

    2008-01-01

    We provide quantitative anatomical data on the muscle–tendon architecture and geometry of the pelvic limb of an elite sprint athlete, the racing greyhound. Specifically, muscle masses, muscle lengths, fascicle lengths, pennation angles and muscle moment arms were measured. Maximum isometric force and power of muscles, the maximum muscle torque at joints and tendon stress and strain were estimated. We compare data with that published for a generalized breed of canid, and other cursorial mammals such as the horse and hare. The pelvic limb of the racing greyhound had a relatively large volume of hip extensor muscle, which is likely to be required for power production. Per unit body mass, some pelvic limb muscles were relatively larger than those in less specialized canines, and many hip extensor muscles had longer fascicle lengths. It was estimated that substantial extensor moments could be created about the tarsus and hip of the greyhound allowing high power output and potential for rapid acceleration. The racing greyhound hence possesses substantial specializations for enhanced sprint performance. PMID:18657259

  20. Core Muscle Activation in Suspension Training Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Cugliari, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A quantitative observational laboratory study was conducted to characterize and classify core training exercises executed in a suspension modality on the base of muscle activation. In a prospective single-group repeated measures design, seventeen active male participants performed four suspension exercises typically associated with core training (roll-out, bodysaw, pike and knee-tuck). Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from lower and upper parts of rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, lower and upper parts of erector spinae muscles using concentric bipolar electrodes. The average rectified values of electromyographic signals were normalized with respect to individual maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle. Roll-out exercise showed the highest activation of rectus abdominis and oblique muscles compared to the other exercises. The rectus abdominis and external oblique reached an activation higher than 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (or very close to that threshold, 55%) in roll-out and bodysaw exercises. Findings from this study allow the selection of suspension core training exercises on the basis of quantitative information about the activation of muscles of interest. Roll-out and bodysaw exercises can be considered as suitable for strength training of rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles. PMID:28469744

  1. Core Muscle Activation in Suspension Training Exercises.

    PubMed

    Cugliari, Giovanni; Boccia, Gennaro

    2017-02-01

    A quantitative observational laboratory study was conducted to characterize and classify core training exercises executed in a suspension modality on the base of muscle activation. In a prospective single-group repeated measures design, seventeen active male participants performed four suspension exercises typically associated with core training (roll-out, bodysaw, pike and knee-tuck). Surface electromyographic signals were recorded from lower and upper parts of rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, lower and upper parts of erector spinae muscles using concentric bipolar electrodes. The average rectified values of electromyographic signals were normalized with respect to individual maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle. Roll-out exercise showed the highest activation of rectus abdominis and oblique muscles compared to the other exercises. The rectus abdominis and external oblique reached an activation higher than 60% of the maximal voluntary contraction (or very close to that threshold, 55%) in roll-out and bodysaw exercises. Findings from this study allow the selection of suspension core training exercises on the basis of quantitative information about the activation of muscles of interest. Roll-out and bodysaw exercises can be considered as suitable for strength training of rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles.

  2. A 2-week elective experience provides comparable training as longitudinal exposure during residency for pelvic sonography.

    PubMed

    Jang, Timothy B; Kaji, Amy H

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of first-trimester pelvic sonography done by physicians after a 2-week emergency ultrasound elective to similarly numbered examinations done by physicians longitudinally over several years of residency training. We conducted a secondary analysis of a previously reported prospective study of pelvic sonography for symptomatic first-trimester pregnancy. The 21st through 40th examinations were compared between those who completed an emergency ultrasound elective and those who did not. The reference standard was pelvic sonography done by the department of radiology. Eighty-six examinations (34%) were done by 12 operators who did not participate in an emergency ultrasound elective, and 171 examinations (67%) were done by 13 operators who completed an emergency ultrasound elective. There was no statistical difference between the groups with regard to identifying an intrauterine pregnancy, molar pregnancy, ectopic pregnancy, or adnexal mass. The accuracy of pelvic sonography for first-trimester pregnancy was comparable between physicians who participated in a 2-week emergency ultrasound elective and those who performed the same number of examinations over a longer period during residency training. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. Pelvic floor muscle function in women with provoked vestibulodynia and asymptomatic controls.

    PubMed

    Næss, Ingrid; Bø, Kari

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess vaginal resting pressure (VRP), pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength and endurance, and surface EMG activity in women with and without provoked vestibulodynia (PVD). This was an assessor-masked comparison study including 70 women. Exclusion criteria were any previous pregnancy and presence of candida. Sensitivity of the vulvar vestibule was rated at three sites with Q-tip pressure measurement and a numerical rating scale for pain. VRP and PFM strength and endurance were measured with a high precision pressure transducer connected to a vaginal balloon. Pelvic floor muscle activity was measured with surface EMG. The independent samples t test was used to analyze differences between groups. The p value was set to <0.05 RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 24.3 years (SD 4.7) and mean body mass index (BMI) was 22.0 kg/m(2) (SD 2.6). Q-tip pressure measurement was significantly lower and pain more severe in the PVD group at all sites of the vulvar vestibule. The PVD group had significantly higher VRP: 20.6 cmH2O (SD 7.1) versus controls: 17.3 cmH2O (SD 4.4), p = 0.02. The PVD group had significantly lower muscle activity during a 10-s holding period; PVD: 465.2 μV (SD 218.4), controls: 591.1 μV (SD 277.7), p = 0.04. Young, nulliparous women with PVD had significantly higher VRP, but this finding was not confirmed by vaginal surface EMG.

  4. [Effects of Electric Stimulation and Biofeedback for Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercise in Women with Vaginal Rejuvenation Women].

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Bok; Choi, So Young

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pelvic floor muscle exercise using electric stimulation and biofeedback on maximum pressure of vaginal contraction, vaginal contraction duration and sexual function in women who have had vaginal rejuvenation. The research design was a non-equivalent control group non-synchronized design study. Participants in this study were women who had vaginal rejuvenation at C obstetrics and gynecology hospital. The 15 participants in the experimental group were given pelvic floor muscle exercise using electric stimulation and biofeedback and the 15 participants in the control group received self pelvic floor muscle exercise. For maximum pressure of vaginal contraction, the experimental group showed a statistically significant increase compared to than the control group (t=5.96, p<.001). For vaginal contraction duration, the experimental group also showed a statistically significant increase compared to the control group (t=3.23, p=.003). For women's sexual function, the experimental group showed a significant increase when compared to the control group in total sexual function scores (t=3.41, p=.002). The results indicate that pelvic floor muscle exercise with electric stimulation and biofeedback after vaginal rejuvenation is effective in strengthening vaginal contraction pressure, vaginal contraction and that it also positively functions to increase women's sexual function.

  5. Influence of parity, type of delivery, and physical activity level on pelvic floor muscles in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Varella, Larissa Ramalho Dantas; Torres, Vanessa Braga; Angelo, Priscylla Helouyse Melo; Eugênia de Oliveira, Maria Clara; Matias de Barros, Alef Cavalcanti; Viana, Elizabel de Souza Ramalho; Micussi, Maria Thereza de Albuquerque Barbosa Cabral

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of parity, type of delivery, and physical activity level on pelvic floor muscles in postmenopausal women. [Subjects and Methods] This was an observational analytic cross-sectional study with a sample of 100 postmenopausal women, aged between 45 and 65 years, divided into three groups according to menopausal stage: hysterectomized and early and late postmenopause. Patients were assessed for sociodemographic and gyneco-obstetric factors and subjected to a muscle strength test and perineometry. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and multiple regression were applied. [Results] The results showed homogeneity in sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics. There was no difference in pelvic floor muscle function among the three groups. Type of delivery, parity and physical activity level showed no influence on muscle function. [Conclusion] The findings demonstrate that parity, type of delivery, and physical activity level had no influence on pelvic floor muscle pressure in postmenopausal women. One hypothesis to explain these results is the fact that the decline in muscle function in postmenopausal women is related to the female aging process. PMID:27134366

  6. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Voet, Nicoline B M; van der Kooi, Elly L; Riphagen, Ingrid I; Lindeman, Eline; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Geurts, Alexander C H

    2013-07-09

    Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. This is an update of a review first published in 2004. To examine the safety and efficacy of strength training and aerobic exercise training in people with a muscle disease. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register (July 2012), CENTRAL (2012 Issue 3 of 4), MEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2012), EMBASE (January 1974 to July 2012), EMBASE Classic (1947 to 1973) and CINAHL (January 1982 to July 2012). Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing strength training or aerobic exercise programmes, or both, to no training, and lasting at least six weeks, in people with a well-described diagnosis of a muscle disease.We did not use the reporting of specific outcomes as a study selection criterion. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data obtained from the full text-articles and from the original investigators. We collected adverse event data from included studies. We included five trials (170 participants). The first trial compared the effect of strength training versus no training in 36 people with myotonic dystrophy. The second trial compared aerobic exercise training versus no training in 14 people with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. The third trial compared strength training versus no training in a factorial trial that also compared albuterol with placebo, in 65 people with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The fourth trial compared combined strength training and aerobic exercise versus no training in 18 people with mitochondrial myopathy. The fifth trial compared combined strength training and aerobic exercise versus no training in 35 people with myotonic dystrophy type 1.In both myotonic dystrophy trials and the dermatomyositis and polymyositis trial there were no significant differences

  7. FDG PET/CT images demonstrating Fournier gangrene with bilateral pelvic muscle extension in a patient with recurrent rectosigmoid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Tien; Kao, Pan-Fu; Huang, Chi-Chou; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Lee, Jong-Kang

    2014-01-01

    A 71-year-old male patient with Parkinsonism was referred for an F-FDG PET/CT scan for suspicious recurrence of rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma. The FDG PET/CT scan revealed increased FDG uptakes in the lower pelvic region around the wall of the rectal stump, with extension to the bilateral pelvic sidewalls and the right gluteous minimus muscle. In addition, multiple small air bubbles were noted in the lesions on the attenuation CT images. Fournier gangrene was diagnosed. After treatment with intravenous antibiotics and debridement with sigmoidoscopic irrigation, the patient was discharged and remained uneventful during clinical follow-up for 50 days.

  8. Experience with 32 Pelvic Fracture Urethral Defects Associated with Urethrorectal Fistulas: Transperineal Urethroplasty with Gracilis Muscle Interposition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hailin; Sa, Yinglong; Fu, Qiang; Jin, Chongrui; Wang, Lin

    2017-07-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral defects associated with urethrorectal fistulas are rare and difficult to repair. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of transperineal urethroplasty with gracilis muscle interposition for the repair of pelvic fracture urethral defects associated with urethrorectal fistulas. We identified 32 patients who underwent transperineal urethroplasty with gracilis muscle interposition to repair pelvic fracture urethral defects associated with urethrorectal fistulas. Patient demographics as well as preoperative, operative and postoperative data were obtained. Mean followup was 33 months (range 6 to 64). The overall success rate was 91% (29 of 32 cases). One-stage repair was successful in 17 of 18 patients (94%) using perineal anastomosis with separation of the corporeal body and in 12 of 14 (86%) using perineal anastomosis with inferior pubectomy and separation of the corporeal body. All 22 patients (100%) without a previous history of repair were successfully treated. However, only 7 of 10 patients (70%) with a previous history of failed urethroplasty and urethrorectal fistula repair were cured. Recurrent urethral strictures developed in 2 cases. One patient was treated successfully with optical internal urethrotomy and the other was treated successfully with tubed perineoscrotal flap urethroplasty. Recurrent urethrorectal fistulas associated with urethral strictures developed in an additional patient. Transperineal urethroplasty with gracilis muscle interposition is a safe and effective surgical procedure for most pelvic fracture urethral defects associated with urethrorectal fistulas. Several other factors may affect its postoperative efficiency. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain activity during bladder filling and pelvic floor muscle contractions: a study using functional magnetic resonance imaging and synchronous urodynamics.

    PubMed

    Krhut, Jan; Holy, Petr; Tintera, Jaroslav; Zachoval, Roman; Zvara, Peter

    2014-02-01

    To map the brain activity during bladder filling by functional magnetic resonance imaging using a refined scanning protocol including synchronous urodynamics and pelvic floor muscle contractions. A total of 23 healthy female volunteers (age 20-68 years) were enrolled. Participants were asked to contract their pelvic floor muscles. This was followed by a urodynamic examination consisting of repeated filling cycles. Brain activity was measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging using a 3T magnetic resonance system. Measurements of brain activity consisted of 120 functional scans during pelvic floor contractions and 210 scans during bladder filling. Each functional magnetic resonance imaging scan covered the brain with 35 slices. Statistical analyses used the general linear model and independent component analysis. Areas of activation were visualized using group statistics. The following main clusters of activation were observed during pelvic floor muscle contractions: medial surface of the frontal lobe (primary motor area), bilaterally; supplementary motor area, bilaterally; and left gyrus precentralis. During bladder filling, activation was detected in the inferior frontal lobe bordering the frontal cingulum, left gyrus parietalis superior, left central area, right insula, brainstem and thalamus with subcortical gray matter nuclei. Our work extends an existing functional magnetic resonance imaging protocol for researching the neural control of the lower urinary tract. The present results are consistent with the available literature and agree with the present hypothetical functional model of lower urinary tract neural control. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  10. Distensibility and Strength of the Pelvic Floor Muscles of Women in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Petricelli, Carla Dellabarba; Resende, Ana Paula Magalhães; Elito Júnior, Julio; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Alexandre, Sandra Maria; Zanetti, Miriam Raquel Diniz; Nakamura, Mary Uchiyama

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to compare the role of the pelvic floor muscles between nulliparous and multiparous women in the third trimester of pregnancy, by analyzing the relationship between electrical activity (surface electromyography—EMG), vaginal palpation (modified Oxford scale), and perineal distensibility (Epi-no). Methods. This was an observational cross-sectional study on a sample of 60 healthy pregnant women with no cervical dilation, single fetus, gestational age between 35 and 40 weeks, and maternal age ranging from 15 to 40 years. The methods used were bidigital palpation (modified Oxford scale, graded 0–5), surface EMG (electrical activity during maximal voluntary contraction), and perineal distensibility (Epi-no device). The Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was used to analyze the Epi-no values and the surface EMG findings. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the median values from surface EMG and Epi-no, using the modified Oxford scale scores. Results. Among the 60 patients included in this study, 30 were nulliparous and 30 multiparous. The average maternal age and gestational age were 26.06 (±5.58) and 36.56 (±1.23), respectively. It was observed that nulliparous women had both higher perineal muscle strength (2.53 ± 0.57 versus 2.06 ± 0.64; P = 0.005) and higher electrical activity (45.35 ± 12.24 μV versus 35.79 ± 11.66 μV; P = 0.003), while among the multiparous women, distensibility was higher (19.39 ± 1.92 versus 18.05 ± 2.14; P = 0.013). We observed that there was no correlation between perineal distensibility and electrical activity during maximal voluntary contraction (r = − 0.193; P = 0.140). However, we found a positive relationship between vaginal palpation and surface electromyography (P = 0.008), but none between Epi-no values (P = 0.785). Conclusion. The electrical activity and muscle strength of the pelvic floor muscles of the multiparous women were damaged, in relation to the

  11. Pregnancy-induced adaptations in the intrinsic structure of rat pelvic floor muscles

    PubMed Central

    Alperin, Marianna; Lawley, Danielle M.; Esparza, Mary C.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Maternal birth trauma to the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) is a major risk factor for pelvic floor disorders. Modeling and imaging studies suggest that demands placed on PFMs during childbirth exceed their physiologic limits; however many parous women do not sustain PFM injury. Here we determine whether pregnancy induces adaptations in PFM architecture, the strongest predictor of muscle function, and/or intramuscular extracellular matrix (ECM), responsible for load bearing. To establish if parallel changes occur in muscles outside of the PFM, we also examined a hind limb muscle. STUDY DESIGN Coccygeus, iliocaudalis, pubocaudalis, and tibialis anterior of 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley virgin, mid-pregnant, and late-pregnant; 6-month-old virgin; and 4- and 12-week postpartum rats (N = 10/group) were fixed in situ and harvested. Major architectural parameters determining muscle’s excursion and force-generating capacity were quantified, namely, normalized fiber length (Lfn), physiologic cross-sectional area, and sarcomere length. Hydroxyproline content was used as a surrogate for intramuscular ECM quantity. Analyses were performed by 2-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc testing at a significance level of .05. RESULTS Pregnancy induced a significant increase in Lfn in all PFMs by the end of gestation relative to virgin controls. Fibers were elongated by 37% in coccygeus (P < .0001), and by 21% in iliocaudalis and pubocaudalis (P < .0001). Importantly, no Lfn change was observed in the tibialis anterior. Physiologic cross-sectional area and sarcomere length were not affected by pregnancy. By 12 weeks’ postpartum, Lfn of all PFMs returned to the prepregnancy values. Relative to virgin controls, ECM increased by 140% in coccygeus, 52% in iliocaudalis, and 75% in pubocaudalis in late-pregnant group, but remained unchanged across time in the tibialis anterior. Postpartum, ECM collagen content returned to prepregnancy levels in iliocaudalis and pubocaudalis

  12. MUSCLE ACTIVATION PATTERNS DURING SUSPENSION TRAINING EXERCISES

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Sean; Ruffin, Elise; Brewer, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Background Suspension training (ST) has been utilized over exercises performed on a stable surface to train multiple muscle groups simultaneously to increase muscle activation and joint stability. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether ST augments muscle activation compared to similar exercises performed on a stable surface. Study Design Cross-sectional study Methods Twenty-five healthy adults (male: 16; women: 9; BMI: 23.50 ± 2.48 kg/m2) had 16 pre-amplified wireless surface EMG electrodes placed bilaterally on: the pectoralis major (PM), middle deltoid (MD), serratus anterior (SA), obliques (OB), rectus abdominis (RA), gluteus maximus (GM), erector spinae (ES), and middle trapezius/rhomboids (MT). Each participant performed reference isometric exercises (Sorensen test, push-up, sit-up, and inverted row) to establish a baseline muscle contraction. Muscle activation was assessed during the following exercises: ST bridge, ST push-up, ST inverted row, ST plank, floor bridge, floor push-up, floor row, and floor plank. The root mean square (RMS) of each side for every muscle was averaged for data analysis. Multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA) for each exercise with post-hoc comparisons were performed to compare muscle activation between each ST exercise and its stable surface counterpart. Results MANOVAs for all exercise comparisons showed statistically significant greater muscle activation in at least one muscle group during the ST condition. Post-hoc analyses revealed a statistically significant increase in muscle activation for the following muscles during the plank: OB (p = 0.021); Push-up: PM (p = 0.002), RA (p<0.0001), OB (p = 0.019), MT (p<0.0001), and ES (p = 0.006); Row: MD (p = 0.016), RA (p = 0.059), and OB (p = 0.027); and Bridge: RA (p = 0.013) and ES (p<0.0001). Conclusions Performing ST exercises increases muscle activation of selected muscles when compared to exercises performed on a stable surface. Level of

  13. MUSCLE ACTIVATION PATTERNS DURING SUSPENSION TRAINING EXERCISES.

    PubMed

    Harris, Sean; Ruffin, Elise; Brewer, Wayne; Ortiz, Alexis

    2017-02-01

    Suspension training (ST) has been utilized over exercises performed on a stable surface to train multiple muscle groups simultaneously to increase muscle activation and joint stability. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ST augments muscle activation compared to similar exercises performed on a stable surface. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-five healthy adults (male: 16; women: 9; BMI: 23.50 ± 2.48 kg/m(2)) had 16 pre-amplified wireless surface EMG electrodes placed bilaterally on: the pectoralis major (PM), middle deltoid (MD), serratus anterior (SA), obliques (OB), rectus abdominis (RA), gluteus maximus (GM), erector spinae (ES), and middle trapezius/rhomboids (MT). Each participant performed reference isometric exercises (Sorensen test, push-up, sit-up, and inverted row) to establish a baseline muscle contraction. Muscle activation was assessed during the following exercises: ST bridge, ST push-up, ST inverted row, ST plank, floor bridge, floor push-up, floor row, and floor plank. The root mean square (RMS) of each side for every muscle was averaged for data analysis. Multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA) for each exercise with post-hoc comparisons were performed to compare muscle activation between each ST exercise and its stable surface counterpart. MANOVAs for all exercise comparisons showed statistically significant greater muscle activation in at least one muscle group during the ST condition. Post-hoc analyses revealed a statistically significant increase in muscle activation for the following muscles during the plank: OB (p = 0.021); Push-up: PM (p = 0.002), RA (p<0.0001), OB (p = 0.019), MT (p<0.0001), and ES (p = 0.006); Row: MD (p = 0.016), RA (p = 0.059), and OB (p = 0.027); and Bridge: RA (p = 0.013) and ES (p<0.0001). Performing ST exercises increases muscle activation of selected muscles when compared to exercises performed on a stable surface. 1b.

  14. A new concept of the anatomy of the anal sphincter mechanism and the physiology of defecation: mass contraction of the pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    Shafik, A

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated both anatomically and physiologically that the external anal (EAS) and urethral (EUS) sphincters and the bulbocavernosus muscle (BC) originate from the puborectalis muscle (PR). It is hypothesized that stimulation of any of these muscles would lead to contraction of all the others. Because the levator ani (pubococcygeus) muscle (LA) also has the same innervation as the above-mentioned muscles, it is further suggested that it, too, contracts reflexly upon stimulation of any of those muscles. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis. The study comprised 18 healthy volunteers (mean age 36.6 +/- 8.4 years; 10 men, 8 women). The EAS was stimulated and the response of the EUS, PR, LA and BC was determined. Each muscle was thereafter stimulated separately and the response of the other pelvic floor muscles registered. Stimulation of any of the pelvic floor muscles effected an increased EMG activity of the rest of the muscles. The muscle contraction was instantaneous with no latency in all the muscles except the LA EMG activity, which showed a mean latency of 21.3 +/- 6.6 ms. The pelvic floor muscles' response seems to be attributable to muscle stimulation both directly and indirectly through activation of pudendal nerve fibers in the muscles. The study demonstrated that the pelvic floor muscles behave as one muscle: they contract or relax en masse. This 'mass contraction' might explain some of the physiologic phenomena that occur during pelvic organ evacuation. However, besides this mass contraction, a voluntary 'selective' individual muscle activity exists by which each individual muscle acts independently of the others.

  15. Effects of Combined Spinal-Epidural Analgesia during Labor on Postpartum Electrophysiological Function of Maternal Pelvic Floor Muscle: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiao-Ming; Huang, Li; Lao, Cheng-Yi; Yang, Mei; Gao, Shan; Huang, Qiong-Yan; Yang, Wei; Zhu, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Di-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective Combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) is sometimes used for difficult births, but whether it contributes to postpartum pelvic muscle disorder is unclear. This randomized controlled trial examined whether CSEA given during labor affects the electrophysiological index of postpartum pelvic floor muscle function. Methods A consecutive sample of primiparous women who delivered vaginally at term were randomly assigned to a CSEA group (n = 143) and control group (n = 142) between June 2013 and June 2014. All were assessed 6–8 weeks later for electrophysiological function of pelvic floor muscle. Results The two groups were similar in the degree of muscle strength, muscle fatigue, and pelvic dynamic pressure of pelvic floor muscle. The CSEA and control groups showed similar proportions of women with normal muscle strength (score ≥4) in type I pelvic fibers (23.1% vs. 14.1%, P = 0.051) and type II pelvic fibers (28.0% vs. 24.6%, P = 0.524). The groups also contained similar proportions of women who showed no fatigue in type I fibers (54.5% vs. 48.6%, P = 0.315) or type II fibers (88.8% vs. 87.3%, P = 0.699). Similarly low proportions of women in the CSEA group and control group showed normal pelvic dynamic pressure (11.2% vs. 7.7%, P = 0.321). However, women in the CSEA group spent significantly less time in labor than those in the control group (7.25 vs. 9.52 h, P <0.001). Conclusions CSEA did not affect the risk of postpartum pelvic muscle disorder in this cohort of primiparous women who gave birth vaginally. A significant shorter duration of labour was observed in the CSEA-group. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02334150 PMID:26340002

  16. Effects of Combined Spinal-Epidural Analgesia during Labor on Postpartum Electrophysiological Function of Maternal Pelvic Floor Muscle: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ji-Juan; Liu, Xiu-Fen; Xiong, Xiao-Ming; Huang, Li; Lao, Cheng-Yi; Yang, Mei; Gao, Shan; Huang, Qiong-Yan; Yang, Wei; Zhu, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Di-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) is sometimes used for difficult births, but whether it contributes to postpartum pelvic muscle disorder is unclear. This randomized controlled trial examined whether CSEA given during labor affects the electrophysiological index of postpartum pelvic floor muscle function. A consecutive sample of primiparous women who delivered vaginally at term were randomly assigned to a CSEA group (n = 143) and control group (n = 142) between June 2013 and June 2014. All were assessed 6-8 weeks later for electrophysiological function of pelvic floor muscle. The two groups were similar in the degree of muscle strength, muscle fatigue, and pelvic dynamic pressure of pelvic floor muscle. The CSEA and control groups showed similar proportions of women with normal muscle strength (score ≥4) in type I pelvic fibers (23.1% vs. 14.1%, P = 0.051) and type II pelvic fibers (28.0% vs. 24.6%, P = 0.524). The groups also contained similar proportions of women who showed no fatigue in type I fibers (54.5% vs. 48.6%, P = 0.315) or type II fibers (88.8% vs. 87.3%, P = 0.699). Similarly low proportions of women in the CSEA group and control group showed normal pelvic dynamic pressure (11.2% vs. 7.7%, P = 0.321). However, women in the CSEA group spent significantly less time in labor than those in the control group (7.25 vs. 9.52 h, P <0.001). CSEA did not affect the risk of postpartum pelvic muscle disorder in this cohort of primiparous women who gave birth vaginally. A significant shorter duration of labour was observed in the CSEA-group. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02334150.

  17. Pelvic Support Problems

    MedlinePlus

    The pelvic floor is a group of muscles and other tissues that form a sling or hammock across the pelvis. ... place so that they can work properly. The pelvic floor can become weak or be injured. The main ...

  18. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and layers of connective tissue, which are called fascia, become weakened, stretched, or are torn the pelvic ... delivery) can cause injury to the muscles or fascia of the pelvic floor. The increased pressure of ...

  19. Can I prevent Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... That Answers to FAQs Learn the Terms Glossary Pelvic Floor Dialogues Printable PDFs on PFDs Patient Fact Sheets ... or retrain the nerves and muscles of the pelvic floor. Regular daily exercising of the pelvic muscles can ...

  20. Effects of external pelvic compression on isokinetic strength of the thigh muscles in sportsmen with and without hamstring injuries.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Ashokan; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Woodley, Stephanie; Sole, Gisela

    2015-05-01

    To investigate whether application of a pelvic compression belt affects isokinetic strength of the thigh muscles in sportsmen with and without hamstring injuries. Randomized crossover, cross-sectional. Twenty sportsmen (age 22.0±1.5 years) with hamstring injuries (hamstring-injured group) and 29 (age 23.5±1.5 years) without hamstring injuries (control group) underwent isokinetic testing of the thigh muscles. Testing included five reciprocal concentric quadriceps and hamstring contractions, and five eccentric hamstring contractions at an angular velocity of 60°/s, with and without a pelvic compression belt in randomized order. The outcome measures were average torque normalized to bodyweight for terminal range eccentric hamstring contractions and peak torque normalized to bodyweight for concentric quadriceps, concentric hamstring and eccentric hamstring contractions. There was a significant increase in normalized average torque of eccentric hamstring contractions in the terminal range for both groups (p≤0.044) and normalized peak torque of eccentric hamstring contractions for injured hamstrings (p=0.025) while wearing the pelvic compression belt. No significant changes were found for other torque variables. Injured hamstrings were weaker than the contralateral uninjured hamstrings during terminal range eccentric hamstring (p=0.040), and concentric hamstring (p=0.020) contractions recorded without the pelvic compression belt. However, no between-group differences were found for any of the investigated variables. Wearing the pelvic compression belt appears to have a facilitatory effect on terminal range eccentric hamstring strength in sportsmen with and without hamstring injuries. Future investigations should ascertain whether there is a role for using a pelvic compression belt for rehabilitation of hamstring injuries. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of surgical training on the performance of proposed quality measures for hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Adams-Piper, Emily R; Guaderrama, Noelani M; Chen, Qiaoling; Whitcomb, Emily L

    2017-06-01

    Recent healthcare reform has led to increased emphasis on standardized provision of quality care. Use of government- and organization-approved quality measures is 1 way to document quality care. Quality measures, to improve care and aid in reimbursement, are being proposed and vetted in many areas of medicine. We aimed to assess performance of proposed quality measures that pertain to hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse stratified by surgical training. The 4 quality measures that we assessed were (1) the documentation of offering conservative treatment of pelvic organ prolapse, (2) the quantitative assessment of pelvic organ prolapse (Pelvic Organ Prolapse-Quantification or Baden-Walker), (3) the performance of an apical support procedure, and (4) the performance of cystoscopy at time of hysterectomy. Patients who underwent hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse from January 1 to December 31, 2008, within a large healthcare maintenance organization were identified by diagnostic and procedural codes within the electronic medical record. Medical records were reviewed extensively for demographic and clinical data that included the performance of the 4 proposed quality measures and the training background of the primary surgeon (gynecologic generalist, fellowship-trained surgeon in Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, and "grandfathered" Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery). Data were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics. Inferential statistics with chi-squared tests were used to compare performance rates of quality measures that were stratified by surgical training. Probability values <.05 were considered statistically significant. Six hundred thirty patients who underwent hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse in 2008 had complete records available for analysis. Fellowship-trained surgeons performed 302 hysterectomies for pelvic organ prolapse; grandfathered Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery surgeons performed

  2. Impact of different body positions on bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles in nulliparous continent women.

    PubMed

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Sobota, Grzegorz; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Błaszczak, Edward; Taradaj, Jakub; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    We examined pelvic floor muscles (PFM) activity (%MVC) in twenty nulliparous women by body position during exercise as well as the activation of abdominal muscles and the gluteus maximus during voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Activation of transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, and gluteus maximus during voluntary PFM contractions was also assessed. Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P < 0.00024) and lying and ball-sitting positions (P < 0.0053). Average peak, average time before peak, and average time after peak did not differ significantly during the voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Baseline PFM activity seemed to depend on the body position and was the highest in standing. Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women. Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs.

  3. Impact of Different Body Positions on Bioelectrical Activity of the Pelvic Floor Muscles in Nulliparous Continent Women

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewska, Daria; Stania, Magdalena; Sobota, Grzegorz; Kwaśna, Krystyna; Błaszczak, Edward; Taradaj, Jakub; Juras, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    We examined pelvic floor muscles (PFM) activity (%MVC) in twenty nulliparous women by body position during exercise as well as the activation of abdominal muscles and the gluteus maximus during voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Pelvic floor muscle activity was recorded using a vaginal probe during five experimental trials. Activation of transversus abdominis, rectus abdominis, and gluteus maximus during voluntary PFM contractions was also assessed. Significant differences in mean normalized amplitudes of baseline PFM activity were revealed between standing and lying (P < 0.00024) and lying and ball-sitting positions (P < 0.0053). Average peak, average time before peak, and average time after peak did not differ significantly during the voluntary contractions of the PFMs. Baseline PFM activity seemed to depend on the body position and was the highest in standing. Pelvic floor muscles activity during voluntary contractions did not differ by position in continent women. Statistically significant differences between the supine lying and sitting positions were only observed during a sustained 60-second contraction of the PFMs. PMID:25793212

  4. Physical Therapy in the Management of Pelvic Floor Muscles Hypertonia in a Woman with Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Aline Moreira; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge; Cristine Lemes Mateus-Vasconcelos, Elaine; Moroni, Rafael Mendes; Brito, Luciane Maria Oliveira; Brito, Luiz Gustavo Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pelvic floor (PF) hypertonic disorders are a group of conditions that present with muscular hypertonia or spasticity, resulting in a diminished capacity to isolate, contract, and relax the PF. Their presentation includes voiding and sexual dysfunctions, pelvic pain, and constipation. Various factors are associated, such as complicated vaginal birth, muscular injury, scar tissue formation, and neuropathies. Study Design. The case of a single patient will be presented, together with the management strategies employed. Case Description. A woman with hereditary spastic paraparesis and a history of muscle spasticity and urinary and fecal complaints since childhood. She presented to this institution seeking treatment for pelvic pain, pain during intercourse, constipation, and micturition problems. A physical therapy protocol was developed, with the trial of several treatment modalities. Outcome. After some failed attempts, perineal and pelvic floor stretching proved to be very efficacious therapies for this patient's complaint, leading to improved pain during intercourse, constipation, pelvic pain, and urinary stream. Discussion. PF spasticity can lead to severe disability and interfere with daily basic functions, such as micturition and evacuation. Physical therapy plays an essential role in the management of these patients and can lead to significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:25478261

  5. Pre- and postoperative evaluation of pelvic floor muscle function in POP patients using surface electromyography and digital palpation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinliang; Gong, Yao; Wu, Dan; Li, Xiaocui; Li, Huaifang; Tong, Xiaowen; Cheng, Weiwei

    2014-04-01

    The study aims to evaluate the pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) pre- and postoperatively using digital palpation and surface electromyography. In this non-randomized prospective study, two groups of patients were recruited for assessment. The surgical group included 74 POP patients receiving the modified pelvic reconstructive surgery and the control group consisted of 30 non-POP patients. One physiotherapist conducted the digital palpation and SEMG evaluation. The scale of PFM strength, the duration and voltage of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) as well as numbers and voltage of short, fast contractions (SFC) by SEMG were documented and compared in both groups. For statistical analysis, t-test, Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon test were used with a significant level 0.05. A total of 68 POP patients finished the two follow-ups. Sixty-four patients were objectively cured with a 94.1% cure rate. Mesh erosions happened in three patients (4.8%). By digital palpation, the PFM strength increased significantly in POP patients after surgery but still lower than non-POP patients (P<0.001). By SEMG, the electrical activity of PFM increased significantly in the surgical group postoperatively (P 0.001). The PFM function was improved 3 months after the modified pelvic reconstructive surgery in POP patients based on digital palpation and SEMG. The evaluation of PFM function should be included in the overall assessment of pelvic reconstructive surgeries. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Association between the Functionality of Pelvic Floor Muscles and Sexual Satisfaction in Young Women.

    PubMed

    Darski, Caroline; Barbosa, Lia Janaina Ferla; Paiva, Luciana Laureano; Vieira, Adriane

    2016-04-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to associate the results obtained while assessing the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) functionality with the score of sexual satisfaction of young adult women. Methods This is an observational and cross-sectional study. The inclusion criteria were women aged between 20 and 40 years who have had sexual intercourse, nulliparous, BMI lower than 25 kg/m(2), and absence of pelvic floor dysfunction. The evaluation consisted of both the medical history and assessment of the PFM functionality using the Perina pressure biofeedback and Oxford Scale. We measured sexual satisfaction using the Female Sexual Quotient questionnaire and used the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to verify the normality of the data. We analyzed non-parametric variables using the Spearman correlation test. The significance level was 5%. Results A total of 80 women with a median age of 26 years and median BMI of 21.64 kg/m(2) participated in this study. We divided the subjects into two groups, best and worse PFM functionality, according to median Perina pressure biofeedback and Oxford scale. We found no difference between the groups when comparing the sexual satisfaction scores. There was only a slight significant correlation between the Contraction Voluntary Average obtained using the pressure biofeedback and the primary domain (r = 0.27; p = 0.01). Conclusion This study found a slight correlation between PFM functionality and the functionality of the primary domain of the Female Sexual Quotient questionnaire. Therefore, it is not possible to state whether there is an association between the PFM functionality and female sexual satisfaction in young adults.

  7. Intra and inter-rater reliability study of pelvic floor muscle dynamometric measurements

    PubMed Central

    Martinho, Natalia M.; Marques, Joseane; Silva, Valéria R.; Silva, Silvia L. A.; Carvalho, Leonardo C.; Botelho, Simone

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intra and inter-rater reliability of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dynamometric measurements for maximum and average strengths, as well as endurance. METHOD: A convenience sample of 18 nulliparous women, without any urogynecological complaints, aged between 19 and 31 (mean age of 25.4±3.9) participated in this study. They were evaluated using a pelvic floor dynamometer based on load cell technology. The dynamometric evaluations were repeated in three successive sessions: two on the same day with a rest period of 30 minutes between them, and the third on the following day. All participants were evaluated twice in each session; first by examiner 1 followed by examiner 2. The vaginal dynamometry data were analyzed using three parameters: maximum strength, average strength, and endurance. The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) was applied to estimate the PFM dynamometric measurement reliability, considering a good level as being above 0.75. RESULTS: The intra and inter-raters' analyses showed good reliability for maximum strength (ICCintra-rater1=0.96, ICCintra-rater2=0.95, and ICCinter-rater=0.96), average strength (ICCintra-rater1=0.96, ICCintra-rater2=0.94, and ICCinter-rater=0.97), and endurance (ICCintra-rater1=0.88, ICCintra-rater2=0.86, and ICCinter-rater=0.92) dynamometric measurements. CONCLUSIONS: The PFM dynamometric measurements showed good intra- and inter-rater reliability for maximum strength, average strength and endurance, which demonstrates that this is a reliable device that can be used in clinical practice. PMID:25993624

  8. A new device for simultaneous measurement of pelvic floor muscle activity and vaginal blood flow: a test in a nonclinical sample.

    PubMed

    Both, Stephanie; van Lunsen, Rik; Weijenborg, Philomeen; Laan, Ellen

    2012-11-01

    Dyspareunia in women, defined as persistent or recurrent genital pain associated with sexual intercourse, is hypothesized to be related to (fear associated) pelvic floor hyperactivity and to diminished sexual arousal. Psychophysiological research to support these hypotheses is scarce and concentrates mostly on the role of either pelvic floor activity or sexual arousal. To investigate both factors, a measurement device that enables simultaneous assessment of pelvic floor muscle activity and genital sexual arousal would be most optimal. The aim of this study was to test a new vaginal device0-a vaginal photoplethysmograph with build-in surface electromyography (EMG)--that allows simultaneous assessment of pelvic floor muscle activity and vaginal blood flow. Genital arousal measured as vaginal pulse amplitude (VPA) and vaginal surface EMG. Thirty-six sexually functional women participated. To investigate the sensitivity of the device for changes in genital blood flow and involuntary changes in pelvic floor activity, VPA and vaginal surface EMG were monitored during exposure to sexual and anxiety-evoking film clips. In addition, vaginal surface EMG was monitored during voluntary flick and hold contractions. VPA increased in response to the sexual film, and EMG values were significantly higher in response to the anxiety-evoking film. Higher EMG values in response to the anxiety film were associated with lower VPA. EMG during the instructed 3-second hold pelvic floor contractions showed, as expected, higher values during pelvic floor contractions with support of surrounding muscle groups, compared with pelvic floor muscles alone. The device is sensitive to changes in vaginal blood flow in response to sexual stimuli, and it is able to pick up small, involuntary changes in pelvic floor activity associated with anxiety. Also, the device is able to record changes in pelvic floor activity during voluntary pelvic floor contractions. This new device will be a valuable tool in

  9. Low impact weight-bearing exercise in an upright posture increases the activation of two key local muscles of the lumbo-pelvic region.

    PubMed

    Debuse, Dorothée; Birch, Olivia; St Clair Gibson, Alan; Caplan, Nick

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of exercises have been used to improve the function of the lumbar multifidus (LM) and transversus abdominis (TrA) muscles in people with low back pain, but uncertainty remains as to what exactly constitutes meaningful LM and TrA training. We examined the effects of exercising with a new device which combines weight-bearing, an unstable base of support (BOS) (feet), an upright posture with a relatively stable lumbo-pelvic area, and functional lower limb movement, with the aim of exploring which of these elements may be effective, in increasing LM and TrA muscle activity. Twelve non-symptomatic participants had ultrasound images taken of their LM and TrA during a range of conditions, including rest, traditional exercise approaches to LM and TrA recruitment, and exercising on the new device. Our results indicate that an unstable BOS on its own is not enough to increase LM and TrA activity, and that a combination of weight-bearing, an unstable BOS (feet), an upright posture with a relatively stable lumbo-pelvic area, and functional lower limb movement is most effective at increasing LM and TrA activity. This way of exercising appears to recruit LM more effectively than the widely used "swelling" of LM, and to cause automatic TrA and LM recruitment. Importantly, our findings also indicate LM and TrA may have slightly different roles during trunk stabilisation.

