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Sample records for penn state pulsatile

  1. Penn State DOE GATE Program

    SciTech Connect

    Anstrom, Joel

    2012-08-31

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) was established in October 1998 pursuant to an award from the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). The focus area of the Penn State GATE Program is advanced energy storage systems for electric and hybrid vehicles.

  2. 2014 Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Golbeck, John

    2015-10-01

    The 3rd Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop took place in early June 2014 and was combined with the 3rd Penn State Frontiers in Metallobiochemistry Symposium. The workshop was even larger than the 2nd Penn State Bioinorganic Workshop we offered in 2012. It had even more participants (162 rather than 123 in 2012). Like the 2012 workshop, the 2014 workshop had three parts. The first part consisted of 16 90-minute lectures presented by faculty experts on the topic of their expertise (see below). Based on the suggestions from the 2012 workshop, we have recorded all 16 lectures professionally and make them available to the entire bioinorganic community via online streaming. In addition, hard copies of the recordings are available as backup.

  3. Penn State researches acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-27

    A brief news item reports that work is being carried out at Penn State University on the effectiveness of sphagnum moss and other marsh-type plants in removing iron from acid mine water. A sphagnum moss bog has been established in a greenhouse at the University and field work is also being undertaken in a natural environment in Clearfield County.

  4. Penn State's Visual Image User Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisciotta, Henry A.; Dooris, Michael J.; Frost, James; Halm, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Visual Image User Study (VIUS), an extensive needs assessment project at Penn State University, describes academic users of pictures and their perceptions. These findings outline the potential market for digital images and list the likely determinates of whether or not a system will be used. They also explain some key user requirements for…

  5. Foil bearing research at Penn State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpino, Marc

    1993-11-01

    Foil journal bearings consist of a compliant metal shell or foil which supports a rigid journal by means of a fluid film. Foil bearings are considered to be a potential alternative to rolling element or traditional rigid surface bearings in cryogenic turbomachinery applications. The prediction of foil bearing performance requires the coupled solution of the foil deflection and the fluid flow in the bearing clearance between the rotor and the foil. The investigations being conducted in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Penn State are focused in three areas: theoretical prediction of steady state bearing performance, modeling of the dynamic bearing characteristics to determine performance in rotor systems, and experimental verification of analysis codes. The current status and results from these efforts will be discussed.

  6. Penn State Radar Systems: Implementation and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, J. V.; Seal, R.; Sorbello, R.; Kuyeng, K.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Software Defined Radio/Radar (SDR) platforms have become increasingly popular as researchers, hobbyists, and military seek more efficient and cost-effective means for radar construction and operation. SDR platforms, by definition, utilize a software-based interface for configuration in contrast to traditional, hard-wired platforms. In an effort to provide new and improved radar sensing capabilities, Penn State has been developing advanced instruments and technologies for future radars, with primary objectives of making such instruments more capable, portable, and more cost effective. This paper will describe the design and implementation of two low-cost radar systems and their deployment in ionospheric research at both low and mid-latitudes. One radar has been installed near Penn State campus, University Park, Pennsylvania (77.97°W, 40.70°N), to make continuous meteor observations and mid-latitude plasma irregularities. The second radar is being installed in Huancayo (12.05°S, -75.33°E), Peru, which is capable of detecting E and F region plasma irregularities as well as meteor reflections. In this paper, we examine and compare the diurnal and seasonal variability of specular, non- specular, and head-echoes collected with these two new radar systems and discuss sampling biases of each meteor observation technique. We report our current efforts to validate and calibrate these radar systems with other VHF radars such as Jicamarca and SOUSY. We also present the general characteristics of continuous measurements of E-region and F-region coherent echoes using these modern radar systems and compare them with coherent radar events observed at other geographic mid-latitude radar stations.

  7. The Engineering Science Curriculum At Penn State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, William

    1997-03-01

    The Engineering Science major at Penn State is an interdisciplinary program of study for academically gifted students that features both breadth and depth exposure to the engineering sciences. It is the honors curriculum in the College of Engineering. During the junior year of this program, students study courses selected from a broad range of the engineering sciences such as solid and fluid mechanics (11 credits total during the four years), thermodynamics and heat transfer (6 credits), electrical sciences (10 credits), materials science (6 credits), and applied mathematics and computer science (30 credits). These courses stress the basic principles underlying engineering analysis and synthesis as well as the transferability of engineering concepts from one discipline to another. Seniors then undertake a seven credit capstone design project which they support with four three-credit technical electives. Students work one-on-one with a faculty member on this capstone design project. Because this faculty member can be in any engineering department, these senior projects cover an enormous range of topics. However, because a large number of the faculty of the Engineering Science department (officially known as the Engineering Science and Mechanics department) have an interest in engineered materials (e.g., composites, sensors, powdered materials, thin films, video displays, MEMS, smart materials, electronic devices) many of the senior projects, as well as many of the graduate theses, involve materials design, fabrication, testing, utilization, or corrosion prevention. Some of the current projects and facilities of the department will be highlighted in this talk.

  8. Death Threats and a Sit-In Divide Penn State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Describes how death threats against black students at Penn State prompted an extended sit-in and a debate over whether the university was doing enough to protect black students and promote diversity. (EV)

  9. Science Documentaries at Your Library: Two Penn State Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimland, Emily; Butkovich, Nancy J.; Musser, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Two science branch libraries at Penn State's University Park campus hosted film series centered on scientific documentary films. Although the reasons for starting the series differ, both have been successful in meeting their goals. Patron responses have been favorable, and the series have focused attention on the collections and services offered…

  10. An overview of the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center is presented. The following subject areas are covered: research objectives and long term perspective of the Center; current status and operational philosophy; and brief description of Center projects (combustion, fluid mechanics and heat transfer, materials compatibility, turbomachinery, and advanced propulsion concepts).

  11. Economic Development in Challenging Times: The Penn State Outreach Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smutz, Wayne; Weidemann, Craig D.

    2008-01-01

    From its inception, Penn State has played a role in Pennsylvania's economy. As a land-grant university, it has functioned as a change agent, transferring research and knowledge to increase farm yields, encouraging business and "the mechanic arts," and transmitting technology to the general population. While the university still does those things…

  12. Penn State Scandal Encompasses Professors, Too

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2012-01-01

    While most of the national focus following charges of child sex abuse at Pennsylvania State University has centered on its coaches and administrators, the scandal has reached deep into the professoriate as well. Responding to constant questions has taken an emotional toll on the university's faculty members, who have been asked by neighbors,…

  13. Tomorrow's engineers through teacher/student programs at Penn State

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, C. )

    1992-01-01

    Interest in math and science increases when the problems and topics are current and socially relevant. A course that integrates various sciences requires a solid foundation in mathematics and an understanding that real life consists of an interaction of the basic sciences. One topical area that requires the understanding of math and science and affects our society is radiation. Although nuclear issues are prevalent in the news, very few secondary science educators receive much formal training in radiation and nuclear science. A strong push for educational programs on this topic by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and state departments of education began in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Through this effort, Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) developed the Nuclear Concepts Institute for secondary science teachers and has continued its involvement with educational programs in nuclear science for teachers and students. From discussions with teachers and students along with formal and informal surveys, the programs have had a positive impact on teachers' interest in learning more about nuclear science and on students' choices to enter nuclear engineering or a related field. The paper discusses the Nuclear Concepts Program; formation of the American Nuclear Science Teachers Association (ANSTA); ANSTA projects; other Penn State educational programs; and impact of education programs.

  14. Recycling at Penn State's Beaver Stadium. "Recycle on the Go" Success Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2009

    2009-01-01

    With a 13-year-old recycling program, The Pennsylvania State University's (Penn State) Beaver Stadium in the past diverted nearly 30 tons of recyclables per year from local landfills. A new initiative to promote recycling in the stadium's tailgating area has helped Penn State more than triple its old recycling record, collecting 112 tons in 2008.…

  15. Estimation of Reynolds stresses within the Penn State left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, J T; Deutsch, S; Geselowitz, D B; Tarbell, J M

    1990-01-01

    Fluid velocities were measured using a two-component laser Doppler anemometery (LDA) system at 129 locations within a Plexiglas model of a 70 cm3 Penn State electric Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD). The LVAD was driven by a pulsatile piston pump acting on an attached segmented polyurethane diaphragm. Bjork-Shiley tilting disc valves were used to provide unidirectional flow through the inlet and outlet ports. A seeded blood analog fluid, which matched the kinematic viscosity of blood at high shear rates and the refractive index of Plexiglas, was used to make the measurements. At each location, 250 instantaneous velocity realizations were collected at eight instances during the pump cycle. The maximum Reynolds shear and normal stresses were calculated for each pump cycle time and location after filtering the data. The results reveal that the highest Reynolds shear and normal stresses occur in the near wall region just proximal to the aortic valve during diastole, and reach values of 5,300 dynes/cm2 and 10,800 dynes/cm2, respectively. The elevated turbulent stresses are observed during the period of regurgitant flow through the aortic valve, with peak stress values arising during the period of peak regurgitant flow. This supports the hypothesis that a regurgitant turbulent jet is formed near the wall of the prosthetic aortic valve and may be contributing to blood damage.

  16. BRIE: The Penn State Biogeochemical Research Initiative for Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Brantley, S. L.; Brenchley, J.

    2003-12-01

    Few scientists are prepared to address the interdisciplinary challenges of biogeochemical research due to disciplinary differences in vocabulary, technique, and scientific paradigm. Thus scientists and engineers trained in traditional disciplines bring a restricted view to the study of environmental systems, which can limit their ability to exploit new techniques and opportunities for scientific advancement. Although the literature is effusive with enthusiasm for interdisciplinary approaches to biogeochemistry, there remains the basic difficulty of cross-training geological and biological scientists. The NSF-IGERT funded Biogeochemical Research Initiative for Education (BRIE) program at Penn State is specifically designed to break down both disciplinary and institutional barriers and it has fostered cross-disciplinary collaboration and training since 1999. Students and faculty are drawn from environmental engineering, geochemistry, soil science, chemistry and microbiology, and the program is regarded on the Penn State campus as a successful example of how interdisciplinary science can best be promoted. There are currently 23 Ph.D. students funded by the program, with an additional 7 affiliated students. At present, a total of 6 students have completed doctoral degrees, and they have done so within normal timeframes. The program is "discipline-plus," whereby students enroll in traditional disciplinary degree programs, and undertake broad training via 12 credits of graduate coursework in other departments. Students are co-advised by faculty from different disciplines, and engage in interdisciplinary research facilitated by research "credit cards." Funding is available for international research experiences, travel to meetings, and other opportunities for professional development. Students help institutionalize interdisciplinary training by designing and conducting a teaching module that shares their expertise with a class in another department or discipline

  17. The future of acoustics distance education at Penn State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Karen P.; Sparrow, Victor W.; Atchley, Anthony A.

    2005-04-01

    For nearly 20 years Penn State's Graduate Program in Acoustics has offered a graduate distance education program, established in response to Department of Defense needs. Using satellite technology, courses provided synchronous classes incorporating one-way video and two-way audio. Advancements in technology allowed more sophisticated delivery systems to be considered and courses to be offered to employees of industry. Current technology utilizes real time video-streaming and archived lectures to enable individuals anywhere to access course materials. The evolution of technology, expansion of the geographic market and changing needs of the student, among other issues, require a new paradigm. This paradigm must consider issues such as faculty acceptance and questions facing all institutions with regard to blurring the distinction between residence and distance education. Who will be the students? What will be the purpose of education? Will it be to provide professional and/or research degrees? How will the Acoustics Program ensure it remains attractive to all students, while working within the boundaries and constraints of a major research university? This is a look at current practice and issues with an emphasis on those relevant to constructing the Acoustics Programs distance education strategy for the future.

  18. A Vision and Promise: Distance Education at Penn State. Part 2--Policy and Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froke, Marlowe

    1994-01-01

    Based on Penn State's experience with distance education, critical policy issues are discussed: faculty control (developing an academic plan, linking to technology, community service) and defining students and resources (particularly access for part-time students). (SK)

  19. The Penn State Mini Medical School: A Prescription for Community Engagement in Health Care Issues and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorndyke, Luanne E.; Bixler, Bonnie J.; Carubia, Josephine M.

    2004-01-01

    The Penn State Mini Medical School is a high-impact community engagement program created and led by the Office of Continuing Education at the Penn State College of Medicine. The broad goals of the program are to respond to the general public's intense desire for health and medical information, to educate the community about biomedical science and…

  20. Penn State Adult Literacy Courseware: Impact on Parents and Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askov, Eunice N.

    The Penn State Adult Literacy Courseware project uses a "whole word" approach with some word-building activities in teaching 1,000 high frequency and functional words to adult beginning readers whose children participate in Chapter I programs. The aim of the project is to counteract the intergenerational effects of illiteracy. The courseware runs…

  1. The Penn state lunar lion: A university mission to explore the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Michael V.; Spencer, David B.; Lego, Sara E.; Muncks, John P.

    2014-03-01

    The Penn State Lunar Lion Team plans to send a robotic explorer to the surface of the Moon and, by applying 30 years of technological advancements, win the Google Lunar X Prize. The Google Lunar X Prize aims to showcase the ability of the growing private space industry by having teams pursue the goal of becoming the first private entity to land a spacecraft on another body in the solar system. Through the Team's pursuit of this Prize, Penn State will establish itself as a leader in space exploration. The Lunar Lion Team will win this Prize through the collaboration of faculty and students from multiple disciplines, and the engineering and technical staff at the Penn State Applied Research Lab, as well as strategic collaborations with industry partners. The diversity of technical disciplines required to build a system that can land on the Moon can be found at Penn State. This multidisciplinary project will be not only a means for bringing together personnel from around the University, but also a way to attract faculty and students to these fields. The baseline concept for the Lunar Lion will strictly follow the requirements of the Grand Prize and the Grand Prize only, leading to the simplest possible system for the mission. By achieving the Grand Prize, Penn State will have accomplished what once took the large-scale effort of NASA's early robotic lunar landers or the USSR's space program. While the Bonus Prizes are noteworthy, ensuring their accomplishment will add development and operational risk to the flight system that could jeopardize the Team's ability to win the Grand Prize. The Team will build the simplest spacecraft, with the fewest number of systems and components. This philosophy will shorten the development timeline and result in a robust flight system that is of minimum cost. Wherever possible, the Team will use commercially available products to satisfy the needs of the system. The work of the Team will be efficient systems integration, careful

  2. Penn State Multi-Discipline Tribology Group and Energy Institute Studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Joseph

    2001-08-05

    This presentation is a summary of the current research activities on fuels and lubricants in the Multi-discipline Tribology group and the engine test group in the Combustion Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University. The progress areas discussed in this summary include those found in Table 1. Table 1. RESEARCH AREAS: Diesel Engine Emission Reduction; Oxygenated Fuels; Improved Friction Fuels; Vegetable Oil Lubricants; Extended Drain Lubricants; Effect of Chemical Structure on Friction and Wear. The research is of interest either directly or indirectly to the goal of this workshop, diesel engine emissions reduction. The current projects at Penn State in the areas listed above will be discussed.

  3. Viewgraph description of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center: Activity highlights and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented that describe the progress and status of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center. The Center was established in Jul. 1988 by a grant from NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers Program. After two and one-half years of operation, some 16 faculty are participating, and the Center is supporting 39 graduate students plus 18 undergraduates. In reviewing the Center's status, long-term plans and goals are reviewed and then the present status of the Center and the highlights and accomplishments of the past year are summarized. An overview of plans for the upcoming year are presented.

  4. Results From Penn State's Interactive, On-line, Scifi Version Of Astro 001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, Christopher; Charlton, J. C.; Herrmann, K.; Narayanan, A.; Tr'Ehnl, N.

    2007-12-01

    We present results from a new, fully on-line astronomy course for undergraduate non-science majors at Penn State that was offered for the first time in Spring 2007 to 422 enrolled students. The entire course content is conveyed through an interactive story, capitalizing on the many multimedia astronomy resources publicly available on the Internet. The four units of the course (Basic Astronomy and the Nighttime Sky, Our Solar System, Stars and the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology) deliver the same content as a traditional Astro 001 course. Each unit follows the educational adventure of a different fictional Astro 001 student who has been "abducted" by aliens. The four units are united by a character, the Riddler, who poses riddles about various aspects of astronomy, and whose identity and purpose is revealed gradually as a reward for completion of various subtopics. The initial Spring offering of the course was entirely web-based except for traditional evening in-class exams. We were very successful: it was popular with the students, the exam grades were about 10% higher than usual, and enrollments in Fall 2007 (more than 700 students) and Spring 2008 (almost 200 pre-enrolled to date) are strong. Future plans are underway to broaden the audience to students attending other Penn State campuses and perhaps to adapt the course for presentation as an astronomy unit to middle or high school students. We gratefully acknowledge funding from STScI IDEAS grant HST-ED-90284-01-A

  5. Animal Model Development for the Penn State Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Elizabeth L.; Clark, J. Brian; Myers, John L.; Peterson, Rebecca; Wilson, Ronald P.; Weiss, William J.

    2009-01-01

    In March 2004, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) awarded five contracts to develop devices providing circulatory support for infants and small children with congenital and acquired cardiac disease. Since 2004, the team at Penn State College of Medicine has developed a pneumatically-actuated ventricular assist device (VAD) with mechanical tilting disk valves. To date, hemodynamic performance, thrombogenesis, and hemolysis have been chronically evaluated in 16 animals, including 4 pygmy goats and 12 sheep. Major complications, mainly respiratory failure, have been encountered and resolved by a multi-disciplinary team. Multi-modal analgesia, appropriate antibiotic therapy, and attentive animal care have contributed to successful outcomes. Time after implant has ranged from 0–40 days. Most recently, a sheep implanted with Version 3 Infant VAD was electively terminated at 35 days post-implant, with no major adverse events. This report describes a successful in vivo model for evaluating a pediatric VAD. PMID:19849686

  6. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire: Multiple factors or method effects?

    PubMed

    Brown, Timothy A

    2003-12-01

    The latent structure of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) was evaluated with confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) in 1200 outpatients with DSM-IV anxiety and mood disorders. Of particular interest was the comparative fit and interpretability of a two-factor solution (cf. Behaviour Research and Therapy 40 (2002) 313) vs. a one-factor model that specified method effects arising from five reverse-worded items. Consistent with prediction, the superiority of the one-factor model was demonstrated in split-sample CFA replications (ns=600). Multiple-group CFAs indicated that the measurement properties of the PSWQ were invariant in male and female patients. In addition to their direct relevance to the psychometrics of the PSWQ, the results are discussed in regard to methodological considerations for using factor analytic methods in the evaluation of psychological tests.

  7. Analysis of Coherent Scatter Observations collected with the new Penn State VHF Meteor Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, J. V.; Hackett, A. L.; Dyrud, L. P.; Fentzke, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Penn State University 50 MHz radar interferometer has been installed near Penn State campus, University Park, Pennsylvania (77.97°W, 40.70°N), to make continuous meteor observations since July 5, 2012. The antenna beam is pointed to the north in the magnetic meridian plane. In azimuth the half-power beam-width is about 3.4o, while in elevation the gain pattern peaked in the direction perpendicular to the geomagnetic field at E-region heights at about 18o elevation angle. The system uses two phased sub-arrays of four 24-element COCO strings with an east-west separation of 50 m. On transmission both sub-arrays are excited simultaneously and oriented perpendicular to the Earth's geomagnetic field lines at E- region heights. On reception each sub-array is sampled independently for interferometric detection of the scattering regions. The new radar operates at a peak power of about 30 kW and can detect all three types of meteor reflections: 1) the commonly used specular meteor trails; 2) non-specular trails, which result from plasma instability and turbulence generated field aligned irregularities (FAI); and 3) meteor head-echoes, which are a radar target moving at the speed of the meteoroid. In this paper, we present first observational trends of specular, non- specular, and head-echoes collected with the new system and discuss sampling biases of each meteor observation technique. We also present the general characteristics of continuous measurements of E-region and F-region coherent echoes using this modern radar system and compare them with coherent radar events observed at other geographic mid-latitude radar stations.

  8. A New Coherent Science Content Storyline Astronomy Course for Pre-Service Teachers at Penn State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, Christopher; Plummer, Julia; Earth and Space Science Partnership

    2016-01-01

    The Earth and Space Science Partnership (ESSP) is a collaboration among Penn State scientists, science educators and seven school districts across Pennsylvania. One of the ESSP goals has been to provide pre-service teachers with new or improved science course offerings at Penn State in the Earth and Space Science domains. In particular, we aim to provide students with opportunities to learn astronomy content knowledge through teaching methods that engage them in investigations where they experience the practices used by astronomers. We have designed a new course that builds on our research into students' ideas about Solar System astronomy (Plummer et al. 2015) and the curriculum our team created for a professional development workshop for in-service teachers (Palma et al. 2013) with this same theme. The course was offered for the first time in the spring 2015 semester. We designed the course using a coherent science content storyline approach (see, e.g., Palma et al. 2014), which requires all of the student investigations to build towards a big idea in science; in this case, we chose the model for formation of our Solar System. The course led pre-service teachers through a series of investigations that model the type of instruction we hope they will adopt in their own classrooms. They were presented with a series of research questions that all tie in to the big idea of Solar System formation, and they were responsible for collecting and interpreting their own data to draw evidence-based conclusions about one aspect of this model. Students in the course were assessed on their astronomy content knowledge, but also on their ability to construct arguments using scientific reasoning to answer astronomy questions. In this poster, we will present descriptions of the investigations, the assessments used, and our preliminary results about how the course led this group of pre-service teachers to improved understanding of astronomy content and the practices astronomers use in

  9. The New Meteor Radar at Penn State: Design and First Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urbina, J.; Seal, R.; Dyrud, L.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to provide new and improved meteor radar sensing capabilities, Penn State has been developing advanced instruments and technologies for future meteor radars, with primary objectives of making such instruments more capable and more cost effective in order to study the basic properties of the global meteor flux, such as average mass, velocity, and chemical composition. Using low-cost field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), combined with open source software tools, we describe a design methodology enabling one to develop state-of-the art radar instrumentation, by developing a generalized instrumentation core that can be customized using specialized output stage hardware. Furthermore, using object-oriented programming (OOP) techniques and open-source tools, we illustrate a technique to provide a cost-effective, generalized software framework to uniquely define an instrument s functionality through a customizable interface, implemented by the designer. The new instrument is intended to provide instantaneous profiles of atmospheric parameters and climatology on a daily basis throughout the year. An overview of the instrument design concepts and some of the emerging technologies developed for this meteor radar are presented.

  10. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Tom Steitz

    2002-10-14

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives. During this reporting period, the final technical design and cost estimate were submitted to Penn State by Foster Wheeler. In addition, Penn State initiated the internal site selection process to finalize the site for the boiler plant.

  11. Chronic In Vivo Testing of the Penn State Infant Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, William J.; Carney, Elizabeth L.; Clark, J. Brian; Peterson, Rebecca; Cooper, Timothy K.; Nifong, Thomas P.; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Hicks, Dennis; Doxtater, Bradley; Lukic, Branka; Yeager, Eric; Reibson, John; Cysyk, Joshua; Rosenberg, Gerson; Pierce, William S.

    2011-01-01

    The Penn State Infant Ventricular Assist Device is a 12-14 ml stroke volume pneumatically actuated pump, with custom Björk-Shiley monostrut valves, developed under the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Pediatric Circulatory Support program. In this report we describe the 7 most recent chronic animal studies of the Infant VAD in the juvenile ovine model, with a mean body weight of 23.5 +/- 4.1 kg. The goal of 4-6 weeks survival was achieved in 5 of 7 studies, with support duration ranging from 5 to 41 days; mean 26.1 days. Anticoagulation was accomplished using unfractionated heparin, and study animals were divided into 2 protocol groups: the first based on a target activated partial thromboplastin time of 1.5 to 2 times normal, and a second group using a target thromboelastography R-time of 2 times normal. The second group required significantly less heparin, which was verified by barely detectable heparin activity (anti-Xa). In both groups, there was no evidence of thromboembolism except in one animal with a chronic infection and fever. Device thrombi were minimal, and were further reduced by introduction of the custom valve. These results are consistent with results of adult VAD testing in animals, and are encouraging given the extremely low levels of anticoagulation in the second group. PMID:22157073

  12. Fruit consumption, fitness, and cardiovascular health in female adolescents: the Penn State Young Women's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, T; Chinchilli, V M; Rollings, N; Kieselhorst, K; Tregea, D F; Henderson, N A; Sinoway, L I

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the relations among nutrient intake, fitness, serum antioxidants, and cardiolipoprotein profiles in female adolescents. The study design was a cross-sectional analysis of the Penn State Young Women's Health Study. The present study was performed with the entire cohort (n = 86) when they were 17.1+/-0.5 y (x+/-SD) of age. Primary measurements included cardiolipoprotein indexes, serum antioxidants, nutrient intakes, aerobic fitness, and percentage body fat. The cohort was stratified by estimated maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) measurements and by percentage body fat. The fifth quintile by estimated VO2max had significantly lower percentage body fat, higher athletic scores, higher fruit intake, lower total serum cholesterol, and lower ratios of total serum cholesterol to HDL cholesterol than members of the first quintile. When the members of the first and fifth quintiles by percentage body fat were compared, the first quintile had significantly lower weight, lower body mass index, higher estimated VO2max, higher athletic scores, lower ratios of total serum cholesterol to HDL cholesterol, and higher fruit, carbohydrate, and fiber intakes. Correlation analyses performed with the data for the entire cohort showed fruit consumption to be positively correlated with estimated VO2max, and predicted VO2max to be positively correlated with circulating beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol. This study provided evidence that the positive associations of exercise and fruit consumption with cardiovascular health apply to female adolescents as well as to adults. PMID:9537609

  13. Sensing for directed energy deposition and powder bed fusion additive manufacturing at Penn State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Abdalla R.; Reutzel, Edward W.; Brown, Stephen W.; Morgan, John P.; Morgan, Jacob P.; Natale, Donald J.; Tutwiler, Rick L.; Feck, David P.; Banks, Jeffery C.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing of metal components through directed energy deposition or powder bed fusion is a complex undertaking, often involving hundreds or thousands of individual laser deposits. During processing, conditions may fluctuate, e.g. material feed rate, beam power, surrounding gas composition, local and global temperature, build geometry, etc., leading to unintended variations in final part geometry, microstructure and properties. To assess or control as-deposited quality, researchers have used a variety of methods, including those based on sensing of melt pool and plume emission characteristics, characteristics of powder application, and layer-wise imaging. Here, a summary of ongoing process monitoring activities at Penn State is provided, along with a discussion of recent advancements in the area of layer-wise image acquisition and analysis during powder bed fusion processing. Specifically, methods that enable direct comparisons of CAD model, build images, and 3D micro-tomographic scan data will be covered, along with thoughts on how such analyses can be related to overall process quality.

  14. Final report to DOE: Matching Grant Program for the Penn State University Nuclear Engineering Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jack S. Brenizer, Jr.

    2003-01-17

    The DOE/Industry Matching Grant Program is designed to encourage collaborative support for nuclear engineering education as well as research between the nation's nuclear industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Despite a serious decline in student enrollments in the 1980s and 1990s, the discipline of nuclear engineering remained important to the advancement of the mission goals of DOE. The program is designed to ensure that academic programs in nuclear engineering are maintained and enhanced in universities throughout the U.S. At Penn State, the Matching Grant Program played a critical role in the survival of the Nuclear Engineering degree programs. Funds were used in a variety of ways to support both undergraduate and graduate students directly. Some of these included providing seed funding for new graduate research initiatives, funding the development of new course materials, supporting new teaching facilities, maintenance and purchase of teaching laboratory equipment, and providing undergraduate scholarships, graduate fellowships, and wage payroll positions for students.

  15. Preliminary Normative Data on the Penn State University Symbol Cancellation Task With Nonconcussed Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Conder, Robert L; Conder, Alanna A; Register-Mihalik, Johna; Conder, Lauren H; Newton, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Visual concentration impairment after neurologic injury is frequent, making its identification a critical component of neurocognitive concussion assessment. Visual target cancellation tests such as the Penn State University Symbol Cancellation Task (PSUSCT) have been widely used in assessing professional and collegiate athletes. To date, there are no normative studies using the PSUSCT with an adolescent population. Given that 38 million children and adolescents participate in sports and an estimated 5% to 10% are concussed annually, adolescent normative data are critically needed to evaluate concussions in this vulnerable population. The purpose of this study was to provide adolescent normative data on the PSUSCT. Participants included 40 healthy, nonconcussed high school students aged 14 to 19 years old (20 men, 20 women). Participants were administered Forms A and C of the PSUSCT within a 4-day period. Data analysis examined hits, omission errors, and commission errors, with descriptive statistics calculated for the total sample and for subgroups by gender and age. Study 1 provided normative adolescent data on Form A. Study 2 examined practice effects and established reliable change indexes (RCIs) by comparing results on Forms A and C. Neither Study 1 nor Study 2 demonstrated significant group differences for gender or age. In conclusion, this study presents adolescent normative data, apparent practice effects, and RCIs on the PSUSCT. These norms provide data needed to appropriately include the PSUSCT in baseline and postinjury concussion evaluation batteries with adolescent student-athletes. Findings should be replicated with a larger, more heterogeneous sample. PMID:25072106

  16. Massively parallel implementation of the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Michalakes, J.

    1992-12-01

    Parallel computing promises significant improvements in both the raw speed and cost performance of mesoscale atmospheric models. On distributed-memory massively parallel computers available today, the performance of a mesoscale model will exceed that of conventional supercomputers; on the teraflops machines expected within the next five years, performance will increase by several orders of magnitude. As a result, scientists will be able to consider larger problems, more complex model processes, and finer resolutions. In this paper. we report on a project at Argonne National Laboratory that will allow scientists to take advantage of parallel computing technology. This Massively Parallel Mesoscale Model (MPMM) will be functionally equivalent to the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM). In a prototype study, we produced a parallel version of MM4 using a static (compile-time) coarse-grained ``patch`` decomposition. This code achieves one-third the performance of a one-processor CRAY Y-MP on twelve Intel 1860 microprocessors. The current version of MPMM is based on all MM5 and uses a more fine-grained approach, decomposing the grid as finely as the mesh itself allows so that each horizontal grid cell is a parallel process. This will allow the code to utilize many hundreds of processors. A high-level language for expressing parallel programs is used to implement communication strearns between the processes in a way that permits dynamic remapping to the physical processors of a particular parallel computer. This facilitates load balancing, grid nesting, and coupling with graphical systems and other models.

  17. Massively parallel implementation of the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Michalakes, J.

    1992-01-01

    Parallel computing promises significant improvements in both the raw speed and cost performance of mesoscale atmospheric models. On distributed-memory massively parallel computers available today, the performance of a mesoscale model will exceed that of conventional supercomputers; on the teraflops machines expected within the next five years, performance will increase by several orders of magnitude. As a result, scientists will be able to consider larger problems, more complex model processes, and finer resolutions. In this paper. we report on a project at Argonne National Laboratory that will allow scientists to take advantage of parallel computing technology. This Massively Parallel Mesoscale Model (MPMM) will be functionally equivalent to the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM). In a prototype study, we produced a parallel version of MM4 using a static (compile-time) coarse-grained patch'' decomposition. This code achieves one-third the performance of a one-processor CRAY Y-MP on twelve Intel 1860 microprocessors. The current version of MPMM is based on all MM5 and uses a more fine-grained approach, decomposing the grid as finely as the mesh itself allows so that each horizontal grid cell is a parallel process. This will allow the code to utilize many hundreds of processors. A high-level language for expressing parallel programs is used to implement communication strearns between the processes in a way that permits dynamic remapping to the physical processors of a particular parallel computer. This facilitates load balancing, grid nesting, and coupling with graphical systems and other models.

  18. Penn State geoPebble system: Design,Implementation, and Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, J. V.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Bilen, S. G.; Fleishman, A.; Burkett, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Penn State geoPebble system is a new network of wirelessly interconnected seismic and GPS sensor nodes with flexible architecture. This network will be used for studies of ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland, as well as to investigate mountain glaciers. The network will consist of ˜150 geoPebbles that can be deployed in a user-defined spatial geometry. We present our design methodology, which has enabled us to develop these state-of- the art sensors using commercial-off-the-shelf hardware combined with custom-designed hardware and software. Each geoPebble is a self- contained, wirelessly connected sensor for collecting seismic measurements and position information. Key elements of each node encompasses a three-component seismic recorder, which includes an amplifier, filter, and 24- bit analog-to-digital converter that can sample up to 10 kHz. Each unit also includes a microphone channel to record the ground-coupled airwave. The timing for each node is available from GPS measurements and a local precision oscillator that is conditioned by the GPS timing pulses. In addition, we record the carrier-phase measurement of the L1 GPS signal in order to determine location at sub-decimeter accuracy (relative to other geoPebbles within a few kilometers radius). Each geoPebble includes 16 GB of solid-state storage, wireless communications capability to a central supervisory unit, and auxiliary measurements capability (including tilt from accelerometers, absolute orientation from magnetometers and temperature). A novel aspect of the geoPebble is a wireless charging system for the internal battery (using inductive coupling techniques). The geoPebbles include all the sensors (geophones, GPS, microphone), communications (WiFi), and power (battery and charging) internally, so the geoPebble system can operate without any cabling connections (though we do provide an external connector so that different geophones can be used). We report initial field-deployment results and

  19. 77 FR 44310 - Penn-Ohio Transportation, LLC-Acquisition Exemption-Eastern States Railroad, LLC and Columbiana...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ..., LLC and Columbiana County Port Authority Penn-Ohio Transportation, LLC (Penn-Ohio), a noncarrier, has... Columbiana County Port Authority (CCPA); (2) receive permanent assignment of ESR's and CCPA's agreements...

  20. Brown dwarf candidates from the PennState-Toruń Planet Search with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, A.; Wolszczan, A.; Adamów, M.; Nowak, G.; Deka, B.; Górecka, M.; Kowalik, K.

    We present preliminary results of a brown dwarf (BD) detection in a ˜1000 star sample monitored with the ongoing PennState-Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search. Contrary to most other projects, our sample contains a substantial fraction of evolved stars ranging from sub-giants up to bright giants, allowing us to study companions to stars more massive than ˜1.5 M⊙. For Main Sequence stars, this limit is set by effective temperature and rotation velocity. Our relatively long list of about a dozen candidates suggests that the BD frequency may rise with stellar mass as it does in the case of planets \\citep{lm2007}.

  1. Sea-Level Static Testing of the Penn State Two-Dimensional Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, J. M.; Marshall, W. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Twin thruster tests have been conducted with the Penn State RBCC test article operating at sea- level static conditions. Significant differences were observed in the performance characteristics for two different thruster centerline spacings. Changing the thruster spacing from 2.50 to 1.75 in. reduced the entrained air velocity (-17%) and the thrust (-7%) for tests at a thruster chamber pressure of 200 psia and MR = 8. In addition, significant differences were seen in the static pressure profiles, the Raman spectroscopy profiles, and the acoustic power spectrum for these two configurations.

  2. The Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, A.; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B.; Adamczyk, M.; Adamów, M.; Nowak, G.; Wolszczan, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We present the complete spectroscopic analysis of 455 stars observed within the Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search (PTPS) with the High Resolution Spectrograph of the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. We also present the total sample of 744 evolved stars of the PTPS and discuss masses of stellar hosts in our and other surveys devoted to evolved planetary systems. Methods: Stellar atmospheric parameters were determined through a strictly spectroscopic LTE analysis of equivalent widths of Fe I and Fe II lines. Rotational velocities were obtained from fitting synthetic spectra. Radial velocities were obtained from fitting a Gaussian function to the cross-correlation function. We determined stellar masses, ages, and luminosities with a Bayesian analysis of theoretical isochrones. The radii were calculated either from derived masses and log g or from Teff and luminosities. Results: We present basic atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, vt and [Fe/H]), rotation velocities, and absolute radial velocities as well as luminosities, masses, ages and radii for 402 stars (including 11 single-line spectroscopic binaries) that are mostly subgiants and giants. For 272 of them we present parameters for the first time. For another 53 stars we present estimates of Teff and log g based on photometric calibrations. More than half of the objects were found to be subgiants, but there is also a large group of giants, and a few stars appear to be dwarfs. The results show that the sample is composed of stars with masses ranging from 0.52 to 3.21 M⊙, 17 of which have masses ≥2.0 M⊙. The stellar radii range from 0.66 to 36.04 R⊙, with the vast majority having radii between 2.0 and 4.0 R⊙. They are generally less metal abundant than the Sun with a median [ Fe/H ] = -0.07. For 62 stars that we have in common with other planet searches, the stellar atmospheric parameters we found agree very well. We also present basic properties of the complete list of 744 stars

  3. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Tom Steitz

    2002-07-12

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives.

  4. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke; Joseph J. Battista

    2001-03-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute and the Office of Physical Plant, Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc., and Cofiring Alternatives.

  5. The Influence of Device Position on the Flow within the Penn State 12 cc Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Schönberger, Markus; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B.

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices are a commonly used heart failure therapy for adult patients as bridge-to-transplant or bridge-to-recovery tool. The application of adult ventricular assist devices in pediatric patients has led to increased thrombotic events. Therefore, we have been developing a pediatric ventricular assist device, the Penn State 12 cc PVAD. It is designed for patients with a body weight of 5 to 15 kg and has a stroke volume of 12 cc. Clot formation is the major concern. It is correlated to the coagulability of blood, the blood contacting materials and the fluid dynamics within the system. The intent is for the PVAD to be a long term therapy. Therefore, the system may be oriented in different positions according to the patient’s behavior. This study evaluates for the first time the impact of position on the flow patterns within the Penn State 12 cc PVAD, which may help to improve the PVAD design concerning chamber and ports geometries. The fluid dynamics are visualized by particle image velocimetry. The evaluation is based on inlet jet behavior and calculated wall shear rates. Vertical and horizontal model orientations are compared, both with a beat rate of 75, outlet pressures of 90/60 mmHg and a flow rate of 1.3 l/min. The results show a significant change of the inlet jet behavior and the development of a rotational flow pattern. Vertically, the inlet jet is strong along the wall. It initiates a rotational flow pattern with a wandering axis of rotation. In contrast, the horizontal model orientation results show a weaker inlet jet along the wall with a nearly constant center of rotation location, which can be correlated to a higher risk of thrombotic events. In addition high speed videography illustrates differences in the diaphragm motion during diastole. Diaphragm opening trajectories measurements determine no significant impact of the density of the blood analog fluids. Hence, the results correlate to human blood. PMID:22929894

  6. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Curtis Jawdy

    2000-10-09

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal or coal refuse, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute and the Office of Physical Plant, Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, and Cofiring Alternatives. The major emphasis of work during this reporting period was to assess the types and quantities of potential feedstocks and collect samples of them for analysis. Approximately twenty different biomass, animal waste, and other wastes were collected and analyzed.

  7. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke

    2001-07-13

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences, Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc., Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc., and Cofiring Alternatives. During this reporting period, work focused on completing the biofuel characterization and the design of the conceptual fluidized bed system.

  8. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits

    2001-01-18

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives. During this reporting period, work focused on performing the design of the conceptual fluidized bed system and determining the system economics.

  9. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke

    2001-10-12

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels.

  10. Psychometric characteristics of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire in an Argentinean sample: a cross-cultural contribution.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Biglieri, Ricardo; Vetere, Giselle Lorena

    2011-05-01

    Although studies in several populations have provided support for Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSQW) reliability and validity, factor analysis studies carried out on different populations show divergent results. The aim of this article is to contribute with the cross-cultural literature on PSWQ. This report describes two studies examining the psychometric characteristics of a revised Argentinean version of the PSWQ. In the first study, items of original PSWQ were translated into Spanish and then back-translated into English. Then, in order to examine its reliability and factorial structure, the instrument was completed by 400 community participants. The second study included two groups of participants as follows: patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and patients with other anxiety disorders (AC). Results revealed appropriated test-retest reliability over a four-week period, high internal consistency, and good convergent and discriminant validity for PSWQ. In concordance with some results reported in previous studies, a single factorial structure was confirmed for the Argentinean version of PSWQ. By the other hand, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was made to evaluate the ability of PSWQ to discriminate GAD from individuals with others anxiety disorders. A total score of 63 simultaneously optimized sensitivity and specificity in discriminating GAD patients from patients with others anxiety disorders.

  11. Some considerations in low-cost image processing on a university main frame: The Penn State (ORSER) experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The ORSER System as implemented on the Penn State University Computation Center's IBM main frame is an exceptionally useful mechanism for instructing the present and future remote sensing community in the theory and practice of automated analysis of digitized data. From its beginning, the system was used as the hands-on back-bone of a graduate level "Multispectral Remote Sensing" one-term course taught annually in the School of Forest Resources. It was also used at the end of a senior-level undergraduate "Introduction to Remote Sensing" course, and in teaching a variety of short courses, ranging in length from a few days for small groups of remote sensing consultants with specific application interests, to a 2-week course oganized by NASA for regional and urban planners who had little or no previous exposure to remote sensing. Because of its modular construction, the ORSER is suitable for all classes of remote sensing users. Although in a beginning course only 6 to 10 of the programs are generally used, the researcher has a set of about 35 programs available for his analyses.

  12. Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Bypass Circuits: A Review of Studies Conducted at the Penn State Pediatric Cardiac Research Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Akemi; Lu, Chiajung Karen; Wang, Shigang; Umstead, Todd M.; Freeman, Willard M.; Vrana, Kent; Yang, Sung; Myers, John L.; Phelps, David S.; Zahn, Jeffrey D.; Ündar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuits are frequently necessary in the repair of congenital heart defects in infants and children. Although advances in technology and operative technique have decreased the mortality associated with cardiac procedures requiring CPB, post-operative neuro-cognitive outcome and the role of the CPB circuit in post-operative morbidity remains a significant concern. There are several factors that have been suggested to play a significant role in general post-operative outcome, including intraoperative inflammatory responses caused by the interaction of blood with circuit component surfaces, selection of appropriate perfusion mode to optimize organ function during CPB, and the introduction of gaseous microemboli into the patient’s systemic circulation through circuit manipulations and modifications. These factors are the subject of continuing research at the Penn State Hershey Children’s Hospital Pediatric Cardiac Research Laboratories, and this review will focus on the results of studies aimed at identifying circuit elements that affect the delivery of gaseous microemboli to the patient during CPB procedures, the role of anti-factor D monoclonal antibody in reducing systemic inflammation during CPB, and the results of preliminary plasma proteomics studies conducted on infants undergoing CPB. PMID:19361042

  13. A Model for Creating Engaged Land-Grant Universities: Penn State's Engagement Ladder Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Keith R.; Webster, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    The original mission of the state and land-grant university was to engage with communities to solve problems and improve the quality of life for the citizenry. Today most state and land-grant universities have moved far away from their original mission and are struggling to become engaged with the communities they serve. In this case study, we…

  14. Penn State/OCYF Day Care Project: Final Report of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontos, Susan; Fiene, Richard

    In Pennsylvania compliance with state health and safety regulations for day care center licensing is monitored by administering the Child Development Program Evaluation (CDPE). This pilot study attempted to discover key indicators of day care center quality other than those measured on the CDPE and also to find out about the relationships between…

  15. The Penn State ORSER system for processing and analyzing ERTS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Borden, F. Y.; Weeden, H. A.; Petersen, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    The Office for Remote Sensing of Earth Resources (ORSER) of the Space Science and Engineering Laboratory (SSEL) at The Pennsylvania State University has developed an extensive operational system for processing and analyzing ERTS-1 and similar multispectral data. Specific results obtained by using this system include a study of land use, discrimination between types of forest resources and vegetation, detection of previously unknown geologic faults and correlation of these with known mineral deposits and ground water, mapping of mine spoils in the anthracite region of eastern Pennsylvania, mapping of strip mines and acid mine drainage in Central Pennsylvania, agricultural land use mapping, and detection of gypsy moth infestation.

  16. A brief history of graduate distance education in nuclear engineering at Penn State Univ

    SciTech Connect

    Hochreiter, L. E.; Zimmerman, D. L.; Brenizer Jr, J. S.; Stark, M. A.

    2006-07-01

    The Pennsylvania State University Nuclear Engineering Distance Education Program has a twenty year history of providing graduate level distance education in Nuclear Engineering. The Distance Education Program was initiated as a specific program which was developed for the Westinghouse Energy Systems Divisions in Pittsburgh. In 1983, Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU) decided to terminate its small Nuclear Engineering Program. Up until that time, Westinghouse employees could enroll at CMU for graduate classes in Nuclear Engineering as well as other engineering disciplines and could obtain a masters degree or if desired, could continue for a Ph.D. degree. (authors)

  17. The Penn State ORSER system for processing and analyzing ERTS and other MSS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Borden, F. Y.; Weeden, H. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The office for Remote Sensing of Earth Resources (ORSER) of the Space Science and Engineering Laboratory at the Pennsylvania State University has developed an extensive operational system for processing and analyzing ERTS-1 and similar multispectral data. The ORSER system was developed for use by a wide variety of researchers working in remote sensing. Both photointerpretive techniques and automatic computer processing methods have been developed and used, separately and in a combined approach. A remote Job Entry system permits use of an IBM 370/168 computer from any compatible remote terminal, including equipment tied in by long distance telephone connections. An elementary cost analysis has been prepared for the processing of ERTS data.

  18. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; Rhett McLaren; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Tom Steitz; Joseph J. Battista

    2003-03-26

    The Pennsylvania State University, utilizing funds furnished by the U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Power Program, investigated the installation of a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The study was performed using a team that included personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives. The activities included assessing potential feedstocks at the University Park campus and surrounding region with an emphasis on biomass materials, collecting and analyzing potential feedstocks, assessing agglomeration, deposition, and corrosion tendencies, identifying the optimum location for the boiler system through an internal site selection process, performing a three circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler design and a 15-year boiler plant transition plan, determining the costs associated with installing the boiler system, developing a preliminary test program, determining the associated costs for the test program, and exploring potential emissions credits when using the biomass CFB boiler.

  19. Abnormal Baseline Brain Activity in Patients with Pulsatile Tinnitus: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lv; Zhaohui, Liu; Fei, Yan; Ting, Li; Pengfei, Zhao; Wang, Du; Cheng, Dong; Pengde, Guo; Xiaoyi, Han; Xiao, Wang; Rui, Li; Zhenchang, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Numerous investigations studying the brain functional activity of the tinnitus patients have indicated that neurological changes are important findings of this kind of disease. However, the pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients were excluded in previous studies because of the totally different mechanisms of the two subtype tinnitus. The aim of this study is to investigate whether altered baseline brain activity presents in patients with PT using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) technique. The present study used unilateral PT patients (n = 42) and age-, sex-, and education-matched normal control subjects (n = 42) to investigate the changes in structural and amplitude of low-frequency (ALFF) of the brain. Also, we analyzed the relationships between these changes with clinical data of the PT patients. Compared with normal controls, PT patients did not show any structural changes. PT patients showed significant increased ALFF in the bilateral precuneus, and bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and decreased ALFF in multiple occipital areas. Moreover, the increased THI score and PT duration was correlated with increased ALFF in precuneus and bilateral IFG. The abnormalities of spontaneous brain activity reflected by ALFF measurements in the absence of structural changes may provide insights into the neural reorganization in PT patients. PMID:24872895

  20. Actions of NPY, and its Y1 and Y2 receptors on pulsatile growth hormone secretion during the fed and fasted state.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lili; Tan, Hwee Y; Fogarty, Matthew J; Andrews, Zane B; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Herzog, Herbert; Steyn, Frederik J; Chen, Chen

    2014-12-01

    The hypothalamic NPY system plays an important role in regulating food intake and energy expenditure. Different biological actions of NPY are assigned to NPY receptor subtypes. Recent studies demonstrated a close relationship between food intake and growth hormone (GH) secretion; however, the mechanism through which endogenous NPY modulates GH release remains unknown. Moreover, conclusive evidence demonstrating a role for NPY and Y-receptors in regulating the endogenous pulsatile release of GH does not exist. We used genetically modified mice (germline Npy, Y1, and Y2 receptor knock-out mice) to assess pulsatile GH secretion under both fed and fasting conditions. Deletion of NPY did not impact fed GH release; however, it reversed the fasting-induced suppression of pulsatile GH secretion. The recovery of GH secretion was associated with a reduction in hypothalamic somatotropin release inhibiting factor (Srif; somatostatin) mRNA expression. Moreover, observations revealed a differential role for Y1 and Y2 receptors, wherein the postsynaptic Y1 receptor suppresses GH secretion in fasting. In contrast, the presynaptic Y2 receptor maintains normal GH output under long-term ad libitum-fed conditions. These data demonstrate an integrated neural circuit that modulates GH release relative to food intake, and provide essential information to address the differential roles of Y1 and Y2 receptors in regulating the release of GH under fed and fasting states.

  1. Development of a Comprehensive Recruitment Program Targeted at the Penn State Student Market. AIR Forum 1979 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Louis M.; McCallus, Joseph L.

    A time sequence of recruitment activities was developed using high school data to represent the total, potential, and actual student markets for Pennsylvania State University. High schools with similar characteristics were grouped according to potential recruitment yields. Under the assumption that college decision-making behavior approximated the…

  2. The Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search stars (Corrigendum). III. The sample of evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, A.; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B.; Adamczyk, M.; Adamów, M.; Nowak, G.; Wolszczan, A.

    2016-05-01

    Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  3. Thermal hydraulic analysis of two-phase closed thermosyphon cooling system for new cold neutron source moderator of Breazeale research reactor at Penn State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habte, Melaku

    A cold neutron source cooling system is required for the Penn State's next generation cold neutron source facility that can accommodate a variable heat load up to about ˜10W with operating temperature of about 28K. An existing cold neutron source cooling system operating at the University of Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) facility failed to accommodate heat loads upwards of 4W with the moderator temperature reaching a maximum of 44K, which is the critical temperature for the operating fluid neon. The cooling system that was used in the TCNS cooling system was a two-phase closed thermosyphon with a reservoir (TPCTR). The reservoir containing neon gas is kept at room temperature. In this study a detailed thermal analysis of the fundamental operating principles of a TPCTR were carried out. A detailed parametric study of the various geometric and thermo-physical factors that affect the limits of the operational capacity of the TPCTR investigated. A CFD analysis is carried out in order to further refine the heat transfer analysis and understand the flow structure inside the thermosyphon and the two-phase nucleate boiling in the evaporator section of the thermosyphon. In order to help the new design, a variety of ways of increasing the operating range and heat removal capacity of the TPCTR cooling system were analyzed so that it can accommodate the anticipated heat load of 10W or more. It is found, for example, that doubling the pressure of the system will increase the capacity index zeta by 50% for a system with an initial fill ratio FR of 1. A decrease in cryorefrigeration performance angle increases the capacity index. For example taking the current condition of the TCNS system and reducing the angle from the current value of ˜700 by half (˜350) will increase the cooling power 300%. Finally based on detailed analytic and CFD analysis the best operating condition were proposed.

  4. Objective pulsatile tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Yacovino, Dario A; Casas, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Tinnitus is the usually unwanted perception of sound, in most cases there is no genuine physical source of sound. Less than 10% of tinnitus patients suffer from pulsatile tinnitus. Objective Pulsatile tinnitus can also be the first indication of dural arteriovenous fistula, so examination for such vascular origin must be performed. PMID:26733223

  5. Objective pulsatile tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Yacovino, Dario A; Casas, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Tinnitus is the usually unwanted perception of sound, in most cases there is no genuine physical source of sound. Less than 10% of tinnitus patients suffer from pulsatile tinnitus. Objective Pulsatile tinnitus can also be the first indication of dural arteriovenous fistula, so examination for such vascular origin must be performed.

  6. The Center for Environmental Kinetics Analysis: an NSF- and DOE-funded Environmental Molecular Science Institute (EMSI) at Penn State

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Brantley; William D. Burgos; Brian A. Dempsey; Peter J. Heaney; James D. Kubicki; Peter C. Lichtner; Bruce E. Logan; Carmen E. Martinez; Karl T. Mueller; Kwadwo A. Osseo-Asare; Ming Tien; Carl I. Steefel, Glenn A. Waychunas; and John M. Zachara

    2007-04-19

    Physicochemical and microbiological processes taking place at environmental interfaces influence natural processes as well as the transport and fate of environmental contaminants, the remediation of toxic chemicals, and the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. A team of scientists and engineers has been assembled to develop and apply new experimental and computational techniques to expand our knowledge of environmental kinetics. We are also training a cohort of talented and diverse students to work on these complex problems at multiple length scales and to compile and synthesize the kinetic data. Development of the human resources capable of translating molecular-scale information into parameters that are applicable in real world, field-scale problems of environmental kinetics is a major and relatively unique objective of the Institute's efforts. The EMSI team is a partnership among 10 faculty at The Pennsylvania State University (funded by the National Science Foundation Divisions of Chemistry and Earth Sciences), one faculty member at Juniata College, one faculty member at the University of Florida, and four researchers drawn from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (funded by the Department of Energy Division of Environmental Remediation Sciences). Interactions among the applied and academic scientists drives research approaches aimed toward solving important problems of national interest. The Institute is organized into three interest groups (IGs) focusing on the processes of dissolution (DIG), precipitation (PIG), and microbial reactions at surfaces (BIG). Some of the research activity from each IG is highlighted to the right. The IGs interact with each other as each interest group studies reactions across the molecular, microscopic, mesoscopic and, in most cases, field scales. For example, abiotic dissolution and precipitation reactions of Fe oxides as studied in the Dissolution IG

  7. Femoral bone structural geometry adapts to mechanical loading and is influenced by sex steroids: the Penn State Young Women's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Petit, Moira A; Beck, Thomas J; Lin, Hung-Mo; Bentley, Christy; Legro, Richard S; Lloyd, Tom

    2004-09-01

    We used 10 years of longitudinal data from Penn State Young Women's Health Study to explore predictors of adult bone structural geometry and strength. One hundred twelve participants were enrolled in the study at age 12. We report findings on the 76 participants who remained in the study for 10 years. Measurements were recorded biannually for the first 4 years and annually thereafter. Proximal femur DXA scans (Hologic QDR 2000) were taken from 17-22 years and analyzed using a hip structure analysis program to assess areal bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm2), subperiosteal width, cortical thickness, bone cross-sectional area (CSA), and section modulus (Z) at the narrow neck and femoral shaft. Total body lean mass (g) was measured with DXA total body scans. Nutrition, anthropometry, and sex steroids [testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2)] were measured from ages 12-22 years. Multiple regression models were used to assess predictors of change in bone variables (17-22 years) and absolute bone values (average of age 21 and 22 years, n = 79). Neck Z (+3.1%) and width (+1.3%), but not BMD (-0.8%), increased significantly from age 17 to 22 years. At the shaft, all variables increased (+1.0-4.0%, P < 0.01). After controlling for baseline (age 17) height, weight and bone measurement, weight change (neck) or lean mass (shaft), and age of menarche were the primary predictors of change in bone strength. After controlling for height and weight, only lean mass predicted absolute young adult Z at both the neck (r2 = 0.48, P < 0.01) and the shaft (r2 = 0.67, P < 0.01). When lean mass was removed from the model, sports exercise score replaced lean mass as a predictor of Z at both neck (r2 = 0.40, P < 0.01) and shaft (r2 = 0.60, P < 0.01) sites. For neck and shaft cortical thickness and BMD, both estradiol and sports score/lean mass were positive predictors (r2 = 0.15-0.40, P < 0.01). For neck bone width, testosterone levels (negative) and lean mass (positive) were significant (r2 = 0

  8. The Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search stars. II. Lithium abundance analysis of the red giant clump sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamów, M.; Niedzielski, A.; Villaver, E.; Wolszczan, A.; Nowak, G.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Standard stellar evolution theory does not predict existence of Li-rich giant stars. Several mechanisms for Li-enrichment have been proposed to operate at certain locations inside some stars. The actual mechanism operating in real stars is still unknown. Aims: Using the sample of 348 stars from the Penn State - Toruń Centre for Astronomy Planet Search, for which uniformly determined atmospheric parameters are available, with chemical abundances and rotational velocities presented here, we investigate various channels of Li enrichment in giants. We also study Li-overabundant giants in more detail in search for origin of their peculiarities. Methods: Our work is based on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope spectra obtained with the High Resolution Spectrograph, which we use for determination of abundances and rotational velocities. The Li abundance was determined from the 7Li λ670.8 nm line, while we use a more extended set of lines for α-elements abundances. In a series of Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, we compare Li-overabundant giants with other stars in the sample. We also use available IR photometric and kinematical data in search for evidence of mass-loss. We investigate properties of the most Li-abundant giants in more detail by using multi-epoch precise radial velocities. Results: We present Li and α-elements abundances, as well as rotational velocities for 348 stars. We detected Li in 92 stars, of which 82 are giants. Eleven of them show significant Li abundance A(Li)NLTE> 1.4 and seven of them are Li-overabundant objects, according to common criterion of A(Li) > 1.5 and their location on HR diagram, including TYC 0684-00553-1 and TYC 3105-00152-1, which are two giants with Li abundances close to meteoritic level. For another 271 stars, upper limits of Li abundance are presented. We confirmed three objects with increased stellar rotation. We show that Li-overabundant giants are among the most massive stars from our sample and show larger than average

  9. Modeling and design of a new core-moderator assembly and neutron beam ports for the Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucar, Dundar

    This study is for modeling and designing a new reactor core-moderator assembly and new neutron beam ports that aimed to expand utilization of a new beam hall of the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). The PSBR is a part of the Radiation Science and Engineering Facility (RSEC) and is a TRIGA MARK III type research reactor with a movable core placed in a large pool and is capable to produce 1MW output. This reactor is a pool-type reactor with pulsing capability up to 2000 MW for 10-20 msec. There are seven beam ports currently installed to the reactor. The PSBR's existing core design limits the experimental capability of the facility, as only two of the seven available neutron beam ports are usable. The finalized design features an optimized result in light of the data obtained from neutronic and thermal-hydraulics analyses as well as geometrical constraints. A new core-moderator assembly was introduced to overcome the limitations of the existing PSBR design, specifically maximizing number of available neutron beam ports and mitigating the hydrogen gamma contamination of the neutron beam channeled in the beam ports. A crescent-shaped moderator is favored in the new PSBR design since it enables simultaneous use of five new neutron beam ports in the facility. Furthermore, the crescent shape sanctions a coupling of the core and moderator, which reduces the hydrogen gamma contamination significantly in the new beam ports. A coupled MURE and MCNP5 code optimization analysis was performed to calculate the optimum design parameters for the new PSBR. Thermal-hydraulics analysis of the new design was achieved using ANSYS Fluent CFD code. In the current form, the PSBR is cooled by natural convection of the pool water. The driving force for the natural circulation of the fluid is the heat generation within the fuel rods. The convective heat data was generated at the reactor's different operating powers by using TRIGSIMS, the fuel management code of the PSBR core. In the CFD

  10. 4. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, Altoona, Pennsylvania) ADVERTISEMENT TO SELL STOCK IN PENN ALTO HOTEL - Penn Alto Hotel, 1120-1130 Thirteenth Avenue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  11. 3. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. photocopy of an advertisement (from Penn Alto Hotel archives, Altoona, Pennsylvania) ADVERTISEMENT TO SELL STOCK IN PENN ALTO HOTEL - Penn Alto Hotel, 1120-1130 Thirteenth Avenue, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  12. A TRIBUTE TO DR. WILLIAM PENN WATKINSON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. William Penn Watkinson (known to colleagues as "Penn") of EPA¿s health research lab (National Health and Environmental Research Laboratory) of Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, died Wednesday, December 13 after a battle with lung cancer. He was a member of the Pulmonar...

  13. Public Health Potential of Farmers’ Markets on Medical Center Campuses: A Case Study From Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.

    2011-01-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers’ markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces. PMID:22021298

  14. Public health potential of farmers' markets on medical center campuses: a case study from Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel R; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Rovniak, Liza S

    2011-12-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers' markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces.

  15. 77 FR 12905 - Land Release for Penn Yan Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Land Release for Penn Yan Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... requesting public comment on the Penn Yan Airport (PEO), Penn Yan, New York, Notice of Proposed Release from Aeronautical Use of approximately 10.00 +/- acres of airport property, to allow for...

  16. 78 FR 53184 - Land Release for Penn Yan Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Land Release for Penn Yan Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... requesting public comment on the Penn Yan Airport (PEO), Penn Yan, New York, Notice of Proposed Release from Aeronautical Use of approximately 0.069 +/- acres of airport property, to allow for...

  17. The Pennsylvania State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlingame, Philip J.; Dowhower, Andrea L.

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1855 as the Farmer's High School, the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) began as a small college in Centre County providing agricultural education to young men from regional farm families. Penn State became a land-grant university in 1863 following passage of the Morrill Act. Today, Penn State enrolls more than 83,000 students…

  18. Pulsatile LHRH therapy in patients with oligozoospermia and disturbed LH pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Aulitzky, W; Frick, J; Hadziselimovic, F

    1989-08-01

    Pulsatile administration of LHRH can drive the pituitary to secrete LH and FSH in a pattern that closely mimics the physiological pattern of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. As there is evidence that infertility in some men is due to dysfunction of this axis, 14 men with reported infertility of more than 2 years duration were treated by long-term pulsatile LHRH therapy. They were 24-42 years of age, with variable degrees of oligozoospermia, elevated FSH levels but normal LH and testosterone levels. The number of endogenous LH pulses/24 h was less than eight in all 14 subjects. The degree of testicular damage was assessed semi-thin sections prepared from biopsies of both testes. Scores for spermatogonia per seminiferous tubule (SPT) were calculated from the actual number of Ad-spermatogonia/tubule. Patients were grouped according to sperm density and SPT score (groups I-III). Pulsatile LHRH therapy was administered by means of a portable infusion pump; 4 micrograms LHRH were administered subcutaneously every 120 min for a period of 6 months. This treatment restored the normal pattern of LH secretion to 12 LH pulses/24 h in all patients. A statistically significant decrease of mean FSH levels to normal, and an increase of mean LH levels was observed in most of the 14 patients. Testosterone values did not change in any group. Marked improvement of the sperm count was observed in eight out of 14 patients (groups I and II) and three pregnancies were reported during the treatment periods. These results suggest that some states of male infertility are due to hormonal dysregulation and that these patients may benefit from pulsatile LHRH therapy.

  19. The Use of Fluid Mechanics to Predict Regions of Microscopic Thrombus Formation in Pulsatile VADs.

    PubMed

    Topper, Stephen R; Navitsky, Michael A; Medvitz, Richard B; Paterson, Eric G; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Slattery, Margaret J; Deutsch, Steven; Rosenberg, Gerson; Manning, Keefe B

    2014-03-01

    We compare the velocity and shear obtained from particle image velocimetry (PIV) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in a pulsatile ventricular assist device (VAD) to further test our thrombus predictive methodology using microscopy data from an explanted VAD. To mimic physiological conditions in vitro, a mock circulatory loop is used with a blood analog that matched blood's viscoelastic behavior at 40% hematocrit. Under normal physiologic pressures and for a heart rate of 75 bpm, PIV data is acquired and wall shear maps are produced. The resolution of the PIV shear rate calculations are tested using the CFD and found to be in the same range. A bovine study, using a model of the 50 cc Penn State V-2 VAD, for 30 days at a constant beat rate of 75 beats per minute (bpm) provides the microscopic data whereby after the 30 days, the device is explanted and the sac surface analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and, after immunofluorescent labeling for platelets and fibrin, confocal microscopy. Areas are examined based on PIV measurements and CFD, with special attention to low shear regions where platelet and fibrin deposition are most likely to occur. Data collected within the outlet port in a direction normal to the front wall of the VAD shows that some regions experience wall shear rates less than 500 s(-1), which increases the likelihood of platelet and fibrin deposition. Despite only one animal study, correlations between PIV, CFD, and in vivo data show promise. Deposition probability is quantified by the thrombus susceptibility potential, a calculation to correlate low shear and time of shear with deposition.

  20. Penn Macy Initiative To Advance Academic Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Norma M.; Evans, Lois K.; Swan, Beth Ann

    2002-01-01

    The Penn School of Nursing and the Macy Foundation established a comprehensive institute and technical assistance program to help nursing schools advance academic nursing practice. The Penn School consulted with 21 participating schools, providing institutes, conferences, a listserv and a web-based knowledge center focused on integrating research,…

  1. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  2. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  3. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  4. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  5. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  6. Gosling's Doppler pulsatility index revisited.

    PubMed

    Michel, E; Zernikow, B

    1998-05-01

    In Doppler sonography, the physiological meaning of Gosling's pulsatility index (PI) as a measure of downstream resistance is still under dispute. We deliver the theoretical derivation of its physiological significance. We present a mathematical model based on the linked theories of critical closing pressure (CCP) and cerebrovascular impedance, verified in preterm neonates. Mathematical transformation results in a series of equations interrelating several physiological parameters. Instead of indicating cerebrovascular resistance, PI is linked to the ratio of cerebrovascular impedances at the heart rate and at zero frequency. Next to arterial blood pressure, CCP is the principal determinant of PI. PI is identical to the ratio of the alternate and the direct component of the effective driving force. Thus, PI has no distinctive physiological meaning by itself. At present, our model is confined to physiological conditions where the lowest velocity is the end diastolic, and always more than zero.

  7. Use of a novel diagonal pump in an in vitro neonatal pulsatile extracorporeal life support circuit.

    PubMed

    Evenson, Alissa; Wang, Shigang; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2014-01-01

    One approach with the potential to improve morbidity and mortality rates following extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is the use of pulsatile perfusion. Currently, no ECLS pumps used in the United States can produce pulsatile flow. The objective of this experiment is to evaluate a novel diagonal pump used in Europe to determine whether it provides physiological pulsatility in a neonatal model. The ECLS circuit consisted of a Medos Deltastream DP3 diagonal pump, a Hilite 800LT polymethylpentene diffusion membrane oxygenator, and arterial/venous tubing. A 300-mL pseudopatient was connected to the circuit using an 8Fr arterial cannula and a 10Fr venous cannula. A clamp maintained constant pressure entering the pseudopatient. Trials (64 total) were conducted in nonpulsatile and pulsatile modes at flow rates of 200 mL/min to 800 mL/min. Flow and pressure data were collected using a custom-based data acquisition system. The Deltastream DP3 pump was capable of producing an adequate quality of pulsatility. Pulsatile flow produced increased mean arterial pressure, energy equivalent pressure (EEP), and surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE) at all flow rates compared to nonpulsatile flow. Pressure drop across the cannula accounted for the majority of pressure loss in the circuit. The greatest loss of SHE and total hemodynamic energy occurred across the arterial cannula due to its small diameter. The Deltastream DP3 pump produced physiological pulsatile flow without backflow while providing EEP and SHE to our neonatal pseudopatient. Further experiments are necessary to determine the impact of this pulsatile pump in an in vivo model prior to clinical use.

  8. Pulsatile blood flow, shear force, energy dissipation and Murray's Law

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Page R; Edén, Patrik; Bengtsson, Hans-Uno

    2006-01-01

    Background Murray's Law states that, when a parent blood vessel branches into daughter vessels, the cube of the radius of the parent vessel is equal to the sum of the cubes of the radii of daughter blood vessels. Murray derived this law by defining a cost function that is the sum of the energy cost of the blood in a vessel and the energy cost of pumping blood through the vessel. The cost is minimized when vessel radii are consistent with Murray's Law. This law has also been derived from the hypothesis that the shear force of moving blood on the inner walls of vessels is constant throughout the vascular system. However, this derivation, like Murray's earlier derivation, is based on the assumption of constant blood flow. Methods To determine the implications of the constant shear force hypothesis and to extend Murray's energy cost minimization to the pulsatile arterial system, a model of pulsatile flow in an elastic tube is analyzed. A new and exact solution for flow velocity, blood flow rate and shear force is derived. Results For medium and small arteries with pulsatile flow, Murray's energy minimization leads to Murray's Law. Furthermore, the hypothesis that the maximum shear force during the cycle of pulsatile flow is constant throughout the arterial system implies that Murray's Law is approximately true. The approximation is good for all but the largest vessels (aorta and its major branches) of the arterial system. Conclusion A cellular mechanism that senses shear force at the inner wall of a blood vessel and triggers remodeling that increases the circumference of the wall when a shear force threshold is exceeded would result in the observed scaling of vessel radii described by Murray's Law. PMID:16923189

  9. Pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy for ovulatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Santoro, N; Elzahr, D

    1993-09-01

    Pulsatile GnRH remains a physiologic method of inducing ovulation that is effective and safer than other parenteral preparations. Its lower rate of acceptance in the United States stands in curious contrast to its widespread usage in other countries as a second-line (postclomiphene) technique of choice for ovulation induction. In a high-technology era such as ours, women who may benefit from pulsatile GnRH therapy should not be forgotten. By far the most favorable results are obtained in women with primary or secondary hypothalamic amenorrhea. In such women, pregnancy rates appear comparable to those achieved with exogenous gonadotropins with a much lower risk of multiple pregnancy and ovarian hyperstimulation. These positive aspects, combined with the decreased need for clinical monitoring and the increased sense of control imparted to the patient, lead to the conclusion that women with uncomplicated hypothalamic-pituitary disorders are the ideal patient group to consider for therapy. The application of pulsatile GnRH therapy to other groups of women relies on limited data. By all means, women with polycystic ovarian syndrome who have not ovulated or conceived after other forms of treatment should be considered because reasonable pregnancy salvage can be obtained. We have noted a first-cycle successful pregnancy after failure of exogenous gonadotropins, with or without a superimposed GnRH agonist, and even in vitro fertilization with multiple embryo transfers. Before such invasive, high-technology procedures are entertained, it would appear prudent to consider this simple alternative in women with an overactive hypothalamic-pituitary axis, as seen in polycystic ovarian syndrome. Other ovulatory defects also may be amenable to treatment with pulsatile GnRH, but their practical usefulness will await further clinical study.

  10. Study on the effect of steady, simple pulsatile and physiological pulsatile flows through a stenosed artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, P.; Mandal, D. K.; Manna, N. K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-10-01

    In the present paper, the comparison of steady, simple pulsatile flow and physiological pulsatile flow on flow reversal zone and hemodynamic wall parameters [wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI)] for the progression of the disease, atherosclerosis has been investigated numerically. The governing equations have been solved by finite volume method. For the numerical analysis, Womersley number, Reynolds number and percentage of restriction are taken as 10, 100 and 50 % respectively. From this study it is revealed that the separated flow from the stenosis strongly depends on inlet flow situations, the maximum chance of deposition of plaque material due to streamline contour is higher at time step t* = 0.75 for simple pulsatile flow and at time step t* = 0 for physiological pulsatile flow and this chance is lower in case of steady flow. The effect of WSS on the disease is higher in physiological pulsatile flow compared to steady as well as simple pulsatile flow. The maximum possibility of initiation as well as progression for atherosclerosis in arterial wall due to high WSS takes place at t* = 0.25 for physiological pulsatile flow. OSI indicates same length of separation for two cases of transient flow, but the rate of cyclic departure of WSS is higher in case of physiological pulsatile flow.

  11. 77 FR 35850 - Safety Zone; F/V Deep Sea, Penn Cove, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... the Fishing Vessel (F/V) Deep Sea, located in Penn Cove, WA. This action is necessary to ensure the... Fishing Vessel Deep Sea located at approximately 48 13'18'' N, 122 47'42'' W, Penn Cove, WA. (b... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; F/V Deep Sea, Penn Cove, WA AGENCY:...

  12. Pulsatile neck mass: A rare cause

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Dattatreya P. V.; Ananthakrishna, Rajiv; Nanjappa, Manjunath C.

    2013-01-01

    A 20-year-old female presented with a pulsatile neck mass. On evaluation, she was found to have right cervical aortic arch, which is a rare anomaly. We highlight the conventional and Computed tomography angiography features of this vascular anomaly. PMID:23626449

  13. Effects of the pulsatile flow settings on pulsatile waveforms and hemodynamic energy in a PediVAS centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Rider, Alan R; Kunselman, Allen R; Richardson, J Scott; Dasse, Kurt A; Undar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test different pulsatile flow settings of the PediVAS centrifugal pump to seek an optimum setting for pulsatile flow to achieve better pulsatile energy and minimal backflow. The PediVAS centrifugal pump and the conventional pediatric clinical circuit, including a pediatric membrane oxygenator, arterial filter, arterial cannula, and 1/4 in circuit tubing were used. The circuit was primed with 40% glycerin water mixture. Postcannula pressure was maintained at 40 mm Hg by a Hoffman clamp. The experiment was conducted at 800 ml/min of pump flow with a modified pulsatile flow setting at room temperature. Pump flow and pressure readings at preoxygenator and precannula sites were simultaneously recorded by a data acquisition system. The results showed that backflows appeared at flow rates of 200-800 ml/min (200 ml/min increments) with the default pulsatile flow setting and only at 200 ml/min with the modified pulsatile flow setting. With an increased rotational speed difference ratio and a decreased pulsatile width, the pulsatility increased in terms of surplus hemodynamic energy and total hemodynamic energy at preoxygenator and precannula sites. Backflows seemed at preoxygenator and precannula sites at a 70% of rotational speed difference ratio. The modified pulsatile flow setting was better than the default pulsatile flow setting in respect to pulsatile energy and backflow. The pulsatile width and the rotational speed difference ratio significantly affected pulsatility. The parameter of the rotational speed difference ratio can automatically increase pulsatility with increased rotational speeds. Further studies will be conducted to optimize the pulsatile flow setting of the centrifugal pump.

  14. Defining pulsatility during continuous-flow ventricular assist device support.

    PubMed

    Soucy, Kevin G; Koenig, Steven C; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    Continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (CVADs) have gained widespread use as an effective clinical therapy for patients with advanced-stage heart failure. Axial and centrifugal CVADs have been successfully used as bridge-to-transplant and destination therapy. CVADs are smaller, more reliable, and less complex than the first-generation pulsatile-flow ventricular assist devices. Despite their recent clinical success, arteriovenous malformations, gastrointestinal bleeding, hemorrhagic strokes, aortic valve insufficiency, and valve fusion have been reported in heart failure patients supported by CVADs. It has been hypothesized that diminished arterial pressure and flow pulsatility delivered by CVAD may be a contributing factor to these adverse events. Subsequently, the clinical significance of vascular pulsatility continues to be highly debated. Studies comparing pulsatile-flow and continuous-flow support have presented conflicting findings, largely due to variations in device operation, support duration, and the criteria used to quantify pulsatility. Traditional measurements of pulse pressure and pulsatility index are less effective at quantifying pulsatility for mechanically derived flows, particularly with the growing trend of CVAD speed modulation to achieve various pulsatile flow patterns. Kinetic measurements of energy equivalent pressure and surplus hemodynamic energy can better quantify pulsatile energies, yet technologic and conceptual challenges are impeding their clinical adaption. A review of methods for quantifying vascular pulsatility and their application as a research tool for investigating physiologic responses to CVAD support are presented. PMID:23540401

  15. Arterial tree asymmetry reduces cerebral pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Vrselja, Zvonimir; Brkic, Hrvoje; Curic, Goran

    2015-11-01

    With each heartbeat, pressure wave (PW) propagates from aorta toward periphery. In cerebral circulation, at the level of circle of Willis (CW), four arteries and four PWs converge. Since the interference is an elemental property of the wave, PWs interfere at the level of CW. We hypothesize that the asymmetry of brain-supplying arteries (that join to form CW) creates phase difference between the four PWs that interfere at the level of CW and reduce downstream cerebral pulsatility. To best of our knowledge, the data about the sequence of PWs' arrival into the cerebral circulation is lacking. Evident imperfect bilateral symmetry of the vessels results with different path length of brain-supplying arteries, hence, PWs should arrive into the head at different times. The probabilistic calculation shows that asynchronous arrival is more probable than synchronous. The importance of PWs for the cerebral circulation is highlighted by the observation that barotrauma protection mechanisms are more influenced by the crest of PW (pulse pressure) than by the mean arterial pressure. In addition, an increased arterial pulsatility is associated with several brain pathologies. We created simple computational models of four converging arteries and found that asynchronous arrival of the PWs results with lower maximum pressure, slower rate of pressure amplification and lower downstream pulsatility. In analogy, the asynchronous arrival of the pressure waves into the cerebral circulation should decrease blood flow pulsatility and lower transmission of kinetic energy on arterial wall. We conclude that asynchronous arrival of PWs into the cerebral circulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and represents a physiological necessity.

  16. Penn Macy initiative to advance academic nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Lang, Norma M; Evans, Lois K; Swan, Beth Ann

    2002-01-01

    Academic nursing practice holds great promise for the future of the nursing discipline. The successful and intentional integration of the tripartite mission of research, education, and clinical practice can facilitate both the evolution of the science and implementation of evidence-based practice, while imbuing practitioners in the making with the world of the possible. Although many schools of nursing have been involved in some aspects of academic practice, the lack of common focus and direction has hampered concerted movement. The Penn Macy Initiative was conceived as a vehicle to help build and coalesce the critical mass needed to bridge this gap. The Penn Macy Initiative, its implementation and experience in the first 3 years, and how its alumni fellows, an annual conference, and Web-based consultation will continue to provide impetus, leadership, and resources for academic nursing practice in the years to come are described.

  17. Recent technologies in pulsatile drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepika; Raturi, Richa; Jain, Vikas; Bansal, Praveen; Singh, Ranjit

    2011-01-01

    Pulsatile drug delivery systems (PDDS) have attracted attraction because of their multiple benefits over conventional dosage forms. They deliver the drug at the right time, at the right site of action and in the right amount, which provides more benefit than conventional dosages and increased patient compliance. These systems are designed according to the circadian rhythm of the body, and the drug is released rapidly and completely as a pulse after a lag time. These products follow the sigmoid release profile characterized by a time period. These systems are beneficial for drugs with chronopharmacological behavior, where nocturnal dosing is required, and for drugs that show the first-pass effect. This review covers methods and marketed technologies that have been developed to achieve pulsatile delivery. Marketed technologies, such as PulsincapTM, Diffucaps®, CODAS®, OROS® and PULSYSTM, follow the above mechanism to render a sigmoidal drug release profile. Diseases wherein PDDS are promising include asthma, peptic ulcers, cardiovascular ailments, arthritis and attention deficit syndrome in children and hypercholesterolemia. Pulsatile drug delivery systems have the potential to bring new developments in the therapy of many diseases. PMID:23507727

  18. Non-dimensional physics of pulsatile cardiovascular networks and energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Berk; Pekkan, Kerem

    2016-01-01

    In Nature, there exist a variety of cardiovascular circulation networks in which the energetic ventricular load has both steady and pulsatile components. Steady load is related to the mean cardiac output (CO) and the haemodynamic resistance of the peripheral vascular system. On the other hand, the pulsatile load is determined by the simultaneous pressure and flow waveforms at the ventricular outlet, which in turn are governed through arterial wave dynamics (transmission) and pulse decay characteristics (windkessel effect). Both the steady and pulsatile contributions of the haemodynamic power load are critical for characterizing/comparing disease states and for predicting the performance of cardiovascular devices. However, haemodynamic performance parameters vary significantly from subject to subject because of body size, heart rate and subject-specific CO. Therefore, a 'normalized' energy dissipation index, as a function of the 'non-dimensional' physical parameters that govern the circulation networks, is needed for comparative/integrative biological studies and clinical decision-making. In this paper, a complete network-independent non-dimensional formulation that incorporates pulsatile flow regimes is developed. Mechanical design variables of cardiovascular flow systems are identified and the Buckingham Pi theorem is formally applied to obtain the corresponding non-dimensional scaling parameter sets. Two scaling approaches are considered to address both the lumped parameter networks and the distributed circulation components. The validity of these non-dimensional number sets is tested extensively through the existing empirical allometric scaling laws of circulation systems. Additional validation studies are performed using a parametric numerical arterial model that represents the transmission and windkessel characteristics, which are adjusted to represent different body sizes and non-dimensional haemodynamic states. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed non

  19. GnRH Pulsatility, the Pituitary Response and Reproductive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Webster, Nicholas J.G.

    2015-01-01

    GnRH plays an essential role in neuroendocrine control of reproductive function. In mammals, the pattern of gonadotropin secretion includes both pulse and surge phases, which are regulated independently. The pulsatile release of GnRH and LH plays an important role in the development of sexual function and in the normal regulation of the menstrual cycle. The importance of GnRH pulsatility was established in a series of classic studies. Fertility is impaired when GnRH pulsatility is inhibited by chronic malnutrition, excessive caloric expenditure, or aging. A number of reproductive disorders in women with including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypothlamic amenorrhea, hyperprolactinemia and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are also associated with disruption of the normal pulsatile GnRH secretion. Despite these findings, the molecular mechanisms of this pulsatile GnRH regulation are not well understood. Here, we review recent studies about GnRH pulsatility, signaling and transcriptional response, and its implications for disease. PMID:19609045

  20. Policies and Procedures for Academic Affairs , California State College, Penn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Coll., PA.

    Policies and procedures for academic affairs are detailed in the 1974-1975 edition of the faculty handbook. Areas of concern are presented alphabetically and include: absences, academic classification, admissions requirements, advanced standing, appealing grades, curriculum changes, course or college withdrawal, fees, graduate courses and…

  1. Creating a Culture of Innovation at Penn State Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidemann, Craig D.

    2009-01-01

    From all sides, academia is being prodded to be ever more innovative. Not only are faculty expected to create knowledge from which solutions for our social, physical, and economic ills will spring, but all segments of the university must deal with new modes of communication, new business models, and even new ways of processing thought. This…

  2. Field Plot Studies. Penn State HPER Series No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Christine

    Outdoor education teaching materials are presented for grades 3-6. The term "plot studies" encompasses those investigative activities which can be carried on within a small, defined land area on or near school grounds for the purpose of enhancing and extending classroom and textbook activities. Natural science activities deal with plant and animal…

  3. Measurement of pulsatile motion with millisecond resolution by MRI.

    PubMed

    Souchon, Rémi; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Salomir, Rares; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    We investigated a technique based on phase-contrast cine MRI combined with deconvolution of the phase shift waveforms to measure rapidly varying pulsatile motion waveforms. The technique does not require steady-state displacement during motion encoding. Simulations and experiments were performed in porcine liver samples in view of a specific application, namely the observation of transient displacements induced by acoustic radiation force. Simulations illustrate the advantages and shortcomings of the methods. For experimental validation, the waveforms were acquired with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner (Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer), and the rates of decay of the waveforms (relaxation time) were compared. With bipolar motion-encoding gradient of 8.4 ms, the method was able to measure displacement waveforms with a temporal resolution of 1 ms over a time course of 40 ms. Reasonable agreement was found between the rate of decay of the waveforms measured in ultrasound (2.8 ms) and in MRI (2.7-3.3 ms).

  4. High-speed visualization of disturbed pathlines in axial flow ventricular assist device under pulsatile conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fang; Kormos, Robert L.; Antaki, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate potentially pro-thrombotic flow patterns within an axial flow ventricular assist device under clinically relevant pulsatile hemodynamic conditions. Methods A transparent replica of the HeartMate-II was visualized using a high speed camera at both low and high frame rates (125 and 3000 fps). Three steady-state conditions were studied: nominal (4.5 lpm), low flow (3.0 lpm) and high flow (6.0 lpm). Time-varying conditions were introduced with external pulsatile pump which modulated the flow rate by approximately +/−50% of the mean, corresponding to a pulsatility index of 1.0. Results At nominal and high flow rates, the path lines within the upstream region were generally stable, well attached, and streamlined. As the flow rate was reduced below 3.8 lpm, a rapid transition to a chaotic velocity field occurred exhibiting a large toroidal vortex adjacent to the upstream bearing. The pathlines in the downstream stator section were consistently chaotic for all hemodynamic conditions investigated. It was common to observe tracer particles trapped within recirculation bubbles and drawn retrograde, causing repeated contact with the bearing surfaces. The addition of pulsatility caused the flow field to become periodically chaotic during the diastolic portion of the cardiac cycle depending on the instantaneous flow rate and acceleration. Conclusion The contribution of pulsatility by the native heart may induce a periodic disturbance to an otherwise stable flow field within an axial flow VAD, particularly during the diastolic and decelerating portion of the cardiac cycle. Potentially pro-thrombotic flow features were found to occur periodically in the region of the upstream bearing. PMID:26208892

  5. Detection and measurement of retinal blood vessel pulsatile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Frost, Shaun; Vignarajan, Janardhan; An, Dong; Tay-Kearney, Mei-Ling; Kanagasingam, Yogi

    2016-03-01

    Retinal photography is a non-invasive and well-accepted clinical diagnosis of ocular diseases. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of retinal images is crucial in ocular diseases related clinical application. Pulsatile properties caused by cardiac rhythm, such as spontaneous venous pulsation (SVP) and pulsatile motion of small arterioles, can be visualized by dynamic retinal imaging techniques and provide clinical significance. In this paper, we aim at vessel pulsatile motion detection and measurement. We proposed a novel approach for pulsatile motion measurement of retinal blood vessels by applying retinal image registration, blood vessel detection and blood vessel motion detection and measurement on infrared retinal image sequences. The performance of the proposed methods was evaluated on 8 image sequences with 240 images. A preliminary result has demonstrated the good performance of the method for blood vessel pulsatile motion observation and measurement.

  6. Pulsatile dynamics in the yeast proteome.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Chiraj K; Cai, Long; Lin, Yihan; Rahbar, Kasra; Elowitz, Michael B

    2014-09-22

    The activation of transcription factors in response to environmental conditions is fundamental to cellular regulation. Recent work has revealed that some transcription factors are activated in stochastic pulses of nuclear localization, rather than at a constant level, even in a constant environment [1-12]. In such cases, signals control the mean activity of the transcription factor by modulating the frequency, duration, or amplitude of these pulses. Although specific pulsatile transcription factors have been identified in diverse cell types, it has remained unclear how prevalent pulsing is within the cell, how variable pulsing behaviors are between genes, and whether pulsing is specific to transcriptional regulators or is employed more broadly. To address these issues, we performed a proteome-wide movie-based screen to systematically identify localization-based pulsing behaviors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen examined all genes in a previously developed fluorescent protein fusion library of 4,159 strains [13] in multiple media conditions. This approach revealed stochastic pulsing in ten proteins, all transcription factors. In each case, pulse dynamics were heterogeneous and unsynchronized among cells in clonal populations. Pulsing is the only dynamic localization behavior that we observed, and it tends to occur in pairs of paralogous and redundant proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that pulsatile dynamics play a pervasive role in yeast and may be similarly prevalent in other eukaryotic species.

  7. Fractality of pulsatile flow in speckle images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemati, M.; Kenjeres, S.; Urbach, H. P.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2016-05-01

    The scattering of coherent light from a system with underlying flow can be used to yield essential information about dynamics of the process. In the case of pulsatile flow, there is a rapid change in the properties of the speckle images. This can be studied using the standard laser speckle contrast and also the fractality of images. In this paper, we report the results of experiments performed to study pulsatile flow with speckle images, under different experimental configurations to verify the robustness of the techniques for applications. In order to study flow under various levels of complexity, the measurements were done for three in-vitro phantoms and two in-vivo situations. The pumping mechanisms were varied ranging from mechanical pumps to the human heart for the in vivo case. The speckle images were analyzed using the techniques of fractal dimension and speckle contrast analysis. The results of these techniques for the various experimental scenarios were compared. The fractal dimension is a more sensitive measure to capture the complexity of the signal though it was observed that it is also extremely sensitive to the properties of the scattering medium and cannot recover the signal for thicker diffusers in comparison to speckle contrast.

  8. Active acromegaly enhances spontaneous parathyroid hormone pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Cimino, Vincenzo; De Menis, Ernesto; Bonadonna, Stefania; Bugari, Giovanna; De Marinis, Laura; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Giustina, Andrea

    2006-06-01

    In healthy subjects, parathyroid hormone (PTH) is secreted in a dual fashion, with low-amplitude and high-frequency pulses superimposed on tonic secretion. These 2 components of PTH secretion seem to have different effects on target organs. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether growth hormone excess in acromegaly may modify the spontaneous pulsatility of PTH. Five male patients with newly diagnosed active acromegaly and 8 healthy subjects were evaluated by 3-minute blood sampling for 6 hours. Plasma PTH concentrations were evaluated by multiparameter deconvolution analysis. Plasma PTH release profiles were also subjected to an approximate entropy (ApEn) estimate, which provides an ensemble measure of the serial regularity or orderliness of the release process. In acromegalic patients, baseline serum PTH values were not significantly different from those measured in the healthy subjects, as well as tonic PTH secretion rate, number of bursts, fractional pulsatile PTH secretion, and ApEn ratio. Conversely, PTH pulse half-duration was significantly longer in acromegalic patients vs healthy subjects (11.8+/-0.95 vs 6.9+/-1.6 minutes; P=.05), whereas PTH pulse mass showed a tendency (P=.06) to be significantly greater in acromegalic patients. These preliminary data suggest that growth hormone excess may affect PTH secretory dynamics in patients with acromegaly. Potentially negative bone effects of the modifications of PTH secretory pattern in acromegaly should be investigated.

  9. A study on oscillating second-kind boundary condition for Pennes equation considering thermal relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weiping; Xu, Peng; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Meimei; Liu, Huiming; Gong, Linghui; Lu, Junfeng

    2014-05-01

    To study the effects of the thermal relaxation, the blood perfusion and the oscillating of ambient heat flux on the living tissue temperature in detail, we analytically investigated the one-dimensional CV model, a thermal wave model presented by Cattaneo and Vernott, for Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation under oscillating second-kind boundary condition. The results showed that the blood perfusion has the effect of maintaining the tissue's temperature. The heat propagation velocity decreases with the thermal relaxation time, while the absolute value of tissue's mean excess temperature at steady state increases with the thermal relaxation time. When the ambient heat flux oscillates, the tissue's temperature oscillates in the same period with a lag time. The results obtained in this paper are valuable for the research reference on the topic of tumor hyperthermia, heat injury, etc.

  10. Somatosensory Pulsatile Tinnitus Syndrome: Somatic Testing Identifies a Pulsatile Tinnitus Subtype That Implicates the Somatosensory System

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert Aaron; Nam, Eui-Cheol; Melcher, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    A new tinnitus syndrome is described: high-pitched, cardiac-synchronous tinnitus, whose pulsations are suppressed by strong contractions or compressions of the neck and jaw muscles (somatic testing). 14 cases, 6 non-lateralized and 8 unilateral, are reported. In the non-lateralized cases, onset was bilateral. In the one intermittent case, while her tinnitus was absent her pulsatile tinnitus could be induced by somatic testing. No etiology was found from physical examination, imaging, or ancillary testing. Because these cases of pulsatile tinnitus can be both induced and suppressed by activation of the somatosensory system of the head or upper lateral neck, we propose that this syndrome is occurring from (a) cardiac synchronous somatosensory activation of the central auditory pathway or (b) failure of the somatosensory-auditory central nervous system interactions to suppress cardiac somatosounds. PMID:18632767

  11. A novel rotary pulsatile flow pump for cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Teman, Nicholas R; Mazur, Daniel E; Toomasian, John; Jahangir, Emilia; Alghanem, Fares; Goudie, Marcus; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Haft, Jonathan W

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that pulsatile blood flow is superior to continuous flow (CF) in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, adoption of pulsatile flow (PF) technology has been limited because of practicality and complexity of creating a consistent physiologic pulse. A pediatric pulsatile rotary ventricular pump (PRVP) was designed to address this problem. We evaluated the PRVP in an animal model and determined its ability to generate PF during CPB. The PRVP (modified peristaltic pump, with tapering of the outlet of the pump chamber) was tested in four piglets (10-12 kg). Cannulation was performed with right atrial and aortic cannulae, and pressure sensors were inserted into the femoral arteries. Pressure curves were obtained at different levels of flow and compared with both the animal's baseline physiologic function and a CF roller pump. Pressure and flow waveforms demonstrated significant pulsatility in the PRVP setup compared with CF at all tested conditions. Measurement of hemodynamic energy data, including the percentage pulsatile energy and the surplus hydraulic energy, also revealed a significant increase in pulsatility with the PRVP (p < 0.001). The PRVP creates physiologically significant PF, similar to the pulsatility of a native heart, and has the potential to be easily implemented in pediatric CPB.

  12. Nanoscaffold matrices for size-controlled, pulsatile transdermal testosterone delivery: nanosize effects on the time dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Ritu; Tondwal, Shailesh; Venkatesh, K. S.; Misra, Amit

    2008-10-01

    Pulsatile transdermal testosterone (T) has applications in hormone supplementation and male contraception. Pulsatile T delivery was achieved by assembling crystalline and nanoparticulate T in nucleation-inhibiting polymer matrices of controlled porosity. Different interference patterns observed from various polymeric films containing T were due to the various particle sizes of T present in the polymer matrices. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the size and shape of T crystals. Skin-adherent films containing T nanoparticles of any size between 10-500 nm could be prepared using pharmaceutically acceptable vinylic polymers. Drug release and skin permeation profiles were studied. The dissolution-diffusion behavior of nanoparticles differed from crystalline and molecular states. Nanosize may thus be used to engineer chronopharmacologically relevant drug delivery.

  13. Design and performance of HEAD PENN-PET scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Freifelder, R.; Karp, J.S. . Dept. of Radiology); Geagan, M.; Muehllehner, G. )

    1994-08-01

    A new PET scanner for brain imaging (and animals) has been designed with very high sensitivity and spatial resolution. The design is an evolution of the PENN-PET scanner, which uses large position-sensitive NaI(Tl) detectors, with Anger-type positioning logic, and which allows 3-D volume imaging, without septa. The new design is built with a single annular crystal coupled to 180 photomultiplier tubes, and uses local triggering electronics to subdivide the detector into small zones and to determine coincident events within the detector. The axial acceptance angle of [+-] 27 deg, with a field-of-view of 25.6 cm, is larger than any currently operating PET scanner. Performance measurements are presented.

  14. Optimum Heart Rate to Minimize Pulsatile External Cardiac Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2011-11-01

    The workload on the left ventricle is composed of steady and pulsatile components. Clinical investigations have confirmed that an abnormal pulsatile load plays an important role in the pathogenesis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and progression of LVH to congestive heart failure (CHF). The pulsatile load is the result of the complex dynamics of wave propagation and reflection in the compliant arterial vasculature. We hypothesize that aortic waves can be optimized to reduce the left ventricular (LV) pulsatile load. We used an in-vitro experimental approach to investigate our hypothesis. A unique hydraulic model was used for in-vitro experiments. This model has physical and dynamical properties similar to the heart-aorta system. Different compliant models of the artificial aorta were used to test the hypothesis under various aortic rigidities. Our results indicate that: i) there is an optimum heart rate that minimizes LV pulsatile power (this is in agreement with our previous computational study); ii) introducing an extra reflection site at the specific location along the aorta creates constructive wave conditions that reduce the LV pulsatile power.

  15. Non-dimensional physics of pulsatile cardiovascular networks and energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Berk; Pekkan, Kerem

    2016-01-01

    In Nature, there exist a variety of cardiovascular circulation networks in which the energetic ventricular load has both steady and pulsatile components. Steady load is related to the mean cardiac output (CO) and the haemodynamic resistance of the peripheral vascular system. On the other hand, the pulsatile load is determined by the simultaneous pressure and flow waveforms at the ventricular outlet, which in turn are governed through arterial wave dynamics (transmission) and pulse decay characteristics (windkessel effect). Both the steady and pulsatile contributions of the haemodynamic power load are critical for characterizing/comparing disease states and for predicting the performance of cardiovascular devices. However, haemodynamic performance parameters vary significantly from subject to subject because of body size, heart rate and subject-specific CO. Therefore, a 'normalized' energy dissipation index, as a function of the 'non-dimensional' physical parameters that govern the circulation networks, is needed for comparative/integrative biological studies and clinical decision-making. In this paper, a complete network-independent non-dimensional formulation that incorporates pulsatile flow regimes is developed. Mechanical design variables of cardiovascular flow systems are identified and the Buckingham Pi theorem is formally applied to obtain the corresponding non-dimensional scaling parameter sets. Two scaling approaches are considered to address both the lumped parameter networks and the distributed circulation components. The validity of these non-dimensional number sets is tested extensively through the existing empirical allometric scaling laws of circulation systems. Additional validation studies are performed using a parametric numerical arterial model that represents the transmission and windkessel characteristics, which are adjusted to represent different body sizes and non-dimensional haemodynamic states. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed non

  16. Effect of echo artifacts on characterization of pulsatile tissues in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Takahashi, Kazuki; Tabata, Yuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2016-04-01

    Effect of echo artifacts on characterization of pulsatile tissues has been examined in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies by characterizing pulsatile intensities with different regions of interest (ROIs). The pulsatile tissue, which is a key point in pediatric diagnosis of brain tissue, was detected from a heartbeat-frequency component in Fourier transform of a time-variation of 64 samples of echo intensity at each pixel in a movie fragment. The averages of pulsatile intensity and power were evaluated in two ROIs: common fan-shape and individual cranial-shape. The area of pulsatile region was also evaluated as the number of pixels where the pulsatile intensity exceeds a proper threshold. The extracranial pulsatile region was found mainly in the sections where mirror image was dominant echo artifact. There was significant difference of pulsatile area between two ROIs especially in the specific sections where mirror image was included, suggesting the suitability of cranial-shape ROI for statistical study on pulsatile tissues in brain. The normalized average of pulsatile power in the cranial-shape ROI exhibited most similar tendency to the normalized pulsatile area which was treated as a conventional measure in spite of its requirement of thresholding. It suggests the potential of pulsatile power as an alternative measure for pulsatile area in further statistical study of pulsatile tissues because it was neither affected by echo artifacts nor threshold.

  17. A new method of providing pulsatile flow in a centrifugal pump: assessment of pulsatility using a mock circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Herreros, Jesús; Berjano, Enrique J; Sales-Nebot, Laura; Más, Pedro; Calvo, Irene; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Mercé, Salvador

    2008-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential advantages of pulsatile flow as compared with continuous flow. However, to date, physiologic pumps have been technically complex and their application has therefore remained in the experimental field. We have developed a new type of centrifugal pump, which can provide pulsatile as well as continuous flow. The inner wall of a centrifugal pump is pulsed by means of a flexible membrane, which can be accurately controlled by means of either a hydraulic or pneumatic driver. The aim of this study was to assess the hydraulic behavior of the new pump in terms of surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE). We conducted experiments using a mock circulatory system including a membrane oxygenator. No differences were found in the pressure-flow characteristics between the new pump and a conventional centrifugal pump, suggesting that the inclusion of the flexible membrane does not alter hydraulic performance. The value of SHE rose when systolic volume was increased. However, SHE dropped when the percentage of ejection time was reduced and also when the continuous flow (programmed by the centrifugal console) increased. Mean flow matched well with the continuous flow set by the centrifugal console, that is, the pulsatile component of the flow was exclusively controlled by the pulsatile console, and was therefore independent of the continuous flow programmed by the centrifugal console. The pulsatility of the new pump was approximately 25% of that created with a truly pulsatile pump.

  18. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  19. Measuring pulsatile forces on the human cranium.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Cory S; Antonyshyn, Oleh; Midha, Rajiv; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2005-01-01

    The cyclic stresses in the cranium caused by pulsation of the brain play an important role in the design of materials for cranioplasty, as well as craniofacial development. However, these stresses have never been quantified. In this study, the force in the epidural space against the cranium was measured intraoperatively in 10 patients using a miniature force probe. Heart and ventilatory rates computed from the force tracing correlated closely with the corresponding measured values in the patients, confirming that the forces measured were indeed a result of brain pulsation. The mean outward systolic normal and tangential stresses were 54.2 kilo-Pascals (kPa) and 345.4 kPa, respectively. The systolic shear stress was 199.8 kPa. Through mechanotransduction, these stresses play a role in cranial development. The calculated yield stress of a cranioplasty repair was 0.4 MPa, which is within one order of magnitude of the known strength of common calcium-phosphate cements. This indicates a possible relation of these pulsatile forces and occult failure of calcium-phosphate cement cranioplasties through material fatigue.

  20. Collapse in High-Grade Stenosis during Pulsatile Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shunichi; Tang, Dalin; Ku, David N.

    It has been hypothesized that blood flow through high grade stenotic arteries may produce conditions in which elastic flow choking may occur. The development of atherosclerotic plaque fracture may be exacerbated by the compressive stresses during collapse. This study explored the effects of pulsatile flow on stenotic flow collapse. Pulsatile flow was produced using a gear pump controlled by a digitized physiologic waveform. Upstream and downstream mean pressures and pulsatile flow rates were measured and digitized. An improved model of arterial stenosis was created using an elastomer with an incremental modulus of elasticity matched to a bovine carotid artery in the relevant range of collapse. Additionally, the model retained a very thick wall in the stenotic region similar to arterial disease. Flow choking was observed for pulsatile pressure drops close to those previously reported for steady flow. The phase difference between flow rate and pressure between upstream and downstream of the stenosis occurred by the compliance of tube and stenosis resistance. For 80% nominal stenosis by diameter and 100+/-30mmHg upstream pressure, collapse occurred for average pulsatile pressure drops of 93mmHg. Pulsatile flow experiments in this model revealed the range of conditions for the flow choking and the paradoxical collapse of the stenosis during systole with expansion during diastole. The stenosis severity was dynamic through the pulse cycle and was significantly greater under flow than the nominal severity. The results indicate that flow choking and stenotic compression may be significant in thick-walled arterial stenoses subjected to pulsatile flow.

  1. Effects of hydrocortisone on pulsatile pituitary glycoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Samuels, M H; Luther, M; Henry, P; Ridgway, E C

    1994-01-01

    During states of stress, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function can be suppressed. One putative mediator of this stress response may be glucocorticoids, which have widespread effects on thyroid and gonadal function. To characterize dynamic pituitary glycoprotein secretion during glucocorticoid administration, 24-h TSH, LH, FSH, and alpha-subunit pulses were measured in 10 healthy young subjects on 3 occasions: 1) at baseline, 2) during infusions of 100 mg hydrocortisone (HC) over 24 h, and 3) during infusions of 300 mg HC over 24 h. These HC infusions led to serum cortisol levels similar to the endogenous cortisol levels seen in moderate and severe stress. Both HC infusions had profound rapid effects on TSH levels, decreasing TSH pulse amplitude by 60% and abolishing the nocturnal TSH surge. However, TSH pulse frequency was unaltered. In contrast, HC infusions did not change mean or pulsatile LH, FSH, or alpha-subunit secretion. These results suggest that stress levels of cortisol acutely suppress TSH secretion at the pituitary level, with little effect on the TSH pulse generator. On the other hand, the effects of stress and/or hypercortisolism on the gonadal axis may require higher cortisol levels, more prolonged exposure, or other mediators of the stress response.

  2. Encoding and decoding mechanisms of pulsatile hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Walker, J J; Terry, J R; Tsaneva-Atanasova, K; Armstrong, S P; McArdle, C A; Lightman, S L

    2010-12-01

    Ultradian pulsatile hormone secretion underlies the activity of most neuroendocrine systems, including the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) and gonadal (HPG) axes, and this pulsatile mode of signalling permits the encoding of information through both amplitude and frequency modulation. In the HPA axis, glucocorticoid pulse amplitude increases in anticipation of waking, and, in the HPG axis, changing gonadotrophin-releasing hormone pulse frequency is the primary means by which the body alters its reproductive status during development (i.e. puberty). The prevalence of hormone pulsatility raises two crucial questions: how are ultradian pulses encoded (or generated) by these systems, and how are these pulses decoded (or interpreted) at their target sites? We have looked at mechanisms within the HPA axis responsible for encoding the pulsatile mode of glucocorticoid signalling that we observe in vivo. We review evidence regarding the 'hypothalamic pulse generator' hypothesis, and describe an alternative model for pulse generation, which involves steroid feedback-dependent endogenous rhythmic activity throughout the HPA axis. We consider the decoding of hormone pulsatility by taking the HPG axis as a model system and focussing on molecular mechanisms of frequency decoding by pituitary gonadotrophs.

  3. Effects of non-pulsatile flow on thrombogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Ralph; Harting, Matthew; Delgado, Reynolds; Frazier, O. Howard

    2002-11-01

    Congestive heart failure afflicts 4.5 million people in the US alone, with an average 5-year mortality of more than 50%. Among the most promising treatments for this condition are VADs (ventricular assist devices). While conventional pulsatile flow VADs are large and introduce some significant complications such as thrombosis, non-pulsatile axial flow VADs have potentially significant advantages in being smaller, with smaller thrombogenic surfaces. However, the long term effects of non-pulsatile flow on the vascular system are not well understood. We have investigated the effects of pulsatility of blood flow in the stenotic human carotid artery using unsteady, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic simulations. We have found that permanent, low shear stagnation zones can develop distal to stenoses with non-pulsatile flow, potentially leading to thrombus formation. In contrast, systolic peak flow tends to flush out such stagnation zones. These results are consistent with observed thrombus formation in two patients who underwent implantation of a Jarvik 2000 LVAD.

  4. Rotary pumps and diminished pulsatility: do we need a pulse?

    PubMed

    Soucy, Kevin G; Koenig, Steven C; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) have been successfully used as a bridge to heart transplant and destination therapy (DT) for congestive heart failure (HF) patients. Recently, continuous flow VAD (CVAD) has emerged as an attractive clinical option for long-term mechanical support of HF patients, with bridge-to-transplant outcomes comparable with pulsatile flow VAD (PVAD). Continuous flow VADs are smaller, more reliable, and less complex than the first-generation PVAD. Despite the widespread clinical use, CVAD support has been associated with gastrointestinal bleeding, hemorrhagic strokes, and aortic valve insufficiency. Speculation that diminished arterial pressure pulsatility associated with continuous flow devices may be contributing to these complications has sparked much debate over CVAD support. Studies comparing pulsatile flow and continuous flow (CF) support have presented conflicting findings, and the relevance to CVAD as DT is uncertain due to variations in device operation, support duration, and the criteria used to quantify pulsatility. Currently, there is interest in developing control algorithms for CVAD to increase the delivered pulsatility as a strategy to mitigate adverse event risks associated with CVAD therapy. There may also be the added benefit of specific control strategies for managing CVAD therapy, potentially improving the rate of myocardial recovery and successful weaning of mechanical circulatory support. PMID:23820272

  5. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulsatile administration restores luteinizing hormone pulsatility and normal testosterone levels in males with hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, P; Lagoguey, M; Brailly, S; Schaison, G

    1985-02-01

    Hyperprolactinemia in men is frequently associated with hypogonadism. Normalization of serum PRL levels is generally associated with an increase in serum testosterone (T) to normal. To determine the mechanism of the inhibitory effect of hyperprolactinemia on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, we studied the effect of intermittent pulsatile GnRH administration on LH pulsatility and T levels in four men with prolactinomas. All patients had high PRL values (100-3000 ng/ml), low LH (mean +/- SEM, 2.2 +/- 0.1 mIU/ml), and low T values (2.3 +/- 0.3 ng/ml), with no other apparent abnormality of pituitary function. GnRH was administered iv using a pump delivering a bolus dose of 10 micrograms every 90 min for 12 days. No LH pulses were detected before treatment. Pulsatile GnRH administration resulted in a significant increase in basal LH levels (6.7 +/- 0.6 mIU/ml; P less than 0.001) and restored LH pulsatility. In addition, T levels increased significantly to normal values in all patients (7.8 +/- 0.4 ng/ml; P less than 0.001) and were normal or supranormal as long as the pump was in use, although PRL levels remained elevated. These data, therefore, suggest that hyperprolactinemia produces hypogonadism primarily by interfering with pulsatile GnRH release.

  6. The effects of pulmonary circulation pulsatility on the impedance cardiogram.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Goto, T; Terasaki, H; Hayashida, Y; Morioka, T

    1983-11-01

    To study the effects of pulmonary blood flow on the impedance cardiogram, the pattern of pulmonary blood flow was alternated from pulsatile to non pulsatile, or the reverse, using our extracorporeal bypass-method on anaesthetized dogs. The thoracic impedance cardiogram was recorded from band electrodes placed around the neck and upper abdomen. During nonpulsatile pulmonary blood flow, the height of the diastolic phase of the delta Z wave was lower than that during pulsatile pulmonary blood flow. The area under the impedance curve decreased during nonpulsatile pulmonary blood flow. This appeared to be more obvious as the pulmonary arterial flow was reduced. The results suggest that the pulmonary blood flow might have substantial effects on the impedance cardiogram.

  7. Perceptual elements in Penn & Teller's "Cups and Balls" magic trick.

    PubMed

    Rieiro, Hector; Martinez-Conde, Susana; Macknik, Stephen L

    2013-01-01

    Magic illusions provide the perceptual and cognitive scientist with a toolbox of experimental manipulations and testable hypotheses about the building blocks of conscious experience. Here we studied several sleight-of-hand manipulations in the performance of the classic "Cups and Balls" magic trick (where balls appear and disappear inside upside-down opaque cups). We examined a version inspired by the entertainment duo Penn & Teller, conducted with three opaque and subsequently with three transparent cups. Magician Teller used his right hand to load (i.e. introduce surreptitiously) a small ball inside each of two upside-down cups, one at a time, while using his left hand to remove a different ball from the upside-down bottom of the cup. The sleight at the third cup involved one of six manipulations: (a) standard maneuver, (b) standard maneuver without a third ball, (c) ball placed on the table, (d) ball lifted, (e) ball dropped to the floor, and (f) ball stuck to the cup. Seven subjects watched the videos of the performances while reporting, via button press, whenever balls were removed from the cups/table (button "1") or placed inside the cups/on the table (button "2"). Subjects' perception was more accurate with transparent than with opaque cups. Perceptual performance was worse for the conditions where the ball was placed on the table, or stuck to the cup, than for the standard maneuver. The condition in which the ball was lifted displaced the subjects' gaze position the most, whereas the condition in which there was no ball caused the smallest gaze displacement. Training improved the subjects' perceptual performance. Occlusion of the magician's face did not affect the subjects' perception, suggesting that gaze misdirection does not play a strong role in the Cups and Balls illusion. Our results have implications for how to optimize the performance of this classic magic trick, and for the types of hand and object motion that maximize magic misdirection.