  10. Clarification and Confirmation of the Effect of Volitional Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction to Preempt Urine Loss (The Knack Maneuver) in Stress Incontinent Women

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Janis M.; Sampselle, Carolyn M.; Ashton-Miller, James A; Hong, Gwi-Ryung Son; DeLancey, John O.L.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the immediate effect of timing a pelvic muscle contraction with the moment of expected leakage (the Knack maneuver) to preempt cough-related stress incontinence. Women performed a standing stress test using three hard coughs without and then with the Knack maneuver. Volume of urine loss under both conditions was quantified with paper-towel test. Two groups of women were tested: nonpregnant women (n=64) and pregnant women (n=29). In nonpregnant women, wetted area decreased from a median (range) of 43.2 (0.2−183.7) cm2 without the Knack maneuver to 6.9 (range of 0 to 183.7 cm2) with it (p<0.0001); while in pregnant women it decreased from 14.8 (0−169.7) cm2 to 0 (0−96.5) cm2, respectively (p=0.001). This study confirms the effect from the Knack maneuver as immediate and provides a partial explanation for early response to widely applied pelvic muscle training regimens in women with stress incontinence. PMID:18204797

  11. Functional subdivision of fin protractor and retractor muscles underlies pelvic fin walking in the African lungfish Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Brett R; King, Heather M; Hale, Melina E

    2014-10-01

    African lungfish Protopterus annectens can produce rotational movements around the joint between the pelvis and the pelvic fin, allowing these animals to walk across benthic substrates. In tetrapods, limb rotation at the hip joint is a common feature of substrate-based locomotion. For sprawling tetrapods, rotation can involve nine or more muscles, which are often robust and span multiple joints. In contrast, P. annectens uses a modest morphology of two fan-shaped muscles, the pelvic fin protractor and retractor, to accomplish this movement. We hypothesized that functional subdivision, coupled with their broad insertions on the femur, allows each of these muscles to pull on the limb from multiple directions and provides a mechanism for fin rotation. To test this hypothesis, we examined the muscle activity at three locations in both the protractor and the retractor muscles during walking. Electromyograms show differences in the timing of muscle activation between dorsal and ventral regions of each muscle, suggesting that each muscle is functionally subdivided once. The subdivisions demonstrate sequential onsets of muscle activity and overlap of activity between regions, which are also features of limb control in tetrapods. These data indicate that subdivisions of protractor and retractor muscles impart functional complexity to a morphologically simple system, and suggest a mechanism that allows lungfish to produce a tetrapod-like walking gait with only two muscles. As one of few extant sarcopterygian fishes, P. annectens may provide important functional data to inform interpretation of limb movement of fossil relatives. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Sagittal Spinal and Pelvic Postures of Highly-Trained Young Canoeists

    PubMed Central

    López-Miñarro, Pedro A.; Muyor, José M.; Alacid, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the sagittal spinal curvatures and pelvic position in standing and kneeling in the canoe in young canoeists. Forty-four young highly-trained canoeists (mean age: 15.11 ± 0.61 years) were recruited. Thoracic and lumbar curvatures and pelvic inclination were evaluated with a Spinal Mouse system in standing position and in the base position (kneeling on one knee in the canoe) and catch phase of the stroke. The mean thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis and pelvic inclination in standing were 44.66 ± 8.80º, −30.34 ± 8.31º, and 14.20 ± 7.32º, respectively. In the canoe, the thoracic, lumbar and pelvic angles were 39.66 ± 9.52º, −24.32 ± 6.79º, and 15.18 ± 4.34º, respectively, for the base position (p<0.001 with respect to standing, except for pelvic inclination), and 28.93 ± 10.45º, −13.45 ± 10.60º, and 37.61 ± 6.27º, respectively, for the catch phase of the stroke (p<0.001 with respect to standing and base position). A higher percentage of hyperkyphotic postures in standing than in the canoe was found, while thoracic hypokyphosis increased in the catch phase of the stroke. In regards to the lumbar curve, the percentage of hypolordosis postures in the base position was higher than when standing. Lumbar kyphotic postures were detected in the catch phase of the stroke. In conclusion, the standing thoracic hyperkyphosis in young canoeists may be related to factors other than the posture and movement in the canoe. The canoeists adopted a lumbar flexed posture at the catch phase of the stroke, although this position may not affect the sagittal configuration of lumbar spine in standing. Postural training should be included in the training program of canoeists to improve the thoracic posture in the standing position. PMID:23487014

  13. The effect of lumbar-pelvic alignment and abdominal muscle thickness on primary dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon-Jeong; Baek, Il-Hun; Goo, Bong-Oh

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify effects of malalignment of the lumbar pelvis, as a passive element, and the thicknesses of abdominal muscles, as active elements, on primary dysmenorrhea. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were divided into a primary dysmenorrhea group and normal group according to Visual Analogue Scale, and ultimately there were 28 subjects in the dysmenorrhea group and 22 subjects in the normal group. Alignment of the lumbar pelvis was measured by using a Formetric 4D analysis system, and the thicknesses of abdominal muscles were measured by using ultrasound imaging. [Result] Scoliosis was 6.7 ± 4.3° in the primary dysmenorrhea group and 3.8 ± 2.0° in the normal group, and the lordotic angles of the two groups were 0.6 ± 0.5° and 0.1 ± 0.3°, respectively. The thickness of the internal oblique was 3.8 ± 1.3 mm in the primary dysmenorrhea group and 6.0 ± 1.9 mm in the thicknesses of the transverse abdominis in the two groups were 2.6 ± 6.8 mm and 3.5 ± 6.1 mm, respectively. Furthermore, the thickness of the normal group, and the external oblique was 4.0 ± 0.8 mm in the primary dysmenorrhea group and 5.4 ± 1.4 mm in the normal group. [Conclusion] This study showed significant differences between the primary dysmenorrhea group and the normal group in lumbar-pelvic alignment and thicknesses of abdominal muscles.

  14. The effect of lumbar-pelvic alignment and abdominal muscle thickness on primary dysmenorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-jeong; Baek, Il-hun; Goo, Bong-oh

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify effects of malalignment of the lumbar pelvis, as a passive element, and the thicknesses of abdominal muscles, as active elements, on primary dysmenorrhea. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were divided into a primary dysmenorrhea group and normal group according to Visual Analogue Scale, and ultimately there were 28 subjects in the dysmenorrhea group and 22 subjects in the normal group. Alignment of the lumbar pelvis was measured by using a Formetric 4D analysis system, and the thicknesses of abdominal muscles were measured by using ultrasound imaging. [Result] Scoliosis was 6.7 ± 4.3° in the primary dysmenorrhea group and 3.8 ± 2.0° in the normal group, and the lordotic angles of the two groups were 0.6 ± 0.5° and 0.1 ± 0.3°, respectively. The thickness of the internal oblique was 3.8 ± 1.3 mm in the primary dysmenorrhea group and 6.0 ± 1.9 mm in the thicknesses of the transverse abdominis in the two groups were 2.6 ± 6.8 mm and 3.5 ± 6.1 mm, respectively. Furthermore, the thickness of the normal group, and the external oblique was 4.0 ± 0.8 mm in the primary dysmenorrhea group and 5.4 ± 1.4 mm in the normal group. [Conclusion] This study showed significant differences between the primary dysmenorrhea group and the normal group in lumbar-pelvic alignment and thicknesses of abdominal muscles. PMID:27821975

  15. Pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women according to the delivery type: cross-sectional study 1

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Edilaine de Paula Batista; de Oliveira, Sonia Maria Junqueira Vasconcellos; Caroci, Adriana de Souza; Francisco, Adriana Amorim; Oliveira, Sheyla Guimaraes; da Silva, Renata Luana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, related to the socio-demographic characteristics, nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal exercise in pregnancy, perineal condition and weight of the newborn. Methods: this was a cross-sectional study conducted after 50 - 70 postpartum days, with 24 primiparous women who underwent cesarean delivery and 72 who had a normal birth. The 9301 PeritronTM was used for analysis of muscle strength. The mean muscle strength was compared between the groups by two-way analysis of variance. Results: the pelvic floor muscle strength was 24.0 cmH2O (±16.2) and 25.4 cmH2O (±14.7) in postpartum primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, respectively, with no significant difference. The muscular strength was greater in postpartum women with ≥ 12 years of study (42.0 ±26.3 versus 14.6 ±7.7 cmH2O; p= 0.036) and in those who performed perineal exercises (42.6±25.4 11.8±4.9 vs. cmH2O; p = 0.010), compared to caesarean. There was no difference in muscle strength according to delivery type regarding nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal condition or newborn weight. Conclusion: pelvic floor muscle strength does not differ between primiparous women based on the type of delivery. Postpartum women with normal births, with higher education who performed perineal exercise during pregnancy showed greater muscle strength. PMID:27533267

  16. The effects of Pilates method on pelvic floor muscle strength in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cíntia S; Pedriali, Fabiana R; Urbano, Mariana R; Moreira, Eliane H; Averbeck, Marcio A; Almeida, Silvio Henrique M

    2017-05-02

    To assess the effects of a Pilates exercise program compared to conventional pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) protocol on pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. Patients were randomized into three treatment groups (G1: Pilates, G2: electrical stimulation combined with PFMT, and G3: control group). Duration of therapy was 10 weeks. Baseline assessment included the 24 h pad-test and the ICI-Q questionnaire. PFMS was measured using a manometric perineometry device at baseline and 4 months after radical prostatectomy (RP). The level of significance was P < 0.05. One hundred twenty three patients were randomized and 104 patients completed the study protocol (G1: n = 34; G2: n = 35; G3: n = 35). Post-treatment assessment showed statistically significant improvements in maximum strength in G2, increased endurance in G1 and G2, and increment of muscle power in all three groups (P < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in the mean changes of maximum strength, endurance, and muscle power between groups after treatment (P > 0.05). G1 and G2 achieved a higher number of fully continent patients than G3 (P < 0.05). At the end of treatment, 59% of patients in G1, 54% in G2, and 26% in G3 were continent (no pads/day). Improvements in PFMS parameters were distinct among active treatment groups versus controls, but did not predict recovery of urinary continence at final assessment. The Pilates method promoted similar outcomes in the proportion of fully continent patients when compared to conventional PFMT 4 months after RP. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Simultaneous measurement of pelvic floor muscle activity and vaginal blood flow: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Both, Stephanie; Laan, Ellen

    2007-05-01

    Dyspareunia, defined as persistent or recurrent genital pain associated with sexual intercourse, is hypothesized to be related to pelvic floor hyperactivity and to diminished sexual arousal. Empirical research to support these hypotheses is scarce and concentrates mostly on the role of either pelvic floor activity or genital arousal in female dyspareunia. Currently, however, there is no measurement device to assess pelvic floor activity and genital response simultaneously. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of a new device that enables simultaneous measurement of pelvic floor activity and genital response in women. Genital arousal measured as vaginal pulse amplitude, and vaginal surface electromyogram (EMG). Thirty sexually functional women participated. To investigate the accuracy of genital response measurement with the adapted photoplethysmograph, and the sensitivity of the device for involuntary changes in pelvic floor activity, vaginal pulse amplitude and vaginal surface EMG were monitored during exposure to emotional, including erotic, films. In addition, vaginal surface EMG was monitored during instructed pelvic floor contractions. The genital data obtained during emotional films proved accurate measurement of genital response. EMG values during the emotional films indicated limited sensitivity of the device for small, involuntary changes in pelvic floor activity due to emotional state. The EMG measurements during the instructed pelvic floor contractions proved sensitivity of the new probe to voluntary pelvic floor activity. It is concluded that following improvement of the sensitivity of the EMG measurement for small, involuntary changes in pelvic floor activity, the device will be a valuable tool in research on superficial dyspareunia.

  18. Pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women according to the delivery type: cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Edilaine de Paula Batista; Oliveira, Sonia Maria Junqueira Vasconcellos de; Caroci, Adriana de Souza; Francisco, Adriana Amorim; Oliveira, Sheyla Guimaraes; Silva, Renata Luana da

    2016-08-15

    to compare the pelvic floor muscle strength in primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, related to the socio-demographic characteristics, nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal exercise in pregnancy, perineal condition and weight of the newborn. this was a cross-sectional study conducted after 50 - 70 postpartum days, with 24 primiparous women who underwent cesarean delivery and 72 who had a normal birth. The 9301 PeritronTM was used for analysis of muscle strength. The mean muscle strength was compared between the groups by two-way analysis of variance. the pelvic floor muscle strength was 24.0 cmH2O (±16.2) and 25.4 cmH2O (±14.7) in postpartum primiparous women after normal birth and cesarean section, respectively, with no significant difference. The muscular strength was greater in postpartum women with ≥ 12 years of study (42.0 ±26.3 versus 14.6 ±7.7 cmH2O; p= 0.036) and in those who performed perineal exercises (42.6±25.4 11.8±4.9 vs. cmH2O; p = 0.010), compared to caesarean. There was no difference in muscle strength according to delivery type regarding nutritional status, dyspareunia, urinary incontinence, perineal condition or newborn weight. pelvic floor muscle strength does not differ between primiparous women based on the type of delivery. Postpartum women with normal births, with higher education who performed perineal exercise during pregnancy showed greater muscle strength. comparar a força muscular do assoalho pélvico em primíparas no pós-parto normal e cesariana, relacionando-a às características sociodemográficas, estado nutricional, incontinência urinária, dispareunia, exercício perineal na gestação, condição perineal e peso do recém-nascido. estudo transversal realizado entre 50 e 70 dias de pós-parto, com 24 primíparas submetidas à cesariana e 72 ao parto normal. Utilizou-se PeritronTM 9301 para análise da força muscular. Comparou-se as médias da força muscular entre os

  19. The improvement of pelvic floor muscle function in POP patients after the Prolift procedure: results from surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihua; Chen, Xinliang; Li, Xiaocui; Gong, Yao; Li, Huaifang; Tong, Xiaowen

    2013-10-01

    Patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) have lower pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function. We hypothesized that pelvic reconstructive surgery could improve PFM function and strength. The controlled, nonrandomized study recruited 37 POP patients in the Prolift group and 30 non-POP patients in the control group. Two urogynecologists performed the Prolift procedure. One experienced physiotherapist who was blinded to the grouping conducted the surface electromyography (SEMG) evaluation using an intravaginal probe. The patient was considered objectively cured if she had stage 0 or I according to the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system (POP-Q) at the 3rd month postoperatively. Two types of contractions, namely maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and short, fast contractions (SFC) in 6 s were performed at each SEMG measurement. The SEMG data were collected once in the control group on admission and twice in the Prolift group (on admission and at the 3rd month postoperatively). The t test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Wilcoxon test were used for statistical analysis. A total of 36 POP patients were cured by the Prolift procedure. At the 3-month follow-up, the voltage and duration of MVC as well as the numbers and voltage of SFC increased significantly in the Prolift group. These variables were lower in POP patients compared to women without POP. The restoration of pelvic anatomy may account for the improved PFM function with increased electrical activity in POP patients verified by SEMG. Evaluation of PFM function may be used as a clinical tool in the overall assessment of pelvic reconstructive surgeries.

  20. Opportunities, challenges and concerns for the implementation and uptake of pelvic floor muscle assessment and exercises during the childbearing years: protocol for a critical interpretive synthesis.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Victoria E; Hay-Smith, E Jean C; Jarvie, Rachel; Dean, Sarah; Oborn, Eivor; Bayliss, Susan E; Bick, Debra; Davenport, Clare; Ismail, Khaled M; MacArthur, Christine; Pearson, Mark

    2017-01-25

    Pregnancy and childbirth are important risk factors for urinary incontinence (UI) in women. Pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) are effective for prevention of UI. Guidelines for the management of UI recommend offering pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) to women during their first pregnancy as a preventive strategy. The objective of this review is to understand the relationships between individual, professional, inter-professional and organisational opportunities, challenges and concerns that could be essential to maximise the impact of PFMT during childbearing years and to effect the required behaviour change. Following systematic searches to identify sources for inclusion, we shall use a critical interpretive synthesis (CIS) approach to produce a conceptual model, mapping the relationships between individual, professional, inter-professional and organisational factors and the implementation, acceptability and uptake of PFME education, assessment and training during the childbearing years. Purposive sampling will be used to identify potentially relevant material relating to topics or areas of interest which emerge as the review progresses. A wide range of empirical and non-empirical sources will be eligible for inclusion to encompass the breadth of relevant individual, professional, inter-professional and organisational issues relating to PFME during childbearing years. Data analysis and synthesis will identify key themes, concepts, connections and relationships between these themes. Findings will be interpreted in relation to existing frameworks of implementation, attitudes and beliefs of individuals and behaviour change. We will collate examples to illustrate relationships expressed in the conceptual model and identify potential links between the model and drivers for change. The CIS review findings and resulting conceptual model will illustrate relationships between factors that might affect the implementation, acceptability and uptake of PFME education

  1. Outcomes of a comprehensive nonsurgical approach to pelvic floor rehabilitation for urinary symptoms, defecatory dysfunction, and pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Starr, Julie A; Drobnis, Erma Z; Lenger, Stacy; Parrot, Jessica; Barrier, Breton; Foster, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    The authors' intent was to determine the clinical efficacy of comprehensive pelvic floor rehabilitation among women with symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD). We performed a retrospective analysis of women referred to an academic female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery practice for PFD. Data were gathered from the records of 778 women referred for pelvic floor therapy for urinary, bowel, pelvic pain, and sexual symptoms over the course of 4 years. Patients who completed at least 5 therapy sessions reported a mean symptom improvement of 80% in each of the 3 main categories analyzed, namely, urinary incontinence, defecatory dysfunction, and pelvic pain. Comprehensive, nonoperative management of PFD including pelvic floor muscle training, biofeedback, electrogalvanic stimulation, constipation management, behavioral modification, incontinence devices, and pharmacotherapy including vaginal estrogen is effective in the treatment of women with PFD.

  2. Extracorporeal magnetic energy stimulation of pelvic floor muscles for urodynamic stress incontinence of urine in women.

    PubMed

    Ismail, S I M F; Forward, G; Bastin, L; Wareham, K; Emery, S J; Lucas, M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy, side effects and drop out rate of extra-corporeal magnetic energy stimulation of pelvic floor muscles for urodynamic stress incontinence of urine in women. It was a prospective non-controlled study at 2 district general hospitals in South Wales. It included 48 female patients with urodynamic stress incontinence of urine, who had 16, twice weekly treatment sessions. Pad test was the primary outcome measure and continence diary, King's Health and EuroQol quality of life questionnaires, side effects and drop out were the secondary outcome measures. Assessment was made on recruitment, at the end of treatment sessions and at 3 months follow up. Thirty one patients completed treatment sessions and 27 attended for follow up at 3 months. There was no significant change in outcome measures at the end of treatment or at 3 months follow up. Side effects were encountered by 52.1% of patients and the drop out rate was 35.4%.

  3. [Hemomicrocirculation channel and mastocyte population in outer oblique aponeurosis stomach muscles and uterus ligament in women with small pelvic organ prolapses].

    PubMed

    Novruzov, R M

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the research was histochemical and morphometric investigation of microcirculation channel and study of mastocytes in outer oblique aponeurosis stomach muscles and sacrouterine ligaments. The study was carried out on 36 patients with small pelvic organs prolapse and on 22 patients without such. Patients with different forms and severity of small pelvic organs prolapse displayed the reduction of aponeurosis microcirculatory channel, sacrouterine and round ligament of the uterus (p<0.05) in contrast to women without small pelvic organs prolapse. It was found that outer oblique aponeurosis stomach muscles in patients contains large amount of labrocytes, which degranulate with statistically significant intensiveness, in contrast to women without prolapses (p<0.05). The state of microcirculation channel and local aponeurosis secretor regulator apparatus of the outer oblique aponeurosis stomach muscles and the sacrouterine ligaments must be considered in choosing the most suitable method of suspension and fixations of small pelvic organs prolapse.

  4. Inspiratory muscle training attenuates the human respiratory muscle metaboreflex

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Jonathan D; Guenette, Jordan A; Rupert, Jim L; McKenzie, Donald C; Sheel, A William

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that inspiratory muscle training (IMT) would attenuate the sympathetically mediated heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) increases normally observed during fatiguing inspiratory muscle work. An experimental group (Exp, n = 8) performed IMT 6 days per week for 5 weeks at 50% of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), while a control group (Sham, n = 8) performed IMT at 10% MIP. Pre- and post-training, subjects underwent a eucapnic resistive breathing task (RBT) (breathing frequency = 15 breaths min−1, duty cycle = 0.70) while HR and MAP were continuously monitored. Following IMT, MIP increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the Exp group (−125 ± 10 to −146 ± 12 cmH2O; mean ±s.e.m.) but not in the Sham group (−141 ± 11 to −148 ± 11 cmH2O). Prior to IMT, the RBT resulted in significant increases in HR (Sham: 59 ± 2 to 83 ± 4 beats min−1; Exp: 62 ± 3 to 83 ± 4 beats min−1) and MAP (Sham: 88 ± 2 to 106 ± 3 mmHg; Exp: 84 ± 1 to 99 ± 3 mmHg) in both groups relative to rest. Following IMT, the Sham group observed similar HR and MAP responses to the RBT while the Exp group failed to increase HR and MAP to the same extent as before (HR: 59 ± 3 to 74 ± 2 beats min−1; MAP: 84 ± 1 to 89 ± 2 mmHg). This attenuated cardiovascular response suggests a blunted sympatho-excitation to resistive inspiratory work. We attribute our findings to a reduced activity of chemosensitive afferents within the inspiratory muscles and may provide a mechanism for some of the whole-body exercise endurance improvements associated with IMT. PMID:17855758

  5. The Effect of Pelvic Muscle Exercises on Urinary Incontinency and Self-Esteem of Elderly Females With Stress Urinary Incontinency, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Talebizadeh, Malihe; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Millions of women are afflicted with stress urinary incontinence. Urinary incontinence is mentioned as one of the geriatric syndromes, together with pressure ulcers, functional decline, falls, and low self-esteem. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of pelvic muscle exercises on urinary incontinency and self- esteem of elderly females with stress urinary incontinency in Shiraz, Iran, 2013. Material and Method: In this interventional study, 50 old females aged 60-74 years were chosen among the members of Jahandidegan center, and they were asked to sign the informed consent form and complete the demographic questionnaire. Then, Quid questionnaire was used for choosing the type of incontinence in the elderly females. Next, the participants completed the ICIQ and self-esteem questionnaires. Then, they were randomly assigned to case and control groups. Each participant took part in 8 training classes. Finally, the subjects filled the ICIQ and self-esteem questionnaires before and 2 months after the intervention. Result: The results is shown that after the intervention, ICIQ score has a significant difference between the two groups (P=0.001). Also, after the treatment, self-esteem average scores of studied unit indicated a significant statistical difference in experimental group. In other words, the training sessions improved the score of self-esteem in the experimental group (P<0.001) versus control group (P=0.08). Conclusion: Pelvic muscle exercises were an empowerment mechanism for incontinent women in improving their quality of life and self-esteem, so recommended that such these exercising programs be used in elderly health care centers as a factor to improve health promotion of elderlies ’that are suffering from urinary incontinence. PMID:25716389

  6. Biomechanical properties of the pelvic floor muscles of continent and incontinent women using an inverse finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, M E T; Brandão, S; Parente, M P L; Mascarenhas, T; Natal Jorge, R M

    2017-03-17

    Pelvic disorders can be associated with changes in the biomechanical properties in the muscle, ligaments and/or connective tissue form fascia and ligaments. In this sense, the study of their mechanical behavior is important to understand the structure and function of these biological soft tissues. The aim of this study was to establish the biomechanical properties of the pelvic floor muscles of continent and incontinent women, using an inverse finite element analysis (FEA). The numerical models, including the pubovisceral muscle and pelvic bones were built from magnetic resonance (MR) images acquired at rest. The numerical simulation of Valsalva maneuver was based on the finite element method and the material constants were determined for different constitutive models (Neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin and Yeoh) using an iterative process. The material constants (MPa) for Neo-Hookean (c1) were 0.039 ± 0.022 and 0.024 ± 0.004 for continent vs. incontinent women. For Mooney-Rivlin (c1) the values obtained were 0.026 ± 0.010 vs. 0.016 ± 0.003, and for Yeoh (c1) the values obtained were 0.031 ± 0.023 vs. 0.016 ± 0.002, (p < 0.05). Muscle displacements obtained in the numerical simulations of Valsalva maneuver were compared with the muscle displacements obtained through additional dynamic MRI. Incontinent women presented a higher antero-posterior displacement than the continent women. The results were also similar between MRI and numerical simulations (40.27% vs. 42.17% for Neo-Hookean, 39.87% for Mooney-Rivlin and 41.61% for Yeoh). Using an inverse FEA coupled with MR images allowed to obtain the in vivo biomechanical properties of the pelvic floor muscles, leading to a relationship between them for the continent and incontinent women in a non-invasive manner.

  7. Effectiveness of adding voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction to a Pilates exercise program: an assessor-masked randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Luiza; de Jarmy Di Bella, Zsuzsanna Ilona Katalin; Rodrigues, Claudinei Alves; Stüpp, Liliana; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of adding voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) to a Pilates exercise program in sedentary nulliparous women. Fifty-seven healthy nulliparous and physically inactive women were randomized to a Pilates exercise program (PEP) with or without PFMC. Forty-eight women concluded this study (24 participants for each group). Each woman was evaluated before and after the PEP, by a physiotherapist and an urogynecologist (UG). Neither of the professionals was revealed to them. This physiotherapist measured their pelvic floor muscle strength by using both a perineometer (Peritron) and vaginal palpation (Oxford Scale). The UG, who performed 3D perineal ultrasound examinations, collected their data and evaluated the results for pubovisceral muscle thickness and the levator hiatus area (LA). Both professionals were blinded to the group allocation. The protocol for both groups consisted of 24 bi-weekly 1-h individual sessions of Pilates exercises, developed by another physiotherapist who specializes in PFM rehabilitation and the Pilates technique. The PEP+ PFMC group showed significantly greater strength improvements than the PEP group when comparing the Oxford scale, vaginal pressure and pubovisceral muscle thickness during contraction measurements at baseline and post-treatment. Our findings suggest that adding a voluntary PFMC to a Pilates exercise program is more effective than Pilates alone in improving PFM strength in sedentary nulliparous women.

  8. Inspiratory muscle training for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Houston, Brian W; Mills, Nicola; Solis-Moya, Arturo

    2008-10-08

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-limiting genetic condition in Caucasians and the life-expectancy of those newly diagnosed is increasing. Inspiratory muscle training may be a way of improving the lung function and quality of life of people with cystic fibrosis. Hence there is a need to establish whether this intervention is beneficial. To determine the effect of inspiratory muscle training on health-related quality of life, pulmonary function and exercise tolerance. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials register comprising of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of most recent search: April 2008. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical controlled trials comparing different inspiratory muscle training regimens with each other or a control in people with cystic fibrosis. Three review authors independently applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria to publications and assessed the quality of the included studies. Seven studies were identified. Of these six studies with 140 participants met the review inclusion criteria. There was wide variation in the quality of the included studies. Data were not published in sufficient detail or with sufficiently similar outcome measures in these studies to perform meta-analyses. We have not found any evidence to suggest that this treatment is either beneficial or not. We would advise that practitioners evaluate on a case-by-case basis whether or not to employ this therapy. We recommend that future studies make more use of health-related quality of life and exercise tolerance measures; and that there is an agreement upon a single standard measure of classifying the clinical status of the participants.

  9. [Pelvic floor rehabilitation for female urinary incontinence: mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Deffieux, X; Billecocq, S; Demoulin, G; Rivain, A-L; Trichot, C; Thubert, T

    2013-06-01

    To analyze the proven mechanisms of action of pelvic rehabilitation in women presenting with urinary incontinence. Review of literature (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Database) using following keywords: female; urinary incontinence; overactive bladder syndrome; stress urinary incontinence; bladder training; bladder diary; pelvic floor muscle training; pelvic floor rehabilitation; physiotherapy; cognitive therapies. Among 2906 articles (animal and anatomical studies have been excluded); 66 have been selected because they focused on the evaluation of the pathophysiological mechanisms of pelvic floor rehabilitation concerning female urinary incontinence. Studies on pelvic floor muscles training exercises showed a significant increase in the force of contraction of these muscles and it was correlated with improved scores of urinary incontinence and pad test (coefficient of correlation r ranged from 0.23 to 0.34) for women presenting with stress urinary incontinence. These studies have not observed an increase in the maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP) or correction of urethral hypermobility related with the improvement of incontinence after rehabilitation sessions. Studies concerning pelvic floor stimulation observed an increase in the force of contraction of pelvic floor muscles after rehabilitation and a decrease in the intensity of detrusor contractions without changing the MUCP. There is very little data on the precise mechanisms of action of biofeedback and cognitive behavioral therapy. In studies that objectively evaluated the mechanisms of action of pelvic rehabilitation, it was observed that pelvic floor muscles voluntary exercises and electrostimulation resulted an increase in force of contraction of these muscles without changing the MUCP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Study on the influence of the fetus head molding on the biomechanical behavior of the pelvic floor muscles, during vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Silva, M E T; Oliveira, D A; Roza, T H; Brandão, S; Parente, M P L; Mascarenhas, T; Natal Jorge, R M

    2015-06-25

    Pelvic floor injuries during vaginal delivery are considered a significant risk factor to develop pelvic floor dysfunction. The molding of the fetus head during vaginal delivery facilitates the labor progress, since it adjusts to the birth canal geometry. In this work, a finite element model was used to represent the effects induced by the passage of the fetus head on the pelvic floor. The numerical model used for this simulation included the pelvic floor muscles attached to the bones, and a fetus body. The model of the fetus head included the skin and soft tissues, the skull with sutures and fontanelles, and the brain. The fetus head movements during birth in vertex position were simulated: descent, internal rotation and extension. Two models of the fetus head were compared: a rigid and a deformable one, with the inclusion of the cranial sutures. The influence of the fetus head molding on the pelvic floor muscles was analyzed by evaluating their reaction forces, stretch, and stress and strain fields. Additionally, anatomical indices for the molding of the fetal skull were obtained and compared with clinical data. The passage of the deformable fetus head through the birth canal leads to a reduction of 17.3% on the reaction forces on the pelvic floor muscles when compared to the ones of a rigid head. Furthermore, the fetus head molding implies inferior resistance to rotation resulting in a reduction of 1.86% in muscle stretching. Quantitative evaluation of the fetus head molding showed good agreement with clinical experiments.

  11. Pelvic floor muscle electromyography during different running speeds: an exploratory and reliability study.

    PubMed

    Luginbuehl, Helena; Naeff, Rebecca; Zahnd, Anna; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Kuhn, Annette; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) affects women of all ages including young athletes, especially those involved in high-impact sports. To date, hardly any studies are available testing pelvic floor muscles (PFM) during sports activities. The aim of this study was the description and reliability test of six PFM electromyography (EMG) variables during three different running speeds. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether there was a speed-dependent difference between the PFM activity variables. This trial was designed as an exploratory and reliability study including ten young healthy female subjects to characterize PFM pre-activity and reflex activity during running at 7, 9 and 11 km/h. Six variables for each running speed, averaged over ten steps per subject, were presented descriptively, tested regarding their reliability (Friedman, ICC, SEM, MD) and speed difference (Friedman). PFM EMG variables varied between 67.6 and 106.1 %EMG, showed no systematic error and were low for SEM and MD using the single value model. Applying the average model over ten steps, ICC (3,k) were >0.75 and SEM and MD about 50 % lower than for the single value model. Activity was found to be highest in 11 km/h. EMG variables showed excellent ICC and very low SEM and MD. Further studies should investigate inter-session reliability and PFM reactivity patterns of SUI patients using the average over ten steps for each variable as it showed very high ICC and very low SEM and MD. Subsequently, longer running distances and other high-impact sports disciplines could be studied.

  12. Hypoxia increases muscle hypertrophy induced by resistance training.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akinobu; Sugita, Masaaki; Kato, Ko; Fukuda, Aki; Sudo, Akihiro; Uchida, Atsumasa

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that low-intensity resistance training with vascular occlusion (kaatsu training) induces muscle hypertrophy. A local hypoxic environment facilitates muscle hypertrophy during kaatsu training. We postulated that muscle hypertrophy can be more efficiently induced by placing the entire body in a hypoxic environment to induce muscle hypoxia followed by resistance training. Fourteen male university students were randomly assigned to hypoxia (Hyp) and normoxia (Norm) groups (n = 7 per group). Each training session proceeded at an exercise intensity of 70% of 1 repetition maximum (RM), and comprised four sets of 10 repetitions of elbow extension and flexion. Students exercised twice weekly for 6 wk and then muscle hypertrophy was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and muscle strength was evaluated based on 1RM. Muscle hypertrophy was significantly greater for the Hyp-Ex (exercised flexor of the hypoxia group) than for the Hyp-N (nonexercised flexor of the hypoxia group) or Norm-Ex flexor (P < .05, Bonferroni correction). Muscle hypertrophy was significantly greater for the Hyp-Ex than the Hyp-N extensor. Muscle strength was significantly increased early (by week 3) in the Hyp-Ex, but not in the Norm-Ex group. This study suggests that resistance training under hypoxic conditions improves muscle strength and induces muscle hypertrophy faster than under normoxic conditions, thus representing a promising new training technique.

  13. MRI measures of the lumbo-pelvic muscles in bedrest and follow up: Implications for exercise counter measures in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, C. A.; Hides, J.; Wilson, S.; Belavy, D. L.; Stanton, W.; McCook, D.; Elmann-Larsen, B.; Rittweger, J.; Felsenberg, D.

    2005-08-01

    Exercise countermeasures to reverse muscle atrophy in microgravity should be based on the specific muscle changes occurring with unloading of the skeleton. Changes in measures of cross sectional areas (CSA's) of selected flexor and extensor lumbo-pelvic muscles were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as part of the European Space Agency's Berlin Bedrest Study. Nineteen subjects were exposed to 8 weeks of strict bedrest, with MRI assessments taken before, during and after bedrest. Only multifidus was significantly reduced in CSA during bedrest (with no change in CSA of the flexors), and remained so during the recovery period. There was a significant increase in the CSA of the erector spinae during the reloading (recovery) phase. These results have implications for exercise countermeasures in microgravity.

  14. Pelvic floor muscle reflex activity during coughing - an exploratory and reliability study.

    PubMed

    Luginbuehl, Helena; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Kuhn, Annette; Christen, Regula; Oberli, Bettina; Eichelberger, Patric; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2016-12-01

    Activities that provoke stress urinary incontinence (SUI) rapidly increase the intra-abdominal pressure and the impact loading on the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs). Coughing can cause urinary leakage and is often used to test SUI. However, PFM characteristics during coughing, including their reliability, have not been investigated. Here, we used electromyography (EMG) to describe PFM pre-activity and reflexivity during coughing and examined the reliability of the measurements. This was an exploratory and reliability study including 11 young healthy women to characterize EMG reflex activity in PFMs during coughing. We describe 6 variables, averaged over 3 coughs per subject, and tested their reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient 3,1 [ICC(3,1)] and ICC(3,k), related standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimal difference [MD]). The variables represented the mean EMG activity for PFMs during 30-ms time intervals of pre-activity (initial time point of coughing [T0] and minus 30ms) and reflex activity (T0-30, 30-60, 60-90, 90-120 and 120-150ms after T0) of stretch-reflex latency responses. The mean %EMG (normalized to maximal voluntary PFM contraction) for EMG variables was 35.1 to 52.2 and was significantly higher during coughing than for PFM activity at rest (mean 24.9±3.7%EMG; P<0.05). ICC(3,k) ranged from 0.67 to 0.91 (SEM 6.1-13.3%EMG and MD 16.7-36.8%EMG) and was higher than ICC(3,1) (range 0.40-0.77; SEM 9.0-18.0%EMG, MD 24.9-50.0%EMG). PFM activity during reflex latency response time intervals during coughing was significantly higher than at rest, which suggests PFM pre-activity and reflex activity during coughing. Although we standardized coughing, EMG variables for PFM activity showed poor reliability [good to excellent ICC(3,k) and fair to excellent ICC(3,1) but high SEM and MD]. Therefore, coughing is expected to be heterogeneous, with low reliability, in clinical test situations. Potential crosstalk from other muscles involved in coughing could

  15. Assessment of voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction in continent and incontinent women using transperineal ultrasound, manual muscle testing and vaginal squeeze pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Judith A; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Briffa, N Kathryn; Neumann, Patricia

    2006-11-01

    The aims of the study were: (1) to assess women performing voluntary pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contractions, on initial instruction without biofeedback teaching, using transperineal ultrasound, manual muscle testing, and perineometry and (2) to assess for associations between the different measurements of PFM function. Sixty continent (30 nulliparous and 30 parous) and 60 incontinent (30 stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and 30 urge urinary incontinence (UUI)) women were assessed. Bladder neck depression during attempts to perform an elevating pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction occurred in 17% of continent and 30% of incontinent women. The UUI group had the highest proportion of women who depressed the bladder neck (40%), although this was not statistically significant (p=0.060). The continent women were stronger on manual muscle testing (p=0.001) and perineometry (p=0.019) and had greater PFM endurance (p<0.001) than the incontinent women. There was a strong tendency for the continent women to have a greater degree of bladder neck elevation than the incontinent women (p=0.051). There was a moderate correlation between bladder neck movement during PFM contraction measured by ultrasound and PFM strength assessed by manual muscle testing (r=0.58, p=0.01) and perineometry (r=0.43, p=0.01). The observation that many women were performing PFM exercises incorrectly reinforces the need for individual PFM assessment with a skilled practitioner. The significant correlation between the measurements of bladder neck elevation during PFM contraction and PFM strength measured using MMT and perineometry supports the use of ultrasound in the assessment of PFM function; however, the correlation was only moderate and, therefore, indicates that the different measurement tools assess different aspects of PFM function. It is recommended that physiotherapists use a combination of assessment tools to evaluate the different aspects of PFM function that are important for continence

  16. Design of a gait training device for control of pelvic obliquity.

    PubMed

    Pietrusinski, Maciej; Severini, Giacomo; Cajigas, Iahn; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Bonato, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of a novel device for the control of pelvic obliquity during gait. The device, called the Robotic Gait Rehabilitation (RGR) Trainer, consists of a single actuator system designed to target secondary gait deviations, such as hip-hiking, affecting the movement of the pelvis. Secondary gait deviations affecting the pelvis are generated in response to primary gait deviations (e.g. limited knee flexion during the swing phase) in stroke survivors and contribute to the overall asymmetrical gait pattern often observed in these patients. The proposed device generates a force field able to affect the obliquity of the pelvis (i.e. the rotation of the pelvis around the anteroposterior axis) by using an impedance controlled single linear actuator acting on a hip orthosis. Tests showed that the RGR Trainer is able to induce changes in pelvic obliquity trajectories (hip-hiking) in healthy subjects. These results suggest that the RGR Trainer is suitable to test the hypothesis that has motivated our efforts toward developing the system, namely that addressing both primary and secondary gait deviations during robotic-assisted gait training may help promote a physiologically-sound gait behavior more effectively than when only primary deviations are addressed.

  17. Botulinum Toxin A Injections Into Pelvic Floor Muscles Under Electromyographic Guidance for Women With Refractory High-Tone Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: A 6-Month Prospective Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Darlene; El-Khawand, Dominique; Ginzburg, Natasha; Wehbe, Salim; O'Hare, Peter; Whitmore, Kristene

    2015-01-01

    High-tone pelvic floor dysfunction (HTPFD) is a debilitating chronic pain disorder for many women with significant impact on their quality of life (QoL). Our objective was to determine the efficacy of electromyography-guided onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox; Allergan, Irvine, Calif) injections in treating patient's perception of pelvic pain and improving QoL measurement scores. This is a prospective pilot open-label study of women with chronic pelvic pain and HTPFD who have failed conventional therapy between January 2011 and August 2013. Botox injections (up to 300 U) were done using needle electromyography guidance, from a transperineal approach, to localize spastic pelvic floor muscles (PFMs). Data were collected at baseline, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after injections. This included demographics; Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores for pain and dyspareunia; validated questionnaires for symptoms, QoL, and sexual function; Global Response Assessment scale for pelvic pain; digital examination of PFM for tone and tenderness; and vaginal manometry. Side effects were also recorded. Out of 28 women who enrolled in the study, 21 completed the 6-month follow-up and qualified for analysis. The mean (SD) age was 35.1 (9.4) years (range, 22-50 years), and the mean (SD) body mass index was 25 (4.4). Comorbidities included interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (42.9%) and vulvodynia (66.7%). Overall, 61.9% of subjects reported improvement on Global Response Assessment at 4 weeks and 80.9% at 8, 12, and 24 weeks post injection, compared with baseline. Of the subjects who were sexually active at baseline, 58.8% (10/17), 68.8% (11/16), 80% (12/15), and 83.3% (15/18) reported less dyspareunia at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. Dyspareunia Visual Analog Scale score significantly improved at weeks 12 (5.6, P = 0.011) and 24 (5.4, P = 0.004) compared with baseline (7.8). Two of the 4 patients who avoided sexual activity at baseline secondary to dyspareunia resumed and tolerated

  18. The impact of acute and chronic strenuous exercise on pelvic floor muscle strength and support in nulliparous healthy women.

    PubMed

    Middlekauff, Monique L; Egger, Marlene J; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M

    2016-09-01

    Strenuous physical activity, which is known to increase intraabdominal pressure and theoretically places stress on the pelvic floor, may affect pelvic support in nulliparous women. The aims of this study were to: (1) examine the differences in maximal vaginal descent (MVD), vaginal resting pressure (VRP), and pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) between women who habitually perform strenuous exercise vs women who refrain from performing strenuous exercise; and (2) compare MVD, VRP, and PFMS before and immediately following physical activity in the strenuous and nonstrenuous groups separately. Participants were healthy nulliparous women ages 18-35 years who were habitual strenuous or nonstrenuous exercisers. Women in the strenuous group participated in CrossFit (CrossFit, Inc., Washington, DC) at least 3 days per week for at least 6 months. We assessed anthropometric and body composition values using standardized procedures. Participants completed the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification examination and pelvic muscle strength assessment before and again within 15 minutes of completing exercise (CrossFit for the strenuous group and self-paced walking for the nonstrenuous). A research nurse masked to study group assignment recorded MVD, defined as the greatest value of anterior, posterior, or apical support, and VRP and PFMS using a perineometer. Maximal PFMS was recorded as the highest pressure measured in 3 vaginal contraction trials. Data were analyzed using parametric and nonparametric tests as appropriate. P < .05 was considered significant. Seventy nulliparous women participated in the study, 35 in each group. The mean age was 24.77 ± 4.3 years. Compared to the nonstrenuous group, strenuous participants were heavier (64.70 ± 7.78 kg vs 60.6 ± 8.99 kg, P = .027), had lower percent body fat (23.36 ± 5.88% vs 27.55 ± 7.07%, P = .003), and had higher handgrip strength (20.78 ± 5.97 kg vs 16.04 ± 11.04 kg, P = .001). Before exercise, there were no

  19. Frequency: The Overlooked Resistance Training Variable for Inducing Muscle Hypertrophy?

    PubMed

    Dankel, Scott J; Mattocks, Kevin T; Jessee, Matthew B; Buckner, Samuel L; Mouser, J Grant; Counts, Brittany R; Laurentino, Gilberto C; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2017-05-01

    The principle of progressive overload must be adhered to for individuals to continually increase muscle size with resistance training. While the majority of trained individuals adhere to this principle by increasing the number of sets performed per exercise session, this does not appear to be an effective method for increasing muscle size once a given threshold is surpassed. Opposite the numerous studies examining differences in training loads and sets of exercise performed, a few studies have assessed the importance of training frequency with respect to muscle growth, none of which have tested very high frequencies of training (e.g., 7 days a week). The lack of studies examining such frequencies may be related to the American College of Sports Medicine recommendation that trained individuals use split routines allowing at least 48 h of rest between exercises that stress the same muscle groups. Given the attenuated muscle protein synthetic response to resistance exercise present in trained individuals, it can be hypothesized that increasing the training frequency would allow for more frequent elevations in muscle protein synthesis and more time spent in a positive net protein balance. We hypothesize that increasing the training frequency, as opposed to the training load or sets performed, may be a more appropriate strategy for trained individuals to progress a resistance exercise program aimed at increasing muscle size.

  20. The response of the abdominal muscles to pelvic floor muscle contraction in women with and without stress urinary incontinence using ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Arab, Amir Massoud; Chehrehrazi, Mahshid

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the changes in the thickness of the abdominal muscles; measured by ultrasound, in response to pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction in women with and without stress urinary incontinence (SUI). A total of 20 non-pregnant female participated in the study. Subjects were categorized into two groups: continent females (N=10) and females with SUI (N=10). The change in the thickness of the right transverse abdominis muscle (TrAM) and internal oblique muscle (IOM) was measured with ultrasound imaging during PFM contraction in both groups. There was an increase in thickness of the TrAM and IOM muscle during PFM contraction showing a co-contraction of the abdominals during PFM contraction both in women with and without SUI. No significant difference was found in the change in thickness of TrAM (P=0.43) and IOM (P=0.72) in response to PFM contraction between women with and without SUI. In overall, there was no statistical significant difference in co-contraction of abdominal muscles during PFM contraction between SUI women and healthy continent women. It seems that co-activation of the abdominal muscles during PFM contraction exists in continent and stress incontinent women.

  1. Does respiratory muscle training increase physical performance?

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Billy; Fricke, Hannes; de Marées, Markus; Linville, John W; Mester, Joachim

    2009-09-01

    Special force units and military personnel undergo demanding physical exercise and might benefit from high-intensity respiratory muscle training (RMT) by increasing their endurance performance. This study examined the effects of a 6-week high-intensity RMT on running performance and oxygen uptake (VO2max) in a group of German Special Force Squad members. 17 participants were randomly assigned to a training or control group. Baseline and post-testing included a ramp test, as well as an incremental test on a treadmill, performed to physical exhaustion. VO2, respiratory exchange ratio, and heart rate were measured breath by breath. Furthermore, maximum running speed (V(max)), 4 mmol x 1(-1) lactate threshold (V4) and perception of respiratory effort were determined. During pulmonary testing, sustained maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressure (PI(max) and PE(max)) were obtained. RMT was performed daily at approximately 90% PI(max) for 6 weeks with 2 x 30 breath cycles using an Ultrabreathe lung trainer. No statistical differences were detected between the groups for any parameter after RMT. High-intensity RMT did not show any benefits on VO2max and endurance performance and are unlikely to be of benefit to military or paramilitary training programs for an increase in endurance performance.

  2. INSPIRATIonAL--INSPIRAtory muscle training in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Benjamin C; Boland, Robert A; Brodaty, Nina E; Zoing, Margie C; Jeffery, Sandra E; McKenzie, David K; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory impairment, due to respiratory muscle weakness, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND). Threshold loading may strengthen the inspiratory muscles and thereby improve patient prognosis. A phase II, double-blind, randomized-controlled trial was undertaken to determine whether a 12-week inspiratory muscle training programme attenuated the decline in respiratory function and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with ALS/MND. Nine patients were randomized to inspiratory muscle training and 10 to sham training. Primary endpoints were respiratory function (forced vital capacity, vital capacity), lung volumes and inspiratory muscle strength. Patients were assessed before, during and immediately after a 12-week training period, and at eight weeks follow-up. While improvements in inspiratory muscle strength were observed in both treatment arms, there was a non-significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure of 6.1% in the experimental group compared to controls (standard error of mean, 6.93%; 95% confidence interval -8.58 -20.79; p=0.39). The gains in inspiratory muscle strength were partially reversed during a period of training cessation. In conclusion, inspiratory muscle training may potentially strengthen the inspiratory muscles and slow the decline in respiratory function in patients with ALS/MND.

  3. Post-absorptive muscle protein turnover affects resistance training hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Paul T; Borack, Michael S; Markofski, Melissa M; Dickinson, Jared M; Fry, Christopher S; Deer, Rachel R; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2017-05-01

    Acute bouts of resistance exercise and subsequent training alters protein turnover in skeletal muscle. The mechanisms responsible for the changes in basal post-absorptive protein turnover and its impact on muscle hypertrophy following resistance exercise training are unknown. Our goal was to determine whether post-absorptive muscle protein turnover following 12 weeks of resistance exercise training (RET) plays a role in muscle hypertrophy. In addition, we were interested in determining potential molecular mechanisms responsible for altering post-training muscle protein turnover. Healthy young men (n = 31) participated in supervised whole body progressive RET at 60-80% 1 repetition maximum (1-RM), 3 days/week for 3 months. Pre- and post-training vastus lateralis muscle biopsies and blood samples taken during an infusion of (13)C6 and (15)N phenylalanine and were used to assess skeletal muscle protein turnover in the post-absorptive state. Lean body mass (LBM), muscle strength (determined by dynamometry), vastus lateralis muscle thickness (MT), myofiber type-specific cross-sectional area (CSA), and mRNA were assessed pre- and post-RET. RET increased strength (12-40%), LBM (~5%), MT (~15%) and myofiber CSA (~20%) (p < 0.05). Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) increased 24% while muscle protein breakdown (MPB) decreased 21%, respectively. These changes in protein turnover resulted in an improved net muscle protein balance in the basal state following RET. Further, the change in basal MPS is positively associated (r = 0.555, p = 0.003) with the change in muscle thickness. Post-absorptive muscle protein turnover is associated with muscle hypertrophy during resistance exercise training.

  4. Pelvic floor muscle problems mediate sexual problems in young adult rape victims.

    PubMed

    Postma, Riemke; Bicanic, Iva; van der Vaart, Huub; Laan, Ellen

    2013-08-01

    Prior studies have addressed sexual abuse and sexual function in adult women. No studies have focused on the effect of adolescence rape on sexual functioning. To investigate the effect of rape on sexual problems and on pelvic floor problems, as well as the mediating role of pelvic floor problems on sexual problems, in a homogenous group of victims of adolescence rape without a history of childhood sexual, physical, and/or emotional abuse. Sexual functioning and pelvic floor functioning were assessed using self-report questionnaires. In this cross-sectional study, a group of 89 young women aged 18-25 years who were victimized by rape in adolescence was compared with a group of 114 nonvictimized controls. The rape victims were treated for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 3 years prior to participation in the study. Three years posttreatment, rape victims were 2.4 times more likely to have a sexual dysfunction (lubrication problems and pain) and 2.7 times more likely to have pelvic floor dysfunction (symptoms of provoked vulvodynia, general stress, lower urinary tract, and irritable bowel syndrome) than nonvictimized controls. The relationship between rape and sexual problems was partially mediated by the presence of pelvic floor problems. Rape victims and controls did not differ with regard to sexual activities. Rape victims suffer significantly more from sexual dysfunction and pelvic floor dysfunction when compared with nontraumatized controls, despite the provision of treatment for PTSD. Possibly, physical manifestations of PTSD have been left unaddressed in treatment. Future treatment protocols should consider incorporating (physical or psychological) treatment strategies for sexual dysfunction and/or pelvic floor dysfunction into trauma exposure treatments. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  5. Botulinum neurotoxin type A injection of the pelvic floor muscle in pain due to spasticity: a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Bhide, Alka A; Puccini, Federica; Khullar, Vik; Elneil, Suzy; Digesu, G Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    The role of muscle spasm is not a new concept in the genesis of pain. Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) has been successfully employed in a variety of muscular and inflammatory conditions. The aim of our study was to review the published literature on the role of BoNTA injection of the pelvic floor muscle in the management of women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP). A systematic search of the literature published up to June 2012 on the use of BoNTA in the treatment of female pelvic floor muscle spasm was carried out using relevant search terms in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The results were limited to full-text English language articles. Relevant trials as well as relevant reviews were selected and analyzed by two independent reviewers. Five studies (2 case reports, 1 prospective pilot study, 1 retrospective study and 1 randomised double-blind placebo controlled study) were included in this systematic review. Overall, BoNTA has shown to be beneficial in relieving CPP related to pelvic floor spasm. The role of BoNTA as a treatment of CPP has been recognized for more than 10 years. Although data are still scarce preliminary results are encouraging. BoNTA is an attractive option for refractory CPP related to pelvic floor muscle spasm, but further studies using validated and reproducible outcome measures are needed, to establish its effectiveness, safeness, technique, optimal dosage, and duration of symptom relief.

  6. Changes in trunk muscle activation and lumbar-pelvic position associated with abdominal hollowing and reach during a simulated manual material handling task.

    PubMed

    Butler, Heather L; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L; Kozey, John W

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abdominal hollowing (AH) on trunk muscle activation and lumbar-pelvic motion during a controlled lift and replace task. Surface electromyograms were recorded from five abdominal and two back muscle sites. Sagittal lumbar-pelvic motion was recorded by video. Subjects lifted a 3.8 kg load in normal, maximum and extreme reaches, first while performing their preferred lifting style (PLS) and then maintaining an AH technique. The external oblique muscle site activities were significantly higher (p < 0.05) for the AH technique (ranging from 7-20% of maximal voluntary activation (MVIC)) than at any of the abdominal sites for the PLS (ranging from 2-10% MVIC). Differences were found among abdominal sites for the AH, but not for the PLS. The back muscle site activities (ranging from 9-30% MVIC) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than for any of the abdominal muscles for all conditions, except for the anterior external oblique for AH. The pelvic and lumbar angles changed significantly (p < 0.05) between normal and maximal reaches and between techniques. The AH technique altered abdominal muscle activation amplitudes, with minimal differences in trunk extensors compared to the PLS. The AH resulted in more posterior pelvic tilt.

  7. Muscle activity during the active straight leg raise (ASLR), and the effects of a pelvic belt on the ASLR and on treadmill walking.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai; Meijer, Onno G; van Dieën, Jaap H; Hodges, Paul W; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Strijers, Rob L; Nanayakkara, Prabath W; van Royen, Barend J; Wu, Wenhua; Xia, Chun

    2010-02-10

    Women with pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain (PPP), or athletes with groin pain, may have trouble with the active straight leg raise (ASLR), for which a pelvic belt can be beneficial. How the problems emerge, or how the belt works, remains insufficiently understood. We assessed muscle activity during ASLR, and how it changes with a pelvic belt. Healthy nulligravidae (N=17) performed the ASLR, and walked on a treadmill at increasing speeds, without and with a belt. Fine-wire electromyography (EMG) was used to record activity of the mm. psoas, iliacus and transversus abdominis, while other hip and trunk muscles were recorded with surface EMG. In ASLR, all muscles were active. In both tasks, transverse and oblique abdominal muscles were less active with the belt. In ASLR, there was more activity of the contralateral m. biceps femoris, and in treadmill walking of the m. gluteus maximus in conditions with a belt. For our interpretation, we take our starting point in the fact that hip flexors exert a forward rotating torque on the ilium. Apparently, the abdominal wall was active to prevent such forward rotation. If transverse and oblique abdominal muscles press the ilia against the sacrum (Snijders' "force closure"), the pelvis may move as one unit in the sagittal plane, and also contralateral hip extensor activity will stabilize the ipsilateral ilium. The fact that transverse and oblique abdominal muscles were less active in conditions with a pelvic belt suggests that the belt provides such "force closure", thus confirming Snijders' theory.

  8. Relationship between aerobic capacity and pelvic floor muscles function: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, S.P.; Borghi-Silva, A.; Bastos, A.M.F.G.; Correia, G.N.; Pereira-Baldon, V.S.; Cabiddu, R.; Catai, A.M.; Driusso, P.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between aerobic capacity and pelvic floor muscles (PFM) function in adult women. Women aged 18 or over and without urinary dysfunction or other chronic diseases were eligible to participate. They completed the habitual physical activity (HPA) questionnaire, underwent a PFM functional evaluation by palpation and perineometry, and performed a submaximal (between 75 and 85% of maximum heart rate) cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) test to determine the ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT). Forty-one women were included (35±16 years, 75% physically active, 17% very active, and 8% sedentary and 17% presented grade 1 PFM contraction, 31.8% grade 2, 26.8% grade 3, and 24.4% grade 4, according to the modified Oxford Scale). The average PFM contraction pressure obtained by perineometer was 53±26 cmH2O and the average oxygen consumption at VAT (VO2VAT) obtained from CPX was 14±2 mL·kg-1·min-1. Significant correlations were found between PFM contraction pressure and VO2VAT (r=0.55; P<0.001); between PFM contraction pressure and HPA score (r=0.38; P=0.02); between age and VO2VAT (r=-0.25; P=0.049); and between VO2VAT and HPA score (r=0.36; P=0.02). An age-adjusted multiple linear regression equation (R2=0.32) was derived to estimate VO2VAT from the contraction value obtained by perineometer, so that the PFM contraction pressure was able to predict VO2VAT. The equation was validated using data from another group of 20 healthy women (33±12 years; PFM contraction: 49±23 cmH2O) and no significant difference was found between actual VO2VAT and predicted VO2VAT (13.1±1.9 vs 13.8±2.0 mL·kg-1·min-1). In conclusion, PFM function is associated with aerobic capacity in healthy women and PFM contraction pressure may be used to estimate VO2VAT in this population. PMID:28953985

  9. Relationship between aerobic capacity and pelvic floor muscles function: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, S P; Borghi-Silva, A; Bastos, A M F G; Correia, G N; Pereira-Baldon, V S; Cabiddu, R; Catai, A M; Driusso, P

    2017-09-21

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between aerobic capacity and pelvic floor muscles (PFM) function in adult women. Women aged 18 or over and without urinary dysfunction or other chronic diseases were eligible to participate. They completed the habitual physical activity (HPA) questionnaire, underwent a PFM functional evaluation by palpation and perineometry, and performed a submaximal (between 75 and 85% of maximum heart rate) cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) test to determine the ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT). Forty-one women were included (35±16 years, 75% physically active, 17% very active, and 8% sedentary and 17% presented grade 1 PFM contraction, 31.8% grade 2, 26.8% grade 3, and 24.4% grade 4, according to the modified Oxford Scale). The average PFM contraction pressure obtained by perineometer was 53±26 cmH2O and the average oxygen consumption at VAT (VO2VAT) obtained from CPX was 14±2 mL·kg-1·min-1. Significant correlations were found between PFM contraction pressure and VO2VAT (r=0.55; P<0.001); between PFM contraction pressure and HPA score (r=0.38; P=0.02); between age and VO2VAT (r=-0.25; P=0.049); and between VO2VAT and HPA score (r=0.36; P=0.02). An age-adjusted multiple linear regression equation (R2=0.32) was derived to estimate VO2VAT from the contraction value obtained by perineometer, so that the PFM contraction pressure was able to predict VO2VAT. The equation was validated using data from another group of 20 healthy women (33±12 years; PFM contraction: 49±23 cmH2O) and no significant difference was found between actual VO2VAT and predicted VO2VAT (13.1±1.9 vs 13.8±2.0 mL·kg-1·min-1). In conclusion, PFM function is associated with aerobic capacity in healthy women and PFM contraction pressure may be used to estimate VO2VAT in this population.

  10. The role of lumbopelvic posture in pelvic floor muscle activation in continent women.

    PubMed

    Capson, Angela Christine; Nashed, Joseph; Mclean, Linda

    2011-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effect of changing standing lumbopelvic posture on pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activation amplitude and timing and the resultant vaginal manometry values recorded during static and dynamic tasks. Sixteen nulliparous, continent women between the ages of 22 and 41 years performed five tasks (quiet standing, maximal effort cough, Valsalva manoeuvre, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the PFMs, and a load-catching task) in three different standing postures (normal lumbopelvic posture, hyperlordosis and hypolordosis). Electromyographic (EMG) data were recorded from the PFMs bilaterally using a Periform™ vaginal probe coupled to Delsys™ Bagnoli-8 EMG amplifiers. In separate trials, vaginal manometry was obtained using a Peritron™ perineometer. Lumbopelvic angle was recorded simultaneously with EMG and vaginal manometry using an Optotrak™ 3D motion analysis system to ensure that subjects maintained the required posture throughout the three trials of each task. All data were filtered using a moving 100 ms RMS window and peak values were determined for each trial and task. Repeated-measures analyses of variance were performed on the peak PFM EMG, intra-vaginal pressure amplitudes, and lumbopelvic angles as well as activation onset data for the cough and load-catching tasks. There was significantly higher resting PFM activity in all postures in standing as compared to supine, and in the standing position, there was higher resting PFM activity in the hypo-lordotic posture as compared to the normal and hyperlordotic postures. During the MVC, cough, Valsalva, and load-catching tasks, subjects generated significantly more PFM EMG activity when in their habitual posture than when in hyper- or hypo-lordotic postures. Conversely, higher peak vaginal manometry values were generated in the hypo-lordotic posture for all tasks in all cases. These results clearly indicate that changes in lumbopelvic posture influence both the

  11. Evaluation of the relationship between the pelvic floor muscles and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Micussi, Maria Thereza; Freitas, Rodrigo Pegado; Angelo, Priscylla Helouyse; Soares, Elvira Maria; Lemos, Telma Maria; Maranhão, Técia Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) in women with insulin resistance (IR) using surface electromyography and to associate the results with insulin levels. Patients and methods Through an analytical, cross-sectional study, 86 women were evaluated and divided into two groups: a control group (n=35) and an IR group (n=51). Data were collected through detailed history-taking, physical examination, and biochemical analysis. Fasting insulin levels were used for diagnosing IR. Electromyography of the PFMs was used for analyzing the tone and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The measures of central tendency and linear regression models were used. Results The average age was 25.3±4.5 years in the IR group and 27.2±4.4 years in the control group. The mean weight was 75.6±17.6 kg and 51.8±4.9 kg in the IR and control groups, respectively. Fasting insulin levels were 19.7±6.6 µIU/mL in the IR group and 5.4±1.8 µIU/mL in the control group (P<0.010). There were significant differences between the groups with regard to PFM tone (IR: 13.4±3.4 µV; control: 25.1±3.3 µV; P<0.001) and MVC (IR: 47.6±4.5 µV; control: 64.3±5.0 µV; P<0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis using the insulin levels as dependent variable showed a significant association for MVC (P=0.047), weight (P=0.017), and waist circumference (P=0.000). Conclusion Compared with the control group, the IR group showed lower electromyographic activity of the PFMs, and there was an association between insulin levels and electromyographic activity. PMID:26357485

  12. Association of urinary and anal incontinence with measures of pelvic floor muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Oversand, S H; Atan, I K; Shek, K L; Dietz, H P

    2016-05-01

    To assess the association between clinical and sonographic measures of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function and symptoms of urinary and anal incontinence (AI). This was a retrospective study of women seen at a tertiary urogynecological unit. All women had undergone a standardized interview, clinical examination including Modified Oxford Scale (MOS) grading, urodynamic testing and four-dimensional translabial ultrasound (TLUS). Cranioventral shift of the bladder neck (BN) and reduction in the hiatal anteroposterior (AP) diameter were measured using ultrasound volumes acquired on maximal PFM contraction, blinded against all clinical data. Data from 726 women with a mean age of 56 ± 13.7 (range, 18-88) years and a mean body mass index of 29 ± 6.1 (range, 17-55) kg/m(2) were analyzed. Stress (SI) and urge (UI) urinary incontinence were reported by 73% and 72%, respectively, and 13% had AI. Mean MOS grade was 2.4 ± 1.1 (range, 0-5). Mean cranioventral BN shift on TLUS was 7.1 ± 4.4 (range, 0.3-25.3) mm; mean reduction in AP hiatal diameter was 8.6 ± 4.8 (range, 0.3-31.3) mm. On univariate analysis, neither MOS nor TLUS measures were strongly associated with symptoms of urinary incontinence or AI; associations were non-significant except for BN displacement/SI (7.3 mm vs 6.5 mm; P = 0.028), BN displacement/UI (6.85 vs 7.75; P = 0.019), hiatal AP diameter/AI (9.6 mm vs 8.5 mm; P = 0.047) and MOS/SI (2.42 vs 2.19; P = 0.013). In this large retrospective study we did not find any strong associations between sonographic or palpatory measures of PFM function and symptoms of urinary incontinence or AI. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Cancer cachexia: muscle physiology and exercise training.

    PubMed

    Battaglini, Claudio L; Hackney, Anthony C; Goodwin, Matthew L

    2012-11-29

    Cachexia in cancer patients is a condition marked by severe tissue wasting and a myriad of quality of life and health consequences. Cachexia is also directly linked to the issues of morbidity and survivability in cancer patients. Therapeutic means of mitigating cachexia and its effects are thus critical in cancer patient treatment. We present a discussion on the use of physical exercise activities in the context of such treatment as a means to disruption the tissue wasting effects (i.e., muscle tissue losses via anorexigenic pro-inflammatory cytokines) of cachexia. In addition we propose a theoretical model (Exercise Anti-Cachectic Hypothetical-"EACH" model) as to how exercise training may promote a disruption in the cycle of events leading to advancing cachexia and in turn promote an enhanced functionality and thus improved quality of life in cancer patients.

  14. Exercise training and inspiratory muscle training in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Newall, C; Stockley, R A; Hill, S L

    2005-11-01

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic suppurative lung disease often characterised by airflow obstruction and hyperinflation, and leading to decreased exercise tolerance and reduced health status. The role of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has not been investigated in this group of patients. Thirty two patients with idiopathic bronchiectasis were randomly allocated to one of three groups: PR plus sham IMT (PR-SHAM), PR plus targeted IMT (PR-IMT), or control. All patients (except the control group) underwent an 8 week training programme of either PR or PR plus targeted IMT. Exercise training during PR was performed three times weekly at 80% of the peak heart rate. IMT was performed at home for 15 minutes twice daily over the 8 week period. PR-SHAM and PR-IMT resulted in significant increases in the incremental shuttle walking test of 96.7 metres (95% confidence interval (CI) 59.6 to 133.7) and 124.5 metres (95% CI 63.2 to 185.9), respectively, and in endurance exercise capacity of 174.9% (95% CI 34.7 to 426.1) and 205.7% (95% CI 31.6 to 310.6). There were no statistically significant differences in the improvements in exercise between the two groups. Significant improvements in inspiratory muscle strength were also observed both in the PR-IMT group (21.4 cm H2O increase, 95% CI 9.3 to 33.4; p = 0.008) and the PR-SHAM group (12.0 cm H2O increase, 95% CI 1.1 to 22.9; p = 0.04), the magnitude of which were also similar (p = 0.220). Improvements in exercise capacity were maintained in the PR-IMT group 3 months after training, but not in the PR-SHAM group. PR is effective in improving exercise tolerance in bronchiectasis but there is no additional advantage of simultaneous IMT. IMT may, however, be important in the longevity of the training effects.

  15. Influence of a pelvic floor training programme to prevent perineal trauma: A quasi-randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Leon-Larios, Fatima; Corrales-Gutierrez, Isabel; Casado-Mejía, Rosa; Suarez-Serrano, Carmen

    2017-07-01

    perineal injury is common after birth and may be caused by tears or episiotomy or both. Perineal massage has been shown to prevent episiotomies in primiparous women. On the other hand, pelvic floor exercises might have an influence by shortening the first and second stages of labour in the primigravida. the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a pelvic floor training following a birth programme on perineal trauma. a single-blind quasi-randomized controlled trial with two groups: standard care and intervention. a tertiary, metropolitan hospital in Seville, Spain. women (n=466) who were 32 weeks pregnant, having a singleton pregnancy and anticipating a normal birth were randomised. Women in the experimental groups were asked to perform a pelvic floor training programme that included: daily perineal massage and pelvic floor exercises from 32 weeks of pregnancy until birth. They were allocated to an intervention group by clusters (antenatal education groups) randomized 1:1. The control group had standard care that did not involve a perineal/pelvic floor intervention. These women were collected in a labour ward at admission 1:3 by midwives. outcomes were analysed by intention-to-treat. Women assigned to the perineal/pelvic floor intervention showed a 31.63% reduction in episiotomy (50.56% versus 82.19%, p<0.001) and a higher likelihood of having an intact perineum (17.61% versus 6.85%, p<0.003). There were also fewer third (5.18% versus 13.12%, p<0.001) and fourth degree-tears (0.52% versus 2.5%, p<0.001). Women allocated to the intervention group also had less postpartum perineal pain (24.57% versus 36.30%, p<0.001) and required less analgesia in the postnatal period (21.14% versus 30.82%, p<0.001). a training programme composed of pelvic floor exercises and perineal massage may prevent episiotomies and tears in primiparous women. This programme can be recommended to primiparous women in order to prevent perineal trauma. the pelvic floor programme was

  16. Effect of additional respiratory muscle endurance training in young well-trained swimmers.

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, Frédéric; Coquart, Jérémy B; Chavallard, Florence; Castres, Ingrid; Mucci, Patrick; Costalat, Guillaume; Chollet, Didier

    2013-01-01

    While some studies have demonstrated that respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) improves performances during various exercise modalities, controversy continues about the transfer of RMET effects to swimming performance. The objective of this study was to analyze the added effects of respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET; normocapnic hyperpnea) on the respiratory muscle function and swimming performance of young well-trained swimmers. Two homogenous groups were recruited: ten swimmers performed RMET (RMET group) and ten swimmers performed no RMET (control group). During the 8-week RMET period, all swimmers followed the same training sessions 5-6 times/week. Respiratory muscle strength and endurance, performances on 50- and 200-m trials, effort perception, and dyspnea were assessed before and after the intervention program. The results showed that ventilatory function parameters, chest expansion, respiratory muscle strength and endurance, and performances were improved only in the RMET group. Moreover, perceived exertion and dyspnea were lower in the RMET group in both trials (i.e., 50- and 200-m). Consequently, the swim training associated with RMET was more effective than swim training alone in improving swimming performances. RMET can therefore be considered as a worthwhile ergogenic aid for young competitive swimmers. Key PointsRespiratory muscle endurance training improves the performance.Respiratory muscle endurance training improves the ventilatory function parameters, chest expansion, respiratory muscle strength and endurance.Respiratory muscle endurance training decreases the perceived exertion and dyspnea.Respiratory muscle endurance training can be considered as a worthwhile ergogenic aid for young competitive swimmers.

  17. Effect of Additional Respiratory Muscle Endurance Training in Young Well-Trained Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Frédéric; Coquart, Jérémy B.; Chavallard, Florence; CASTRES, Ingrid; MUCCI, Patrick; Costalat, Guillaume; Chollet, Didier

    2013-01-01

    While some studies have demonstrated that respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) improves performances during various exercise modalities, controversy continues about the transfer of RMET effects to swimming performance. The objective of this study was to analyze the added effects of respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET; normocapnic hyperpnea) on the respiratory muscle function and swimming performance of young well-trained swimmers. Two homogenous groups were recruited: ten swimmers performed RMET (RMET group) and ten swimmers performed no RMET (control group). During the 8-week RMET period, all swimmers followed the same training sessions 5-6 times/week. Respiratory muscle strength and endurance, performances on 50- and 200-m trials, effort perception, and dyspnea were assessed before and after the intervention program. The results showed that ventilatory function parameters, chest expansion, respiratory muscle strength and endurance, and performances were improved only in the RMET group. Moreover, perceived exertion and dyspnea were lower in the RMET group in both trials (i.e., 50- and 200-m). Consequently, the swim training associated with RMET was more effective than swim training alone in improving swimming performances. RMET can therefore be considered as a worthwhile ergogenic aid for young competitive swimmers. Key Points Respiratory muscle endurance training improves the performance. Respiratory muscle endurance training improves the ventilatory function parameters, chest expansion, respiratory muscle strength and endurance. Respiratory muscle endurance training decreases the perceived exertion and dyspnea. Respiratory muscle endurance training can be considered as a worthwhile ergogenic aid for young competitive swimmers. PMID:24421721

  18. Endometrical cancer metastases in the region of abdominal muscles and pelvic wall.

    PubMed

    Djurdjević, S; Mladenović-Segedi, L; Djolai, M

    2006-01-01

    We present a case of surgical removal of solitary metastases in the region of anterior and lateral pelvic wall following primary surgery, pelvic irradiation (external beam-Linac X 6 MV to whole pelvis, followed by intra-vaginal Ir(192)), and adjuvant chemotherapy (carboplatin/adriamycin) in a patient with endometrial adenocarcinoma, FIGO stage IIIA, performed on 3 consecutive recurrences. All recurrences were histologically well-differentiated. The first of them was in the region of m. Rectus abdominis and m. psoas, and was totally removed. The location of the last 2 recurrences occured approximately at the same site, and, after surgical removal, the patient received 4 cycles of paclitaxel and adjuvant irradiation to the lateral pelvic wall (external beam-Linac X 6 MV) in order to possibly prolong the disease-free interval. The patient is in good general condition with no evidence of disease 36 months following primary surgery.

  19. The Effects of Combining Videogame Dancing and Pelvic Floor Training to Improve Dual-Task Gait and Cognition in Women with Mixed-Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Sarah A; Elliott, Valerie; de Bruin, Eling D; Bherer, Louis; Dumoulin, Chantal

    2014-06-01

    Many women over 65 years of age suffer from mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) and executive function (EF) deficits. Both incontinence and EF declines increase fall risk. The current study assessed EF and dual-task gait after a multicomponent intervention that combined pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training and videogame dancing (VGD). Baseline (Pre1), pretraining (Pre2), and post-training (Post) neuropsychological and dual-task gait assessments were completed by 23 women (mean age, 70.4 years) with MUI. During the dual-task, participants walked and performed an auditory n-back task. From Pre2 to Post, all women completed 12 weeks of combined PFM and VGD training. After training (Pre2 to Post), the number of errors in the Inhibition/Switch Stroop condition decreased significantly, the Trail Making Test difference score improved marginally, and the number of n-back errors during dual-task gait significantly decreased. A subgroup analysis based on continence improvements (pad test) revealed that only those subjects who improved in the pad test had significantly reduced numbers of n-back errors during dual-task gait. The results of this study suggest that a multicomponent intervention can improve EFs and the dual-task gait of older women with MUI. Future research is needed to determine if the training-induced improvements in these factors reduce fall risk.

  20. Effect of motor control training on hip muscles in elite football players with and without low back pain.

    PubMed

    Mendis, M Dilani; Hides, Julie A

    2016-11-01

    Previous research has shown that motor control training improved size and function of trunk muscles in elite football players with and without low back pain (LBP). Imbalances in hip muscles have been found in athletes with LBP and it is not known if motor control training can change these muscles. This study investigated if a motor control intervention program affected hip muscle size in elite football players with and without LBP. Panel-randomised intervention design. Forty-six players from one club in the Australian Football League (AFL) participated in a motor control training program delivered across the season as a stepped-wedge intervention design with 3 treatment arms: 15 weeks intervention, 8 weeks intervention and a wait-list control who received 7 weeks intervention toward the end of the playing season. Presence of LBP was assessed by interview and physical examination. Cross-sectional areas of iliacus, psoas, iliopsoas, sartorius, gluteus minimus, and gluteus medius muscles were measured from magnetic resonance images taken at 3 time points during the season. Iliopsoas, sartorius and gluteus medius muscle size increased for players who received intervention (p<0.05). For players with current LBP, sartorius and gluteus medius muscle size increased for those who received motor control training (p<0.05). Motor control training programs aimed at the lumbo-pelvic region also benefit the hip muscles. For players with current LBP, the intervention mitigated sartorius muscle atrophy and increased gluteus medius muscle size. These findings may help guide the management of LBP in elite football players. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Kênia Kp; Nascimento, Lucas R; Ada, Louise; Polese, Janaine C; Avelino, Patrick R; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2016-07-01

    After stroke, does respiratory muscle training increase respiratory muscle strength and/or endurance? Are any benefits carried over to activity and/or participation? Does it reduce respiratory complications? Systematic review of randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Adults with respiratory muscle weakness following stroke. Respiratory muscle training aimed at increasing inspiratory and/or expiratory muscle strength. Five outcomes were of interest: respiratory muscle strength, respiratory muscle endurance, activity, participation and respiratory complications. Five trials involving 263 participants were included. The mean PEDro score was 6.4 (range 3 to 8), showing moderate methodological quality. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that respiratory muscle training increased maximal inspiratory pressure by 7 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 14) and maximal expiratory pressure by 13 cmH2O (95% CI 1 to 25); it also decreased the risk of respiratory complications (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.96) compared with no/sham respiratory intervention. Whether these effects carry over to activity and participation remains uncertain. This systematic review provided evidence that respiratory muscle training is effective after stroke. Meta-analyses based on five trials indicated that 30minutes of respiratory muscle training, five times per week, for 5 weeks can be expected to increase respiratory muscle strength in very weak individuals after stroke. In addition, respiratory muscle training is expected to reduce the risk of respiratory complications after stroke. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether the benefits are carried over to activity and participation. PROSPERO (CRD42015020683). [Menezes KKP, Nascimento LR, Ada L, Polese JC, Avelino PR, Teixeira-Salmela LF (2016) Respiratory muscle training increases respiratory muscle strength and reduces respiratory complications after stroke: a systematic review.Journal of Physiotherapy62: 138-144]. Copyright © 2016 Australian

  2. Changes in skeletal muscle with aging: effects of exercise training.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M A; Evans, W J

    1993-01-01

    There is an approximate 30% decline in muscle strength and a 40% reduction in muscle area between the second and seventh decades of life. Thus, the loss of muscle mass with aging appears to be the major factor in the age-related loss of muscle strength. The loss of muscle mass is partially due to a significant decline in the numbers of both Type I and Type II muscle fibers plus a decrease in the size of the muscle cells, with the Type II fibers showing a preferential atrophy. There appears to be no loss of glycolytic capacity in senescent skeletal muscle whereas muscle oxidative enzyme activity and muscle capillarization decrease by about 25%. Vigorous endurance exercise training in older people, where the stimulus is progressively increased, elicits a proliferation of muscle capillaries, an increase in oxidative enzyme activity, and a significant improvement in VO2max. Likewise, progressive resistive training in older individuals results in muscle hypertrophy and increased strength, if the training stimulus is of a sufficient intensity and duration. Since older individuals adapt to resistive and endurance exercise training in a similar fashion to young people, the decline in the muscle's metabolic and force-producing capacity can no longer be considered as an inevitable consequence of the aging process. Rather, the adaptations in aging skeletal muscle to exercise training may prevent sarcopenia, enhance the ease of carrying out the activities of daily living, and exert a beneficial effect on such age-associated diseases as Type II diabetes, coronary artery disease, hypertension, osteoporosis, and obesity.

  3. Endurance training facilitates myoglobin desaturation during muscle contraction in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Hisashi; Furuichi, Yasuro; Yamada, Tatsuya; Jue, Thomas; Ojino, Minoru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Iwase, Satoshi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Izawa, Tetsuya; Masuda, Kazumi

    2015-03-24

    At onset of muscle contraction, myoglobin (Mb) immediately releases its bound O2 to the mitochondria. Accordingly, intracellular O2 tension (PmbO2) markedly declines in order to increase muscle O2 uptake (mVO2). However, whether the change in PmbO2 during muscle contraction modulates mVO2 and whether the O2 release rate from Mb increases in endurance-trained muscles remain unclear. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of endurance training on O2 saturation of Mb (SmbO2) and PmbO2 kinetics during muscle contraction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a 4-week swimming training (Tr group; 6 days per week, 30 min × 4 sets per day) with a weight load of 2% body mass. After the training period, deoxygenated Mb kinetics during muscle contraction were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy under hemoglobin-free medium perfusion. In the Tr group, the VmO2peak significantly increased by 32%. Although the PmbO2 during muscle contraction did not affect the increased mVO2 in endurance-trained muscle, the O2 release rate from Mb increased because of the increased Mb concentration and faster decremental rate in SmbO2 at the maximal twitch tension. These results suggest that the Mb dynamics during muscle contraction are contributing factors to faster VO2 kinetics in endurance-trained muscle.

  4. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing. PMID:27134409

  5. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing.

  6. Reliability of MR-Based Volumetric 3-D Analysis of Pelvic Muscles among Subjects with Low Back with Leg Pain and Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Keczmer, Przemysław; Łochowski, Rafał M.; Tomal, Paulina; Rychlik, Michał; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Aim Lately, the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging, Lasègue sign and classic neurological signs have been considered not accurate enough to distinguish the radicular from non-radicular low back with leg pain (LBLP) and a calculation of the symptomatic side muscle volume has been indicated as a probable valuable marker. However, only the multifidus muscle volume has been calculated so far. The main objective of the study was to verify whether LBLP subjects presented symptomatic side pelvic muscle atrophy compared to healthy volunteers. The second aim was to assess the inter-rater reliability of 3-D manual method for segmenting and measuring the volume of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscles in both LBLP patients and healthy subjects. Method Two independent raters analyzed MR images of LBLP and healthy subjects towards muscle volume of four pelvic muscles, i.e. the piriformis, gluteus minimus, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus. For both sides, the MR images of the muscles without adipose tissue infiltration were manually segmented in 3-D medical images. Results Symptomatic muscle atrophy was confirmed in only over 50% of LBLP subjects (gluteus maximus (p<0.001), gluteus minimus (p<0.01) and piriformis (p<0.05)). The ICC values indicated that the inter-rater reproducibility was greater than 0.90 for all measurements (LBLP and healthy subjects), except for the measurement of the right gluteus medius muscle in LBLP patients, which was equal to 0.848. Conclusion More than 50% of LBLP subjects presented symptomatic gluteus maximus, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscle atrophy. 3-D manual segmentation reliably measured muscle volume in all the measured pelvic muscles in both healthy and LBLP subjects. To answer the question of what kind of muscle atrophy is indicative of radicular or non-radicular pain further studies are required. PMID:27459688

  7. Myofascial pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Spitznagle, Theresa Monaco; Robinson, Caitlin McCurdy

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with pelvic pain commonly present with complaints of pain located anywhere below the umbilicus radiating to the top of their thighs or genital region. The somatovisceral convergence that occurs within the pelvic region exemplifies why examination of not only the organs but also the muscles, connective tissues (fascia), and neurologic input to the region should be performed for women with pelvic pain. The susceptibility of the pelvic floor musculature to the development of myofascial pain has been attributed to unique functional demands of this muscle. Conservative interventions should be considered to address the impairments found on physical examination.

  8. Does the prevalence of levator ani muscle avulsion differ when assessed using tomographic ultrasound imaging at rest vs on maximum pelvic floor muscle contraction?

    PubMed

    van Delft, K; Thakar, R; Sultan, A H; Kluivers, K B

    2015-07-01

    It has been suggested that transperineal ultrasound images obtained during maximum pelvic floor muscle contraction improve the diagnosis of levator ani muscle (LAM) avulsion by comparison with those obtained at rest. The objective of this study was to establish, using transperineal tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI), the correlation between LAM avulsion diagnosed at rest and that on contraction. Primiparous women were examined 3 months postpartum by Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) assessment and for LAM avulsion clinically by digital palpation and by transperineal TUI performed at rest and on pelvic floor muscle contraction. LAM avulsion was diagnosed on TUI when the three central slices were abnormal. A comparison was made between LAM avulsion diagnosed at rest and on maximum contraction. Two independent blinded investigators performed the analyses and a third investigator resolved discrepancies. One hundred and ninety primiparae were analyzed providing 380 results for comparison, as right and left LAM were analyzed independently. LAM avulsion was found in 36 (9.5%) images obtained at rest and in 35 (9.2%) on contraction, revealing moderate correlation between the two (ICC, 0.58 (95% CI, 0.51-0.64)). Twenty-two cases of LAM avulsion were identified both at rest and on contraction. One woman had LAM avulsion on palpation, which was seen on TUI as LAM avulsion on contraction, but not at rest. More cases of anterior and posterior compartment prolapse were found in women with LAM avulsion diagnosed on contraction only compared to LAM avulsion observed at rest only (POP-Q assessment point Ba, -1.8 vs -2.5 (P = 0.075) and point Bp, -2.5 vs -2.8 (P = 0.072)). Findings on transperineal TUI performed in women at rest and on contraction correlate reasonably well. However, given the trend towards an association with signs of pelvic floor dysfunction, diagnosis of LAM avulsion on contraction seems to be more reliable. Consistency in technique and

  9. [Decreasing systolic blood pressure with isometric muscle training: a CAT].

    PubMed

    Espinoza Salinas, Alexis; Sánchez, Pablo Aguilera; Zafra Santos, Edson; Cofre Bolados, Cristian; Prado Núñez, Hugo; Pavez Von Martens, Gustavo

    2014-09-11

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart disease or heart failure. One of the interventions for the management of this disorder is isometric muscle training on upper and lower limbs. To prove the validity and applicability of results regarding the effectiveness of isometric training in hypertensive subjects. We also attempt to answer the following question: what is the effectiveness of isometric muscle training on the decrease of systolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients? Critical appraisal of the systematic review and meta-analysis "Isometric exercise training for blood pressure management". Isometric training reduces systolic blood pressure in normotensive and medicated hypertensive subjects, with a standardized mean difference of 6.77 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: 7.93-5.62). It is reasonable to recommend isometric muscle training with the aim of lowering systolic blood pressure, considering the impact of the results of the articles analyzed and the applicability of this type of training.