  8. Pulsatile Hyperglycaemia Induces Vascular Oxidative Stress and GLUT 1 Expression More Potently than Sustained Hyperglycaemia in Rats on High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Rakipovski, Günaj; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Raun, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pulsatile hyperglycaemia resulting in oxidative stress may play an important role in the development of macrovascular complications. We investigated the effects of sustained vs. pulsatile hyperglycaemia in insulin resistant rats on markers of oxidative stress, enzyme expression and glucose metabolism in liver and aorta. We hypothesized that liver’s ability to regulate the glucose homeostasis under varying states of hyperglycaemia may indirectly affect oxidative stress status in aorta despite the amount of glucose challenged with. Methods Animals were infused with sustained high (SHG), low (SLG), pulsatile (PLG) glucose or saline (VEH) for 96 h. Oxidative stress status and key regulators of glucose metabolism in liver and aorta were investigated. Results Similar response in plasma lipid oxidation was observed in PLG as in SHG. Likewise, in aorta, PLG and SHG displayed increased expression of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), gp-91PHOX and super oxide dismutase (SOD), while only the PLG group showed increased accumulation of oxidative stress and oxidised low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) in aorta. Conclusion Pulsatile hyperglycaemia induced relatively higher levels of oxidative stress systemically and in aorta in particular than overt sustained hyperglycaemia thus supporting the clinical observations that pulsatile hyperglycaemia is an independent risk factor for diabetes related macrovascular complications. PMID:26790104

  9. A case of Takayasu's arteritis with pulsatile neck mass

    PubMed Central

    Karimifar, Mansoor; Karimifar, Mozhgan; Salimi, Fereshteh; Behjati, Mohaddeseh

    2011-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA), also known as pulseless disease or occlusive thromboaortopathy, is a form of vasculitis of unknown cause that chiefly affects the aorta and its major branches, most frequently in young women. We describe an 18-year-old female with a soft and pulsatile mass in the left side of her neck. PMID:22973373

  10. Case of a non-pulsatile groin swelling.

    PubMed

    Razif, M A Mohamed; Rajasingam, V; Abdullah, B J J

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of a non-pulsatile groin swelling in a 38 years old male drug addict without the typical clinical signs of an aneurysm. Ultrasound revealed a left femoral artery pseudo-aneurysm. He was surgically treated and the vessels were ligated without revascularisation.

  11. A Meta-Analysis of Renal Function After Adult Cardiac Surgery With Pulsatile Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Nam, Myung Ji; Lim, Choon Hak; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Yong Hwi; Choi, Hyuk; Son, Ho Sung; Lim, Hae Ja; Sun, Kyung

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine whether pulsatile perfusion during cardiac surgery has a lesser effect on renal dysfunction than nonpulsatile perfusion after cardiac surgery in randomized controlled trials. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were used to identify available articles published before April 25, 2014. Meta-analysis was conducted to determine the effects of pulsatile perfusion on postoperative renal functions, as determined by creatinine clearance (CrCl), serum creatinine (Cr), urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and the incidences of acute renal insufficiency (ARI) and acute renal failure (ARF). Nine studies involving 674 patients that received pulsatile perfusion and 698 patients that received nonpulsatile perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were considered in the meta-analysis. Stratified analysis was performed according to effective pulsatility or unclear pulsatility of the pulsatile perfusion method in the presence of heterogeneity. NGAL levels were not significantly different between the pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups. However, patients in the pulsatile group had a significantly higher CrCl and lower Cr levels when the analysis was restricted to studies on effective pulsatile flow (P < 0.00001, respectively). The incidence of ARI was significantly lower in the pulsatile group (P < 0.00001), but incidences of ARF were similar. In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests that the use of pulsatile flow during CPB results in better postoperative renal function.

  12. Nonlinear analysis and prediction of pulsatile hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K. |; Kloppstech, M.; Nowlan, S.J.; Harms, H.M.; Brabant, G.; Hesch, R.; Sejnowski, T.J.

    1996-06-01

    Pulsatile hormone secretion is observed in almost every hormonal system. The frequency of episodic hormone release ranges from approximately 10 to 100 pulses in 24 hours. This temporal mode of secretion is an important feature of intercellular information transfer in addition to a dose-response dependent regulation. It has been demonstrated in a number of experiments that changes in the temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone secretion specifically regulate cellular and organ function and structure. Recent evidence links osteoporosis, a disease characterized by loss of bone mass and structure, to changes in the dynamics of pulsatile parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. In our study we applied nonlinear and linear time series prediction to characterize the secretory dynamics of PTH in both healthy human subjects and patients with osteoporosis. Osteoporotic patients appear to lack periods of high predictability found in normal humans. In contrast to patients with osteoporosis patients with hyperparathyroidism, a condition which despite sometimes reduced bone mass has a preserved bone architecture, show periods of high predictability of PTH secretion. Using stochastic surrogate data sets which match certain statistical properties of the original time series significant nonlinear determinism could be found for the PTH time series of a group of healthy subjects. Using classical nonlinear analytical techniques we could demonstrate that the irregular pattern of pulsatile PTH secretion in healthy men exhibits characteristics of deterministic chaos. Pulsatile secretion of PTH in healthy subjects seems to be a first example of nonlinear determinism in an apparently irregular hormonal rhythm in human physiology. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Endogenous opiates modulate the pulsatile secretion of biologically active luteinizing hormone in man.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Rogol, A D; Johnson, M L

    1983-12-01

    We studied the secretion of physiological pools of immunoreactive and biologically active luteinizing hormone in response to endogenous pulses of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) in eugonadal men. Concentrations of immunoactive and bioactive luteinizing hormone (LH) were determined in blood drawn at 20-min intervals for 8 h in eight normal men under two conditions: (a) after placebo, in order to evaluate spontaneous LH pulsations in the basal state, and (b) after administration of the opiate-receptor antagonist, naltrexone, which is believed to amplify the pulsatile release of endogenous GNRH. Spontaneous and naltrexone-stimulated secretion of LH occurred in pulses of high biological activity, as measured in the RICT (rat interstitial cell testosterone bioassay), i.e., bioactive:immunoactive LH ratios within both spontaneous and naltrexone-stimulated LH pulses were higher than corresponding interpulse ratios (P less than 0.001). Quantitative characterization of the pulsatile release of bioactive LH revealed the following specific effects of opiate-receptor blockade: increased 8-h mean and integrated serum concentrations of bioactive LH (P less than 0.002), enhanced pulse frequency of bioactive LH release (P less than 0.001), and augmented peak amplitude of bio-LH pulses (P less than 0.01). Moreover, this increase in episodic secretion of bioactive LH was associated with increased 8-h mean and integrated serum testosterone concentrations in these men (P less than 0.05). We conclude the following: (a) LH is normally released in spontaneous pulses of high biological activity in men; (b) when the endogenous GNRH signal is amplified by opiate-receptor blockade, the pituitary gland releases more frequent bioactive LH pulses, which are of high amplitude and contain a high bioactive:immunoactive LH ratio. This increase in pulsatile release of bioactive LH quantitated in the RICT assay in vitro is reflected by acutely increased serum testosterone concentrations in vivo

  14. Frequency-Dependent Neural Activity in Patients with Unilateral Vascular Pulsatile Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Lv, Han; Zhao, Pengfei; Liu, Zhaohui; Wang, Guopeng; Zeng, Rong; Yan, Fei; Dong, Cheng; Zhang, Ling; Li, Rui; Wang, Peng; Li, Ting; Gong, Shusheng; Wang, Zhenchang

    2016-01-01

    Previous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) studies have shown that neurological changes are important findings in vascular pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients. Here, we utilized rs-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in forty patients with unilateral PT and forty age-, gender-, and education-matched normal control subjects. Two different frequency bands (slow-4, 0.027-0.073 Hz, and slow-5, 0.010-0.027 Hz, which are more sensitive to subcortical and cortical neurological signal changes, resp.) were analyzed to examine the intrinsic brain activity in detail. Compared to controls, PT patients had increased ALFF values mainly in the PCu, bilateral IPL (inferior parietal lobule), left IFG (inferior frontal gyrus), and right IFG/anterior insula and decreased ALFF values in the multiple occipital areas including bilateral middle-inferior occipital lobe. For the differences of the two frequency bands, widespread ALFF differences were observed. The ALFF abnormalities in aMPFC/ACC, PCu, right IPL, and some regions of occipital and parietal cortices were greater in the slow-5 band compared to the slow-4 band. Additionally, the THI score of PT patients was positively correlated with changes in slow-5 and slow-4 band in PCu. Pulsatile tinnitus is a disease affecting the neurological activities of multiple brain regions. Slow-5 band is more sensitive in detecting the alternations. Our results also indicated the importance of pathophysiological investigations in patients with pulsatile tinnitus in the future. PMID:27413554

  15. Frequency-Dependent Neural Activity in Patients with Unilateral Vascular Pulsatile Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Han; Zhao, Pengfei; Liu, Zhaohui; Wang, Guopeng; Zeng, Rong; Yan, Fei; Dong, Cheng; Zhang, Ling; Li, Rui; Wang, Peng; Li, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Previous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) studies have shown that neurological changes are important findings in vascular pulsatile tinnitus (PT) patients. Here, we utilized rs-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) in forty patients with unilateral PT and forty age-, gender-, and education-matched normal control subjects. Two different frequency bands (slow-4, 0.027–0.073 Hz, and slow-5, 0.010–0.027 Hz, which are more sensitive to subcortical and cortical neurological signal changes, resp.) were analyzed to examine the intrinsic brain activity in detail. Compared to controls, PT patients had increased ALFF values mainly in the PCu, bilateral IPL (inferior parietal lobule), left IFG (inferior frontal gyrus), and right IFG/anterior insula and decreased ALFF values in the multiple occipital areas including bilateral middle-inferior occipital lobe. For the differences of the two frequency bands, widespread ALFF differences were observed. The ALFF abnormalities in aMPFC/ACC, PCu, right IPL, and some regions of occipital and parietal cortices were greater in the slow-5 band compared to the slow-4 band. Additionally, the THI score of PT patients was positively correlated with changes in slow-5 and slow-4 band in PCu. Pulsatile tinnitus is a disease affecting the neurological activities of multiple brain regions. Slow-5 band is more sensitive in detecting the alternations. Our results also indicated the importance of pathophysiological investigations in patients with pulsatile tinnitus in the future. PMID:27413554

  16. 76 FR 24472 - UGI Central Penn Gas, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on April 8...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission UGI Central Penn Gas, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on April 8, 2011, UGI Central Penn Gas, Inc. (CPG) filed a petition pursuant to section 284.123(b)(1)(ii) of the Commission's regulations a rate election for interruptible transportation service....

  17. 76 FR 42163 - East Penn Railroad, L.L.C.; Lease and Operation Exemption; Norfolk Southern Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board East Penn Railroad, L.L.C.; Lease and Operation Exemption; Norfolk Southern.... East Penn Railroad, L.L.C. (ESPN), a Class III rail carrier, has filed a verified notice of...

  18. 76 FR 29744 - Monongahela Power Company, West Penn Power Company, The Potomac Edison Company, PJM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Monongahela Power Company, West Penn Power Company, The Potomac... FirstEnergy Utilities), and PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. filed a joint petition requesting that...

  19. A Meta-Analytic Review of the Penn Resiliency Program's Effect on Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunwasser, Steven M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Kim, Eric S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate whether the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP), a group cognitive-behavioral intervention, is effective in targeting depressive symptoms in youths. We identified 17 controlled evaluations of PRP (N = 2,498) in which depressive symptoms had been measured via an online search of PsycInfo, Medline, ERIC, and…

  20. Preventing Adolescents' Externalizing and Internalizing Symptoms: Effects of the Penn Resiliency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutuli, J. J.; Gillham, Jane E.; Chaplin, Tara M.; Reivich, Karen J.; Seligman, Martin E. P.; Gallop, Robert J.; Abenavoli, Rachel M.; Freres, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    This study reports secondary outcome analyses from a past study of the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP), a cognitive-behavioral depression prevention program for middle-school aged children. Middle school students (N = 697) were randomly assigned to PRP, PEP (an alternate intervention), or control conditions. Gillham et al., (2007) reported analyses…

  1. 75 FR 54215 - East Penn Railroad, LLC-Abandonment Exemption-in Montgomery County, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board East Penn Railroad, LLC--Abandonment Exemption--in Montgomery County, PA East... Bridgeport, and milepost 2.14 at Henderson Road in Upper Merion Township, in Montgomery County, Pa. The...

  2. EVIDENCE FOR METAL ATTENUATION IN ACID MINE WATER BY SULFATE REDUCTION, PENN MINE, CALAVERAS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Penn Mine in Calaveras County, California, produced Cu from massive sulfide ores from 1861 to 1953. Mine wastes were removed to a landfill during the late 1990s, improving surface-water quality, but deep mine workings were not remediated and contain metalliferous water with p...

  3. The University of Pennsylvania's PennInfo Campus-Wide Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Souza, Alfred C.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the development of a campuswide information system at the University of Pennsylvania called PennInfo. Topics discussed include client/server architecture; menu-driven software; technical features; operational support to end-users; a Gopher server; and future plans. (LRW)

  4. Tissue Pulsatility Imaging of Cerebral Vasoreactivity during Hyperventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kucewicz, John C.; Dunmire, Barbrina; Giardino, Nicholas D.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Paun, Marla; Dager, Stephen R.; Beach, Kirk W.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue Pulsatility Imaging (TPI) is an ultrasonic technique that is being developed at the University of Washington to measure tissue displacement or strain due to blood flow over the cardiac and respiratory cycles. This technique is based in principle on plethysmography, an older non-ultrasound technology for measuring expansion of a whole limb or body part due to perfusion. TPI adapts tissue Doppler signal processing methods to measure the “plethysmographic” signal from hundreds or thousands of sample volumes in an ultrasound image plane. This paper presents a feasibility study to determine if TPI can be used to assess cerebral vasoreactivity. Ultrasound data were collected transcranially through the temporal acoustic window from four subjects before, during, and after voluntary hyperventilation. In each subject, decreases in tissue pulsatility during hyperventilation were observed that were statistically correlated with the subject’s end-tidal CO2 measurements. PMID:18336991

  5. CFD modeling of pulsatile hemodynamics in the total cavopulmonary connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobaer, S. M. Tareq; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique

    2016-07-01

    Total cavopulmonary connection is a blood flow pathway which is created surgically by an operation known as Fontan procedure, performed on children with single ventricle heart defects. Recent studies have shown that the hemodynamics in the connection can be strongly influenced by the presence of pulsatile flow. The aim of this paper is model the pulsatile flow patterns, and to calculate the vorticity field and power losses in an idealized 1.5D offset model of Total Cavopulmonary Connection. A three-dimensional polyhedral mesh was constructed for the numerical simulation. The rheological properties of blood were considered as Newtonian, and flow in the connection was assumed to be laminar. The results demonstrated complex flow patterns in the connection. The outcomes of the simulation showed reasonable agreement with the results available in the literature for a similar model.

  6. The dynamics of pulsatile flow in distensible model arteries.

    PubMed

    Liepsch, D W; Zimmer, R

    1995-12-01

    Deposits and blockages are often found in the carotid, coronary, renal and femoral arteries. This paper deals with laser-Doppler velocity measurements in models of bifurcations of the human femoral arteries. Several models were prepared for the studies: a simplified 35 degrees glass model, two elastic-silicone-rubber models with a wall thickness of 1 mm and 2 mm, and true-to-scale rigid and elastic models. These measurements give a clearer picture of how hemodynamics influences the formation of atherosclerotic plaques where there is a hardening of the arterial walls and a loss of elasticity. In addition to the effects of elasticity, the influence of the flow's pulsatility were studied. The measurements were done in steady and pulsatile flow. From the velocity measurements the shear stresses were calculated.

  7. Nonlinear dynamics in pulsatile secretion of parathyroid hormone in normal human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Klaus; Harms, Heio; Brabant, Georg; Hesch, Rolf-Dieter; Dämmig, Matthias; Mitschke, Fedor

    1995-03-01

    In many biological systems, information is transferred by hormonal ligands, and it is assumed that these hormonal signals encode developmental and regulatory programs in mammalian organisms. In contrast to the dogma of endocrine homeostasis, it could be shown that the biological information in hormonal networks is not only present as a constant hormone concentration in the circulation pool. Recently, it has become apparent that hormone pulses contribute to this hormonal pool, which modulates the responsiveness of receptors within the cell membrane by regulation of the receptor synthesis, movement within the membrane layer, coupling to signal transduction proteins and internalization. Phase space analysis of dynamic parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion allowed the definition of a (in comparison to normal subjects) relatively quiet ``low dynamic'' secretory pattern in osteoporosis, and a ``high dynamic'' state in hyperparathyroidism. We now investigate whether this pulsatile secretion of PTH in healthy men exhibits characteristics of nonlinear determinism. Our findings suggest that this is conceivable, although on the basis of presently available data and techniques, no proof can be established. Nevertheless, pulsatile secretion of PTH might be a first example of nonlinear deterministic dynamics in an apparently irregular hormonal rhythm in human physiology.

  8. Visualization of pulsatile flow for magnetic nanoparticle based therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzel, Andrew; Yecko, Philip

    2015-11-01

    Pulsatile flow of blood through branched, curved, stenosed, dilated or otherwise perturbed vessels is more complex than flow through a straight, uniform and rigid tube. In some magnetic hyperthermia and magnetic chemo-therapies, localized regions of magnetic nanoparticle laden fluid are deliberately formed in blood vessels and held in place by magnetic fields. The effect of localized magnetic fluid regions on blood flow and the effect of the pulsatile blood flow on such magnetic fluid regions are poorly understood and difficult to examine in vivo or by numerical simulation. We present a laboratory model that facilitates both dye tracer and particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) studies of pulsatile flow of water through semi-flexible tubes in the presence of localized magnetic fluid regions. Results on the visualization of flows over a range of Reynolds and Womersley numbers and for several different (water-based) ferrofluids are compared for straight and curved vessels and for different magnetic localization strategies. These results can guide the design of improved magnetic cancer therapies. Support from the William H. Sandholm Program of Cooper Union's Kanbar Center for Biomedical Engineering is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Numerical modeling of hemodynamics with pulsatile impeller pump support.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yubing; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney

    2010-08-01

    There is significant interest in the development and application of variable speed impeller-pump type ventricular assist devices designed to generate pulsatile blood flow. However, no study has so far been carried out to investigate the systemic cardiovascular response to various aspects of pump motion. In this article, a numerical model is constructed for the simulation of the cardiovascular response in the heart failure condition under representative cases of pulsatile impeller pump support. The native cardiovascular model is based on a previously validated model, and the impeller pump is modeled by directly fitting the pressure-flow curves that describe the pump characteristics. The model developed is applied to study circulatory dynamics under different degrees of phase shift and pulsation ratio in the pump motion profile. The characteristic variables are discussed as criteria for the evaluation of system response for comparison of the pulsatile flows. Simulation results show that a constant pump speed is the most efficient work mode for the rotary pump, and with the application of either a phase shift of 75% and a pulsation ratio of 0.5, or a phase shift of 42% and a pulsation ratio of 0.55, it is possible to generate arterial pulse pressure with the maximal magnitude of about 28 mmHg. However, this is achieved at the cost of reduced cardiac output and pump efficiency.

  10. Pulsatile dynamic stiffness of cartilage-like materials and use of agarose gels to validate mechanical methods and models.

    PubMed

    Scandiucci de Freitas, P; Wirz, D; Stolz, M; Göpfert, B; Friederich, N-F; Daniels, A U

    2006-08-01

    Stiffness is a fundamental indicator of the functional state of articular cartilage. Reported test modes include compressive incremental strain to determine the equilibrium modulus, and sinusoidal strain to determine the dynamic modulus and stress/strain loss angle. Here, initial development is described for a method recognizing that gait is pulsatile. Agarose gels have been used by others for validation or comparison of mechanical test methods and models for cartilage and proteoglycan aggregate. Accordingly, gels ranging from 0.5 to 20% agarose were prepared. Pulsatile stiffness in both indentation and unconfined compression were closely reproducible. Stiffness as a function of agarose concentration rose exponentially, as found using other methods. Indentation stiffness was higher than for unconfined compression and ranged from approximately 2.0 kPa for 0.5% gel to approximately 3,800 kPa for 20% gel. Pulsatile dynamic stiffness appears to be a useful method, although further development is needed. Agarose gel stiffness values obtained by other methods were reviewed for comparison. Unfortunately, reported values for a given agarose concentration ranged widely (e.g. fourfold) even when test methods were similar. Causes appear to include differences in molecular weight and gel preparation time-temperature regimens. Also, agarose is hygroscopic, leading to unintended variations in gel composition. Agarose gels are problematic materials for validation or comparison of cartilage mechanical test methods and models. PMID:16470817

  11. Investigations of groundwater system and simulation of regional groundwater flow for North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Goode, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    by USGS at the site and results from other studies support, and are consistent with, a conceptual model of a layered leaky aquifer where the dip of the beds has a strong control on hydraulic connections in the groundwater system. Connections within and (or) parallel to bedding tend to be greater than across bedding. Transmissivities of aquifer intervals isolated by packers ranged over three orders of magnitude [from about 2.8 to 2,290 square feet per day (ft2/d) or 0.26 to 213 square meters per day (m2/d)], did not appear to differ much by mapped geologic unit, but showed some relation to depth being relatively smaller in the shallowest and deepest intervals (0 to 50 ft and more than 250 ft below land surface, respectively) compared to the intermediate depth intervals (50 to 250 ft below land surface) tested. Transmissivities estimated from multiple-observation well aquifer tests ranged from about 700 to 2,300 ft2/d (65 to 214 m2/d). Results of chemical analyses of water from isolated intervals or monitoring wells open to short sections of the aquifer show vertical differences in concentrations; chloride and silica concentrations generally were greater in shallow intervals than in deeper intervals. Chloride concentrations greater than 100 milligrams per liter (mg/L), combined with distinctive chloride/bromide ratios, indicate a different source of chloride in the western part of North Penn Area 7 than elsewhere in the site. Groundwater flow at a regional scale under steady-state conditions was simulated by use of a numerical model (MODFLOW-2000) for North Penn Area 7 with different layers representing saprolite/highly weathered rock near the surface and unweathered competent bedrock. The sedimentary formations that underlie the study area were modeled using dipping model layers for intermediate and deep zones of unweathered, fractured rock. Horizontal cell model size was 100 meters (m) by 100 meters (328 ft by 328 ft), and model layer thickness ranged from 6 m (19

  12. Investigations of groundwater system and simulation of regional groundwater flow for North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Goode, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    by USGS at the site and results from other studies support, and are consistent with, a conceptual model of a layered leaky aquifer where the dip of the beds has a strong control on hydraulic connections in the groundwater system. Connections within and (or) parallel to bedding tend to be greater than across bedding. Transmissivities of aquifer intervals isolated by packers ranged over three orders of magnitude [from about 2.8 to 2,290 square feet per day (ft2/d) or 0.26 to 213 square meters per day (m2/d)], did not appear to differ much by mapped geologic unit, but showed some relation to depth being relatively smaller in the shallowest and deepest intervals (0 to 50 ft and more than 250 ft below land surface, respectively) compared to the intermediate depth intervals (50 to 250 ft below land surface) tested. Transmissivities estimated from multiple-observation well aquifer tests ranged from about 700 to 2,300 ft2/d (65 to 214 m2/d). Results of chemical analyses of water from isolated intervals or monitoring wells open to short sections of the aquifer show vertical differences in concentrations; chloride and silica concentrations generally were greater in shallow intervals than in deeper intervals. Chloride concentrations greater than 100 milligrams per liter (mg/L), combined with distinctive chloride/bromide ratios, indicate a different source of chloride in the western part of North Penn Area 7 than elsewhere in the site. Groundwater flow at a regional scale under steady-state conditions was simulated by use of a numerical model (MODFLOW-2000) for North Penn Area 7 with different layers representing saprolite/highly weathered rock near the surface and unweathered competent bedrock. The sedimentary formations that underlie the study area were modeled using dipping model layers for intermediate and deep zones of unweathered, fractured rock. Horizontal cell model size was 100 meters (m) by 100 meters (328 ft by 328 ft), and model layer thickness ranged from 6 m (19

  13. Effect of Flow Pulsatility on Modeling the Hemodynamics in the Total Cavopulmonary Connection

    PubMed Central

    khiabani, Reza H.; Restrepo, Maria; Tang, Elaine; De Zélicourt, Diane; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Fogel, Mark; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2012-01-01

    Total Cavopulmonary Connection is the result of a series of palliative surgical repairs performed on patients with single ventricle heart defects. The resulting anatomy has complex and unsteady hemodynamics characterized by flow mixing and flow separation. Although varying degrees of flow pulsatility have been observed in vivo, non-pulsatile (time-averaged) boundary conditions have traditionally been assumed in hemodynamic modeling, and only recently have pulsatile conditions been incorporated without completely characterizing their effect or importance. In this study, 3D numerical simulations with both pulsatile and non-pulsatile boundary conditions were performed for 24 patients with different anatomies and flow boundary conditions from Georgia Tech database. Flow structures, energy dissipation rates and pressure drops were compared under rest and simulated exercise conditions. It was found that flow pulsatility is the primary factor in determining the appropriate choice of boundary conditions, whereas the anatomic configuration and cardiac output had secondary effects. Results show that the hemodynamics can be strongly influenced by the presence of pulsatile flow. However, there was a minimum pulsatility threshold, identified by defining a weighted pulsatility index (wPI), above which the influence was significant. It was shown that when wPI < 30%, the relative error in hemodynamic predictions using time-averaged boundary conditions was less than 10% compared to pulsatile simulations. In addition, when wPI <50, the relative error was less than 20%. A correlation was introduced to relate wPI to the relative error in predicting the flow metrics with non-pulsatile flow conditions. PMID:22841650

  14. An optimization formulation for characterization of pulsatile cortisol secretion

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Rose T.; Dahleh, Munther A.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Cortisol is released to relay information to cells to regulate metabolism and reaction to stress and inflammation. In particular, cortisol is released in the form of pulsatile signals. This low-energy method of signaling seems to be more efficient than continuous signaling. We hypothesize that there is a controller in the anterior pituitary that leads to pulsatile release of cortisol, and propose a mathematical formulation for such controller, which leads to impulse control as opposed to continuous control. We postulate that this controller is minimizing the number of secretory events that result in cortisol secretion, which is a way of minimizing the energy required for cortisol secretion; this controller maintains the blood cortisol levels within a specific circadian range while complying with the first order dynamics underlying cortisol secretion. We use an ℓ0-norm cost function for this controller, and solve a reweighed ℓ1-norm minimization algorithm for obtaining the solution to this optimization problem. We use four examples to illustrate the performance of this approach: (i) a toy problem that achieves impulse control, (ii) two examples that achieve physiologically plausible pulsatile cortisol release, (iii) an example where the number of pulses is not within the physiologically plausible range for healthy subjects while the cortisol levels are within the desired range. This novel approach results in impulse control where the impulses and the obtained blood cortisol levels have a circadian rhythm and an ultradian rhythm that are in agreement with the known physiology of cortisol secretion. The proposed formulation is a first step in developing intermittent controllers for curing cortisol deficiency. This type of bio-inspired pulse controllers can be employed for designing non-continuous controllers in brain-machine interface design for neuroscience applications. PMID:26321898

  15. An optimization formulation for characterization of pulsatile cortisol secretion.

    PubMed

    Faghih, Rose T; Dahleh, Munther A; Brown, Emery N

    2015-01-01

    Cortisol is released to relay information to cells to regulate metabolism and reaction to stress and inflammation. In particular, cortisol is released in the form of pulsatile signals. This low-energy method of signaling seems to be more efficient than continuous signaling. We hypothesize that there is a controller in the anterior pituitary that leads to pulsatile release of cortisol, and propose a mathematical formulation for such controller, which leads to impulse control as opposed to continuous control. We postulate that this controller is minimizing the number of secretory events that result in cortisol secretion, which is a way of minimizing the energy required for cortisol secretion; this controller maintains the blood cortisol levels within a specific circadian range while complying with the first order dynamics underlying cortisol secretion. We use an ℓ0-norm cost function for this controller, and solve a reweighed ℓ1-norm minimization algorithm for obtaining the solution to this optimization problem. We use four examples to illustrate the performance of this approach: (i) a toy problem that achieves impulse control, (ii) two examples that achieve physiologically plausible pulsatile cortisol release, (iii) an example where the number of pulses is not within the physiologically plausible range for healthy subjects while the cortisol levels are within the desired range. This novel approach results in impulse control where the impulses and the obtained blood cortisol levels have a circadian rhythm and an ultradian rhythm that are in agreement with the known physiology of cortisol secretion. The proposed formulation is a first step in developing intermittent controllers for curing cortisol deficiency. This type of bio-inspired pulse controllers can be employed for designing non-continuous controllers in brain-machine interface design for neuroscience applications. PMID:26321898

  16. Defects in pulsatile LH release in normally menstruating runners.

    PubMed

    Cumming, D C; Vickovic, M M; Wall, S R; Fluker, M R

    1985-04-01

    Intense physical exercise has been associated with reproductive dysfunction and menstrual cycles may be abnormal in a majority of women with a heavy training load. To determine whether training influenced pulsatile LH release, we measured LH pulse frequency, LH pulse amplitude and area under the curve over six hours during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle in four sedentary women and six eumenorrheic women runners with a training volume of at least 32 km per week. All three LH variables were significantly lower in runners than in controls. These data suggest that there is a central inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in eumenorrheic runners.

  17. Fluid-structure interaction for nonlinear response of shells conveying pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubaldi, Eleonora; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2016-06-01

    Circular cylindrical shells with flexible boundary conditions conveying pulsatile flow and subjected to pulsatile pressure are investigated. The equations of motion are obtained based on the nonlinear Novozhilov shell theory via Lagrangian approach. The flow is set in motion by a pulsatile pressure gradient. The fluid is modeled as a Newtonian pulsatile flow and it is formulated using a hybrid model that contains the unsteady effects obtained from the linear potential flow theory and the pulsatile viscous effects obtained from the unsteady time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A numerical bifurcation analysis employs a refined reduced order model to investigate the dynamic behavior. The case of shells containing quiescent fluid subjected to the action of a pulsatile transmural pressure is also addressed. Geometrically nonlinear vibration response to pulsatile flow and transmural pressure are here presented via frequency-response curves and time histories. The vibrations involving both a driven mode and a companion mode, which appear due to the axial symmetry, are also investigated. This theoretical framework represents a pioneering study that could be of great interest for biomedical applications. In particular, in the future, a more refined model of the one here presented will possibly be applied to reproduce the dynamic behavior of vascular prostheses used for repairing and replacing damaged and diseased thoracic aorta in cases of aneurysm, dissection or coarctation. For this purpose, a pulsatile time-dependent blood flow model is here considered by applying physiological waveforms of velocity and pressure during the heart beating period. This study provides, for the first time in literature, a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction model with deep insights in the nonlinear vibrations of circular cylindrical shells subjected to pulsatile pressure and pulsatile flow.

  18. In vitro heart valve testing: steady versus pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Black, M M; Hose, D R; Lamb, C J; Lawford, P V; Ralph, S J

    1994-03-01

    The design of artificial heart valves has traditionally been based on the development of a prototype device which was then subjected to extensive laboratory testing in order to confirm its suitability for clinical use. In the past the in vitro assessment of a valve's performance was based principally on the measurement of parameters such as pressure difference, regurgitation and, more recently, energy losses. Such measurements can be defined as being at the 'macro' level and rarely show any clinically significant differences amongst currently available prostheses. The analytical approach to flow through heart valves has previously been hampered by difficulties experienced in solving the relevant equations of flow particularly in the case of pulsatile conditions. Computational techniques are now available which enable appropriate solutions to be obtained for these problems and consequently provide an opportunity for detailed examination of the 'micro' level of flow disturbances exhibited by the different valves. This present preliminary study is designed to illustrate the use of such an analytical approach to the flow through prosthetic valves. A single topic has been selected for this purpose which is the comparative value of steady versus pulsatile flow testing. A bileaflet valve was chosen for the analysis and a mathematical model of this valve in the aortic position of the Sheffield Pulse Duplicator was created. The theoretical analysis was carried out using a commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics package, namely, FIDAP, on a SUN MICROSYSTEMS 10-30 workstation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Hypothyroidism affects pulsatile LH secretion in pubertal orchiectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Maia, A L; Favaretto, A L; Carvaho, T L; Rodrigues, J A; Iazigi, N

    1995-08-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of hypothyroidism on the pituitary-testicular axis in rats rendered hypothyroid on the beginning of puberty. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil for 8 weeks and killed for determination of hormonal status and body parameters. For determination of pulsatile LH secretion other animals were orchiectomized two weeks before sampling. Analysis of the results led us to conclude that although the absolute weight of sex organs tended to decrease in hypothyroid animals, the relative weights were equal or higher than control, suggesting that the development of these organs were not affected by hypothyroidism; the androgenic activity of hypothyroid rat testes were preserved; basal plasma levels of pituitary hormones were similar in control and hypothyroid groups; the pulsatile LH secretion showed a decrease in the number of pulses, nadir mean and total LH secretion in hypothyroid animals. Our results demonstrate that although hypothalamic-pituitary axis of hypothyroid pubertal rats displays an abnormal pulsation LH release, no evidences of abnormalities in the reproductive system functions were found.

  20. Cinematics and sticking of heart valves in pulsatile flow test.

    PubMed

    Köhler, J; Wirtz, R

    1991-05-01

    The aim of the project was to develop laboratory test devices for studies of the cinematics and sticking behaviour of technical valve protheses. The second step includes testing technical valves of different types and sizes under static and dynamic conditions. A force-deflection balance was developed in order to load valve rims by static radial forces until sticking or loss of a disc (sticking- and clamping-mould point) with computer-controlled force deflection curves. A second deflection device was developed and used for prosthetic valves in the aortic position of a pulsatile mock circulation loop with simultaneous video-cinematography. The stiffness of technical valve rims varied between 0.20 (St. Jude) and about 1.0 N/micron (metal rim valves). The stiffness decreased significantly with increasing valve size. Sticking under pulsatile flow conditions was in good agreement with the static deflection measurements. Hence, valve sticking with increasing danger of thrombus formation is more likely with a less stiff valve rim. In the case of forces acting perpendicularly to the pendulum axis, the clamping mould-point of the valve can be reached, followed by disc dislodgement. PMID:1864654

  1. Prediction and control of neural responses to pulsatile electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Luke J.; Sly, David James; O'Leary, Stephen John

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to predict and control the probability of firing of a neuron in response to pulsatile electrical stimulation of the type delivered by neural prostheses such as the cochlear implant, bionic eye or in deep brain stimulation. Using the cochlear implant as a model, we developed an efficient computational model that predicts the responses of auditory nerve fibers to electrical stimulation and evaluated the model's accuracy by comparing the model output with pooled responses from a group of guinea pig auditory nerve fibers. It was found that the model accurately predicted the changes in neural firing probability over time to constant and variable amplitude electrical pulse trains, including speech-derived signals, delivered at rates up to 889 pulses s-1. A simplified version of the model that did not incorporate adaptation was used to adaptively predict, within its limitations, the pulsatile electrical stimulus required to cause a desired response from neurons up to 250 pulses s-1. Future stimulation strategies for cochlear implants and other neural prostheses may be enhanced using similar models that account for the way that neural responses are altered by previous stimulation.

  2. A resolution congratulating the Penn State IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2013-03-06

    03/06/2013 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1237) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Early detection of microstructural white matter changes associated with arterial pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Todd A D; Bateman, Grant A; Levi, Christopher R; Parsons, Mark W; Michie, Patricia T; Karayanidis, Frini

    2013-01-01

    Increased cerebral blood flow pulsatility is common in vascular dementia and is associated with macrostructural damage to cerebral white matter or leukoaraiosis (LA). In this study, we examine whether cerebral blood flow pulsatility is associated with macrostructural and microstructural changes in cerebral white matter in older adults with no or mild LA and no evidence of dementia. Diffusion Tensor Imaging was used to measure fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of the microstructural integrity of white matter, and radial diffusivity (RaD), a measure sensitive to the integrity of myelin. When controlling for age, increased arterial pulsation was associated with deterioration in both measures of white matter microstructure but not LA severity. A stepwise multiple linear regression model revealed that arterial pulsatility index was the strongest predictor of FA (R = 0.483, adjusted R (2) = 0.220), followed by LA severity, but not age. These findings suggest that arterial pulsatility may provide insight into age-related reduction in white matter FA. Specifically, increased arterial pulsatility may increase perivascular shear stress and lead to accumulation of damage to perivascular oligodendrocytes, resulting in microstructural changes in white matter and contributing to proliferation of LA over time. Changes in cerebral blood flow pulsatility may therefore provide a sensitive index of white matter health that could facilitate the early detection of risk for perivascular white matter damage and the assessment of the effectiveness of preventative treatment targeted at reducing pulsatility.

  4. A comparison of methods for analyzing time series of pulsatile hormone data.

    PubMed

    Carlson, N E; Horton, K W; Grunwald, G K

    2013-11-20

    Many endocrine systems are regulated by pulsatile hormones - hormones that are secreted intermittently in boluses rather than continuously over time. To study pulsatile secretion, blood is drawn every few minutes for an extended period. The result is a time series of hormone concentrations for each individual. The goal is to estimate pulsatile hormone secretion features such as frequency, location, duration, and amount of pulsatile and non-pulsatile secretion and compare these features between groups. Various statistical approaches to analyzing these data have been proposed, but validation has generally focused on one hormone. Thus, we lack a broad understanding of each method's performance. By using simulated data with features seen in reproductive and stress hormones, we investigated the performance of three recently developed statistical approaches for analyzing pulsatile hormone data and compared them to a frequently used deconvolution approach. We found that methods incorporating a changing baseline modeled both constant and changing baseline shapes well; however, the added model flexibility resulted in a slight increase in bias in other model parameters. When pulses were well defined and baseline constant, Bayesian approaches performed similar to the existing deconvolution method. The increase in computation time of Bayesian approaches offered improved estimation and more accurate quantification of estimation variation in situations where pulse locations were not clearly identifiable. Within the class of deconvolution models for fitting pulsatile hormone data, the Bayesian approach with a changing baseline offered adequate results over the widest range of data.

  5. Hemodialysis: evidence of enhanced molecular clearance and ultrafiltration volume by using pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Runge, T M; Briceño, J C; Sheller, M E; Moritz, C E; Sloan, L; Bohls, F O; Ottmers, S E

    1993-09-01

    We describe several in vitro experiments showing evidence that pulsatile flow hemodialysis enhances ultrafiltration volume and molecular clearance as compared with steady flow hemodialysis. A new pulsatile pump and a conventional roller pump were compared using different hollow fiber dialyzers and a simulated blood solution containing urea, aspartame and vitamin B-12 at different flow rates and configurations. Ultrafiltration volume and concentration of urea, aspartame and B-12 were measured and molecular clearance (K) calculated. Ultrafiltration volume markedly increased with pulsatile flow. After 10 min K for urea with pulsatile flow was higher in all experiments even when ultrafiltration was prevented. Clearance of aspartame and B-12 also increased with pulsatile flow. We propose three mechanisms by which pulsatile flow is more efficient than steady flow hemodialysis: greater fluid energy, avoidance of molecular channeling and avoidance of membrane layering. We hypothesize that using pulsatile flow in hemodialysis can significantly shorten the duration of dialysis sessions for most of the patients, and consequently reduce the duration of the procedure and its cost.

  6. Concentration and dispersal of a Pseudo-nitzschia bloom in Penn Cove, Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Trainer, V L; Adams, N G; Bill, B D; Anulacion, B F; Wekell, J C

    1998-01-01

    A bloom of the pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia, several species of which are associated with the production of the potent excitotoxin domoic acid, was observed in a Puget Sound, Washington embayment in July and August of 1997. Penn Cove, which receives nutrients from the nearby Skagit River and abundant sunshine during summer months due to its location in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, is the home of a commercial mussel farm which supplies shellfish to many coastal areas of the USA. Levels of domoic acid in mussels increased to 3 ppm on 6 and 10 July, corresponding to the observation of a brown algal bloom in Penn Cove. Four species of Pseudo-nitzschia (P. pungens, P. multiseries, P. australis, and P. pseudodelicatissima) were present in our samples from the cove, corresponding to levels of domoic acid in seawater ranging from 0.1-0.8 mirog l(-1) as measured by a receptor binding assay. The highest Pseudo-nitzschia concentration during the time of our sampling was 13 million cells per liter on 28 July. The bloom of Pseudo-nitzschia occurred after a period of strong discharge from the Skagit River and rain accompanied by elevated south and southeasterly winds. Stratification of the cove, providing optimal bloom conditions, was facilitated by weak winds, sunshine, and a freshwater lens at the mouth of the cove. The position of the Pseudo-nitzschia bloom was influenced by buoyancy fronts caused by exchange of water within the cove with that of Saratoga Passage. The decay of this bloom in Penn Cove was accompanied by decreasing nitrate levels at all measured depths. These and future observations aid in the development of a model for prediction of toxic bloom events in the shallow embayments of Puget Sound. PMID:10223627

  7. Concentration and dispersal of a Pseudo-nitzschia bloom in Penn Cove, Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Trainer, V L; Adams, N G; Bill, B D; Anulacion, B F; Wekell, J C

    1998-01-01

    A bloom of the pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia, several species of which are associated with the production of the potent excitotoxin domoic acid, was observed in a Puget Sound, Washington embayment in July and August of 1997. Penn Cove, which receives nutrients from the nearby Skagit River and abundant sunshine during summer months due to its location in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, is the home of a commercial mussel farm which supplies shellfish to many coastal areas of the USA. Levels of domoic acid in mussels increased to 3 ppm on 6 and 10 July, corresponding to the observation of a brown algal bloom in Penn Cove. Four species of Pseudo-nitzschia (P. pungens, P. multiseries, P. australis, and P. pseudodelicatissima) were present in our samples from the cove, corresponding to levels of domoic acid in seawater ranging from 0.1-0.8 mirog l(-1) as measured by a receptor binding assay. The highest Pseudo-nitzschia concentration during the time of our sampling was 13 million cells per liter on 28 July. The bloom of Pseudo-nitzschia occurred after a period of strong discharge from the Skagit River and rain accompanied by elevated south and southeasterly winds. Stratification of the cove, providing optimal bloom conditions, was facilitated by weak winds, sunshine, and a freshwater lens at the mouth of the cove. The position of the Pseudo-nitzschia bloom was influenced by buoyancy fronts caused by exchange of water within the cove with that of Saratoga Passage. The decay of this bloom in Penn Cove was accompanied by decreasing nitrate levels at all measured depths. These and future observations aid in the development of a model for prediction of toxic bloom events in the shallow embayments of Puget Sound.

  8. Development and Initial Testing of the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Laura; Siderowf, Andrew; Rubright, Jonathan D.; Rick, Jacqueline; Dahodwala, Nabila; Duda, John E.; Hurtig, Howard; Stern, Matthew; Xie, Sharon X.; Rennert, Lior; Karlawish, Jason; Shea, Judy A.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Weintraub, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to describe the development and psychometric analysis of the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire. The questionnaire is an item response theory-based tool for rating cognitive instrumental activities of daily living in PD. Methods Candidate items for the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire were developed through literature review and focus groups of patients and knowledgeable informants. Item selection and calibration of item-response theory parameters were performed using responses from a cohort of PD patients and knowledgeable informants (n = 388). In independent cohorts of PD patients and knowledgeable informants, assessments of test-retest reliability (n = 50), and construct validity (n = 68) of the questionnaire were subsequently performed. Construct validity was assessed by correlating questionnaire scores with measures of motor function, cognition, an existing activities of daily living measure, and directly observed daily function. Results Fifty items were retained in the final questionnaire item bank. Items were excluded owing to redundancy, difficult reading level, and when item-response theory parameters could not be calculated. Test-retest reliability was high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.97; P < 0.001). The questionnaire correlated strongly with cognition (r = 0.68; P < 0.001) and directly observed daily function (r = 0.87; P < 0.001), but not with motor impairment (r = 0.08; P = 0.53). The questionnaire score accurately discriminated between PD patients with and without dementia (receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.91; 95% confidence interval: 0.85–0.97). Conclusions The Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire shows strong evidence of reliability and validity. Item response theory-based psychometric analysis suggests that this questionnaire can discriminate across a range of daily functions. PMID:26249849

  9. Altered pulsatile gonadotropin signaling in nutritional deficiency in the male.

    PubMed

    Bergendahl, M; Veldhuis, J D

    1995-07-01

    Reproduction cannot occur without adequate nutrition. Diets that are nutritionally inadequate delay and disrupt the pubertal development of the reproductive processes of immature experimental animals and humans, and impair the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in adults. Although there is a general understanding of the linkages between nutrition and reproduction, there is a lack of detailed knowledge of the exact mechanisms that couple these two systems. The major effects of malnutrition on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis reported in the literature are, for the most part, manifested as reduced gonadotropin secretion. Malnutrition results in decreased circulating gonadotropin concentrations. These changes in the reproductive system are associated with impaired gonadal function and subsequent secondary sex organ atrophy and lead, ultimately, to poor reproduction. Decreased hypothalamic release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has been proposed as the most important etiologic factor for the fasting-induced suppression of pituitary-testicular function. In the human, hypogonadism and infertility develop in both sexes during chronic malnutrition. Most studies on the effects of malnutrition on the reproductive hormones have been performed in women, perhaps because malnutrition in women is promptly accompanied by amenorrhea, whereas in men hypogonadism develops gradually and becomes clinically evident only during more severe malnutrition. With the advent of sensitive assays for measuring reproductive hormones and of modern computerized methods for analyzing the pulsatile secretion of these hormones, however, the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis has been scrutinized and it has, indeed, been observed that this system is disturbed even during acute malnutrition. Here, we review the effects of malnutrition on reproductive function, especially on the pulsatile pattern of LH secretion, in humans and in experimental animals.

  10. Hippocampal Fast Glutamatergic Transmission Is Transiently Regulated by Corticosterone Pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Sarabdjitsingh, R Angela; Pasricha, Natasha; Smeets, Johanna A S; Kerkhofs, Amber; Mikasova, Lenka; Karst, Henk; Groc, Laurent; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that corticosteroid hormones (such as corticosterone) are released in ultradian pulses as a natural consequence of pituitary-adrenal interactions. All organs, including the brain, are thus exposed to pulsatile changes in corticosteroid hormone level, important to ensure full genomic responsiveness to stress-induced surges. However, corticosterone also changes neuronal excitability through rapid non-genomic pathways, particularly in the hippocampus. Potentially, background excitability of hippocampal neurons could thus be changed by pulsatile exposure to corticosteroids. It is currently unknown, though, how neuronal activity alters during a sequence of corticosterone pulses. To test this, hippocampal cells were exposed in vitro to four consecutive corticosterone pulses with a 60 min inter-pulse interval. During the pulses we examined four features of hippocampal signal transfer by the main excitatory transmitter glutamate-i.e., postsynaptic responses to spontaneous release of presynaptic vesicles, postsynaptic GluA2-AMPA receptor dynamics, basal (evoked) field responses, and synaptic plasticity, using a set of high resolution imaging and electrophysiological approaches. We show that the first pulse of corticosterone causes a transient increase in miniature EPSC frequency, AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity, while basal evoked field responses are unaffected. This pattern is not maintained during subsequent applications: responses become more variable, attenuate or even reverse over time, albeit with different kinetics for the various experimental endpoints. This may indicate that the beneficial effect of ultradian pulses on transcriptional regulation in the hippocampus is not consistently accompanied by short-term perturbations in background excitability. In general, this could be interpreted as a means to keep hippocampal neurons responsive to incoming signals related to environmental challenges. PMID:26741493

  11. Microprocessor-controlled pulsatile flow loop for hemodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T G; Hobson, R W; Pawel, H E

    1986-03-01

    Validation of spectral analytic techniques in the clinical assessment and quantitation of vascular stenoses has been aided by use of in vitro flow loops. We have used a recently developed microprocessor-controlled pulsatile flow model to examine the influence of varying stenoses on Doppler-shifted peak systolic frequencies. A nonaxisymmetric, vertically oriented stenosis was produced by extrinsic compression of latex rubber tubing 12 mm in diameter, reducing the cross-sectional area (CSA) by 25, 40, 50, 60, 70, 85, and 97%. A rolling diaphragm pump, driven through a slider-crank mechanism by a microprocessor-controlled stepper motor, generated characteristic arterial pulse waves at a rate of 75 cycles per minute. Using an 8 MHz, continuous-wave, directional Doppler velocimeter, the Doppler-shifted frequencies were recorded at the stenosis. Four sets of observations were made at each of the stenoses, and the peak systolic frequency (PSF) was determined using a spectrum analyzer. The PSF in the absence of an obstructing stenosis was 2.56 +/- 0.03 (KHz +/- SEM). This increased significantly (P less than 0.05) to 4.80 +/- 0.09 when the CSA was reduced by 50%, to 5.90 +/- 0.37 when the CSA was reduced by 60% (P less than 0.05), to 8.40 +/- 0.10 when the CSA was reduced by 70% (P less than 0.05), and to 17.84 +/- 0.89 when the CSA was reduced by 85% (P less than 0.05). These data establish the utility of this pulsatile flow model, confirming the direct relationship between the Doppler-shifted PSF and the percentage reduction in CSA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3951221

  12. Cellulose-to-ethanol projects losing momentum. [Gulf Process; Penn/GE Process; Iotech Process

    SciTech Connect

    Worthy, W.

    1981-12-07

    The history of cellulose-to-ethanol production in the US is briefly described. Although results have been encouraging for cellulose-to-ethanol projects at pilot plant stage, the Reagan Administration's decision not to support commercial development of synthetic fuels technology is making it difficult for promoters to secure funds for demonstration plants. The technology to produce ethanol from cellulosic feedstocks is described and the processes that are farthest along in terms of overall development are detailed. In particular, a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process, developed by Gulf is described together with the Penn/GE process and the Iotech process.

  13. The pulsatility volume index: an indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on fast magnetic resonance imaging of cardiac and respiratory pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Evans, Karleyton C; Bhat, Himanshu; Keil, Boris; Rosen, Bruce R; Boas, David A; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-05-13

    The influence of cardiac activity on the viscoelastic properties of intracranial tissue is one of the mechanisms through which brain-heart interactions take place, and is implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Cerebrovascular disease risk is not fully explained by current risk factors, including arterial compliance. Cerebrovascular compliance is currently estimated indirectly through Doppler sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of blood velocity changes. In order to meet the need for novel cerebrovascular disease risk factors, we aimed to design and validate an MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on direct endogenous measures of blood volume changes. We implemented a fast non-gated two-dimensional MRI pulse sequence based on echo-planar imaging (EPI) with ultra-short repetition time (approx. 30-50 ms), which stepped through slices every approximately 20 s. We constrained the solution of the Bloch equations for spins moving faster than a critical speed to produce an endogenous contrast primarily dependent on spin volume changes, and an approximately sixfold signal gain compared with Ernst angle acquisitions achieved by the use of a 90° flip angle. Using cardiac and respiratory peaks detected on physiological recordings, average cardiac and respiratory MRI pulse waveforms in several brain compartments were obtained at 7 Tesla, and used to derive a compliance indicator, the pulsatility volume index (pVI). The pVI, evaluated in larger cerebral arteries, displayed significant variation within and across vessels. Multi-echo EPI showed the presence of significant pulsatility effects in both S0 and [Formula: see text] signals, compatible with blood volume changes. Lastly, the pVI dynamically varied during breath-holding compared with normal breathing, as expected for a compliance indicator. In summary, we characterized and performed an initial validation of a novel MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance, which might prove useful

  14. The pulsatility volume index: an indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on fast magnetic resonance imaging of cardiac and respiratory pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Evans, Karleyton C; Bhat, Himanshu; Keil, Boris; Rosen, Bruce R; Boas, David A; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-05-13

    The influence of cardiac activity on the viscoelastic properties of intracranial tissue is one of the mechanisms through which brain-heart interactions take place, and is implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Cerebrovascular disease risk is not fully explained by current risk factors, including arterial compliance. Cerebrovascular compliance is currently estimated indirectly through Doppler sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of blood velocity changes. In order to meet the need for novel cerebrovascular disease risk factors, we aimed to design and validate an MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance based on direct endogenous measures of blood volume changes. We implemented a fast non-gated two-dimensional MRI pulse sequence based on echo-planar imaging (EPI) with ultra-short repetition time (approx. 30-50 ms), which stepped through slices every approximately 20 s. We constrained the solution of the Bloch equations for spins moving faster than a critical speed to produce an endogenous contrast primarily dependent on spin volume changes, and an approximately sixfold signal gain compared with Ernst angle acquisitions achieved by the use of a 90° flip angle. Using cardiac and respiratory peaks detected on physiological recordings, average cardiac and respiratory MRI pulse waveforms in several brain compartments were obtained at 7 Tesla, and used to derive a compliance indicator, the pulsatility volume index (pVI). The pVI, evaluated in larger cerebral arteries, displayed significant variation within and across vessels. Multi-echo EPI showed the presence of significant pulsatility effects in both S0 and [Formula: see text] signals, compatible with blood volume changes. Lastly, the pVI dynamically varied during breath-holding compared with normal breathing, as expected for a compliance indicator. In summary, we characterized and performed an initial validation of a novel MRI indicator of cerebrovascular compliance, which might prove useful

  15. Measurement of real pulsatile blood flow using X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Lim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging technique has been used to investigate biofluid flows in a non-destructive manner. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of the X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles as flow tracer for measurement of pulsatile blood flows under in vivo conditions. The traceability of CO2 microbubbles in a pulsatile flow was demonstrated through in vitro experiment. A rat extracorporeal bypass loop was used by connecting a tube between the abdominal aorta and jugular vein of a rat to obtain hemodynamic information of actual pulsatile blood flows without changing the hemorheological properties. The decrease in image contrast of the surrounding tissue was also investigated for in vivo applications of the proposed technique. This technique could be used to accurately measure whole velocity field information of real pulsatile blood flows and has strong potential for hemodynamic diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25744850

  16. Pulsatile flow into the aqueous veins: Manifestations in normal and glaucomatous eyes

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Murray; Martin, Elizabeth; Jamil, Annisa

    2015-01-01

    The aqueous outflow system is unique because nowhere else can the pattern of flow of an extravascular fluid be directly observed as it returns to the vascular system. Such observations reveal that aqueous flow both from Schlemm’s canal into the aqueous veins and from the aqueous veins into the episcleral veins is pulsatile. Pulsatile aqueous flow mechanisms are observable in vivo not only in normal and but also in glaucomatous eyes. A series of specific patterns accompany the pulsatile mixing of aqueous with blood in the episcleral veins. These directly observable patterns of pulsatile flow are synchronous with intraocular pressure (IOP) transients induced by the cardiac pulse, blinking and eye movement. Patterns of pulsatile flow are altered by events that increase IOP such as pressure on the side of the eye, tonography and water drinking. Pulsatile flow stops when IOP is reduced below its resting level, but begins again when IOP returns to the resting level. Pulsatile flow reduction probably results from the intrinsic reduction of pulse amplitude at a lower IOP, and may thus provide a passive mechanism to maintain short-term homeostasis. Thus modulation of the pulsatile flow phenomenon appears to maintain a homeostatic IOP setpoint. Visible pulsatile flow abnormalities develop in glaucoma patients. Medications that reduce IOP through improvement in outflow do so through pulsatile flow mechanisms. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that cyclic stresses in outflow tissues alter signaling pathways, cytoskeletal responses, extracellular matrix composition and cytokine secretion. How physiologic pulse transients orchestrate cellular responses and how cellular responses identified in the laboratory may in turn regulate pulsatile aqueous outflow is unknown. Linkage of laboratory and in vivo observations await an improved understanding of how cellular and extracellular structures within the outflow system are able to generate an aqueous pulse wave. The purpose of the

  17. Analytical analysis of the Pennes bioheat transfer equation with sinusoidal heat flux condition on skin surface.

    PubMed

    Shih, Tzu-Ching; Yuan, Ping; Lin, Win-Li; Kou, Hong-Sen

    2007-11-01

    This study focuses on the effect of the temperature response of a semi-infinite biological tissue due to a sinusoidal heat flux at the skin. The Pennes bioheat transfer equation such as rho(t)c(t)( partial differentialT/ partial differentialt)+W(b)c(b)(T-T(a))=k partial differential(2)T/ partial differentialx(2) with the oscillatory heat flux boundary condition such as q(0,t)=q(0)e(iomegat) was investigated. By using the Laplace transform, the analytical solution of the Pennes bioheat transfer equation with surface sinusoidal heating condition is found. This analytical expression is suitable for describing the transient temperature response of tissue for the whole time domain from the starting periodic oscillation to the final steady periodic oscillation. The results show that the temperature oscillation due to the sinusoidal heating on the skin surface is unstable in the initial period. Further, it is unavailable to predict the blood perfusion rate via the phase shifting between the surface heat flux and the surface temperature. Moreover, the lower frequency of sinusoidal heat flux on the skin surface induces a more sensitive phase shift response to the blood perfusion rate change, but extends the beginning time of sampling because of the avoidance of the unavailable first cyclic oscillation.