  10. Abnormal expression of p27kip1 protein in levator ani muscle of aging women with pelvic floor disorders – a relationship to the cellular differentiation and degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Copas, Pleas; Caudle, Michael R; Cekanova, Maria; Dassanayake, Tamara; Asbury, Bridgett; Van Meter, Stuart E; Elder, Robert F; Brown, Jeffrey B; Cross, Stephanie B

    2001-01-01

    Background Pelvic floor disorders affect almost 50% of aging women. An important role in the pelvic floor support belongs to the levator ani muscle. The p27/kip1 (p27) protein, multifunctional cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, shows changing expression in differentiating skeletal muscle cells during development, and relatively high levels of p27 RNA were detected in the normal human skeletal muscles. Methods Biopsy samples of levator ani muscle were obtained from 22 symptomatic patients with stress urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and overlaps (age range 38–74), and nine asymptomatic women (age 31–49). Cryostat sections were investigated for p27 protein expression and type I (slow twitch) and type II (fast twitch) fibers. Results All fibers exhibited strong plasma membrane (and nuclear) p27 protein expression. cytoplasmic p27 expression was virtually absent in asymptomatic women. In perimenopausal symptomatic patients (ages 38–55), muscle fibers showed hypertrophy and moderate cytoplasmic p27 staining accompanied by diminution of type II fibers. Older symptomatic patients (ages 57–74) showed cytoplasmic p27 overexpression accompanied by shrinking, cytoplasmic vacuolization and fragmentation of muscle cells. The plasma membrane and cytoplasmic p27 expression was not unique to the muscle cells. Under certain circumstances, it was also detected in other cell types (epithelium of ectocervix and luteal cells). Conclusions This is the first report on the unusual (plasma membrane and cytoplasmic) expression of p27 protein in normal and abnormal human striated muscle cells in vivo. Our data indicate that pelvic floor disorders are in perimenopausal patients associated with an appearance of moderate cytoplasmic p27 expression, accompanying hypertrophy and transition of type II into type I fibers. The patients in advanced postmenopause show shrinking and fragmentation of muscle fibers associated with strong cytoplasmic p27 expression. PMID:11696252

  11. Adaptations of mouse skeletal muscle to low intensity vibration training

    PubMed Central

    McKeehen, James N.; Novotny, Susan A.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Call, Jarrod A.; Nuckley, David J.; Lowe, Dawn A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that low intensity vibration training in mice improves contractile function of hindlimb skeletal muscles and promotes exercise-related cellular adaptations. Methods We subjected C57BL/6J mice to 6 wk, 5 d·wk−1, 15 min·d−1 of sham or low intensity vibration (45 Hz, 1.0 g) while housed in traditional cages (Sham-Active, n=8; Vibrated-Active, n=10) or in small cages to restrict physical activity (Sham-Restricted, n=8; Vibrated-Restricted, n=8). Contractile function and resistance to fatigue were tested in vivo (anterior and posterior crural muscles) and ex vivo on the soleus muscle. Tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were evaluated histologically for alterations in oxidative metabolism, capillarity, and fiber types. Epididymal fat pad and hindlimb muscle masses were measured. Two-way ANOVAs were used to determine effects of vibration and physical inactivity. Results Vibration training resulted in a 10% increase in maximal isometric torque (P=0.038) and 16% faster maximal rate of relaxation (P=0.030) of the anterior crural muscles. Posterior crural muscles were unaffected by vibration, with the exception of greater rates of contraction in Vibrated-Restricted mice compared to Vibrated-Active and Sham-Restricted mice (P=0.022). Soleus muscle maximal isometric tetanic force tended to be greater (P=0.057) and maximal relaxation was 20% faster (P=0.005) in Vibrated compared to Sham mice. Restriction of physical activity induced muscle weakness but was not required for vibration to be effective in improving strength or relaxation. Vibration training did not impact muscle fatigability or any indicator of cellular adaptation investigated (P≥0.431). Fat pad but not hindlimb muscle masses were affected by vibration training. Conclusion Vibration training in mice improved muscle contractility, specifically strength and relaxation rates, with no indication of adverse effects to muscle function or cellular adaptations. PMID:23274599

  12. Examination of Strength Training and Detraining Effects in Expiratory Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Susan; Davenport, Paul; Sapienza, Christine

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine strength gains following expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) and to determine detraining effects when the training stimulus is removed. Method: Thirty-two healthy participants were enrolled in an EMST program. Sixteen participants trained for 4 weeks (Group 1) and 16 participants trained…

  13. Examination of Strength Training and Detraining Effects in Expiratory Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Susan; Davenport, Paul; Sapienza, Christine

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine strength gains following expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) and to determine detraining effects when the training stimulus is removed. Method: Thirty-two healthy participants were enrolled in an EMST program. Sixteen participants trained for 4 weeks (Group 1) and 16 participants trained…

  14. The Influence of Dual Pressure Biofeedback Units on Pelvic Rotation and Abdominal Muscle Activity during the Active Straight Leg Raise in Women with Chronic Lower Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Ha, Sung-Min; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to assess the influence of applying dual pressure biofeedback units (DPBUs) on the angle of pelvic rotation and abdominal muscle activity during the active straight leg raise (ASLR). [Subjects] Seventeen patients with low-back pain (LBP) participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects were asked to perform an active straight leg raise (ASLR) without a PBU, with a single PBU, and with DPBUs. The angles of pelvic rotation were measured using a three-dimensional motion-analysis system, and the muscle activity of the bilateral internal oblique abdominis (IO), external oblique abdominis (EO), and rectus abdominis (RA) was recorded using surface electromyography (EMG). One-way repeated-measures ANOVA was performed to determine the rotation angles and muscle activity under the three conditions. [Results] The EMG activity of the ipsilateral IO, contralateral EO, and bilateral RA was greater and pelvic rotation was lower with the DPBUs than with no PBU or a single PBU. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that applying DPBUs during ASLR is effective in decreasing unwanted pelvic rotation and increasing abdominal muscle activity in women with chronic low back pain.

  15. Respiratory dysfunction in ventilated patients: can inspiratory muscle training help?

    PubMed

    Bissett, B; Leditschke, I A; Paratz, J D; Boots, R J

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is associated with prolonged and difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation. This dysfunction in ventilator-dependent patients is multifactorial: there is evidence that inspiratory muscle weakness is partially explained by disuse atrophy secondary to ventilation, and positive end-expiratory pressure can further reduce muscle strength by negatively shifting the length-tension curve of the diaphragm. Polyneuropathy is also likely to contribute to apparent muscle weakness in critically ill patients, and nutritional and pharmaceutical effects may further compound muscle weakness. Moreover, psychological influences, including anxiety, may contribute to difficulty in weaning. There is recent evidence that inspiratory muscle training is safe and feasible in selected ventilator-dependent patients, and that this training can reduce the weaning period and improve overall weaning success rates. Extrapolating from evidence in sports medicine, as well as the known effects of inspiratory muscle training in chronic lung disease, a theoretical model is proposed to describe how inspiratory muscle training enhances weaning and recovery from mechanical ventilation. Possible mechanisms include increased protein synthesis (both Type 1 and Type 2 muscle fibres), enhanced limb perfusion via dampening of a sympathetically-mediated metaboreflex, reduced lactate levels and modulation of the perception of exertion, resulting in less dyspnoea and enhanced exercise capacity.

  16. Effect of unilateral exercise on spinal and pelvic deformities, and isokinetic trunk muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Kim, Soonyoung

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to collect basic data regarding the prevention of spinal and pelvic deformities by investigating the spinal shape and muscular function characteristics of imbalance reduction and functional improvement following asymmetric activities. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 14 archery athletes who mostly perform unilateral motion with spinal and pelvic pain, and 19 healthy subjects. All the participants were evaluated using spinal structure analysis and for 60°/sec isokinetic muscular strength of the trunk. [Results] Between the two groups, there were significant differences in the interaction effect of trunk inclination deformities, and flexor and extensor 60°/sec isokinetic muscular strength of the trunk. Also, the main effects of gender comparison showed significant differences in the trunk inclination deformities, pelvic rotation deformities, lordosis angles, and flexor and extensor 60 ˚/sec isokinetic muscular strengths of the trunk. [Conclusion] The basic data obtained in this study can be used to help develop a strategic exercise program for improving unilateral movement and malalignment of the spine and pelvis.

  17. Effect of unilateral exercise on spinal and pelvic deformities, and isokinetic trunk muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Kim, Soonyoung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to collect basic data regarding the prevention of spinal and pelvic deformities by investigating the spinal shape and muscular function characteristics of imbalance reduction and functional improvement following asymmetric activities. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 14 archery athletes who mostly perform unilateral motion with spinal and pelvic pain, and 19 healthy subjects. All the participants were evaluated using spinal structure analysis and for 60°/sec isokinetic muscular strength of the trunk. [Results] Between the two groups, there were significant differences in the interaction effect of trunk inclination deformities, and flexor and extensor 60°/sec isokinetic muscular strength of the trunk. Also, the main effects of gender comparison showed significant differences in the trunk inclination deformities, pelvic rotation deformities, lordosis angles, and flexor and extensor 60 ˚/sec isokinetic muscular strengths of the trunk. [Conclusion] The basic data obtained in this study can be used to help develop a strategic exercise program for improving unilateral movement and malalignment of the spine and pelvis. PMID:27134369

  18. Effect of feedback techniques for lower back pain on gluteus maximus and oblique abdominal muscle activity and angle of pelvic rotation during the clam exercise.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eun-Kyung; Park, Kyue-Nam; Jung, Do-Young

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the effect of feedback tools on activities of the gluteus maximus (Gmax) and oblique abdominal muscles and the angle of pelvic rotation during clam exercise (CE). Comparative study using repeated measures. University laboratory. Sixteen subjects with lower back pain. Each subject performed the CE without feedback, the CE using a pressure biofeedback unit (CE-PBU), and the CE with palpation and visual feedback (CE-PVF). Electromyographic (EMG) activity and the angles of pelvic rotation were measured using surface EMG and a three-dimensional motion-analysis system, respectively. One-way repeated-measures ANOVA followed by the Bonferroni post hoc test were used to compare the EMG activity in each muscle as well as the angle of pelvic rotation during the CE, CE-PBU, and CE-PVF. The results of post-hoc testing showed a significantly reduced angle of pelvic rotation and significantly more Gmax EMG activity during the CE-PVF compared with during the CE and CE-PBU. These findings suggest that palpation and visual feedback is effective for activating the Gmax and controlling pelvic rotation during the CE in subjects with lower back pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Cultured Murine Muscle Cells Reproduces Gene Expression Changes of Trained Mouse Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Nathalie; Arnold, Anne-Sophie; Item, Flurin; Summermatter, Serge; Brochmann Santana Santos, Gesa; Christe, Martine; Boutellier, Urs; Toigo, Marco; Handschin, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Adequate levels of physical activity are at the center of a healthy lifestyle. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate the beneficial effects of exercise remain enigmatic. This gap in knowledge is caused by the lack of an amenable experimental model system. Therefore, we optimized electric pulse stimulation of muscle cells to closely recapitulate the plastic changes in gene expression observed in a trained skeletal muscle. The exact experimental conditions were established using the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) as a marker for an endurance-trained muscle fiber. We subsequently compared the changes in the relative expression of metabolic and myofibrillar genes in the muscle cell system with those observed in mouse muscle in vivo following either an acute or repeated bouts of treadmill exercise. Importantly, in electrically stimulated C2C12 mouse muscle cells, the qualitative transcriptional adaptations were almost identical to those in trained muscle, but differ from the acute effects of exercise on muscle gene expression. In addition, significant alterations in the expression of myofibrillar proteins indicate that this stimulation could be used to modulate the fiber-type of muscle cells in culture. Our data thus describe an experimental cell culture model for the study of at least some of the transcriptional aspects of skeletal muscle adaptation to physical activity. This system will be useful for the study of the molecular mechanisms that regulate exercise adaptation in muscle. PMID:20532042

  20. Prolonged androgen deprivation may influence the autoregulation of estrogen receptors in the brain and pelvic floor muscles of male rats.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Erik; Calich, Hannah J; Currie, R William; Wassersug, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Androgen deprivation in males has detrimental effects on various tissues and bodily functions, some of which can be restored by estradiol (E2) administration. We investigated how the duration of androgen deprivation affects the autoregulation of estrogen receptors (ERs) levels in core brain areas associated with sexual behavior and cognition, as well as in pelvic floor muscles (PFM). We also measured c-Fos levels in brain areas associated with sexual behavior shortly after the rats mated. Prolonged castration increases ERα levels in the preoptic area (POA) and E2 treatment reverses these effects. In the POA, c-Fos levels after mating are not affected by the duration of androgen deprivation and/or E2 treatment. ERβ levels in the POA as well as c-Fos levels in the POA and the core area of nucleus accumbens correlate with the mounting frequency for E2-treated Short-Term castrates. Additionally, ERβ levels in the medial amygdala are positively correlated with the mounting frequency of Long-Term castrates that received E2 treatment. In the hippocampus, ERs are downregulated only when E2 is administered early after castration, whereas downregulation of ERα in the prefrontal cortex only occurs with delayed E2 treatment. Early, but not delayed, E2 treatment after castration increases ERβ levels in the bulbocavernosus and ERα levels in the levator ani of male rats. Our data suggest that the duration of androgen deprivation may influence the autoregulation of ERs by E2 treatment in select brain areas and pelvic floor muscles of male rats.

  1. Myofascial Pelvic Pain and Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bonder, Jaclyn H; Chi, Michelle; Rispoli, Leia

    2017-08-01

    Myofascial pelvic pain refers to pain in the pelvic floor muscles, the pelvic floor connective tissue, and the surrounding fascia. The cause is often multifactorial and requires treatment that encompasses multiple modalities. This type of pain is often associated with other abdominopelvic disorders, so providers in these specialties need to be aware of these connections. A comprehensive musculoskeletal examination, including evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles, and history are key to diagnosing myofascial pelvic pain. Treatments include physical therapy, muscle relaxers, oral neuromodulators, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and pelvic floor muscle injections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of the pelvic floor in bladder neck opening and closure I: muscle forces.

    PubMed

    Petros, P E; Ulmsten, U

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the striated muscle forces hypothesized to assist bladder neck opening and closure in females. Cadaveric dissection was used to identify the levator plate (LP), the anterior portion of pubococcygeus muscle (PCM), the longitudinal muscle of the anus (LMA), and their relation to the bladder, vagina and rectum. X-ray video recordings were made during coughing, straining, squeezing and micturition in a group of 20 incontinent patients and 4 controls, along with surface EMG, urethral pressure and digital palpation studies. During effort, urethral closure appeared to be activated by a forward muscle force corresponding to PCM, and bladder neck closure by backward muscle forces corresponding to LP and LMA. During micturition the PCM force appeared to relax, allowing LP and LMA to pull open the outflow tract. The data appear to support the hypothesis of specific directional muscle forces stretching the vagina to assist bladder neck opening and closure.

  3. Endurance training increases the efficiency of rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Koziel, Agnieszka; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Celichowski, Jan; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-10-01

    Endurance training enhances mitochondrial oxidative capacity, but its effect on mitochondria functioning is poorly understood. In the present study, the influence of an 8-week endurance training on the bioenergetic functioning of rat skeletal muscle mitochondria under different assay temperatures (25, 35, and 42 °C) was investigated. The study was performed on 24 adult 4-month-old male Wistar rats, which were randomly assigned to either a treadmill training group (n = 12) or a sedentary control group (n = 12). In skeletal muscles, endurance training stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative capacity. In isolated mitochondria, endurance training increased the phosphorylation rate and elevated levels of coenzyme Q. Moreover, a decrease in mitochondrial uncoupling, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed after training, which could explain the increased reactive oxygen species production (in nonphosphorylating mitochondria) and enhanced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency. At all studied temperatures, endurance training significantly augmented H2O2 production (and coenzyme Q reduction level) in nonphosphorylating mitochondria and decreased H2O2 production (and coenzyme Q reduction level) in phosphorylating mitochondria. Endurance training magnified the hyperthermia-induced increase in oxidative capacity and attenuated the hyperthermia-induced decline in oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species formation of nonphosphorylating mitochondria via proton leak enhancement. Thus, endurance training induces both quantitative and qualitative changes in muscle mitochondria that are important for cell signaling as well as for maintaining muscle energy homeostasis, especially at high temperatures.

  4. THE EFFECT OF A PELVIC COMPRESSION BELT ON FUNCTIONAL HAMSTRING MUSCLE ACTIVITY IN SPORTSMEN WITH AND WITHOUT PREVIOUS HAMSTRING INJURY.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Ashokan; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Woodley, Stephanie; Sole, Gisela

    2015-06-01

    There is evidence that applying a pelvic compression belt (PCB) can decrease hamstring and lumbar muscle electromyographic activity and increase gluteus maximus activity in healthy women during walking. Increased isokinetic eccentric hamstring strength in the terminal range (25 ° - 5 °) of knee extension has been reported with the use of such a belt in sportsmen with and without hamstring injuries. However, it is unknown whether wearing a pelvic belt alters activity of the hamstrings in sportsmen during walking. To examine the effects of wearing a PCB on electromyographic activity of the hamstring and lumbopelvic muscles during walking in sportsmen with and without hamstring injuries. Randomised crossover, cross-sectional study. Thirty uninjured sportsmen (23.53 ± 3.68 years) and 20 sportsmen with hamstring injuries (22.00 ± 1.45 years) sustained within the previous 12 months participated in this study. Electromyographic amplitudes of the hamstrings, gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and lumbar multifidus were monitored during defined phases of walking and normalised to maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Within-group comparisons [PCB vs. no PCB] for the normalised electromyographic amplitudes were performed for each muscle group using paired t tests. Electromyographic change scores [belt - no belt] were calculated and compared between the two groups with independent t tests. No significant change was evident in hamstring activity for either group while walking with the PCB (p > 0.050). However, with the PCB, gluteus medius activity (p ≤ 0.028) increased in both groups, while gluteus maximus activity increased (p = 0.025) and multifidus activity decreased (p < 0.001) in the control group. The magnitude of change induced by the PCB in gluteus medius activity was similar between groups (p = 0.760). No statistically significant baseline differences in no belt scores were evident between groups for the investigated muscles (p ≥ 0

  5. Spine lateral flexion strength development differences between exercises with pelvic stabilization and without pelvic stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straton, Alexandru; Gidu, Diana Victoria; Micu, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Poor lateral flexor muscle strength can be an important source of lumbar/thoracic back pain in women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pelvic stabilization (PS) and no pelvic stabilization (NoPS) lateral flexion strength exercise training on the development of isolated right and left lateral flexion strength. Isometric torque of the isolated right and left lateral flexion muscles was measured at two positions (0° and 30° opposed angle range of motion) on 42 healthy women before and after 8 weeks of PS and NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise training. Subjects were assigned in three groups, the first (n=14) trained 3 times/week with PS lateral flexion strength exercise, the second (n=14) trained 3 times/week with NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise and the third (control, n=14) did not train. Post training isometric strength values describing PS and NoPS lateral flexion strength improved in greater extent for the PS lateral flexion strength exercise group and in lesser extent for the NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise group, in both angles (p<0.05) relative to controls. These data indicate that the most effective way of training the spine lateral flexion muscles is PS lateral flexion strength exercises; NoPS lateral flexion strength exercises can be an effective way of training for the spine lateral flexion muscles, if there is no access to PS lateral flexion strength training machines.

  6. The effect of parity on pelvic floor muscle strength and quality of life in women with urinary incontinence: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Özdemır, Özlem Çınar; Bakar, Yesim; Özengın, Nuriye; Duran, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activity after vaginal birth, and the effect of parity on PFM strength and quality of life (QoL) in women with urinary incontinence. [Subjects and Methods] Patients (n=241) who gave birth vaginally and experienced urinary incontinence were divided into three groups: group 1 consisted of women having 1–3 children, group 2 consisted of women having 4–6 children, and group 3 consisted of women having more than 6 children. All patients underwent detailed examination of the PFM. The Turkish version of the self-administered Incontinence Quality of Life Instrument (I-QoL) questionnaire was used to evaluate the effects of stress urinary incontinence on participants’ QoL. [Results] Comparison of PFM strengths showed a significant intergroup difference. Group 1 showed significantly higher PFM strength scores than those of groups 2 and 3. I-QoL scores related to stress incontinence showed a significant intergroup difference. As number of deliveries increased, quality of life decreased. Comparison of PFM strengths and I-QoL scores related to stress incontinence showed a significant intergroup difference. [Conclusion] Increasing the awareness of PFM training in women will reduce potential postpartum incontinence due to a weak PFM strength; and will increase quality of life. PMID:26311939

  7. Progressive resistance muscle strength training of hospitalized frail elderly.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, D H; Wall, P T; Bariola, J R; Bopp, M M; Frost, Y M

    2001-07-01

    To determine whether frail elderly patients recuperating from acute illnesses could safely participate in and gain appreciable improvement in muscle strength from progressive resistance muscle strength training. Muscle strength (one repetition maximum), functional abilities (sit-to-stand maneuver and 20-sec maximal safe gait speed), and body composition were measured before and at the conclusion of a 10-wk program of lower limb progressive resistance muscle strength training. The nonrandomized study was conducted in a 30-bed geriatric rehabilitation unit of a university-affiliated Veterans Affairs hospital and a 28-bed transitional care unit of a community nursing home. Participants included 19 recuperating elderly subjects (14 male, 5 female; 13 ambulatory, 6 nonambulatory) >64 yr (mean age, 82.8+/-7.9 yr). The one repetition maximum increased an average of 74%+/-49% (median, 70%; interquartile range, 38%-95%, and an average of 20+/-13 kg (P = 0.0001). Sit-to-stand maneuver times improved in 15 of 19 cases (79%). Maximum safe gait speeds improved in 10 of 19 cases (53%). Four of the six nonambulatory subjects progressed to ambulatory status. No subject experienced a complication. A carefully monitored program of progressive resistance muscle strength training to regain muscle strength is a safe and possibly effective method for frail elderly recuperating from acute illnesses. A randomized control study is needed to examine the degree to which progressive resistance muscle strength training offers advantages, if any, over routine posthospital care that includes traditional low-intensity physical therapy.

  8. The relationship between the piriformis muscle, low back pain, lower limb injuries and motor control training among elite football players.

    PubMed

    Leung, Felix T; Mendis, M Dilani; Stanton, Warren R; Hides, Julie A

    2015-07-01

    Australian Football League (AFL) players have a high incidence of back injuries. Motor control training to increase lumbopelvic neuromuscular control has been effective in reducing low back pain (LBP) and lower limb injuries in elite athletes. Control of pelvic and femoral alignment during functional activity involves the piriformis muscle. This study investigated (a) the effect of motor control training on piriformis muscle size in AFL players, with and without LBP, during the playing season, and (b) whether there is a relationship between lower limb injury and piriformis muscle size. Stepped-wedge intervention. 46 AFL players participated in a motor control training programme consisting of two 30min sessions per week over 7-8 weeks, delivered across the season as a randomised 3 group single-blinded stepped-wedge design. Assessment of piriformis muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) involved magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 time points during the season. Assessment of LBP consisted of player interview and physical examination. Injury data were obtained from club records. An interaction effect for Time, Intervention Group and LBP group (F=3.7, p=0.03) was found. Piriformis muscle CSA showed significant increases between Times 1 and 2 (F=4.24, p=0.046), and Times 2 and 3 (F=8.59, p=0.006). Players with a smaller increase in piriformis muscle CSA across the season had higher odds of sustaining an injury (OR=1.08). Piriformis muscle size increases across the season in elite AFL players and is affected by the presence of LBP and lower limb injury. Motor control training positively affects piriformis muscle size in players with LBP. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Importance of mind-muscle connection during progressive resistance training.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Vinstrup, Jonas; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Jay, Kenneth; Colado, Juan Carlos; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluates whether focusing on using specific muscles during bench press can selectively activate these muscles. Altogether 18 resistance-trained men participated. Subjects were familiarized with the procedure and performed one-maximum repetition (1RM) test during the first session. In the second session, 3 different bench press conditions were performed with intensities of 20, 40, 50, 60 and 80 % of the pre-determined 1RM: regular bench press, and bench press focusing on selectively using the pectoralis major and triceps brachii, respectively. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded for the triceps brachii and pectoralis major muscles. Subsequently, peak EMG of the filtered signals were normalized to maximum maximorum EMG of each muscle. In both muscles, focusing on using the respective muscles increased muscle activity at relative loads between 20 and 60 %, but not at 80 % of 1RM. Overall, a threshold between 60 and 80 % rather than a linear decrease in selective activation with increasing intensity appeared to exist. The increased activity did not occur at the expense of decreased activity of the other muscle, e.g. when focusing on activating the triceps muscle the activity of the pectoralis muscle did not decrease. On the contrary, focusing on using the triceps muscle also increased pectoralis EMG at 50 and 60 % of 1RM. Resistance-trained individuals can increase triceps brachii or pectarilis major muscle activity during the bench press when focusing on using the specific muscle at intensities up to 60 % of 1RM. A threshold between 60 and 80 % appeared to exist.

  10. Nonuniform muscle hypertrophy: its relation to muscle activation in training session.

    PubMed

    Wakahara, Taku; Fukutani, Atsuki; Kawakami, Yasuo; Yanai, Toshimasa

    2013-11-01

    Muscle hypertrophy in response to resistance training has been reported to occur nonuniformly along the length of the muscle. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the regional difference in muscle hypertrophy induced by a training intervention corresponds to the regional difference in muscle activation in the training session. Twelve young men participated in a training intervention program for the elbow extensors with a multijoint resistance exercise for 12 wk (3 d · wk(-1)). Before and after the intervention, cross-sectional areas of the triceps brachii along its length were measured with magnetic resonance images. A series of transverse relaxation time (T2)-weighted magnetic resonance images was recorded before and immediately after the first session of training intervention. The T2 was calculated for each pixel within the triceps brachii. In the images recorded after the session, the number of pixels with a T2 greater than the threshold (mean + 1 SD of T2 before the session) was expressed as the ratio to the whole number of pixels within the muscle and used as an index of muscle activation (percent activated area). The percent activated area of the triceps brachii in the first session was significantly higher in the middle regions than that in the most proximal region. Similarly, the relative change in cross-sectional area induced by the training intervention was also significantly greater in the middle regions than the most proximal region. The results suggest that nonuniform muscle hypertrophy after training intervention is due to the region-specific muscle activation during the training session.

  11. Pelvic floor muscles and the external urethral sphincter have different responses to applied bladder pressure during continence

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai-Hong; Salcedo, Levilester B.; Song, Bo; Damaser, Margot S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the functional innervation of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) and if there is PFM activity during an external pressure increase to the bladder in female rats. Methods Thirty-one female adult virgin Sprague Dawley rats received an external increase in bladder pressure until urinary leakage was noted while bladder pressure was recorded (leak point pressure; LPP) under urethane anesthesia. Six of the rats underwent repeat LPP testing after bilateral transection of the levator ani nerve. Another 6 rats underwent repeat LPP testing after bilateral transection of the pudendal nerve. Simultaneous recordings of PFM (pubo-/iliococcygeus muscles) electromyogram (EMG) and external urethral sphincter (EUS) EMG were recorded during cystometry and LPP testing. Results Thirteen rats (42%) showed tonic PFM EMG activity during filling cystometry. Eighteen rats (58%) showed no tonic PFM EMG activity at baseline, but PFM EMG could be activated by pinching the perineal skin. This activity could be maintained unless voiding occurred. The external increase in bladder pressure caused significantly increased EUS EMG activity as demonstrated by increased amplitude and frequency. However, there was no such response in PFM EMG. LPP was not significantly different after levator ani nerve transection, but was significantly decreased after pudendal nerve transection. Conclusions PFM activity was not increased during external pressure increases to the bladder in female rats. Experimental designs using rats should consider this result. PMID:20206969

  12. Investigation of optimal cues to instruction for pelvic floor muscle contraction: a pilot study using 2D ultrasound imaging in pre-menopausal, nulliparous, continent women.

    PubMed

    Crotty, Kay; Bartram, Clive I; Pitkin, Joan; Cairns, Mindy C; Taylor, Paul C; Dorey, Grace; Chatoor, Dave

    2011-11-01

    Optimal urethrovesical positioning (UVP) may be important for continence. Pelvic floor muscle contraction (PFMC) influences UVP. PFMC instruction cues vary and often encourage anterior PFM recruitment that may result in sub-maximal posterior facilitation. posterior or combined cues are more influential in optimizing UVP during PFMC following a brief practice period than anterior cue. Seventeen pre-menopausal, nulliparous, continent women were taught selective PFMC using different cues: anterior; posterior; anterior and posterior combined. Perineal ultrasound images of three PFMC for each cue were captured in supine and standing twice, 5  min apart. For reliability two raters measured data using angle of urethral inclination (AUI). Data analysis was undertaken using a customized General Linear Model ANOVA testing for interactions between all variables; subject, cue, posture, and test. Post hoc Bonferroni correction was used with a significance level of 0.05. The ANOVA showed significant differences between variables (P = 0.000). Post hoc analysis indicated significant differences between posterior and anterior cues 4.240° (P = 0.003); combined and anterior 3.756° (P = 0.009) but not between posterior and combined cues -0.484° (P = 1.00). Mean difference in AUI between supine and standing was 9.496° (P = 0.000); however, the interaction of cues and postures was not significant. AUI was significantly more acute/optimal when PFMC instruction included a posterior cue. This may be due to optimal recruitment of puborectalis and other posterior regional muscles which may be sub-maximally recruited with anterior cue. Investigation of the potential impact of these findings and possible usefulness of standardized instructions in PFM training is required. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Training-specific muscle architecture adaptation after 5-wk training in athletes.

    PubMed

    Blazevich, Anthony J; Gill, Nicholas D; Bronks, Roger; Newton, Robert U

    2003-12-01

    This study examined changes in the muscle size, muscle architecture, strength, and sprint/jump performances of concurrently training athletes during 5 wk of "altered" resistance training (RT). Eight female and 15 male athletes performed 4 wk of sprint, jump, and resistance training in addition to their sports training (standardization) before adopting one of three different programs for 5 wk: 1) squat lift training (SQ, N = 8) with sprint/jump training; 2) forward hack squat training (FHS, N = 7) with sprint/jump training; or 3) sprint/jump training only (SJ, N = 8). Muscle size, fascicle angle, and fascicle length of the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles (using ultrasound procedures) as well as 20-m sprint run, vertical jump, and strength performance changes were examined. A small increase in VL fascicle angle in SQ and FHS was statistically different to the decrease in SJ subjects (P < 0.05 at distal, P < 0.1 at proximal). VL fascicle length increased for SJ only (P < 0.05 at distal, P < 0.1 at proximal) and increased in RF in SQ subjects (P < 0.05). Muscle thickness of VL and RF increased in all training groups (P < 0.05) but only at proximal sites. There were no between-group differences in squat, forward hack squat, or isokinetic strength performances, or in sprint or jump performances, despite improvements in some of the tests across the groups. Significant muscle size and architectural adaptations can occur in concurrently training athletes in response to a 5-wk training program. These adaptations were possibly associated with the force and velocity characteristics of the training exercises but not the movement patterns. Factors other than, or in addition to, muscle architecture must mediate changes in strength, sprint, and jump performance.

  14. Kinesthetic imagery training of forceful muscle contractions increases brain signal and muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wan X; Ranganathan, Vinoth K; Allexandre, Didier; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yue, Guang H

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of training using internal imagery (IMI; also known as kinesthetic imagery or first person imagery) with that of external imagery (EMI; also known as third-person visual imagery) of strong muscle contractions on voluntary muscle strengthening. Eighteen young, healthy subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups (6 in each group): internal motor imagery (IMI), external motor imagery (EMI), or a no-practice control (CTRL) group. Training lasted for 6 weeks (~15 min/day, 5 days/week). The participants' right arm elbow-flexion strength, muscle electrical activity, and movement-related cortical potential (MRCP) were evaluated before and after training. Only the IMI group showed significant strength gained (10.8%) while the EMI (4.8%) and CTRL (-3.3%) groups did not. Only the IMI group showed a significant elevation in MRCP on scalp locations over both the primary motor (M1) and supplementary motor cortices (EMI group over M1 only) and this increase was significantly greater than that of EMI and CTRL groups. These results suggest that training by IMI of forceful muscle contractions was effective in improving voluntary muscle strength without physical exercise. We suggest that the IMI training likely strengthened brain-to-muscle (BTM) command that may have improved motor unit recruitment and activation, and led to greater muscle output. Training by IMI of forceful muscle contractions may change the activity level of cortical motor control network, which may translate into greater descending command to the target muscle and increase its strength.

  15. Effect of an Exercise Protocol on Pelvic Muscle Resting Pressure in Healthy Adult Women.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    bulbocavernosi, the superficial transverse perineal muscles, and the external anal sphincter (Mandelstam, 1978). The bulbocavernosi are located on either side...the deep muscles and are absent in some women (Oxorn, 1986). The external anal sphincter is comprised of both superficial (voluntary) and deep...levatores ani and internal anal sphincter to maintain tone and occlude the anal orifice (Oxorn, 1986). The external anal sphincter originates in the

  16. Effects of Inspiratory Muscle Training and Calisthenics-and-Breathing Exercises in COPD With and Without Respiratory Muscle Weakness.

    PubMed

    Basso-Vanelli, Renata P; Di Lorenzo, Valéria A Pires; Labadessa, Ivana G; Regueiro, Eloisa M G; Jamami, Mauricio; Gomes, Evelim L F D; Costa, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Patients with COPD may experience respiratory muscle weakness. Two therapeutic approaches to the respiratory muscles are inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises. The aims of the study are to compare the effects of inspiratory muscle training and calisthenics-and-breathing exercises associated with physical training in subjects with COPD as an additional benefit of strength and endurance of the inspiratory muscles, thoracoabdominal mobility, physical exercise capacity, and reduction in dyspnea on exertion. In addition, these gains were compared between subjects with and without respiratory muscle weakness. 25 subjects completed the study: 13 composed the inspiratory muscle training group, and 12 composed the calisthenics-and-breathing exercises group. Subjects were assessed before and after training by spirometry, measurements of respiratory muscle strength and test of inspiratory muscle endurance, thoracoabdominal excursion measurements, and the 6-min walk test. Moreover, scores for the Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale were reported. After intervention, there was a significant improvement in both groups of respiratory muscle strength and endurance, thoracoabdominal mobility, and walking distance in the 6-min walk test. Additionally, there was a decrease of dyspnea in the 6-min walk test peak. A difference was found between groups, with higher values of respiratory muscle strength and thoracoabdominal mobility and lower values of dyspnea in the 6-min walk test peak and the Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale in the inspiratory muscle training group. In the inspiratory muscle training group, subjects with respiratory muscle weakness had greater gains in inspiratory muscle strength and endurance. Both interventions increased exercise capacity and decreased dyspnea during physical effort. However, inspiratory muscle training was more effective in increasing inspiratory muscle strength and endurance, which could

  17. Myofascial pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Kotarinos, Rhonda

    2012-10-01

    Myofascial pelvic pain is fraught with many unknowns. Is it the organs of the pelvis, is it the muscles of the pelvis, or is the origin of the pelvic pain from an extrapelvic muscle? Is there a single source or multiple? In this state of confusion what is the best way to manage the many symptoms that can be associated with myofascial pelvic pain. This article reviews current studies that attempt to answer some of these questions. More questions seem to develop as each study presents its findings.

  18. Vaginismus, a component of a general defensive reaction. an investigation of pelvic floor muscle activity during exposure to emotion-inducing film excerpts in women with and without vaginismus.

    PubMed

    van der Velde, J; Laan, E; Everaerd, W

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanism underlying vaginismus, which may be part of a general defense mechanism. Exposure to a threatening situation will evoke an increase in muscle activity. This muscle reaction will not be restricted to the pelvic floor but will also occur in postural muscles, such as in the trapezius region. Women with and without vaginismus were exposed to four stimuli: excerpts from threatening, erotic, neutral and sexual-threatening films. Subjects were 45 physician- or self-referred patients with vaginismus and 32 controls with no sexual or pelvic floor complaints. The activity of the pelvic floor muscles and of the muscles in the trapezius region was recorded with surface electrodes. There were no differences between women with and without vaginistic reactions. EMG measurement of both the pelvic floor muscles and the trapezius muscle showed an increase in muscle activity during the threatening and sexual-threatening excerpts in women with and without vaginismus. This increase of involuntary pelvic floor muscle activity is part of a general defense mechanism that occurs during exposure to threatening situations. This reaction is not restricted to a situation with a sexual content. The results of this study shed new light on the concept of vaginismus as a primarily sexual dysfunction.

  19. Muscle carnosine loading by beta-alanine supplementation is more pronounced in trained vs. untrained muscles.

    PubMed

    Bex, T; Chung, W; Baguet, A; Stegen, S; Stautemas, J; Achten, E; Derave, W

    2014-01-15

    Carnosine occurs in high concentrations in human skeletal muscle and assists working capacity during high-intensity exercise. Chronic beta-alanine (BA) supplementation has consistently been shown to augment muscle carnosine concentration, but the effect of training on the carnosine loading efficiency is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to compare muscle carnosine loading between trained and untrained arm and leg muscles. In a first study (n = 17), reliability of carnosine quantification by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was evaluated in deltoid and triceps brachii muscles. In a second study, participants (n = 35; 10 nonathletes, 10 cyclists, 10 swimmers, and 5 kayakers) were supplemented with 6.4 g/day of slow-release BA for 23 days. Carnosine content was evaluated in soleus, gastrocnemius medialis, and deltoid muscles by (1)H-MRS. All the results are reported as arbitrary units. In the nonathletes, BA supplementation increased carnosine content by 47% in the arm and 33% in the leg muscles (not significant). In kayakers, the increase was more pronounced in arm (deltoid) vs. leg (soleus + gastrocnemius) muscles (0.089 vs. 0.049), whereas the reverse pattern was observed in cyclists (0.065 vs. 0.084). Swimmers had significantly higher increase in carnosine in both deltoid (0.107 vs. 0.065) and gastrocnemius muscle (0.082 vs. 0.051) compared with nonathletes. We showed that 1) carnosine content can be reliably measured by (1)H-MRS in deltoid muscle, 2) carnosine loading is equally effective in arm vs. leg muscles of nonathletes, and 3) carnosine loading is more pronounced in trained vs. untrained muscles.

  20. Respiratory modulation of the activity in sympathetic neurones supplying muscle, skin and pelvic organs in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Boczek-Funcke, A; Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Michaelis, M

    1992-01-01

    1. The respiratory-related modulation of activity in neurones of the lumbar sympathetic outflow to skeletal muscle, skin and pelvic organs was investigated in anaesthetized, paralysed and artificially ventilated cats, using single- and multi-unit recordings. The activity of the neurones was analysed with respect to the phrenic nerve discharge under various experimental conditions. 2. Neurones tentatively classified as muscle vasoconstrictor and visceral vasoconstrictor neurones exhibited two activity peaks, one caused by baroreceptor unloading during the declining phase of the second order blood pressure waves and a respiratory drive-dependent peak in parallel with inspiration. The two peaks were separated by depressions of activity in early inspiration and post-inspiration. After cutting vagus and buffer nerves the activity peak during inspiration remained and was followed and sometimes preceded by a depression of activity. 3. The majority of the neurones tentatively classified as cutaneous vasoconstrictor neurones exhibited no respiratory modulation in their activity. Others exhibited an activity peak in expiration, an activity peak in inspiration, or a respiratory profile similar to that in muscle vasoconstrictor neurones. During increased respiratory drive (induced by hypercapnia) some neurones with unmodulated activity changed to an inspiratory or an expiratory pattern. Neurones discharging predominantly in inspiration projected preferentially to hairless skin. 4. Neurones which were tentatively classified as sudomotor neurones discharged predominantly in early expiration. 5. Some preganglionic neurones which were tentatively classified as motility-regulating neurones discharged during expiration. The majority of these neurones disclosed no respiratory modulation of their activity. 6. The study shows that different types of neurone of the lumbar sympathetic system exhibit distinct patterns of respiratory modulation in their activity. We conclude that the type

  1. Respiratory modulation of the activity in sympathetic neurones supplying muscle, skin and pelvic organs in the cat.

    PubMed

    Boczek-Funcke, A; Häbler, H J; Jänig, W; Michaelis, M

    1992-04-01

    1. The respiratory-related modulation of activity in neurones of the lumbar sympathetic outflow to skeletal muscle, skin and pelvic organs was investigated in anaesthetized, paralysed and artificially ventilated cats, using single- and multi-unit recordings. The activity of the neurones was analysed with respect to the phrenic nerve discharge under various experimental conditions. 2. Neurones tentatively classified as muscle vasoconstrictor and visceral vasoconstrictor neurones exhibited two activity peaks, one caused by baroreceptor unloading during the declining phase of the second order blood pressure waves and a respiratory drive-dependent peak in parallel with inspiration. The two peaks were separated by depressions of activity in early inspiration and post-inspiration. After cutting vagus and buffer nerves the activity peak during inspiration remained and was followed and sometimes preceded by a depression of activity. 3. The majority of the neurones tentatively classified as cutaneous vasoconstrictor neurones exhibited no respiratory modulation in their activity. Others exhibited an activity peak in expiration, an activity peak in inspiration, or a respiratory profile similar to that in muscle vasoconstrictor neurones. During increased respiratory drive (induced by hypercapnia) some neurones with unmodulated activity changed to an inspiratory or an expiratory pattern. Neurones discharging predominantly in inspiration projected preferentially to hairless skin. 4. Neurones which were tentatively classified as sudomotor neurones discharged predominantly in early expiration. 5. Some preganglionic neurones which were tentatively classified as motility-regulating neurones discharged during expiration. The majority of these neurones disclosed no respiratory modulation of their activity. 6. The study shows that different types of neurone of the lumbar sympathetic system exhibit distinct patterns of respiratory modulation in their activity. We conclude that the type

  2. Effect of resistance training on muscle use during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz, Lori L.; Tesch, Per A.; Biro, Ronald L.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the effect of resistance training on exercise-induced contrast shift in magnetic resonance (MR) images. It was hypothesized that a given load could be lifted after training with less muscle showing contrast shift, thereby suggesting less muscle was used to perform the exercise. Nine males trained the left quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle 2 days/wk for 9 wk using 3-6 sets of 12 knee extensions each day. The right QF served as a control. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in MR images evoked by each of three bouts of exercise (5 sets of 10 knee extensions with a load equal to 50, 75, and 100% of the maximum pretraining load that could be lifted for 5 sets of 10 repetitions) were quantified pre- and posttraining. MR image contrast shift was quantified by determining QF cross-sectional area (CSA) showing increased spin-spin relaxation time. One repetition maximum increased 14% in the left trained QF and 7% in the right untrained QF. Left QF CSA increased 5%, with no change in right QSF CSA. Left QF CSA showing contrast shift was less after each bout of the exercise test posttraining. This was also true, to a lesser extent, for the right QF at the higher two loads. The results suggest that short-term resistance training reduces MR image contrast shift evoked by a given effort, thereby reflecting the use of less muscle to lift the load. Because this response was evident in both trained and contralateral untrained muscle, neural factors are suggested to be responsible. The consequence of this adaptation could be to increase 'stress' per unit area of active muscle during the course of training and thereby evoke hypertrophy.

  3. Effect of resistance training on muscle use during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz, Lori L.; Tesch, Per A.; Biro, Ronald L.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the effect of resistance training on exercise-induced contrast shift in magnetic resonance (MR) images. It was hypothesized that a given load could be lifted after training with less muscle showing contrast shift, thereby suggesting less muscle was used to perform the exercise. Nine males trained the left quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle 2 days/wk for 9 wk using 3-6 sets of 12 knee extensions each day. The right QF served as a control. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in MR images evoked by each of three bouts of exercise (5 sets of 10 knee extensions with a load equal to 50, 75, and 100% of the maximum pretraining load that could be lifted for 5 sets of 10 repetitions) were quantified pre- and posttraining. MR image contrast shift was quantified by determining QF cross-sectional area (CSA) showing increased spin-spin relaxation time. One repetition maximum increased 14% in the left trained QF and 7% in the right untrained QF. Left QF CSA increased 5%, with no change in right QSF CSA. Left QF CSA showing contrast shift was less after each bout of the exercise test posttraining. This was also true, to a lesser extent, for the right QF at the higher two loads. The results suggest that short-term resistance training reduces MR image contrast shift evoked by a given effort, thereby reflecting the use of less muscle to lift the load. Because this response was evident in both trained and contralateral untrained muscle, neural factors are suggested to be responsible. The consequence of this adaptation could be to increase 'stress' per unit area of active muscle during the course of training and thereby evoke hypertrophy.

  4. Whole Body Vibration Training - Improving Balance Control and Muscle Endurance

    PubMed Central

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Kramer, Andreas; Bernhardt, Sascha; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Exercise combined with whole body vibration (WBV) is becoming increasingly popular, although additional effects of WBV in comparison to conventional exercises are still discussed controversially in literature. Heterogeneous findings are attributed to large differences in the training designs between WBV and “control” groups in regard to training volume, load and type. In order to separate the additional effects of WBV from the overall adaptations due to the intervention, in this study, a four-week WBV training setup was compared to a matched intervention program with identical training parameters in both training settings except for the exposure to WBV. In a repeated-measures matched-subject design, 38 participants were assigned to either the WBV group (VIB) or the equivalent training group (CON). Training duration, number of sets, rest periods and task-specific instructions were matched between the groups. Balance, jump height and local static muscle endurance were assessed before and after the training period. The statistical analysis revealed significant interaction effects of group×time for balance and local static muscle endurance (p<0.05). Hence, WBV caused an additional effect on balance control (pre vs. post VIB +13%, p<0.05 and CON +6%, p = 0.33) and local static muscle endurance (pre vs. post VIB +36%, p<0.05 and CON +11%, p = 0.49). The effect on jump height remained insignificant (pre vs. post VIB +3%, p = 0.25 and CON ±0%, p = 0.82). This study provides evidence for the additional effects of WBV above conventional exercise alone. As far as balance and muscle endurance of the lower leg are concerned, a training program that includes WBV can provide supplementary benefits in young and well-trained adults compared to an equivalent program that does not include WBV. PMID:24587114

  5. Does Resistance Training Stimulate Cardiac Muscle Hypertrophy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomer, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the left ventricular structural adaptations induced by resistance/strength exercise, focusing on human work, particularly well-trained strength athletes engaged in regular, moderate- to high-intensity resistance training (RT). The article discusses both genders and examines the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids in…

  6. Does Resistance Training Stimulate Cardiac Muscle Hypertrophy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomer, Richard J.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the left ventricular structural adaptations induced by resistance/strength exercise, focusing on human work, particularly well-trained strength athletes engaged in regular, moderate- to high-intensity resistance training (RT). The article discusses both genders and examines the use of anabolic-androgenic steroids in…

  7. Resistance Exercise Training Alters Mitochondrial Function in Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Porter, Craig; Reidy, Paul T; Bhattarai, Nisha; Sidossis, Labros S; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2015-09-01

    Loss of mitochondrial competency is associated with several chronic illnesses. Therefore, strategies that maintain or increase mitochondrial function will likely be of benefit in numerous clinical settings. Endurance exercise has long been known to increase mitochondrial function in the skeletal muscle. Comparatively little is known regarding the effect of resistance exercise training (RET) on skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of chronic resistance training on skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity and function. Here, we studied the effect of a 12-wk RET program on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in 11 young healthy men. Muscle biopsies were collected before and after the 12-wk training program, and mitochondrial respiratory capacity was determined in permeabilized myofibers by high-resolution respirometry. RET increased lean body mass and quadriceps muscle strength by 4% and 15%, respectively (P < 0.001). Coupled mitochondrial respiration supported by complex I, and complex I and II substrates increased by 2- and 1.4-fold, respectively (P < 0.01). The ratio of coupled complex I-supported respiration to maximal respiration increased with RET (P < 0.05), as did complex I protein abundance (P < 0.05), whereas the substrate control ratio for succinate was reduced after RET (P < 0.001). Transcripts responsible for proteins critical to electron transfer and NAD production increased with training (P < 0.05), whereas transcripts involved in mitochondrial biogenesis were unaltered. Collectively, 12 wk of RET resulted in qualitative and quantitative changes in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration. This adaptation was accompanied by modest changes in mitochondrial proteins and transcript expression. RET seems to be a means to augment the respiratory capacity and intrinsic function of skeletal muscle mitochondria.

  8. Prevention and management of pelvic organ prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Giarenis, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse is a highly prevalent condition in the female population, which impairs the health-related quality of life of affected individuals. Despite the lack of robust evidence, selective modification of obstetric events or other risk factors could play a central role in the prevention of prolapse. While the value of pelvic floor muscle training as a preventive treatment remains uncertain, it has an essential role in the conservative management of prolapse. Surgical trends are currently changing due to the controversial issues surrounding the use of mesh and the increasing demand for uterine preservation. The evolution of laparoscopic and robotic surgery has increased the use of these techniques in pelvic floor surgery. PMID:25343034

  9. Inertial flywheel resistance training and muscle oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Timón, Rafael; Ponce-González, Jesús G; González-Montesinos, José L; Olcina, Guillermo; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Castro-Piñero, José

    2017-07-24

    The inertial flywheel device causes an increase in eccentric overload during training. The aim was to study muscle oxygen saturation produced during an inertial flywheel squat training, comparing it with a barbell squat training. Twelve male adults performed a barbell squat training (3 x 8 reps, 75-80% 1RM) and a flywheel squat training (3 x 8 reps, all-out). Muscle oxygen saturation (%SmO2), total hemoglobin (tHb), reoxygenation, heart rate (HR), lactate, vertical jumps, maximal voluntary isometric contraction and rated perceived exertion (RPE) were studied. Both protocols produced a significant decrease in %SmO2 and tHB during the sets of squats, and a significant increase in HR, lactate sdand RPE after training. The flywheel squat protocol caused a greater decrease in %SmO2 than the barbell squat protocol in each of the sets of exercises (1st set:- 67.5 ± 7.2vs -53.7 ± 16.2 %; 2nd set: - 67.2 ± 13.5vs -53.6 ± 15.4 %; 3rdset: -68.1 ± 13.0vs -55.0 ± 17.0 %), as well as a longer reoxygenation after finishing the training (61.7 ± 12.6 vs 55.7 ± 13.7 s.). Although no differences were found on a muscle fatigue level, the flywheel training brought on greater physiological stress than the barbell squat training, observing a greater decrease in muscle oxygen saturation and a longer reoxygenation.

  10. The Joanna Briggs Institute best practice information sheet: the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle exercises on urinary incontinence in women following childbirth.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    This Best Practice Information Sheet is derived from 21 studies and aims to synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle exercises on urinary incontinence in women following childbirth. The information that is contained in this sheet has been derived from studies that were included in a systematic review that was conducted by the Joanna Briggs Institute. The original references can be sourced from the systematic review. Pregnancy and childbirth are major risk factors for the development of urinary incontinence as the muscles of the pelvic floor become stretched and weakened. For some women, such incontinence after childbirth is temporary, but for others, their suffering can be of much longer-term duration. A number of risk factors has been identified for urinary incontinence following childbirth, including antenatal urinary incontinence, obesity, and significant perineal trauma. The aim of pelvic floor muscle exercises is to strengthen the perivaginal and perianal musculature in order to increase a woman's control of urinary leakage.

  11. Pelvic floor muscle activity, quality of life, and sexual function in peri- and recently postmenopausal women with and without dyspareunia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Schvartzman, Renata; Bertotto, Adriane; Schvartzman, Luiza; Wender, Maria Celeste Osório

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor alterations during menopausal years, resulting from aging and hormonal decline, may lead to several forms of sexual dysfunction. Dyspareunia-pain during sexual intercourse-is among the most frequent. Nevertheless, few studies so far have evaluated pelvic floor muscle function in postmenopausal women with dyspareunia. The authors thus carried out a cross-sectional study to assess myoelectric activity in pelvic floor muscles in peri- and postmenopausal women with and without dyspareunia receiving routine care at an outpatient clinic. In addition, sexual function (using the Female Sexual Function Index) and quality of life (using the Cervantes Scale) were assessed. Fifty-one peri- and postmenopausal women between 45 to 60 years of age (M = 52.1, SD = 4.9) were evaluated, 27 with and 24 without dyspareunia. There were no statistically significant differences in resting muscle activity, maximal voluntary contraction, and sustained contraction between women with and without dyspareunia. There were statistically significant between-group differences on the Cervantes Scale (p =.009) and in all Female Sexual Function Index domains except desire and satisfaction (arousal, p =.019; lubrication, p =.030; orgasm, p =.032; pain, p <.001; desire, p =.061; satisfaction, p =.081), indicating that women with dyspareunia experience worse quality of life and less satisfactory sexual function as compared with women without dyspareunia.

  12. Systematic Review of Inspiratory Muscle Training After Cerebrovascular Accident.

    PubMed

    Martín-Valero, Rocío; De La Casa Almeida, Maria; Casuso-Holgado, Maria Jesus; Heredia-Madrazo, Alfonso

    2015-11-01

    This systematic review examines levels of evidence and recommendation grades of various therapeutic interventions of inspiratory muscle training in people who have had a stroke. Benefits from different levels of force and resistance in respiratory muscles are shown in this population. This review was conducted following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) directives and was completed in November 2014. The search limits were studies published in English between 2004 and 2014. Relevant studies were searched for in MEDLINE, PEDro, OAIster, Scopus, PsycINFO, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, DOAJ, Cochrane, Embase, Academic Search Complete, Fuente Académica, and MedicLatina. Initially, 20 articles were identified. After analyzing all primary documents, 14 studies were excluded. Only 6 studies were relevant to this review. Three different types of interventions were found (maximum inspiratory training, controlled training, and nonintervention) in 3 different groups. One specific study compared 3 inspiratory muscle training groups with a group of breathing exercises (diaphragmatic exercises with pursed lips) and a control group. Future long-term studies with larger sample sizes are needed. It is necessary to apply respiratory muscle training as a service of the national health system and to consider its inclusion in the conventional neurological program. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  13. The male rectourethralis and deep transverse perineal muscles and their relationship to adjacent structures examined with successive slices of celloidin-embedded pelvic viscera.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Li-Dong; Liu, Jin; Li, Yun-Sheng; Ma, Qing-Tong; Yin, Ping

    2011-03-01

    The precise relationship of the structures dorsal to the membranous urethra, including the rectourethralis muscle, the rhabdosphincter, the deep transverse perineal muscle (DTPM), the perineal body, and Denonvillier's fascia, remains controversial. Our aim was to reexamine the detailed anatomy of the rectourethralis muscle and the deep transverse perineal muscle and their relationship with adjacent structures. The pelvic viscera, including bladder, prostate, and rectum, were obtained from 20 formalin-fixed adult male cadavers. The pelvic viscera were embedded in celloidin and then cut into successive slices with an immersing-alcohol microtome. All slices were explored with anatomic microscopy. The longitudinal muscle of the anterior rectal wall was divided into anterior and posterior bundles at the junction of the rectum and anal canal. The intermediate fibers of the anterior bundle ended at the perineal body. The lateral fibers of the anterior bundle terminated at the posterior connective tissue of the bulbus penis. The DTPM occupied the space between the rhabdosphincter, rectum, and the bilateral levator ani muscle. Denonvillier's fascia terminated at the junction of the prostate and rhabdosphincter. Numerous slender nerves coming from the neurovascular bundle perforated the DTPM. The anterior bundle of the longitudinal muscle of the rectum inserts into the bulbus penis forming the rectourethralis muscle and ends at the perineal body forming the rectoperinealis muscle. The anterior bundle and DTPM together may contribute to the rectal angle of the anterior rectal wall, and they support the posterior border of the rhabdosphincter. Copyright © 2010 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Muscle triacylglycerol and hormone-sensitive lipase activity in untrained and trained human muscles.

    PubMed

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Biba, Taus O; Galbo, Henrik; Gaster, Michael; Donsmark, Morten

    2006-07-01

    During exercise, triacylglycerol (TG) is recruited in skeletal muscles. We hypothesized that both muscle hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and TG recruitment would be higher in trained than in untrained subjects in response to prolonged exercise. Healthy male subjects (26 +/- 1 years, body moss index 23.3 +/- 0.5 kg m(-2)), either untrained (N = 8, VO(2max) 3.8 +/- 0.2 l min(-1)) or trained (N = 8, VO(2max) 5.1 +/- 0.1 l min(-1)), were studied. Before and after 3-h exercise (58 +/- 1% VO(2max)), a biopsy was taken. Muscle citrate synthase (32 +/- 2 vs. 47 +/- 6 mumol g(-1) min(-1) d.w.) and beta-hydroxy-acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (38 +/- 3 vs. 52 +/- 5 mumol g(-1) min(-1) d.w.) activities were lower in untrained than in trained subjects (p < 0.05). Throughout the exercise, fat oxidation was higher in trained than in untrained subjects (p < 0.05). Muscle HSL activity was similar at rest (0.72 +/- 0.08 and 0.74 +/- 0.03 mU mg(-1) protein) and after exercise (0.71 +/- 0.1 and 0.68 +/- 0.03 mU mg(-1) protein) in untrained and trained subjects. At rest, the chemically determined muscle TG content (37 +/- 8 and 26 +/- 5 mmol g(-1) d.w.) was similar (p > 0.05), and after exercise it was unchanged in untrained and lower (p < 0.05) in trained subjects (41 +/- 9 and 10 +/- 2 mmol g((1) d.w.). Determined histochemically, TG was decreased (p < 0.05) after exercise in type I and II fibres. Depletion of TG was not different between fibre types in untrained, but tended to be higher (p = 0.07) in type I compared with type II fibres in trained muscles. In conclusion, HSL activity is similar in untrained and trained skeletal muscles both before and after prolonged exercise. However, the tendency to higher muscle TG recruitment during exercise in the trained subjects suggests a difference in the regulation of HSL or other lipases during exercise in trained compared with untrained subjects.

  15. Assessment of pelvic floor muscle function in women with and without low back pain using transabdominal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Arab, Amir Massoud; Behbahani, Roxana Bazaz; Lorestani, Leila; Azari, Afsaneh

    2010-06-01

    Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunction has been recently associated with the development of low back pain (LBP). Transabdominal ultrasound imaging has been established as an appropriate method for visualizing and measuring PFM function. No study has directly evaluated PFM function in individuals with and without LBP. The purpose of this study was to investigate the PFM function in women with and without LBP using transabdominal ultrasound. Convenience sample of 40 non-pregnant female participated in the study. Subjects were categorized into two groups: with LBP (n = 20) and without LBP (n = 20). The amount of bladder base movement on ultrasound (normalized to body mass index) was measured in all subjects and considered as an indicator of PFM function. Statistical analysis (Independent t-test) revealed significant difference in transabdominal ultrasound measurements for PFM function between the two groups (P = 0.04, 95% CI of difference: 0.002-0.27). The results of this study indicate PFM dysfunction in individuals with LBP compared to those without LBP. The results could be beneficial to clinicians when assessing and prescribing therapeutic exercises for patients with LBP.

  16. Impact of childbirth and mode of delivery on vaginal resting pressure and on pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance.

    PubMed

    Hilde, Gunvor; Stær-Jensen, Jette; Siafarikas, Franziska; Engh, Marie Ellström; Brækken, Ingeborg Hoff; Bø, Kari

    2013-01-01

    We sought to study impact of delivery mode on vaginal resting pressure (VRP) and on pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength and endurance, and whether these measurements differed in women with and without urinary incontinence. We conducted a cohort study following 277 nulliparous women from midpregnancy to 6 weeks postpartum. Manometer was used for PFM measurements; differences were analyzed by t test (within groups) and analysis of variance (between groups). Only VRP changed significantly (10% reduction, P = .001) after emergency cesarean section. After normal and instrumental vaginal delivery, VRP was reduced by 29% and 30%; PFM strength by 54% and 66%; and endurance by 53% and 65%, respectively. Significant differences for all PFM measures (P < .001) were found when comparing cesarean vs normal and instrumental vaginal delivery, respectively. Urinary continent women at both time points had significantly higher PFM strength and endurance than incontinent counterparts (P < .05). Pronounced reductions in VRP and in PFM strength and endurance were found after vaginal delivery. Continent women were stronger than incontinent counterparts. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Abdominal muscle training can enhance cough after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    McBain, Rachel A; Boswell-Ruys, Claire L; Lee, Bonsan B; Gandevia, Simon C; Butler, Jane E

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory complications in people with high-level spinal cord injury (SCI) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly because of a reduced ability to cough as a result of abdominal muscle paralysis. . We investigated the effect of cough training combined with functional electrical stimulation (FES) over the abdominal muscles for 6 weeks to observe whether training could improve cough strength. Fifteen SCI subjects (C4-T5) trained for 6 weeks, 5 days per week (5 sets of 10 coughs per day) in a randomized crossover design study. Subjects coughed voluntarily at the same time as a train of electrical stimulation was delivered over the abdominal muscles via posterolaterally positioned electrodes (50 Hz, 3 seconds). Measurements were made of esophageal (Pes) and gastric (Pga) expiratory pressures and the peak expiratory flow (PEFcough) produced at the 3 time points of before, during, and after the training. During voluntary coughs, FES cough stimulation improved Pga, Pes, and PEFcough acutely, 20-fold, 4-fold, and 50%, respectively. Six weeks of cough training significantly increased Pga (37.1 ± 2.0 to 46.5 ± 2.9 cm H2O), Pes (35.4 ± 2.7 to 48.1 ± 2.9 cm H2O), and PEFcough (3.1 ± 0.1 to 3.6 ± 0.1 L/s). Cough training also improved pressures and flow during voluntary unstimulated coughs. FES of abdominal muscles acutely increases mechanical output in coughing in high-level SCI subjects. Six weeks of cough training further increases gastric and esophageal cough pressures and expiratory cough flow during stimulated cough maneuvers.

  18. Is hypoxia training good for muscles and exercise performance?

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Hoppeler, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Altitude training has become very popular among athletes as a means to further increase exercise performance at sea level or to acclimatize to competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved during the last few decades, with "live high-train low" and "live low-train high" being the most popular. This review focuses on functional, muscular, and practical aspects derived from extensive research on the "live low-train high" approach. According to this, subjects train in hypoxia but remain under normoxia for the rest of the time. It has been reasoned that exercising in hypoxia could increase the training stimulus. Hypoxia training studies published in the past have varied considerably in altitude (2300-5700 m) and training duration (10 days to 8 weeks) and the fitness of the subjects. The evidence from muscle structural, biochemical, and molecular findings point to a specific role of hypoxia in endurance training. However, based on the available performance capacity data such as maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) and (maximal) power output, hypoxia as a supplement to training is not consistently found to be advantageous for performance at sea level. Stronger evidence exists for benefits of hypoxic training on performance at altitude. "Live low-train high" may thus be considered when altitude acclimatization is not an option. In addition, the complex pattern of gene expression adaptations induced by supplemental training in hypoxia, but not normoxia, suggest that muscle tissue specifically responds to hypoxia. Whether and to what degree these gene expression changes translate into significant changes in protein concentrations that are ultimately responsible for observable structural or functional phenotypes remains open. It is conceivable that the global functional markers such as Vo(2)max and (maximal) power output are too coarse to detect more subtle changes that might still be functionally relevant, at least to high-level athletes.

  19. Low Intensity Exercise Training Improves Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Potential

    PubMed Central

    Pietrangelo, Tiziana; Di Filippo, Ester S.; Mancinelli, Rosa; Doria, Christian; Rotini, Alessio; Fanò-Illic, Giorgio; Fulle, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether 12 days of low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude (598 m a.s.l.) improves skeletal muscle regeneration in sedentary adult women. Methods: Satellite cells were obtained from the vastus lateralis skeletal muscle of seven women before and after this exercise training at low altitude. They were investigated for differentiation aspects, superoxide anion production, antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial potential variation after a depolarizing insult, intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, and micro (mi)RNA expression (miR-1, miR-133, miR-206). Results: In these myogenic populations of adult stem cells, those obtained after exercise training, showed increased Fusion Index and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. This exercise training also generally reduced superoxide anion production in cells (by 12–67%), although not in two women, where there was an increase of ~15% along with a reduced superoxide dismutase activity. miRNA expression showed an exercise-induced epigenetic transcription profile that was specific according to the reduced or increased superoxide anion production of the cells. Conclusions: The present study shows that low-to-moderate exercise training at low altitude improves the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle in adult women. The differentiation of cells was favored by increased intracellular calcium concentration and increased the fusion index. This low-to-moderate training at low altitude also depicted the epigenetic signature of cells. PMID:26733888

  20. Pelvic Exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Exam, Pelvic Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... 1500x1230 View Download Large: 3000x2460 View Download Title: Exam, Pelvic Description: Pelvic exam; drawing shows a side ...

  1. Muscle Damage and Muscle Activity Induced by Strength Training Super-Sets in Physically Active Men.

    PubMed

    Brentano, Michel A; Umpierre, Daniel; Santos, Lucas P; Lopes, André L; Radaelli, Regis; Pinto, Ronei S; Kruel, Luiz F M

    2017-07-01

    Brentano, MA, Umpierre, D, Santos, LP, Lopes, AL, Radaelli, R, Pinto, RS, and Kruel, LFM. Muscle damage and muscle activity induced by strength training super-sets in physically active men. J Strength Cond Res 31(7): 1847-1858, 2017-In strength training, muscle activity is often analyzed by surface electromyography (EMG) and muscle damage through indirect markers, such as plasma concentrations of creatine kinase (CK) after exercise. However, there is little information about the influence of the strength exercises order on these parameters. The purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of strength exercises order (super-sets) in muscle activity and indirect markers of muscle damage. Twenty men were randomly assigned to one of the strength training sessions (TS). Each TS (5 sets × 8-10 repetition maximum) consisted of 2 exercises for the knee extensor muscles and 2 exercises for the horizontal shoulder flexors performed in a different order: exercises for the same muscle group grouped (grouped exercises [GE]: n = 10; 26.6 ± 3.4 years; 17.4 ± 3.4 body fat) or separated (separated exercises [SE]: n = 10; 24.9 ± 2.6 years; 15.4 ± 5.9 body fat). Muscle activity was analyzed by surface EMG (vastus lateralis [VL], vastus medialis [VM], rectus femoris [RF], pectoralis major [PM], and anterior deltoid [AD]), and the main indirect marker of muscle damage was the CK, evaluated immediately before and after the first 5 days of each TS. There was a higher EMG activity of GE in the RF (GE: 88.4% × SE: 73.6%) and AD (GE: 176.4% × SE: 100.0%), in addition to greater concentration of CK (GE: 632.4% × SE: 330.5%) after exercise. Our findings suggest that, in physically active men, implementing super-sets with GE promotes greater muscle effort and muscle damage, wherein 5 days are not enough to recover the trained muscle groups.

  2. Effect of swim exercise training on human muscle fiber function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Costill, D. L.; Gardetto, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of swim exercise training on the human muscle fiber function was investigated in swimmers trained in a typical collegiate swim-training program followed by an intensified 10-day training period. The measured parameters included the peak tension (P0), negative log molar Ca(2+) concentration (pCa)-force, and maximal shortening speed (Vmax) of the slow-twitch type I and fast-twitch type II fibers obtained by biopsy from the deltoid muscle. The P0 values were found to be not altered after either the training or the 10-day intensive program. The type I fibers from the trained swimmers showed pCa-force curves shifted to the right, such that higher free Ca(2+) levels were required to elicit a given percent of P0. The training program significantly increased the Vmax in the type I fibers and decreased that of the type II fibers, and the 10-day intensive training produced a further significant decrease of the type II fibers.

  3. Effect of swim exercise training on human muscle fiber function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Costill, D. L.; Gardetto, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of swim exercise training on the human muscle fiber function was investigated in swimmers trained in a typical collegiate swim-training program followed by an intensified 10-day training period. The measured parameters included the peak tension (P0), negative log molar Ca(2+) concentration (pCa)-force, and maximal shortening speed (Vmax) of the slow-twitch type I and fast-twitch type II fibers obtained by biopsy from the deltoid muscle. The P0 values were found to be not altered after either the training or the 10-day intensive program. The type I fibers from the trained swimmers showed pCa-force curves shifted to the right, such that higher free Ca(2+) levels were required to elicit a given percent of P0. The training program significantly increased the Vmax in the type I fibers and decreased that of the type II fibers, and the 10-day intensive training produced a further significant decrease of the type II fibers.

  4. Modelling the pelvic floor for investigating difficulties during childbirth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinshan; Kruger, Jennifer A.; Chung, Jae-Hoon; Nash, Martyn P.; Nielsen, Poul M. F.

    2008-03-01

    Research has suggested that athletes involved in high-intensity sports for sustained periods have a higher probability of experiencing prolonged second stage of labour compared to non-athletes. The mechanism responsible for this complication is unknown but may depend on the relative size or tone of the pelvic floor muscles. Prolonged training can result in enlargement and stiffening of these muscles, providing increased resistance as the fetal head descends through the birth canal during a vaginal birth. On the other hand, recent studies have suggested an association between increased muscle bulk in athletes and higher distensibility. This project aims to use mathematical modelling to study the relationship between the size and tone of the pelvic floor muscles and the level of difficulty during childbirth. We obtained sets of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the pelvic floor region for a female athlete and a female non-athlete. Thirteen components of the pelvic floor were segmented and used to generate finite element (FE) models. The fetal head data was obtained by laser scanning a skull replica and a FE model was fitted to these data. We used contact mechanics to simulate the motion of the fetal head moving through the pelvic floor, constructed from the non-athlete data. A maximum stretch ratio of 3.2 was induced in the muscle at the left lateral attachment point to the pubis. We plan to further improve our modelling framework to include active muscle contraction and fetal head rotations in order to address the hypotheses that there is a correlation between the level of difficulty and the size or tone of the pelvic floor muscles.

  5. Effects Of treadmill training on hindlimb muscles of spinal cord–injured mice

    PubMed Central

    Battistuzzo, Camila R.; Rank, Michelle M.; Flynn, Jamie R.; Morgan, David L.; Callister, Robin; Callister, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Treadmill training is known to prevent muscle atrophy after spinal cord injury (SCI), but the training duration required to optimize recovery has not been investigated. Methods: Hemisected mice were randomized to 3, 6, or 9 weeks of training or no training. Muscle fiber type composition and fiber cross‐sectional area (CSA) of medial gastrocnemius (MG), soleus (SOL), and tibialis anterior (TA) were assessed using ATPase histochemistry. Results: Muscle fiber type composition of SCI animals did not change with training. However, 9 weeks of training increased the CSA of type IIB and IIX fibers in TA and MG muscles. Conclusions: Nine weeks of training after incomplete SCI was effective in preventing atrophy of fast‐twitch muscles, but there were limited effects on slow‐twitch muscles and muscle fiber type composition. These data provide important evidence of the benefits of exercising paralyzed limbs after SCI. Muscle Nerve, 2016 Muscle Nerve 55: 232–242, 2017 PMID:27273462

  6. Relationship between lower limb position and pelvic floor muscle surface electromyography activity in menopausal women: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Halski, Tomasz; Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Słupska, Lucyna; Dymarek, Robert; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Objectives In physiotherapeutic practice, special attention is being given to the reciprocal anatomical, physiological, and biomechanical relationship of the pelvis and the structures connected to it. However, the scientific literature shows mainly the theoretical information about their mutual connections. The lack of information about these relations from a practical aspect coupled with the paucity of scientific papers on the impact of posture changes on the pelvic floor led the authors to conduct this study. The primary aim of this study was to compare the resting and functional bioelectrical activities of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) depending on three different positions of the lower limbs (positions A, B, and C) in the supine position. Materials and methods This was a prospective observational study evaluating resting and functional activities of the PFM depending on the position of the lower limbs. The study was carried out at the Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland and the target group were women in the menopausal period. Bioelectrical activity of PFM was recorded using a surface electromyographic instrument in the supine position. Results of the values obtained in A, B, and C positions were compared using a one-way analysis of variance. Results In position A, the average resting surface electromyography (sEMG) activity of PFM was 6.9±2.6 µV; in position B, the result was 6.9±2.5 µV and in position C, the resting sEMG activity was 5.7±1.8 µV (P=0.0102). The results of the functional bioelectrical activity of PFM were as follows: position A – 20.3±11.8 µV, position B – 19.9±10.6 µV, and position C – 25.3±10.9 µV (P=0.0104). Conclusion The results showed that in the supine position, the PFM achieved the lowest resting activity and the highest functional activity. Therefore, the supine position can be recommended for the diagnosis and therapy of weakened PFM. PMID:28115836

  7. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on resistance to fatigue of respiratory muscles during exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Timofeev, N N; Donina, Zh A; Kur'yanovich, E N; Aleksandrova, N P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on resistance to fatigue of the diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and scalene (SC) muscles in healthy humans during exhaustive exercise. Daily inspiratory muscle strength training was performed for 3 weeks in 10 male subjects (at a pressure threshold load of 60% of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) for the first week, 70% of MIP for the second week, and 80% of MIP for the third week). Before and after training, subjects performed an incremental cycle test to exhaustion. Maximal inspiratory pressure and EMG-analysis served as indices of inspiratory muscle fatigue assessment. The before-to-after exercise decreases in MIP and centroid frequency (fc) of the EMG (D, PS, SCM, and SC) power spectrum (P<0.05) were observed in all subjects before the IMT intervention. Such changes were absent after the IMT. The study found that in healthy subjects, IMT results in significant increase in MIP (+18%), a delay of inspiratory muscle fatigue during exhaustive exercise, and a significant improvement in maximal work performance. We conclude that the IMT elicits resistance to the development of inspiratory muscles fatigue during high-intensity exercise.

  8. [PELVIC FLOOR RECONSTRUCTION AFTER PELVIC EVISCERATION USING GRACILIS MUSCULOCUTANEOUS FLAP].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, V N; Bakirov, A A; Kabirov, I R; Izmajlov, A A; Kutlijarov, L M; Safiullin, R L; Urmancev, M F; Sultanov, I M; Abdrahimov, R V

    2015-01-01

    Evisceration of the pelvic organs (EPO) is a fairly uncommon surgical treatment that removes all organs from a patient's pelvic cavity. We use gracilis musculocutaneous flap to repair pelvic floor after EPO. Over the period from November 2013 to December 2014 we carried out EPO with reconstructive repair of the pelvic floor with gracilis musculocutaneous flap in 10 patients with locally advanced pelvic tumors. We describe the surgical procedure and surgical outcomes in these patients. Mean age of the patients was 55 years. Mean duration of EPO with the pelvic floor repair was 285 min., mean blood loss--595 mL and the average length of hospital stay--19 days. Gracilis musculocutaneous flap has a sufficient arterial supply and mobility for pelvic floor reconstruction. Necrosis of flap's distal edge occurred in one of the 10 clinical cases, while the remaining flaps were fully preserved. Complete healing of wounds with no signs of weakening of the pelvic floor muscles was observed in all cases. Pelvic floor reconstruction is an essential procedure in order to reduce complications associated with the evisceration of the pelvic organs. The Gracilis musculocutaneous flap is the logical alternative to repair pelvic floor defect. It does not contribute to complications like functional deficiency of the lower limbs, complications of stoma formation or weakening of the muscles of the anterior abdominal wall.

  9. Associations between physiotherapy findings and subsequent diagnosis of pelvic or hindlimb fracture in racing Thoroughbreds.

    PubMed

    Hesse, K L; Verheyen, K L P

    2010-04-01

    Physiotherapists who work in racehorse training yards routinely treat horses' backs and hindquarters and may be able to recognise signs that indicate the presence of (impending) pelvic or hindlimb fracture before it becomes catastrophic. To establish whether physiotherapy assessment findings in Thoroughbred racehorses referred for routine physiotherapy could be predictive of subsequent (within 30 days) pelvic or hindlimb fracture diagnosis. Retrospective veterinary and physiotherapy data from a cohort of Newmarket (UK) Thoroughbred racehorses, were used. A case-control study compared physiotherapy assessment findings of racehorses with and without a subsequently diagnosed pelvic or hindlimb fracture. Uni- and multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate and quantify the strength of association between physiotherapy findings and subsequent fracture diagnosis. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. A total of 513 horses provided 14 fracture cases for analysis. Presence of pelvic bony asymmetry, muscle atrophy of the quarters, reduced reflex movements of dorsi- and/or ventroflexion and spasm or tenderness on palpation of the gluteal muscles were significantly associated with subsequent fracture diagnosis in univariable analysis. Multivariable analysis indicated that horses subsequently diagnosed with pelvic or hindlimb fracture were 11.1 times more likely to show pelvic bony asymmetry, 4.7 times more likely to display muscle atrophy of the quarters and 6.6 times more likely to have spasm or tenderness on palpation of the gluteal muscles than those that were not. Racehorses presented for physiotherapy that show pelvic bony asymmetry, muscle atrophy of the quarters and/or spasm or tenderness on palpation of the gluteal muscles should alert the physiotherapist to the potential presence of (impending) pelvic or hindlimb fracture. Earlier detection of (impending) pelvic or hindlimb fracture in racing Thoroughbreds could reduce the incidence of

  10. Respiratory muscle training improves respiratory muscle endurance but not exercise tolerance in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bieli, Christian; Summermatter, Selina; Boutellier, Urs; Moeller, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory muscle endurance (RME) training has been shown to increase exercise endurance and lung function in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). We conducted an interventional study to investigate the effectiveness of RME training on CF-related health outcomes in children. In a crossover trial, 22 children, aged 9-18 years, with CF performed 8 weeks of RME training and standard chest physiotherapy in a randomized sequence separated by a 1 week washout period. All children underwent training sessions using the RME training device before beginning the study. The primary outcomes were RME (in minutes) and exercise endurance (in minutes). Data were analyzed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Sixteen of 22 children (73%) completed the study. Study dropouts tended to be older with more advanced lung disease. After RME training, respiratory muscle endurance significantly increased by 7.03 ± 8.15 min (mean ± standard deviation, P < 0.001), whereas exercise endurance was unchanged by RME training (0.80 ± 2.58 min, P = 0.169). No significant improvement in secondary outcomes (lung function, CF quality of life, and CF clinical score) were observed. The small sample size and short intervention time have to be acknowledged as limitations of our study. RME training led to a significant increase in respiratory muscle endurance in children with CF. However, RME training did not improve exercise endurance or other CF-related health outcomes. Thus, our results do not support the routine use of RME training in the care of children with CF. Future studies in larger populations and with prolonged intervention time may overcome the limitations of our study. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2017;52:331-336. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effects of Training Attendance on Muscle Strength of Young Men after 11 Weeks of Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Gentil, Paulo; Bottaro, Martim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Training attendance is an important variable for attaining optimal results after a resistance training (RT) program, however, the association of attendance with the gains of muscle strength is not well defined. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to verify if attendance would affect muscle strength gains in healthy young males. Methods Ninety two young males with no previous RT experience volunteered to participate in the study. RT was performed 2 days a week for 11 weeks. One repetition maximum (1RM) in the bench press and knee extensors peak torque (PT) were measured before and after the training period. After the training period, a two step cluster analysis was used to classify the participants in accordance to training attendance, resulting in three groups, defined as high (92 to 100%), intermediate (80 to 91%) and low (60 to 79%) training attendance. Results According to the results, there were no significant correlations between strength gains and training attendance, however, when attendance groups were compared, the low training attendance group showed lower increases in 1RM bench press (8.8%) than the other two groups (17.6% and 18.0% for high and intermediate attendance, respectively). Conclusions Although there is not a direct correlation between training attendance and muscle strength gains, it is suggested that a minimum attendance of 80% is necessary to ensure optimal gains in upper body strength. PMID:23802051

  12. Case report: pelvic actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Maxová, K; Menzlová, E; Kolařík, D; Dundr, P; Halaška, M

    2012-01-01

    A case of pelvic actinomycosis is presented. The patient is 42-year-old female with a 5 weeks history of pelvic pain. An intrauterine device (IUD) was taken out 3 weeks ago. There is a lump length 9 cm between rectus muscles. Ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology are used to make the diagnosis. Actinomycosis can mimic the tumour disease. The definitive diagnosis requires positive anaerobic culture or histological identification of actinomyces granulas. A long lasting antibiotic therapy is performed.

  13. Skeletal muscle plasticity with marathon training in novice runners.

    PubMed

    Luden, N; Hayes, E; Minchev, K; Louis, E; Raue, U; Conley, T; Trappe, S

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate leg muscle adaptation in runners preparing for their first marathon. Soleus and vastus lateralis (VL) biopsies were obtained from six recreational runners (23 ± 1 years, 61 ± 3 kg) before (T1), after 13 weeks of run training (T2), and after 3 weeks of taper and marathon (T3). Single muscle fiber size, contractile function (strength, speed, and power) and oxidative enzyme activity [citrate synthase (CS)] were measured at all three time points, and fiber type distribution was determined before and after the 16-week intervention. Training increased VO(2max) ∼9% (P<0.05). All soleus parameters were unchanged. VL MHC I fiber diameter increased (+8%; P<0.05) from T1 to T2. VL MHC I V(o) (-12%), MHC I power (-22%) and MHC IIa power (-29%) were reduced from T1 to T2 (P<0.05). No changes in VL single fiber contractile properties were observed from T2 to T3. No change was observed in soleus CS activity, whereas VL CS activity increased 66% (P<0.05). Our observations indicate that modest marathon training elicits very specific skeletal muscle adaptations that likely support the ability to perform 42.2 km of continuous running - further strengthening the existing body of evidence for skeletal muscle specificity.

  14. Nutritional modulation of training-induced skeletal muscle adaptations.

    PubMed

    Hawley, John A; Burke, Louise M; Phillips, Stuart M; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2011-03-01

    Skeletal muscle displays remarkable plasticity, enabling substantial adaptive modifications in its metabolic potential and functional characteristics in response to external stimuli such as mechanical loading and nutrient availability. Contraction-induced adaptations are determined largely by the mode of exercise and the volume, intensity, and frequency of the training stimulus. However, evidence is accumulating that nutrient availability serves as a potent modulator of many acute responses and chronic adaptations to both endurance and resistance exercise. Changes in macronutrient intake rapidly alter the concentration of blood-borne substrates and hormones, causing marked perturbations in the storage profile of skeletal muscle and other insulin-sensitive tissues. In turn, muscle energy status exerts profound effects on resting fuel metabolism and patterns of fuel utilization during exercise as well as acute regulatory processes underlying gene expression and cell signaling. As such, these nutrient-exercise interactions have the potential to activate or inhibit many biochemical pathways with putative roles in training adaptation. This review provides a contemporary perspective of our understanding of the molecular and cellular events that take place in skeletal muscle in response to both endurance and resistance exercise commenced after acute and/or chronic alterations in nutrient availability (carbohydrate, fat, protein, and several antioxidants). Emphasis is on the results of human studies and how nutrient provision (or lack thereof) interacts with specific contractile stimulus to modulate many of the acute responses to exercise, thereby potentially promoting or inhibiting subsequent training adaptation.

  15. Pelvic radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation of the pelvis - discharge; Cancer treatment - pelvic radiation; Prostate cancer - pelvic radiation; Ovarian cancer - pelvic radiation; Cervical cancer - pelvic radiation; Uterine cancer - pelvic radiation; Rectal cancer - ...

  16. A Pilates exercise program with pelvic floor muscle contraction: Is it effective for pregnant women? A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dias, Naiara T; Ferreira, Letícia R; Fernandes, Mariana G; Resende, Ana Paula M; Pereira-Baldon, Vanessa S

    2017-05-23

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Pilates exercise program with pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contraction compared to a conventional intervention in pregnant women. Fifty primiparous women, without gestational alterations, were randomized to the Pilates group (n = 25) and control group (n = 25). Interventions for both groups consisted of twice-weekly sessions of 1 h each during the period between the 14-16th and 32-34th gestational weeks. The Pilates group performed a Pilates exercises program with the addition of voluntary PFM contraction. Mat-based Pilates exercises were performed involving movement of the upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk in all sessions. The Control group walked for 10 min and performed strengthening exercises of the lower limbs, upper limbs, and trunk with resistance from an elastic band and body weight. Each woman was evaluated by an unblinded physiotherapist before and after intervention for primary (PFM strength using a manometer) and secondary (PFM strength using Oxford Scale, endurance and repeatability) outcomes. Covariance analysis (ANCOVA) was used to compare the groups using the baseline values as a covariate. Thirty-six women were included in the analysis. There were no differences between the groups for manometry. An increase in the PFM strength, endurance, and repeatability was only observed in the Pilates group. In addition, the Pilates group showed greater adherence to the intervention. Pilates exercise program with PFM contraction is not able to change the PFM strength assessed by manometer in pregnant women, but it improved adherence to the intervention. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Does episiotomy influence vaginal resting pressure, pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance, and prevalence of urinary incontinence 6 weeks postpartum?

    PubMed

    Bø, Kari; Hilde, Gunvor; Tennfjord, Merete Kolberg; Engh, Marie Ellstrøm

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare vaginal resting pressure (VRP), pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength and endurance, and prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) at 6 weeks postpartum, in women with and without lateral or mediolateral episiotomy. Two hundred and thirty-eight nulliparous pregnant women, mean age 28.5 years (SD 4.2) and pre-pregnancy BMI 23.8 (SD 4.0) participated in the study. Lateral or mediolateral episiotomy was only performed for indications such as fetal distress or imminent risk of severe perineal tear. At 6 weeks postpartum, a vaginal balloon connected to a high precision pressure transducer was used to measure VRP (cm H2 O), PFM strength (cm H2 O), and endurance (cm H2 O sec). All women completed the International Classification of Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI-SF) by means of an electronic questionnaire. No statistically significant differences were found in VRP (mean difference 0.0 cm H2 O, 95%CI: -2.1 to 2.1), PFM strength (mean difference 1.3 cm H2 O, 95%CI: -1.9 to 4.6), or PFM endurance (mean difference 12.1 cm H2 O sec, 95%CI: -11.0 to 35.1) between women with or without episiotomy. No significant differences were found in prevalence of UI (37.5% vs. 46.6%) or SUI (23.6% vs. 35.6%), between women with or without episiotomy, respectively. PFM function and/or prevalence of post-partum UI were not affected by a lateral or mediolateral episiotomy. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:683-686, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The HSP expression of passive repetitive plyometric trained skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Chen; Hsu, Mei-Chich; Huang, Mao-Shung; Chen, Chuan-Show; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang; Wang, Chiou-Huey; Chen, Tzuping; Su, Borcherng

    2005-01-01

    This study aims to understand the effect of ten-week passive repetitive plyometric (PRP) training on human skeletal muscle and the application of PRP training for performance. Vastus lateralis of nine candidates were aspirated before (pre) and after (post) PRP training. Histochemical approaches with regular hematoxylene-eosin (HE) and Mallory's phosphotungstic acid hematoxylin (PTAH) stains were used to demonstrate the changes of muscle fibers. Immunohistochemical studies with heat shock protein (anti-hsp72, Stressgen, Canada) were employed to display cellular activities. Each set of slides was quantitatively analyzed by using a modified morphometric method (Russ and Dehoff, 1999) on a Nikon ECLIPSE 80i microscope, equipped with an Evolution VF COOLED color video camera, and the Image-Pro Plus software (5.0 for Win; Media Cybernetics, USA). Finally, hsp72 mRNAs of both pre-PRP and post-PRP specimens were amplified through RT-PCR. Signal intensities were read by a densitometer and analyzed through the SPSS (11.0 for Win) statistically. Post-PRP muscle cells demonstrated hypertrophic change with increased cellular content and a narrowed inter-cellular space according to both HE and PTAH profiles. Post-PRP cellular hsp72 proteins were higher by up to five percent, as measured by a gray-scale reading. Further, after a training period of 10 weeks, hsp72 mRNA expression was several times higher.