  18. Three-dimensional shape construction of pulsatile tissue from ultrasonic movies for assistance of clinical diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kawaguchi, Hikari; Yamada, Masayoshi; Nakamori, Nobuyuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2010-02-01

    Three-dimensional shape of pulsatile tissue due to blood flow, which is one of key diagnostic features in ischemia, has been constructed from 2D ultrasonic movies for assisting clinical diagnosis. The 2D ultrasonic movies (640x480pixels/frame, 8bits/pixel, 33ms/frame) were taken with a conventional ultrasonic apparatus and an ultrasonic probe, while measuring the probe orientations with a compact tilt-sensor. The 2D images of pulsatile strength were obtained from each 2D ultrasonic movie by evaluating a heartbeat-frequency component calculated by Fourier transform of a series of pixel values sampled at each pixel. The 2D pulsatile images were projected into a 3D domain to obtain a 3D grid of pulsatile strength according to the probe orientations. The 3D shape of pulsatile tissue was constructed by determining the iso-surfaces of appropriate strength in the 3D grid. The shapes of pulsatile tissue examined in neonatal crania clearly represented the 3D structures of several arteries such as middle cerebral artery, which is useful for diagnosis of ischemic diseases. Since our technique is based on feature extraction in tissue dynamics, it is also useful for homogeneous tissue, for which conventional 3D ultrasonogram is unsuitable due to unclear tissue boundary.

  19. Increased erythrocyte adhesion to VCAM-1 during pulsatile flow: Application of a microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay

    PubMed Central

    White, Jennell; Lancelot, Moira; Sarnaik, Sharada; Hines, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by microvascular occlusion mediated by adhesive interactions of sickle erythrocytes (SSRBCs) to the endothelium. Most in vitro flow adhesion assays measure SSRBC adhesion during continuous flow, although in vivo SSRBC adhesive interactions occur during pulsatile flow. Using a well-plate microfluidic flow adhesion system, we demonstrate that isolated SSRBCs adhere to vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) at greater levels during pulsatile versus continuous flow. A significant increase in adhesive interactions was observed between all pulse frequencies 1 Hz to 2 Hz (60–120 beats/min) when compared to non-pulsatile flow. Adhesion of isolated SSRBCs and whole blood during pulsatile flow was unaffected by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition, and exposure of SSRBCs to pulsatile flow did not affect the intrinsic adhesive properties of SSRBCs. The cell type responsible for increased adhesion of whole blood varied from patient to patient. We conclude that low flow periods of the pulse cycle allow more adhesive interactions between sickle erythrocytes and VCAM-1, and sickle erythrocyte adhesion in the context of whole blood may better reflect physiologic cellular interactions. The microfluidic flow adhesion bioassay used in this study may have applications for clinical assessment of sickle erythrocyte adhesion during pulsatile flow. PMID:24898561

  20. School-Based Prevention of Depressive Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Study of the Effectiveness and Specificity of the Penn Resiliency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, Jane E.; Reivich, Karen J.; Freres, Derek R.; Chaplin, Tara M.; Shatte, Andrew J.; Samuels, Barbra; Elkon, Andrea G. L.; Litzinger, Samantha; Lascher, Marisa; Gallop, Robert; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the effectiveness and specificity of the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP; J. E. Gillham, L. H. Jaycox, K. J. Reivich, M. E. P. Seligman, & T. Silver, 1990), a cognitive-behavioral depression prevention program. Children (N = 697) from 3 middle schools were randomly assigned to PRP, Control (CON), or the Penn Enhancement …

  1. Reduced Pulsatility Induces Periarteritis in Kidney: Role of the Local Renin-Angiotensin System

    PubMed Central

    Ootaki, Chiyo; Yamashita, Michifumi; Ootaki, Yoshio; Kamohara, Keiji; Weber, Stephan; Klatte, Ryan S.; Smith, William A.; Massiello, Alex L.; Emancipator, Steven N.; Golding, Leonard A.R.; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2008-01-01

    Background The need for pulsatility in the circulation during long-term mechanical support has been a subject of debate. We compared histological changes in calf renal arteries subjected to various degrees of pulsatile circulation in vivo. We addressed the hypothesis that the local reninangiotensin system (RAS) may be implicated in these histological changes. Methods and Results Sixteen calves were implanted with devices giving differing degrees of pulsatile circulation: six had a continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD); six had a continuous flow right ventricular assist device (RVAD); and four had a pulsatile total artificial heart (TAH). Six other calves were histological and immunohistochemical controls. In the LVAD group, the pulsatility index was significantly lower (0.28 ± 0.07 LVAD vs 0.56 ± 0.08 RVAD, vs 0.53 ± 0.10 TAH; p < 0.01), and we observed severe periarteritis in all cases in the LVAD group. The number of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R)-positive cells and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-positive cells in periarterial areas was significantly higher in the LVAD group (AT1R: 350 ± 139 LVAD vs 8 ± 6 RVAD, vs 3 ± 2 TAH, vs 3 ± 2 in control; p < 0.001 and ACE: 325 ± 59 LVAD vs 6 ± 4 RVAD, vs 6 ± 5 TAH, vs 3 ± 1 control; p < 0.001). Conclusions The reduced pulsatility produced by a continuous flow LVAD implantation induced severe periarteritis in the kidney. The local RAS was upregulated in the inflammatory cells only in the continuous flow LVAD group. ULTAMINI-ABSTRACT We compared histological changes in calf renal arteries subjected to various degrees of pulsatile circulation; continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD), continuous flow right ventricular assist device, pulsatile total artificial heart and control. We observed severe periarteritis, and upregulation of local renin angiotensin system only in the LVAD group. The necessity of maintaining pulsatility in the systemic circulation during long

  2. Pulsatile instability in rapid directional solidification - Strongly-nonlinear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, G. J.; Braun, R. J.; Brattkus, K.; Davis, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the rapid directional solidification of a dilute binary alloy, analysis reveals that, in addition to the cellular mode of Mullins and Sekerka (1964), there is an oscillatory instability. For the model analyzed by Merchant and Davis (1990), the preferred wavenumber is zero; the mode is one of pulsation. Two strongly nonlinear analyses are performed that describe this pulsatile mode. In the first case, nonequilibrium effects that alter solute rejection at the interface are taken asymptotically small. A nonlinear oscillator equation governs the position of the solid-liquid interface at leading order, and amplitude and phase evolution equations are derived for the uniformly pulsating interface. The analysis provides a uniform description of both subcritical and supercritical bifurcation and the transition between the two. In the second case, nonequilibrium effects that alter solute rejection are taken asymptotically large, and a different nonlinear oscillator equation governs the location of the interface to leading order. A similar analysis allows for the derivation of an amplitude evolution equation for the uniformly pulsating interface. In this case, the bifurcation is always supercritical. The results are used to make predictions about the characteristics of solute bands that would be frozen into the solid.

  3. Platelet adhesion to polyurethane urea under pulsatile flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Navitsky, Michael A; Taylor, Joshua O; Smith, Alexander B; Slattery, Margaret J; Deutsch, Steven; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Manning, Keefe B

    2014-12-01

    Platelet adhesion to a polyurethane urea surface is a precursor to thrombus formation within blood-contacting cardiovascular devices, and platelets have been found to adhere strongly to polyurethane surfaces below a shear rate of approximately 500 s(-1). The aim of the current work is to determine the properties of platelet adhesion to the polyurethane urea surface as a function of time-varying shear exposure. A rotating disk system was used to study the influence of steady and pulsatile flow conditions (e.g., cardiac inflow and sawtooth waveforms) for platelet adhesion to the biomaterial surface. All experiments were conducted with the same root mean square angular rotation velocity (29.63 rad/s) and waveform period. The disk was rotated in platelet-rich bovine plasma for 2 h, with adhesion quantified by confocal microscopy measurements of immunofluorescently labeled bovine platelets. Platelet adhesion under pulsating flow was found to decay exponentially with increasing shear rate. Adhesion levels were found to depend upon peak platelet flux and shear rate, regardless of rotational waveform. In combination with flow measurements, these results may be useful for predicting regions susceptible to thrombus formation within ventricular assist devices.

  4. An experimental study of pulsatile flow through compliant tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Victoria; Savas, Omer; Saloner, David

    2006-11-01

    An experimental investigation is made into transitional behaviors and instability of oscillatory input flows through elastic tubes, a problem with applications to hemodynamics and flows in the pulmonary system. Sinusoidal input flow is driven through a compliant silicone model in a series of experiments to investigate the effects of wall motion. A novel mechanism allows active control and feedback over the pressure on the tube exterior. By comparing the pressure within and outside of the tube and modifying the exterior pressure accordingly, the tube is inflated in a controlled manner without altering the input flow. In these experiments, the tube wall is deformed sinusoidally with an amplitude of approximately ten percent of its radius. Experiments are conducted using varying values of the parameters α= a √φν and β= δx √φν where a is the tube radius, φ the angular velocity of the input flow, ν the kinematic viscosity, and δx the cross-stream averaged periodic displacement of a fluid particle undergoing pulsatile motion. For a given α, it is found that indications of conditional turbulence appear in this flow through elastic tubes at far lower values of β - and thus at lower amplitudes of oscillation - than are reported in the literature for flows through rigid tubing.

  5. Description of a flow optimized oxygenator with integrated pulsatile pump.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, Ralf; Schlanstein, Peter; Arens, Jutta; Graefe, Roland; Schreiber, Fabian; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2010-11-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a well-established therapy for several lung and heart diseases in the field of neonatal and pediatric medicine (e.g., acute respiratory distress syndrome, congenital heart failure, cardiomyopathy). Current ECMO systems are typically composed of an oxygenator and a separate nonpulsatile blood pump. An oxygenator with an integrated pulsatile blood pump for small infant ECMO was developed, and this novel concept was tested regarding functionality and gas exchange rate. Pulsating silicone tubes (STs) were driven by air pressure and placed inside the cylindrical fiber bundle of an oxygenator to be used as a pump module. The findings of this study confirm that pumping blood with STs is a viable option for the future. The maximum gas exchange rate for oxygen is 48mL/min/L(blood) at a medium blood flow rate of about 300mL/min. Future design steps were identified to optimize the flow field through the fiber bundle to achieve a higher gas exchange rate. First, the packing density of the hollow-fiber bundle was lower than commercial oxygenators due to the manual manufacturing. By increasing this packing density, the gas exchange rate would increase accordingly. Second, distribution plates for a more uniform blood flow can be placed at the inlet and outlet of the oxygenator. Third, the hollow-fiber membranes can be individually placed to ensure equal distances between the surrounding hollow fibers.

  6. Validation of the Penn Interactive Peer Play Scale with Preschool Children in Low-Income Families in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Chi-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Play is a primary context for fostering young children's positive peer interactions. Through play, children develop the social, emotional, cognitive and language skills that contribute to the ability to establish effective relationships with peers. The Penn Interactive Peer Play Scale (PIPPS) was first developed by Fantuzzo to assess the…

  7. Hemodynamic responses to continuous versus pulsatile mechanical unloading of the failing left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Carlo R; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Litwak, Kenneth N; Sobieski, Michael; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Slaughter, Mark S; Koenig, Steven C

    2010-01-01

    Debate exists regarding the merits and limitations of continuous versus pulsatile flow mechanical circulatory support. To characterize the hemodynamic differences between each mode of support, we investigated the acute effects of continuous versus pulsatile unloading of the failing left ventricle in a bovine model. Heart failure was induced in male calves (n = 14). During an acute study, animals were instrumented through thoracotomy for hemodynamic measurement. A continuous flow (n = 8) and/or pulsatile flow (n = 8) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) was implanted and studied during maximum support ( approximately 5 L/min) and moderate support ( approximately 2-3 L/min) modes. Pulse pressure (PP), surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE), and (energy equivalent pressure [EEP]/mean aortic pressure (MAP) - 1) x 100% were derived to characterize hemodynamic energy profiles during the different support modes. Standard hemodynamic parameters of cardiac performance were also derived. Data were analyzed by repeated measures one-way analysis of variance within groups and unpaired Student's t-tests across groups. During maximum and moderate continuous unloading, PP, SHE, and (EEP/MAP - 1) x 100% were significantly decreased compared with baseline and compared with pulsatile unloading. As a result, continuous unloading significantly altered left ventricular peak systolic pressure, aortic systolic and diastolic pressure, +/-dP/dt, and rate x pressure product, whereas pulsatile unloading preserved a normal profile of physiologic values. As continuous unloading increased, the pressure-volume relationship collapsed, and the aortic valve remained closed. In contrast, as pulsatile unloading increased, a comparable decrease in left ventricular volumes was noted. However, a normal range of left ventricular pressures was preserved. Continuous unloading deranged the physiologic profile of myocardial and vascular hemodynamic energy utilization, whereas pulsatile unloading preserved more

  8. Changing Perceptions of the University as a Community of Learning: The Case of Penn State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willits, Fern K.; Brennan, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Writing in 1990 for the Carnegie Foundation and the American Council on Education, Ernest Boyer described the importance of strengthening the colleges and universities as vital communities of learning by emphasizing six critical dimensions or characteristics of campus life: educationally purposeful, open, just, disciplined, caring, and…

  9. Penn State Activities in the NASA GSFC Transmissive Microshutter Array Technology Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ge, Jian

    2002-01-01

    This is a one year contract starting on April 1, 2001 to design the Rapid Infrared and Visible Multiple Object Spectrometer (RIVMOS) and its auxiliary dispersing elements, design and fabricate silicon grisms, and reduce testing data with silicon grisms. Here I report our progress made during the funding period.

  10. Community-Based Interventions for Young Adolescents: The Penn State PRIDE Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Susan M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    With local Cooperative Extension agents serving as a bridge between university-based researchers and local community members, the PRIDE Project's collaborative activities have included building university-community relationships; carrying out needs assessments, program planning, and program evaluation research; and conducting policy seminars at…

  11. Non-invasive estimation of static and pulsatile intracranial pressure from transcranial acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Levinsky, Alexandra; Papyan, Surik; Weinberg, Guy; Stadheim, Trond; Eide, Per Kristian

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether a method for estimation of non-invasive ICP (nICP) from transcranial acoustic (TCA) signals mixed with head-generated sounds estimate the static and pulsatile invasive ICP (iICP). For that purpose, simultaneous iICP and mixed TCA signals were obtained from patients undergoing continuous iICP monitoring as part of clinical management. The ear probe placed in the right outer ear channel sent a TCA signal with fixed frequency (621 Hz) that was picked up by the left ear probe along with acoustic signals generated by the intracranial compartment. Based on a mathematical model of the association between mixed TCA and iICP, the static and pulsatile nICP values were determined. Total 39 patients were included in the study; the total number of observations for prediction of static and pulsatile iICP were 5789 and 6791, respectively. The results demonstrated a good agreement between iICP/nICP observations, with mean difference of 0.39 mmHg and 0.53 mmHg for static and pulsatile ICP, respectively. In summary, in this cohort of patients, mixed TCA signals estimated the static and pulsatile iICP with rather good accuracy. Further studies are required to validate whether mixed TCA signals may become useful for measurement of nICP. PMID:26997563

  12. Pulsatility flow around a single cylinder - an experimental model of flow inside an artificial lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Bull, Joseph L.

    2004-11-01

    Pulsatile flow past a single cylinder is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry. This study aims to elucidate the effects of pulstility on the velocity field, which influences the convection-dominated transport within the fluid. The artificial lung device can be connected in parallel or series with the native lungs and may potentially be used as a bridge to transplant or for pulmonary replacement. The artificial lung consists of hollow microfibers through which gas flows and blood flows around. Blood flow through the device is pulsatile because it is driven entirely by the right heart. Steady flow over bluff bodies has been investigated in many contexts, such as heat exchangers. However, few studies have been investigated the effect of pulsatility. The effects of frequency, amplitude of pulsatility, and average flow rate on the formation of vortices after a cylinder are examined. Vortices near the cylinder are found to develop at lower Reynolds number in pulsatile flow than in steady flow. This work is supported by NIH grant R01 HL69420-01.

  13. Easy Pulsatile Phantom for Teaching and Validation of Flow Measurements in Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Rominger, M. B.; Müller-Stuler, E.-M.; Pinto, M.; Becker, A. S.; Martini, K.; Frauenfelder, T.; Klingmüller, V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To build a simple model to teach and validate non-pulsatile and pulsatile flow quantification in ultrasound. Materials and Methods: The setting consists of the following connected components: (1) medical syringe pump producing an adjustable constant flow (ml/min), (2) modulator modifying constant flow to a reproducible pulsatile flow, (3) water tank containing a diagonal running silicone tube (0.5 mm inner diameter), and (4) a fixated ultrasound probe (L9 Linear Array 9 MHz, GE Logiq E9) measuring the flow inside the tube. Commercially available microbubbles suspended with physiological saline solution were used for ultrasonic visibility. Spectral Doppler of different flow profiles is performed. Results: The syringe pump produces an adjustable, constant flow and serves as the reference standard. The filling volume of the tube system is 1.2 ml. Microbubbles are very well detected by ultrasound and can be used as an easy and clean blood mimicking substance. The modulator generates different physiological and pathological flow profiles. Velocities are similar to those found within human blood vessels. Thus, it is possible to train and validate flow measurements in ultrasound. Conclusion: The model produces non-pulsatile and various pulsatile flow profiles and allows validation of flow measurements. The compact size permits easy and economic setup for flow measurements in research, skills lab and continuing education.

  14. Local anaesthetic techniques and pulsatile ocular blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Chang, B.; Hee, W.; Ling, R.; Broadway, D.; Beigi, B.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To compare pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) and intraocular pressure (IOP) between eyes of patients receiving either peribulbar (with and without balloon compression) or subconjunctival local anaesthesia (LA).
METHODS—30 eyes of 30 patients undergoing cataract surgery by phacoemulsification were investigated in a study of parallel group design. Ten patients had peribulbar LA and 10 minutes compression with a Honan's balloon (group A). A further 10 patients who received peribulbar LA alone (group B) acted as controls for the effects of balloon compression. Ten other patients were given subconjunctival LA (group C). POBF and IOP were measured using a modified Langham pneumatonometer. Three measurements were made in each eye, the first recording immediately before LA, the second 1 minute after, and the third 10 minutes after LA.
RESULTS—No significant change in POBF or IOP was recorded in eyes receiving subconjunctival LA. In the peribulbar groups (A and B), there was a drop in median POBF of 252 and 138 µl/min respectively 1 minute after LA, which was statistically significant in both groups (p<0.01). By 10 minutes, POBF tended to return to baseline levels, but remained significantly reduced in group B (p<0.05). In addition, there was a significant (p<0.05) reduction in IOP (mean drop of 4.82 mm Hg) in group A following peribulbar LA with balloon compression.
CONCLUSIONS—POBF was significantly reduced after peribulbar LA but was unchanged after subconjunctival LA. Balloon compression reduced IOP and improved POBF following peribulbar LA. The findings may have clinical implications in patients with compromised ocular circulation or significant glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

 PMID:11049951

  15. Investigation of pulsatile flowfield in healthy thoracic aorta models.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chih-Yung; Yang, An-Shik; Tseng, Li-Yu; Chai, Jyh-Wen

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Complex hemodynamics plays a critical role in the development of aortic dissection and atherosclerosis, as well as many other diseases. Since fundamental fluid mechanics are important for the understanding of the blood flow in the cardiovascular circulatory system of the human body aspects, a joint experimental and numerical study was conducted in this study to determine the distributions of wall shear stress and pressure and oscillatory WSS index, and to examine their correlation with the aortic disorders, especially dissection. Experimentally, the Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI) method was used to acquire the true geometry of a normal human thoracic aorta, which was readily converted into a transparent thoracic aorta model by the rapid prototyping (RP) technique. The thoracic aorta model was then used in the in vitro experiments and computations. Simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code ACE+((R)) to determine flow characteristics of the three-dimensional, pulsatile, incompressible, and Newtonian fluid in the thoracic aorta model. The unsteady boundary conditions at the inlet and the outlet of the aortic flow were specified from the measured flowrate and pressure results during in vitro experiments. For the code validation, the predicted axial velocity reasonably agrees with the PC-MRI experimental data in the oblique sagittal plane of the thoracic aorta model. The thorough analyses of the thoracic aorta flow, WSSs, WSS index (OSI), and wall pressures are presented. The predicted locations of the maxima of WSS and the wall pressure can be then correlated with that of the thoracic aorta dissection, and thereby may lead to a useful biological significance. The numerical results also suggest that the effects of low WSS and high OSI tend to cause wall thickening occurred along the inferior wall of the aortic arch and the

  16. A new approach to generate arbitrary pulsatile pressure wave forms in mechanical circulatory support systems.

    PubMed

    Aghababaei, Amin; Hexamer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile pressure/flow wave forms reproduction of blood in mechanical circulatory systems are still an open topic. Regarding the periodic behavior of pulsatile hemodynamics, a repetitive control algorithm was adopted as a potential methodology for rotary blood pumps. The developed algorithm was tested on a mock system including an oxygenator, a resistance, and a compliance. The post-oxygenator pressure served as the feedback of the control system. Initially, a model of the whole system was developed in order to use repetitive control algorithm. Then the performance of the developed algorithm was evaluated in three different scenarios. The experimental results indicated that the proposed method was able to accurately reproduce any pattern of pulsatile pressure. Moreover, it demonstrated an acceptable robustness in terms of model uncertainty and nonlinearity.

  17. Formulation and process optimization of multiparticulate pulsatile system delivered by osmotic pressure-activated rupturable membrane.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sheng-Feng; Hsieh, Chien-Ming; Chen, Ying-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Ho, Hsiu-O; Sheu, Ming-Thau

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a multiparticulate pulsatile drug delivery system activated by a rupturable controlled-release membrane (Eudragit(®) RS) via osmotic pressure (with NaCl as the osmogent) was developed and characterized for omeprazole, omeprazole sodium, and propranolol HCl which have different water solubilities. Multiparticulates in pellet form for incorporation with or without the osmogent were manufactured by three methods and then used to coat a polymeric membrane. Results demonstrated that drug/osmogent-containing pellets manufactured by the extrusion/spheronization method with incorporation of the osmogent were optimal. The lag time (tL) to initiate pulsatile release is regulated by tL=l(2)/(6×D), which is dependent on the coating levels (l(2)) and plasticizer content (D). The pulsatile release pattern was found to be dependent on the osmotic pressure (osmogent), drug solubility, and mechanical properties of the polymeric membrane (elasticity and toughness). Omeprazole with lower water solubility could not generate sufficient osmotic pressure to create a crack in the membrane to activate pulsatile release, whereas the two other model drugs with higher solubilities could. But adsorption of omeprazole sodium on Eudragit(®) RS via charge-charge interactions led the its incomplete release. Finally, with 4% osmogent of NaCl added, a lag time in a range from 0 to 12h proportionally regulated by varying both the membrane thickness and plasticizer level initiated the complete pulsatile release of propranolol HCl. In conclusion, a multiparticulate pulsatile drug delivery system activated by a rupturable controlled-release membrane via osmotic pressure was successfully developed, and clinical applications of chronotherapy with drugs like propranolol HCl are expected.

  18. Visualization and finite element analysis of pulsatile flow in models of the abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, T; Matsuzawa, T; Homma, T

    1989-01-01

    Pulsatile flows in glass models simulating fusiform and lateral saccular aneurysms were investigated by a flow visualization method. When resting fluid starts to flow, the initial fluid motion is practically irrotational. After a short period of time, the flow began to separate from the proximal wall of the aneurysm. Then the separation bubble or vortex grew rapidly in size and filled the whole area of the aneurysm circumferentially. During this period of time, the center of the vortex moved from the proximal end to the distal point of the aneurysm. The transient reversal flow, for instance, which may occur at the end of the ejection period, passed between the wall of the aneurysm and the centrally located vortex. When the rate and pulsatile frequency of flow were high, the vortex broke down into highly disturbed flow (or turbulence) at the distal portion of the aneurysm. The same effect was observed when the length of the aneurysm was increased. A reduction in pulsatile amplitude made the flow pattern close to that in steady flow. A finite element analysis was made to obtain velocity and pressure fields in pulsatile flow through a tube with an axisymmetric expansion. Calculations were performed with the pulsatile flows used in the visualization experiment in order to study the effects of change in the pulsatile wave form by keeping the time-mean Reynolds number and Womersley's parameter unchanged. Calculated instantaneous patterns of velocity field and stream lines agreed well with the experimental results. The appearance and disappearance of the vortex in the dilated portion and its development resulted in complex distributions of pressure and shear fields. Locally minimum and maximum values of wall shear stress occurred at points just upstream and downstream of the distal end of the expansion when the flow rate reached its peak. PMID:2605323

  19. A meta-analysis of pulmonary function with pulsatile perfusion in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Lim, Choon-Hak; Nam, Myung-Ji; Lee, Ji-Sung; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Shin, Hye-Won; Lee, Hye-Won; Sun, Kyung

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pulsatile or nonpulsatile perfusion had a greater effect on pulmonary dysfunction in randomized controlled trials. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were used to identify available articles published before April 13, 2013. A meta-analysis was conducted on the effects of pulsatile perfusion on postoperative pulmonary function, intubation time, and the lengths of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stays. Eight studies involving 474 patients who received pulsatile perfusion and 496 patients who received nonpulsatile perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were considered in the meta-analysis. Patients receiving pulsatile perfusion had a significantly greater PaO2 /FiO2 ratio 24 h and 48 h post-operation (P < 0.00001, both) and significantly lower chest radiograph scores at 24 h and 48 h post-operation (P < 0.00001 and P = 0.001, respectively) compared with patients receiving nonpulsatile perfusion. The incidence of noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory insufficiency was significantly lower (P < 0.00001), and intubation time and ICU and hospital stays were shorter (P = 0.004, P < 0.00001, and P < 0.00001, respectively) in patients receiving pulsatile perfusion during CPB compared with patients receiving nonpulsatile perfusion. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggests that the use of pulsatile flow during CPB results in better postoperative pulmonary function and shorter ICU and hospital stays.

  20. [Hematologic and endocrinologic effects of pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass using a centrifugal pump].

    PubMed

    Komoda, T; Maeta, H; Imawaki, S; Shiraishi, Y; Tanaka, S

    1992-06-01

    The effects of pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with of centrifugal pump (Sarns) and membrane oxygenator, on blood cells, hemodynamics, and hormonal response were studied. In the pulsatile group (group P) in which pulsatile flow was generated by centrifugal pump and a 20 Fr arterial cannula was used, hemolysis and reduction of platelet count during CPB were more marked than in the nonpulsatile group (group NP), in which the same type of circuit was used. When the 20 Fr arterial cannula was replaced with a 24 Fr cannula (group Pc), the rate of hemolysis during CPB was significantly reduced compared with that in group P (p less than 0.05). The rate of rise in plasma free hemoglobin from 10 to 70 minutes CPB in group Pc was 15.0 mg/dl/hr, this value did not exceed that in either group NP or in group Pr, in which a roller pump rather than centrifugal pump was used to generate pulsatile flow. These findings show that pulsatile CPB with a centrifugal pump produces no deleterious hematologic effect in clinical use. The rise in the level of angiotensin II in group P was significantly smaller than that in group NP (p less than 0.05), and the rise in plasma renin activity and levels of angiotensin I, adrenalin and noradrenaline were smaller than those in group NP, although these differences were no significance. These findings indicate that the centrifugal pump generates pulsatile flow effectively, although not so effectively as to prevent the rise in peripheral vascular resistance. During CPB, there was no change in levels of thyroid hormones, including free T3, free T4 and reverse T3, in either pulsatile groups P and Pc or nonpulsatile group. TSH level in group Pc was significantly elevated in contrast with that in the nonpulsatile group (p less than 0.05), in which no change in TSH level was seen. It is suggested that pulsatile perfusion using a centrifugal pump might maintain sufficient hypothalamic-pituitary function to permit

  1. Clinical evaluation of pulsatile flow mode of Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Uesugi, H; Nishinaka, T; Uwabe, K; Aomi, S; Endo, M; Koyanagi, H; Oshiyama, H; Nogawa, A; Akutsu, T

    1997-07-01

    The Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump system possesses an automatic priming function in which the motor repeatedly stops and runs intermittently to eliminate air bubbles in the circuit through the micropores of the hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator. By modifying this mechanism, we have developed a pulsatile flow mode. In this mode, maximum and minimum pump rotational speeds can be independently set every 20 rpm in the range of 0 to 3,000 rpm. The duration of the pump run at maximum and minimum speeds can also be independently set every 0.1 s in the range of 0.2 to 15 s. In a clinical trial, after obtaining the desired flow rate, 2.4 L/min/m2 in nonpulsatile flow mode, a pulsatile flow mode of 60 cycles/min (with 1 cycle being maximum speed for 0.4 s and minimum speed for 0.6 s) was obtained by adding and subtracting 500 rpm to and from the rotational speed in nonpulsatile flow mode. Pulse pressures in the femoral artery and in the circuit just proximal to the perfusion cannula (6.5 mm Sarns high flow cannula with metal tip) were measured in 5 patients who underwent pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and compared to pulse pressures obtained by intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) in 3 patients and by the pulsatile mode of the 3M Delphin pump in 3 patients. The platelet count, free hemoglobin, and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) were measured and compared with measurements from another 5 patients who underwent nonpulsatile CPB. Although the pulse pressure measured in the circuit was 180 mm Hg on average, the pressure in the femoral artery was only 15 to 40 mm Hg with a mean of 20 mm Hg. In the same patients, 60 to 80 mm Hg pulse pressure was obtained with IABP. The pulse pressure obtained with the Delphin pump was not more than that obtained with the Terumo pump. There were no significant differences in percents of preoperative levels of platelet counts (pulsatile, 87.6 +/- 15.8% and nonpulsatile, 72.4 +/- 40.6%), free

  2. Beyond the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge 2007: non-Newtonian and flow pulsatility effects.

    PubMed

    Cavazzuti, Marco; Atherton, Mark; Collins, Michael; Barozzi, Giovanni

    2010-09-17

    The Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge 2007 (VISC'07) is becoming a standard test case in computational minimally invasive cerebrovascular intervention. Following views expressed in the literature and consistent with the recommendations of a report, the effects of non-Newtonian viscosity and pulsatile flow are reported. Three models of stented cerebral aneurysms, originating from VISC'07 are meshed and the flow characteristics simulated using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. We conclude that non-Newtonian and pulsatile effects are important to include in order to discriminate more effectively between stent designs.

  3. Behavioral treatment of pulsatile tinnitus and headache following traumatic head injury. Objective polygraphic assessment of change.

    PubMed

    Hegel, M T; Martin, J B

    1998-10-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus is a disorder that can be extremely disabling. Nonetheless, it has not been well-researched in the fields of psychology or behavioral therapy. This article describes the evaluation and behavioral treatment of a gentleman with pulsatile tinnitus. The evaluation included polygraphic assessment of vasomotor and electromyographic function both before and after treatment. The results show that the combination of lifestyle modifications and specific behavioral interventions were successful in modifying not only self-report indices of functioning, but also the underlying physiology related to the disorder. The potential role of the various treatment components and the value of including polygraphic assessment for informing treatment and evaluating outcome are discussed.

  4. Clinical evaluation of pulsatile flow mode of Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Uesugi, H; Nishinaka, T; Uwabe, K; Aomi, S; Endo, M; Koyanagi, H; Oshiyama, H; Nogawa, A; Akutsu, T

    1997-07-01

    The Terumo Capiox centrifugal pump system possesses an automatic priming function in which the motor repeatedly stops and runs intermittently to eliminate air bubbles in the circuit through the micropores of the hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator. By modifying this mechanism, we have developed a pulsatile flow mode. In this mode, maximum and minimum pump rotational speeds can be independently set every 20 rpm in the range of 0 to 3,000 rpm. The duration of the pump run at maximum and minimum speeds can also be independently set every 0.1 s in the range of 0.2 to 15 s. In a clinical trial, after obtaining the desired flow rate, 2.4 L/min/m2 in nonpulsatile flow mode, a pulsatile flow mode of 60 cycles/min (with 1 cycle being maximum speed for 0.4 s and minimum speed for 0.6 s) was obtained by adding and subtracting 500 rpm to and from the rotational speed in nonpulsatile flow mode. Pulse pressures in the femoral artery and in the circuit just proximal to the perfusion cannula (6.5 mm Sarns high flow cannula with metal tip) were measured in 5 patients who underwent pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and compared to pulse pressures obtained by intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) in 3 patients and by the pulsatile mode of the 3M Delphin pump in 3 patients. The platelet count, free hemoglobin, and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) were measured and compared with measurements from another 5 patients who underwent nonpulsatile CPB. Although the pulse pressure measured in the circuit was 180 mm Hg on average, the pressure in the femoral artery was only 15 to 40 mm Hg with a mean of 20 mm Hg. In the same patients, 60 to 80 mm Hg pulse pressure was obtained with IABP. The pulse pressure obtained with the Delphin pump was not more than that obtained with the Terumo pump. There were no significant differences in percents of preoperative levels of platelet counts (pulsatile, 87.6 +/- 15.8% and nonpulsatile, 72.4 +/- 40.6%), free

  5. Measurement of wall shear stress in a pulsatile pipe flow system using micro-pillar shear sensor (MPS3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghav, Vrishank; Garcia, Christine; Gnanamanickam, Ebenezer; Yoganathan, Ajit; GT-Embry-Riddle Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    The measurement of unsteady wall shear stress (WSS) in a pulsatile flow system is quite a challenge in experimental fluid mechanics. Recent developments in micro fabrication techniques have resulted in a novel measurement technique called the micro-pillar shear stress sensor (MPS3). It is a micro-pillar mounted on the surface of interest, which deflects an amount proportional to the shear stress it experiences. This technique has been widely used, validated and applied to measure turbulent WSS in several flow configurations. In this work, the MPS3 technique is used to measure WSS for a pulsatile fully developed pipe flow. The main objective here is to validate this technique for pulsatile pipe flow applications. For this purpose the WSS measurements obtained are compared with those obtained from analytical womersley solutions of the pulsatile flow system in the laminar flow regime. Statistical metrics will be used to better understand the measured WSS through the time period of the pulsatile flow.

  6. [The role of pulsatile LHRH therapy in women: the treatment of delayed puberty and of hypothalamic amenorrhea].

    PubMed

    Giusti, M; Cavagnaro, P; Traverso, L; Torre, R

    1990-11-01

    The importance of gonadotropin pulsatility for normal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function is well known. The most important aim of exogenous LHRH administration, given in females with delayed puberty or hypothalamic amenorrhea is to physiologically restore LH pulsatility to a more physiologic way as possible. In fact, a variable degree of LHRH endogenous defect is present in these conditions. Moreover, exogenous LHRH pulsatile administration is able to restore normal pubertal development until menarche appears and normal ovulatory cycles occur and pregnancy is induced. We reported our experience and review the literature regarding the importance and use of LHRH pulsatile therapy in delayed puberty and hypothalamic amenorrhea. We have also evaluated the data for various administration routes, the choice of patients, response to therapy and the possible diagnostic use of pulsatile LHRH with regard to the differential diagnosis of delayed puberty.

  7. HABS PA,6MTPLES.V,7 (sheet 1 of 1) Dundore Farm, State ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HABS PA,6-MTPLES.V,7- (sheet 1 of 1) - Dundore Farm, State Route 183 & Church Road vicinity, Penn Township (moved to Brownsville vicinity, Lower Heidelberg Township, Berks County), Mount Pleasant, Berks County, PA

  8. Clinical effectiveness of centrifugal pump to produce pulsatile flow during cardiopulmonary bypass in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y John; van Oeveren, Willem; Mungroop, Hubert E; Epema, Anne H; den Hamer, Inez J; Keizer, Jorrit J; Leuvenink, Ron P; Mariani, Massimo A; Rakhorst, Gerhard

    2011-02-01

    Although the centrifugal pump has been widely used as a nonpulsatile pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), little is known about its performance as a pulsatile pump for CPB, especially on its efficacy in producing hemodynamic energy and its clinical effectiveness. We performed a study to evaluate whether the Rotaflow centrifugal pump produces effective pulsatile flow during CPB and whether the pulsatile flow in this setting is clinically effective in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Thirty-two patients undergoing CPB for elective coronary artery bypass grafting were randomly allocated to a pulsatile perfusion group (n = 16) or a nonpulsatile perfusion group (n = 16). All patients were perfused with the Rotaflow centrifugal pump. In the pulsatile group, the centrifugal pump was adjusted to the pulsatile mode (60 cycles/min) during aortic cross-clamping, whereas in the nonpulsatile group, the pump was kept in its nonpulsatile mode during the same period of time. Compared with the nonpulsatile group, the pulsatile group had a higher pulse pressure (P < 0.01) and a fraction higher energy equivalent pressure (EEP, P = 0.058). The net gain of pulsatile flow, represented by the surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE), was found much higher in the CPB circuit than in patients (P < 0.01). Clinically, there was no difference between the pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups with regard to postoperative acute kidney injury, endothelial activation, or inflammatory response. Postoperative organ function and the duration of hospital stay were similar in the two patient groups. In conclusion, pulsatile CPB with the Rotaflow centrifugal pump is associated with a small gain of EEP and SHE, which does not seem to be clinically effective in adult cardiac surgical patients.

  9. Review of PennDOT Publication 408 for the use of recycled co-product materials: Summary recommendations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tassel, E.L.; Tikalsky, P.J.; Christensen, D.W.

    1999-04-30

    The purpose of this project is to decrease the institutional or perceived institutional barriers for the use of recycled and co-product materials including glass, steel slag, foundry sand, fly ash, shingle tabs, reclaimed Portland cement concrete, and scrap tires in the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation`s (PennDOT) Publications 408, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Specifications. This report reviews potential uses of each material, identifies the project that used these materials, and provides direction for future specification development.

  10. Preventing adolescents’ externalizing and internalizing symptoms: Effects of the Penn Resiliency Program

    PubMed Central

    Cutuli, J. J.; Gillham, Jane E.; Chaplin, Tara M.; Reivich, Karen J.; Seligman, Martin E. P.; Gallop, Robert J.; Abenavoli, Rachel M.; Freres, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports secondary outcome analyses from a past study of the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP), a cognitive-behavioral depression prevention program for middle-school aged children. Middle school students (N = 697) were randomly assigned to PRP, PEP (an alternate intervention), or control conditions. Gillham et al., (2007) reported analyses examining PRP’s effects on average and clinical levels of depression symptoms. We examine PRP’s effects on parent-, teacher-, and self-reports of adolescents’ externalizing and broader internalizing (depression/anxiety, somatic complaints, and social withdrawal) symptoms over three years of follow-up. Relative to no intervention control, PRP reduced parent-reports of adolescents’ internalizing symptoms beginning at the first assessment after the intervention and persisting for most of the follow-up assessments. PRP also reduced parent-reported conduct problems relative to no-intervention. There was no evidence that the PRP program produced an effect on teacher- or self-report of adolescents’ symptoms. Overall, PRP did not reduce symptoms relative to the alternate intervention, although there is a suggestion of a delayed effect for conduct problems. These findings are discussed with attention to developmental trajectories and the importance of interventions that address common risk factors for diverse forms of negative outcomes. PMID:24634897

  11. Resiliency Training in Indian Children: A Pilot Investigation of the Penn Resiliency Program

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Aruna; Cycil, Chandrika

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP) in an urban Indian setting. The PRP is a program to prevent depression in early adolescence and has proved successful in changing children’s attributional style of life events. While the program has been successful in preventing symptoms of depression in Western populations, the current study explored whether this program could be effective with an Indian sample. The aim of the current study was twofold; first, to study the attributional style of early adolescents in India and identify negative effects (if any) and second, to gain insights in using the PRP as a tool to change explanatory styles in Indian children. A total of 58 children participated in the study (Intervention group n = 29 and Control group n = 29). An Analysis of Covariance comparing post-test scores on Children’s Attributional Style Questionnaire (CASQ) while controlling for baseline scores indicated that children in the intervention group exhibited a significant reduction in pessimistic explanatory style and an increase in optimistic orientation compared to children in the control group. This indicates that the program was effective in changing negative attribution styles among upper-class Indian school children. Future work may look into the longer impact of the program as well as further considerations into adapting the program for a middle class population. PMID:24739766

  12. A pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass system that prevents negative pressure at the membrane oxygenator.

    PubMed

    Komoda, T; Maeta, H; Imawaki, S; Shiraishi, Y; Arioka, I; Fukunaga, S; Tanaka, S; Nasu, N

    1993-01-01

    Negative pressure is a problem in pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). To avoid this, the authors designed a pulsatile CPB system containing a Sarns centrifugal pump (CP) and a Univox membrane oxygenator, in which the inertial flow is not obstructed by the CP. In both an in vitro study and a clinical study, negative pressure was not observed in the arterial line of the CPB circuit when this system was used. When a roller pump (RP) was used, however, instead of a CP, negative pressure did occur. In a clinical study using this system, mean pulse pressure was 36 mmHg and hemolysis, expressed as the rate of rise in plasma free hemoglobin from 10 to 70 min of CPB, was 26.2 mg/dl/hr, which did not exceed that seen with a pulsatile CPB using an RP instead of a CP. The hemolysis seen in the study caused no clinical problems. Thus, pulsatile CPB using a CP and Univox membrane oxygenator should be considered for clinical use to prevent the occurrence of negative pressure.

  13. A new pulsatile total artificial heart using a single centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Imachi, K; Chinzei, T; Abe, Y; Mabuchi, K; Imanishi, K; Yonezawa, T; Kouno, A; Ono, T; Atsumi, K; Isoyama, T

    1991-01-01

    A new pulsatile total artificial heart (TAH) system, combining a single centrifugal pump (CFP) with two three-way valves, was developed. One port of each three-way valve was connected to the inlet and outlet of a CFP, respectively. The other two ports of each valve ware connected to the right and left atrium, pulmonary artery, and aorta. The CFP can perfuse the pulmonary and systemic circulation alternately with pulsatile flow. A prototype system composed of a Sarns' CFP and solenoid valves was connected to a mock circulatory system resulting in 1) a pulsatile TAH that could be produced with a single CFP, 2) 5 L/min of pulsatile output with a normal flow wave form that can be obtained alternately on the right and left side by switching the solenoid valves, and 3) flow balance between the left and the right that could be controlled easily by the length of switching duration. This new system could be miniaturized and is feasible for a totally implantable TAH.

  14. Three-dimensional flow separation over a surface-mounted hemisphere in pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Flow separation over a surface-mounted obstacle is prevalent in numerous applications. Previous studies of 3D separation around protuberances have been limited to steady flow. In biological and geophysical flows, pulsatile conditions are frequently encountered, yet this situation has not been extensively studied. Primarily motivated by our previous studies of the flow patterns observed in various human vocal fold pathologies such as polyps, our research aimed to fill this gap in the knowledge concerning unsteady 3D flow separation. This is achieved by characterizing velocity fields surrounding the obstacle, focused primarily on the vortical flow structures and dynamics that occur around a hemispheroid in pulsatile flow. As part of this study, two-dimensional, instantaneous and phase-averaged particle image velocimetry data in both steady and pulsatile flows are presented and compared. Coherent vortical flow structures have been identified by their swirling strength. This analysis revealed flow structures with dynamics dependent on the pulsatile forcing function. A mechanism to explain the formation and observed dynamics of these flow structures based on the self-induced velocity of vortex rings interacting with the unsteady flow is proposed.

  15. Pulsatile protein release from monodisperse liquid-core microcapsules of controllable shell thickness

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yujie; Pack, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pulsatile delivery of proteins, in which release occurs over a short time after a period of little or no release, is desirable for many applications. This paper investigates the effect of biodegradable polymer shell thickness on pulsatile protein release from biodegradable polymer microcapsules. Methods Using precision particle fabrication (PPF) technology, monodisperse microcapsules were fabricated encapsulating bovine serum albumin (BSA) in a liquid core surrounded by a drug-free poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) shell of uniform, controlled thickness from 14 to 19 μm. Results When using high molecular weight PLG (Mw 88 kDa), microparticles exhibited the desired core-shell structure with high BSA loading and encapsulation efficiency (55-65%). These particles exhibited very slow release of BSA for several weeks followed by rapid release of 80-90% of the encapsulated BSA within seven days. Importantly, with increasing shell thickness the starting time of the pulsatile release could be controlled from 25 to 35 days. Conclusions Biodegradable polymer microcapsules with precisely controlled shell thickness provide pulsatile release with enhanced control of release profiles. PMID:24831313

  16. A Pulsatile Cardiovascular Computer Model for Teaching Heart-Blood Vessel Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Kenneth; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a model which gives realistic predictions of pulsatile pressure, flow, and volume events in the cardiovascular system. Includes computer oriented laboratory exercises for veterinary and graduate students; equations of the dynamic and algebraic models; and a flow chart for the cardiovascular teaching program. (JN)

  17. Feasibility of Pump Speed Modulation for Restoring Vascular Pulsatility with Rotary Blood Pumps.

    PubMed

    Ising, Mickey S; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Koenig, Steven C; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2015-01-01

    Continuous flow (CF) left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) diminish vascular pressure pulsatility, which may be associated with clinically reported adverse events including gastrointestinal bleeding, aortic valve insufficiency, and hemorrhagic stroke. Three candidate CF LVAD pump speed modulation algorithms designed to augment aortic pulsatility were evaluated in mock flow loop and ischemic heart failure (IHF) bovine models by quantifying hemodynamic performance as a function of mean pump speed, modulation amplitude, and timing. Asynchronous and synchronous copulsation (high revolutions per minute [RPM] during systole, low RPM during diastole) and counterpulsation (low RPM during systole, high RPM during diastole) algorithms were tested for defined modulation amplitudes (±300, ±500, ±800, and ±1,100 RPM) and frequencies (18.75, 37.5, and 60 cycles/minute) at low (2,900 RPM) and high (3,200 RPM) mean LVAD speeds. In the mock flow loop model, asynchronous, synchronous copulsation, and synchronous counterpulsation algorithms each increased pulse pressure (ΔP = 931%, 210%, and 98% and reduced left ventricular external work (LVEW = 20%, 22%, 16%). Similar improvements in vascular pulsatility (1,142%) and LVEW (40%) were observed in the IHF bovine model. Asynchronous modulation produces the largest vascular pulsatility with the advantage of not requiring sensor(s) for timing pump speed modulation, facilitating potential clinical implementation. PMID:26102173

  18. Flap raising on pulsatile perfused cadaveric tissue: a novel method for surgical teaching and exercise.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Fichter, Andreas; Braun, Christian; Bauer, Florian; Humbs, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Exercising flap raising procedures on cadavers is considered a prerequisite to prepare for clinical practise. To improve teaching and create conditions as realistic as possible, a perfusion device was developed providing pulsatile flow through the vessels of different donor sites. A plastic bag filled with red stained tab water was placed into a pump, which was driven by an electric motor. The bag was set under rhythmic compression with variable frequency and pressure. The pedicles of the radial forearm, anterolateral thigh, rectus abdominis, fibular and iliac crest flap were cannulated at the origin from their source arteries. Flap raising was performed under pulsatile perfusion in 15 fresh bodies and subsequently in 6 Thiel-embalmed cadavers during a flap raising course. We regularly observed staining of the skin and skin bleeding in fresh bodies and less reliable in embalmed cadavers. All flap pedicles showed pulsatile movements, and the radial pulse became palpable. Most perforators of the anterolateral thigh and osteocutaneous fibular flap could be identified by their pulse. Bleeding from bony tissue and venous return was seldom observed. We conclude that pulsatile perfusion of cadaveric tissue creates more realistic conditions for flap raising and improves teaching for beginners and advanced surgeons.

  19. Effects of Thoratec pulsatile ventricular assist device timing on the abdominal aortic wave intensity pattern.

    PubMed

    Jahren, Silje Ekroll; Amacher, Raffael; Weber, Alberto; Most, Henriette; Flammer, Shannon Axiak; Traupe, Tobias; Stoller, Michael; de Marchi, Stefano; Vandenberghe, Stijn

    2014-10-15

    Arterial waves are seen as possible independent mediators of cardiovascular risks, and the wave intensity analysis (WIA) has therefore been proposed as a method for patient selection for ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation. Interpreting measured wave intensity (WI) is challenging, and complexity is increased by the implantation of a VAD. The waves generated by the VAD interact with the waves generated by the native heart, and this interaction varies with changing VAD settings. Eight sheep were implanted with a pulsatile VAD (PVAD) through ventriculoaortic cannulation. The start of PVAD ejection was synchronized to the native R wave and delayed between 0 and 90% of the cardiac cycle in 10% steps or phase shifts (PS). Pressure and velocity signals were registered, with the use of a combined Doppler and pressure wire positioned in the abdominal aorta, and used to calculate the WI. Depending on the PS, different wave interference phenomena occurred. Maximum unloading of the left ventricle (LV) coincided with constructive interference and maximum blood flow pulsatility, and maximum loading of the LV coincided with destructive interference and minimum blood flow pulsatility. We believe that noninvasive WIA could potentially be used clinically to assess the mechanical load of the LV and to monitor the peripheral hemodynamics such as blood flow pulsatility and risk of intestinal bleeding.

  20. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the temporal bone presenting with pulsatile tinnitus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the temporal bone is an unusual but distinct disease entity. The most common presenting symptoms are otalgia, otorrhea, hearing loss, facial palsy, and vertigo. We describe here what we believe to be the first reported case of a patient presenting with persistent pulsatile tinnitus. The clinical features, radiological and histopathologic findings, and treatment outcomes of the patient are presented. Case presentation A 59-year-old woman of Chinese Han origin presented with complaints of left-sided pulsatile tinnitus and progressive hearing loss for several years. Clinical evaluations revealed a reddish mass behind the intact tympanic membrane, and a moderately severe conductive hearing loss in the left ear. The computed tomographic imaging of the temporal bone demonstrated a slightly ill-defined left middle ear soft tissue mass involving the posterior portion of the mesotympanum and epitympanum, and the mastoid antrum. The patient underwent surgical excision of the lesion which subsequently resolved her symptoms. Postoperative pathology was consistent with an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. Conclusions An inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the temporal bone can present clinically with pulsatile tinnitus and masquerade as venous hum or vascular tumors of the middle ear; therefore, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of pulsatile tinnitus. PMID:23787119

  1. In vitro pulsatility analysis of axial-flow and centrifugal-flow left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, J Ryan; Selzman, Craig H

    2013-03-01

    Recently, continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (CF-VADs) have supplanted older, pulsatile-flow pumps, for treating patients with advanced heart failure. Despite the excellent results of the newer generation devices, the effects of long-term loss of pulsatility remain unknown. The aim of this study is to compare the ability of both axial and centrifugal continuous-flow pumps to intrinsically modify pulsatility when placed under physiologically diverse conditions. Four VADs, two axial- and two centrifugal-flow, were evaluated on a mock circulatory flow system. Each VAD was operated at a constant impeller speed over three hypothetical cardiac conditions: normo-tensive, hypertensive, and hypotensive. Pulsatility index (PI) was compared for each device under each condition. Centrifugal-flow devices had a higher PI than that of axial-flow pumps. Under normo-tension, flow PI was 0.98 ± 0.03 and 1.50 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Under hypertension, flow PI was 1.90 ± 0.16 and 4.21 ± 0.29 for the axial and centrifugal pumps, respectively (p = 0.01). Under hypotension, PI was 0.73 ± 0.02 and 0.78 ± 0.02 for the axial and centrifugal groups, respectively (p = 0.13). All tested CF-VADs were capable of maintaining some pulsatile-flow when connected in parallel with our mock ventricle. We conclude that centrifugal-flow devices outperform the axial pumps from the basis of PI under tested conditions.

  2. A meta-analytic review of the Penn Resiliency Program's effect on depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Brunwasser, Steven M; Gillham, Jane E; Kim, Eric S

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate whether the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP), a group cognitive-behavioral intervention, is effective in targeting depressive symptoms in youths. We identified 17 controlled evaluations of PRP (N = 2,498) in which depressive symptoms had been measured via an online search of PsycINFO, Medline, ERIC, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses and by requesting data from PRP researchers. We combined effect sizes (ESs; Glass's d), using random effects models at postintervention and two follow-up assessments (6-8 and 12 months postintervention). PRP participants reported fewer depressive symptoms at postintervention and both follow-up assessments compared with youths receiving no intervention, with ESs ranging from 0.11 to 0.21. Subgroup analyses showed that PRP's effects were significant at 1 or more follow-up assessments among studies with both targeted and universal approaches, when group leaders were research team members and community providers, among participants with both low and elevated baseline symptoms, and among boys and girls. Limited data showed no evidence that PRP is superior to active control conditions. Preliminary analyses suggested that PRP's effects on depressive disorders may be smaller than those reported in a larger meta-analysis of depression prevention programs for older adolescents and adults. We found evidence that PRP significantly reduces depressive symptoms through at least 1-year postintervention. Future PRP research should examine whether PRP's effects on depressive symptoms lead to clinically meaningful benefits for its participants, whether the program is cost-effective, whether CB skills mediate program effects, and whether PRP is effective when delivered under real-world conditions.