  19. TRAINING-INDUCED VASCULAR ADAPTATIONS TO ISCHEMIC MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    YANG, H.T.; PRIOR, B.M.; LLOYD, P.G.; TAYLOR, J.C.; LI, Z.; LAUGHLIN, M.H.; TERJUNG, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral arterial insufficiency is a progressive degenerative disease associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. It decreases exercise tolerance and often presents with symptoms of intermittent claudication. Enhanced physical activity is one of the most effective means of improving the life of affected patients. While this occurs for a variety of reasons, vascular remodeling can be an important means for improved oxygen exchange and blood flow delivery. Relevant exercise-induced signals stimulate angiogenesis, within the active muscle (e.g. hypoxia), and arteriogenesis (enlargement of pre-existing vessels via increased shear stress) to increase oxygen exchange and blood flow capacity, respectively. Evidence from pre-clinical studies shows that the increase in collateral blood flow observed with exercise progresses over time of training, is accompanied by significant enlargement of isolated collateral vessels, and enhances the responses observed with angiogenic growth factors (e.g. VEGF, FGF-2). Thus, enhanced physical activity can be an effective means of enlarging the structure and function of the collateral circuit. Interestingly, disrupting normal NO production (via L-NAME) eliminates this increase in collateral blood flow induced by training, but does not disturb the increase in muscle capillarity within the active muscle. Similarly, inhibiting VEGF receptor kinase activity eliminates the increase in collateral-dependent blood flow, and lessens, but does not eliminate, angiogenesis within the calf muscle. These findings illustrate distinctions between the processes influencing angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. Further, sympathetic modulation of the collateral circuit does not eliminate the increase in collateral circuit conductance induced by exercise training. These findings indicate that structural enlargement of the collateral vessels is essential to realize the increase in collateral-dependent blood flow capacity caused by exercise training

  20. Prospective randomized comparison of oxybutynin, functional electrostimulation, and pelvic floor training for treatment of detrusor overactivity in women.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Raquel M; Castro, Rodrigo A; Sousa, Gabriela C; Sartori, Marair G F; Baracat, Edmund C; Girão, Manoel J B C

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of oxybutynin, functional electrostimulation (FES), and pelvic floor training (PFT) for treatment of women with detrusor overactivity. Sixty-four subjects were randomized to oxybutynin (n=22), FES (n=21), or PFT (n=21). Women were evaluated before and after completion of 12 weeks of treatment by subjective response, voiding diary, and urodynamic test. There was subjective symptomatic improvement in 77% of the women treated with oxybutynin, 52% with FES, and 76% with PFT. Urgency resolved in 64% of women treated with oxybutynin, 52% with FES, and in 57% with PFT. Urodynamic evaluation was normal in 36% treated with oxybutynin, 57% with FES, and 52% with PFT. Maximum detrusor involuntary contraction pressure decreased in all groups (p<0.05). All treatments were equally effective. Subjective reduction of urge-incontinence episodes was associated with symptomatic improvement.

  1. Effects of a resistance training program and subsequent detraining on muscle strength and muscle power in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Medina-Perez, Carlos; de Souza-Teixeira, Fernanda; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; de Paz-Fernandez, Jose Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Although resistance training adaptations in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have been described, the detraining response in this population is largely unknown. [corrected] This study was designed to evaluate the effects of a 12-week detraining period on muscle strength (isometric and endurance) and muscle power of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients that had previously carried out a 12-week resistance training program (RTP). Forty-two MS patients were randomly assigned into two groups: an exercise group (EG) that performed a 12-week RTP for the knee extensors muscles; and a control group (CG), that did not perform any specific training. Knee extension maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), muscle power and muscle endurance were evaluated before and after the RTP, as well as 12 weeks after training completion. A strain gauge was used to measure the maximal voluntary isometric contraction and muscle power was assessed with a linear encoder. Muscle endurance was interpreted as the number of repetitions that a patient could perform in a single set of knee extension exercise. The EG increased MVIC and muscle power after the training period, although the training did not affect muscle endurance. After 12 weeks of detraining, MVIC returned to pre-training values but muscle power was still greater than pre-training values in the EG. The CG did not present any change in the variables measured during the intervention. A 12-week RTP improved MVIC and muscle power in MS patients. Additionally, 12 weeks of detraining blunted strength training adaptations in MS patients, although muscle power training adaptations were still evident after the detraining period.

  2. Resistance Training Using Different Hypoxic Training Strategies: a Basis for Hypertrophy and Muscle Power Development.

    PubMed

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Morales-Artacho, Antonio J; Padial, Paulino

    2017-12-01

    The possible muscular strength, hypertrophy, and muscle power benefits of resistance training under environmental conditions of hypoxia are currently being investigated.Nowadays, resistance training in hypoxia constitutes a promising new training strategy for strength and muscle gains. The main mechanisms responsible for these effects seem to be related to increased metabolite accumulation due to hypoxia. However, no data are reported in the literature to describe and compare the efficacy of the different hypertrophic resistance training strategies in hypoxia.Moreover, improvements in sprinting, jumping, or throwing performance have also been described at terrestrial altitude, encouraging research into the speed of explosive movements at altitude. It has been suggested that the reduction in the aerodynamic resistance and/or the increase in the anaerobic metabolism at higher altitudes can influence the metabolic cost, increase the take-off velocities, or improve the motor unit recruitment patterns, which may explain these improvements. Despite these findings, the applicability of altitude conditions in improving muscle power by resistance training remains to be clarified.This review examines current knowledge regarding resistance training in different types of hypoxia, focusing on strategies designed to improve muscle hypertrophy as well as power for explosive movements.

  3. Knowledge of the pelvic floor in nulliparous women

    PubMed Central

    Neels, Hedwig; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques; Tjalma, Wiebren A. A.; De Wachter, Stefan; Wyndaele, Michel; Vermandel, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Proper pelvic floor function is important to avoid serious dysfunctions including incontinence, prolapse, and sexual problems. The current study evaluated the knowledge of young nulliparous women about their pelvic floor and identified what additional information they wanted. [Subjects and Methods] In this cross-sectional survey, a validated, 36 item questionnaire was distributed to 212 nulliparous women. The questionnaire addressed demography, pelvic floor muscles, pelvic floor dysfunction, and possible information sources. Descriptive statistics were generated for all variables. Stability and validity testing were performed using Kappa statistics and intra class correlation coefficients to define agreement for each question. The study was approved by the ethics Committee (B300201318334). [Results] Using a VAS scale (0 to 10), the women rated their knowledge about the pelvic floor as a mean of 2.4 (SD 2.01). A total of 93% of the women were insufficiently informed and requested more information; 25% had concerns about developing urinary incontinence, and 14% about fecal incontinence. Many of the women were unaware what pelvic floor training meant. [Conclusion] There was a significant lack of knowledge about pelvic floor function among nulliparous women. The majority of nulliparous women expressed a need for education, which might offer a way to reduce dysfunction. PMID:27313364

  4. Knowledge of the pelvic floor in nulliparous women.

    PubMed

    Neels, Hedwig; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques; Tjalma, Wiebren A A; De Wachter, Stefan; Wyndaele, Michel; Vermandel, Alexandra

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Proper pelvic floor function is important to avoid serious dysfunctions including incontinence, prolapse, and sexual problems. The current study evaluated the knowledge of young nulliparous women about their pelvic floor and identified what additional information they wanted. [Subjects and Methods] In this cross-sectional survey, a validated, 36 item questionnaire was distributed to 212 nulliparous women. The questionnaire addressed demography, pelvic floor muscles, pelvic floor dysfunction, and possible information sources. Descriptive statistics were generated for all variables. Stability and validity testing were performed using Kappa statistics and intra class correlation coefficients to define agreement for each question. The study was approved by the ethics Committee (B300201318334). [Results] Using a VAS scale (0 to 10), the women rated their knowledge about the pelvic floor as a mean of 2.4 (SD 2.01). A total of 93% of the women were insufficiently informed and requested more information; 25% had concerns about developing urinary incontinence, and 14% about fecal incontinence. Many of the women were unaware what pelvic floor training meant. [Conclusion] There was a significant lack of knowledge about pelvic floor function among nulliparous women. The majority of nulliparous women expressed a need for education, which might offer a way to reduce dysfunction.

  5. Physical training in man. Skeletal muscle metabolism in relation to muscle morphology and running ability.

    PubMed

    Bylund, A C; Bjurö, T; Cederblad, G; Holm, J; Lundholm, K; Sjöstroöm, M; Angquist, K A; Scherstén, T

    1977-03-15

    The metabolic and morphologic adaptation to physical training in skeletal muscle tissue of eleven middle-aged, physically untrained men was studied. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before, after 8 weeks and after 6 months of physical training for analysis of metabolic and morphologic variables. Glucose tolerance test indicated increased insulin sensitivity after 6 months of physical training. The activities of glycogen phosphorylase, hexokinase and glucose-6-P-dehydrogenase were increased but other enzymes involved in glycogen turnover and glycolysis were unchanged after 6 months of physical traning. The activities of citrate synthase and cytochrome-c-oxidase, representing the oxidative capacity were significantly increased already after 8 weeks of physical training. The incorporation rate of palmitate-carbon into CO2 and triglycerides increased, and the incorporation rate of leucine-carbon into CO2 decreased with 6 months of physical training. The fiber diameter of both Type 1- and Type 2-fibers increased, while the mitochondrial volume increased predominantly in Type 2-fibers. Significant correlations were found between metabolic, physiologic and morphologic variables before and after physical training. The results indicate an increased oxidative capacity, mainly located to Type 2-fibers, and an increased utilization of fatty acids in response to this type of physical training.

  6. Practical blood flow restriction training increases muscle hypertrophy during a periodized resistance training programme.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Loenneke, Jeremy P; de Souza, Eduardo O; Machado, Marco; Dudeck, Joshua E; Wilson, Jacob M

    2014-07-01

    Resistance training in combination with practical blood flow restriction (pBFR) is thought to stimulate muscle hypertrophy by increasing muscle activation and muscle swelling. Most previous studies used the KAATSU device; however, little long-term research has been completed using pBFR. To investigate the effects of pBFR on muscle hypertrophy. Twenty college-aged male participants with a minimum of 1 year of resistance training experience were recruited for this study. Our study consisted of a randomized, crossover protocol consisting of individuals either using pBFR for the elbow flexors during the first 4 weeks (BFR-HI) or the second 4 weeks (HI-BFR) of an 8-week resistance training programme. Direct ultrasound-determined bicep muscle thickness was assessed collectively at baseline and at the end of weeks 4 and 8. There were no differences in muscle thickness between groups at baseline (P = 0·52). There were time (P<0·01, ES = 0·99) but no condition by time effects (P = 0·58, ES = 0·80) for muscle thickness in which the combined values of both groups increased on average from week 0 (3·66 ± 0·06) to week 4 (3·95 ± 0·05) to week 8 (4·11 ± 0·07). However, both the BFR-HI and HI-BFR increased significantly from baseline to week 4 (6·9% and 8·6%, P<0·01) and from weeks 4 to 8 (4·1%, 4·0%, P<0·01), respectively. The results of this study suggest that pBFR can stimulate muscle hypertrophy to the same degree to that of high-intensity resistance training. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Muscle fiber size increases following resistance training in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dalgas, U; Stenager, E; Jakobsen, J; Petersen, T; Overgaard, K; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    2010-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that lower body progressive resistance training (PRT) leads to an increase of the muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) and a shift in the proportion of fiber types in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The present study was a two-arm, randomized controlled trial (RCT). Thirty-eight MS patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) 3-5.5) were randomized to a PRT group (Exercise, n = 19) or a control group (Control, n = 19). The Exercise group performed a biweekly 12-week lower body PRT program [five exercises progressing from 15RM (Repetition Maximum) towards 8RM], whereas the Control group maintained their usual daily activity level during the trial period. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis were taken before (pre) and after the trial (post). Thigh volume (TV) was estimated from anthropometric measurements. Isokinetic muscle strength of the knee extensors (KE) and flexors (KF) were evaluated at slow (90(°)/s) and fast (180(°)/s) angular velocities. In the Exercise group the mean CSA of all muscle fibers (7.9 ± 15.4% vs. -3.5 ± 9.0%, p = 0.03) and of type II muscle fibers (14.0 ± 19.4% vs. -2.6 ± 15.5%, p = 0.02) increased in comparison with the Control group. No changes occurred in the proportion of fiber types in the Exercise group. Neither was there any change in total TV. Isokinetic strength at KE180, KF90 and KF180 improved significantly after PRT when compared with the control group (10.2-21.3%, p ≤ 0.02). We conclude that progressive resistance training induces a compensatory increase of muscle fiber size in patients with the central nervous system disorder, multiple sclerosis.

  8. Pulmonary adaptations to swim and inspiratory muscle training.

    PubMed

    Mickleborough, Timothy D; Stager, Joel M; Chatham, Ken; Lindley, Martin R; Ionescu, Alina A

    2008-08-01

    Because the anomalous respiratory characteristics of competitive swimmers have been suggested to be due to inspiratory muscle work, the respiratory muscle and pulmonary function of 30 competitively trained swimmers was assessed at the beginning and end of an intensive 12-week swim training (ST) program. Swimmers (n = 10) combined ST with either inspiratory muscle training (IMT) set at 80% sustained maximal inspiratory pressure (SMIP) with progressively increased work-rest ratios until task failure for 3-days per week (ST + IMT) or ST with sham-IMT (ST + SHAM-IMT, n = 10), or acted as controls (ST only, ST, n = 10). Measures of respiratory and pulmonary function were assessed at the beginning and end of the 12 week study period. There were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in respiratory and pulmonary function between groups (ST + IMT, ST + SHAM-IMT and ST) at baseline and at the end of the 12 week study period. However, within all groups significant increases (P < 0.05) were observed in a number of respiratory and pulmonary function variables at the end of the 12 week study, such as maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure, inspiratory power output, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory and inspiratory volume in 1-s, total lung capacity and diffusion capacity of the lung. This study has demonstrated that there are no appreciable differences in terms of respiratory changes between elite swimmers undergoing a competitive ST program and those undergoing respiratory muscle training using the flow-resistive IMT device employed in the present study; as yet, the causal mechanisms involved are undefined.

  9. Long-term training effects on masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, D; Giannakopoulos, N N; Blaser, R; Eberhard, L; Rues, S; Schindler, H J

    2011-12-01

    Neuromuscular adaptations during skill acquisition have been extensively investigated for skeletal muscles. Motor rehabilitation is the main target for application of motor training. Such measures are also relevant for the musculature of the jaw, but few data are available for motor adaptation of the masticatory system. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare long-term training effects of different motor tasks on masseter and temporal muscles. In 20 healthy subjects, the electromyographic response to unilateral and bilateral maximum voluntary tooth clenching, balancing the mandible on a hydrostatic system under force-feedback-controlled conditions, and unilateral chewing was investigated in an initial session and then in two follow-up sessions separated by 2 and 10 weeks from baseline. Motor tasks were repeated three times for chewing, nine times for maximum biting (MB) and 24 times for the coordination tasks (CT). The sequences of the various motor tasks were applied once in the first session and twice in the second and third sessions. No effects of training were observed for MB tasks except for MB in intercuspation, for which significant yet transient avoidance behaviour occurred in the second session. No significant effects were found for chewing tests. For the CT, however, a robust significant long-term training effect was detected which reduced the electric muscle activity in session 2 by approximately 20% and in session 3 by approximately 40% compared with the initial measurements. The study showed that the masticatory muscles are remarkably prone to motor adaptation if demanding CT must be accomplished.

  10. Using exercise training to understand control of skeletal muscle metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gibala, Martin J

    2017-01-01

    Bengt Saltin believed that exercise was the unsurpassed tool to study human integrative physiology. He demonstrated this over the course of his career by employing physical training as a model to advance our understanding of skeletal muscle metabolic control and the impact of physical activity on performance and health. Bengt was also a pioneer in advocating the concept of exercise is medicine. His scientific curiosity was perhaps exceeded only by his generosity.

  11. Respiratory muscle training with the incentive spirometer resistive breathing device.

    PubMed

    Larson, M; Kim, M J

    1984-07-01

    Utilizing the conceptual scheme of Kim, this study focused on the effect of inspiratory muscle training on the strength of the respiratory muscles, exercise performance, clinical manifestations, and activities of daily living. Unlike previous studies, inspiratory muscle training was performed by the use of an ISRBD that gave alinear inspiratory resistance of 50 cm H2O/L/sec at 1 L/sec flow. Subjects used an ISRBD twice a day for 15 minutes each day for 4 weeks. Strength of respiratory muscles as measured by PImax and sputum expectoration improved significantly (P less than 0.05) but there was no significant change in exercise performance (12-minute walk distance), other clinical signs and symptoms, or activities of daily living. Visual feedback given by the bellows of the ISRBD that inflated and deflated with inspiration and expiration apparently served as a positive reinforcer and motivator for most subjects. Daily logs of clinical signs and symptoms and activities of daily living, along with weekly telephone conferences with each subject, provided comprehensive data and may have contributed to the high compliance rate (98%) in this study.

  12. Contraction induced muscle injury: towards personalized training and recovery programs.

    PubMed

    Givli, Sefi

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscles can be injured by their own contractions. Such contraction-induced injury, often accompanied by delayed onset of muscle soreness, is a leading cause of the loss of mobility in the rapidly increasing population of elderly people. Unlike other types of muscle injuries which hurt almost exclusively those who are subjected to intensive exercise such as professional athletes and soldiers in training, contraction induced injury is a phenomenon which may be experienced by people of all ages while performing a variety of daily-life activities. Subjects that experience contraction induced injury report on soreness that usually increases in intensity in the first 24 h after the activity, peaks from 24 to 72 h, and then subsides and disappears in a few days. Despite their clinical importance and wide influence, there are almost no studies, clinical, experimental or computational, that quantitatively relate between the extent of contraction induced injury and activity factors, such as number of repetitions, their frequency and magnitude. The lack of such quantitative information is even more emphasized by the fact that contraction induced injury can be used, if moderate and controlled, to improve muscle performance in the long term. Thus, if properly understood and carefully implemented, contraction induced injury can be used for the purpose of personalized training and recovery programs. In this paper, we review experimental, clinical, and theoretical works, attempting towards drawing a more quantitative description of contraction induced injury and related phenomena.

  13. The effect of resistance training combined with timed ingestion of protein on muscle fiber size and muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lars L; Tufekovic, Goran; Zebis, Mette K; Crameri, Regina M; Verlaan, George; Kjaer, Michael; Suetta, Charlotte; Magnusson, Peter; Aagaard, Per

    2005-02-01

    Acute muscle protein metabolism is modulated not only by resistance exercise but also by amino acids. However, less is known about the long-term hypertrophic effect of protein supplementation in combination with resistance training. The present study was designed to compare the effect of 14 weeks of resistance training combined with timed ingestion of isoenergetic protein vs carbohydrate supplementation on muscle fiber hypertrophy and mechanical muscle performance. Supplementation was administered before and immediately after each training bout and, in addition, in the morning on nontraining days. Muscle biopsy specimens were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle and analyzed for muscle fiber cross-sectional area. Squat jump and countermovement jump were performed on a force platform to determine vertical jump height. Peak torque during slow (30 degrees s-1) and fast (240 degrees s-1) concentric and eccentric contractions of the knee extensor muscle was measured in an isokinetic dynamometer. After 14 weeks of resistance training, the protein group showed hypertrophy of type I (18% +/- 5%; P < .01) and type II (26% +/- 5%; P < .01) muscle fibers, whereas no change above baseline occurred in the carbohydrate group. Squat jump height increased only in the protein group, whereas countermovement jump height and peak torque during slow isokinetic muscle contraction increased similarly in both groups. In conclusion, a minor advantage of protein supplementation over carbohydrate supplementation during resistance training on mechanical muscle function was found. However, the present results may have relevance for individuals who are particularly interested in gaining muscle size.

  14. Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Folsom, Ian A; Gaz, Dan V; Kakuk, Alynn C; Mack, Jessica L; Ver Mulm, Jacyln A

    2015-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) strengthens the muscles of respiration, improves breathing efficiency, and increases fitness. The IMT is generally performed independently of aerobic exercise; however, it is not clear whether there is added benefit of performing the IMT while simultaneously performing aerobic exercise in terms of activating and strengthening inspiratory muscles. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of IMT on respiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared with that when the IMT was performed alone. Diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity was measured under different resting and cycling postures, with and without the use of the IMT at 40% maximal inspiratory pressure (n = 10; mean age 37). Cycling in an upright posture while simultaneously performing the IMT resulted in a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than while performing the IMT at rest in upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Cycling in drops postures while performing the IMT had a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than when performing the IMT at rest in either upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased with both cycling and IMT, although posture had little effect. These results support our hypothesis in that the IMT while cycling increases respiratory EMG activity to a significantly greater extent than when performing the IMT solely at rest, suggesting that the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect.

  15. The influence of respiratory muscle training upon intermittent exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Nicks, C R; Morgan, D W; Fuller, D K; Caputo, J L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of respiratory muscle training (RMT) on intermittent exercise performance, respiratory muscle strength (PI (max)), respiratory muscle fatigue (RMF), and dyspnea in soccer athletes. Collegiate soccer athletes (20 male, 7 female) were randomly divided into either a RMT or control condition during off-season conditioning. The RMT group performed a 30RM protocol (10 times weekly) for 5 weeks using a commercially-available training device, while the controls received no RMT. Performance was evaluated utilizing Level 1 of the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test (IRT) and dyspnea was assessed during and immediately following the IRT. RMF was quantified within 2 minutes (RMF2) and 10 minutes (RMF10) after completing the IRT. Following training, the RMT group significantly increased IRT performance by 216.6 +/- 231.0 meters (p = .008) while the 49.2 +/- 75.1 meter increase observed in the controls was not significant. PI (max) in the RMT group increased from 138.1 +/- 19.6 to 165.3 +/- 23.5 cmH (2)O (p < .001), with no significant change observed in the controls. RMT did not significantly affect RMF or dyspnea. In conclusion, RMT improved intermittent exercise performance in these soccer athletes. The mechanisms by which RMT improves performance warrant further study.

  16. Spinal Posture of Thoracic and Lumbar Spine and Pelvic Tilt in Highly Trained Cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Muyor, José M.; López-Miñarro, Pedro A.; Alacid, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sagittal thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in elite and master cyclists when standing on the floor, and sitting on a bicycle at three different handlebar-hand positions. A total of 60 elite male cyclists (mean age: 22.95 ± 3.38 years) and 60 master male cyclists (mean age: 34.27 ± 3.05 years) were evaluated. The Spinal Mouse system was used to measure sagittal thoracic and lumbar curvature in standing on the floor and sitting positions on the bicycle at three different handlebar-hand positions (high, medium, and low). The mean values for thoracic and lumbar curvatures and pelvic tilt in the standing position on the floor were 48.17 ± 8.05°, -27.32 ± 7.23°, and 13.65 ± 5.54°, respectively, for elite cyclists and 47.02 ± 9.24°, -25.30 ± 6.29°, and 11.25 ± 5.17° for master cyclists. A high frequency of thoracic hyperkyphosis in the standing position was observed (58.3% in elite cyclists and 53.3% in master cyclists), whereas predominately neutral values were found in the lumbar spine (88.3% and 76.7% in elite and master cyclists, respectively). When sitting on the bicycle, the thoracic curve was at a lower angle in the three handlebar-hand positions with respect to the standing position on the floor in both groups (p < 0.01). The lumbar curve adopted a kyphotic posture. In conclusion, cyclists present a high percentage of thoracic hyperkyphotic postures in standing positions on the floor. However, thoracic hyperkyphosis is not directly related to positions adopted on the bicycle. Key points This study evaluated thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in elite and master cyclists while standing and sitting on the bicycle. Elite and master cyclists showed a high frequency of thoracic hyperkyphosis and neutral lumbar lordosis in standing. Cyclists adopted a significantly lower thoracic kyphosis on the bicycle at the three handlebar positions analysed (upper, middle and lower handlebars

  17. Managing chronic pelvic pain following reconstructive pelvic surgery with transvaginal mesh.

    PubMed

    Gyang, Anthony N; Feranec, Jessica B; Patel, Rakesh C; Lamvu, Georgine M

    2014-03-01

    In 2001, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first transvaginal mesh kit to treat pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Since the introduction of vaginal mesh kits, some vaginal meshes have been associated with chronic pelvic pain after reconstructive pelvic floor surgery. Pelvic pain results in between 0 % and 30 % of patients following transvaginal mesh placement. Common causes of chronic pelvic pain include pelvic floor muscle spasm, pudendal neuralgia, and infection. Paucity of data exists on the effective management of chronic pelvic pain after pelvic reconstructive surgery with mesh. We outline the management of chronic pelvic pain after transvaginal mesh placement for reconstructive pelvic floor repair based on our clinical experience and adaptation of data used in other aspects of managing chronic pelvic pain conditions.

  18. The effect of exercise training on lower trunk muscle morphology.

    PubMed

    Shahtahmassebi, Behnaz; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Stomski, Norman J; Hecimovich, Mark; Fairchild, Timothy J

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle plays an important role in maintaining the stability of the lumbar region. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the effects of exercise on trunk muscle morphology. To systematically review the literature on the effects of exercise training on lower trunk muscle morphology to determine the comparative effectiveness of different exercise interventions. A systematic search strategy was conducted in the following databases: PubMed, SportDiscus, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PEDro. We included full, peer-reviewed, prospective longitudinal studies, including randomized controlled trials and single-group designs, such as pre- to post-intervention and crossover studies, reporting on the effect of exercise training on trunk muscle morphology. Study quality was assessed with the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. We classified each exercise intervention into four categories, based on the primary exercise approach: motor control, machine-based resistance, non-machine-based resistance or cardiovascular. Treatment effects were estimated using within-group standardized mean differences (SMDs). The systematic search identified 1,911 studies; of which 29 met our selection criteria: motor control (n = 12), machine-based resistance (n = 10), non-machine-based resistance (n = 5) and cardiovascular (n = 2). Fourteen studies (48 %) reported an increase in trunk muscle size following exercise training. Among positive trials, the largest effects were reported by studies testing combined motor control and non-machine-based resistance exercise (SMD [95 % CI] = 0.66 [0.06 to 1.27] to 3.39 [2.80 to 3.98]) and machine-based resistance exercise programmes (SMD [95 % CI] = 0.52 [0.01 to 1.03] to 1.79 [0.87 to 2.72]). Most studies investigating the effects of non-machine-based resistance exercise reported no change in trunk muscle morphology, with one study reporting a medium effect on trunk muscle size (SMD [95 % CI] = 0.60 [0.03 to 1.16]). Cardiovascular exercise

  19. The Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory and Limb Locomotor Muscle Deoxygenation During Exercise with Resistive Inspiratory Loading.

    PubMed

    Turner, L A; Tecklenburg-Lund, S L; Chapman, R; Shei, R-J; Wilhite, D P; Mickleborough, T

    2016-07-01

    We investigated how inspiratory muscle training impacted respiratory and locomotor muscle deoxygenation during submaximal exercise with resistive inspiratory loading. 16 male cyclists completed 6 weeks of either true (n=8) or sham (n=8) inspiratory muscle training. Pre- and post-training, subjects completed 3, 6-min experimental trials performed at ~80%  ˙VO2peak with interventions of either moderate inspiratory loading, heavy inspiratory loading, or maximal exercise imposed in the final 3 min. Locomotor and respiratory muscle oxy-, deoxy-, and total-haemoglobin and myoglobin concentration was continuously monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy. Locomotor muscle deoxygenation changes from 80%  ˙VO2peak to heavy inspiratory loading were significantly reduced pre- to post-training from 4.3±5.6 µM to 2.7±4.7 µM. Respiratory muscle deoxygenation was also significantly reduced during the heavy inspiratory loading trial (4.6±3.5 µM to 1.9±1.5 µM) post-training. There was no significant difference in oxy-, deoxy-, or total-haemoglobin and myoglobin during any of the other loading trials, from pre- to post-training, in either group. After inspiratory muscle training, highly-trained cyclists exhibited decreased locomotor and respiratory muscle deoxygenation during exercise with heavy inspiratory loading. These data suggest that inspiratory muscle training reduces oxygen extraction by the active respiratory and limb muscles, which may reflect changes in respiratory and locomotor muscle oxygen delivery.

  20. Olympic weightlifting training causes different knee muscle-coactivation adaptations compared with traditional weight training.

    PubMed

    Arabatzi, Fotini; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of an Olympic weightlifting (OL) and traditional weight (TW) training program on muscle coactivation around the knee joint during vertical jump tests. Twenty-six men were assigned randomly to 3 groups: the OL (n = 9), the TW (n = 9), and Control (C) groups (n = 8). The experimental groups trained 3 d · wk(-1) for 8 weeks. Electromyographic (EMG) activity from the rectus femoris and biceps femoris, sagittal kinematics, vertical stiffness, maximum height, and power were collected during the squat jump, countermovement jump (CMJ), and drop jump (DJ), before and after training. Knee muscle coactivation index (CI) was calculated for different phases of each jump by dividing the antagonist EMG activity by the agonist. Analysis of variance showed that the CI recorded during the preactivation and eccentric phases of all the jumps increased in both training groups. The OL group showed a higher stiffness and jump height adaptation than the TW group did (p < 0.05). Further, the OL showed a decrease or maintenance of the CI recorded during the propulsion phase of the CMJ and DJs, which is in contrast to the increase in the CI observed after TW training (p < 0.05). The results indicated that the altered muscle activation patterns about the knee, coupled with changes of leg stiffness, differ between the 2 programs. The OL program improves jump performance via a constant CI, whereas the TW training caused an increased CI, probably to enhance joint stability.

  1. Effect of pelvic floor muscle contraction on vesical and rectal function with identification of puborectalis-rectovesical inhibitory reflex and levator-rectovesical excitatory reflex.

    PubMed

    Shafik, A; El-Sibai, O

    2001-08-01

    The effects of pelvic floor muscle contraction on rectal and vesical function were studied in 19 healthy volunteers with the aim of shedding light on some of the hitherto vague aspects of the mechanisms involved in micturition and defecation and their disorders. Rectal and vesical pressures were recorded during puborectalis (PR) and levator ani (LA) muscle stimulation with the rectum or urinary bladder empty and full. Muscle stimulation was effected by needle EMG electrode. The pressure responses to stimulation of the PR and LA muscles were also recorded with these muscles and the rectum and urinary bladder individually anesthetized in 12 of the 19 subjects. The test was repeated using saline instead of xylocaine. PR and LA muscle stimulation produced no pressure response in the empty rectum or bladder. Upon rectal balloon distension with a mean of 156.6+/-34.2 ml of carbon dioxide the mean rectal pressure was 64.6+/-18.7 cm H2O, the subject felt the urge to evacuate and the balloon was expelled to the exterior. On PR muscle stimulation at rectal distension with the above volume, the subject did not feel the urge to evacuate, the rectal pressure was 8.2+/-1.6 cm H2O and the balloon was not expelled. Upon LA stimulation at the same volume, the urge persisted, the rectal pressure was higher and the balloon was expelled. Vesical filling with a mean of 378.2+/-23.6 ml of saline initiated the urge to urinate and elevated the vesical pressure. PR muscle stimulation at this volume aborted the urge and pressure elevation, while LA stimulation caused more elevation of the vesical pressure and spontaneous micturition. Bladder filling with a mean of 423.6+/-38.2 ml produced high vesical pressure and spontaneous urination, both of which were prevented by PR muscle stimulation but not by LA muscle stimulation. Stimulation of the PR and LA muscles during individual anesthetization of the rectum, bladder or PR and LA muscles resulted in no significant rectal or vesical pressure

  2. Muscle fibre capillarization is a critical factor in muscle fibre hypertrophy during resistance exercise training in older men.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; Joanisse, Sophie; Leenders, Marika; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2017-04-01

    Adequate muscle fibre perfusion is critical for the maintenance of muscle mass; it is essential in the rapid delivery of oxygen, nutrients and growth factors to the muscle, stimulating muscle fibre growth. Muscle fibre capillarization is known to decrease substantially with advancing age. However, whether (relative) low muscle fibre capillarization negatively impacts the muscle hypertrophic response following resistance exercise training in older adults is unknown. Twenty-two healthy older men (71 ± 1 years) performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance type exercise training. To assess the change in muscle fibre characteristics, percutaneous biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were taken before and following 12 and 24 weeks of the intervention programme. A comparison was made between participants who had a relatively low type II muscle fibre capillary-to-fibre perimeter exchange index (CFPE; LOW group) and high type II muscle fibre CFPE (HIGH group) at baseline. Type I and type II muscle fibre size, satellite cell, capillary content and distance between satellite cells to the nearest capillary were determined by immunohistochemistry. Overall, type II muscle fibre size (from 5150 ± 234 to 6719 ± 446 µm(2) , P < 0.05) and satellite cell content (from 0.058 ± 0.006 to 0.090 ± 0.010 satellite cells per muscle fibre, P < 0.05) had increased significantly in response to 24 weeks of resistance exercise training. However, these improvements where mainly driven by differences in baseline type II muscle fibre capillarization, whereas muscle fibre size (from 5170 ± 390 to 7133 ± 314 µm(2) , P < 0.05) and satellite cell content (from 0.059 ± 0.009 to 0.102 ± 0.017 satellite cells per muscle fibre, P < 0.05) increased significantly in the HIGH group, no significant changes were observed in LOW group following exercise training. No significant changes in type I and type II muscle fibre

  3. Flywheel resistance training calls for greater eccentric muscle activation than weight training.

    PubMed

    Norrbrand, Lena; Pozzo, Marco; Tesch, Per A

    2010-11-01

    Changes in muscle activation and performance were studied in healthy men in response to 5 weeks of resistance training with or without "eccentric overload". Subjects, assigned to either weight stack (grp WS; n = 8) or iso-inertial "eccentric overload" flywheel (grp FW; n = 9) knee extensor resistance training, completed 12 sessions of four sets of seven concentric-eccentric actions. Pre- and post-measurements comprised maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), rate of force development (RFD) and training mode-specific force. Root mean square electromyographic (EMG(RMS)) activity of mm. vastus lateralis and medialis was assessed during MVC and used to normalize EMG(RMS) for training mode-specific concentric (EMG(CON)) and eccentric (EMG(ECC)) actions at 90°, 120° and 150° knee joint angles. Grp FW showed greater (p < 0.05) overall normalized angle-specific EMG(ECC) of vastii muscles compared with grp WS. Grp FW showed near maximal normalized EMG(CON) both pre- and post-training. EMG(CON) for Grp WS was near maximal only post-training. While RFD was unchanged following training (p > 0.05), MVC and training-specific strength increased (p < 0.05) in both groups. We believe the higher EMG(ECC) activity noted with FW exercise compared to standard weight lifting could be attributed to its unique iso-inertial loading features. Hence, the resulting greater mechanical stress may explain the robust muscle hypertrophy reported earlier in response to flywheel resistance training.

  4. Inspiratory muscle training is ineffective in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Pedro; Denari, Silvia D C; Ruiz, Soraia A L; Bernal, Karla G; Manfrin, Gabriela M; Friedrich, Celena; Deheinzelin, Daniel

    2005-12-01

    Invasive mechanical ventilation is associated with complications, and its abbreviation is desirable. The imbalance between increased workload, decreased inspiratory muscle strength and endurance is an important determinant of ventilator dependence. Low endurance may be present due to respiratory muscle atrophy, critical illness, or steroid use. Specific inspiratory muscle training may increase or preserve endurance. The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that inspiratory muscle training from the beginning of mechanical ventilation would abbreviate the weaning duration and decrease reintubation rate. As a secondary objective, we described the evolution of inspiratory muscle strength with and without inspiratory muscle training. Prospective, randomized clinical trial in an adult clinical-surgical intensive care unit. Twelve patients trained the inspiratory muscles twice a day, and 13 patients did not (control). Training was performed adjusting the sensitivity of the ventilator based on the maximal inspiratory pressure. Patients underwent daily surveillance of the maximal inspiratory pressure. The weaning duration (31 +/- 22 hr, control and 23 +/- 11 hr, training group; P = .24) and reintubation rate (5 control and 3 training group; P = .39) were not statistically different. The maximal inspiratory pressure of the control group showed a trend toward a modest increase. In contrast, the training group showed a small decrease (P = .34). In acute critically ill patients, inspiratory muscle training from the beginning of mechanical ventilation neither abbreviated the weaning duration, nor decreased the reintubation rate. Inspiratory muscle strength tended to stay constant, along the mechanical ventilation, with or without this specific inspiratory muscle training.

  5. Muscle fibre capillarization is a critical factor in muscle fibre hypertrophy during resistance exercise training in older men

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P.; Joanisse, Sophie; Leenders, Marika; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Adequate muscle fibre perfusion is critical for the maintenance of muscle mass; it is essential in the rapid delivery of oxygen, nutrients and growth factors to the muscle, stimulating muscle fibre growth. Muscle fibre capillarization is known to decrease substantially with advancing age. However, whether (relative) low muscle fibre capillarization negatively impacts the muscle hypertrophic response following resistance exercise training in older adults is unknown. Methods Twenty‐two healthy older men (71 ± 1 years) performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance type exercise training. To assess the change in muscle fibre characteristics, percutaneous biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were taken before and following 12 and 24 weeks of the intervention programme. A comparison was made between participants who had a relatively low type II muscle fibre capillary‐to‐fibre perimeter exchange index (CFPE; LOW group) and high type II muscle fibre CFPE (HIGH group) at baseline. Type I and type II muscle fibre size, satellite cell, capillary content and distance between satellite cells to the nearest capillary were determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Overall, type II muscle fibre size (from 5150 ± 234 to 6719 ± 446 µm2, P < 0.05) and satellite cell content (from 0.058 ± 0.006 to 0.090 ± 0.010 satellite cells per muscle fibre, P < 0.05) had increased significantly in response to 24 weeks of resistance exercise training. However, these improvements where mainly driven by differences in baseline type II muscle fibre capillarization, whereas muscle fibre size (from 5170 ± 390 to 7133 ± 314 µm2, P < 0.05) and satellite cell content (from 0.059 ± 0.009 to 0.102 ± 0.017 satellite cells per muscle fibre, P < 0.05) increased significantly in the HIGH group, no significant changes were observed in LOW group following exercise training. No significant changes in type I

  6. The transverse abdominal muscle is excessively active during active straight leg raising in pregnancy-related posterior pelvic girdle pain: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Mens, Jan M A; Pool-Goudzwaard, Annelies

    2017-08-25

    Many studies suggest that impairment of motor control is the mechanical component of the pathogenesis of painful disorders in the lumbo-sacral region; however, this theory is still unproven and the results and recommendations for intervention remain questionable. The need for a force to compress both innominate bones against the sacrum is the basis for treatment of pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain (PGP). Therefore, it is advised to use a pelvic belt and do exercises to enhance contraction of the muscles which provide this compression. However, our clinical experience is that contraction of those muscles appears to be excessive in PGP. Therefore, in patients with long-lasting pregnancy-related posterior PGP, there is a need to investigate the contraction pattern of an important muscle that provides a compressive force, i.e. the transverse abdominal muscle (TrA), during a load transfer test, such as active straight leg raising (ASLR). TrA thickness was measured by means of ultrasound imaging at rest and during ASLR in 43 non-pregnant women with ongoing posterior PGP that started during a pregnancy or delivery, and in 39 women of the same age group who had delivered at least once and had no current PGP (healthy controls). In participants with PGP, the median TrA thickness increase with respect to rest during ipsilateral and contralateral ASLR was 31% (SD 46%) and 31% (SD 57%), respectively. In healthy controls, these values were 11% (SD 25%) and 13% (SD 22%), respectively. Significant excessive contraction of the TrA is present during ASLR in patients with long-lasting pregnancy-related posterior PGP. The present findings do not support the idea that contraction of the TrA is decreased in long-lasting pregnancy-related PGP. This implies that there is no rationale for the prescription of exercises to enhance contraction of TrA in patients with long-lasting pregnancy-related PGP.

  7. Anatomical and biomechanical traits of broiler chickens across ontogeny. Part II. Body segment inertial properties and muscle architecture of the pelvic limb

    PubMed Central

    Tickle, Peter G.; Rankin, Jeffery W.; Codd, Jonathan R.; Hutchinson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    In broiler chickens, genetic success for desired production traits is often shadowed by welfare concerns related to musculoskeletal health. Whilst these concerns are clear, a viable solution is still elusive. Part of the solution lies in knowing how anatomical changes in afflicted body systems that occur across ontogeny influence standing and moving. Here, to demonstrate these changes we quantify the segment inertial properties of the whole body, trunk (legs removed) and the right pelvic limb segments of five broilers at three different age groups across development. We also consider how muscle architecture (mass, fascicle length and other properties related to mechanics) changes for selected muscles of the pelvic limb. All broilers used had no observed lameness, but we document the limb pathologies identified post mortem, since these two factors do not always correlate, as shown here. The most common leg disorders, including bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis and rotational and angular deformities of the lower limb, were observed in chickens at all developmental stages. Whole limb morphology is not uniform relative to body size, with broilers obtaining large thighs and feet between four and six weeks of age. This implies that the energetic cost of swinging the limbs is markedly increased across this growth period, perhaps contributing to reduced activity levels. Hindlimb bone length does not change during this period, which may be advantageous for increased stability despite the increased energetic costs. Increased pectoral muscle growth appears to move the centre of mass cranio-dorsally in the last two weeks of growth. This has direct consequences for locomotion (potentially greater limb muscle stresses during standing and moving). Our study is the first to measure these changes in the musculoskeletal system across growth in chickens, and reveals how artificially selected changes of the morphology of the pectoral apparatus may cause deficits in

  8. Can Fear, Pain, and Muscle Tension Discriminate Vaginismus from Dyspareunia/Provoked Vestibulodynia? Implications for the New DSM-5 Diagnosis of Genito-Pelvic Pain/Penetration Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lahaie, Marie-Andrée; Amsel, Rhonda; Khalifé, Samir; Boyer, Stephanie; Faaborg-Andersen, Marie; Binik, Yitzchak M

    2015-08-01

    Fear has been suggested as the crucial diagnostic variable that may distinguish vaginismus from dyspareunia. Unfortunately, this has not been systematically investigated. The primary purpose of this study, therefore, was to investigate whether fear as evaluated by subjective, behavioral, and psychophysiological measures could differentiate women with vaginismus from those with dyspareunia/provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) and controls. A second aim was to re-examine whether genital pain and pelvic floor muscle tension differed between vaginismus and dyspareunia/PVD sufferers. Fifty women with vaginismus, 50 women with dyspareunia/PVD, and 43 controls participated in an experimental session comprising a structured interview, pain sensitivity testing, a filmed gynecological examination, and several self-report measures. Results demonstrated that fear and vaginal muscle tension were significantly greater in the vaginismus group as compared to the dyspareunia/PVD and no-pain control groups. Moreover, behavioral measures of fear and vaginal muscle tension were found to discriminate the vaginismus group from the dyspareunia/PVD and no-pain control groups. Genital pain did not differ significantly between the vaginismus and dyspareunia/PVD groups; however, genital pain was found to discriminate both clinical groups from controls. Despite significant statistical differences on fear and vaginal muscle tension variables between women suffering from vaginismus and dyspareunia/PVD, a large overlap was observed between these conditions. These findings may explain the great difficulty health professionals experience in attempting to reliably differentiate vaginismus from dyspareunia/PVD. The implications of these data for the new DSM-5 diagnosis of Genito-Pelvic Pain/Penetration Disorder are discussed.