  3. In vitro evaluation of the DP-4M PennCentury insufflator.

    PubMed

    Hoppentocht, M; Hoste, C; Hagedoorn, P; Frijlink, H W; de Boer, A H

    2014-09-01

    Dry powder formulations for inhalation have to be screened in animal studies for therapeutic efficacy and safety aspects and both are significantly affected by the dose and the particle size distribution (PSD) of the aerosol that is given. One of the most frequently used apparatus for pulmonary delivery of dry powder formulations in mice studies is the PennCentury DP-4M Dry Powder Insufflator. To make researchers of future preclinical animal studies with the DP-4M insufflator aware of the pitfalls regarding the conclusions to be drawn from their data, we investigated the dispersion behaviour by the DP-4M insufflator using two to three different powder preparation techniques for four different compounds. The primary PSDs of the different formulations were determined in duplicate by laser diffraction analysis. To measure the PSDs of the aerosols obtained with the DP-4M insufflator, the same diffractometer was used in combination with an in-house constructed adapter for the insufflator. The dispersion efficiency and delivered dose were highly affected by the amount of air available for dispersion; the 200 μL of air recommended for the type of insufflator used was insufficient for adequate dispersion. In contrast, the weighed dose did not have a profound effect on the dispersion behaviour and the delivered dose of the DP-4M insufflator. Also the physico-chemical powder properties and the applied particle preparation technique influenced the amount and PSD of the delivered aerosol only to a limited extend, with a few exceptions. We advise researchers to investigate the dispersion efficiency and delivered dose from the DP-4M insufflator with the formulation under investigation prior to in vivo studies and it may be necessary to optimise the formulation for administration to mice. PMID:24993307

  4. A Meta-Analytic Review of the Penn Resiliency Program’s Effect on Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Brunwasser, Steven M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Kim, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this review was to evaluate whether the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP), a group cognitive-behavioral intervention, is effective in targeting depressive symptoms in youth. Data sources We identified 17 controlled evaluations of PRP (N = 2498) measuring depressive symptoms via an online search of PsycInfo, Medline, ERIC, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, and by requesting data from PRP researchers. Review methods We combined effect sizes (ESs; Glass’s d), using random effects models at post-intervention and two follow-up assessments. Results PRP participants reported fewer depressive symptoms at post-intervention and both follow-up assessments compared to youth receiving no intervention, with ESs ranging from 0.11 to 0.21. Limited data show no evidence that PRP is superior to active control conditions. Subgroup analyses showed that PRP’s effects were significant at 1 or more follow-up assessments among studies using both targeted and universal approaches, when group leaders were research team members and community providers, among participants with both low and elevated baseline symptoms, and among boys and girls. Preliminary analyses suggest that PRP’s effects on depressive disorders may be smaller than those reported in a larger meta-analysis of depression prevention programs for older adolescents and adults. Conclusion We found evidence that PRP significantly reduces depressive symptoms through at least 1 year post-intervention. Future PRP research should examine whether PRP’s effects on depressive symptoms lead to clinically meaningful benefits for its participants, whether the program is cost-effective, whether CBT skills mediate program effects, and whether PRP is effective when delivered under real-world conditions. PMID:19968381

  5. Five-day pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone administration unveils combined hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal defects underlying profound hypoandrogenism in men with prolonged critical illness.

    PubMed

    van den Berghe, G; Weekers, F; Baxter, R C; Wouters, P; Iranmanesh, A; Bouillon, R; Veldhuis, J D

    2001-07-01

    Central hyposomatotropism and hypothyroidism have been inferred in long-stay intensive care patients. Pronounced hypoandrogenism presumably also contributes to the catabolic state of critical illness. Accordingly, the present study appraises the mechanism(s) of failure of the gonadotropic axis in prolonged critically ill men by assessing the effects of pulsatile GnRH treatment in this unique clinical context. To this end, 15 critically ill men (mean +/- SD age, 67 +/- 12 yr; intensive care unit stay, 25 +/- 9 days) participated, with baseline values compared with those of 50 age- and BMI-matched healthy men. Subjects were randomly allocated to 5 days of placebo or pulsatile iv GnRH administration (0.1 microg/kg every 90 min). LH, GH, and TSH secretion was quantified by deconvolution analysis of serum hormone concentration-time series obtained by sampling every 20 min from 2100-0600 h at baseline and on nights 1 and 5 of treatment. Serum concentrations of gonadal and adrenal steroids, T(4), T(3), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF), and IGF-binding proteins as well as circulating levels of cytokines and selected metabolic markers were measured. During prolonged critical illness, pulsatile LH secretion and mean LH concentrations (1.8 +/- 2.2 vs. 6.0 +/- 2.2 IU/L) were low in the face of extremely low circulating total testosterone (0.27 +/- 0.18 vs. 12.7 +/- 4.07 nmol/L; P < 0.0001) and relatively low estradiol (E(2); 58.3 +/- 51.9 vs. 85.7 +/- 18.6 pmol/L; P = 0.009) and sex hormone-binding globulin (39.1 +/- 11.7 vs. 48.6 +/- 27.8 nmol/L; P = 0.01). The molar ratio of E(2)/T was elevated 37-fold in ill men (P < 0.0001) and correlated negatively with the mean serum LH concentrations (r = -0.82; P = 0.0002). Pulsatile GH and TSH secretion were suppressed (P < or = 0.0004), as were mean serum IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3, and acid-labile subunit concentrations; thyroid hormone levels; and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Morning cortisol was within the normal range

  6. Role of endogenous opiates in the expression of negative feedback actions of androgen and estrogen on pulsatile properties of luteinizing hormone secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Rogol, A D; Samojlik, E; Ertel, N H

    1984-07-01

    We have tested the participation of endogenous opiate pathways in the negative feedback actions of gonadal steroids on pulsatile properties of luteinizing (LH) hormone release in normal men. To this end, sex steroid hormones were infused intravenously at dosages that under steady state conditions selectively suppressed either the frequency or the amplitude of the pulsatile LH signal. The properties of pulsatile LH secretion were assessed quantitatively by computerized analysis of LH series derived from serial blood sampling over 12 h of observation. When the pure (nonaromatizable) androgen, 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone, was infused continuously for 108 h at the blood production rate of testosterone, we were able to achieve selective inhibition of LH pulse frequency akin to that observed in experimental animals after low-dosage androgen replacement. Under these conditions, serum concentrations of testosterone and estradiol-17 beta did not change significantly, but serum 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone concentrations increased approximately two- to threefold, with a corresponding increase in levels of its major metabolite, 5 alpha-androstan-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol. In separate experiments, the infusion of estradiol-17 beta at its blood production rate over a 4.5-d interval selectively suppressed LH pulse amplitude without influencing LH pulse frequency. Estrogen infusion increased serum estradiol-17 beta levels approximately twofold without significantly altering blood androgen concentrations. We then used these schedules of selective androgen or estrogen infusion to investigate the participation of endogenous opiates in the individual inhibitory feedback actions of pure androgen or estrogen on pulsatile LH release by administering a potent and specific opiate-receptor antagonist, naltrexone, during the infusions. Our observations indicate that, despite the continuous infusion of a dosage of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone that significantly suppresses LH pulse frequency, co

  7. Evaluation of pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow in capillaries of goat skeletal muscle using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, J J; Tyml, K; Menkis, A H; Novick, R J; Mckenzie, F N

    1994-11-01

    It is commonly believed that pulsatile flow generated by the pumping action of the heart is dampened out by the time it reaches the microcirculation. In clinical practice, most of the cardiopulmonary bypass pumps and ventricular assist devices are nonpulsatile. To test the hypothesis that pulsatile flow generated by the heart does exist at the microvascular level, intravital microscopy of a large animal model (goat) was developed to visualize and to videorecord the surface microcirculation of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle from the right forelimb. Density of perfused capillaries and red blood cell velocity in capillaries were measured in five goats during pulsatile perfusion provided by the heart and during a subsequent 3-hr period of nonpulsatile perfusion provided by a centrifugal ventricular assist device (Centrimed, Sarns 3M) that bypassed the heart. Throughout the experiment, the heart rate, innominate artery mean blood pressure, and flow remained unchanged. During the pulsatile regimen, velocities showed regular fluctuations that coincided with the period of the cardiac cycle (range of periods: 0.5-0.8 sec). The peak velocity amplitudes (range: 0.25-0.55 mm/sec) correlated directly with the amplitude of the pulse pressure. During the nonpulsatile regimen, no such correlations were seen. During pulsatile flow and during the 3-hr nonpulsatile period, capillary density remained stable at 24 capillaries/mm of test line but there were significant increases in red cell velocity, from 0.8 to 1.2 mm/sec (P < 0.05), and in coefficient of variation of velocity (used as an index of flow heterogeneity), from 19 to 34% (P < 0.05). We conclude that (1) pulsatility exists in the capillary bed and that it directly correlates with the pumping action of the heart and (2) nonpulsatile flow produced by the ventricular assist device does not cause an acute deterioration in microvascular perfusion. We interpret the increase in heterogeneity of flow as an early sign of

  8. Pulsatile flow of Casson's fluid through stenosed arteries with applications to blood flow.

    PubMed

    Chaturani, P; Samy, R P

    1986-01-01

    The effects of non-Newtonian nature of blood and pulsatility on flow through a stenosed tube have been investigated. A perturbation method is used to analyse the flow. It is of interest to note that the thickness of the viscous flow region is non-uniform (changing with axial distance). An analytic relation between viscous flow region thickness and red cell concentration has been obtained. It is important to mention that some researchers have obtained an approximate solution for the flow rate-pressure gradient equation (assuming the ratio between the yield stress and the wall shear to be very small in comparison to unity); in the present analysis, we have obtained an exact solution for this non-linear equation without making that assumption. The approximate and exact solutions compare well with one of the exact solutions. Another important result is that the mean and steady flow rates decrease as the yield stress theta increases. For the low values of the yield stress, the mean flow rate is higher than the steady flow rate, but for high values of the yield stress, the mean flow rate behaviour is of opposite nature. The critical value of the yield stress at which the flow rate behaviour changes from one type to another has been determined. Further, it seems that there exists a value of the yield stress at which flow stops for both the flows (steady and pulsatile). It is observed that the flow stop yield value for pulsatile flow is lower than the steady flow. The most notable result of pulsatility is the phase lag between the pressure gradient and flow rate, which is further influenced by the yield stress and stenosis. Another important result of pulsatility is the mean resistance to flow is greater than its steady flow value, whereas the mean value of the wall shear for pulsatile flow is equal to steady wall shear. Many standard results regarding Casson and Newtonian fluids flow, uniform tube flow and steady flow can be obtained as the special cases of the present

  9. The effect of the pulsatile electromagnetic field in children suffering from bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Sadlonova, J; Korpas, J; Salat, D; Miko, L; Kudlicka, J

    2003-01-01

    From the bibliography it is well known that pulsatile electromagnetic field has an anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect. It causes vasodilatation, myorelaxation, hyper-production of connective tissue and activation of the cell membrane. Therefore our aim was to study the possible therapeutic effect of pulsatile electromagnetic field in asthmatic children. Forty-two children participating in this study were divided in two groups. The 1st group consisting of 21 children (11 females, 10 males, aged 11.8 +/- 0.4 yr) was treated by pulsatile electromagnetic field and pharmacologically. The 2nd group served as control, consisting also of 21 children (11 females, 10 males, aged 11.7 +/- 0.3 yr) and was treated only pharmacologically. Therapeutic effect of the pulsatile electromagnetic field was assessed on the basis of pulmonary tests performed by means of a Spirometer 100 Handi (Germany). The indexes FVC, IVC, ERV, IRV, FEV1, FEV1/FVC%, MEF75,50,25, PEF, PIF and the changes of the flow-volume loop were also registered. The pulsatile electromagnetic field was applied by means of the device MTU 500H, Therapy System (Brno, Czech Republic) for 5 days, two times daily for 30 minutes (magnetic induction: 3 mT, frequency: 4 Hz as recommended by the manufacturer). The results in children of the 1st group showed an improvement of FVC of about 70 ml, IVC of about 110 ml, FEV1 of about 80 ml, MEF75 of about 30 ml, PEF of about 480 ml, PIF of about 550 ml. The increases of ERV, IRV and FEV1/FVC and decreases of MEF25,50 were statistically insignificant. The results in the 2nd group were less clear. The flow-volume loop showed a mild improvement in 14 children. This improvement in the 2nd group was less significant. The clinical status of children and their mood became better. We believe that the pulsatile electro-magnetotherapy in children suffering from asthma is effective. On the basis of our results we can recommend it as a complementary therapy. PMID:14708875

  10. Pregnancy following combined growth hormone--pulsatile GnRH treatment in a patient with hypothalamic amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Volpe, A; Coukos, G; Artini, P G; Silferi, M; Petraglia, F; Boghen, M; D'Ambrogio, G D; Genazzani, A R

    1990-04-01

    A patient with hypothalamic amenorrhoea and a poor response in terms of pituitary growth hormone (GH) to acute administration of growth hormone-releasing factor has been treated with pulsatile gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) combined with GH to induce ovulation. GH was administered daily until signs of ovulation were detected. The luteal phase was supported by pulsatile GnRH only. Combined treatment gave an improved follicular recruitment, higher plasma levels of 17 beta-oestradiol and an earlier ovulation, compared to the previous cycle with pulsatile GnRH only. The result was a twin pregnancy which ended with the birth of two healthy male babies. The role of GH in potentiating the ovarian response to gonadotrophins, as well as the GH secretion abnormalities associated with dysfunctions of the hypothalamic - pituitary - gonadal axis, might provide a rationale for combined GH and pulsatile GnRH treatment in such patients.

  11. SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control technologies - developments at Penn State`s Combustion Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pisupati, S.V.

    1996-12-31

    The majority of pollution from coal combustion is from the emission of sulfur and nitrogen oxides. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 established the Acid Rain Program under Title IV to achieve significant environmental and public health benefits through reductions in electric utility emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. The Act calls for significant reduction in NO{sub x} emissions by year 2000. The data obtained by EPA showed that 1995 SO{sub 2} emissions declined sharply by approximately 5 million tons below 1980 levels at the 445 Phase I affected electric utilities. The data also indicated that the boilers involved in the first stage of the NO{sub x} reduction program met Phase I emission standards of 0.5 lbs/MMBtu for dry bottom, wall fired units, and 0.45 lbs/MMBtu for tangentially fired boilers. Fluidized bed combustors, due to inherently low operating temperatures, produce less thermal NO{sub x} than pulverized coal units. However, with Ozone Transport Commission`s deliberations, it is expected that NO{sub x} emission limits could be lowered even further up to 0.15 lb/MMBtu for the fluidized bed combustion Units. Therefore, NO{sub x} reduction is important not only from an acid rain point of view but also from ozone formation at lower altitudes.

  12. Reproducibility of aortic pulsatility measurements from ECG-gated abdominal CTA in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, Joel G.; Wentz, Robert J.; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri J.; Siddiki, Hassan; Nielson, Theresa

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: ECG-gated abdominal CT angiography with reconstruction of multiple, temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets has been proposed for measuring aortic pulsatility. The purpose of this work is to develop algorithms to segment the aorta from surrounding structures from CTA datasets across cardiac phases, calculate registered centerlines and measurements of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with AAA, and to assess the reproducibility of these measurements. Methods: ECG-gated CTA was performed with a temporal resolution of 165 ms, reconstructed to 1 mm slices ranging at 14 cardiac phase points. Data sets were obtained from 17 patients on which two such scans were performed 6 to 12 months apart. Automated segmentation, centerline generation, and registration of centerlines between phases was performed, followed by calculation of cross-sectional areas and regional and local pulsatility. Results: Pulsatility calculations for the supraceliac region were very reproducible between earlier and later scans of the same patient, with average differences less than 1% for pulsatility values ranging from 2% to 13%. Local radial pulsatilities were also reproducible to within ~1%. Aneurysm volume changes between scans can also be quantified. Conclusion: Automated segmentation, centerline generation, and registration of temporally resolved CTA datasets permit measurements of regional changes in cross-sectional area over the course of the cardiac cycle (i.e., regional aortic pulsatility). These measurements are reproducible between scans 6-12 months apart, with differences in aortic areas reflecting both aneurysm remodeling and changes in blood pressure. Regional pulsatilities ranged from 2 to 13% but were reproducible at the 1% level.

  13. A new imaging technique on strength and phase of pulsatile tissue-motion in brightness-mode ultrasonogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Yamada, Masayoshi; Nakamori, Nobuyuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2007-03-01

    A new imaging technique has been developed for observing both strength and phase of pulsatile tissue-motion in a movie of brightness-mode ultrasonogram. The pulsatile tissue-motion is determined by evaluating the heartbeat-frequency component in Fourier transform of a series of pixel value as a function of time at each pixel in a movie of ultrasonogram (640x480pixels/frame, 8bit/pixel, 33ms/frame) taken by a conventional ultrasonograph apparatus (ATL HDI5000). In order to visualize both the strength and the phase of the pulsatile tissue-motion, we propose a pulsatile-phase image that is obtained by superimposition of color gradation proportional to the motion phase on the original ultrasonogram only at which the motion strength exceeds a proper threshold. The pulsatile-phase image obtained from a cranial ultrasonogram of normal neonate clearly reveals that the motion region gives good agreement with the anatomical shape and position of the middle cerebral artery and the corpus callosum. The motion phase is fluctuated with the shape of arteries revealing local obstruction of blood flow. The pulsatile-phase images in the neonates with asphyxia at birth reveal decreases of the motion region and increases of the phase fluctuation due to the weakness and local disturbance of blood flow, which is useful for pediatric diagnosis.

  14. Pulsatile Tinnitus with a Dural Arterio-Venous Fistula Diagnosed by Computed Tomography-Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sujin; Byun, Jaeyong; Park, Moonsuh

    2013-01-01

    A 43 year-old female patient suffered the sudden onset of pulsatile tinnitus in the left ear 2 months ago. The tinnitus did not subside spontaneously and remained unchanged. The patient had no history of head trauma or surgery of the head and neck. The character of the tinnitus was pulsatile, and it was synchronous with the heart beat. Audiologic examinations were performed and all of the results were normal. Computed tomography with angiography was performed and evidence of an arterio-venous fistula (AVF) was found. 4-vessel angiography was performed to confirm the dural AVF between the external carotid artery and sigmoid sinus. Embolization of the feeder-vessels was done under a fluoroscope and 70% of the fistula flow was controlled after embolization and the tinnitus totally subsided during the embolization. PMID:24653921

  15. Analysis of geophysical logs, at North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site, Lansdale, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, Randall W.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of technical assistance to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), collected borehole geophysical log data in 34 industrial, commercial, and public supply wells and 28 monitor wells at the North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site, in Lansdale, Pa., from August 22, 1995, through August 29, 1997. The wells range in depth from 50 to 1,027 feet below land surface and are drilled in Triassic-age shales and siltstones of the Brunswick Group and Lockatong Formation. The geophysical log data were collected to help describe the hydrogeologic framework in the area and to provide guidance in the reconstruction of the 28 monitor wells drilled during summer 1997. At the time of logging, all wells had open-hole construction. The geophysical logs, caliper, fluid-resistivity, and fluid-temperature, and borehole video logs were used to determine the vertical distribution of water-bearing fractures. Heatpulse-flowmeter measurements were used to determine vertical borehole flow under pumping and nonpumping conditions. The most productive fractures generally could be determined from heatpulse-flowmeter measurements under pumping conditions. Vertical borehole flow was measured under nonpumping conditions in most wells that had more than one water-bearing fracture. Upward flow was measured in 35 wells and probably is a result of natural head differences between fractures in the local ground-water-flow system. Downward flow was measured in 11 wells and commonly indicated differences in hydraulic heads of the fractures caused by nearby pumping. Both upward and downward flow was measured in three wells. No flow was detected in eight wells. Natural-gamma-ray logs were used to estimate the attitude of bedding. Thin shale marker beds, shown as spikes of elevated radioactivity in the natural-gamma logs of some wells throughout the area, enable the determination of bedding-plane orientation from three-point correlations. Generally, the marker beds in

  16. Fiber-Based Laser Speckle Imaging for the Detection of Pulsatile Flow

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Caitlin; Yang, Bruce Y.; Mayzel, Kent C.; Ramirez-San-Juan, Julio C.; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Choi, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective In endodontics, a major diagnostic challenge is the accurate assessment of pulp status. In this study, we designed and characterized a fiber-based laser speckle imaging system to study pulsatile blood flow in the tooth. Study Design/Materials and Methods To take transilluminated laser speckle images of the teeth, we built a custom fiber-based probe. To assess our ability to detect changes in pulsatile flow, we performed in vitro and preliminary in vivo tests on tissue-simulating phantoms and human teeth. We imaged flow of intralipid in a glass microchannel at simulated heart rates ranging from 40 beats/minute (bpm) to 120 bpm (0.67–2.00 Hz). We also collected in vivo data from the upper front incisors of healthy subjects. From the measured raw speckle data, we calculated temporal speckle contrast versus time. With frequency-domain analysis, we identified the frequency components of the contrast waveforms. Results With our approach, we observed in vitro the presence of pulsatile flow at different simulated heart rates. We characterized simulated heart rate with an accuracy of and >98%. In the in vivo proof-of-principle experiment, we measured heart rates of 69, 90, and 57 bpm, which agreed with measurements of subject heart rate taken with a wearable, commercial pulse oximeter. Conclusions We designed, built, and tested the performance of a dental imaging probe. Data from in vitro and in vivo tests strongly suggest that this probe can detect the presence of pulsatile flow. LSI may enable endodontists to noninvasively assess pulpal vitality via direct measurement of blood flow. PMID:26202900

  17. Successful Endovascular Treatment of Pulsatile Tinnitus Caused by a Sigmoid Sinus Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gard, A.P.; Klopper, H.B.; Thorell, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We describe the case of a 48-year-old woman who presented with a sigmoid sinus aneurysm. These rare entities have only recently been described in the literature and the ideal treatment approach has not been elucidated. This report represents additional evidence in a growing body of literature that suggests that endovascular therapy is a safe and effective therapeutic alternative to surgical reconstruction of the sigmoid sinus in selected cases of intractable pulsatile tinnitus. PMID:20465881

  18. Indirect assessment of pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone release in agonadal prepubertal rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Suter, K J; Pohl, C R; Plant, T M

    1999-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to characterize the open-loop frequency of pulsatile GnRH release in the female rhesus monkey at an age (15-20 months) when the prepubertal restraint on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is maximally imposed. Additionally, evidence for pulsatile GnRH release in agonadal males of comparable age was also sought. Episodic LH secretion from the pituitary was used as an indirect index of GnRH discharges. In order to maximize the sensitivity of this in situ bioassay, the responsiveness of the pituitary gonadotrophs was usually first heightened by an i.v. intermittent infusion of the synthetic peptide. Monkeys (five females, three males) were castrated between 9 and 14 months of age, implanted with indwelling venous catheters, fitted with nylon jackets and housed in specialized cages that permitted remote access to the venous circulation with minimal restraint and without interruption of the light-darkness cycle. In females, LH secretion was generally assessed at 20-day intervals during alternate nighttime (1900-0200 h) and daytime (0700-1400 h) windows. In males, LH was assessed less frequently and only at night. The mean frequency of pulsatile LH release in agonadal prepubertal females was 4 pulses/7 h during the night and 2 pulses/7 h during the day. These findings indicate that, prior to puberty in the female monkey, the GnRH pulse generator operates at a relatively slow frequency and is subjected to diurnal modulation. In males, evidence for robust pulsatile GnRH release was not observed. The striking difference in activity of the GnRH pulse generator in agonadal prepubertal male and female monkeys reinforces the view that the ontogeny of the hypothalamic drive to the pituitary-gonadal axis in higher primates, including man, is sexually differentiated.

  19. Neoglycoenzyme-Gated Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles: Toward the Design of Nanodevices for Pulsatile Programmed Sequential Delivery.

    PubMed

    Díez, Paula; Sánchez, Alfredo; de la Torre, Cristina; Gamella, María; Martínez-Ruíz, Paloma; Aznar, Elena; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Pingarrón, José M; Villalonga, Reynaldo

    2016-03-01

    We report herein the design of a stimulus-programmed pulsatile delivery system for sequential cargo release based on the use of a lactose-modified esterase as a capping agent in phenylboronic acid functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The dual-release mechanism was based on the distinct stability of the cyclic boronic acid esters formed with lactose residues and the long naturally occurring glycosylation chains in the modified neoglycoenzyme. Cargo delivery in succession was achieved using glucose and ethyl butyrate as triggers.

  20. Feasibility Study of Ex Ovo Chick Chorioallantoic Artery Model for Investigating Pulsatile Variation of Arterial Geometry.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Kim, Juho; Ra, Gicheol; Lee, Chong Hyun; Paeng, Dong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable research efforts on the relationship between arterial geometry and cardiovascular pathology, information is lacking on the pulsatile geometrical variation caused by arterial distensibility and cardiomotility because of the lack of suitable in vivo experimental models and the methodological difficulties in examining the arterial dynamics. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of using a chick embryo system as an experimental model for basic research on the pulsatile variation of arterial geometry. Optical microscope video images of various arterial shapes in chick chorioallantoic circulation were recorded from different locations and different embryo samples. The high optical transparency of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) allowed clear observation of tiny vessels and their movements. Systolic and diastolic changes in arterial geometry were visualized by detecting the wall boundaries from binary images. Several to hundreds of microns of wall displacement variations were recognized during a pulsatile cycle. The spatial maps of the wall motion harmonics and magnitude ratio of harmonic components were obtained by analyzing the temporal brightness variation at each pixel in sequential grayscale images using spectral analysis techniques. The local variations in the spectral characteristics of the arterial wall motion were reflected well in the analysis results. In addition, mapping the phase angle of the fundamental frequency identified the regional variations in the wall motion directivity and phase shift. Regional variations in wall motion phase angle and fundamental-to-second harmonic ratio were remarkable near the bifurcation area. In summary, wall motion in various arterial geometry including straight, curved and bifurcated shapes was well observed in the CAM artery model, and their local and cyclic variations could be characterized by Fourier and wavelet transforms of the acquired video images. The CAM artery model with the spectral

  1. Combined MRI and CFD analysis of fully developed steady and pulsatile laminar flow through a bend.

    PubMed

    Weston, S J; Wood, N B; Tabor, G; Gosman, A D; Firmin, D N

    1998-01-01

    A combined MR and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study is made of flow in a simple phantom laboratory flow rig consisting of a 180 degree bend with straight entry and exit sections. The aim was to investigate the potential of the use of MRI-linked CFD simulations for in vivo use. To this end, the experiment was set up for both steady and pulsatile laminar flow conditions, with Reynolds and Dean numbers and Womersley pulsatility parameter representative of resting flow in the human aorta. The geometrical images of the pipe and the velocity images at entry to the bend were used as boundary conditions for CFD simulations of the flow. The CFD results for both steady and pulsatile cases compared favorably with velocity images obtained at exit from the bend. Additional information such as pressure and wall shear stress, which either could not be measured adequately via MRI, or could not be measured at all, was also extracted from the simulation. Overall, the results were sufficiently promising to justify pursuing subsequent in vivo studies.

  2. Modelling of pulsatile blood flow in arterial trees of retinal vasculature.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, P; He, S; Xu, H

    2011-09-01

    The paper presents a numerical investigation of the pulsatile blood flow in the detailed arterial vasculatures of a mouse retina using the mathematical model based on frequency domain incorporating an appropriate outlet boundary impedance at the end of the terminal vessels of the arterial trees. The viscosity in the vessels was evaluated considering the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect, the plasma skimming effect and in vivo viscosity effect in the microcirculation. Comparative studies of the pulsatile circulation were carried out for cases of rigid vessels, constant viscosity, zero and non-zero outlet boundary impedances. In addition, the dependence of the oscillating input impedance at the inlet of the arterial trees on angular frequencies of the oscillation and vessel elasticises was also studied. The study shows that the pressure wave continues in the pre-capillary vessels throughout the retina. In elastic vessels, the amplitude of oscillatory velocity and wall shear stress in larger vessels and in vessels at the periphery region of the retina is amplified. The pulsatile blood flow is significantly influenced by the outlet boundary (or load) impedance which simulates the effect of the capillary and venous vasculatures. The oscillating input impedance at the inlet of the arterial trees is also found to be dependent on the angular frequency and the Young modulus of the vessel segment. Insights into the potential variations of the dynamic responses of the system under retinal pathological condition of arteriosclerosis may be inferred from the findings of the present study.

  3. An experimental study of pressure losses in pulsatile flows through rigid and pulsating stenosis.

    PubMed

    Rabinovitz, R; Degani, D; Gutfinger, C; Milo, S

    1984-11-01

    The time-dependent pressure curves of a pulsatile flow across rigid and pulsating stenoses were investigated experimentally in a laboratory simulator of the outflow tract of the heart right ventricle. The experiments were performed within the range of physiological conditions of frequency and flow rate. The experimental setup consisted of a closed flow system which was operated by a pulsatile pump, and a test chamber which enabled checking different modes of stenosis. Rigid constrictions were simulated by means of axisymmetric blunt-ended annular plugs with moderate-to-severe area reductions. The pulsating stenosis consisted of a short starling resistor device operated by a pulsating external pressure which was synchronized by the pulsatile flow. It was found that the shape of the time-dependent pressure curve upstream of the stenosis was different in the case of rigid stenosis than in the pulsating one. Potential clinical applications of the work may relate to diagnosis of the type of stenosis in the congenital heart disease known as Tetralogy of Fallot. PMID:6513525

  4. Field-induced self-assembled ferrofluid aggregation in pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Ranjan; Zellmer, Brian; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2005-09-01

    Ferrofluid aggregation and dispersion occurs at several length scales in pulsatile flow applications, e.g., in ferrofluidic pumps, valves, and biomedical applications such as magnetic drug targeting. Because of a yet limited understanding, ferrohydrodynamic investigations involving laboratory-scale studies in idealized geometries are of considerable use. We have injected a ferrofluid into a pulsatile host flow and produced field-induced dissolution (aggregation) using external magnets. A comparison is made with ferrofluid aggregation in a steady flow. Subsequently, the accumulation and dispersion of the ferrofluid aggregates in pulsatile flow are characterized by analyzing their size, mean position, and the flow frequency spectrum. The maximum aggregate size Amax, time to form it tmax, and the aggregate half-life thalf are found to scale according to the relations Amax∝Re-0.71, tmax∝Re-2.1, and thalf∝Re-2.2. While the experiments are conducted at a macroscopic length scale for useful experimental resolution, the results also enable an understanding of the micro- and mesoscale field-assisted self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles.

  5. Alkaline phosphatase in osteoblasts is down-regulated by pulsatile fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsley, M. V.; Frangos, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    It is our hypothesis that interstitial fluid flow plays a role in the bone remodeling response to mechanical loading. The fluid flow-induced expression of three proteins (collagen, osteopontin, and alkaline phosphatase) involved in bone remodeling was investigated. Rat calvarial osteoblasts subjected to pulsatile fluid flow at an average shear stress of 5 dyne/cm2 showed decreased alkaline phosphatase (AP) mRNA expression after only 1 hour of flow. After 3 hours of flow, AP mRNA levels had decreased to 30% of stationary control levels and remained at this level for an additional 5 hours of flow. Steady flow (4 dyne/cm2 fluid shear stress), in contrast, resulted in a delayed and less dramatic decrease in AP mRNA expression to 63% of control levels after 8 hours of flow. The reduced AP mRNA expression under pulsatile flow conditions was followed by reduced AP enzyme activity after 24 hours. No changes in collagen or osteopontin mRNA expression were detected over 8 hours of pulsatile flow. This is the first time fluid flow has been shown to affect gene expression in osteoblasts.

  6. Vortex propagation around a wall-mounted obstacle in pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2015-11-01

    Wall-mounted obstacles are prevalent in nature and engineering applications. Physiological flows observed in human vocal fold pathologies, such as polyps, can be modeled by flow over a wall-mounted protuberance. Despite their prevalence, studies of wall-mounted obstacles have been restricted to steady (constant velocity) freestream flow. In biological and geophysical applications, pulsatile flow is much more common, yet effects of pulsatility on the wake of a wall-mounted obstacle remain to be extensively studied. This study aims to characterize the complex physics produced in this unsteady, separated flow. Experiments were performed in a low-speed wind tunnel with a set of rotating vanes, which produce the pulsatile inflow waveform. Instantaneous and phase-averaged particle image velocimetry (PIV) results acquired around a hemispherical obstacle are presented and compared. A mechanism based on self-induced vortex propagation, analogous to that in vortex rings, is proposed to explain the observed dynamics of coherent structures. Predictions of the propagation velocity based on analytical expressions for vortex rings in a viscous fluid are compared to the experimentally measured propagation velocity. Effects of the unsteady boundary layer on the observed physics are explored. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-1236351, and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  7. Pulsatile Flow Across a Cylinder--An Investigation of Flow in a Total Artificial Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chun

    2005-11-01

    The effect of pulsatility on flow across a single cylinder has been examined experimentally using particle image velocimetry. This work is motivated by the ongoing development of a total artificial lung (TAL), a device which would serve as a bridge to lung transplant. The prototype TAL consists of hollow microfibers through which oxygen-rich gas flows and blood flows around. Flow through the device is provided entirely by right heart and, therefore, is puslatile. The Peclet number of the flow is large and consequently the development of secondary flow affects the resulting gas exchange. The effects of frequency and average flow rate of pulsatile flow around a cylinder were investigated experimentally in a water tunnel and some of the results were compared with preliminary numerical results. Vortices developed behind the cylinder at lower Reynolds numbers in pulsatile flow than steady flow. The results indicate that there are critical values of the Reynolds number between 3 to 5 and Stokes numbers of 0.22, below which vortices were not observed. The findings suggest that higher Stokes and Reynolds numbers within the device could enhance vortex formation. However, this enhanced gas exchange could be at the expense of higher device resistance and increased likelihood of blood trauma. Intelligent TAL design will require consideration of these effects. This work is supported by NIH grant HL69420.

  8. Initial results with simultaneous analog and pulsatile stimulation of the cochlea.

    PubMed

    von Wallenberg, E L; Hochmair, E S; Hochmair-Desoyer, I J

    1990-01-01

    An improved method has been developed for the coding of speech information into adequate signals for the stimulation of the auditory nerve. It combines the periodicity principle, which has been applied in single-channel analog stimulation in the Austrian cochlear prosthesis, with the place principle by simultaneous analog stimulation on one channel and pulsatile stimulation on other channels. The second formant frequency determines the place of stimulation for the pulsatile signals. Simultaneous stimulation of several channels can cause the currents emerging from different electrodes to interact because the fluid impedance in the cochlea is small. Therefore, an important aspect of the multichannel strategy is to maintain the temporal pattern transmitted via the analog channel by adequate repetition rates and phase relationships of the pulsatile signals. The signals were processed with finite impulse response digital filters. Vowel identification tests were performed with 6 patients implanted with a 4-channel intracochlear electrode. The test material was spoken by male and female speakers. With proper timing of the pulses the improvement over the single-channel stimulation was significant at the 1% level and this difference was due to a significant increase in second formant recognition.

  9. Power consumption of rotary blood pumps: pulsatile versus constant-speed mode.

    PubMed

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Cotter, Chris; Bourque, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the power consumption of a HeartMate III rotary blood pump based on in vitro experiments performed in a cardiovascular simulator. To create artificial-pulse mode, we modulated the pump speed by decreasing the mean speed by 2000 rpm for 200 ms and then increasing speed by 4000 rpm (mean speeds plus 2000 rpm) for another 200 ms, creating a square waveform shape. The HeartMate III was connected to a cardiovascular simulator consisting of a hydraulic pump system to simulate left ventricle pumping action, arterial and venous compliance chambers, and an adjustable valve for peripheral resistance to facilitate the desired aortic pressure. The simulator operated based on Suga's elastance model to mimic the Starling response of the heart, thereby reproducing physiological blood flow and pressure conditions. We measured the instantaneous total electrical current and voltage of the pump to evaluate its power consumption. The aim was to answer these fundamental questions: (i) How does pump speed modulation affect pump power consumption? (ii) How does the power consumption vary in relation to external pulsatile flow? The results indicate that speed modulation and external pulsatile flow both moderately increase the power consumption. Increasing the pump speed reduces the impact of external pulsatile flow.

  10. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-hydroxyethylacrylamide) thermosensitive microspheres: the size of microgels dictates the pulsatile release mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fundueanu, Gheorghe; Constantin, Marieta; Asmarandei, Ionela; Bucatariu, Sanda; Harabagiu, Valeria; Ascenzi, Paolo; Simionescu, Bogdan C

    2013-11-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-hydroxyethylacrylamide) (poly(NIPAAm-co-HEAAm)) was prepared as a new thermosensitive copolymer possessing a sharp phase transition around the human body temperature. The effect of the copolymer concentration on the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) was determined under physiological conditions by cloud point (CP) and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) methods. Then, thermosensitive microspheres were prepared from preformed copolymers by chemical cross-linking of hydroxyl groups with glutaraldehyde at a temperature situated slightly below LCST of the copolymer solution. The volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of corresponding cross-linked microspheres was determined from swelling degree-temperature curve. The microspheres were loaded with model drug indomethacin by the solvent evaporation method. The DSC analysis proved that the drug is molecularly dispersed in the polymer network. Finally, the influence of the microsphere size on drug release was investigated. It was established that microspheres with the diameter ranging between 5 and 60 μm release the drug with almost the same rate below (in the swollen state) and above the VPTT (in the collapsed state). On the contrary, microspheres with the diameter ranging between 125 and 220 μm release a significantly higher amount of indomethacin below than above the VPTT. This different behavior is enough to assure a pulsatile release mechanism when the temperature changes cyclically below and above the VPTT. However, both small and large microspheres release a large amount of the drug during the collapsing process.

  11. Interstitial hyperthermia treatment of countercurrent vascular tissue: a comparison of Pennes, WJ and porous media bioheat models.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, Saied; Saboonchi, Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Development of appropriate heat transfer models to investigate the thermal behavior of living tissues has become increasingly important in simulations of cancer hyperthermia. In this paper, a review is initially presented of the more important general models developed for heat transfer description of perfused tissues. Comparisons are then made between Pennes' simplified Weinbaum and Jiji "WJ" and the more recent porous media "PM" bioheat models. For this purpose, a mathematical model is developed for the heat transfer in a cylindrical medium containing parallel counter-current pairs of small vessels with characteristics as much as possible similar to those of living tissues. The validity of the models is examined and confirmed using the Pennes in vivo experiments and one-dimensional analytical solutions. For consideration of interstitial hyperthermia treatment the smaller cylindrical zone with typical heat generation, is assumed in the center of the main cylinder. The numerical simulation results revealed that, despite difference in temperature distributions calculated by these three models at normal condition, the heat affected zone at hyperthermic condition predicted by all three models are similar.

  12. Acute hamstring strain injury in track-and-field athletes: A 3-year observational study at the Penn Relay Carnival.

    PubMed

    Opar, D A; Drezner, J; Shield, A; Williams, M; Webner, D; Sennett, B; Kapur, R; Cohen, M; Ulager, J; Cafengiu, A; Cronholm, P F

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to observe the incidence rates of hamstring strain injuries (HSIs) across different competition levels and ages during the Penn Relays Carnival. Over a 3-year period, all injuries treated by the medical staff were recorded. The type of injury, anatomic location, event in which the injury occurred, competition level, and demographic data were documented. Absolute and relative HSI (per 1000 participants) were determined, and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated between sexes, competition levels, and events. Throughout the study period 48,473 athletes registered to participate in the Penn Relays Carnival, with 118 HSIs treated by the medical team. High school girls displayed lesser risk of HSI than high school boys (OR = 0.55, P = 0.021), and masters athletes were more likely than high school- (OR = 4.26, P < 0.001) and college-level (OR = 3.55, P = 0.001) athletes to suffer HSI. The 4 × 400-m relay displayed a greater likelihood of HSI compared with the 4 × 100-m relay (OR = 1.77, P = 0.008). High school boys and masters-level athletes are most likely to suffer HSI, and there is higher risk in 400-m events compared with 100-m events.

  13. Cyclic variations of high-frequency ultrasonic backscattering from blood under pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung

    2009-08-01

    It was shown previously that ultrasonic scattering from whole blood varies during the flow cycle under pulsatile flow both in vitro and in vivo. It has been postulated that the cyclic variations of the backscattering signal are associated with red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in flowing whole blood. To obtain a better understanding of the relationship between blood backscattering and RBC aggregation behavior for pulsatile flowing blood, the present study used high-frequency ultrasound to characterize blood properties. The backscattering signals from both whole blood and an RBC suspension at different peak flow velocities (from 10 to 30 cm/s) and hematocrits (20% and 40%) under pulsatile flow (stroke rate of 20 beats/min) were measured with 3 single-element transducers at frequencies of 10, 35, and 50 MHz in a mock flow loop. To avoid the frequency response problem of a Doppler flowmeter, the integrated backscatter (IB) and flow velocity as functions of time were calculated directly using RF signals from flowing blood. The experimental results showed that cyclic variations of the IB curve were clearly observed at a low flow velocity and a hematocrit of 40% when using 50 MHz ultrasound, and that these variations became weaker as the peak flow velocity increased. However, these cyclic variations were detected only at 10 cm/s when using 10 MHz ultrasound. These results demonstrate that a high flow velocity can stop the formation of rouleaux and that a high hematocrit can promote RBC aggregation to produce cyclic variations of the backscattering signal under pulsatile flow. In addition, slight cyclic variations of the IB curve for an RBC suspension were observed at 35 and 50 MHz. Furthermore, the peak of the IB curve from whole blood led the peak of the velocity waveform when using high-frequency ultrasound, which could be explained by the assumption that a rapid flow can promote RBC aggregation under pulsatile flow. Together, the experimental results showed that the

  14. Gaseous micro-emboli activity during cardiopulmonary bypass in adults: pulsatile flow versus nonpulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Dodonov, Mikhail; Milano, Aldo; Onorati, Francesco; Dal Corso, Bruno; Menon, Tiziano; Ferrarini, Daniele; Tessari, Maddalena; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has a risk of cerebral injury, with an important role of gaseous micro-emboli (GME) coming from the CPB circuit. Pulsatile perfusion is supposed to perform specific conditions for supplementary GME activity. We aimed to determine whether pulsatile CPB augments production and delivery of GME and evaluate the role of different events in GME activity during either type of perfusion. Twenty-four patients who underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting surgery at the University of Verona were divided equally into two groups-pulsatile perfusion (PP) group and nonpulsatile perfusion (NP) group. The circuit included a JostraHL-20 roller pump set in pulsatile or nonpulsatile mode, an open Sorin Synthesis membrane oxygenator with integrated screen-type arterial filter, and phosphorylcholine-coated tubes. Hemodynamic flow evaluation was performed in terms of energy equivalent pressure and surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE). GME were counted by means of a GAMPT BCC200 bubble counter (GAMPT, Zappendorf, Germany) with two probes placed at postpump and postarterial filter positions. Results were evaluated in terms of GME number, GME volume, number of over-ranged GME from both probes, and series of filtering indexes. In PP mode, the pump produced and delivered along the circuit significantly higher amounts of SHE than in NP mode. At the venous postpump site, GME number was significantly higher during PP but no difference was found in terms of GME volume or number of over-ranged bubbles. No significant difference in GME number, GME volume, or number of over-ranges was found at the postarterial filter site. Filtering indexes were similar between the two groups. Neither type of perfusion was shown to contribute to excessive GME production during the most important perfusionist manipulation. Pulsatility leads to GME increment by splitting and size diminishing of the existing bubbles but not by additional gas production. PP augmented GME number at the

  15. Impact of the postpump resistance on pressure-flow waveform and hemodynamic energy level in a neonatal pulsatile centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Haines, Nikkole; Richardson, J Scott; Dasse, Kurt A; Undar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the impact of different postpump resistances on pulsatile pressure-flow waveforms and hemodynamic energy output in a mock extracorporeal system. The circuit was primed with a 40% glycerin-water mixture, and a PediVAS centrifugal pump was used. The pre- and postpump pressures and flow rates were monitored via a data acquisition system. The postpump resistance was adjusted using a Hoffman clamp at the outlet of the pump. Five different postpump resistances and rotational speeds were tested with nonpulsatile (NP: 5000 RPM) and pulsatile (P: 4000 RPM) modes. No backflow was found when using pulsatile flow. With isoresistance, increased arterial resistances decreased pump flow rates (NP: from 1,912 ml/min to 373 ml/min; P: from 1,485 ml/min to 288 ml/min), increased postpump pressures (NP: from 333 mm Hg to 402 mm Hg; P: from 223 mm Hg to 274 mm Hg), and increased hemodynamic energy output with pulsatile mode. Pump flow rate correlated linearly with rotational speed (RPMs) of the pump, whereas postpump pressures and hemodynamic energy outputs showed curvilinear relationships with RPMs. The maximal pump flow rate also increased from 618 ml/min to 4,293 ml/min with pulsatile mode and from 581 ml/min to 5,665 ml/min with nonpulsatile mode. Results showed that higher postpump resistance reduced the pump flow range, and increased postpump pressure and surplus hemodynamic energy output with pulsatile mode. Higher rotational speeds also generated higher pump flow rates, postpump pressures, and increased pulsatility.

  16. Non-Newtonian perspectives on pulsatile blood-analog flows in a 180° curved artery model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk, Stevin; Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Fuchs, Laszlo; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2015-07-01

    Complex, unsteady fluid flow phenomena in the arteries arise due to the pulsations of the heart that intermittently pumps the blood to the extremities of the body. The many different flow waveform variations observed throughout the arterial network are a result of this process and a function of the vessel properties. Large scale secondary flow structures are generated throughout the aortic arch and larger branches of the arteries. An experimental 180° curved artery test section with physiological inflow conditions was used to validate the computational methods implemented in this study. Good agreement of the secondary flow structures is obtained between experimental and numerical studies of a Newtonian blood-analog fluid under steady-state and pulsatile, carotid artery flow rate waveforms. Multiple vortical structures, some of opposite rotational sense to Dean vortices, similar to Lyne-type vortices, were observed to form during the systolic portion of the pulse. Computational tools were used to assess the effect of blood-analog fluid rheology (i.e., Newtonian versus non-Newtonian). It is demonstrated that non-Newtonian, blood-analog fluid rheology results in shear layer instabilities that alter the formation of vortical structures during the systolic deceleration and onwards during diastole. Additional vortices not observed in the Newtonian cases appear at the inside and outside of the bend at various times during the pulsation. The influence of blood-analog shear-thinning viscosity decreases mean pressure losses in contrast to the Newtonian blood analog fluid.

  17. Comparison of pulsatile and continuous ritodrine administration: effects on uterine contractility and beta-adrenergic receptor cascade.

    PubMed

    Caritis, S N; Chiao, J P; Kridgen, P

    1991-04-01

    In this study we compare the uterine contractility and beta-adrenergic receptor effects of identical doses of ritodrine administered intermittently or continuously for 24 hours in pregnant sheep. Ritodrine was administered intravenously to five animals as a pulse, 16 micrograms/kg every 1.5 hours, whereas five other animals received ritodrine as a continuous infusion of 0.18 microgram/kg/min. Ritodrine plasma concentrations at steady state were comparable in both groups and averaged 18 ng/ml. Animals receiving ritodrine pulses demonstrated no alteration of myometrial beta-adrenergic receptors or adenylyl cyclase activity, and ritodrine inhibited oxytocin-induced contractility comparably at 4 and 24 hours. Animals receiving ritodrine continuously had a significant decrease in myometrial beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylyl cyclase activity, yet ritodrine inhibition of oxytocin-induced uterine contractility was sustained for 24 hours. Oxytocin receptors were not affected by ritodrine administration and were similar in both groups. At the dose studied, oxytocin-induced contractions are comparably inhibited by ritodrine for 24 hours whether the drug is given continuously or in a pulsatile fashion.

  18. Fasting suppresses pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion and enhances orderliness of LH release in young but not older men.

    PubMed

    Bergendahl, M; Aloi, J A; Iranmanesh, A; Mulligan, T M; Veldhuis, J D

    1998-06-01

    Pulsatile gonadotropin secretion and sex-steroid concentrations are suppressed reversibly in young fasted or malnourished human subjects. In this study, we investigated the impact of age on the dynamic neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying this stress response in healthy young (age, 28 +/- 3 yr, n = 8) vs. older (age 67 +/- 2 yr, n = 8) men with similar body mass indices (mean, 26 +/- 0.6 vs. 26 +/- 1.3 kg/m2, respectively). Serum LH concentrations were measured by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) in blood collected at 10-min intervals over 27 h on a control (fed) day and on the third day of a 3.5-day fast (water only) assigned in randomized order. After 24 h of basal sampling, GnRH (10 micrograms i.v. bolus) was administered to test gonadotrope responsiveness. Cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, androstenedione, testosterone, FSH, GH, and PRL were measured in 24-h pooled serum as positive and negative control hormones. Approximate entropy was used to quantitate the orderliness of LH release over 24 h, and a multiple-parameter deconvolution method was applied to quantify pulsatile LH secretion and LH half-life. In the fed state, older men exhibited elevated mean (24-h pooled) serum FSH and cortisol concentrations compared with young controls but equivalent serum LH concentrations and reduced serum GH, free testosterone, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentrations. Fed older men also manifested a lower frequency and amplitude of 24-h pulsatile LH secretion, and, by approximate entropy calculations, a more disorderly pattern of basal LH release than younger individuals. Three- and one-half days of fasting evoked 40% and 47% increases in mean (24-h) serum cortisol concentrations in young and older men, respectively (P < 0.01 vs. fed, but P = not significant for percentage rise in older vs. young men). Concurrently, fasting induced a 2.1-fold fall in the 24-h endogenous LH production rate in young men (fed 36 +/- 9.7 vs. fasted 17 +/- 2.0 IU

  19. Cardiac flow measurement by ultrafast CT: validation of continuous and pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Ludman, P F; Darby, M; Tomlinson, N; Poole-Wilson, P A; Rees, S

    1992-01-01

    To gauge the accuracy of ultrafast CT in measuring cardiac output and myocardial perfusion in humans, measurements of continuous and pulsatile flow were made in a large asymmetrical phantom. The variation in the relationship between Hounsfield number and contrast concentration was assessed in a human thorax phantom. Radiopaque contrast medium was injected during perfusion of the phantom at a range of flow rates between 1.5 and 8 L/min. The phantom was scanned in two modes (50 and 100 ms) during continuous and pulsatile flow and with the phantom surrounded by air and by water. Flow in the tubes was calculated using indicator dilution theory, and flow in the tissue-equivalent chamber was calculated by applying first-pass distribution principles. The standard deviation of the difference between calculated and measured flow varied from 0.2 to 0.6 L/min, giving 95% limits of agreement from 0.4 to 1.2 L/min. The constant (K) relating Hounsfield unit number to iodine concentration varied widely both in different locations within the phantom and under different scan conditions (17.2-27.6 HU/mg I). Within a human thorax phantom, K varied from 14.15 to 23.18 HU/mg I and was dependent on location within the thorax phantom, the scan mode, and the cross-sectional diameter of the phantom. These data suggest that though the ultrafast CT scanner can measure continuous and pulsatile flow accurately in tubes, precise measurements of cardiac output in humans will require K to be assessed for each subject. Measurements of flow in tissue should be possible. PMID:1522275

  20. Pulsatile secretion of LH in relation to the resumption of ovarian activity post partum.

    PubMed

    Glasier, A; McNeilly, A S; Howie, P W

    1984-04-01

    Changes in the pulsatile pattern of LH secretion in relation to the resumption of ovarian activity post partum have been studied in breast feeding mothers. Basal concentrations of LH were significantly lower than normal both when ovarian activity was completely suppressed and when there was evidence of some follicular development prior to the resumption of menstruation. Once menstruation resumed basal concentrations of LH were unchanged whether ovulation occurred or not. No difference in the frequency or amplitude of pulses in LH secretion could be found at any stage post partum in either breast or bottle feeding women. FSH levels remained constant throughout the post partum period while mean concentrations of prolactin fell as ovarian activity returned to normal. However, during the period of complete suppression of ovarian activity in breast feeding women, two patterns of pulsatile secretion of LH were observed. In 76% of observation periods, basal levels of LH were lower than normal and were characterized by low frequency and low amplitude pulses of LH. In contrast, in the remaining 24% of observation periods, basal levels and pulse amplitude and frequency of LH were similar to those in the follicular phase of normal menstrual cycles in these women. Individual women showed either or both of these patterns of secretion during the period of ovarian suppression post partum. The data suggests that the failure to maintain ovarian follicular development post partum in breast feeding women may be due to: (1) a direct block of LH action at ovarian level, perhaps by the high levels of prolactin associated with lactation and/or (2) an inability of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis-as a result of the suckling stimulus and/or prolactin-to maintain pulsatile secretion of LH in the face of the negative feedback effects of the increased oestrogen secretion resulting from the initiation of follicular development.

  1. Automatic segmentation and co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets: measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Robert; Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, J. G.; Siddiki, Hassan; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri; Spencer, Garrett; Primak, Andrew N.; Zhang, Jie; Nielson, Theresa; McCollough, Cynthia; Yu, Lifeng

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To develop robust, novel segmentation and co-registration software to analyze temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets, with an aim to permit automated measurement of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods: We perform retrospective gated CT angiography in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Multiple, temporally overlapping, time-resolved CT angiography datasets are reconstructed over the cardiac cycle, with aortic segmentation performed using a priori anatomic assumptions for the aorta and heart. Visual quality assessment is performed following automatic segmentation with manual editing. Following subsequent centerline generation, centerlines are cross-registered across phases, with internal validation of co-registration performed by examining registration at the regions of greatest diameter change (i.e. when the second derivative is maximal). Results: We have performed gated CT angiography in 60 patients. Automatic seed placement is successful in 79% of datasets, requiring either no editing (70%) or minimal editing (less than 1 minute; 12%). Causes of error include segmentation into adjacent, high-attenuating, nonvascular tissues; small segmentation errors associated with calcified plaque; and segmentation of non-renal, small paralumbar arteries. Internal validation of cross-registration demonstrates appropriate registration in our patient population. In general, we observed that aortic pulsatility can vary along the course of the abdominal aorta. Pulsation can also vary within an aneurysm as well as between aneurysms, but the clinical significance of these findings remain unknown. Conclusions: Visualization of large vessel pulsatility is possible using ECG-gated CT angiography, partial scan reconstruction, automatic segmentation, centerline generation, and coregistration of temporally resolved datasets.