  9. Ultrasound Imaging of the Pelvic Floor.

    PubMed

    Stone, Daniel E; Quiroz, Lieschen H

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the background and appraisal of endoluminal ultrasound of the pelvic floor. It provides a detailed anatomic assessment of the muscles and surrounding organs of the pelvic floor. Different anatomic variability and pathology, such as prolapse, fecal incontinence, urinary incontinence, vaginal wall cysts, synthetic implanted material, and pelvic pain, are easily assessed with endoluminal vaginal ultrasound. With pelvic organ prolapse in particular, not only is the prolapse itself seen but the underlying cause related to the anatomic and functional abnormalities of the pelvic floor muscle structures are also visualized.

  10. RESPIRATORY MUSCLE STRENGTH IN IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS AFTER TRAINING PROGRAM.

    PubMed

    Alves, Vera Lúcia Dos Santos; Avanzi, Osmar

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the impact of a physiotherapy protocol in maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressure in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) by manovacuometry. AIS may change the respiratory dynamics and the performance of inspiratory and expiratory muscles, affecting ventilatory capacity. Patients with AIS aged 10 to 20 years old were randomly assigned to receive an aerobic exercise-training program or no treatment. They were evaluated for respiratory muscle strength before and after the treatment period by means of manovacuometry, thorax and spine radiographs. Physical therapy exercising protocol comprised three weekly sessions including stretching and aerobic exercises during four months. Forty five patients received physical therapy and 45 patients received no treatment (control group). The mean maximum inspiratory pressure (Pimax) was -52.13 cm H20 and the maximum expiratory pressure (Pemax) was 62.38 cm H20. There was a significant increase of Pimax and Pemax (p=0,000) in the group receiving physical therapy. There were no drop-outs and no adverse events in this study. Respiratory muscle strength, scoliosis and kyphosis degrees were not statistically correlated. Exercising is beneficial to patients with AIS, who have shown significant increases in respiratory muscle strength after physical therapy. There was no correlation between respiratory pressure and spine deformity. Level of Evidence I, High quality randomized trial.

  11. Regional fat changes induced by localized muscle endurance resistance training.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Andrade, David C; Campos-Jara, Christian; Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Alvarez-Lepín, Cristian; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a localized muscle endurance resistance training program on total body and regional tissue composition. Seven men and 4 women (aged 23 ± 1 years) were trained with their nondominant leg during 12 weeks, 3 sessions per week. Each session consisted of 1 set of 960-1,200 repetitions (leg press exercise), at 10-30% 1 repetition maximum. Before and after training, body mass, bone mass, bone mineral density (BMD), lean mass, fat mass, and fat percentage were determined by dual-emission x-ray absorptiometry. Energy intakes were registered using a food recall questionnaire. At the whole-body level, body mass, bone mass, BMD, lean mass, or body fat percentage were not significantly changed. However, body fat mass significantly decreased by 5.1% (preexercise: 13.5 ± 6.3 kg; postexercise: 12.8 ± 5.4 kg, p < 0.05). No significant changes in bone mass, lean mass, fat mass, or fat percentage were observed in both the control and trained leg. A significant (p < 0.05) decrease in fat mass was observed in the upper extremities and trunk (10.2 and 6.9%, respectively, p < 0.05). The reduction of fat mass in the upper extremities and trunk was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than the fat mass change observed in the trained leg but not in the control leg. No significant changes were observed in energy intake pre- and postexercise intervention (2,646 ± 444 kcal·d-1 and 2,677 ± 617 kcal·d-1, respectively). In conclusion, the training program was effective in reducing fat mass, but this reduction was not achieved in the trained body segment. The present results expand the limited knowledge available about the plastic heterogeneity of regional body tissues when a localized resistance training program is applied.

  12. Training response of mitochondrial transcription factors in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Norrbom, J; Wallman, S E; Gustafsson, T; Rundqvist, H; Jansson, E; Sundberg, C J

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is essential for physical performance and health. Aerobic fitness is positively associated with mitochondrial (mt) biogenesis in muscle cells through partly unknown regulatory mechanisms. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of exercise and training status on key mt transcription factors in relation to oxidative capacity in human skeletal muscle. The basal mRNA and protein levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), mitochondrial transcription factors B1 (TFB1M) or B2 (TFB2M), and mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF), were measured in a cross-sectional study with elite athletes (EA) and moderately active (MA) and the basal mRNA levels of these factors were measured during a 10-day endurance training programme with (R-leg) and without (NR-leg) restricted blood flow to the working leg. TFAM protein expression was significantly higher in the EA than in the MA, while protein levels of TFB1M and TFB2M were not different between the groups. There was no difference between EA and MA, or any effect with training on TFAM mRNA levels. However, the mRNA levels of TFB1M, TFB2M and mTERF were higher in EA compared with MA. For TFB1M and TFB2M, the mRNA expression was increased in the R-leg after 10 days of training, but not in the NR-leg. mTERF mRNA levels were higher in EA compared with MA. This study further establishes that TFAM protein levels are higher in conditions with enhanced oxidative capacity. The mRNA levels of TFB1M and TFB2M are influenced by endurance training, possibly suggesting a role for these factors in the regulation of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis.

  13. The influence of inspiratory muscle work history and specific inspiratory muscle training upon human limb muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Alison K; Lomax, Michelle

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of the work history of the inspiratory muscles upon the fatigue characteristics of the plantar flexors (PF). We hypothesized that under conditions where the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex has been elicited, PF fatigue would be hastened due to peripheral vasoconstriction. Eight volunteers undertook seven test conditions, two of which followed 4 week of inspiratory muscle training (IMT). The inspiratory metaboreflex was induced by inspiring against a calibrated flow resistor. We measured torque and EMG during isometric PF exercise at 85% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. Supramaximal twitches were superimposed upon MVC efforts at 1 min intervals (MVC(TI)); twitch interpolation assessed the level of central activation. PF was terminated (T(lim)) when MVC(TI) was <50% of baseline MVC. PF T(lim) was significantly shorter than control (9.93 +/- 1.95 min) in the presence of a leg cuff inflated to 140 mmHg (4.89 +/- 1.78 min; P = 0.006), as well as when PF was preceded immediately by fatiguing inspiratory muscle work (6.28 +/- 2.24 min; P = 0.009). Resting the inspiratory muscles for 30 min restored the PF T(lim) to control. After 4 weeks, IMT, inspiratory muscle work at the same absolute intensity did not influence PF T(lim), but T(lim) was significantly shorter at the same relative intensity. The data are the first to provide evidence that the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex accelerates the rate of calf fatigue during PF, and that IMT attenuates this effect.

  14. Effect of strength training on regional hypertrophy of the elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Marcos D M; Szmuchrowski, Leszek A; Goulart, Karine N O; Couto, Bruno P

    2016-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy is the main structural adaptation to strength training. We investigated the chronic effects of strength training on muscle hypertrophy in different regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Eleven untrained men (21.8 ± 1.62 years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging to determine the proximal, medial, distal, and mean cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the elbow flexors. The volunteers completed 12 weeks of strength training. The training protocol consisted of 4 sets of 8-10 maximum repetitions of unilateral elbow flexion. The interval between sets was 120 s. The training frequency was 3 sessions per week. The magnetic resonance images verified the presence of significant and similar hypertrophy in the distal, medial, and proximal portions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle hypertrophy may be assessed using only the medial CSA. We should not expect different degrees of hypertrophy among the regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle Nerve 54: 750-755, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Physical activity and the pelvic floor.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic floor disorders are common, with 1 in 4 US women reporting moderate to severe symptoms of urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, or fecal incontinence. Given the high societal burden of these disorders, identifying potentially modifiable risk factors is crucial. Physical activity is one such potentially modifiable risk factor; the large number of girls and women participating in sport and strenuous training regimens increases the need to understand associated risks and benefits of these exposures. The aim of this review was to summarize studies reporting the association between physical activity and pelvic floor disorders. Most studies are cross-sectional and most include small numbers of participants. The primary findings of this review include that urinary incontinence during exercise is common and is more prevalent in women during high-impact sports. Mild to moderate physical activity, such as brisk walking, decreases both the odds of having and the risk of developing urinary incontinence. In older women, mild to moderate activity also decreases the odds of having fecal incontinence; however, young women participating in high-intensity activity are more likely to report anal incontinence than less active women. Scant data suggest that in middle-aged women, lifetime physical activity increases the odds of stress urinary incontinence slightly and does not increase the odds of pelvic organ prolapse. Women undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse are more likely to report a history of heavy work than controls; however, women recruited from the community with pelvic organ prolapse on examination report similar lifetime levels of strenuous activity as women without this examination finding. Data are insufficient to determine whether strenuous activity while young predisposes to pelvic floor disorders later in life. The existing literature suggests that most physical activity does not harm the pelvic floor and does provide numerous health benefits for

  16. Inspiratory muscle training lowers the oxygen cost of voluntary hyperpnea.

    PubMed

    Turner, Louise A; Tecklenburg-Lund, Sandra L; Chapman, Robert F; Stager, Joel M; Wilhite, Daniel P; Mickleborough, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if inspiratory muscle training (IMT) alters the oxygen cost of breathing (Vo(2RM)) during voluntary hyperpnea. Sixteen male cyclists completed 6 wk of IMT using an inspiratory load of 50% (IMT) or 15% placebo (CON) of maximal inspiratory pressure (Pi(max)). Prior to training, a maximal incremental cycle ergometer test was performed to determine Vo(2) and ventilation (V(E)) at multiple workloads. Pre- and post-training, subjects performed three separate 4-min bouts of voluntary eucapnic hyperpnea (mimic), matching V(E) that occurred at 50, 75, and 100% of Vo(2 max). Pi(max) was significantly increased (P < 0.05) by 22.5 ± 8.7% from pre- to post-IMT and remained unchanged in the CON group. The Vo(2RM) required during the mimic trial corresponded to 5.1 ± 2.5, 5.7 ± 1.4, and 11.7% ± 2.5% of the total Vo(2) (Vo(2T)) at ventilatory workloads equivalent to 50, 75, and 100% of Vo(2 max), respectively. Following IMT, the Vo(2RM) requirement significantly decreased (P < 0.05) by 1.5% (4.2 ± 1.4% of Vo(2T)) at 75% Vo(2 max) and 3.4% (8.1 ± 3.5% of Vo(2T)) at 100% Vo(2 max). No significant changes were shown in the CON group. IMT significantly reduced the O(2) cost of voluntary hyperpnea, which suggests that a reduction in the O(2) requirement of the respiratory muscles following a period of IMT may facilitate increased O(2) availability to the active muscles during exercise. These data suggest that IMT may reduce the O(2) cost of ventilation during exercise, providing an insight into mechanism(s) underpinning the reported improvements in whole body endurance performance; however, this awaits further investigation.

  17. Exploration of Two Training Paradigms Using Forced Induced Weight Shifting With the Tethered Pelvic Assist Device to Reduce Asymmetry in Individuals After Stroke: Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Lauri; Khan, Moiz; Martelli, Dario; Quinn, Lori; Stein, Joel; Agrawal, Sunil

    2017-10-01

    Many robotic devices in rehabilitation incorporate an assist-as-needed haptic guidance paradigm to promote training. This error reduction model, while beneficial for skill acquisition, could be detrimental for long-term retention. Error augmentation (EA) models have been explored as alternatives. A robotic Tethered Pelvic Assist Device has been developed to study force application to the pelvis on gait and was used here to induce weight shift onto the paretic (error reduction) or nonparetic (error augmentation) limb during treadmill training. The purpose of these case reports is to examine effects of training with these two paradigms to reduce load force asymmetry during gait in two individuals after stroke (>6 mos). Participants presented with baseline gait asymmetry, although independent community ambulators. Participants underwent 1-hr trainings for 3 days using either the error reduction or error augmentation model. Outcomes included the Borg rating of perceived exertion scale for treatment tolerance and measures of force and stance symmetry. Both participants tolerated training. Force symmetry (measured on treadmill) improved from pretraining to posttraining (36.58% and 14.64% gains), however, with limited transfer to overground gait measures (stance symmetry gains of 9.74% and 16.21%). Training with the Tethered Pelvic Assist Device device proved feasible to improve force symmetry on the treadmill irrespective of training model. Future work should consider methods to increase transfer to overground gait.

  18. Functional outcomes associated with expiratory muscle strength training: narrative review.

    PubMed

    Laciuga, Helena; Rosenbek, John C; Davenport, Paul W; Sapienza, Christine M

    2014-01-01

    This review presents the available evidence for the effects of expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) with the use of a pressure threshold device. The investigators used computerized database searches for studies reporting the outcomes of pressure threshold EMST published after 1994. A total of 24 selected articles presented outcomes related but not limited to respiratory function, such as speech, swallow, voice, and cough function in persons with neurologic conditions such as Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, and Lance-Adams syndrome; in persons with respiratory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and in healthy young adults and sedentary and active elderly. Several studies demonstrated promising outcomes of EMST as a non-task-specific training for airway protection in persons with dysphagia secondary to neuromuscular impairments; however, further research is needed to confirm and generalize the reported findings.

  19. Eccentric resistance training increases and retains maximal strength, muscle endurance, and hypertrophy in trained men.

    PubMed

    Coratella, Giuseppe; Schena, Federico

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different resistance training protocols on muscle strength, endurance, and hypertrophy after training and detraining. Thirty-four resistance-trained males were randomized in concentric-only (CONC), eccentric-only (ECC), traditional concentric-eccentric (TRAD) bench press resistance training or control group. The training volume was equalized among the intervention groups. Bench press of 1-repetition maximum (1RM)/body mass, maximum number of repetitions (MNR), and chest circumference were evaluated at the baseline, after 6 weeks of training, and after 6 weeks of detraining. All intervention groups reported significant 1RM/body mass increases after training (CONC baseline: 1.04 ± 0.06, post-training: 1.12 ± 0.08, p < 0.05; ECC baseline: 1.08 ± 0.04, post-training: 1.15 ± 0.05, p < 0.05; TRAD baseline: 1.06 ± 0.08, post-training: 1.11 ± 0.10, p < 0.05). After detraining, only ECC retained 1RM/body mass above the baseline (1.17 ± 0.07, p < 0.05), while CONC and TRAD returned to baseline values. Only ECC improved and retained MNR (baseline: 22 ± 3; post-training: 25 ± 3, and post-detraining: 25 ± 4, p < 0.05 compared with baseline) and chest circumference (baseline: 98.3 ± 2.4 cm, post-training: 101.7 ± 2.2 cm and post-detraining: 100.7 ± 2.3 cm. p < 0.05 compared with baseline), while no significant changes occurred in both CONC and TRAD. The incorporation of eccentric training can be recommended for counteracting the negative effects of detraining or forced physical inactivity.

  20. The effect of testosterone treatment on urodynamic findings and histopathomorphology of pelvic floor muscles in female rats with experimentally induced stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Mammadov, Rashad; Simsir, Adnan; Tuglu, Ibrahim; Evren, Vedat; Gurer, Ergun; Özyurt, Ceyhun

    2011-12-01

    In recent studies, it has been observed that androgen receptors are densely located in pelvic floor muscles. We aimed to investigate the effect of testosterone on urodynamic findings and histopathomorphology of pelvic floor muscles in rats with experimentally induced stress urinary incontinence. Twenty-eight adult female rats were randomized into four groups. Group I: rats in which SUI was induced and single-dose testosterone was administered 30 days later, group II: rats in which SUI was induced and single-dose testosterone was administered within the same session, group III: rats in which SUI was induced and saline was injected intramuscularly 30 days later, and group IV: the sham group. In order to demonstrate objectively the curative and preventive role of testosterone in experimental model of SUI, urodynamic examination and histopathomorphological evaluation of levator ani muscle were performed. Myofiber areas in groups I and II were detected to be significantly larger than those of the control group (P < 0.001). Another parameter was leak point pressure value by urodynamy. Regarding this parameter, LPP values in groups 1, 2 and 4 were observed to be significantly higher than those of group 3 (P < 0.001). The results of the comparison among groups 1, 2 and 4 revealed no significance (P > 0.05), which indicates that testosterone provides continence in a similar way to the group in which sciatic nerve section was not performed. In the present study, it has been demonstrated that testosterone has both preventive and curative effects on rat models of experimental SUI.

  1. Students' views on the impact of two pedagogical tools for the teaching of breast and pelvic examination techniques (video-clip and training model): a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Grynberg, Michael; Thubert, Thibault; Guilbaud, Lucie; Cordier, Anne-Gaël; Nedellec, Sophie; Lamazou, Frédéric; Deffieux, Xavier

    2012-10-01

    To investigate and compare the views and experience of undergraduate medical students concerning two methods used in the teaching of pelvic and breast examinations: a video clip and a training model. Following the teaching sessions, the students (n=79; female 67%; median age 20; students' grade level: 2nd study year (87%) and 3rd study year (13%)) completed a satisfaction questionnaire, which included items related to the pedagogical value of these two different types of tool. Most of the students ranked their own satisfaction in each teaching session as either very satisfied or satisfied: the median rating was 3 or 4 for each item. For their satisfaction with the pedagogical tools, in terms of the degree to which they contributed toward practical knowledge of the examination procedures, the students rated the video clip with a higher degree of satisfaction than the training model, for both breast (very satisfied 73% vs. 40%, satisfied 27% vs. 43%, unsatisfied 0% vs. 7% (P<0.001)) and pelvic examinations (very satisfied 57% vs. 33%, satisfied 39% vs. 66%, unsatisfied 4% vs. 1% (P<0.004), respectively. Teaching sessions for pelvic and breast examination, which make combined use of videos and training models, are associated with a high degree of satisfaction from students in their 2nd or 3rd student's year. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Single muscle fiber adaptations to resistance training in old (>80 yr) men: evidence for limited skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Slivka, Dustin; Raue, Ulrika; Hollon, Chris; Minchev, Kiril; Trappe, Scott

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whole muscle and single muscle fiber adaptations in very old men in response to progressive resistance training (PRT). Six healthy independently living old men (82 +/- 1 yr; range 80-86 yr, 74 +/- 4 kg) resistance-trained the knee extensors (3 sets, 10 repetitions) at approximately 70% one repetition maximum 3 days/wk for 12 wk. Whole thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) was assessed before and after PRT using computed tomography (CT). Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis before and after the PRT program. Isolated myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and IIa single muscle fibers (n = 267; 142 pre; 125 post) were studied for diameter, peak tension, shortening velocity, and power. An additional set of isolated single muscle fibers (n = 2,215; 1,202 pre; 1,013 post) was used to identify MHC distribution. One repetition maximum knee extensor strength increased (P < 0.05) 23 +/- 4 kg (56 +/- 4 to 79 +/- 7 kg; 41%). Muscle CSA increased (P < 0.05) 3 +/- 1 cm2 (120 +/- 7 to 123 +/- 7 cm2; 2.5%). Single muscle fiber contractile function and MHC distribution were unaltered with PRT. These data indicate limited muscle plasticity at the single-muscle fiber level with a resistance-training program among the very old. The minor increases in whole muscle CSA coupled with the static nature of the myocellular profile indicate that the strength gains were primarily neurological. These data contrast typical muscle responses to resistance training in young ( approximately 20 yr) and old ( approximately 70 yr) humans and indicate that the physiological regulation of muscle remodeling is adversely modified in the oldest old.

  3. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ploug, T.; Stallknecht, B.M.; Pedersen, O.; Kahn, B.B.; Ohkuwa, T.; Vinten, J.; Galbo, H. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers and an increase of approximately 33% for contraction-stimulated transport in slow-twitch red fibers compared with nonexercised sedentary muscle. A fully additive effect of insulin and contractions was observed both in trained and untrained muscle. Compared with transport in control rats subjected to an almost exhaustive single exercise session the day before experiment both maximum insulin- and contraction-stimulated transport rates were increased in all muscle types in trained rats. Accordingly, the increased glucose transport capacity in trained muscle was not due to a residual effect of the last training session. Half-times for reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport were similar in trained and untrained muscles. The concentrations of mRNA for GLUT-1 (the erythrocyte-brain-Hep G2 glucose transporter) and GLUT-4 (the adipocyte-muscle glucose transporter) were increased approximately twofold by training in fast-twitch red muscle fibers. In parallel to this, Western blot demonstrated a approximately 47% increase in GLUT-1 protein and a approximately 31% increase in GLUT-4 protein. This indicates that the increases in maximum velocity for 3-MG transport in trained muscle is due to an increased number of glucose transporters.

  4. Pelvic Organ Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Iglesia, Cheryl B; Smithling, Katelyn R

    2017-08-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse is the descent of one or more of the anterior vaginal wall, posterior vaginal wall, the uterus (cervix), or the apex of the vagina (vaginal vault or cuff scar after hysterectomy). Prevalence increases with age. The cause of prolapse is multifactorial but is primarily associated with pregnancy and vaginal delivery, which lead to direct pelvic floor muscle and connective tissue injury. Hysterectomy, pelvic surgery, and conditions associated with sustained episodes of increased intra-abdominal pressure, including obesity, chronic cough, constipation, and repeated heavy lifting, also contribute to prolapse. Most patients with pelvic organ prolapse are asymptomatic. Symptoms become more bothersome as the bulge protrudes past the vaginal opening. Initial evaluation includes a history and systematic pelvic examination including assessment for urinary incontinence, bladder outlet obstruction, and fecal incontinence. Treatment options include observation, vaginal pessaries, and surgery. Most women can be successfully fit with a vaginal pessary. Available surgical options are reconstructive pelvic surgery with or without mesh augmentation and obliterative surgery.

  5. Anorectal and Pelvic Pain.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Adil E; Lee, Tae Hee

    2016-10-01

    Although pelvic pain is a symptom of several structural anorectal and pelvic disorders (eg, anal fissure, endometriosis, and pelvic inflammatory disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 3 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with pelvic pain: functional anorectal pain (ie, levator ani syndrome, unspecified anorectal pain, and proctalgia fugax), interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The first 2 conditions occur in both sexes, while the latter occurs only in men. They are defined by symptoms, supplemented with levator tenderness (levator ani syndrome) and bladder mucosal inflammation (interstitial cystitis). Although distinct, these conditions share several similarities, including associations with dysfunctional voiding or defecation, comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia, depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Several factors, including pelvic floor muscle tension, peripheral inflammation, peripheral and central sensitization, and psychosocial factors, have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The management is tailored to symptoms, is partly supported by clinical trials, and includes multidisciplinary approaches such as lifestyle modifications and pharmacological, behavioral, and physical therapy. Opioids should be avoided, and surgical treatment has a limited role, primarily in refractory interstitial cystitis. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Anorectal and Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Lee, Tae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Although pelvic pain is a symptom of several structural anorectal and pelvic disorders (eg, anal fissure, endometriosis, and pelvic inflammatory disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the three most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with pelvic pain: functional anorectal pain (ie, levator ani syndrome, unspecified anorectal pain, and proctalgia fugax), interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The first two conditions occur in both sexes, while the latter occurs only in men. They are defined by symptoms, supplemented with levator tenderness (levator ani syndrome) and bladder mucosal inflammation (interstitial cystitis). Although distinct, these conditions share several similarities, including associations with dysfunctional voiding or defecation, comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia, depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Several factors, including pelvic floor muscle tension, peripheral inflammation, peripheral and central sensitization, and psychosocial factors, have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The management is tailored to symptoms, is partly supported by clinical trials, and includes multidisciplinary approaches such as lifestyle modifications and pharmacologic, behavioral, and physical therapy. Opioids should not be avoided, and surgery has a limited role, primarily in refractory interstitial cystitis. PMID:27712641

  7. Respiratory muscle training with enzyme replacement therapy improves muscle strength in late - onset Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Mitja, Jevnikar; Metka, Kodric; Fabiana, Cantarutti; Cifaldi, Rossella; Longo, Cinzia; Rossana, Della Porta; Bruno, Bembi; Marco, Confalonieri

    2015-12-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase. This deficiency leads to glycogen accumulation in the lysosomes of muscle tissue causing progressive muscular weakness particularly of the respiratory system. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has demonstrated efficacy in slowing down disease progression in infants. Despite the large number of studies describing the effects of physical training in juvenile and adult late onset Pompe disease (LOPD). There are very few reports that analyze the benefits of respiratory muscle rehabilitation or training. The effectiveness of respiratory muscle training was investigated using a specific appliance with adjustable resistance (Threshold). The primary endpoint was effect on respiratory muscular strength by measurements of MIP and MEP. Eight late-onset Pompe patients (aged 13 to 58 years; 4 female, 4 male) with respiratory muscle deficiency on functional respiratory tests were studied. All patients received ERT at the dosage of 20 mg/kg/every 2 weeks and underwent training with Threshold at specified pressures for 24 months. A significant increase in MIP was observed during the follow-up of 24 month: 39.6 cm H2O (+ 25.0%) at month 3; 39.5 cm H2O (+ 24.9%) at month 6; 39.1 cm H2O (+ 23.7%) at month 9; 37.3 cm H2O (+ 18.2%) at month 12; and 37.3 cm H2O (+ 17.8%) at month 24. Median MEP values also showed a significant increase during the first 9 months: 29.8 cm H2O, (+ 14.3%) at month 3; 31.0 cm H2O (+ 18.6) at month 6; and 29.5 cm H2O (+ 12.9) at month 9. MEP was then shown to be decreased at months 12 and 24; median MEP was 27.2 cm H2O (+ 4.3%) at 12 months and 26.6 cm H2O (+ 1.9%) at 24 months. The FVC remain stable throughout the study. An increase in respiratory muscular strength was demonstrated with Threshold training when used in combination with ERT.

  8. Forceps delivery is associated with increased risk of pelvic organ prolapse and muscle trauma: a cross-sectional study 16-24 years after first delivery.

    PubMed

    Volløyhaug, I; Mørkved, S; Salvesen, Ø; Salvesen, K Å

    2015-10-01

    To study possible associations between mode of delivery and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and pelvic floor muscle trauma 16-24 years after first delivery and, in particular, to identify differences between forceps and vacuum delivery. This was a cross-sectional study including 608 women who delivered their first child in 1990-1997 and were examined with POP quantification (POP-Q) and pelvic floor ultrasound in 2013-2014. Outcome measures were POP ≥ Stage 2 or previous prolapse surgery, levator avulsion and levator hiatal area on Valsalva. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses and ANCOVA were applied to identify outcome variables associated with mode of delivery. Comparing forceps to vacuum delivery, the adjusted odds ratios (aOR) were 1.72 (95% CI, 1.06-2.79; P = 0.03) for POP ≥ Stage 2 or previous prolapse surgery and 4.16 (95% CI, 2.28-7.59; P < 0.01) for levator avulsion. Hiatal area on Valsalva was larger, with adjusted mean difference (aMD) of 4.75 cm(2) (95% CI, 2.46-7.03; P < 0.01). Comparing forceps with normal vaginal delivery, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 1.74 (95% CI, 1.12-2.68; P = 0.01) for POP ≥ Stage 2 or surgery and 4.35 (95% CI, 2.56-7.40; P < 0.01) for levator avulsion; hiatal area on Valsalva was larger, with an aMD of 3.84 cm(2) (95% CI, 1.78-5.90; P < 0.01). Comparing Cesarean delivery with normal vaginal delivery, aOR was 0.06 (95% CI, 0.02-0.14; P < 0.01) for POP ≥ Stage 2 or surgery and crude OR was 0.00 (95% CI, 0.00-0.30; P < 0.01) for levator avulsion; hiatal area on Valsalva was smaller, with an aMD of -8.35 cm(2) (95% CI, -10.87 to -5.84; P < 0.01). No differences were found between vacuum and normal vaginal delivery. We found that mode of delivery was associated with POP and pelvic floor muscle trauma in women from a general population, 16-24 years after their first delivery. Forceps was associated with significantly more POP

  9. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory muscle electromyography and dyspnea during exercise in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Ramsook, Andrew H; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Schaeffer, Michele R; Wilkie, Sabrina S; Camp, Pat G; Reid, W Darlene; Romer, Lee M; Guenette, Jordan A

    2017-03-02

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has consistently been shown to reduce exertional dyspnea in health and disease; however, the physiological mechanisms remain poorly understood. A growing body of literature suggests that dyspnea intensity can largely be explained by an awareness of increased neural respiratory drive, as indirectly measured using diaphragmatic electromyography (EMGdi). Accordingly, we sought to determine if improvements in dyspnea following IMT can be explained by decreases in inspiratory muscle EMG activity. Twenty-five healthy recreationally-active men completed a detailed familiarization visit followed by two maximal incremental cycle exercise tests separated by 5 weeks of randomly assigned pressure threshold IMT or sham control training (SC). The IMT group (n=12) performed 30 inspiratory efforts twice daily against a 30 repetition maximum intensity. The SC group (n=13) performed a daily bout of 60 inspiratory efforts against 10% maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), with no weekly adjustments. Dyspnea intensity was measured throughout exercise using the modified 0-10 Borg scale. Sternocleidomastoid and scalene EMG were measured using surface electrodes whereas EMGdi was measured using a multi-pair esophageal electrode catheter. IMT significantly improved MIP (pre:-138±45 vs. post:-160±43cmH2O, p<0.01) whereas the SC intervention did not. Dyspnea was significantly reduced at the highest equivalent work rate (pre:7.6±2.5 vs. post:6.8±2.9Borg units, p<0.05), but not in the SC group, with no between-group interaction effects. There were no significant differences in respiratory muscle EMG during exercise in either group. Improvements in dyspnea intensity ratings following IMT in healthy humans cannot be explained by changes in the electrical activity of the inspiratory muscles.

  10. Training at non-damaging intensities facilitates recovery from muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuta; Murakami, Taro; Mori, Tomohiro; Agata, Nobuhide; Kimura, Nahoko; Inoue-Miyazu, Masumi; Hayakawa, Kimihide; Hirano, Takayuki; Sokabe, Masahiro; Kawakami, Keisuke

    2017-02-01

    Resistance training promotes recovery from muscle atrophy, but optimum training programs have not been established. We aimed to determine the optimum training intensity for muscle atrophy. Mice recovering from atrophied muscles after 2 weeks of tail suspension underwent repeated isometric training with varying joint torques 50 times per day. Muscle recovery assessed by maximal isometric contraction and myofiber cross-sectional areas (CSAs) were facilitated at 40% and 60% maximum contraction strength (MC), but at not at 10% and 90% MC. At 60% and 90% MC, damaged and contained smaller diameter fibers were observed. Activation of myogenic satellite cells and a marked increase in myonuclei were observed at 40%, 60%, and 90% MC. The increases in myofiber CSAs were likely caused by increased myonuclei formed through fusion of resistance-induced myofibers with myogenic satellite cells. These data indicate that resistance training without muscle damage facilitates efficient recovery from atrophy. Muscle Nerve 55: 243-253, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Short-term isokinetic training versus isotonic training: effects on asymmetry in strength of thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Golik-Peric, Dragana; Drapsin, Miodrag; Obradovic, Borislav; Drid, Patrik

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two training protocols on the isokinetic performance of athletes. The study was conducted in 38 athletes, (age 23.3 ± 3.6 years) participating in national level leagues of different sports, whose initial concentric hamstrings-to-quadriceps (conH/Q) torque ratio was lower than 0.5. During seasonal testing, an isokinetic measurement of knee extensors and flexors was performed at 60°/s. The athletes were divided into two groups. Nineteen athletes performed the isokinetic training protocol (IT) while the second group of 19 athletes followed the isotonic training protocol (RT). Both protocols lasted 4 weeks. After completing the training protocols, both groups underwent a final isokinetic testing. The isokinetic data revealed significant increases after training in measures of peak torque in both extensor and flexor muscle groups, in both the IT and RT study groups (p < 0.05). There were significant increases (p< 0.05) in conH/Q ratio in both groups after the implemented protocols, but greater in IT group. Consequently, applied IT protocol induced changes in working muscles, thereby restoring detected asymmetry to an acceptable balance more efficiently compared to RT protocol.

  12. Effect of endurance versus resistance training on quadriceps muscle dysfunction in COPD: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Munch, Gregers Druedal Wibe; Rugbjerg, Mette; Rinnov, Anders Rasmussen; Zacho, Morten; Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Secher, Niels H; Ringbaek, Thomas; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Hellsten, Ylva; Lange, Peter; Thaning, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exercise is an important countermeasure to limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. The two major training modalities in COPD rehabilitation, endurance training (ET) and resistance training (RT), may both be efficient in improving muscle strength, exercise capacity, and health-related quality of life, but the effects on quadriceps muscle characteristics have not been thoroughly described. Methods Thirty COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 56% of predicted, standard deviation [SD] 14) were randomized to 8 weeks of ET or RT. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained before and after the training intervention to assess muscle morphology and metabolic and angiogenic factors. Symptom burden, exercise capacity (6-minute walking and cycle ergometer tests), and vascular function were also assessed. Results Both training modalities improved symptom burden and exercise capacity with no difference between the two groups. The mean (SD) proportion of glycolytic type IIa muscle fibers was reduced after ET (from 48% [SD 11] to 42% [SD 10], P<0.05), whereas there was no significant change in muscle fiber distribution with RT. There was no effect of either training modality on muscle capillarization, angiogenic factors, or vascular function. After ET the muscle protein content of phosphofructokinase was reduced (P<0.05) and the citrate synthase content tended increase (P=0.08) but no change was observed after RT. Conclusion Although both ET and RT improve symptoms and exercise capacity, ET induces a more oxidative quadriceps muscle phenotype, counteracting muscle dysfunction in COPD. PMID:27822028

  13. Effects Of treadmill training on hindlimb muscles of spinal cord-injured mice.

    PubMed

    Battistuzzo, Camila R; Rank, Michelle M; Flynn, Jamie R; Morgan, David L; Callister, Robin; Callister, Robert J; Galea, Mary P

    2017-02-01

    Treadmill training is known to prevent muscle atrophy after spinal cord injury (SCI), but the training duration required to optimize recovery has not been investigated. Hemisected mice were randomized to 3, 6, or 9 weeks of training or no training. Muscle fiber type composition and fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) of medial gastrocnemius (MG), soleus (SOL), and tibialis anterior (TA) were assessed using ATPase histochemistry. Muscle fiber type composition of SCI animals did not change with training. However, 9 weeks of training increased the CSA of type IIB and IIX fibers in TA and MG muscles. Nine weeks of training after incomplete SCI was effective in preventing atrophy of fast-twitch muscles, but there were limited effects on slow-twitch muscles and muscle fiber type composition. These data provide important evidence of the benefits of exercising paralyzed limbs after SCI. Muscle Nerve, 2016 Muscle Nerve 55: 232-242, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Muscle & Nerve Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Muscle thickness correlates to muscle cross sectional area in the assessment of strength training induced hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Martino V; Longo, Stefano; Mallinson, Joanne; Quinlan, Jonathan I; Taylor, Tariq; Greenhaff, Paul L; Narici, Marco V

    2017-08-14

    Muscle thickness (MT) measured by ultrasound has been used to estimate cross-sectional area (measured by CT and MRI) at a single time-point. We tested whether MT could be used as a valid marker of MRI determined muscle anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA) and volume changes following resistance training (RT). Nine healthy, young, male volunteers (24±2 y.o., BMI 24.1±2.8 kg/m(2) ) had vastus lateralis (VL) muscle volume (VOL) and ACSA mid (at 50% of femur length, FL) assessed by MRI, and VL MT measured by ultrasound at 50% FL. Measurements were taken at baseline and after 12 weeks of isokinetic RT. Differences between baseline and post-training were assessed by Student's paired t-test. The relationships between MRI and ultrasound measurements were tested by Pearson's correlation. After RT, MT increased by 7.5±6.1% (p<0.001), ACSAmid by 5.2±5% (p<0.001) and VOL by 5.0±6.9% (p<0.05) (values: means±S.D.). Positive correlations were found, at baseline and 12 weeks, between MT and ACSAmid (r=0.82, p<0.001 and r=0.73, p<0.001, respectively), and between MT and VOL (r=0.76, p < 0.001 and r=0.73, p < 0.001, respectively). The % change in MT with training was correlated with % change in ACSAmid (r=0.69, p = 0.01), but not % change in VOL (r= 0.33, p>0.05). These data support evidence that MT is a reliable index of muscle ACSAmid and VOL at a single time-point. MT changes following RT are associated with parallel changes in muscle ACSAmid but not with the changes in VOL, highlighting the impact of RT on regional hypertrophy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. PGC-1α-mediated changes in phospholipid profiles of exercise-trained skeletal muscle[S

    PubMed Central

    Senoo, Nanami; Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Minami, Kimiko; Yoshimura, Ryoji; Morita, Akihito; Sawada, Naoki; Matsuda, Junichiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Kamei, Yasutomi; Miura, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training influences phospholipid fatty acid composition in skeletal muscle and these changes are associated with physiological phenotypes; however, the molecular mechanism of this influence on compositional changes is poorly understood. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a nuclear receptor coactivator, promotes mitochondrial biogenesis, the fiber-type switch to oxidative fibers, and angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. Because exercise training induces these adaptations, together with increased PGC-1α, PGC-1α may contribute to the exercise-mediated change in phospholipid fatty acid composition. To determine the role of PGC-1α, we performed lipidomic analyses of skeletal muscle from genetically modified mice that overexpress PGC-1α in skeletal muscle or that carry KO alleles of PGC-1α. We found that PGC-1α affected lipid profiles in skeletal muscle and increased several phospholipid species in glycolytic muscle, namely phosphatidylcholine (PC) (18:0/22:6) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) (18:0/22:6). We also found that exercise training increased PC (18:0/22:6) and PE (18:0/22:6) in glycolytic muscle and that PGC-1α was required for these alterations. Because phospholipid fatty acid composition influences cell permeability and receptor stability at the cell membrane, these phospholipids may contribute to exercise training-mediated functional changes in the skeletal muscle. PMID:26438561

  16. Cycle training induces muscle hypertrophy and strength gain: strategies and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hayao; Loenneke, J P; Thiebaud, R S; Abe, T

    2015-03-01

    Cycle training is widely performed as a major part of any exercise program seeking to improve aerobic capacity and cardiovascular health. However, the effect of cycle training on muscle size and strength gain still requires further insight, even though it is known that professional cyclists display larger muscle size compared to controls. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss the effects of cycle training on muscle size and strength of the lower extremity and the possible mechanisms for increasing muscle size with cycle training. It is plausible that cycle training requires a longer period to significantly increase muscle size compared to typical resistance training due to a much slower hypertrophy rate. Cycle training induces muscle hypertrophy similarly between young and older age groups, while strength gain seems to favor older adults, which suggests that the probability for improving in muscle quality appears to be higher in older adults compared to young adults. For young adults, higher-intensity intermittent cycling may be required to achieve strength gains. It also appears that muscle hypertrophy induced by cycle training results from the positive changes in muscle protein net balance.

  17. Dynamic assessment of the vaginal high-pressure zone using high-definition manometery, 3-dimensional ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    Raizada, Varuna; Bhargava, Valmik; Jung, Sung-Ae; Karstens, Anna; Pretorius, Dolores; Krysl, Petr; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2010-08-01

    We used a novel technique, high-definition manometry (HDM) that utilizes 256 tactile sensitive microtransducers to define the characteristics of vaginal high-pressure zone. Sixteen nullipara asymptomatic women were studied using HDM, transperineal 2-dimensional dynamic ultrasound and dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Vaginal high-pressure zone revealed higher contact pressures in anterior and posterior directions compared with lateral directions, both at rest and squeeze. At rest, anterior pressure cluster is located 10 mm cephalad to posterior pressure cluster; with squeeze the latter moves in the cranial direction by 7 mm. Ultrasound and MR images revealed that the anorectal angle moves cephalad and ventrally during squeeze. Cephalad movement of posterior pressure cluster during squeeze is similar to the cranial movement of anorectal angle. We propose that the vaginal high-pressure zone represents the constrictor function and cranial movement of the posterior pressure cluster represents the elevator function of pelvic floor. HDM may be used to measure the constrictor and elevator functions of pelvic floor muscles. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  18. Electromyographic biofeedback training for reducing muscle pain and tension on masseter and temporal muscles: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Criado, Laura; de La Fuente, Antonio; Heredia, Margarita; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Criado, José-María

    2016-12-01

    Due to the absence of agreement about an effective unified treatment for temporomandibular disorders, non-invasive therapies such as EMG-biofeedback generate a greater interest. Furthermore, most studies to the present show methodological deficiencies that must be solved in the future, which makes important to emphasize this line of studies. Fourteen patients were selected for this case series study, and replied to a questionnaire concerning awareness of bruxism, painful muscles, and muscle tension. They also practiced an intraoral exploration (occlusal analysis and mandibular dynamics), and an extraoral exploration of the head and neck muscles and the temporomandibular joint. Before each session, patients responded to a questionnaire about the subjective perceived improvement. In each session, a period of three minutes of pre-biofeedback EMG activity of right masseter and temporal muscles was registered, then patients performed 30 iterations of visual EMG-biofeedback training and finally, a period of three minutes of post-EMG activity was also registered for those muscles. Patients performed four sessions. A decrease in painful symptoms was found for all patients since the first session. EMG activity decreases (p<0,05) in both muscles during the biofeedback training stage, in the four sessions. It is also observed a decrease (p<0,05) in EMG activity in the masseter muscle at the post-biofeedback stage, in the second and third sessions. There is likewise a decrease in EMG post-biofeedback activity of the temporal muscle (p<0,05) in sessions two, three, and four. EMG-biofeedback training produces a decrease in EMG activity in both masseter and temporal muscles during the session. This decrease persists during the post-biofeedback period since the second session. Also there is a decrease in painful symptoms for all patients. Key words:Muscle tension, muscle pain, EMG-biofeedback, masseter muscle, temporal muscle.