  2. The effect of flow acceleration on the cyclic variation of blood echogenicity under pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Liao, Chen-Chih; Lee, Po-Yang; Shih, Cho-Chiang

    2013-04-01

    It has been shown that the echogenicity of blood varies during a flow cycle under pulsatile flow both in vitro and in vivo. In general, the echogenicity of flowing whole blood increases during the early systole phase and then reduces to a minimum at late diastole. While it has been postulated that this cyclic variation is associated with the dynamics of erythrocyte aggregation, the mechanisms underlying this increasing echogenicity with flow velocity remain uncertain. The effect of flow acceleration has also been proposed as an explanation for this phenomenon, but no specific experiments have been conducted to test this hypothesis. In addition, the influence of ultrasonic attenuation on the cyclic variation of echogenicity requires clarification. In the present study, a Couette flow system was designed to simulate blood flowing with different acceleration patterns, and the flow velocity, attenuation, and backscattering coefficient were measured synchronously from 20%- and 40%-hematocrit porcine whole blood and erythrocyte suspensions using 35-MHz ultrasound transducers. The results showed ultrasonic attenuation exerted only minor effects on the echogenicity of blood under pulsatile flow conditions. Cyclic variations of echogenicity were clearly observed for whole blood with a hematocrit of 40%, but no variations were apparent for erythrocyte suspensions. The echogenicity did not appear to be enhanced when instantaneous acceleration was applied to flowing blood in any case. These findings show that flow acceleration does not promote erythrocyte aggregation, even when a higher peak velocity is applied to the blood. Comparison of the results obtained with different accelerations revealed that the cyclic variation in echogenicity observed during pulsatile blood flow may be jointly attributable to the effect of shear rate and the distribution of erythrocyte on aggregation.

  3. cAMP mediators of pulsatile insulin secretion from glucose-stimulated single beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Idevall-Hagren, Olof; Barg, Sebastian; Gylfe, Erik; Tengholm, Anders

    2010-07-23

    Pulsatile insulin release from glucose-stimulated beta-cells is driven by oscillations of the Ca(2+) and cAMP concentrations in the subplasma membrane space ([Ca(2+)](pm) and [cAMP](pm)). To clarify mechanisms by which cAMP regulates insulin secretion, we performed parallel evanescent wave fluorescence imaging of [cAMP](pm), [Ca(2+)](pm), and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP(3)) in the plasma membrane. This lipid is formed by autocrine insulin receptor activation and was used to monitor insulin release kinetics from single MIN6 beta-cells. Elevation of the glucose concentration from 3 to 11 mm induced, after a 2.7-min delay, coordinated oscillations of [Ca(2+)](pm), [cAMP](pm), and PIP(3). Inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) markedly diminished the PIP(3) response when applied before glucose stimulation, but did not affect already manifested PIP(3) oscillations. The reduced PIP(3) response could be attributed to accelerated depolarization causing early rise of [Ca(2+)](pm) that preceded the elevation of [cAMP](pm). However, the amplitude of the PIP(3) response after PKA inhibition was restored by a specific agonist to the cAMP-dependent guanine nucleotide exchange factor Epac. Suppression of cAMP formation with adenylyl cyclase inhibitors reduced already established PIP(3) oscillations in glucose-stimulated cells, and this effect was almost completely counteracted by the Epac agonist. In cells treated with small interfering RNA targeting Epac2, the amplitudes of the glucose-induced PIP(3) oscillations were reduced, and the Epac agonist was without effect. The data indicate that temporal coordination of the triggering [Ca(2+)](pm) and amplifying [cAMP](pm) signals is important for glucose-induced pulsatile insulin release. Although both PKA and Epac2 partake in initiating insulin secretion, the cAMP dependence of established pulsatility is mediated by Epac2.

  4. Resolution of Pulsatile Tinnitus after Venous Sinus Stenting in Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dinkin, Marc; Suurna, Maria; Hannsgen, Kelly; Bui, Xem

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the role of venous sinus stenting in the treatment of pulsatile tinnitus among patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) and significant venous sinus stenosis. Subjects and Methods A written informed consent approved by the Weill Cornell institutional review board was signed and obtained from the study participants. Thirty-seven consecutive patients with IIH and venous sinus stenosis who were treated with venous sinus stenting between Jan.2012-Jan.2016 were prospectively evaluated. Patients without pulsatile tinnitus were excluded. Tinnitus severity was categorized based on “Tinnitus Handicap Inventory” (THI) at pre-stent, day-0, 1-month, 3-month, 6-month, 12-month, 18-month and 2-year follow-up. Demographics, body-mass index (BMI), pre and post VSS trans-stenotic pressure gradient were documented. Statistical analysis performed using Pearson’s correlation, Chi-square analysis and Fischer’s exact test. Results 29 patients with a mean age of 29.5±8.5 years M:F = 1:28. Median (mean) THI pre and post stenting were: 4 (3.7) and 1 (1) respectively. Median time of tinnitus resolution post VSS was 0-days. There was significant improvement of THI (Δ Mean: 2.7 THI [95% CI: 2.3–3.1 THI], p<0.001) and transverse-distal sigmoid sinus gradient (Δ Mean: -15.3 mm Hg [95% CI: 12.7–18 mm Hg], p<0.001) post-stenting. Mean follow-up duration of 26.4±9.8 months (3–44 months). VSS was feasible in 100% patients with no procedural complications. Three-patients (10%) had recurrent sinus stenosis and tinnitus at mean follow-up of 12 months (6–30 months). Conclusion Venous sinus stenting is an effective treatment for pulsatile tinnitus in patients with IIH and venous sinus stenosis. PMID:27768690

  5. Neoglycoenzyme-Gated Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles: Toward the Design of Nanodevices for Pulsatile Programmed Sequential Delivery.

    PubMed

    Díez, Paula; Sánchez, Alfredo; de la Torre, Cristina; Gamella, María; Martínez-Ruíz, Paloma; Aznar, Elena; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Pingarrón, José M; Villalonga, Reynaldo

    2016-03-01

    We report herein the design of a stimulus-programmed pulsatile delivery system for sequential cargo release based on the use of a lactose-modified esterase as a capping agent in phenylboronic acid functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The dual-release mechanism was based on the distinct stability of the cyclic boronic acid esters formed with lactose residues and the long naturally occurring glycosylation chains in the modified neoglycoenzyme. Cargo delivery in succession was achieved using glucose and ethyl butyrate as triggers. PMID:26966914

  6. Pulsatile blood velocity in human arteries displayed by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, D.A.; Crooks, L.; Hoenninger, J. III.; Arakawa, M.; Watts, J.

    1984-10-01

    The authors describe a new method for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of flowing protons which can illustrate relative blood velocity in the arteries supplying the brain. The magnetic gradient pulse sequence was synchronized to the cardiac cycle at 100-msec. increments to check pulsatile blood flow perpendicular to the image plane. The magnitude of the signal increased with the velocity of blood in major arteries flowing in the direction of the spatially offset refocusing plane. The blood velocity in the vertebral and internal carotid arteries varied as a function of the phase of the cardiac cycle, and the velocity profiles across the vascular lumina were compatible with laminar flow.

  7. Pulsatile flow of blood using a modified second-grade fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Tran, P.X.

    2008-07-01

    We study the unsteady pulsatile flow of blood in an artery, where the effects of body acceleration are included. The blood is modeled as a modified second-grade fluid where the viscosity and the normal stress coefficients depend on the shear rate. It is assumed that the blood near the wall behaves as a Newtonian fluid, and in the core as a non-Newtonian fluid. This phenomenon is also known as the Fahraeus–Lindqvist effect. The equations are made dimensionless and solved numerically.

  8. Orientation-independent rapid pulsatile flow measurement using dual-angle Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lindsy M; Gu, Shi; Jenkins, Michael W; Rollins, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Doppler OCT (DOCT) can provide blood flow velocity information which is valuable for investigation of microvascular structure and function. However, DOCT is only sensitive to motion parallel with the imaging beam, so that knowledge of flow direction is needed for absolute velocity determination. Here, absolute volumetric flow is calculated by integrating velocity components perpendicular to the B-scan plane. These components are acquired using two illumination beams with a predetermined angular separation, produced by a delay encoded technique. This technology enables rapid pulsatile flow measurement from single B-scans without the need for 3-D volumetric data or knowledge of blood vessel orientation. PMID:24575344

  9. A Pulsatile Flow Phantom for Image-Guided HIFU Hemostasis of Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaby, Robyn; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    A pulsatile flow phantom for studying ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis in a controlled environment has been developed. An ex vivo porcine carotid artery was attached to the phantom and embedded in a visually and ultrasonically transparent gel. Heparinized porcine blood was pumped through the phantom. Power-Doppler and B-mode ultrasound were used to remotely target the HIFU focus to the site of a needle puncture. In nine trials, complete hemostasis was achieved after an average HIFU application of 55 +/- 34 seconds. The vessels remained patent after treatment. With this phantom, it will be possible to do controlled studies of ultrasound image-guided acoustic hemostasis.

  10. Pulsatile diastolic increase and systolic decrease in arterial blood pressure: their mechanism of production and physiological role.

    PubMed

    Mandoki, Juan José; Casa-Tirao, Beatriz; Molina-Guarneros, Juan Arcadio; Jiménez-Orozco, Fausto Alejandro; García-Mondragón, María Juana; Maldonado-Espinoza, Amelia

    2013-08-01

    The diastolic pulsatile increase in arterial blood pressure is shown to occur earlier in the aorta than in other arteries. It is thus not a reflection of the systolic pressure wave, as has been generally assumed, but an independent pressure wave produced by the sequential contraction of the arterial tree. Conversely, a systolic pulsatile decrease in the rate of blood pressure rise is also produced by an active relaxation of the arterial tree. Simultaneously with the pulsatile changes in arterial blood pressure, there are corresponding changes in arterial blood flow. All these cyclic changes are reflex responses to decreasing diastolic and increasing systolic baroreceptor firing rates, respectively. The two reflexes contribute, together with the known compliance of the large arteries and the great arteriolar blood flow resistance, to the steadiness of capillary blood flow throughout the systolic and the much longer-lasting diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle.

  11. Pulsatile unsteady flow of blood through porous medium in a stenotic artery under the influence of transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Bansal, Kuldip; Bansal, Seema

    2012-09-01

    The periodic nature of the cardiac cycle induces a pulsatile, unsteady flow within the circulatory system. The pulsatile model of blood flow provides data to analyse the physiological situation in close proximity. The distribution of fatty cholesterol and artery-clogging blood clots in the lumen of the coronary artery is assumed as a porous medium. A mathematical model for pulsatile flow through an stenosed artery filled with porous medium in the presence of transverse static magnetic field has been formulated under the consideration of hematocrit dependent viscosity of blood that governed by Einstein equation. The velocity profile, volume flux, pressure gradient and wall shear stress are obtained and the effects of magnetic number, Darcy number, Womersely number are computed and represented through graphs.

  12. Physiologic benefits of pulsatile perfusion during mechanical circulatory support for the treatment of acute and chronic heart failure in adults.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yulong; Karkhanis, Tushar; Wang, Shigang; Rider, Alan; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; El Banayosy, Aly; Undar, Akif

    2010-07-01

    A growing population experiencing heart failure (100,000 patients/year), combined with a shortage of donor organs (less than 2200 hearts/year), has led to increased and expanded use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. MCS devices have successfully improved clinical outcomes, which are comparable with heart transplantation and result in better 1-year survival than optimal medical management therapies. The quality of perfusion provided during MCS therapy may play an important role in patient outcomes. Despite demonstrated physiologic benefits of pulsatile perfusion, continued use or development of pulsatile MCS devices has been widely abandoned in favor of continuous flow pumps owing to the large size and adverse risks events in the former class, which pose issues of thrombogenic surfaces, percutaneous lead infection, and durability. Next-generation MCS device development should ideally implement designs that offer the benefits of rotary pump technology while providing the physiologic benefits of pulsatile end-organ perfusion.

  13. Pulsatile Support Mode of BJUT-II Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) has Better Hemodynamic Effects on the Aorta than Constant Speed Mode: A Primary Numerical Study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Kaiyun; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu; Zeng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND BJUT-II VAD is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVADs), directly implanted into the ascending aorta. The pulsatile support mode is proposed to achieve better unloading performance than constant speed mode. However, the hemodynamic effects of this support mode on the aorta are still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the hemodynamic effects BJUT-II VAD under pulsatile support mode on the aorta. MATERIAL AND METHODS Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies, based on a patient-specific aortic geometric model, were conducted. Wall shear stress (WSS), averaged WSS (avWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and averaged helicity density (Ha) were calculated to compare the differences in hemodynamic effects between pulsatile support mode and constant speed mode. RESULTS The results show that avWSS under pulsatile support mode is significantly higher than that under constant speed mode (0.955Pa vs. 0.675Pa). Similarly, the OSI value under pulsatile mode is higher than that under constant speed mode (0.104 vs. 0.057). In addition, Ha under pulsatile mode for all selected cross-sections is larger than that under constant mode. CONCLUSIONS BJUT-II VAD, under pulsatile control mode, may prevent atherosclerosis lesions and aortic remodeling. The precise effects of pulsatile support mode on atherosclerosis and aortic remodeling need to be further studied in animal experiments. PMID:27363758

  14. Pulsatile Support Mode of BJUT-II Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) has Better Hemodynamic Effects on the Aorta than Constant Speed Mode: A Primary Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Kaiyun; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu; Zeng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background BJUT-II VAD is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVADs), directly implanted into the ascending aorta. The pulsatile support mode is proposed to achieve better unloading performance than constant speed mode. However, the hemodynamic effects of this support mode on the aorta are still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the hemodynamic effects BJUT-II VAD under pulsatile support mode on the aorta. Material/Methods Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies, based on a patient-specific aortic geometric model, were conducted. Wall shear stress (WSS), averaged WSS (avWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and averaged helicity density (Ha) were calculated to compare the differences in hemodynamic effects between pulsatile support mode and constant speed mode. Results The results show that avWSS under pulsatile support mode is significantly higher than that under constant speed mode (0.955Pa vs. 0.675Pa). Similarly, the OSI value under pulsatile mode is higher than that under constant speed mode (0.104 vs. 0.057). In addition, Ha under pulsatile mode for all selected cross-sections is larger than that under constant mode. Conclusions BJUT-II VAD, under pulsatile control mode, may prevent atherosclerosis lesions and aortic remodeling. The precise effects of pulsatile support mode on atherosclerosis and aortic remodeling need to be further studied in animal experiments. PMID:27363758

  15. The Decline in Pulsatile GnRH Release, as Reflected by Circulating LH Concentrations, During the Infant-Juvenile Transition in the Agonadal Male Rhesus Monkey (Macaca mulatta) Is Associated With a Reduction in Kisspeptin Content of KNDy Neurons of the Arcuate Nucleus in the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Suresh; Dwarki, Karthik; Ali, Barkat; Gibbs, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Puberty in primates is timed by 2 hypothalamic events: during late infancy a decline in pulsatile GnRH release occurs, leading to a hypogonadotropic state that maintains quiescence of the prepubertal gonad; and in late juvenile development, pulsatile GnRH release is reactivated and puberty initiated, a phase of development that is dependent on kisspeptin signaling. In the present study, we determined whether the arrest of GnRH pulsatility in infancy was associated with a change in kisspeptin expression in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). Kisspeptin was determined using immunohistochemistry in coronal hypothalamic sections from agonadal male rhesus monkeys during early infancy when GnRH release as reflected by circulating LH concentrations was robust and compared with that in juveniles in which GnRH pulsatility was arrested. The distribution of immunopositive kisspeptin neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the MBH of infants was similar to that previously reported for adults. Kisspeptin cell body number was greater in infants compared with juveniles, and at the middle to posterior level of the arcuate nucleus, this developmental difference was statistically significant. Neurokinin B in the MBH exhibited a similar distribution to that of kisspeptin and was colocalized with kisspeptin in approximately 60% of kisspeptin perikarya at both developmental stages. Intensity of GnRH fiber staining in the median eminence was robust at both stages. These findings indicate that the switch that shuts off pulsatile GnRH release during infancy and that guarantees the subsequent quiescence of the prepubertal gonad involves a reduction in a stimulatory kisspeptin tone to the GnRH neuronal network. PMID:23525220

  16. SU-D-18C-04: The Feasibility of Quantifying MRI Contrast Agent in Pulsatile Flowing Blood Using DCE-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    N, Gwilliam M; J, Collins D; O, Leach M; R, Orton M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of accurately quantifying the concentration of MRI contrast agent (CA) in pulsatile flowing blood by measuring its T{sub 1}, as is common for the purposes of obtaining a patientspecific arterial input function (AIF). Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) - MRI and pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling is widely used to produce measures of vascular function but accurate measurement of the AIF undermines their accuracy. A proposed solution is to measure the T{sub 1} of blood in a large vessel using the Fram double flip angle method during the passage of a bolus of CA. This work expands on previous work by assessing pulsatile flow and the changes in T{sub 1} seen with a CA bolus. Methods: A phantom was developed which used a physiological pump to pass fluid of a known T{sub 1} (812ms) through the centre of a head coil of a clinical 1.5T MRI scanner. Measurements were made using high temporal resolution sequences suitable for DCE-MRI and were used to validate a virtual phantom that simulated the expected errors due to pulsatile flow and bolus of CA concentration changes typically found in patients. Results: : Measured and virtual results showed similar trends, although there were differences that may be attributed to the virtual phantom not accurately simulating the spin history of the fluid before entering the imaging volume. The relationship between T{sub 1} measurement and flow speed was non-linear. T{sub 1} measurement is compromised by new spins flowing into the imaging volume, not being subject to enough excitations to have reached steady-state. The virtual phantom demonstrated a range of recorded T{sub 1} for various simulated T{sub 1} / flow rates. Conclusion: T{sub 1} measurement of flowing blood using standard DCE-MRI sequences is very challenging. Measurement error is non-linear with relation to instantaneous flow speed. Optimising sequence parameters and lowering baseline T{sub 1} of blood should be considered.

  17. An Investigation of Pulsatile Flow Past Two Cylinders as a Model of Blood Flow in an Artificial Lung.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Khanafer, Khalil M; Bartlett, Robert H; Hirschl, Ronald B; Bull, Joseph L

    2011-07-01

    Pulsatile flow across two circular cylinders with different geometric arrangements is studied experimentally using the particle image velocimetry method and numerically using the finite element method. This investigation is motivated the need to optimize gas transfer and fluid mechanical impedance for a total artificial lung, in which the right heart pumps blood across a bundle of hollow microfibers. Vortex formation was found to occur at lower Reynolds numbers in pulsatile flow than in steady flow, and the vortex structure depends strongly on the geometric arrangement of the cylinders and on the Reynolds and Stokes numbers. PMID:21701672

  18. An Investigation of Pulsatile Flow Past Two Cylinders as a Model of Blood Flow in an Artificial Lung

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-chun; Khanafer, Khalil M.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsatile flow across two circular cylinders with different geometric arrangements is studied experimentally using the particle image velocimetry method and numerically using the finite element method. This investigation is motivated the need to optimize gas transfer and fluid mechanical impedance for a total artificial lung, in which the right heart pumps blood across a bundle of hollow microfibers. Vortex formation was found to occur at lower Reynolds numbers in pulsatile flow than in steady flow, and the vortex structure depends strongly on the geometric arrangement of the cylinders and on the Reynolds and Stokes numbers. PMID:21701672

  19. Design and In Vitro Evaluation of Compression-coated Pulsatile Release Tablets of Losartan Potassium

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, M.; Singh, D. C. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Singh, A.

    2012-01-01

    In majority of individuals blood pressure rises in the early morning hours, which lead to serious cardiovascular complications. Formulation of pulsatile system makes it possible to deliver drug at definite period of time when symptoms of the disease condition are most critical. The purpose of the present work was to develop pulsatile release tablet of losartan potassium for chronotherapy in hypertension. The prepared system consisted of a core tablet coated with versatile and safe hydrophilic cellulosic ethers such as, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, hydroxypropyl cellulose and sodium carboxy methylcellulose to produce burst release after predetermined lag time. Various formulation factors were studied through series of test and in vitro dissolution study. It was found that core tablets containing superdisintegrant failed to produce burst drug release pattern while effervescent agent was able to do so. Results also reveal that coating composition and coating level affects lag time. Formulation containing effervescent agent in core and coated with 200 mg hydroxypropyl cellulose provide lag time of 4.5 h with 73% drug release in 6 h that followed a sigmoidal release pattern. These values were close to the desired objective of producing lag time of 5-6 h followed by fast drug release. This approach can thus provide a useful means for timed release of losartan and is helpful for patients with morning surge. PMID:23325989

  20. A High Performance Pulsatile Pump for Aortic Flow Experiments in 3-Dimensional Models.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Rafeed A; Atlasman, Victor; Pathangey, Girish; Pracht, Nicholas; Adrian, Ronald J; Frakes, David H

    2016-06-01

    Aortic pathologies such as coarctation, dissection, and aneurysm represent a particularly emergent class of cardiovascular diseases. Computational simulations of aortic flows are growing increasingly important as tools for gaining understanding of these pathologies, as well as for planning their surgical repair. In vitro experiments are required to validate the simulations against real world data, and the experiments require a pulsatile flow pump system that can provide physiologic flow conditions characteristic of the aorta. We designed a newly capable piston-based pulsatile flow pump system that can generate high volume flow rates (850 mL/s), replicate physiologic waveforms, and pump high viscosity fluids against large impedances. The system is also compatible with a broad range of fluid types, and is operable in magnetic resonance imaging environments. Performance of the system was validated using image processing-based analysis of piston motion as well as particle image velocimetry. The new system represents a more capable pumping solution for aortic flow experiments than other available designs, and can be manufactured at a relatively low cost. PMID:26983961

  1. Elderly depression diagnostic of diabetic patients by brain tissue pulsatility imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachemi, Mélouka Elkateb; Remeniéras, Jean-pierre; Desmidt, Thomas; Camus, Vincent; Tranquart, François

    2010-01-01

    Pulsatile motion of brain parenchyma results from cardiac and breathing cycles and consists in a rapid displacement in systole, with slow diastolic recovery. Based on the vascular depression concept and recent studies where a correlation was found between cerebral haemodynamics and depression in the elderly, we emitted the hypothesis that tissue brain motion due to perfusion is correlated to elderly depression associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Tissue Pulsatlity Imaging (TPI) is a new ultrasound technique developed firstly at the University of Washington to assess the brain tissue motion. We used TPI technique to measure the brain displacement of two groups of elderly patients with diabetes as a vascular risk factor. The first group is composed of 11 depressed diabetic patients. The second group is composed of 12 diabetic patients without depressive symptoms. Transcranial acquisitions were performed with a 1.8 MHz ultrasound phased array probe through the right temporal bone window. The acquisition of six cardiac cycles was realized on each patient with a frame rate of 23 frames/s. Displacements estimation was performed by off-line analysis. A significant decrease in brain pulsatility was observed in the group of depressed patients compared to the group of non depressed patients. Mean displacement magnitude was about 44±7 μm in the first group and 68±13 μm in the second group.

  2. Numerical investigation of three patterns of motion in an electromagnetic pulsatile VAD.

    PubMed

    Shahraki, Zahra Hashemi; Oscuii, Hanieh Niroomand

    2014-01-01

    Hemolysis and thrombus formation which are critical concerns in designing a long-term implantable ventricular assist device (VAD) have impeded the widespread use of VADs. In this study, thus, the three-dimensional fluid domain of blood flow in a small bichamber positive displacement VAD (25 ml) with a magnetically levitated moving pusher plate was simulated by the means of a finite element package called ADINA. To optimize the function of the pump for minimizing shear stress induced blood damage, three different driver patterns (linear, sinusoidal, and Guyton's pulse) were investigated. The first pattern produced a constant flow, whereas the two others created pulsatile flows. The flow pattern and the distribution of shear stress of each pattern were observed for comparison. It was revealed that the three types of motions may induce less than 0.06% red blood cell damage. Moreover, in comparison to the other patterns not only did the sinusoidal motion of the pusher plate cause less risk of hemolysis, but in comparison to the linear pattern, it produced a pulsatile flow which reduced the stagnation areas in chambers, lowering the probability of thrombosis. In addition, this motion eliminates the probability of cavitations as compared with the Guyton's pulse pattern.

  3. Biological time series analysis using a context free language: applicability to pulsatile hormone data.

    PubMed

    Dean, Dennis A; Adler, Gail K; Nguyen, David P; Klerman, Elizabeth B

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach for analyzing biological time-series data using a context-free language (CFL) representation that allows the extraction and quantification of important features from the time-series. This representation results in Hierarchically AdaPtive (HAP) analysis, a suite of multiple complementary techniques that enable rapid analysis of data and does not require the user to set parameters. HAP analysis generates hierarchically organized parameter distributions that allow multi-scale components of the time-series to be quantified and includes a data analysis pipeline that applies recursive analyses to generate hierarchically organized results that extend traditional outcome measures such as pharmacokinetics and inter-pulse interval. Pulsicons, a novel text-based time-series representation also derived from the CFL approach, are introduced as an objective qualitative comparison nomenclature. We apply HAP to the analysis of 24 hours of frequently sampled pulsatile cortisol hormone data, which has known analysis challenges, from 14 healthy women. HAP analysis generated results in seconds and produced dozens of figures for each participant. The results quantify the observed qualitative features of cortisol data as a series of pulse clusters, each consisting of one or more embedded pulses, and identify two ultradian phenotypes in this dataset. HAP analysis is designed to be robust to individual differences and to missing data and may be applied to other pulsatile hormones. Future work can extend HAP analysis to other time-series data types, including oscillatory and other periodic physiological signals.

  4. First In Vivo Results of a Novel Pediatric Oxygenator with an Integrated Pulsatile Pump.

    PubMed

    Stang, Katharina; Borchardt, Ralf; Neumann, Bernd; Kurz, Julia; Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Greiner, Tim O; Fahrner, Christine; Schenk, Martin; Schlensak, Christian; Schubert, Maria; Lausberg, Henning; Herold, Sabine; Schlanstein, Peter C; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta; Wendel, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a pivotal bridge to recovery for cardiopulmonary failure in children. Besides its life-saving quality, it is often associated with severe system-related complications, such as hemolysis, inflammation, and thromboembolism. Novel oxygenator and pump systems may reduce such ECMO-related complications. The ExMeTrA oxygenator is a newly designed pediatric oxygenator with an integrated pulsatile pump minimizing the priming volume and reducing the surface area of blood contact. The aim of our study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of this new ExMeTrA (expansion mediated transport and accumulation) oxygenator in an animal model. During 6 h of extracorporeal circulation (ECC) in pigs, parameters of the hemostatic system including coagulation, platelets and complement activation, and flow rates were investigated. A nonsignificant trend in C3 consumption, thrombin-antithrombin-III (TAT) complex formation and a slight trend in hemolysis were detected. During the ECC, the blood flow was constantly at 500 ml/min using only flexible silicone tubes inside the oxygenator as pulsatile pump. Our data clearly indicate that the hemostatic markers were only slightly influenced by the ExMeTrA oxygenator. Additionally, the oxygenator showed a constant quality of blood flow. Therefore, this novel pediatric oxygenator shows the potential to be used in pediatric and neonatal support with ECMO. PMID:26098176

  5. Enteric-coating of pulsatile-release HPC capsules prepared by injection molding.

    PubMed

    Macchi, E; Zema, L; Maroni, A; Gazzaniga, A; Felton, L A

    2015-04-01

    Capsular devices based on hydroxypropyl cellulose (Klucel® LF) intended for pulsatile release were prepared by injection molding (IM). In the present work, the possibility of exploiting such capsules for the development of colonic delivery systems based on a time-dependent approach was evaluated. For this purpose, it was necessary to demonstrate the ability of molded cores to undergo a coating process and that coated systems yield the desired performance (gastric resistance). Although no information was available on the coating of IM substrates, some issues relevant to that of commercially-available capsules are known. Thus, preliminary studies were conducted on molded disks for screening purposes prior to the spray-coating of HPC capsular cores with Eudragit® L 30 D 55. The ability of the polymeric suspension to wet the substrate, spread, start penetrating and initiate hydration/swelling, as well as to provide a gastroresistant barrier was demonstrated. The coating of prototype HPC capsules was carried out successfully, leading to coated systems with good technological properties and able to withstand the acidic medium with no need for sealing at the cap/body joint. Such systems maintained the original pulsatile release performance after dissolution of the enteric film in pH 6.8 fluid. Therefore, they appeared potentially suitable for the development of a colon delivery platform based on a time-dependent approach. PMID:25585355

  6. Anti-inflammatory effect with high intensity focused ultrasound-mediated pulsatile delivery of diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Yu; Yang, Chih-Hui; Lin, Yung-Sheng; Chen, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2012-02-01

    A pulsatile ultrasound controlled drug release platform with diclofenac-loaded alginate microcapsules (fabricated with a home-made electrostatic device, 75% embedded rate) was established to evaluate anti-inflammation efficiency. Better anti-inflammation efficiency was found using the ultrasound system and the drug delivery can be adjusted based on the programmed ultrasound cycle. The results of the in vitro study show that an approx. 30% higher drug release rate was obtained by using continuous ultrasound irradiation (9-Watt, 180 min), and an approx. 16% higher drug release rate was obtained by using pulsatile ultrasound irradiation (9-Watt, 60 min) compared to without ultrasound activation. For the in vivo study, the anti-inflammatory test with carrageenan-induced rat's paw edema shows that diclofenac-loaded microcapsules followed by ultrasound irradiation (9-Watt, 60 min) contributed to an 81% inhibition rate, which was significantly higher than diclofenac only (approx. 60% higher). In addition, because of their heat conducting properties, gold nanoparticles encapsulated in the diclofenac-loaded microcapsules resulted in better drug release efficiency, but tended to depress the anti-inflammation effect.

  7. Flow dynamics in anatomical models of abdominal aortic aneurysms: computational analysis of pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Finol, Ender A; Amon, Cristina H

    2003-01-01

    Blood flow in human arteries is dominated by time-dependent transport phenomena. In particular, in the abdominal segment of the aorta under a patient's average resting conditions, blood exhibits laminar flow patterns that are influenced by secondary flows induced by adjacent branches and in irregular vessel geometries. The flow dynamics becomes more complex when there is a pathological condition that causes changes in the normal structural composition of the vessel wall, for example, in the presence of an aneurysm. An aneurysm is an irreversible dilation of a blood vessel accompanied by weakening of the vessel wall. This work examines the importance of hemodynamics in the characterization of pulsatile blood flow patterns in individual Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) models. These patient-specific computational models have been developed for the numerical simulation of the momentum transport equations utilizing the Finite Element Method (FEM) for the spatial and temporal discretization. We characterize pulsatile flow dynamics in AAAs for average resting conditions by means of identifying regions of disturbed flow and quantifying the disturbance by evaluating wall pressure and wall shear stresses at the aneurysm wall. PMID:14515766

  8. Effects of oestrogen replacement on steady and pulsatile haemodynamics in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Lam, Kwok-Keung; Hu, Cheng-Tao; Ou, Tein-Yuan; Yen, Mao-Hsiung; Chen, Hsing-I

    2002-07-01

    1. The effects of ovariectomy (Ovx), menopause and oestrogen replacement on the haemodynamics remain controversial. The present study employed the technique of arterial impedance analysis to measure and calculate the steady and pulsatile haemodynamics. The purpose was to determine the haemodynamic consequence of ovariectomy and oestrogen replacement. 2. Ovariectomy was carried out under anaesthesia on female Sprague Dawley rats aged 9 weeks. Oestrogen (17 beta-estradiol or E(2)) replacement started 1 week after ovariectomy for 4 weeks. Ovx increased the body weight (BW), while it greatly reduced the uterus weight. Left ventricular weight (LVW) was slightly increased, but LVW/BW ratio was slightly reduced. These changes were reversed after E(2) replacement. 3. Compared to sham group, Ovx with or without E(2) replacement did not significantly affect the systolic, mean and diastolic pressure. In Ovx, pulse pressure (PP) and heart rate were significantly increased, while stroke volume and cardiac output were slightly decreased. Total peripheral resistance (TPR) was largely elevated, indicating Ovx induced systemic vasoconstriction. These changes all returned to close normal values (sham group) after E(2) replacement, except PP. 4. Ovx increased the characteristic input impedance (Zc) and pulse wave reflection, while it decreased arterial compliance. E(2) treatment reversed these changes, except Zc. 5. These results demonstrate that Ovx influences both the resistance and Windkessel functions of the artery. E(2) treatment effectively reverses most the effects of Ovx both on the steady and pulsatile haemodynamics. PMID:12110605

  9. In vivo assessment of a new method of pulsatile perfusion based on a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Herreros, Jesús; Ubilla, Matías; Berjano, Enrique J; Vila-Nuñez, Juan E; Páramo, José A; Sola, Josu; Mercé, Salvador

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess platelet dysfunction and damage to organs after extracorporeal circulation using a pump based on a new method that adds a pulsatile flow to the continuous flow provided by a centrifugal pump. The continuous component of the total flow (2-3 L/min) is created by a Bio-Pump centrifugal pump, while the pulsatile component is created by the pulsating of an inner membrane pneumatically controlled by an intra-aortic counterpulsation balloon console (systolic volume of 37.5 mL in an asynchronous way with a frequency of 60 bpm). Six pigs were subjected to a partial cardiopulmonary bypass lasting 180 min and were sacrificed 60 min after extracorporeal circulation was suspended. The hematological study included the measurement of hematocrit, hemoglobin, leukocytes, and platelet function. The new pump did not significantly alter either platelet count or platelet function. In contrast, hematocrit and hemoglobin were significantly reduced during extracorporeal circulation (approximately 5% P = 0.011, and 2 g/dL P = 0.01, respectively). The leukocyte count during extracorporeal circulation showed a tendency to decrease, but this was not significant. In general, the short-term use of the new pump (4 h) did not cause any serious morphological damage to the heart, lung, kidney, or liver. The results suggest that the hemodynamic performance of the new pump is similar to a conventional centrifugal pump and could therefore be appropriate for use in extracorporeal circulation.

  10. Effects of continuous and pulsatile PTH treatments on rat bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Chiming; Frei, Hanspeter Burt, Helen M.; Rossi, Fabio

    2009-03-20

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) differentiation and proliferation are controlled by numerous growth factors and hormones. Continuous parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment has been shown to decrease osteoblast differentiation, whereas pulsatile PTH increases osteoblast differentiation. However, the effects of PTH treatments on MSCs have not been investigated. This study showed continuous PTH treatment in the presence of dexamethasone (DEX) promoted osteogenic differentiation of rat MSCs in vitro, as demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, number of ALP expressing cells, and up-regulation of PTH receptor-1, ALP, and osteocalcin mRNA expressions. In contrast, pulsatile PTH treatment was found to suppress osteogenesis of rat MSCs, possibly by promoting the maintenance of undifferentiated cells. Additionally, the observed effects of PTH were strongly dependent on the presence of DEX. MSC proliferation however was not influenced by PTH independent of treatment regimen and presence or absence of DEX. Furthermore, our work raised the possibility that PTH treatment may modulate stem/progenitor cell activity within MSC cultures.

  11. Time-resolved X-ray PIV measurements of hemodynamic information of real pulsatile blood flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    X-ray imaging technique has been used to visualize various bio-fluid flow phenomena as a nondestructive manner. To obtain hemodynamic information related with circulatory vascular diseases, a time-resolved X-ray PIV technique with high temporal resolution was developed. In this study, to embody actual pulsatile blood flows in a circular conduit without changes in hemorheological properties, a bypass loop is established by connecting a microtube between the jugular vein and femoral artery of a rat. Biocompatible CO2 microbubbles are used as tracer particles. After mixing with whole blood, CO2 microbubbles are injected into the bypass loop. Particle images of the pulsatile blood flows in the bypass loop are consecutively captured by the time-resolved X-ray PIV system. The velocity field information are obtained with varying flow rate and pulsataility. To verify the feasibility of the use of CO2 microbubbles under in vivo conditions, the effects of the surrounding-tissues are also investigated, because these effects are crucial for deteriorating the image contrast of CO2 microbubbles. Therefore, the velocity information of blood flows in the abdominal aorta are obtained to demonstrate the visibility and usefulness of CO2 microbubbles under ex vivo conditions. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2008-0061991).

  12. Behaviour of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes under continuous and pulsatile tocolysis with Fenoterol.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Rhode, Peter; Brunke, Björn; Schröer, Heinrich; Obert, Kirstin; Schlegel, Kerstin; Sturm, Gerhard; Schulz, Klaus-Dieter; von Wichert, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigates the population of beta 2-receptors on lymphocytes in pregnant women with premature labor between the 29th and 34th week of pregnancy. The population of receptors on lymphocytes correlates with that on the myometrium, which is not accessible for study during pregnancy. Fourteen patients received a pulsatile tocolysis, while ten women received a continuous tocolysis with Fenoterol. Assuming an equal population of receptors in both groups before commencement of therapy, the numbers of receptors in the patients with continuous tocolysis fell to about 35% of the initial value after 72 hours. Under pulsatile tocolysis, the numbers of receptors remained unchanged for a period of three days and was still only just below 70% of the initial value by the seventh day. Our data demonstrate that continuous administration of the short-acting beta 2-agonist Fenoterol resulted in a substantial loss of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. In contrast, intermittent administration of the same beta 2-adrenergic agonist prevented the onset of receptor down-regulation in pregnant women with preterm labor. Further studies are required to investigate the impact of the decreased loss of beta 2-adrenoceptor density on the good clinical experience with intermittent tocolysis.

  13. Time controlled pulsatile transdermal delivery of nicotine: A phase I feasibility trial in male smokers.

    PubMed

    Hammann, Felix; Kummer, Oliver; Guercioni, Stefania; Imanidis, Georgios; Drewe, Juergen

    2016-06-28

    Nicotine substitution is a mainstay component in smoking cessation schemes. Current products including patches are poorly effective mainly because they do not give smokers the same pharmacokinetic profile of nicotine as cigarette consumption. This work evaluates a new computer operated delivery system for time controlled pulsatile transdermal administration of nicotine in a phase I clinical trial with twelve heavy smoking male volunteers. The device was affixed to the ventral side of the leading lower arm of the subjects and was programmed to deliver two pulses of drug within 16h with three delivery rates in a consecutive dose escalation study. Tolerability of the three increasing doses of nicotine was established. Plasma concentration of nicotine exhibited two peaks and one trough and reached therapeutically effective levels that behaved linearly with the drug load concentration of the device. In vivo input rate, delivered amount and elimination kinetics were deduced by pharmacokinetic modeling to analyze device performance. Timing, dose and duration of delivery were controlled by system operation parameters. Hence, feasibility of controlled pulsatile delivery of nicotine at predetermined intervals was demonstrated. After additional optimization, preprogrammed or on demand administration to meet individualized and circadian replacement needs should improve smoking cessation efficacy. PMID:27090163

  14. Effects of ghrelin on Kisspeptin mRNA expression in the hypothalamic medial preoptic area and pulsatile luteinising hormone secretion in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Sarah; Li, Xiao Feng; Kinsey-Jones, James; O'Byrne, Kevin

    2009-08-28

    The orexigenic gut peptide ghrelin negatively modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Hyperghrelinaemia results during negative energy balance, a state often associated with delayed puberty and disrupted fertility, whilst exogenous ghrelin suppresses pulsatile luteinising hormone (LH) secretion. The recent identification of kisspeptin (Kiss1) and its G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)54 (Kiss1r) as an essential component of the HPG axis controlling gonadotrophin secretion raises the possibility that kisspeptin-Kiss1r signalling may play a critical role in the transduction of ghrelin-induced suppression of LH. Ovariectomised oestrogen-replaced rats were implanted with intravenous catheters and blood samples collected for detection of LH pulses prior to and after intravenous administration of ghrelin (3nM/250 microl) or saline (250 microl) during ad libitum feeding or after overnight fasting. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA levels in brain punches of the key hypothalamic sites regulating gonadotrophin secretion, the medial preoptic area (mPOA) and arcuate nucleus (ARC), collected 6h following administration of ghrelin. Ghrelin significantly lowered LH pulse frequency in fed rats, an effect significantly enhanced by food deprivation. Fasting, ghrelin or their combination down-regulated Kiss1, without affecting Kiss1r, expression in the mPOA, and affected the expression of neither in the ARC. Considering the pivotal role for kisspeptin signalling in the activation of the HPG axis, the ability of ghrelin to down-regulate Kiss1 expression in mPOA may be a contributing factor in ghrelin-related suppression of pulsatile LH secretion.

  15. Time-resolved OCT-μPIV: a new microscopic PIV technique for noninvasive depth-resolved pulsatile flow profile acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    In vivo acquisition of endothelial wall shear stress requires instantaneous depth-resolved whole-field pulsatile flow profile measurements in microcirculation. High-accuracy, quantitative and non- invasive velocimetry techniques are essential for emerging real-time mechano-genomic investigations. To address these research needs, a novel biological flow quantification technique, OCT-μPIV, was developed utilizing high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) integrated with microscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV). This technique offers the unique advantage of simultaneously acquiring blood flow profiles and vessel anatomy along arbitrarily oriented sagittal planes. The process is instantaneous and enables real-time 3D flow reconstruction without the need for computationally intensive image processing compared to state-of-the-art velocimetry techniques. To evaluate the line-scanning direction and speed, four sets of parametric synthetic OCT-μPIV data were generated using an in-house code. Based on this investigation, an in vitro experiment was designed at the fastest scan speed while preserving the region of interest providing the depth-resolved velocity profiles spanning across the width of a micro-fabricated channel. High-agreement with the analytical flow profiles was achieved for different flow rates and seed particle types and sizes. Finally, by employing blood cells as non-invasive seeding particles, in vivo embryonic vascular velocity profiles in multiple vessels were measured in the early chick embryo. The pulsatile flow frequency and peak velocity measurements were also acquired with OCT-μPIV, which agreed well with previous reported values. These results demonstrate the potential utility of this technique to conduct practical microfluidic and non-invasive in vivo studies for embryonic blood flows.

  16. Time-resolved OCT-μPIV: a new microscopic PIV technique for noninvasive depth-resolved pulsatile flow profile acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William; Pekkan, Kerem

    2012-12-01

    In vivo acquisition of endothelial wall shear stress requires instantaneous depth-resolved whole-field pulsatile flow profile measurements in microcirculation. High-accuracy, quantitative and non- invasive velocimetry techniques are essential for emerging real-time mechano-genomic investigations. To address these research needs, a novel biological flow quantification technique, OCT-μPIV, was developed utilizing high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) integrated with microscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV). This technique offers the unique advantage of simultaneously acquiring blood flow profiles and vessel anatomy along arbitrarily oriented sagittal planes. The process is instantaneous and enables real-time 3D flow reconstruction without the need for computationally intensive image processing compared to state-of-the-art velocimetry techniques. To evaluate the line-scanning direction and speed, four sets of parametric synthetic OCT-μPIV data were generated using an in-house code. Based on this investigation, an in vitro experiment was designed at the fastest scan speed while preserving the region of interest providing the depth-resolved velocity profiles spanning across the width of a micro-fabricated channel. High-agreement with the analytical flow profiles was achieved for different flow rates and seed particle types and sizes. Finally, by employing blood cells as non-invasive seeding particles, in vivo embryonic vascular velocity profiles in multiple vessels were measured in the early chick embryo. The pulsatile flow frequency and peak velocity measurements were also acquired with OCT-μPIV, which agreed well with previous reported values. These results demonstrate the potential utility of this technique to conduct practical microfluidic and non-invasive in vivo studies for embryonic blood flows.

  17. Proceedings of the Annual Penn State Microcomputer Information Exchange Conference (2nd, University Park, Pennsylvania, March 11-12, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streibel, Michael J., Comp.

    This collection of 17 conference presentations includes (1) "Project LOGO: A Study in Cognitive Enhancement Using Microcomputers," Henry Dobson; (2) "Tender Loving Care for Your Terrific Little Computer (TLC for your TLC)," Carol Dwyer and Karl Kelly; (3) "Teaching Micro-Literacy to Kids," Robert Gillingham; (5) "Teaching Music with the Apple II…

  18. A resolution congratulating the Penn State University wrestling team for winning the 2014 National Collegiate Athletic Association Wrestling Championships.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2014-04-02

    04/02/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S2134; text as passed Senate: CR S2096-2097) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Vadose zone transport of natural and synthetic estrogen hormones at Penn State's "Living Filter" wastewater irrigation site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increase in endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the environment has generated new research focused on the behavior of these compounds in natural soil and water ecosystems. To understand how estrogens behave in the soil environment as a result of 25+ years of wastewater irrigation, soils fro...

  20. Sea-Level Static Testing of the Penn State Two-Dimensional Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, J. M.; Pal, S.; Marshall, W. M.; Santoro, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The present results indicated that: 1.Significant RBCC ejector mode database has been generated for single and twin thruster configuration and for global and local measurements. 2. Ongoing analysis and correlation effort for MSFC CFD modeling and turbulent shear layer analysis was completed. 3. The potential follow-on activities are: detailed measurements of air flow static pressure and velocity profiles; investigation other thruster spacing configurations; performing fundamental shear layer mixing study; and demonstrating single-shot Raman measurements.

  1. Image-based biomechanical modeling of aortic wall stress and vessel deformation: response to pulsatile arterial pressure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazer, Dilana; Bauer, Miriam; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Richter, Götz-M.

    2008-03-01

    Image-based modeling of cardiovascular biomechanics may be very helpful for patients with aortic aneurysms to predict the risk of rupture and evaluate the necessity of a surgical intervention. In order to generate a reliable support it is necessary to develop exact patient-specific models that simulate biomechanical parameters and provide individual structural analysis of the state of fatigue and characterize this to the potential of rupture of the aortic wall. The patient-specific geometry used here originates from a CT scan of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA). The computations are based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) and simulate the wall stress distribution and the vessel deformation. The wall transient boundary conditions are based on real time-dependent pressure simulations obtained from a previous computational fluid dynamics study. The physiological wall material properties consider a nonlinear hyperelastic constitutive model, based on realistic ex-vivo analysis of the aneurismal arterial tissue. The results showed complex deformation and stress distribution on the AAA wall. The maximum stresses occurred at the systole and are found around the aneurismal bulge in regions close to inflection points. Biomechanical modeling based on medical images and coupled with patient-specific hemodynamics allows analysing and quantifying the effects of dilatation of the arterial wall due to the pulsatile aortic pressure. It provides a physical and realistic insight into the wall mechanics and enables predictive simulations of AAA growth and assessment of rupture. Further development integrating endovascular models would help evaluating non-invasively individual treatment strategies for optimal placement and improved device design.

  2. Pulsatile delivery of a leucine supplement during long-term continuous enteral feeding enhances lean growth in term neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal pigs are used as a model to study and optimize the clinical treatment of infants who are unable to maintain oral feeding. Using this model, we have previously shown that pulsatile administration of leucine during continuous feeding over 24 h via orogastric tube enhanced protein synthesis in...

  3. The Effect of Pulsatile Versus Nonpulsatile Blood Flow on Viscoelasticity and Red Blood Cell Aggregation in Extracorporeal Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chi Bum; Kang, Yang Jun; Kim, Myoung Gon; Yang, Sung; Lim, Choon Hak; Son, Ho Sung; Kim, Ji Sung; Lee, So Young; Son, Kuk Hui; Sun, Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) can induce alterations in blood viscoelasticity and cause red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. In this study, the authors evaluated the effects of pump flow pulsatility on blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation. Methods Mongrel dogs were randomly assigned to two groups: a nonpulsatile pump group (n=6) or a pulsatile pump group (n=6). After ECC was started at a pump flow rate of 80 mL/kg/min, cardiac fibrillation was induced. Blood sampling was performed before and at 1, 2, and 3 hours after ECC commencement. To eliminate bias induced by hematocrit and plasma, all blood samples were adjusted to a hematocrit of 45% using baseline plasma. Blood viscoelasticity, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, arterial blood gas analysis, central venous O2 saturation, and lactate were measured. Results The blood viscosity and aggregation index decreased abruptly 1 hour after ECC and then remained low during ECC in both groups, but blood elasticity did not change during ECC. Blood viscosity, blood elasticity, plasma viscosity, and the aggregation index were not significantly different in the groups at any time. Hematocrit decreased abruptly 1 hour after ECC in both groups due to dilution by the priming solution used. Conclusion After ECC, blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation were not different in the pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups in the adult dog model. Furthermore, pulsatile flow did not have a more harmful effect on blood viscoelasticity or RBC aggregation than nonpulsatile flow. PMID:27298790

  4. Stimulation of luteinizing hormone subunit gene expression by pulsatile intracerebroventricular microinjection of galanin in female rats.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, A; Zwierzchowski, L; Kochman, K

    2004-06-01

    Although galanin, which exerts its effects both at the hypothalamic and pituitary level, has been implicated as an important neuroendocrine regulator of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis activity, there is a lack of data concerning its involvement in the regulation of gonadotropin subunit gene expression. To elucidate whether galanin can influence luteinizing hormone (LH) subunit mRNA content, as well as affect gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor activity, a model based on pulsatile (one pulse per hour over 5 h) galanin (1 nM) microinjections directly into the third cerebral ventricle of ovariectomized (OVX) and/or oestrogen/progesterone-pretreated rats was used. Furthermore, to determine galanin effects on GnRH-induced LH subunit mRNA synthesis, a cocktail of 1 nM GnRH and 1 nM galanin was coadministered in a pulsatile manner to OVX/steroid primed rats. Subsequently, to obtain data concerning the role of galanin receptors in the regulation of pituitary alpha (common to LH, follicle-stimulating hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone) and LHbeta subunit gene expression, OVX/oestrogen/progesterone rats received microinjections of 1 nM of the receptor antagonist galantide and 1 nM of galanin. In this case, both substances were administered separately, with a 30 min lag, according to which each galantide pulse always preceded a galanin pulse. Northern-blot analysis revealed that intracerebroventricular pulsatile galanin injections were effective in stimulation of both alpha and LHbeta subunit mRNA levels and that this effect was apparently steroid-dependent. Moreover, galanin also up-regulated GnRH receptor functional parameters (affinity and maximum binding capacity) but was ineffective in potentiating GnRH-induced accumulation of both subunit mRNAs. The results from the study also indicate that galanin acts through its own receptor(s) because a receptor antagonist, galantide, significantly reduced the stimulatory effect exerted by galanin on the expression

  5. Optimization of the circuit configuration of a pulsatile ECLs: an in vivo experimental study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Choon Hak; Son, Ho Sung; Lee, Jung Joo; Fang, Yong Hu; Moon, Ki Chul; Ahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Hye Won; Sun, Kyung

    2005-01-01

    An extracorporeal life support system (ECLS) with a conventional membrane oxygenator requires a driving force for the blood to pass through hollow fiber membranes. We hypothesized that if a gravity-flow hollow fiber membrane oxygenator is installed in the circuit, the twin blood sacs of a pulsatile ECLS (the Twin-Pulse Life Support, T-PLS) can be placed downstream of the membrane oxygenator. This would increase pump output by doubling pulse rate at a given pumpsetting rate while maintaining effective pulsatility. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal circuit configuration for T-PLS with respect to energy and pump output. Animals were randomly assigned to 2 groups in a total cardiopulmonary bypass model. In the serial group, a conventional membrane oxygenator was located between the twin blood sacs of the T-PLS. In the parallel group, the twin blood sacs were placed downstream of the gravity-flow membrane oxygenator. Energy equivalent pressure (EEP), surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE) and pump output were collected at the different pump-setting rates of 30, 40, and 50 beats per minute (BPM). At a given pump-setting rate the pulse rate doubled in the parallel group. Percent changes of mean arterial pressure to EEP were 13.0 +/- 1.7, 12.0 +/- 1.9, and 7.6 +/- 0.9% in the parallel group, while 22.5 +/- 2.4, 23.2 +/- 1.9, and 21.8 +/- 1.4 in the serial group at 30, 40, and 50 BPM of pump-setting rates. SHE at each pump setting rate was 20,131 +/- 1408, 21,739 +/- 2470, and 15,048 +/- 2108 erg/ cm3 in the parallel group, while 33,968 +/- 3001, 38,232 +/- 3281, 37,964 +/- 2693 erg/cm3 in the serial group. Pump output was higher in the parallel circuit at 40, and 50 BPM pump-setting rates (3.1 +/- 0.2, 3.7 +/- 0.2 L/min vs. 2.2 +/- 0.1 and 2.5 +/- 0.1 L/min, respectively, p =0.01). Either parallel or serial circuit configuration of T-PLS generates effective pulsatility. As for the pump out, the parallel circuit configuration provides higher flow than the

  6. A Novel Approach to Flurbiprofen Pulsatile Colonic Release: Formulation and Pharmacokinetics of Double-Compression-Coated Mini-Tablets.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sateesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    A significant plan is executed in the present study to study the effect of double-compression coating on flurbiprofen core mini-tablets to achieve the pulsatile colonic delivery to deliver the drug at a specific time as per the patho-physiological need of the disease that results in improved therapeutic efficacy. In this study, pulsatile double-compression-coated tablets were prepared based on time-controlled hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K100M inner compression coat and pH-sensitive Eudragit S100 outer compression coat. Then, the tablets were evaluated for both physical evaluation and drug-release studies, and to prove these results, in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in human volunteers were conducted. From the in vitro drug-release studies, F6 tablets were considered as the best formulation, which retarded the drug release in the stomach and small intestine (3.42 ± 0.12% in 5 h) and progressively released to the colon (99.78 ± 0.74% in 24 h). The release process followed zero-order release kinetics, and from the stability studies, similarity factor between dissolution data before and after storage was found to be 88.86. From the pharmacokinetic evaluation, core mini-tablets producing peak plasma concentration (C max) was 14,677.51 ± 12.16 ng/ml at 3 h T max and pulsatile colonic tablets showed C max = 12,374.67 ± 16.72 ng/ml at 12 h T max. The area under the curve for the mini and pulsatile tablets was 41,238.52 and 72,369.24 ng-h/ml, and the mean resident time was 3.43 and 10.61 h, respectively. In conclusion, development of double-compression-coated tablets is a promising way to achieve the pulsatile colonic release of flurbiprofen.

  7. In vitro performance analysis of a novel pulsatile diagonal pump in a simulated pediatric mechanical circulatory support system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pump performance of the third-generation Medos diagonal pump, the Deltastream DP3, on hemodynamic profile and pulsatility in a simulated pediatric mechanical circulatory support (MCS) system. The experimental circuit consisted of a Medos Deltastream DP3 pump head and console (MEDOS Medizintechnik AG, Stolberg, Germany), a 14-Fr Terumo TenderFlow Pediatric arterial cannula and a 20-Fr Terumo TenderFlow Pediatric venous return cannula (Terumo Corporation, Tokyo, Japan), and 3 ft of tubing with an internal diameter of in. for both arterial and venous lines. Trials were conducted at flow rates ranging from 250 mL/min to 1000 mL/min (250-mL/min increments) and rotational speeds ranging from 1000 to 4000 rpm (1000-rpm increments) using human blood (hematocrit 40%). The postcannula pressure was maintained at 60 mm Hg by a Hoffman clamp. Real-time pressure and flow data were recorded using a Labview-based acquisition system. The pump provided adequate nonpulsatile and pulsatile flow, created more hemodynamic energy under pulsatile mode, and generated higher positive and negative pressures when the inlet and outlet of the pump head, respectively, were clamped. After the conversion from nonpulsatile to pulsatile mode, the flow rates and the rotational speeds increased. In conclusion, the novel Medos Deltastream DP3 diagonal pump is able to supply the required flow rate for pediatric MCS, generate adequate quality of pulsatility, and provide surplus hemodynamic energy output in a simulated pediatric MCS system.

  8. School-Based Prevention of Depressive Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Study of the Effectiveness and Specificity of the Penn Resiliency Program

    PubMed Central

    Gillham, Jane E.; Reivich, Karen J.; Freres, Derek R.; Chaplin, Tara M.; Shatté, Andrew J.; Samuels, Barbra; Elkon, Andrea G. L.; Litzinger, Samantha; Lascher, Marisa; Gallop, Robert; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2015-01-01

    The authors investigated the effectiveness and specificity of the Penn Resiliency Program (PRP; J. E. Gillham, L. H. Jaycox, K. J. Reivich, M. E. P. Seligman, & T. Silver, 1990), a cognitive–behavioral depression prevention program. Children (N = 697) from 3 middle schools were randomly assigned to PRP, Control (CON), or the Penn Enhancement Program (PEP; K. J. Reivich, 1996; A. J. Shatté, 1997), an alternate intervention that controls for nonspecific intervention ingredients. Children’s depressive symptoms were assessed through 3 years of follow-up. There was no intervention effect on average levels of depressive symptoms in the full sample. Findings varied by school. In 2 schools, PRP significantly reduced depressive symptoms across the follow-up relative to both CON and PEP. In the 3rd school, PRP did not prevent depressive symptoms. The authors discuss the findings in relation to previous research on PRP and the dissemination of prevention programs. PMID:17295559

  9. Heart-beat-phase-coherent Doppler optical coherence tomography for measuring pulsatile ocular blood flow.

    PubMed

    Schmoll, Tilman; Leitgeb, Rainer A

    2013-03-01

    We introduce a Doppler OCT (DOCT) platform that is fully synchronized with the heart-beat via a pulse oximeter. The system allows reconstructing heart-beat-phase-coherent quantitative DOCT volumes. The method is to acquire a series of DOCT volumes and to record the pulse in parallel. The heartbeat data is used for triggering the start of each DOCT volume acquisition. The recorded volume series is registered to the level of capillaries using a cross-volume registration. The information of the pulse phase is used to rearrange the tomograms in time, to obtain a series of phase coherent DOCT volumes over a pulse. We present Doppler angle independent quantitative evaluation of the absolute pulsatile blood flow within individual retinal vessels as well as of the total retinal blood flow over a full heartbeat cycle.

  10. A viscoelastic fluid-structure interaction model for carotid arteries under pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongjie; Wood, Nigel B; Xu, Xiao Yun

    2015-05-01

    In this study, a fluid-structure interaction model (FSI) incorporating viscoelastic wall behaviour is developed and applied to an idealized model of the carotid artery under pulsatile flow. The shear and bulk moduli of the arterial wall are described by Prony series, where the parameters can be derived from in vivo measurements. The aim is to develop a fully coupled FSI model that can be applied to realistic arterial geometries with normal or pathological viscoelastic wall behaviour. Comparisons between the numerical and analytical solutions for wall displacements demonstrate that the coupled model is capable of predicting the viscoelastic behaviour of carotid arteries. Comparisons are also made between the solid only and FSI viscoelastic models, and the results suggest that the difference in radial displacement between the two models is negligible.

  11. A comparison of Newtonian and non-Newtonian models for pulsatile blood flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Iqbal; Labropulu, Fotini; Langdon, Chris; Schwark, Justin

    2013-04-01

    Mathematical modeling of blood flows in the arteries is an important and challenging problem. This study compares several non-Newtonian blood models with the Newtonian model in simulating pulsatile blood flow through two three-dimensional models of an arterial stenosis and an aneurysm. Four non-Newtonian blood models, namely the Power Law, the Casson, the Carreau, and the Generalized Power Law, as well as the Newtonian model of blood viscosity, are used to investigate the flow effects induced by these different blood constitutive equations. The aim of this study is three-fold: firstly, to investigate the variation in wall shear stress in an artery with a stenosis or aneurysm at different flow rates and degrees of severity; secondly, to compare the various blood models and hence quantify the differences between the models and judge their significance; and lastly, to determine whether the use of the Newtonian blood model is appropriate over a wide range of shear rates.

  12. Estimation of pressure gradients in pulsatile flow from magnetic resonance acceleration measurements.

    PubMed

    Tasu, J P; Mousseaux, E; Delouche, A; Oddou, C; Jolivet, O; Bittoun, J

    2000-07-01

    A method for estimating pressure gradients from MR images is demonstrated. Making the usual assumption that the flowing medium is a Newtonian fluid, and with appropriate boundary conditions, the inertial forces (or acceleration components of the flow) are proportional to the pressure gradients. The technique shown here is based on an evaluation of the inertial forces from Fourier acceleration encoding. This method provides a direct measurement of the total acceleration defined as the sum of the velocity derivative vs. time and the convective acceleration. The technique was experimentally validated by comparing MR and manometer pressure gradient measurements obtained in a pulsatile flow phantom. The results indicate that the MR determination of pressure gradients from an acceleration measurement is feasible with a good correlation with the true measurements (r = 0.97). The feasibility of the method is demonstrated in the aorta of a normal volunteer. Magn Reson Med 44:66-72, 2000. PMID:10893523

  13. Fluid particle motion and Lagrangian velocities for pulsatile flow through a femoral artery branch model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Crawford, D. W.; Back, L. H.; Back, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    A flow visualization study using selective dye injection and frame by frame analysis of a movie provided qualitative and quantitative data on the motion of marked fluid particles in a 60 degree artery branch model for simulation of physiological femoral artery flow. Physical flow features observed included jetting of the branch flow into the main lumen during the brief reverse flow period, flow separation along the main lumen wall during the near zero flow phase of diastole when the core flow was in the downstream direction, and inference of flow separation conditions along the wall opposite the branch later in systole at higher branch flow ratios. There were many similarities between dye particle motions in pulsatile flow and the comparative steady flow observations.

  14. Arterial pulsatility as an index of cerebral microangiopathy in diabetes type 2.

    PubMed

    Agha, M S; Alboudi, A

    2014-01-09

    Transcranial doppler is an inexpensive, non-invasive investigation. This study assessed its validity in determining cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Flow velocity and pulsatility index were measured in the middle cerebral, basilar and intracranial internal carotid arteries of a sample of 141 diabetic patients with no other risk factors, and 132 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 73 with complicated and 68 with uncomplicated diabetes. There was a statistically significant difference between the complicated diabetes and control groups for the 3 arteries and most indices. The differences between the uncomplicated diabetes patients and the controls were also statistically significant but less strongly. Transcranial doppler may be useful in early diagnosis of cerebral small vessel disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Stress analysis in a layered aortic arch model under pulsatile blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Watanabe, Masahiro; Matsuzawa, Teruo

    2006-01-01

    Background Many cardiovascular diseases, such as aortic dissection, frequently occur on the aortic arch and fluid-structure interactions play an important role in the cardiovascular system. Mechanical stress is crucial in the functioning of the cardiovascular system; therefore, stress analysis is a useful tool for understanding vascular pathophysiology. The present study is concerned with the stress distribution in a layered aortic arch model with interaction between pulsatile flow and the wall of the blood vessel. Methods A three-dimensional (3D) layered aortic arch model was constructed based on the aortic wall structure and arch shape. The complex mechanical interaction between pulsatile blood flow and wall dynamics in the aortic arch model was simulated by means of computational loose coupling fluid-structure interaction analyses. Results The results showed the variations of mechanical stress along the outer wall of the arch during the cardiac cycle. Variations of circumferential stress are very similar to variations of pressure. Composite stress in the aortic wall plane is high at the ascending portion of the arch and along the top of the arch, and is higher in the media than in the intima and adventitia across the wall thickness. Conclusion Our analysis indicates that circumferential stress in the aortic wall is directly associated with blood pressure, supporting the clinical importance of blood pressure control. High stress in the aortic wall could be a risk factor in aortic dissections. Our numerical layered aortic model may prove useful for biomechanical analyses and for studying the pathogeneses of aortic dissection. PMID:16630365

  16. Ocular Perfusion Pressure and Pulsatile Ocular Blood Flow in Normal and Systemic Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Carlos R; Miranda, Rafaela Morais; Cunha, Patricia LT; M Kanadani, Tereza Cristina; Dorairaj, Syril

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Glaucomatous neuropathy can be a consequence of insufficient blood supply, increase in intraocular pressure (IOP), or other risk factors that diminish the ocular blood flow. To determine the ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in normal and systemic hypertensive patients. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty-one patients were enrolled in this prospective and comparative study and underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including slit lamp examination, Goldmann applanation tonometry, stereoscopic fundus examination, and pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) measurements. The OPP was calculated as being the medium systemic arterial pressure (MAP) less the IOP. Only right eye values were considered for calculations using Student’s t-test. Results: The mean age of the patients was 57.5 years (36-78), and 68.5% were women. There was a statistically significant difference in the OPP of the normal and systemic hypertensive patients (p < 0.05). The difference in the OPP between these groups varied between 8.84 and 17.9 mm Hg. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that although the systemic hypertensive patients have a higher OPP in comparison to normal patients, this increase does not mean that they also have a higher OBF (as measured by POBF tonograph). This may be caused by chronic changes in the vascular network and in the blood hemodynamics in patients with systemic hypertension. How to cite this article: Kanadani FN, Figueiredo CR, Miranda RM, Cunha PLT, Kanadani TCM, Dorairaj S. Ocular Perfusion Pressure and Pulsatile Ocular Blood Flow in Normal and Systemic Hypertensive Patients. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(1):16-19. PMID:26997827

  17. The effects of acute exercise on pulsatile LH release in high-mileage male runners.

    PubMed

    McColl, E M; Wheeler, G D; Gomes, P; Bhambhani, Y; Cumming, D C

    1989-11-01

    Evidence suggests that acute exercise and endurance training has a suppressive effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in men and women. To determine if training and acute exercise influence the neuroendocrine regulation of the HPG axis in men we examined pulsatile LH release in six male endurance runners with a training volume of at least 80 km per week, and compared this with values in six age-matched sedentary controls. Blood samples were obtained through an indwelling i.v. cannula from the subjects at 15-min intervals for 6 h following 24 h without significant physical activity and again in the runners, following 60 min of running at a speed equivalent to 5% below the anaerobic threshold. Mean LH pulse frequency and amplitude, as well as areas under the LH pulses and total LH curve, were calculated but only the mean post-exercise area under the total LH curve area was significantly lower than basal values (P less than 0.05) following exercise compared with the resting values in runners. Other measures of LH release did not change with acute exercise. Basal and pre-exercise testosterone levels were also measured and found to be at the lower end of normal men. The mean pre-exercise serum testosterone levels were significantly higher than basal levels. Mean testosterone levels, mean pulse amplitude, and mean area under the LH curve were significantly lower in resting runners than in the controls. The data suggest that exercise induces a general lowering of LH levels but does not inhibit LH pulsatile release. An anticipatory increase in serum testosterone occurred before exercise.

  18. Selective optogenetic activation of arcuate kisspeptin neurons generates pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Han, Su Young; McLennan, Timothy; Czieselsky, Katja; Herbison, Allan E

    2015-10-20

    Normal reproductive functioning in mammals depends upon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons generating a pulsatile pattern of gonadotropin secretion. The neural mechanism underlying the episodic release of GnRH is not known, although recent studies have suggested that the kisspeptin neurons located in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) may be involved. In the present experiments we expressed channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in the ARN kisspeptin population to test directly whether synchronous activation of these neurons would generate pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in vivo. Characterization studies showed that this strategy targeted ChR2 to 70% of all ARN kisspeptin neurons and that, in vitro, these neurons were activated by 473-nm blue light with high fidelity up to 30 Hz. In vivo, the optogenetic activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons at 10 and 20 Hz evoked high amplitude, pulse-like increments in LH secretion in anesthetized male mice. Stimulation at 10 Hz for 2 min was sufficient to generate repetitive LH pulses. In diestrous female mice, only 20-Hz activation generated significant increments in LH secretion. In ovariectomized mice, 5-, 10-, and 20-Hz activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons were all found to evoke LH pulses. Part of the sex difference, but not the gonadal steroid dependence, resulted from differential pituitary sensitivity to GnRH. Experiments in kisspeptin receptor-null mice, showed that kisspeptin was the critical neuropeptide underlying the ability of ARN kisspeptin neurons to generate LH pulses. Together these data demonstrate that synchronized activation of the ARN kisspeptin neuronal population generates pulses of LH. PMID:26443858

  19. Selective optogenetic activation of arcuate kisspeptin neurons generates pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Han, Su Young; McLennan, Timothy; Czieselsky, Katja; Herbison, Allan E

    2015-10-20

    Normal reproductive functioning in mammals depends upon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons generating a pulsatile pattern of gonadotropin secretion. The neural mechanism underlying the episodic release of GnRH is not known, although recent studies have suggested that the kisspeptin neurons located in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) may be involved. In the present experiments we expressed channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in the ARN kisspeptin population to test directly whether synchronous activation of these neurons would generate pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in vivo. Characterization studies showed that this strategy targeted ChR2 to 70% of all ARN kisspeptin neurons and that, in vitro, these neurons were activated by 473-nm blue light with high fidelity up to 30 Hz. In vivo, the optogenetic activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons at 10 and 20 Hz evoked high amplitude, pulse-like increments in LH secretion in anesthetized male mice. Stimulation at 10 Hz for 2 min was sufficient to generate repetitive LH pulses. In diestrous female mice, only 20-Hz activation generated significant increments in LH secretion. In ovariectomized mice, 5-, 10-, and 20-Hz activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons were all found to evoke LH pulses. Part of the sex difference, but not the gonadal steroid dependence, resulted from differential pituitary sensitivity to GnRH. Experiments in kisspeptin receptor-null mice, showed that kisspeptin was the critical neuropeptide underlying the ability of ARN kisspeptin neurons to generate LH pulses. Together these data demonstrate that synchronized activation of the ARN kisspeptin neuronal population generates pulses of LH.

  20. University of Pennsylvania aspiration cart (Penn-A-Cart): an innovative journey in fine needle aspiration service.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prabodh K

    2010-01-01

    On-site evaluation of fine needle aspiration specimens is now considered the standard of care. The procedure is performed at the bedside and at various other locations within the hospital using a mobile cart fitted with essentials, including a microscope, stains and supplies. Earlier, an open specimen cart was used with various supplies and a binocular microscope. The mobile cart during the past 25 years has been variously modified. A second-generation cart containing 2 folding pods, a double-headed microscope, supplies and stains had been used for the past 20 years; it did not meet the current regulatory standards and needs, and little attention was paid to meet the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and infection control standards. Also, the repeated lifting of the microscope resulted in much wear and tear. We have designed Penn-A-Cart, which has a pneumatic lift for the microscope, a high-definition camera with a TV screen and access to the Internet. It has a sharps container and storage space for supplies, stains and slides. This cart meets the various regulatory agency standards. It is user friendly and valuable for multiviewing. The cart is valuable for remote access, telecytopathology and improved patient care.

  1. Validation of the Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity (PIOS) in scrupulous and nonscrupulous patients: Revision of factor structure and psychometrics.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Jonathan D; Fradkin, Isaac

    2016-06-01

    Scrupulosity, or obsessive-compulsive symptoms related to religiosity or religion, is a common presentation of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and it is important to elucidate its phenomenology and measurement. Today, the most widespread questionnaire for the assessment of scrupulosity is the Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity (PIOS). The current study examines the psychometric properties of the PIOS in outpatient, treatment-seeking patients. Results of a confirmatory factor analysis suggested an unsatisfactory fit for previously suggested factor structures. A follow-up exploratory factor analysis suggested that a bifactor model was the most suitable solution. In addition, the scores of the PIOS and its revised subscales were found to have moderate-good concurrent validity; however, its scores discriminated poorly between patients with scrupulous obsessions and patients with OCD and other repugnant obsessions. Group differences and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses both indicated that the PIOS is more suitable in discriminating scrupulous obsessions in Christian patients but not in other religious groups (i.e., Jews, nonreligious patients). Additional analyses revealed that the co-occurrence of scrupulous and other repugnant obsessions is also moderated by religious affiliation. These results raise questions in terms of grouping scrupulosity with other repugnant obsessions and suggest for the need of culturally sensitive instruments of scrupulosity. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26372375

  2. A hemodynamic evaluation of the Levitronix Pedivas centrifugal pump and Jostra Hl-20 roller pump under pulsatile and nonpulsatile perfusion in an infant CPB model.

    PubMed

    Ressler, Noel; Rider, Alan R; Kunselman, Allen R; Richardson, J Scott; Dasse, Kurt A; Wang, Shigang; Undar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    The hemodynamic comparison of the Jostra HL-20 and the Levitronix PediVAS blood pumps is the focus this study, where pressure-flow waveforms and hemodynamic energy values are analyzed in the confines of a pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass circuit.The pseudo pediatric patient was perfused with flow rates between 500 and 900 ml/min (100 ml/min increments) under pulsatile and nonpulsatile mode. The Levitronix continuous flow pump utilized a customized controller to engage in pulsatile perfusion with equivalent pulse settings to the Jostra HL-20 roller pump. Hemodynamic measurements and waveforms were recorded at the precannula location, while the mean arterial pressure was maintained at 40 mm Hg for each test. Glycerin water was used as the blood analog circuit perfusate. At each flow rate 24 trials were conducted yielding a total of 120 experiments (n=60 pulsatile and n=60 nonpulsatile).Under nonpulsatile perfusion the Jostra roller pump produced small values for surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE) due to its inherent pulsatility, while the Levitronix produced values of essentially zero for SHE. When switching to pulsatile perfusion, the SHE levels for both the Jostra and Levitronix pump made considerable increases. In comparing the two pumps under pulsatile perfusion, the Levitronix PediVAS produced significantly more surplus and total hemodynamic energy than did the Jostra roller pump each pump flow rate.The study suggests that the Levitronix PediVAS centrifugal pump has the capability of achieving quality pulsatile waveforms and delivering more SHE to the pseudo patient than the Jostra HL-20 roller pump. Further studies are warranted to investigate the Levitronix under bovine blood studies and with various pulsatile settings.

  3. The Pennsylvania State University Child Sexual Abuse Scandal: An Analysis of Institutional Factors Affecting Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Alice R.

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) child sexual abuse scandal have left many scholars and individuals questioning the university's collective identity. The goal of this research was to uncover the dominant themes that describe a problematic institutional response to the child sexual abuse incidents in order to provide…

  4. Geochemical and mineralogical controls on trace element release from the Penn Mine base-metal slag dump, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, M.B.; Bird, D.K.; Einaudi, M.T.; Alpers, C.N.

    2001-01-01

    Base-metal slag deposits at the Penn Mine in Calaveras County, California, are a source of environmental contamination through leaching of potentially toxic elements. Historical Cu smelting at Penn Mine (1865-1919) generated approximately 200,000 m3 of slag. The slag deposits, which are flooded annually by a reservoir used for drinking water and irrigation, also may be in contact with acidic ground waters (pH < 4) from the adjacent mine area. Slags vary from grey to black, are glassy to crystalline, and range in size from coarse sand to large (0.6 ?? 0.7 ?? 1.5 m), tub-shaped casts. Metals are hosted by a variety of minerals and two glass phases. On the basis of mineralogy, slags are characterized by 4 main types: fayalite-rich, glassy, willemite-rich, and sulfide-rich. The ranges in metal and metalloid concentrations of 17 slag samples are: As, 0.0004-0.92; Ba, 0.13-2.9; Cd, 0.0014-1.4; Cu, 0.18-6.4; Pb, 0.02-11; and Zn, 3.2-28 wt.%. Leachates from Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure tests (acetic acid buffered at pH 4.93) on two wiltemite-rich slags contained Cd and Pb concentrations (up to 2.5 and 30 mg/l, respectively) in excess of US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) regulatory limits. Analyses of filtered (0.45 ??m) water, collected within the flooded slag dump during reservoir drawdown, reveal concentrations of Cd (1.7 ??g/l), Cu (35 ??g/l), and Zn (250 ??g/l) that exceed USEPA chronic toxicity guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Data from field and laboratory studies were used to develop geochemical models with the program EQ3/6 that simulate irreversible mass-transfer between slag deposits and reservoir waters. These models include kinetic rate laws for abiotic sulfide oxidation and surface-controlled dissolution of silicates, oxides, and glass. Calculations demonstrate that the main processes controlling dissolved metal concentrations are (1) dissolution of fayalite, willemite, and glass; (2) sulfide oxidation; and (3) secondary

  5. Development of an Abbreviated Form of the Penn Line Orientation Test Using Large Samples and Computerized Adaptive Test Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Tyler M.; Scott, J. Cobb; Reise, Steven P.; Port, Allison M.; Jackson, Chad T.; Ruparel, Kosha; Savitt, Adam P.; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.

    2015-01-01

    Visuospatial processing is a commonly assessed neurocognitive domain, with deficits linked to dysfunction in right posterior regions of the brain. With the growth of large-scale clinical research studies there is an increased need for efficient and scalable assessments of neurocognition, including visuospatial processing. The purpose of the current study was to use a novel method that combines item response theory (IRT) and computerized adaptive testing (CAT) approaches to create an abbreviated form of the computerized Penn Line Orientation Test (PLOT). The 24-item PLOT was administered to 8,498 youths (aged 8 to 21) as part of the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort study and, by web-based data collection, in an independent sample of 4,593 adults from Great Britain as part of a television documentary. IRT-based CAT simulations were used to select the best PLOT items for an abbreviated form by performing separate simulations in each group and choosing only items that were selected as useful (i.e., high item discrimination and in the appropriate difficulty range) in at least one of the simulations. Fifteen items were chosen for the final, short form of the PLOT, indicating substantial agreement among the models in how they evaluated each item's usefulness. Moreover, this abbreviated version performed comparably to the full version in tests of sensitivity to age and sex effects. This abbreviated version of the PLOT cuts administration time by 50% without detectable loss of information, which points to its feasibility for large-scale clinical and genomic studies. PMID:25822834

  6. Real-time visualization of pulsatile tissue-motion in B-mode ultrasonogram for assistance in bedside diagnosis of ischemic diseases of neonatal cranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, M.; Yamada, M.; Nakamori, N.; Kitsunezuka, Y.

    2008-03-01

    By developing a real-time visualization system, pulsatile tissue-motion caused by artery pulsation of blood flow has been visualized continuously from a video stream of ultrasonogram in brightness mode. The system concurrently executes the three processes: (1) capturing an input B-mode video stream (640×480 pixels/frame, 30 fps) into a ring buffer of 256 frames, (2) detecting intensity and phase of pulsatile tissue-motion at each pixel from a heartbeat-frequency component in Fourier transform of a series of pixel value through the latest 64 frames as a function of time, and (3) generating an output video-stream of pulsatile-phase image, in which the motion phase is superimposed as color gradation on an input video-stream when the motion intensity exceeds a proper threshold. By optimizing the visualization software with the streaming SIMD extensions, the pulsatile-phase image has been continuously updated at more than 10 fps, which was enough to observe pulsatile tissue-motion in real time. Compared to the retrospective technique, the real-time visualization had clear advantages not only in enabling bedside observation and quick snapshot of pulsatile tissue-motion but also in giving useful feedback to probe handling for avoiding unwanted motion-artifacts, which may strongly assist pediatricians in bedside diagnosis of ischemic diseases.

  7. Arterial stiffness, pressure and flow pulsatility and brain structure and function: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary F; van Buchem, Mark A; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Gotal, John D; Jonsdottir, Maria K; Kjartansson, Ólafur; Garcia, Melissa; Aspelund, Thor; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J

    2011-11-01

    Aortic stiffness increases with age and vascular risk factor exposure and is associated with increased risk for structural and functional abnormalities in the brain. High ambient flow and low impedance are thought to sensitize the cerebral microcirculation to harmful effects of excessive pressure and flow pulsatility. However, haemodynamic mechanisms contributing to structural brain lesions and cognitive impairment in the presence of high aortic stiffness remain unclear. We hypothesized that disproportionate stiffening of the proximal aorta as compared with the carotid arteries reduces wave reflection at this important interface and thereby facilitates transmission of excessive pulsatile energy into the cerebral microcirculation, leading to microvascular damage and impaired function. To assess this hypothesis, we evaluated carotid pressure and flow, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, brain magnetic resonance images and cognitive scores in participants in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study who had no history of stroke, transient ischaemic attack or dementia (n = 668, 378 females, 69-93 years of age). Aortic characteristic impedance was assessed in a random subset (n = 422) and the reflection coefficient at the aorta-carotid interface was computed. Carotid flow pulsatility index was negatively related to the aorta-carotid reflection coefficient (R = -0.66, P<0.001). Carotid pulse pressure, pulsatility index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity were each associated with increased risk for silent subcortical infarcts (hazard ratios of 1.62-1.71 per standard deviation, P<0.002). Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was associated with higher white matter hyperintensity volume (0.108 ± 0.045 SD/SD, P = 0.018). Pulsatility index was associated with lower whole brain (-0.127 ± 0.037 SD/SD, P<0.001), grey matter (-0.079 ± 0.038 SD/SD, P = 0.038) and white matter (-0.128 ± 0.039 SD/SD, P<0.001) volumes. Carotid-femoral pulse

  8. Computational solution of the velocity and wall shear stress distribution inside a left carotid artery under pulsatile flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Nurullah; Turmuş, Hakan

    2014-08-01

    Stroke is still one of the leading causes for death after heart diseases and cancer in all over the world. Strokes happen because an artery that carries blood uphill from the heart to the head is clogged. Most of the time, as with heart attacks, the problem is atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries, calcified buildup of fatty deposits on the vessel wall. In this study, the fluid dynamic simulations were done in a left carotid bifurcation under the pulsatile flow conditions computationally. Pulsatile flow waveform is given in the paper. In vivo geometry and boundary conditions were obtained from a patient who has stenosis located at external carotid artery (ECA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) of his common carotid artery (CCA). The location of critical flow fields such as low wall shear stress (WSS), stagnation regions and separation regions were detected near the highly stenosed region and at branching region.

  9. Elimination of motion, pulsatile flow and cross-talk artifacts using blade sequences in lumbar spine MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Lavdas, Eleftherios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Kostopoulos, Spiros; Glotsos, Dimitrios; Roka, Violeta; Koutsiaris, Aristotle G; Batsikas, Georgios; Sakkas, Georgios K; Tsagkalis, Antonios; Notaras, Ioannis; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Vassiou, Katerina

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of T2 turbo spin echo (TSE) axial and sagittal BLADE sequences in reducing or even eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and cross-talk artifacts in lumbar spine MRI examinations. Forty four patients, who had routinely undergone a lumbar spine examination, participated in the study. The following pairs of sequences with and without BLADE were compared: a) T2 TSE Sagittal (SAG) in thirty two cases, and b) T2 TSE Axial (AX) also in thirty two cases. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses were performed based on measurements in different normal anatomical structures and examination of seven characteristics, respectively. The qualitative analysis was performed by experienced radiologists. Also, the presence of image motion, pulsatile flow and cross-talk artifacts was evaluated. Based on the results of the qualitative analysis for the different sequences and anatomical structures, the BLADE sequences were found to be significantly superior to the conventional ones in all the cases. The BLADE sequences eliminated the motion artifacts in all the cases. In our results, it was found that in the examined sequences (sagittal and axial) the differences between the BLADE and conventional sequences regarding the elimination of motion, pulsatile flow and cross-talk artifacts were statistically significant. In all the comparisons, the T2 TSE BLADE sequences were significantly superior to the corresponding conventional sequences regarding the classification of their image quality. In conclusion, this technique appears to be capable of potentially eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and cross-talk artifacts in lumbar spine MR images and producing high quality images in collaborative and non-collaborative patients.

  10. Surgical treatment of severe chronic venous insufficiency caused by pulsatile varicose veins in a patient with tricuspid regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Casian, D; Gutsu, E; Culiuc, V

    2009-04-01

    A case of severe chronic venous insufficiency caused by pulsatile varicose veins in a 46-year-old man with tricuspid regurgitation is presented. Active venous leg ulcer complicated with recurrent venous bleeding and inefficacy of conservative management serve as indications for surgical treatment. This case demonstrates the possibility of radical surgical correction of pathological venous reflux by means of saphenofemoral ligation, foam sclerotherapy and subfascial endoscopic perforator surgery.

  11. Neurocognitive function in patients with ventricular assist devices: a comparison of pulsatile and continuous blood flow devices.

    PubMed

    Zimpfer, Daniel; Wieselthaler, Georg; Czerny, Martin; Fakin, Richard; Haider, Dominik; Zrunek, Philipp; Roethy, Wilfried; Schima, Heinz; Wolner, Ernst; Grimm, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The effect of successful ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation on neurocognitive function in terminal heart failure is uncertain. Additionally, the different impact of continuous versus pulsatile blood flow devices is unknown. A total of 29 patients (mean age 53 years), surviving implantation of a ventricular assist device as bridge to transplantation were prospectively followed (continuous flow: Micromed DeBakey, n = 11; pulsatile flow: Thoratec and Novacor, n = 18). Normative data were obtained in 40 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects (mean age 54 years). Neurocognitive function was objectively measured by means of cognitive P300 auditory evoked potentials before operation (baseline), at intensive care unit (ICU) discharge, and at the 8-week and 12-week follow-up. Before implantation of the VAD, cognitive P300 evoked potentials were impaired (prolonged) compared with age- and sex-matched healthy subjects (p < 0.001). After successful VAD implantation, P300 evoked potentials markedly improved compared with before operation (ICU discharge, p = 0.007; 8-week follow-up, p = 0.022; 12-week follow-up, p < 0.0001). Importantly, there was no difference between continuous and pulsatile VADs (before operation, p = 0.676; ICU discharge, p = 0.736; 8-week follow-up, p = 0.911 and 12-week follow-up, p = 0.397; respectively). Nevertheless, P300 peak latencies did not fully normalize at 12-week follow-up compared with healthy subjects (p = 0.012). Successful VAD implantation improves neurocognitive impairment in patients with terminal heart failure. Importantly, this effect is independent of the type of VAD (pulsatile vs. continuous blood flow). PMID:16436886

  12. Osteoblasts respond to pulsatile fluid flow with short-term increases in PGE(2) but no change in mineralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nauman, E. A.; Satcher, R. L.; Keaveny, T. M.; Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.

    2001-01-01

    Although there is no consensus as to the precise nature of the mechanostimulatory signals imparted to the bone cells during remodeling, it has been postulated that deformation-induced fluid flow plays a role in the mechanotransduction pathway. In vitro, osteoblasts respond to fluid shear stress with an increase in PGE(2) production; however, the long-term effects of fluid shear stress on cell proliferation and differentiation have not been examined. The goal of this study was to apply continuous pulsatile fluid shear stresses to osteoblasts and determine whether the initial production of PGE(2) is associated with long-term biochemical changes. The acute response of bone cells to a pulsatile fluid shear stress (0.6 +/- 0.5 Pa, 3.0 Hz) was characterized by a transient fourfold increase in PGE(2) production. After 7 days of static culture (0 dyn/cm(2)) or low (0.06 +/- 0.05 Pa, 0.3 Hz) or high (0.6 +/- 0.5 Pa, 3.0 Hz) levels of pulsatile fluid shear stress, the bone cells responded with an 83% average increase in cell number, but no statistical difference (P > 0.53) between the groups was observed. Alkaline phosphatase activity per cell decreased in the static cultures but not in the low- or high-flow groups. Mineralization was also unaffected by the different levels of applied shear stress. Our results indicate that short-term changes in PGE(2) levels caused by pulsatile fluid flow are not associated with long-term changes in proliferation or mineralization of bone cells.

  13. Effect of transport on pulsatile and surge secretion of LH in ewes in the breeding season.

    PubMed

    Dobson, H; Tebble, J E; Phogat, J B; Smith, R F

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism(s) involved in stress-induced subfertility by examining the effect of 4 h transport on surge and pulsatile LH secretion in intact ewes and ovariectomized ewes treated with steroids to induce an artificial follicular phase (model ewes). Transport caused a greater delay in the onset of the LH surge in nine intact ewes than it did in ten ovariectomized ewes (intact: 41.0 +/- 0.9 h versus 48.3 +/- 0.8 h, P < 0.02; ovariectomized model: 40.8 +/- 0.6 h versus 42.6 +/- 0.5 h, P < 0.02). Disruption of the hypothalamus-pituitary endocrine balance in intact ewes may have reduced gonadotrophin stimulation of follicular oestradiol production which had an additional effect on the LH surge mechanism. In the ovariectomized model ewes, this effect was masked by the exogenous supply of oestradiol. However, in these model ewes, there was a greater suppression of maximum LH surge concentrations (intact controls: 29 +/- 4 ng ml-1 versus intact transported 22 +/- 5 ng ml-1, P < 0.02; ovariectomized model controls: 35 +/- 7 ng ml-1 versus model transported 15 +/- 2 ng ml-1, P < 0.02). Subsequent exposure to progesterone for 12 days resulted in the resumption of a normal LH profile in the next follicular phase, indicating that acute stress leads to a temporary endocrine lesion. In four intact ewes transported in the mid-follicular phase, there was a suppression of LH pulse amplitude (0.9 +/- 0.3 versus 0.3 +/- 0.02 ng ml-1, P < 0.05) but a statistically significant effect on pulse frequency was not observed (2.0 +/- 0.4 versus 1.7 +/- 0.6 pulses per 2 h). In conclusion, activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis by transport in the follicular phase of intact ewes interrupts surge secretion of LH, possibly by interference with LH pulsatility and, hence, follicular oestradiol production. This disruption of gonadotrophin secretion will have a major impact on fertility.

  14. Mass Transfer in a Rigid Tube With Pulsatile Flow and Constant Wall Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Moschandreou, T. E.; Ellis, C. G.; Goldman, D.

    2011-01-01

    An approximate-analytical solution method is presented for the problem of mass transfer in a rigid tube with pulsatile flow. For the case of constant wall concentration, it is shown that the generalized integral transform (GIT) method can be used to obtain a solution in terms of a perturbation expansion, where the coefficients of each term are given by a system of coupled ordinary differential equations. Truncating the system at some large value of the parameter N, an approximate solution for the system is obtained for the first term in the perturbation expansion, and the GIT-based solution is verified by comparison to a numerical solution. The GIT approximate-analytical solution indicates that for small to moderate nondimensional frequencies for any distance from the inlet of the tube, there is a positive peak in the bulk concentration C1b due to pulsation, thereby, producing a higher mass transfer mixing efficiency in the tube. As we further increase the frequency, the positive peak is followed by a negative peak in the time-averaged bulk concentration and then the bulk concentration C1b oscillates and dampens to zero. Initially, for small frequencies the relative Sherwood number is negative indicating that the effect of pulsation tends to reduce mass transfer. There is a band of frequencies, where the relative Sherwood number is positive indicating that the effect of pulsation tends to increase mass transfer. The positive peak in bulk concentration corresponds to a matching of the phase of the pulsatile velocity and the concentration, respectively, where the unique maximum of both occur for certain time in the cycle. The oscillatory component of concentration is also determined radially in the tube where the concentration develops first near the wall of the tube, and the lobes of the concentration curves increase with increasing distance downstream until the concentration becomes fully developed. The GIT method proves to be a working approach to solve the first

  15. Pulsatile dry cupping in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee – a randomized controlled exploratory trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cupping is used in various traditional medicine forms to relieve pain in musculoskeletal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of cupping in relieving the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods In a two-group, randomized controlled exploratory pilot study patients with a clinically and radiological confirmed knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence Grading Scale: 2-4) and a pain intensity > 40 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) were included. 40 Patients were randomized to either 8 sessions of pulsatile dry cupping within 4 weeks or no intervention (control). Paracetamol was allowed on demand for both groups. Outcomes were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) score, the pain intensity on a VAS (0 mm = no pain to 100 mm = maximum intensity) and Quality of Life (SF-36) 4 and 12 weeks after randomization. Use of Paracetamol was documented within the 4-week treatment period. Analyses were performed by analysis of covariance adjusting for the baseline value for each outcome. Results 21 patients were allocated to the cupping group (5 male; mean age 68 ± SD 7.2) and 19 to the control group (8 male; 69 ± 6.8). After 4 weeks the WOMAC global score improved significantly more in the cupping group with a mean of 27.7 (95% confidence interval 22.1; 33.3) compared to 42.2 (36.3; 48.1) in the control group (p = 0.001). After 12 weeks the WOMAC global score were still significantly different in favor for cupping (31.0 (24.9; 37.2) vs. 40.8 (34.4; 47.3) p = 0.032), however the WOMAC subscores for pain and stiffness were not significant anymore. Significantly better outcomes in the cupping group were also observed for pain intensity on VAS and for the SF-36 Physical Component Scale compared to the control group after 4 and 12 weeks. No significant difference was observed for the SF-36 Mental Component Scale and the total number of consumed Paracetamol tablets

  16. In vitro hemodynamic evaluation of a novel pulsatile extracorporeal life support system: impact of perfusion modes and circuit components on energy loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Kunselman, Allen R; Clark, Joseph B; Ündar, Akif

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of every component of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) circuit on hemodynamic energy transmission in terms of energy equivalent pressure (EEP), total hemodynamic energy (THE), and surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE) under nonpulsatile and pulsatile modes in a novel ECLS system. The ECLS circuit consisted of i-cor diagonal pump and console (Xenios AG, Heilbronn, Germany), an iLA membrane ventilator (Xenios AG), an 18 Fr femoral arterial cannula, a 23/25 Fr femoral venous cannula, and 3/8-in ID arterial and venous tubing. The circuit was primed with lactated Ringer's solution and human whole blood (hematocrit 33%). All trials were conducted under room temperature at the flow rates of 1-4 L/min (1 L/min increments). The pulsatile flow settings were set at pulsatile frequency of 75 beats per minute and differential speed values of 1000-4000 rpm (1000 rpm increments). Flow and pressure data were collected using a custom-based data acquisition system. EEP was significantly higher than mean arterial pressure in all experimental conditions under pulsatile flow (P < 0.01). THE was also increased under pulsatile flow compared with the nonpulsatile flow (P < 0.01). Under pulsatile flow conditions, SHE was significantly higher and increased differential rpm resulted in significantly higher SHE (P < 0.01). There was no SHE generated under nonpulsatile flow. Energy loss depending on the circuit components was almost similar in both perfusion modes at all different flow rates. The pressure drops across the oxygenator were 3.8-24.9 mm Hg, and the pressure drops across the arterial cannula were 19.3-172.6 mm Hg at the flow rates of 1-4 L/min. Depending on the pulsatility setting, i-cor ECLS system generates physiological quality pulsatile flow without increasing the mean circuit pressure. The iLA membrane ventilator is a low-resistance oxygenator, and allows more hemodynamic energy to be delivered

  17. Effects of cocaine and corticotropin-releasing factor on pulsatile ACTH and cortisol release in ovariectomized rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Sarnyai, Z; Mello, N K; Mendelson, J H; Nguyen, P H; Erös-Sarnyai, M

    1995-09-01

    Cocaine stimulates ACTH secretion by a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-dependent mechanism in male rats, rhesus monkeys, and humans. To determine the generality of this effect, we examined the effects of acute cocaine administration on the pulsatile release of ACTH and cortisol in three ovariectomized (OVX) rhesus monkeys and compared its effects to stimulation with CRF. Venous blood samples were collected at 2-min intervals for 60 min before and after iv administration of cocaine (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg) and CRF (1.0 and 10 micrograms/kg). Cluster analysis procedures were used to evaluate the pulsatile characteristics of ACTH and cortisol release. After placebo administration, an ACTH pulse frequency of 3 peaks/h was detected. After cocaine administration, plasma cocaine levels peaked at 92 +/- 3.0 and 201 +/- 60 ng/mL within 2 min. However, in contrast to normal intact males, cocaine did not stimulate the pulsatile release of ACTH in OVX females. Cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) decreased ACTH incremental peak height and valley levels compared with pre-cocaine values, and a higher dose of cocaine produced no changes in ACTH release. Bolus injection of a low dose of CRF (1.0 micrograms/kg, iv) significantly increased ACTH incremental peak height (P < 0.05), and a higher dose of CRF (10 micrograms/kg) increased ACTH peak amplitude, percentage increase in peak amplitude, area under the peaks, and incremental peak heights as well as ACTH valley level and nadir (10 micrograms/kg, iv) (P < 0.05). ACTH pulse frequency did not change after CRF or cocaine administration. Pulsatile release of cortisol was 2.7 peaks/h under placebo conditions and did not change after cocaine or CRF administration. Cortisol pulse amplitude was increased after low and high doses of CRF. High doses of CRF (10 micrograms/kg) also increased the mean level of cortisol valleys. In summary, we found that CRF but not cocaine stimulated pulsatile ACTH and cortisol release in OVX rhesus monkeys. The profound ACTH

  18. Mathematical modeling of CSF pulsatile hydrodynamics based on fluid-solid interaction.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Bastani, Dariush; Najarian, Siamak; Ganji, Fariba; Farmanzad, Farhad; Seddighi, Amir Saeed

    2010-06-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is derived from cerebral blood pressure and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulatory dynamics and can be affected in the course of many diseases. Computer analysis of the ICP time pattern plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment of those diseases. This study proposes the application of Linninger et al.'s [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 557-565, Apr. 2005] fluid-solid interaction model of CSF hydrodynamic in ventricular system based on our clinical data from a group of patients with brain parenchyma tumor. The clinical experiments include the arterial blood pressure (ABP), venous blood pressure, and ICP in the subarachnoid space (SAS). These data were used as inputs to the model that predicts the intracranial dynamic phenomena. In addition, the model has been modified by considering CSF pulsatile production rate as the major factor of CSF motion. The approximations of ventricle enlargement, CSF pressure distribution in the ventricular system and CSF velocity magnitude in the aqueduct and foramina were obtained in this study. The observation of reversal flow in the CSF flow pattern due to brain tissue compression is another finding in our investigation. Based on the experimental results, no existence of large transmural pressure differences were found in the brain system. The measured pressure drop in the ventricular system was less than 5 Pa. Moreover, the CSF flow pattern, ICP distribution, and velocity magnitude were in good agreement with the published models and CINE (phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging) experiments, respectively.

  19. Numerical Study of Turbulent Pulsatile Blood Flow through Stenosed Artery Using Fluid-Solid Interaction.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Mehdi; Saghafian, Mohsen; Sadeghi, Mahmood Reza

    2015-01-01

    The turbulent pulsatile blood flow through stenosed arteries considering the elastic property of the wall is investigated numerically. During the numerical model validation both standard k-ε model and RNG K-ε model are used. Compared with the RNG K-ε model, the standard K-ε model shows better agreement with previous experimental results and is better able to show the reverse flow region. Also, compared with experimental data, the results show that, up to 70% stenosis, the flow is laminar and for 80% stenosis the flow becomes turbulent. Assuming laminar or turbulent flow and also rigid or elastic walls, the results are compared with each other. The investigation of time-averaged shear stress and the oscillatory shear index for 80% stenosis show that assuming laminar flow will cause more error than assuming a rigid wall. The results also show that, in turbulent flow compared with laminar flow, the importance of assuming a flexible artery wall is more than assuming a rigid artery wall.

  20. Realization of a permanent implantable pulsatile impeller heart with magnetically suspended motor.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Zheng, M

    1997-07-01

    A permanent impeller heart that could work for years was once an idea. However, now this idea is turning into reality through the use of the magnetically suspended motor. Recently, with our implantable pulsatile impeller pump, 3 left ventricular assisted calves survived for about 2 months (62, 54, and 46 days, respectively). The termination of the experiments was related to wear of the mechanical bearing, which resulted in vibration of the rotor and pump failure. All the experimental animals were in good condition prior to pump failure. It seemed as if the experiments could have lasted indefinitely if the bearing had not failed. All the hematological and biochemical data of the calves remained in normal or acceptable ranges; neither blood damage nor organ dysfunction of any animal was detected. During autopsy, no severe thrombus formation was found in the pump or vessels although a low dose of heparin (0.5-0.8 g/h) was given to increase the activated coagulation time (ACT) to 1.5-2.0 times its normal value. To solve the problem of bearing wear, a magnetically suspended motor was investigated and applied to the impeller pump. On the opposite sides of a disc connected to the rotor, 2 permanent magnet rings were embedded, one for driving and the other for axial suspension. Because both the driving and suspending coils with iron cores attract the disc, no radial bearing was needed. This newly devised impeller heart promises to have long-term and permanent applications. PMID:9212937

  1. Numerical Study of Turbulent Pulsatile Blood Flow through Stenosed Artery Using Fluid-Solid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Jahangiri, Mehdi; Saghafian, Mohsen; Sadeghi, Mahmood Reza

    2015-01-01

    The turbulent pulsatile blood flow through stenosed arteries considering the elastic property of the wall is investigated numerically. During the numerical model validation both standard k-ε model and RNG K-ε model are used. Compared with the RNG K-ε model, the standard K-ε model shows better agreement with previous experimental results and is better able to show the reverse flow region. Also, compared with experimental data, the results show that, up to 70% stenosis, the flow is laminar and for 80% stenosis the flow becomes turbulent. Assuming laminar or turbulent flow and also rigid or elastic walls, the results are compared with each other. The investigation of time-averaged shear stress and the oscillatory shear index for 80% stenosis show that assuming laminar flow will cause more error than assuming a rigid wall. The results also show that, in turbulent flow compared with laminar flow, the importance of assuming a flexible artery wall is more than assuming a rigid artery wall. PMID:26448782

  2. The Effect of Pulsatility Index on Infarct Volume in Acute Lacunar Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon; Lee, Hanbin; An, Se-A; Yim, Byeongsoo; Kim, Jonguk; Kim, Ok Joon; Kim, Won Chan; Kim, Hyun Sook; Oh, Seung Hun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lacunar stroke, in the context of small vessel disease, is a type of cerebral infarction caused by occlusion of a penetrating artery. Pulsatility index (PI) is an easily measurable parameter in Transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) study. PI reflects distal cerebral vascular resistance and has been interpreted as a surrogate marker of small vessel disease. We hypothesized that an increased PI, a marker of small vessel disease, might be associated with a larger infarct volume in acute lacunar stroke. Materials and Methods This study included 64 patients with acute lacunar stroke who underwent TCD and brain MRI. We evaluated the association between the mean PI value of bilateral middle cerebral arteries and infarct volume on diffusion-weighted MRI using univariate and multivariate linear regression. Results The mean infarct volume and PI were 482.18±406.40 mm3 and 0.86±0.18, respectively. On univariate linear regression, there was a significant positive association between PI and infarct volume (p=0.001). In the multivariate model, a single standard deviation increase of PI (per 0.18) was associated with an increase of 139.05 mm3 in infarct volume (95% confidence interval, 21.25 to 256.85; p=0.022). Conclusion We demonstrated that PI was an independent determinant of infarct volume in acute lacunar stroke. The PI value measured in acute stroke may be a surrogate marker of the extent of ischemic injury. PMID:27189290

  3. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, G. C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank-Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance.

  4. The effect of androgen blockade on pulsatile gonadotrophin release and LH response to naloxone.

    PubMed

    Balzano, S; Migliari, R; Sica, V; Scarpa, R M; Pintus, C; Loviselli, A; Usai, E; Balestrieri, A

    1987-10-01

    In order to clarify the effects of androgen blockade on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in man, four patients with advanced prostate cancer, not previously treated, were given oral flutamide, 250 mg three times daily for 9 days. Before, and 7, 8 and 9 days after starting flutamide treatment, on separate days, the following tests were performed: a gonadotrophin pulsatility study, with 20 min interval blood sampling for 12 h, a naloxone test and a GnRH test. Flutamide induced a significant increase in both LH and FSH pulse frequency, while pulse amplitudes and plasma integrated concentrations (IC) of LH and FSH were unaffected. Plasma integrated concentrations of testosterone and oestradiol rose significantly, while that of prolactin was unaffected. The increase in plasma LH concentration induced by naloxone injection was abolished by flutamide treatment. On the other hand, the small FSH response to naloxone was unaffected by flutamide treatment. Response to GnRH was unaffected by flutamide. These results suggest that flutamide exerts effective androgen blockade at the hypothalamic level, since, despite increased plasma testosterone concentrations, gonadotrophin pulse frequency increased and the LH response to naloxone was abolished.

  5. Effect of Pulsatile and Continuous Flow on Yes-Associated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chitragari, Gautham; Shalaby, Sherif Y.; Sumpio, Brandon J.; Sumpio, Bauer E.

    2014-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a mechanosignaling protein that relays mechanical information to the nucleus by changing its level of phosphorylation. We hypothesize that different flow patterns show differential effect on phosphorylated YAP (pYAP) (S127) and total YAP and could be responsible for flow dependent localization of atherosclerosis. Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) seeded on fibronectin-coated glass slides were exposed to continuous forward flow (CFF) and pulsatile forward flow (PFF) using a parallel plate flow chamber system for 30 minutes. Cell lysates were prepared and immunoblotted to detect the levels of phosphorylated YAP and total YAP. HUVECs exposed to both PFF and CFF showed a mild decrease in the levels of both pYAP (S127) and total YAP. While the levels of pYAP (S127) decreased to 87.85 and 85.21% of static control with PFF and CFF, respectively, the levels of total YAP significantly decreased to 91.31 and 92.27% of static control. No significant difference was seen between CFF and PFF on their effect on pYAP (S127), but both conditions resulted in a significant decrease in total YAP at 30 minutes. The results of this experiment show that the possible effect of different types of flow on YAP is not induced before 30 minutes. Experiments exposing endothelial cells to various types of flow for longer duration of time could help to elucidate the role of YAP in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:25317030

  6. A Pulsatile Bioreactor for Conditioning of Tissue-Engineered Cardiovascular Constructs under Endoscopic Visualization

    PubMed Central

    König, Fabian; Hollweck, Trixi; Pfeifer, Stefan; Reichart, Bruno; Wintermantel, Erich; Hagl, Christian; Akra, Bassil

    2012-01-01

    Heart valve disease (HVD) is a globally increasing problem and accounts for thousands of deaths yearly. Currently end-stage HVD can only be treated by total valve replacement, however with major drawbacks. To overcome the limitations of conventional substitutes, a new clinical approach based on cell colonization of artificially manufactured heart valves has been developed. Even though this attempt seems promising, a confluent and stable cell layer has not yet been achieved due to the high stresses present in this area of the human heart. This study describes a bioreactor with a new approach to cell conditioning of tissue engineered heart valves. The bioreactor provides a low pulsatile flow that grants the correct opening and closing of the valve without high shear stresses. The flow rate can be regulated allowing a steady and sensitive conditioning process. Furthermore, the correct functioning of the valve can be monitored by endoscope surveillance in real-time. The tubeless and modular design allows an accurate, simple and faultless assembly of the reactor in a laminar flow chamber. It can be concluded that the bioreactor provides a strong tool for dynamic pre-conditioning and monitoring of colonized heart valve prostheses physiologically exposed to shear stress. PMID:24955628

  7. A Pulsatile Bioreactor for Conditioning of Tissue-Engineered Cardiovascular Constructs under Endoscopic Visualization.

    PubMed

    König, Fabian; Hollweck, Trixi; Pfeifer, Stefan; Reichart, Bruno; Wintermantel, Erich; Hagl, Christian; Akra, Bassil

    2012-07-19

    Heart valve disease (HVD) is a globally increasing problem and accounts for thousands of deaths yearly. Currently end-stage HVD can only be treated by total valve replacement, however with major drawbacks. To overcome the limitations of conventional substitutes, a new clinical approach based on cell colonization of artificially manufactured heart valves has been developed. Even though this attempt seems promising, a confluent and stable cell layer has not yet been achieved due to the high stresses present in this area of the human heart. This study describes a bioreactor with a new approach to cell conditioning of tissue engineered heart valves. The bioreactor provides a low pulsatile flow that grants the correct opening and closing of the valve without high shear stresses. The flow rate can be regulated allowing a steady and sensitive conditioning process. Furthermore, the correct functioning of the valve can be monitored by endoscope surveillance in real-time. The tubeless and modular design allows an accurate, simple and faultless assembly of the reactor in a laminar flow chamber. It can be concluded that the bioreactor provides a strong tool for dynamic pre-conditioning and monitoring of colonized heart valve prostheses physiologically exposed to shear stress.

  8. Development of a polymer bileaflet valve to realize a low-cost pulsatile blood pump.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iijima, Kazuo; Inoue, Akira; Imachi, Kou; Ye, Chun Xiu

    2003-01-01

    The final goal of this study is to realize a low-cost pulsatile blood pump especially for patients with acute heart failure or postoperative low cardiac output syndrome. In support of the pump, two types of polymer bileaflet valves with different configuration of the valve seats were developed. Influence of the leaflet thickness on the hydrodynamics of the prototype was preliminarily investigated among 70 microm, 100 microm, and 150 microm. As to the valves with the thinner leaflets, buckling of the leaflets was observed, which induced a large amount of regurgitation at valve closure. However, by thickening the leaflet to 150 microm, the mean flow of the prototype and the second model could be successfully comparable to the Medtronic-Hall valve. Moreover, accelerated fatigue tests showed that reinforcement of the valve seat with the additional spokes in the second model extended the durability by four times as compared with the prototype, equivalent to an in vivo duration of over one month. PMID:12534717

  9. Phantom-based ground-truth generation for cerebral vessel segmentation and pulsatile deformation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schetelig, Daniel; Säring, Dennis; Illies, Till; Sedlacik, Jan; Kording, Fabian; Werner, René

    2016-03-01

    Hemodynamic and mechanical factors of the vascular system are assumed to play a major role in understanding, e.g., initiation, growth and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. Among those factors, cardiac cycle-related pulsatile motion and deformation of cerebral vessels currently attract much interest. However, imaging of those effects requires high spatial and temporal resolution and remains challenging { and similarly does the analysis of the acquired images: Flow velocity changes and contrast media inflow cause vessel intensity variations in related temporally resolved computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography data over the cardiac cycle and impede application of intensity threshold-based segmentation and subsequent motion analysis. In this work, a flow phantom for generation of ground-truth images for evaluation of appropriate segmentation and motion analysis algorithms is developed. The acquired ground-truth data is used to illustrate the interplay between intensity fluctuations and (erroneous) motion quantification by standard threshold-based segmentation, and an adaptive threshold-based segmentation approach is proposed that alleviates respective issues. The results of the phantom study are further demonstrated to be transferable to patient data.