  19. Electromyographic biofeedback training for reducing muscle pain and tension on masseter and temporal muscles: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    de La Fuente, Antonio; Heredia, Margarita; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Criado, José-María

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the absence of agreement about an effective unified treatment for temporomandibular disorders, non-invasive therapies such as EMG-biofeedback generate a greater interest. Furthermore, most studies to the present show methodological deficiencies that must be solved in the future, which makes important to emphasize this line of studies. Material and Methods Fourteen patients were selected for this case series study, and replied to a questionnaire concerning awareness of bruxism, painful muscles, and muscle tension. They also practiced an intraoral exploration (occlusal analysis and mandibular dynamics), and an extraoral exploration of the head and neck muscles and the temporomandibular joint. Before each session, patients responded to a questionnaire about the subjective perceived improvement. In each session, a period of three minutes of pre-biofeedback EMG activity of right masseter and temporal muscles was registered, then patients performed 30 iterations of visual EMG-biofeedback training and finally, a period of three minutes of post-EMG activity was also registered for those muscles. Patients performed four sessions. Results A decrease in painful symptoms was found for all patients since the first session. EMG activity decreases (p<0,05) in both muscles during the biofeedback training stage, in the four sessions. It is also observed a decrease (p<0,05) in EMG activity in the masseter muscle at the post-biofeedback stage, in the second and third sessions. There is likewise a decrease in EMG post-biofeedback activity of the temporal muscle (p<0,05) in sessions two, three, and four. Conclusions EMG-biofeedback training produces a decrease in EMG activity in both masseter and temporal muscles during the session. This decrease persists during the post-biofeedback period since the second session. Also there is a decrease in painful symptoms for all patients. Key words:Muscle tension, muscle pain, EMG-biofeedback, masseter muscle, temporal muscle

  20. Motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic region improve respiratory function in obese men. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bezzoli, Emanuela; Andreotti, Dianne; Pianta, Lucia; Mascheroni, Martina; Piccinno, Lorena; Puricelli, Luca; Cimolin, Veronica; Salvadori, Alberto; Codecasa, Franco; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2016-11-10

    Obese subjects have decreased pulmonary function. The hypothesis of our study was that poor coordination of the lumbar-pelvic musculature secondary to obesity may hinder the synergic activation of the respiratory muscles. The aim of the paper was to evaluate whether specific motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic musculature were able to improve respiratory function. Twenty obese male patients underwent a rehabilitation program including adapted physical activity and respiratory physiotherapy. Patients were randomly assigned to a Specific Motor Control Exercise Group (SG) and a Control Group (CG). SG followed a protocol according to the SMARTERehab concept aimed at improving posture, intra-abdominal pressure, rib cage mobility, and perception of correct muscle activation. CG performed an exercise training protocol to improve aerobic capacity and muscle strength. After intervention, both groups showed similar changes in body weight, fat, and fat-free mass. Respiratory function indexes improved in SG due to improved proprioception and coordination of the deep lumbar-pelvic muscles. Our study provides preliminary evidence that breathing, postural control, and spinal stability are intertwined. Positive respiratory effects in obese men can be obtained by prescribing specific motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic muscles. Implications for rehabilitation Obese subjects present with decreased pulmonary function and postural changes. Poor coordination of the lumbar-pelvic muscles affects posture and the synergic activation of the respiratory muscles. Specific motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic musculature can improve respiratory function. Breathing and postural control are intertwined: positive respiratory effects can be obtained by enhancing motor control of the lumbar-pelvic muscles.

  1. Training effect and fatigue in polypyrrole-based artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Kaneto, Keiichi; Suematsu, Hirotaka; Yamato, Kentaro

    2008-09-01

    Artificial muscles based on an electrochemomechanical strain (ECMS) in conducting polymers, namely polypyrrole (PPy) film, have been studied from viewpoints of training, fatigue and aging by repeat cycles under tensile loads. ECMS was approximately 2% in a saline solution, resulting from both insertion and exclusion of Na(+) with solvated water molecules as well in the film. Transient responses of ECMS and current induced by voltage stimuli were measured under tensile stresses up to 5 MPa to see the training effect, fatigue and aging of the film. At higher stresses the film showed larger creeping, which resulted from realignment or conformation change, slipping and breaking of polymer chains. After the experience of large stresses, the training effect in ECMS was appreciably observed as an increase of the strain. Without stress the conductivity of the film was stable (no fatigue) upon an electrochemical cycle; however, under high tensile stresses the conductivity decreased remarkably (fatigue and aging). It is to be noted that straightened polymer chains can be easily oxidized and degraded due to lower pi-electron energy. The conversion efficiency from electrical to mechanical energy in this system was found to be less than 0.03%.

  2. Inspiratory muscle training improves 100 and 200 m swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Kilding, Andrew E; Brown, Sarah; McConnell, Alison K

    2010-02-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to improve time trial performance in competitive athletes across a range of sports. Surprisingly, however, the effect of specific IMT on surface swimming performance remains un-investigated. Similarly, it is not known whether any ergogenic influence of IMT upon swimming performance is confined to specific race distances. To determine the influence of IMT upon swimming performance over 3 competitive distances, 16 competitive club-level swimmers were assigned at random to either an experimental (pressure threshold IMT) or sham IMT placebo control group. Participants performed a series of physiological and performance tests, before and following 6 weeks of IMT, including (1) an incremental swim test to the limit of tolerance to determine lactate, heart rate and perceived exertion responses; (2) standard measures of lung function (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, peak expiratory flow) and maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP); and (3) 100, 200 and 400 m swim time trials. Training utilised a hand-held pressure threshold device and consisted of 30 repetitions, twice per day. Relative to control, the IMT group showed the following percentage changes in swim times: 100 m, -1.70% (90% confidence limits, +/-1.4%), 200 m, -1.5% (+/-1.0), and 400 m, 0.6% (+/-1.2). Large effects were observed for MIP and rates of perceived exertion. In conclusion, 6 weeks of IMT has a small positive effect on swimming performance in club-level trained swimmers in events shorter than 400 m.

  3. Comparison of the functionality of pelvic floor muscles in women who practice the Pilates method and sedentary women: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ferla, Lia; Paiva, Luciana Laureano; Darki, Caroline; Vieira, Adriane

    2016-01-01

    The Pilates method is a form of physical exercise that improves the control of the core muscles, improving the conditioning of all the muscle groups that comprise the core, including the pelvic floor muscles (PFM). Thus, this study had the goal of verifying the existence of differences in the functioning of the PFM in women who practice the Pilates method and sedentary women. This was an observational, cross-sectional pilot study. A sample size calculation was performed using preliminary data and it determined that the sample should have at least 24 individuals in each group. The participants were 60 women aged 20 to 40 years; 30 women practiced the Pilates method (PMG) and 30 were sedentary (SG). An anamnesis file was used to collect personal data and assess the knowledge and perception of the PFM. The Perina perineometer and vaginal palpation were used to determine the functionality of the PFM. There was no significant difference between the PMG and the SG in any of the variables analyzed. We concluded that the functionality of the PFM in younger women who practice the Pilates method is not different from that of sedentary women.

  4. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND THE PELVIC FLOOR

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Ingrid E.; Shaw, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders (PFDs) are common, with one in four U.S. women reporting moderate to severe symptoms of urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse or fecal incontinence. Given the high societal burden of these disorders, identifying potentially modifiable risk factors is crucial. Physical activity is one such potentially modifiable risk factor; the large number of girls and women participating in sport and strenuous training regimens increases the need to understand associated risks and benefits of these exposures. The aim of this review is to summarize studies reporting the association between physical activity and PFDs. Most studies are cross-sectional and most include small numbers of participants. The primary findings of this review include: Urinary incontinence during exercise is common and is more prevalent in women during high-impact sports. Mild to moderate physical activity, such as brisk walking, decreases both the odds of having and the risk of developing urinary incontinence. In older women, mild to moderate activity also decreases the odds of having fecal incontinence; however, young women participating in high intensity activity are more likely to report anal incontinence than less active women. Scant data suggest that in middle-aged women, lifetime physical activity increases the odds of stress urinary incontinence slightly and does not increase the odds of pelvic organ prolapse. Women undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse are more likely to report a history of heavy work than controls; however, women recruited from the community with pelvic organ prolapse on examination report similar lifetime levels of strenuous activity as women without this exam finding. Data are insufficient to determine whether strenuous activity while young predisposes to pelvic floor disorders later in life. The existing literature suggests that most physical activity does not harm the pelvic floor and does provide numerous health benefits for women. However

  5. Responsiveness of muscle size and strength to physical training in very elderly people: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stewart, V H; Saunders, D H; Greig, C A

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine whether very elderly muscle (>75 years) hypertrophies in response to physical training. The databases MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL Plus and SPORTDiscus were systematically literature searched with reference lists of all included studies and relevant reviews. Controlled trials (inactive elderly control group) involving healthy elderly participants over 75 years participating in an intervention complying with an established definition of physical training were included. Data extraction and quality assessment were performed using the PEDro scale. Data analysis was performed on muscle size and strength using RevMan (software version 5.1). Four studies were included of which four of four measured changes in gross muscle size. Training induced increases in muscle size from 1.5%-15.6% were reported in three of four studies, and one of four studies reported a decrease in muscle size (3%). The greatest gain in muscle mass was observed in a study of whole body vibration training. Meta-analysis of three studies found an increase of thigh muscle cross-sectional area (mean difference 2.31 cm(2) or 0.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62 to 4.00; P = 0.008) and muscle strength (standardized mean difference 1.04, 95% CI: 0.65 to 1.43; P < 0.001). Physical training when delivered as resistance training has the ability to elicit hypertrophy and increase muscle strength in very elderly muscle.

  6. A comparison of the moment arms of pelvic limb muscles in horses bred for acceleration (Quarter Horse) and endurance (Arab).

    PubMed

    Crook, T C; Cruickshank, S E; McGowan, C M; Stubbs, N; Wilson, A M; Hodson-Tole, E; Payne, R C

    2010-07-01

    Selective breeding for performance has resulted in distinct breeds of horse, such as the Quarter Horse (bred for acceleration) and the Arab (bred for endurance). Rapid acceleration, seen during Quarter Horse racing, requires fast powerful muscular contraction and the generation of large joint torques, particularly by the hind limb muscles. This study compared hind limb moment arm lengths in the Quarter Horse and Arab. We hypothesized that Quarter Horse hind limb extensor muscles would have longer moment arms when compared to the Arab, conferring a greater potential for torque generation at the hip, stifle and tarsus during limb extension. Six Quarter Horse and six Arab hind limbs were dissected to determine muscle moment arm lengths for the following muscles: gluteus medius, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius (medialis and lateralis) and tibialis cranialis. The moment arms of biceps femoris (acting at the hip) and gastrocnemius lateralis (acting at the stifle) were significantly longer in the Quarter Horse, although the length of the remaining muscle moment arms were similar in both breeds of horse. All the Quarter Horse muscles were capable of generating greater muscle moments owing to their greater physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) and therefore greater isometric force potential, which suggests that PCSA is a better determinant of muscle torque than moment arm length in these two breeds of horse. With the exception of gastrocnemius and tibialis cranialis, the observed muscle fascicle length to moment arm ratio (MFL : MA ratio) was greater for the Arab horse muscles. It appears that the Arab muscles have the potential to operate at slower velocities of contraction and hence generate greater force outputs when compared to the Quarter Horse muscles working over a similar range of joint motion; this would indicate that Arab hind limb muscles are optimized to function at maximum economy rather than maximum power output.

  7. A comparison of the moment arms of pelvic limb muscles in horses bred for acceleration (Quarter Horse) and endurance (Arab)

    PubMed Central

    Crook, T C; Cruickshank, S E; McGowan, C M; Stubbs, N; Wilson, A M; Hodson-Tole, E; Payne, R C

    2010-01-01

    Selective breeding for performance has resulted in distinct breeds of horse, such as the Quarter Horse (bred for acceleration) and the Arab (bred for endurance). Rapid acceleration, seen during Quarter Horse racing, requires fast powerful muscular contraction and the generation of large joint torques, particularly by the hind limb muscles. This study compared hind limb moment arm lengths in the Quarter Horse and Arab. We hypothesized that Quarter Horse hind limb extensor muscles would have longer moment arms when compared to the Arab, conferring a greater potential for torque generation at the hip, stifle and tarsus during limb extension. Six Quarter Horse and six Arab hind limbs were dissected to determine muscle moment arm lengths for the following muscles: gluteus medius, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius (medialis and lateralis) and tibialis cranialis. The moment arms of biceps femoris (acting at the hip) and gastrocnemius lateralis (acting at the stifle) were significantly longer in the Quarter Horse, although the length of the remaining muscle moment arms were similar in both breeds of horse. All the Quarter Horse muscles were capable of generating greater muscle moments owing to their greater physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) and therefore greater isometric force potential, which suggests that PCSA is a better determinant of muscle torque than moment arm length in these two breeds of horse. With the exception of gastrocnemius and tibialis cranialis, the observed muscle fascicle length to moment arm ratio (MFL : MA ratio) was greater for the Arab horse muscles. It appears that the Arab muscles have the potential to operate at slower velocities of contraction and hence generate greater force outputs when compared to the Quarter Horse muscles working over a similar range of joint motion; this would indicate that Arab hind limb muscles are optimized to function at maximum economy rather than maximum power output. PMID

  8. The effects of high- and moderate-resistance training on muscle function in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kalapotharakos, Vasilios I; Michalopoulou, Maria; Godolias, George; Tokmakidis, Savvas P; Malliou, Paraskevi V; Gourgoulis, Vasilios

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a 12-week resistance-training program on muscle strength and mass in older adults. Thirty-three inactive participants (60-74 years old) were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: high-resistance training (HT), moderate-resistance training (MT), and control. After the training period, both HT and MT significantly increased 1-RM body strength, the peak torque of knee extensors and flexors, and the midthigh cross-sectional area of the total muscle. In addition, both HT and MT significantly decreased the abdominal circumference. HT was more effective in increasing 1-RM strength, muscle mass, and peak knee-flexor torque than was MT. These data suggest that muscle strength and mass can be improved in the elderly with both high- and moderate-intensity resistance training, but high-resistance training can lead to greater strength gains and hypertrophy than can moderate-resistance training.

  9. The effect of progressive high-intensity inspiratory muscle training and fixed high-intensity inspiratory muscle training on the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Kim, Nan-Soo

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training on the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-one stroke patients were assigned to one of three groups: progressive load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (n = 8), fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (n = 6), and controls (n = 7). [Methods] The progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training participants undertook an exercise program for 20 minutes, three times weekly, for 6 weeks. After each session, diaphragm thickness was measured using ultrasonography. The diaphragm asymmetry ratio and diaphragm thickening ratio were standardized using a formula. [Results] After intervention, the diaphragm asymmetry ratio significantly differed among the three groups, and the diaphragm asymmetry ratio significantly increased in the control group. A significant increase was identified in the diaphragm thickening ratio within the progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training groups. [Conclusion] Progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training decreased the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients; this effect, in turn, increased the diaphragm thickening ratio in stroke patients. The two interventions examined here should be selectively applied to individuals in the clinical field.

  10. Stress Testing Recovery EMG for Evaluation of Biofeedback and Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sime, Wesley E.; DeGood, Douglas E.

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess biofeedback (BF) and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and placebo-control training by means of a post-training transfer test. The subjects for the research were 30 women. Initial tests consisted of measuring the electromyographic response of the frontalis muscle of the forehead to stress. After…

  11. Stress Testing Recovery EMG for Evaluation of Biofeedback and Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sime, Wesley E.; DeGood, Douglas E.

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess biofeedback (BF) and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and placebo-control training by means of a post-training transfer test. The subjects for the research were 30 women. Initial tests consisted of measuring the electromyographic response of the frontalis muscle of the forehead to stress. After…

  12. Enhancement of Skeletal Muscle in Aged Rats Following High-Intensity Stretch-Shortening Contraction Training.

    PubMed

    Rader, Erik P; Naimo, Marshall A; Layner, Kayla N; Triscuit, Alyssa M; Chetlin, Robert D; Ensey, James; Baker, Brent A

    2017-04-01

    Exercise is the most accessible, efficacious, and multifactorial intervention to improve health and treat chronic disease. High-intensity resistance exercise, in particular, also maximizes skeletal muscle size and strength-outcomes crucial at advanced age. However, such training is capable of inducing muscle maladaptation when misapplied at old age. Therefore, characterization of parameters (e.g., mode and frequency) that foster adaptation is an active research area. To address this issue, we utilized a rodent model that allowed training at maximal intensity in terms of muscle activation and tested the hypothesis that muscles of old rats adapt to stretch-shortening contraction (SSC) training, provided the training frequency is sufficiently low. At termination of training, normalized muscle mass (i.e., muscle mass divided by tibia length) and muscle quality (isometric force divided by normalized muscle mass) were determined. For young rats, normalized muscle mass increased by ∼20% regardless of training frequency. No difference was observed for muscle quality values after 2 days versus 3 days per week training (0.65 ± 0.09 N/mg/mm vs. 0.59 ± 0.05 N/mg/mm, respectively). For old rats following 3 days per week training, normalized muscle mass was unaltered and muscle quality was 30% lower than young levels. Following 2 days per week training at old age, normalized muscle mass increased by 17% and muscle quality was restored to young levels. To investigate this enhanced response, oxidative stress was assessed by lipid peroxidation quantification. For young rats, lipid peroxidation levels were unaltered by training. With aging, baseline levels of lipid peroxidation increased by 1.5-fold. For old rats, only 2 days per week training decreased lipid peroxidation to levels indistinguishable from young values. These results imply that, appropriately scheduled high-intensity SSC training at old age is capable of restoring muscle to a younger phenotype in terms

  13. Effect of abdominal muscle training on respiratory muscle strength and forced expiratory flows in sedentary, healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Iván; Navarro, Ximena; Gatica, Darwin; Manterola, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory muscle training is the most commonly used method to revert respiratory muscle weakness; however, the effect of protocols based on non-respiratory maneuvers has not been adequately studied in the pediatric population. The objective of this study was to establish the effect of abdominal muscle training on respiratory muscle strength and forced expiratory flows in healthy adolescents. This was a quasi-experiment. The sample was made up of healthy adolescents divided into two groups: an experimental group who completed eight weeks of active abdominal muscle training, and an equivalent control group. The following indicators were measured: abdominal muscle strength, maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), peak expiratory flow, and peak cough flow, before and after protocol completion. A value of p < 0.05 was considered significant. All studied outcome measures increased significantly in the experimental group but only MEP increased in the control group. In addition, a higher MEP was observed in the experimental group compared to the control group at the end of the protocol, together with a greater increase in MEP and peak expiratory flow. Finally, the increase in MEP was associated with an increase in cough peak flow in the experimental group but not in the control group. After eight weeks of abdominal muscle training, MEP and peak expiratory flow increased in healthy (sedentary) adolescents. Such effects were associated with intervention-induced increases in cough peak flow. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  14. Pre-Training Muscle Characteristics of Subjects Who Are Obese Determine How Well Exercise Training Will Improve Their Insulin Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Charles A; Lee, Michelle L; South, Mark A; Howell, Mary E A; Cartwright, Brian M; Ramsey, Michael W; Stone, Michael H

    2017-03-01

    Stuart, CA, Lee, ML, South, MA, Howell, MEA, Cartwright, BM, Ramsey, MW, and Stone, MH. Pre-training muscle characteristics of subjects who are obese determine how well exercise training will improve their insulin responsiveness. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 798-808, 2017-Only half of prediabetic subjects who are obese who underwent exercise training without weight loss increased their insulin responsiveness. We hypothesized that those who improved their insulin responsiveness might have pretraining characteristics favoring a positive response to exercise training. Thirty nondiabetic subjects who were obese volunteered for 8 weeks of either strength training or endurance training. During training, subjects increased their caloric intake to prevent weight loss. Insulin responsiveness by euglycemic clamps and muscle fiber composition, and expression of muscle key biochemical pathways were quantified. Positive responders initially had 52% higher intermediate muscle fibers (fiber type IIa) with 27% lower slow-twitch fibers (type I) and 23% lower expression of muscle insulin receptors. Whether after weight training or stationary bike training, positive responders' fiber type shifted away from type I and type IIa fibers to an increased proportion of type IIx fibers (fast twitch). Muscle insulin receptor expression and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) expression increased in all trained subjects, but these moderate changes did not consistently translate to improvement in whole-body insulin responsiveness. Exercise training of previously sedentary subjects who are obese can result in muscle remodeling and increased expression of key elements of the insulin pathway, but in the absence of weight loss, insulin sensitivity improvement was modest and limited to about half of the participants. Our data suggest rather than responders being more fit, they may have been less fit, only catching up to the other half of subjects who are obese whose insulin responsiveness did not

  15. Inspiratory muscle warm-up and inspiratory muscle training: separate and combined effects on intermittent running to exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch; Grant, Ian; Corbett, Jo

    2011-03-01

    In the present study, we examined the independent and combined effects of an inspiratory muscle warm-up and inspiratory muscle training on intermittent running to exhaustion. Twelve males were recruited to undertake four experimental trials. Two trials (Trials 1 and 2) preceded either a 4-week training period of 1 × 30 breaths twice daily at 50% (experimental group) or 15% (control group) maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax). A further two trials (Trials 3 and 4) were performed after the 4 weeks. Trials 2 and 4 were preceded by a warm-up: 2 × 30 breaths at 40% PImax. Pre-training PImax and distance covered increased (P < 0.05) similarly between groups after the warm-up (~11% and ~5-7% PImax and distance covered, respectively). After training, PImax increased by 20 ± 6.1% (P < 0.01; d = 3.6) and 26.7 ± 6.3% (P < 0.01; d = 3.1) when training and warm-up were combined in the experimental group. Distance covered increased after training in the experimental group by 12 ± 4.9% (P < 0.01; d = 3.6) and 14.9 ± 4.5% (P < 0.01; d = 2.3) when training and warm-up interventions were combined. In conclusion, inspiratory muscle training and inspiratory muscle warm-up can both increase running distance independently, but the greatest increase is observed when they are combined.

  16. The Effect of Ankle Joint Muscle Strengthening Training and Static Muscle Stretching Training on Stroke Patients’ C.O.P Sway Amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Ho; Yoon, Joo Soo; Lee, Jin Hwan

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study implement ankle joint dorsiflexion training for ankle muscle the weakness that impairs stroke patients’ gait performance, to examine the effect of the training on stroke patients’ plantar pressure and gait ability. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 36 stroke patients diagnosed with stroke due to cerebral infarction or cerebral hemorrhage performed the training. Static muscle stretching was performed four times a week for 20 minutes at a time for 6 weeks by the training group. Ankle dorsiflexor training was performed four times a week, two sets per time in the case of females and three sets per time in the case of males for 6 weeks, by another group. Center of pressure sway amplitude was measured using the F-scan system during gait. All subjects were assessed with the same measurements at a pre-study examination and reassessed at eight weeks. Data were analyzed statistically using the paired t-test and one-way ANOVA. [Results] Among the between ankle dorsiflexor training group, static muscle stretching group, and control group, the difference before and after the training were proven to be statistically significant. [Conclusion] Compared to other training groups, the ankle muscle strength training group showed statistically significant increases of forward thrust at stroke patients’ toe-off which positively affected stroke patients’ ability to perform gait. PMID:24409032

  17. Women's pelvic floor muscle strength and urinary and anal incontinence after childbirth: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zizzi, Priscila Tavares; Trevisan, Karina Fernandes; Leister, Nathalie; Cruz, Camila da Silva; Riesco, Maria Luiza Gonzalez

    2017-04-10

    To analyse pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) and urinary and anal incontinence (UI and AI) in the postpartum period. Cross-sectional study carried out with women in their first seven months after child birth. Data were collected through interviews, perineometry (Peritron™), and the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF). 128 women participated in the study. The PFMS mean was 33.1 (SD=16.0) cmH2O and the prevalence of UI and AI was 7.8% and 5.5%, respectively. In the multiple analyses, the variables associated with PFMS were type of birth and cohabitation with a partner. Newborn's weight, previous pregnancy, UI during pregnancy, and sexual activity showed an association with UI after child birth. Only AI prior to pregnancy was associated with AI after childbirth. Vaginal birth predisposes to the reduction of PFMS, and caesarean section had a protective effect to its reduction. The occurrence of UI during pregnancy is a predictor of UI after childbirth, and women with previous pregnancies and newborns with higher weights are more likely to have UI after childbirth.AI prior to pregnancy is the only risk factor for its occurrence after childbirth. Associations between PFMS and cohabitation with a partner, and between UI and sexual activity do not make possible to conclude that these variables are directly associated. Analisar a força dos músculos do assoalho pélvico e a incontinência urinária e anal no período pós-parto. Estudo transversal realizado com mulheres nos primeiros 7 meses após o parto. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevista, da perineometria (Peritron™) e do International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF). Participaram do estudo 128 mulheres. A média da força dos músculos do assoalho pélvico foi 33,1 (d.p.=16,0) cmH2O e a prevalência de incontinência urinária e incontinência anal foi de 7,8% e 5,5%, respectivamente. Na análise múltipla, as vari

  18. Early resistance training-induced increases in muscle cross-sectional area are concomitant with edema-induced muscle swelling.

    PubMed

    Damas, Felipe; Phillips, Stuart M; Lixandrão, Manoel E; Vechin, Felipe C; Libardi, Cleiton A; Roschel, Hamilton; Tricoli, Valmor; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that skeletal muscle shows signs of resistance training (RT)-induced muscle hypertrophy much earlier (i.e., ~3-4 weeks of RT) than previously thought. We determined if early increases in whole muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) during a period of RT were concomitant with edematous muscle swelling and thus not completely attributable to hypertrophy. We analyzed vastus lateralis muscle ultrasound CSA images and their respective echo intensities (CSA-USecho) at the beginning (T1), in the 3rd week of RT (T2) and at the end (T3) of a 10-week RT period in ten untrained young men. Functional parameters [training volume (TV = load × reps × sets) and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)] and muscle damage markers (myoglobin and interleukin-6) were also assessed. Muscle CSA increased significantly at T2 (~2.7%) and T3 (~10.4%) versus T1. Similarly, CSA-USecho increased at T2 (~17.2%) and T3 (~13.7%). However, when CSA-USecho was normalized to the increase in muscle CSA, only T2 showed a significantly higher USecho versus T1. Additionally, TV increased at T2 and T3 versus T1, but MVC increased only at T3. Myoglobin and Interleukin-6 were elevated at T2 versus T1, and myoglobin was also higher at T2 versus T3. We propose that early RT-induced increases in muscle CSA in untrained young individuals are not purely hypertrophy, since there is concomitant edema-induced muscle swelling, probably due to muscle damage, which may account for a large proportion of the increase. Therefore, muscle CSA increases (particularly early in an RT program) should not be labeled as hypertrophy without some concomitant measure of muscle edema/damage.

  19. Endurance neuromuscular electrical stimulation training improves skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Melissa L; Ryan, Terence E; Backus, Deborah; McCully, Kevin K

    2017-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in skeletal muscle atrophy, increases in intramuscular fat, and reductions in skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. Endurance training elicited with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may reverse these changes and lead to improvement in muscle metabolic health. Fourteen participants with complete SCI performed 16 weeks of home-based endurance NMES training of knee extensor muscles. Skeletal muscle oxidative capacity, muscle composition, and blood metabolic and lipid profiles were assessed pre- and post-training. There was an increase in number of contractions performed throughout the duration of training. The average improvement in skeletal muscle oxidative capacity was 119%, ranging from -14% to 387% (P = 0.019). There were no changes in muscle composition or blood metabolic and lipid profiles. Endurance training improved skeletal muscle oxidative capacity, but endurance NMES of knee extensor muscles did not change blood metabolic and lipid profiles. Muscle Nerve 55: 669-675, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Effects of Cold Water Immersion after Rugby Training on Muscle Power and Biochemical Markers

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Masaki; Sato, Takashi; Hasegawa, Tatsushi; Shintaku, Hiroto; Kato, Hisashi; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiko; Radak, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    During rugby game, or intensive rugby training there are many high intensity explosive exercises and eccentric muscle contractions, therefore adequate recovery is very important to rugby players. In the present study we have tested the effects of cold water immersion (CWI) after game-simulated (80 min.) rugby training on muscle power recovery and blood markers of muscle damage. Twenty well-trained collegiate male rugby players (age: 20.3 ± 0.6 years old, body height: 1.74 ± 0.05 m, body weight: 85.4 ± 2.0 kg, body fat: 18.2 ± 1.4 %) volunteered for this study. This study was conducted as a cross-over design; i.e., the subjects were randomly assigned either to CWI (n = 10) or passive rest condition (n = 10) for the 1st trial and 1 week later the subjects were switched conditions for the 2nd trial. After the simulated rugby training, including tackles and body contacts, muscle functional ability and blood markers of muscle damage were tested immediately, after CWI or passive rest, and again 24 hours later. Statistical analysis of all muscle functional tests (10 m dash, counter movement jump, reaction time, side steps) except for 10 seconds maximal pedaling power and blood makers of muscle damage (aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and creatinine) revealed significant main effects for time (p < 0.05). However, no statistically significant interactions were found in any of the muscle functional tests and blood markers between groups and time courses. Our results suggest that a rugby game induces muscle damage and reduces muscle function. However, CWI has no significant restorative effect after an 80-minute rugby game in terms of muscle damage. Key Points Cold water immersion study for the recovery of rugby players Muscle strength and muscle power were mainly evaluated as well as muscle enzymes of muscle break down Subjects were highly trained rugby players with control group PMID:25177190

  1. Noninvasive Assessment of Skeletal Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Trained and Untrained Men.

    PubMed

    Fry, Andrew C; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel B; Weir, Joseph P; Beck, Travis W; Schilling, Brian K; Miller, Jonathan D; Nicoll, Justin X

    2017-09-01

    Fry, AC, Housh, TJ, Cramer, JB, Weir, JP, Beck, TW, Schilling, BK, Miller, JD, and Nicoll, JX. Noninvasive assessment of skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain expression in trained and untrained men. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2355-2362, 2017-Numerous conditions and types of physical activity (e.g., exercise, aging, and muscle-related diseases) can influence muscle fiber types and the proteins expressed. To date, muscle fibers can only be characterized by actually obtaining a tissue sample using the invasive muscle biopsy procedure. Mechanomyography (MMG) is the assessment of the vibration properties of contracting skeletal muscle and has been proposed as a possible noninvasive method for muscle fiber analysis. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to examine the feasibility of using MMG and muscle performance measures to noninvasively assess muscle fiber characteristics. Fifteen men (5 endurance-trained, 5 weight-trained, and 5 sedentary) provided muscle samples from their vastus lateralis muscle. These samples were analyzed for relative myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein expression, which is highly correlated with % muscle fiber type areas. Additionally, each subject performed several muscle performance tests, and MMG of the quadriceps was assessed during a knee extension exercise. Multiple regression was used to develop prediction equations for determining relative muscle content of MHC types I, IIa, and IIx. A combination of MMG and knee extension performance variables estimated types I, IIa, and IIx MHCs with approximately 80% accuracy. Although preliminary, these data suggest that muscle performance tests in addition to MMG assessments during a simple muscle performance task (knee extension) can be used to estimate muscle fiber type composition in a healthy male population. Such methods could ultimately be used to noninvasively monitor muscle health and fitness.

  2. Respiratory muscle strength and training in stroke and neurology: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Ross D; Rafferty, Ged F; Moxham, John; Kalra, Lalit

    2013-02-01

    We undertook two systematic reviews to determine the levels of respiratory muscle weakness and effects of respiratory muscle training in stroke patients. Two systematic reviews were conducted in June 2011 using a number of electronic databases. Review 1 compared respiratory muscle strength in stroke and healthy controls. Review 2 was expanded to include randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of respiratory muscle training on stroke and other neurological conditions. The primary outcomes of interest were maximum inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressure (maximum inspiratory pressure and maximum expiratory pressure, respectively). Meta-analysis of four studies revealed that the maximum inspiratory pressure and maximum expiratory pressure were significantly lower (P < 0·00001) in stroke patients compared with healthy individuals (weighted mean difference -41·39 and -54·62 cmH(2) O, respectively). Nine randomized controlled trials indicate a significantly (P = 0·0009) greater effect of respiratory muscle training on maximum inspiratory pressure in neurological patients compared with control subjects (weighted mean difference 6·94 cmH(2) O) while no effect on maximum expiratory pressure. Respiratory muscle strength appears to be impaired after stroke, possibly contributing to increased incidence of chest infection. Respiratory muscle training can improve inspiratory but not expiratory muscle strength in neurological conditions, although the paucity of studies in the area and considerable variability between them is a limiting factor. Respiratory muscle training may improve respiratory muscle function in neurological conditions, but its clinical benefit remains unknown.

  3. Effects of Different Concurrent Resistance and Aerobic Training Frequencies on Muscle Power and Muscle Quality in Trained Elderly Men: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Rodrigo; Fuchs, Sandra C; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Radaelli, Régis; Schoenell, Maira; Izquierdo, Mikel; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Umpierre, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Muscle power is a strong predictor of functional status in the elderly population and is required to perform different daily activities. To compare the effects of different weekly training frequencies on muscle power and muscle quality induced by concurrent training (resistance + aerobic) in previously trained elderly men. Twenty-four trained elderly men (65 ± 4 years), previously engaged in a regular concurrent training program, three times per week, for the previous five months, were randomly allocated to concurrent training programs in which training was performed either twice a week (2·week(-1), n = 12) or three times per week (3·week(-1), n = 12). The groups trained with an identical exercise intensity and volume per session for 10 weeks. Before and after the exercise training, we examined muscle power, as estimated by countermovement jump height; knee extensor isokinetic peak torque at 60 and 180(o.)s(-1); and muscle quality, a quotient between the one-repetition maximum of the knee extensors and the sum of quadriceps femoris muscle thickness determined by ultrasonography. Additionally, as secondary outcomes, blood pressure and reactive hyperemia were evaluated. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures were used and statistical significance was set at α = 0.05. Muscular power (2·week(-1): 7%, and 3·week(-1): 10%) and muscle quality (2·week(-1): 15%, and 3·week(-1): 8%) improved with the concurrent exercise training (p < 0.001) but with no differences between groups. The isokinetic peak torque at 60 (2·week(-1): 4%, and 3·week(-1): 2%) and 180(o.)s(-1) (2·week(-1): 7%, and 3·week(-1): 1%) increased in both groups (p = 0.036 and p=0.014, respectively). There were no changes in blood pressure or reactive hyperemia with the concurrent training. Concurrent training performed twice a week promotes similar adaptations in muscular power and muscle quality when compared with the same program performed three times per week in previously trained elderly men.

  4. Effects of Different Concurrent Resistance and Aerobic Training Frequencies on Muscle Power and Muscle Quality in Trained Elderly Men: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Rodrigo; Fuchs, Sandra C.; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Pinto, Ronei Silveira; Radaelli, Régis; Schoenell, Maira; Izquierdo, Mikel; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Umpierre, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Muscle power is a strong predictor of functional status in the elderly population and is required to perform different daily activities. To compare the effects of different weekly training frequencies on muscle power and muscle quality induced by concurrent training (resistance + aerobic) in previously trained elderly men. Twenty-four trained elderly men (65 ± 4 years), previously engaged in a regular concurrent training program, three times per week, for the previous five months, were randomly allocated to concurrent training programs in which training was performed either twice a week (2·week-1, n = 12) or three times per week (3·week-1, n = 12). The groups trained with an identical exercise intensity and volume per session for 10 weeks. Before and after the exercise training, we examined muscle power, as estimated by countermovement jump height; knee extensor isokinetic peak torque at 60 and 180o.s-1; and muscle quality, a quotient between the one-repetition maximum of the knee extensors and the sum of quadriceps femoris muscle thickness determined by ultrasonography. Additionally, as secondary outcomes, blood pressure and reactive hyperemia were evaluated. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures were used and statistical significance was set at α = 0.05. Muscular power (2·week-1: 7%, and 3·week-1: 10%) and muscle quality (2·week-1: 15%, and 3·week-1: 8%) improved with the concurrent exercise training (p < 0.001) but with no differences between groups. The isokinetic peak torque at 60 (2·week-1: 4%, and 3·week-1: 2%) and 180o.s-1 (2·week-1: 7%, and 3·week-1: 1%) increased in both groups (p = 0.036 and p=0.014, respectively). There were no changes in blood pressure or reactive hyperemia with the concurrent training. Concurrent training performed twice a week promotes similar adaptations in muscular power and muscle quality when compared with the same program performed three times per week in previously trained elderly men. PMID:28053820

  5. Changes of general fitness and muscle properties following police cadet training

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Ning; Hallbourg, Keith W.; Collins, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to examine the relationship between physical performance and muscle properties during police cadet training. The study’s hypothesis was that improved physical performance brought about by training, would in turn cause a reduction in muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-nine police cadets were included in this study. Standard fitness tests and quantitative assessments of muscular biomechanical properties were conducted before, during and after the 20-week cadet training. [Results] General fitness had improved at the end of the police cadet training. There was no significant decrease in muscle flexibility as measured by the Sit-and-Reach test. However, muscle compliance of the non-dominant leg measured by the relaxation coefficient had decreased at the end of the police cadet training. [Conclusion] The increased sit-and-reach distance could be due in part to strengthening of the abdominal muscles. On the other hand, the biomechanical test, which was specific to muscle extensibility, showed a reduction in the relaxation coefficient of the non-dominant leg. Our data suggests that changes in muscle compliance as a result of lower extremity training should be considered. This data may be useful in the design of a training protocol that prevents the potential injuries caused by reduced muscle flexibility. PMID:26504293

  6. Changes of general fitness and muscle properties following police cadet training.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ning; Hallbourg, Keith W; Collins, Sean M

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to examine the relationship between physical performance and muscle properties during police cadet training. The study's hypothesis was that improved physical performance brought about by training, would in turn cause a reduction in muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-nine police cadets were included in this study. Standard fitness tests and quantitative assessments of muscular biomechanical properties were conducted before, during and after the 20-week cadet training. [Results] General fitness had improved at the end of the police cadet training. There was no significant decrease in muscle flexibility as measured by the Sit-and-Reach test. However, muscle compliance of the non-dominant leg measured by the relaxation coefficient had decreased at the end of the police cadet training. [Conclusion] The increased sit-and-reach distance could be due in part to strengthening of the abdominal muscles. On the other hand, the biomechanical test, which was specific to muscle extensibility, showed a reduction in the relaxation coefficient of the non-dominant leg. Our data suggests that changes in muscle compliance as a result of lower extremity training should be considered. This data may be useful in the design of a training protocol that prevents the potential injuries caused by reduced muscle flexibility.

  7. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Capacity in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, André Luiz Lisboa; de Melo, Thiago Araújo; Neves, Daniela; Luna, Julianne; Esquivel, Mateus Souza; Guimarães, André Raimundo França; Borges, Daniel Lago; Petto, Jefferson

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is a highly complex procedure which generates worsening of lung function and decreased inspiratory muscle strength. The inspiratory muscle training becomes effective for muscle strengthening and can improve functional capacity. Objective To investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods This is a clinical randomized controlled trial with patients undergoing cardiac surgery at Instituto Nobre de Cardiologia. Patients were divided into two groups: control group and training. Preoperatively, were assessed the maximum inspiratory pressure and the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test. From the third postoperative day, the control group was managed according to the routine of the unit while the training group underwent daily protocol of respiratory muscle training until the day of discharge. Results 50 patients, 27 (54%) males were included, with a mean age of 56.7±13.9 years. After the analysis, the training group had significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure (69.5±14.9 vs. 83.1±19.1 cmH2O, P=0.0073) and 6-minute walk test (422.4±102.8 vs. 502.4±112.8 m, P=0.0031). Conclusion We conclude that inspiratory muscle training was effective in improving functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in this sample of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27556313

  8. Detraining outcomes with expiratory muscle strength training in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Troche, Michelle S; Rosenbek, John C; Okun, Michael S; Sapienza, Christine M

    2014-01-01

    Expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) is efficacious for improving maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), cough function, and swallowing safety in Parkinson disease (PD). However, there are no published reports describing detraining effects following EMST in persons with PD. Moreover, there are no published reports describing detraining effects following any behavioral swallowing intervention. Ten participants with PD underwent 3 mo of detraining following EMST. Measures of MEP and swallowing safety were made prior to beginning EMST (baseline), posttreatment (predetraining), and 3 mo postdetraining. Participants demonstrated, on average, a 19% improvement in MEP from pre- to post-EMST. Following the 3 mo detraining period, MEP declined by 2% yet remained 17% above the baseline value. No statistically significant changes were found in swallowing safety from post-EMST to postdetraining period. Following the 3 mo detraining period, seven participants demonstrated no change in swallowing safety, one worsened, and two had improvements. This preliminary study highlights the need for the design of maintenance programs to sustain function following intensive periods of training.

  9. Exercise training-induced gender-specific heat shock protein adaptations in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Morton, James P; Holloway, Kathryn; Woods, Paul; Cable, Nigel T; Burniston, Jatin; Evans, Louise; Kayani, Anna C; McArdle, Anne

    2009-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of short-term endurance training on heat shock protein (HSP) adaptations of male and female human skeletal muscle. The data demonstrate that females did not respond to continuous or interval training in terms of increasing HSP content of the vastus lateralis muscle. In contrast, males displayed HSP adaptations to both training interventions. These data provide a platform for future human studies to examine a potential gender-specific stress response to exercise.

  10. Association between regional differences in muscle activation in one session of resistance exercise and in muscle hypertrophy after resistance training.

    PubMed

    Wakahara, Taku; Miyamoto, Naokazu; Sugisaki, Norihide; Murata, Koichiro; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Yasuo; Fukunaga, Tetsuo; Yanai, Toshimasa

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if the regional difference in muscle hypertrophy after chronic resistance training is associated with muscle activation after one session of resistance exercise. Twelve men performed one session of resistance exercise of elbow extensors. Before and immediately after the exercise, transverse relaxation time (T2)-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images of upper arm were recorded to evaluate the muscle activation along its length. In the MR images, T2 for the pixels within the triceps brachii muscle was quantified. The number of pixels with T2 greater than the threshold (mean + 1SD of T2 before the exercise) was expressed as the ratio to the number of pixels occupied by the muscle (%activated area). Another 12 subjects completed 12 weeks of training intervention (3 days per week), which consisted of the same program variables as used in the experiment for the T2 measurement. The cross-sectional areas of the triceps brachii before and after the training intervention were measured from MR images of upper arm. The %activated area of the triceps brachii induced by one session of the exercise was found to be significantly lower in the distal region than the middle and proximal regions. Similarly, the relative increase in muscle cross-sectional area after the 12 weeks of training intervention was significantly less in the distal region than the middle and proximal regions. The results suggest that the regional difference in muscle hypertrophy after chronic resistance training is attributable to the regional difference in muscle activation during the exercis