  10. On the Evolution of Pulsatile Flow Subject to a Transverse Impulse Body Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Labbio, Giuseppe; Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Kadem, Lyes

    2014-11-01

    In the event of an unexpected abrupt traffic stop or car accident, automotive passengers will experience an abrupt body deceleration. This may lead to tearing or dissection of the aortic wall known as Blunt Traumatic Aortic Rupture (BTAR). BTAR is the second leading cause of death in automotive accidents and, although quite frequent, the mechanisms leading to BTAR are still not clearly identified, particularly the contribution of the flow field. As such, this work is intended to provide a fundamental framework for the investigation of the flow contribution to BTAR. In this fundamental study, pulsatile flow in a three-dimensional, straight pipe of circular cross-section is subjected to a unidirectional, transverse, impulse body force applied on a strictly bounded volume of fluid. These models were simulated using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT. The evolution of fluid field characteristics was investigated during and after the application of the force. The application of the force significantly modified the flow field. The force induces a transverse pressure gradient causing the development of secondary flow structures that dissipate the energy added by the acceleration. Once the force ceases to act, these structures are carried downstream and gradually dissipate their excess energy.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of a pulsatile flow in a coronary artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailon-Cuba, Jorge; Hayenga, Heather; Leonardi, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    A direct numerical simulation of the blood flow in a coronary artery has been performed. A pulsatile, turbulent flow, inside a branchless, rigid cylindrical artery with non-slip conditions has been considered. The blood is assumed to be a Newtonian fluid. As a fundamental component of the coronary geometry, several cross-sectional shapes of the arterial lumen, as a function of the streamwise coordinate-z, are being included using the immersed boundary method, with a simple transversal wavy wall, as the most simple case. A preliminary set of simulations has being run, with two time varying flow rate functions. Results include flow velocities, pressure gradients and wall shear stress (WSS) distribution, and their comparison with other CFD and experimental results. In particular, WSS is important due to the significant role that it plays in the early formation of coronary artery disease (CAD). It has been found that waviness on the wall increases the instantaneous streamwise velocity, w (y) , and its fluctuations, (y) , and more drastically the WSS. The numerical simulations were performed on the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) under Grant No. CTS070066.

  12. Effect of pulsatile and continuous flow on yes-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Chitragari, Gautham; Shalaby, Sherif Y; Sumpio, Brandon J; Sumpio, Bauer E

    2014-09-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a mechanosignaling protein that relays mechanical information to the nucleus by changing its level of phosphorylation. We hypothesize that different flow patterns show differential effect on phosphorylated YAP (pYAP) (S127) and total YAP and could be responsible for flow dependent localization of atherosclerosis. Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) seeded on fibronectin-coated glass slides were exposed to continuous forward flow (CFF) and pulsatile forward flow (PFF) using a parallel plate flow chamber system for 30 minutes. Cell lysates were prepared and immunoblotted to detect the levels of phosphorylated YAP and total YAP. HUVECs exposed to both PFF and CFF showed a mild decrease in the levels of both pYAP (S127) and total YAP. While the levels of pYAP (S127) decreased to 87.85 and 85.21% of static control with PFF and CFF, respectively, the levels of total YAP significantly decreased to 91.31 and 92.27% of static control. No significant difference was seen between CFF and PFF on their effect on pYAP (S127), but both conditions resulted in a significant decrease in total YAP at 30 minutes. The results of this experiment show that the possible effect of different types of flow on YAP is not induced before 30 minutes. Experiments exposing endothelial cells to various types of flow for longer duration of time could help to elucidate the role of YAP in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  13. Pulsatile and steady components of blood pressure and subclinical cerebrovascular disease: the Northern Manhattan Study

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Jose; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Cheung, Ken; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Wright, Clinton B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess whether pulse pressure (PP) is associated, independently of mean arterial pressure (MAP), with perivascular spaces (PVS), lacunar lesions presumably ischemic (LPI), and white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV) seen on brain MRI. METHODS Participants in the Northern Manhattan Study had their blood pressure (BP) taken during their baseline enrollment visit and again during a visit for a brain MRI a mean of 7 years later. We assessed small and large PVS, lacunar LPI, and WMHV on MRI. We examined the association of systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), MAP, and PP at baseline with subclinical markers of cerebrovascular disease using generalized linear models and adjusting for vascular risk factors. RESULTS Imaging and BP data were available for 1009 participants (mean age 68 ± 8 years, 60% women, 60% Hispanic). DBP was associated with lacunar LPI and WMHV, while SBP was associated with small and large PVS. Using MAP and PP together disclosed that the effect size for PP was greater for large PVS while the effect of MAP was greater for lacunar LPI and WMHV. The effects of DBP were flat or negative at any degree of SBP > 120 mm Hg for small and large PVS, while a positive association was noted for lacunar LPI and WMHV with any DBP increase over any degree of SBP. CONCLUSIONS We report here a segregated association between the pulsatile and steady components of the BP with subclinical markers of cerebrovascular disease. These differential associations may reflect the underlying pathology of these biomarkers. PMID:26259124

  14. Generating a Pulsatile Pulmonary Flow after Fontan Operation by Means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoreyshi, Mostafa

    2011-03-01

    This study considers blood flow in total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) morphology, which is created in Fontan surgical procedure in patients with single ventricle heart disease. Ordinary process of TCPC operation reduces pulmonary blood flow pulsatility; because of right ventricle being bypassed. This phenomenon causes a lot of side effects for patients. A cardiac surgeon has suggested that keeping main pulmonary artery (MPA) partially open, would increase pulmonary flow pulsations. MPA gets closed in ordinary TCPC operation. The purpose of current study is to verify the effects of keeping MPA partially open on pulmonary flow pulsations, by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). 3D geometry is reconstructed from CT Angiography (CTA) scan of a patient who has undergone an ordinary TCPC procedure. The stenosed MPA or pulmonary stenosis (PS) is virtually added to the original geometry. Flow field is studied in six different models in which average antegrade flow (AF) -coming through PS- increases gradually. Results show that adding AF increases flow pulsations in both pulmonary arteries. Moreover, power loss increases with respect to average AF. We conclude that adding AF is an impressive way to increase pulsations of pulmonary flow, but energy losses should be considered too.

  15. Superficial temporal artery pseudoaneurysm presenting as a growing, pulsatile, and tender mass

    PubMed Central

    Seferi, Arsen; Alimehmeti, Ridvan; Pajaj, Ermira; Vyshka, Gentian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Superficial temporal artery (STA) pseudoaneurysms have been reported in the literature since the mid of seventeenth century from Bartholin, however, there is an increasing number of cases, suggesting a diversity of etiological factors. Among these, traumatic events, even of an iatrogenic nature, have been identified as causative factors for nonspontaneous STA pseudoaneurysms. Regional pain and tenderness, troublesome pulsations of the mass, cosmetic concerns as well as the risk of bleeding warrant a thorough evaluation and a definite interventional approach to the condition. Case Description: A 21-year-old Caucasian male searched medical advice for a growing, tender, and pulsatile mass on his right temple, with isolated and short episodes of lancinating sensations, after sustaining a blunt trauma following a hit with a stick half a year before the admission. Enhanced cranial computed tomography and angiography confirmed the diagnosis of an STA pseudoaneurysm. A direct percutaneous aspiration, as well as ultrasonography, was performed prior to the neurosurgical intervention, with the complete removal of the mass. Conclusions: STA pseudoaneurysms require a careful evaluation and a conclusive approach in order to avoid the risk of a growing mass and other nonremote complications such as bone erosions and bleeding. Different treatment options are available, including endovascular obliteration and embolization, however, surgical removal after ligation of the afferent and efferent segments of the vessel seem to be highly effective. PMID:27413578

  16. Spatial-temporal three-dimensional ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound in free field and pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ting; Hu, Hong; Bai, Chen; Guo, Shifang; Yang, Miao; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation plays important roles in almost all high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications. However, current two-dimensional (2D) cavitation mapping could only provide cavitation activity in one plane. This study proposed a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping (3D-UPACM) for HIFU in free field and pulsatile flow. The acquisition of channel-domain raw radio-frequency (RF) data in 3D space was performed by sequential plane-by-plane 2D ultrafast active cavitation mapping. Between two adjacent unit locations, there was a waiting time to make cavitation nuclei distribution of the liquid back to the original state. The 3D cavitation map equivalent to the one detected at one time and over the entire volume could be reconstructed by Marching Cube algorithm. Minimum variance (MV) adaptive beamforming was combined with coherence factor (CF) weighting (MVCF) or compressive sensing (CS) method (MVCS) to process the raw RF data for improved beamforming or more rapid data processing. The feasibility of 3D-UPACM was demonstrated in tap-water and a phantom vessel with pulsatile flow. The time interval between temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud could be several microseconds. MVCF beamformer had a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 14.17dB higher, lateral and axial resolution at 2.88times and 1.88times, respectively, which were compared with those of B-mode active cavitation mapping. MVCS beamformer had only 14.94% time penalty of that of MVCF beamformer. This 3D-UPACM technique employs the linear array of a current ultrasound diagnosis system rather than a 2D array transducer to decrease the cost of the instrument. Moreover, although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid medium or a constant supply of new cavitation nuclei that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, this technique may exhibit a useful tool in 3D cavitation mapping for HIFU with high speed, precision and resolution

  17. Spatial-temporal three-dimensional ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound in free field and pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ting; Hu, Hong; Bai, Chen; Guo, Shifang; Yang, Miao; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation plays important roles in almost all high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications. However, current two-dimensional (2D) cavitation mapping could only provide cavitation activity in one plane. This study proposed a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping (3D-UPACM) for HIFU in free field and pulsatile flow. The acquisition of channel-domain raw radio-frequency (RF) data in 3D space was performed by sequential plane-by-plane 2D ultrafast active cavitation mapping. Between two adjacent unit locations, there was a waiting time to make cavitation nuclei distribution of the liquid back to the original state. The 3D cavitation map equivalent to the one detected at one time and over the entire volume could be reconstructed by Marching Cube algorithm. Minimum variance (MV) adaptive beamforming was combined with coherence factor (CF) weighting (MVCF) or compressive sensing (CS) method (MVCS) to process the raw RF data for improved beamforming or more rapid data processing. The feasibility of 3D-UPACM was demonstrated in tap-water and a phantom vessel with pulsatile flow. The time interval between temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud could be several microseconds. MVCF beamformer had a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 14.17dB higher, lateral and axial resolution at 2.88times and 1.88times, respectively, which were compared with those of B-mode active cavitation mapping. MVCS beamformer had only 14.94% time penalty of that of MVCF beamformer. This 3D-UPACM technique employs the linear array of a current ultrasound diagnosis system rather than a 2D array transducer to decrease the cost of the instrument. Moreover, although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid medium or a constant supply of new cavitation nuclei that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, this technique may exhibit a useful tool in 3D cavitation mapping for HIFU with high speed, precision and resolution

  18. Blood Glucose Control Using a Novel Continuous Blood Glucose Monitor and Repetitive Intravenous Insulin Boluses: Exploiting Natural Insulin Pulsatility as a Principle for a Future Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Skjaervold, Nils K.; Östling, Dan; Hjelme, Dag R.; Spigset, Olav; Lyng, Oddveig

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to construct a glucose regulatory algorithm by employing the natural pulsatile pattern of insulin secretion and the oscillatory pattern of resting blood glucose levels and further to regulate the blood glucose level in diabetic pigs by this method. We developed a control algorithm based on repetitive intravenous bolus injections of insulin and combined this with an intravascular blood glucose monitor. Four anesthetized pigs were used in the study. The animals developed a mildly diabetic state from streptozotocin pretreatment. They were steadily brought within the blood glucose target range of 4.5–6.0 mmol/L in 21 to 121 min and kept within that range for 128 to 238 min (hypoglycemic values varied from 2.9 to 51.1 min). The study confirmed our hypotheses regarding the feasibility of this new principle for blood glucose control, and the algorithm was constantly improved during the study to produce the best results in the last animals. The main obstacles were the drift of the IvS-1 sensor and problems with the calibration procedure, which calls for an improvement in the sensor stability before this method can be applied fully in new studies in animals and humans. PMID:24369461

  19. Verification of a computational cardiovascular system model comparing the hemodynamics of a continuous flow to a synchronous valveless pulsatile flow left ventricular assist device

    PubMed Central

    Gohean, Jeffrey R.; George, Mitchell J.; Pate, Thomas D.; Kurusz, Mark; Longoria, Raul G.; Smalling, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to utilize a computational model to compare a synchronized valveless pulsatile left ventricular assist device to continuous flow left ventricular assist devices at the same level of device flow, and to verify the model with in vivo porcine data. A dynamic system model of the human cardiovascular system was developed to simulate support of a healthy or failing native heart from a continuous flow left ventricular assist device or a synchronous, pulsatile, valveless, dual piston positive displacement pump. These results were compared to measurements made during in vivo porcine experiments. Results from the simulation model and from the in vivo counterpart show that the pulsatile pump provides higher cardiac output, left ventricular unloading, cardiac pulsatility, and aortic valve flow as compared to the continuous flow model at the same level of support. The dynamic system model developed for this investigation can effectively simulate human cardiovascular support by a synchronous pulsatile or continuous flow ventricular assist device. PMID:23438771

  20. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of pulsatile flow within a layered and stenotic aorta.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng-qi; Liu, Ying; Liu, Tian-tian; Yang, Qing-shan

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the hemodynamic characteristics of blood flow and stress distribution in a layered and stenotic aorta are investigated. By introducing symmetrical and unsymmetrical stenosis, the influence of stenosis morphology and stenotic ratio on the coupled dynamic responses of aorta is clarified. In the analysis, the in-vivo pulsatile waveforms and fully fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between the layered elastic aorta and the blood are considered. The results show that the fluid domain is abnormal in the stenotic aorta, and the whirlpool forms at the obstructed and downstream unobstructed regions. The maximum wall shear stresses appear at the throat of the stenosis. Downstream region appears low and oscillated shear stresses. In addition, along with the increase of the stenotic ratio, the amplitude of the maximum shear stress will be intensively increased and localized, and the sensitivity is also increased. In the aorta with unsymmetrical stenosis, the Von Mises stresses reach the peak value at the side with the surface protuberance, but they are reduced at the side with no protuberance. The sign variation of the layer interface shear stresses near the throat indicates the variation of the shear direction which increases the opportunity of shear damage at the transition plane. Moreover, the shear stress levels at the fluid-solid and intima-media interfaces are higher than that at the media-adventitia interface. The unsymmetrical stenosis causes higher stresses at the side with the surface protuberance than symmetrical one, but lower at the side with no protuberance. These results provide an insight in the influence of the stenosis, as well as its morphology, on the pathogenesis and pathological evolution of some diseases, such as arteriosclerosis and aortic dissection.

  1. Linearity of pulsatile pressure-flow relations in the embryonic chick vascular system.

    PubMed

    Yoshigi, M; Keller, B B

    1996-10-01

    The calculation and modeling of vascular input impedance are based on the assumption that pressure and flow are linearly related in the frequency domain. However, this assumption has not been proven for the embryonic circulation. Therefore, we investigated the linearity of pulsatile pressure flow relations in vivo with acute alterations in cycle length. We simultaneously measured dorsal aortic pressure with a servonull system and flow velocity with a 20-MHz pulsed-Doppler system in stage 24 chick embryos (n = 38). Cycle length was acutely altered using thermal probe(s) applied to the sinus venosus. We determined the impedance spectra at several cycle lengths for each embryo and a reference curve from a three-element Windkessel model with the use of nonlinear curve fitting. We then assessed the scatter of experimental impedance along the reference curve as a measure of linearity in the frequency domain. We found that mean vascular resistance did not change after thermal probe applications (P > .20 for each), indicating that acute alterations in cycle length did not alter peripheral vascular properties. Superpositioned impedance spectra showed minimal scatter along the model impedance from 0 to 6 Hz. Goodness of fit values (R2) were near unity (.94 to .97) and were similar for all interventions (P > .07 for Fisher's z, by F test). Above 6 Hz, both modulus and phase spectra exhibited significant scatter (P < .05, by F test). Experimental impedance spectra tended to have a fluctuation and a phase-zero crossover, indicating significant wave reflection in the embryonic circulation. Thus, the embryonic vascular system can be approximated as a linear system from 0 to 6 Hz, the range in which the majority (96.0 +/- 0.18%) of hydraulic energy is dissipated.

  2. Simulation of a pulsatile total artificial heart: Development of a partitioned Fluid Structure Interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonntag, Simon J.; Kaufmann, Tim A. S.; Büsen, Martin R.; Laumen, Marco; Linde, Torsten; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Due to a shortage in donor organs artificial hearts can be a bridge to transplantation or even serve as a destination therapy for patients with terminal heart insufficiency. A pusher plate driven pulsatile membrane pump, the Total Artificial Heart (TAH) ReinHeart, is currently under development at the Institute of Applied Medical Engineering of RWTH Aachen University.This paper presents the methodology of a fully coupled three-dimensional time-dependent Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) simulation of the TAH using a commercial partitioned block-Gauss-Seidel coupling package. Partitioned coupling of the incompressible fluid with the slender flexible membrane as well as a high fluid/structure density ratio of about unity led inherently to a deterioration of the stability (‘artificial added mass instability’). The objective was to conduct a stable simulation with high accuracy of the pumping process. In order to achieve stability, a combined resistance and pressure outlet boundary condition as well as the interface artificial compressibility method was applied. An analysis of the contact algorithm and turbulence condition is presented. Independence tests are performed for the structural and the fluid mesh, the time step size and the number of pulse cycles. Because of the large deformation of the fluid domain, a variable mesh stiffness depending on certain mesh properties was specified for the fluid elements. Adaptive remeshing was avoided. Different approaches for the mesh stiffness function are compared with respect to convergence, preservation of mesh topology and mesh quality. The resulting mesh aspect ratios, mesh expansion factors and mesh orthogonalities are evaluated in detail. The membrane motion and flow distribution of the coupled simulations are compared with a top-view recording and stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements, respectively, of the actual pump.

  3. Fetal umbilical artery Doppler pulsatility index and childhood neurocognitive outcome at 12 years

    PubMed Central

    Mone, Fionnuala; McConnell, Barbara; Thompson, Andrew; Segurado, Ricardo; Hepper, Peter; Stewart, Moira C; Dornan, James C; Ong, Stephen; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Shields, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an elevated fetal umbilical artery Doppler (UAD) pulsatility index (PI) at 28 weeks’ gestation, in the absence of fetal growth restriction (FGR) and prematurity, is associated with adverse neurocognitive outcome in children aged 12 years. Methods Prospective cohort study, comparing children with a normal fetal UAD PI (<90th centile) (n=110) and those with an elevated PI (≥90th centile) (n=40). UAD was performed at 28, 32 and 34 weeks gestation. At 12 years of age, all children were assessed under standardised conditions at Queen's University, Belfast, UK to determine cognitive and behavioural outcomes using the British Ability Score-II and Achenbach Child Behavioural Checklist Parent Rated Version under standardised conditions. Regression analysis was performed, controlling for confounders such as gender, socioeconomic status and age at assessment. Results The mean age of follow-up was 12.4 years (±0.5 SD) with 44% of children male (n=63). When UAD was assessed at 28 weeks, the elevated fetal UAD group had lower scores in cognitive assessments of information processing and memory. Parameters included (1) recall of objects immediate verbal (p=0.002), (2) delayed verbal (p=0.008) and (3) recall of objects immediate spatial (p=0.0016). There were no significant differences between the Doppler groups at 32 or 34 weeks' gestation. Conclusions An elevated UAD PI at 28 weeks' gestation in the absence of FGR or prematurity is associated with lower scores of declarative memory in children aged 12 years. A potential explanation for this is an element of placental insufficiency in the presence of the appropriately grown fetus, which affects the development of the fetal hippocampus and information processing and memory long-term. These findings, however, had no impact on overall academic ability, mental processing and reasoning or overall behavioural function. PMID:27311899

  4. Development of Press-Coated, Floating-Pulsatile Drug Delivery of Lisinopril

    PubMed Central

    Jagdale, Swati C.; Suryawanshi, Vishnu M.; Pandya, Sudhir V.; Kuchekar, Bhanudas S.; Chabukswar, Aniruddha R.

    2014-01-01

    Lisinopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, primarily used for the treatment of hypertension, congestive heart failure, and heart attack. It belongs to BCS class III having a half-life of 12 hrs and 25% bioavailability. The purpose of the present work was to develop a press-coated, floating-pulsatile drug delivery system. The core tablet was formulated using the super-disintegrants crosprovidone and croscarmellose sodium. A press-coated tablet (barrier layer) contained the polymer carrageenan, xanthan gum, HPMC K4M, and HPMC K15M. The buoyant layer was optimized with HPMC K100M, sodium bicarbonate, and citric acid. The tablets were evaluated for physical characteristics, floating lag time, swelling index, FTIR, DSC, and in vitro and in vivo behavior. The 5% superdisintgrant showed good results. The FTIR and DSC study predicted no chemical interactions between the drug and excipients. The formulation containing xanthan gum showed drug retaining abilities, but failed to float. The tablet containing HPMC K15M showed a high swelling index. The lag time for the tablet coated with 200 mg carrageenan was 3±0.1 hrs with 99.99±1.5% drug release; with 140 mg HPMC K4M, the lag time was 3±0.1 hrs with 99.71±1.2% drug release; and with 120 mg HPMC K15M, the lag time was 3±0.2 hrs with 99.98±1.7% drug release. The release mechanism of the tablet followed the Korsmeyer-Peppas equation and a first-order release pattern. Floating and lag time behavior have shown good in vitro and in vivo correlations. PMID:24959410

  5. Computational study of pulsatile blood flow in prototype vessel geometries of coronary segments

    PubMed Central

    Chaniotis, A.K.; Kaiktsis, L.; Katritsis, D.; Efstathopoulos, E.; Pantos, I.; Marmarellis, V.

    2010-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of wall shear stress (WSS) in prototype vessel geometries of coronary segments are investigated via numerical simulation, and the potential association with vascular disease and specifically atherosclerosis and plaque rupture is discussed. In particular, simulation results of WSS spatio-temporal distributions are presented for pulsatile, non-Newtonian blood flow conditions for: (a) curved pipes with different curvatures, and (b) bifurcating pipes with different branching angles and flow division. The effects of non-Newtonian flow on WSS (compared to Newtonian flow) are found to be small at Reynolds numbers representative of blood flow in coronary arteries. Specific preferential sites of average low WSS (and likely atherogenesis) were found at the outer regions of the bifurcating branches just after the bifurcation, and at the outer-entry and inner-exit flow regions of the curved vessel segment. The drop in WSS was more dramatic at the bifurcating vessel sites (less than 5% of the pre-bifurcation value). These sites were also near rapid gradients of WSS changes in space and time – a fact that increases the risk of rupture of plaque likely to develop at these sites. The time variation of the WSS spatial distributions was very rapid around the start and end of the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle, when strong fluctuations of intravascular pressure were also observed. These rapid and strong changes of WSS and pressure coincide temporally with the greatest flexion and mechanical stresses induced in the vessel wall by myocardial motion (ventricular contraction). The combination of these factors may increase the risk of plaque rupture and thrombus formation at these sites. PMID:20400349

  6. Pulsatile flow of power-law fluid model for blood flow under periodic body acceleration.

    PubMed

    Chaturani, P; Palanisamy, V

    1990-01-01

    A mathematical model has been proposed to study the pulsatile flow of a power-law fluid through rigid circular tubes under the influence of a periodic body acceleration. Numerical solutions have been obtained by using finite difference method. The accuracy of the numerical procedure has been checked by comparing the obtained numerical results with other numerical and analytical solutions. It is found that the agreement between them is quite good. Interaction of non-Newtonian nature of fluid with the body acceleration has been investigated by using the physiological data for two particular cases (coronary and femoral arteries). The axial velocity, fluid acceleration, wall shear stress and instantaneous volume flow rate have been computed and their variations with different parameters have been analyzed. The following important observations have been made: (i) The velocity and acceleration profiles can have more than one maxima, this is in contrast with usual parabolic profiles where they have only one maximum at the axis. As n increases, the maxima shift towards the axis; (ii) For the flow with no body acceleration, the amplitude of both, wall shear and flow rate, increases with n, whereas for the flow with body acceleration, the amplitude of wall shear (flow rate) increases (decreases) as n increases; (iii) In the absence of body acceleration, pseudoplastic (dilatant) fluids, with low frequency pulsations, have higher (lower) value of maximum flow rate Qmax than Newtonian fluids, whereas for high frequencies, opposite behavior has been observed; for flow with body acceleration pulsations gives higher (lower) value of Qmax for pseudoplastic (dilatant) fluids than Newtonian fluids.

  7. Expansion of bubbles under a pulsatile flow regime in decompressed ovine blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Arieli, Ran; Marmur, Abraham

    2016-02-01

    After decompression of ovine large blood vessels, bubbles nucleate and expand at active hydrophobic spots on their luminal aspect. These bubbles will be in the path of the blood flow within the vessel, which might replenish the supply of gas-supersaturated plasma in their vicinity and thus, in contrast with our previous estimations, enhance their growth. We used the data from our previous study on the effect of pulsatile flow in ovine blood vessels stretched on microscope slides and photographed after decompression from hyperbaric exposure. We measured the diameter of 46 bubbles in 4 samples taken from 3 blood vessels (pulmonary artery, pulmonary vein, and aorta) in which both a "multi-bubble active spot" (MBAS)--which produces several bubbles at a time, and at least one "single-bubble active spot" (SBAS)--which produces a single bubble at a time, were seen together. The linear expansion rate for diameter in SBAS ranged from 0.077 to 0.498 mm/min and in MBAS from 0.001 to 0.332 mm/min. There was a trend toward a reduced expansion rate for bubbles in MBAS compared with SBAS. The expansion rate for bubbles in an MBAS when it was surrounded by others was very low. Bubble growth is related to gas tension, and under a flow regime, bubbles expand from a diameter of 0.1 to 1mm in 2-24 min at a gas supersaturation of 620 kPa and lower. There are two phases of bubble development. The slow and disperse initiation of active spots (from nanobubbles to gas micronuclei) continues for more than 1h, whereas the fast increase in size (2-24 min) is governed by diffusion. Bubble-based decompression models should not artificially reduce diffusion constants, but rather take both phases of bubble development into consideration.

  8. Development of a miniature motor-driven pulsatile LVAD driven by a fuzzy controller.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Makino, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Shuji; Yasuda, Takahiko; Akasaka, Yuta; Tani, Makiko; Inoue, Yusuke; Mitoh, Ayumu; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2007-01-01

    We have been developing a small, lightweight motor-driven pulsatile left ventricular assist device (LVAD) with a ball screw. The motor-driven LVAD consists of a brushless DC motor and a ball screw. The attractive magnetic force between Nd-Fe-B magnets (with a diameter of 5 mm and a thickness of 1.5 mm) mounted in holes in a silicone rubber sheet (thickness 2 mm) and an iron plate adhered onto the a diaphragm of the blood pump can provide optimum active blood filling during the pump filling phase. The LVAD has a stroke volume of 55 ml and an overall volume of 285 ml; it weighs 360 g. The controller mainly consists of a fuzzy logic position and velocity controller to apply doctors' and engineers' knowledge to control the LVAD. Each unit of the controller consists of a functionally independent program module for easy improvement of the controller's performance. The LVAD was evaluated in in vitro experiments using a mock circulation. A maximum pump outflow of 5.1 l/min was obtained at a drive rate of 95 bpm against an afterload of 95 mmHg, and active filling using the attractive magnetic force provided a pump output of 3.6 l/min at a drive rate of 75 bpm under a preload of 0 mmHg. The operating efficiency of the LVAD was measured at between 8% and 10.5%. While the LVAD can provide adequate pump outflow for cardiac assistance, further upgrading of the software and improvement of the blood pump are required to improve pump performance and efficiency. PMID:17846714

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Transverse-Sigmoid Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Malformations Presenting as Pulsatile Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Shownkeen, Harish; Yoo, Kevin; Leonetti, John; Origitano, T.C.

    2001-01-01

    Transverse-sigmoid sinus dural arteriovenous malformations (DAVM) are uncommon vascular lesions for which complete cure may be difficult to obtain. A wide variety of treatments for these lesions include observation, arterial compression, surgical resection, and endovascular embolization. We propose that transverse-sigmoid sinus DAVM can be completely cured by occluding the ipsilateral dural sinus with detachable balloon and Guglielmi detachable coils (GDC) coils before arterial feeder embolization with histoacryl. Three patients who presented with pulsatile tinnitus and normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies underwent angiography, which demonstrated transverse-sigmoid sinus DAVM. All three patients wer treated with retrograde transvenous sinus embolization with complete occlusion of the transverse-sigmoid sinus with detachable balloons and GDC coils with preservation of the vein of Labbé. Subsequently, the various feeders from the external carotid artery were embolized. The tentorial arteries arising from the ipsilateral internal carotid arteries were not embolized in any of the cases, which were still contributing to the DAVM. Complete cure with thrombosis of the tentorial branch of the internal carotid artery (ICA) was seen on follow-up angiogram 1 day after embolization in one patient and on 4-week and 6-week follow-up angiograms in the other two patients. Complete occlusion of the transverse sinus proximal to the vein of Labbé, in spite of incomplete arterial feeder embolization, can result in complete cure of the transversesinus dural AVF if adequate time is given for the remaining feeders to occlude, once the fistula is obliterated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 1p18-aFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:17167600

  10. Pulsatility index in carotid arteries is increased in levothyroxine-treated Hashimoto disease.

    PubMed

    Owecki, M; Sawicka-Gutaj, N; Owecki, M K; Ambrosius, W; Dorszewska, J; Oczkowska, A; Michalak, M; Fischbach, J; Kozubski, W; Ruchała, M

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to evaluate carotid hemodynamic variables and traditional cardiovascular risk factors in women with Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT). The study group consisted of 31 females with HT on levothyroxine (L-T4) and 26 euthyroid women with HT without L-T4 matched for age and body mass index (BMI) as controls. Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), carotid extra-media thickness (CEMT), and pulsatility indexes in common carotid artery (PI CCA) and in internal carotid artery (PI ICA) were measured. BMI, waist circumference, lipid profile, fasting glucose and insulin levels, and parameters of thyroid function [TSH, free thyroxine (FT4) and antithyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAbs)] were assessed. The study and the control groups did not differ in age, BMI, waist circumference, lipid profile, fasting glucose, and insulin levels. Results are expressed as median (IQR). Treated HT group had higher FT4 levels than nontreated [17.13 (5.11) pmol/l vs. 14.7 (2.27) pmol/l; p=0.0011] and similar TSH [1.64 (2.08) IU/ml vs. 2.07 (3.14) IU/ml; p=0.5915]. PI CCA and PI ICA were higher in the study group than in controls (p=0.0224 and p=0.0477, respectively). The difference remained statistically significant for PI ICA and PI CCA after adjustment for other variables (coefficient=0.09487; standard error=0.04438; p=0.037 and coefficient=0.1786; standard error=0.0870; p=0.0449, respectively). CIMT and CEMT were similar in both groups (p=0.8746 and p=0.0712, respectively). Women with HT on L-T4 replacement therapy have increased PI in common and internal carotid arteries than nontreated euthyroid HT patients. Therefore, it seems that hypothyroidism, but not autoimmune thyroiditis per se, influences arterial stiffness.

  11. Pulsatile ocular blood flow in asymmetric exudative age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S.; Cheng, C.; Lee, A.; Lee, F.; Chou, J. C.; Hsu, W.; Liu, J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Decreased perfusion or increased vascular resistance of the choroidal vessels had been proposed as the vascular pathogenesis for age related macular degeneration (AMD). This study planned to answer the question whether pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) was different in patients with asymmetric exudative AMD between eyes with drusen, choroidal neovascularisation (CNV), or disciform scar.
METHODS—37 patients with asymmetric exudative AMD were enrolled in this observational case series study. POBF were measured in both eyes of each subject. Eyes with high myopia, anisometropia, recent laser treatment, and glaucoma were excluded.
RESULTS—After adjusting for ocular perfusion pressure, intraocular pressure, and pulse rate, multivariate regression analysis with generalised estimating equation showed POBF was significantly higher in eyes with CNV (1217 (SD 476) µl/min) than the contralateral eyes with drusen (1028 (385) µl/min) (p = 0.024). Eyes with disciform scar had lower POBF than the contralateral eyes with drusen (999 (262) µl/min and 1278 (341) µl/min, respectively, p<0.001). There was no significant correlation between the POBF and the lesion size of the CNV.
CONCLUSION—The POBF in eyes with drusen was lower than their fellow eyes with CNV, but higher than their fellow eyes with disciform scar. This finding suggests that haemodynamic differences between fellow eyes in individuals are relevant to the development of CNV and the formation of disciform scar. Further studies on the follow up patients might shed light on the pathogenesis of exudative AMD.

 PMID:11734510

  12. Dominance of the forward compression wave in determining pulsatile components of blood pressure: similarities between inotropic stimulation and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Guilcher, Antoine; Brett, Sally; Jiang, Benyu; Li, Ye; Epstein, Sally; Alastruey, Jordi; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2014-11-01

    Pulsatile components of blood pressure may arise from forward (ventricular generated) or backward wave travel in the arterial tree. The objective of this study was to determine the relative contributions of forward and backward waves to pulsatility. We used wave intensity and wave separation analysis to determine pulsatile components of blood pressure during inotropic and vasopressor stimulation by dobutamine and norepinephrine in normotensive subjects and compared pulse pressure components in hypertensive (mean±SD, 48.8±11.3 years; 165±26.6/99±14.2 mm Hg) and normotensive subjects (52.2±12.6 years; 120±14.2/71±8.2 mm Hg). Dobutamine (7.5 μg/kg per minute) increased the forward compression wave generated by the ventricle and increased pulse pressure from 36.8±3.7 to 59.0±3.4 mm Hg (mean±SE) but had no significant effect on mean arterial pressure or the midsystolic backward compression wave. By contrast, norepinephrine (50 ng/kg per minute) had no significant effect on the forward compression wave but increased the midsystolic backward compression wave. Despite this increase in the backward compression wave, and an increase in mean arterial pressure, norepinephrine increased central pulse pressure less than dobutamine (increases of 22.1±3.8 and 7.2±2.8 mm Hg for dobutamine and norepinephrine, respectively; P<0.02). An elevated forward wave component (mean±SE, 50.4±3.4 versus 35.2±1.8 mm Hg, in hypertensive and normotensive subjects, respectively; P<0.001) accounted for approximately two thirds of the total difference in central pulse pressures between hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Increased central pulse pressure during inotropic stimulation and in essential hypertension results primarily from the forward compression wave.

  13. Pulsatile Tinnitus due to a Tortuous Siphon-Like Internal Carotid Artery Successfully Treated by Arterial Remodeling.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven; Menovsky, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    A patient is described with a right-sided tortuous siphon-like extracranial internal carotid artery leading to highly distressing ipsilateral heart beat synchronous pulsatile tinnitus, scoring 9/10 measuring loudness. Dilating the balloon during the occlusion test in or distal to the siphon-like anomaly reduces the arterial pulsations. Subsequently, surgery is performed using Teflon as an external construct to straighten the siphon-like anomaly. Postoperatively, the pulsations improve to 5/10 in a standing position and disappear during a reclined position. By adding a hearing aid, the pulsations are almost completely gone during a standing position (1/10) and remain absent in a reclined position.

  14. Assessment of blood flow velocity and pulsatility in cerebral perforating arteries with 7-T quantitative flow MRI.

    PubMed

    Bouvy, W H; Geurts, L J; Kuijf, H J; Luijten, P R; Kappelle, L J; Biessels, G J; Zwanenburg, J J M

    2016-09-01

    Thus far, blood flow velocity measurements with MRI have only been feasible in large cerebral blood vessels. High-field-strength MRI may now permit velocity measurements in much smaller arteries. The aim of this proof of principle study was to measure the blood flow velocity and pulsatility of cerebral perforating arteries with 7-T MRI. A two-dimensional (2D), single-slice quantitative flow (Qflow) sequence was used to measure blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycle in perforating arteries in the basal ganglia (BG) and semioval centre (CSO), from which a mean normalised pulsatility index (PI) per region was calculated (n = 6 human subjects, aged 23-29 years). The precision of the measurements was determined by repeated imaging and performance of a Bland-Altman analysis, and confounding effects of partial volume and noise on the measurements were simulated. The median number of arteries included was 14 in CSO and 19 in BG. In CSO, the average velocity per volunteer was in the range 0.5-1.0 cm/s and PI was 0.24-0.39. In BG, the average velocity was in the range 3.9-5.1 cm/s and PI was 0.51-0.62. Between repeated scans, the precision of the average, maximum and minimum velocity per vessel decreased with the size of the arteries, and was relatively low in CSO and BG compared with the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery. The precision of PI per region was comparable with that of M1. The simulations proved that velocities can be measured in vessels with a diameter of more than 80 µm, but are underestimated as a result of partial volume effects, whilst pulsatility is overestimated. Blood flow velocity and pulsatility in cerebral perforating arteries have been measured directly in vivo for the first time, with moderate to good precision. This may be an interesting metric for the study of haemodynamic changes in aging and cerebral small vessel disease. © 2015 The Authors NMR in Biomedicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evolution of vortical structures in a curved artery model with non-Newtonian blood-analog fluid under pulsatile inflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Steady flow and physiological pulsatile flow in a rigid 180° curved tube are investigated using particle image velocimetry. A non-Newtonian blood-analog fluid is used, and in-plane primary and secondary velocity fields are measured. A vortex detection scheme ( d 2-method) is applied to distinguish vortical structures. In the pulsatile flow case, four different vortex types are observed in secondary flow: deformed-Dean, Dean, Wall and Lyne vortices. Investigation of secondary flow in multiple cross sections suggests the existence of vortex tubes. These structures split and merge over time during the deceleration phase and in space as flow progresses along the 180° curved tube. The primary velocity data for steady flow conditions reveal additional vortices rotating in a direction opposite to Dean vortices—similar to structures observed in pulsatile flow—if the Dean number is sufficiently high.

  16. A Sociological Analysis of the Social System Referred to as Higher Education and the Social Organization of the Pennsylvania State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnahan, Robert E.

    The history and development of the U.S. higher education system are analyzed, using Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) and its branch campuses as an example. Attention is also directed to the personality (i.e., characteristics and attitudes) of the individuals who function within the system/organization, methods of incorporating…

  17. Congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon (THON) on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Thompson, Glenn [R-PA-5

    2010-02-25

    03/22/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Higher Education, Lifelong Learning, and Competitiveness. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. New understanding of the role of cerebrospinal fluid: offsetting of arterial and brain pulsation and self-dissipation of cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile flow energy.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung Jay; Yoon, Soo Han; Kang, Jae-Kyu

    2011-06-01

    Many theories have been postulated to date regarding the mechanisms involved in the absorption of the intracranial arterial blood flow energy in the intracranial space, but it is as yet nor clearly defined. The blood flow energy that is transmitted from the heart formulates the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsatile flow, and is known to constitute the major energy of the CSF flow, while the bulk flow carries only small energy. The intracranial space that is enclosed in a solid cranium and is an isolate system as in the Monroe-Kellie doctrine, and the authors propose to re-analyze the Monroe-Kellie doctrine concept in terms of energy transfer and dissipation of the Windkessel effect. We propose that the large blood flow energy that initiates in the heart is transferred in order of precedence to the arteries, arterioles, brain parenchyma, and finally to CSF within the cranium, in which the energy is confined and unable to be transferred, so that the final transfer of energy to the CSF pulsatile flow is self-dissipated in terms of direction and chronology in CSF pulsatile flow. In order for the CSF pulsatile flow that is transferred from arterial blood flow energy to be dissipated in the intracranial space, this cannot be explained with bulk flow energy in any perspective, since the pulsatile flow kinetic energy is greater than the bulk flow kinetic energy by at least a 100-fold. The pulsatile flow energy within the closed intracranial space cannot be transferred and is confined, as postulated by the Monroe-Kellie doctrine, and therefore the authors propound that the pulsatile flow dissipates by itself. The dissipation of the CSF pulsatile flow kinetic energy will be in all directions in a diffuse and random manner, and is offset by the CSF flow energy vector due to the CSF mixing process. Such energy dissipation will lead to maintenance of low CSF flow energy, which will result in maintaining low intracranial pressure (ICP), and sufficient brain perfusion. It is our

  19. Pulsatile flow in the aorta of the LVAD supported heart studied using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyedi, Zahra

    Currently many patients die because of the end-stage heart failure, mainly due to the reduced number of donor heart transplant organs. Studies show that a permanent left ventricular assist device (LVAD), a battery driven pump which is surgically implanted, increased the survival rate of patients with end-stage heart failure and improved considerably their quality of life. The inlet conduit of the LVAD is attached to the left ventricle and the outflow conduit anastomosed to the ascending aorta. The purpose of LVAD support is to help a weakened heart to pump blood to the rest of the body. However LVAD can cause some alterations of the natural blood flow. When your blood comes in contact with something that isn't a natural part of your body blood clots can occur and disrupt blood flow. Aortic valve integrity is vital for optimal support of left ventricular assist LVAD. Due to the existence of high continuous transvalvular pressure on the aortic valve, the opening frequency of the valve is reduced. To prevent the development of aortic insufficiency, aortic valve closure during LVAD implantation has been performed. However, the closed aortic valve reduces wash out of the aortic root, which causes blood stagnation and potential thrombus formation. So for this reason, there is a need to minimize the risks of occurring blood clot, by having more knowledge about the flow structure in the aorta during LVAD use. The current study focuses on measuring the flow field in the aorta of the LVAD assisted heart with two different types of aortic valve (Flat and Finned) using the SDSU cardiac simulator. The pulsatile pump that mimics the natural pulsing action of the heart also added to the system. The flow field is visualized using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Furthermore, The fluid mechanics of aorta has been studied when LVAD conduit attached to two different locations (proximal and distal to the aortic valve) with pump speeds of 8,000 to 10,000 revolutions per minute (RPM

  20. Reference Ranges for Uterine Artery Pulsatility Index during the Menstrual Cycle: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Guedes-Martins, Luís; Gaio, Rita; Saraiva, Joaquim; Cerdeira, Sofia; Matos, Liliana; Silva, Elisabete; Macedo, Filipe; Almeida, Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Background Cyclic endometrial neoangiogenesis contributes to changes in local vascular patterns and is amenable to non-invasive assessment with Doppler sonography. We hypothesize that the uterine artery (UtA) impedance, measured by its pulsatility index (PI), exhibits a regular pattern during the normal menstrual cycle. Therefore, the main study objective was to derive normative new day-cycle-based reference ranges for the UtA-PI during the entire cycle from days 1 to 34 according to the isolated time effect and potential confounders such as age and parity. Methods From January 2009 to December 2012, a cross-sectional study of 1,821 healthy women undergoing routine gynaecological ultrasound was performed. The Doppler flow of the right and left UtA-PI was studied transvaginally by colour and pulsed Doppler imaging. The mean right and left values and the presence or absence of a bilateral protodiastolic notch were recorded. Reference intervals for the PI according to the cycle day were generated by classical linear regression. Results The majority of patients (97.5%) presented unilateral or bilateral UtA notches. The crude 5th, 50th, and 95th reference percentile curves of the UtA-PI at 1–34 days of the normal menstrual cycle were derived. In all curves, a progressive significant decrease occurred during the first 13 days, followed by an increase and recovery in the UtA-PI. The adjusted 5th, 50th, and 95th reference percentile curves for the effects of age and parity were also obtained. These two conditions generated an approximately identical UtA-PI pattern during the cycle, except with small but significant reductions at the temporal extremes. Conclusions The median, 5th, and the 95th percentiles of the UtA-PI decrease during the first third of the menstrual cycle and recover to their initial values during the last two thirds of the cycle. The rates of decrease and recovery depend significantly on age and parity. PMID:25742286

  1. Systemic Pulsatile Pressure in Type II Endoleaks After Stent Grafting of Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Pitton, Michael Bernhard Schmenger, Patrick; Dueber, Christoph; Neufang, Achim; Thelen, Manfred

    2003-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate pressure and maximum rate of rise of systolic pressure (peak dP/dt) in completely excluded aneurysms and endoleaks to determine the hemodynamic impact of endoleaks. Methods: In mongrel dogs (n =36) experimental aneurysms were created by insertion of a patch (portion of rectus abdomen is muscle sheath) into the infrarenalaorta. In group I (n 18), all aortic branches of the aneurysm were ligated and all aneurysms were completely excluded by stent grafts. Group II (n = 18) consisted of aneurysms with patent aortic side branches that represented sources of endoleaks.One week (n = 12), six weeks (n = 12),and six months (n = 12) after stent grafting,hemodynamic measurements were obtained in thrombosed aneurysms and proved endoleaks. Systemic blood pressure and intraaneurysmal pressure were simultaneously measured and the respective peak dP/dt were computed. Results: At the six-month follow-up, the systolic-pressure ratio (intraaneurysmatic pressure: systemic pressure)was significantly increased in endoleaks compared to non-perfused areas(0.879 {+-} 0.042 versus 0.438 {+-} 0.176, p <0.01, group II) or completely excluded aneurysms (0.385 {+-}0.221, group I). Peak dP/dt ratio (intraaneurysmal peak dP/dt: systemic peak dP/dt) was 0.922 {+-} 0.154 in endoleaks, compared to 0.084 {+-} 0.080 in non-perfused areas (group II, p <0.01), and was 0.146 {+-} 0.121 in completely excluded aneurysms (group I). The diastolic-pressure ratio was also increased inendoleaks compared to non-perfused areas (0.929 {+-} 0.088 versus 0.655 {+-} 0.231, p < 0.01, group II) or completely excluded aneurysms (0.641 {+-} 0.278, group I). In excluded aneurysms, pressure exposure declined as the length of the follow-up period increased. Conclusion: Type II endoleaks transmit pulsatile pressure of near systemic level and indicate insufficient treatment result. In contrast, complete endovascular exclusion of aneurysms results in significantly reduced pressure exposure.

  2. The occurrence of the Coanda effect in pulsatile flow through static models of the human vocal folds.

    PubMed

    Erath, Byron D; Plesniak, Michael W

    2006-08-01

    Pulsatile flow through a one-sided diffuser and static divergent vocal-fold models is investigated to ascertain the relevance of viscous-driven flow asymmetries in the larynx. The models were 7.5 times real size, and the flow was scaled to match Reynolds and Strouhal numbers, as well as the translaryngeal pressure drop. The Reynolds number varied from 0-2000, for flow oscillation frequencies corresponding to 100 and 150 Hz life-size. Of particular interest was the development of glottal flow skewing by attachment to the bounding walls, or Coanda effect, in a pulsatile flow field, and its impact on speech. The vocal folds form a divergent passage during phases of the phonation cycle when viscous effects such as flow separation are important. It was found that for divergence angles of less than 20 degrees, the attachment of the flow to the vocal-fold walls occurred when the acceleration of the forcing function was zero, and the flow had reached maximum velocity. For a divergence angle of 40 degrees, the fully separated central jet never attached to the vocal-fold walls. Inferences are made regarding the impact of the Coanda effect on the sound source contribution in speech. PMID:16938987

  3. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Biofilm Formation Over A Separated Flow Region Under Steady And Pulsatile Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salek, M. Mehdi; Martinuzzi, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Several researchers have observed that the formation, morphology and susceptibility of bacterial biofilms are affected by the local hydrodynamic condition and, in particular, shear stresses acting on the fluid-biofilm interface. A backwards facing step (BFS) experimental model has been widely utilized as an in vitro model to examine and characterize the effect of flow separation and recirculation zones comparable to those present within various medical devices as well as those observed in vivo. The specific geometry of BFS covers a vide range of flow features observed in physiological or environmental conditions. The hypothesis of this study is that the flow behavior and structures can effectively contribute to the transport and attachment of cells and affecting the morphology of adhered colonies as well as suspended structures (i.e. biofilm streamers). Hence, the formation of the recirculation region occurring within a backward facing step (BFS) under steady and pulsatile conditions as well as three-dimensional flow structures arising close to the side walls are investigated to correlate to biofilms behavior. This hypothesis is investigated using a backward facing step incorporated into a flow cell under steady and pulsatile flow regimes to study the growth of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) UC18 as the study microorganism.

  4. Chronic pulsatile shear stress alters insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) binding protein release in vitro.

    PubMed

    Elhadj, Selim; Akers, R Michael; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly

    2003-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a potent smooth muscle cell mitogen indicated to have a role in vascular disease. IGF-I stimulates proliferation via receptor activation but its activity is mediated by IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). Since hemodynamics have been linked to vascular proliferative disorders, we studied how pulsatile low (5 +/- 2 dynes/cm2) and high (23 +/- 8 dynes/cm2) shear stresses impacted IGFBP metabolism in bovine aortic endothelial cells using the Cellmax capillary system. We modeled the pulsatile flow in our system using the Womersley model for flow inside a rigid tube and harmonic analysis revealed that the flow was sinusoidal with a frequency of approximately 0.3 Hz for both shear stress treatments. Laminar flow was confirmed and the phase lag between the pressure and the flow found to be insignificant. Thus, our study provides a necessary characterization of this in vitro system as well as an investigation into how shear impacts the IGF axis. We found a significant difference in IGFBP distribution between treatments and, given that IGFBPs regulate IGF-I activity and that IGF-I-independent activities have been suggested for IGFBP-3, suggest that shear stress may indirectly regulate IGF-I activity, and, by extension, the effect of IGF-I on vascular pathologies. PMID:12627824

  5. Oxytocin evokes a pulsatile PGE2 release from ileum mucosa and is required for repair of intestinal epithelium after injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dawei; Zhao, Junhan; Wang, Haoyi; An, Ning; Zhou, Yuping; Fan, Jiahui; Luo, Junwen; Su, Wenlong; Liu, Chuanyong; Li, Jingxin

    2015-07-10

    We measured the short-circuit current (Isc) in rat ileum mucosa to identify the effect of oxytocin (OT) on mucosal secretion in small intestine. We identified a COX-2-derived pulsatile PGE2 release triggered by OT in rat ileum mucosa. OT receptors (OTR) are expressed in intestine crypt epithelial cells. Notably, OT evoked a dynamic change of [Ca(2+)]i in ileum crypts, which was responsible for this pulsatile release of PGE2. OT ameliorated 5-FU-, radiation- or DSS- induced injury in vivo, including the improvement of weight loss, reduced villus height and impaired survival of crypt transit-amplifying cells as well as crypt. Moreover, these protective effects of OT against intestinal injury were eliminated by coadministration of a selective inhibitor of PGE2, AH6809. Our findings strongly suggest that OT, a novel and important regulator of intestine mucosa barrier, is required for repair of intestinal epithelium after injury. Considering that OT is an FDA-approved drug, this work reveals a potential novel and safe way to combat or prevent chemo-radiotherapy induced intestine injury or to treat IBD.

  6. Pulsatile and sexually dimorphic secretion of luteinizing hormone in the human infant on the day of birth.

    PubMed

    de Zegher, F; Devlieger, H; Veldhuis, J D

    1992-11-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is operational and sexually dimorphic in the mammalian fetus and newborn. We examined the dynamics of human luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in five male and three female infants on the day of birth, after 34-41 wk of gestation. The infants were polycythemic, and blood samples were obtained every 20 min for 160 to 360 min during a therapeutic, standardized, isovolumetric, partial exchange transfusion. Serum LH was measured by an immunoradiometric assay that does not cross-react with human chorionic gonadotropin. The serum profiles of LH presented a striking sex dimorphism with elevated LH levels in male compared with female newborns. Deconvolution analysis of all male LH profiles was consistent with a high-frequency, pulsatile secretory pattern. Testosterone, measured in a pooled serum sample of each infant, was 10-fold higher in male than in female newborns. These results document pulsatile and sexually dimorphic secretion of LH in the human infant as early as the first day of postnatal life. It is possible that the augmented LH secretion in the male newborn participates in the neonatal rise of the serum testosterone concentration.

  7. The Importance of dQ/dt on the Flow Field in a Turbodynamic Pump With Pulsatile Flow

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Fangjun; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Antaki, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Fluid dynamic analysis of turbodynamic blood pumps (TBPs) is often conducted under steady flow conditions. However, the preponderance of clinical applications for ventricular assistance involves unsteady, pulsatile flow—due to the residual contractility of the native heart. This study was undertaken to demonstrate the importance of pulsatility and the associated time derivative of the flow rate (dQ/dt) on hemodynamics within a clinical-scale TBP. This was accomplished by performing flow visualization studies on a transparent model of a centrifugal TBP interposed within a cardiovascular simulator with controllable heart rate and stroke volume. Particle image velocimetry triggered to both the rotation angle of the impeller and phase of the cardiac cycle was used to quantify the velocity field in the outlet volute and in between the impeller blades for 16 phases of the cardiac cycle. Comparison of the unsteady flow fields to corresponding steady conditions at the same (instantaneous) flow rates revealed marked differences. In particular, deceleration of flow was found to promote separation within the outlet diffuser, while acceleration served to stabilize the velocity field. The notable differences between the acceleration and deceleration phases illustrated the prominence of inertial fluid forces. These studies emphasize the importance of dQ/dt as an independent variable for thorough preclinical validation of TBPs intended for use as a ventricular assist device. PMID:19775268

  8. Induction of ovulation with subcutaneous pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone: correlation with body weight and other parameters.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A K; Mander, J; Hale, J; Walstab, J; Forrest, M S

    1989-05-01

    We treated 21 anovulatory infertile patients with subcutaneous pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) administered via a syringe pump. Response to treatment was assessed by urinary estrogen excretion and ultrasound measurement of follicular growth. Ten patients ovulated and 8 subsequently conceived, for a total of 10 pregnancies. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was not administered routinely, but two patients required hCG to induce follicular rupture. The majority of the patients who conceived had a body mass index (BMI) of less than 21 and a luteinizing hormone (LH)/follicle-stimulating hormone ratio of less than 1. Conversely, those patients with either elevated BMI or LH or both generally failed to respond satisfactorily to this treatment. It is suggested that pulsatile GnRH is most likely to succeed in inducing ovulation if the BMI is less than 21 and the LH is normal, but is unlikely to be successful if there is both an elevated LH and a BMI of greater than 25. Between these two extremes, the response is variable and a therapeutic trial may be appropriate. PMID:2495993

  9. An Ultrasound Simulation Model for the Pulsatile Blood Flow Modulated by the Motion of Stenosed Vessel Wall.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghui; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Kexin; Gao, Lian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrasound simulation model for pulsatile blood flow, modulated by the motion of a stenosed vessel wall. It aims at generating more realistic ultrasonic signals to provide an environment for evaluating ultrasound signal processing and imaging and a framework for investigating the behaviors of blood flow field modulated by wall motion. This model takes into account fluid-structure interaction, blood pulsatility, stenosis of the vessel, and arterial wall movement caused by surrounding tissue's motion. The axial and radial velocity distributions of blood and the displacement of vessel wall are calculated by solving coupled Navier-Stokes and wall equations. With these obtained values, we made several different phantoms by treating blood and the vessel wall as a group of point scatterers. Then, ultrasound echoed signals from oscillating wall and blood in the axisymmetric stenotic-carotid arteries were computed by ultrasound simulation software, Field II. The results show better consistency with corresponding theoretical values and clinical data and reflect the influence of wall movement on the flow field. It can serve as an effective tool not only for investigating the behavior of blood flow field modulated by wall motion but also for quantitative or qualitative evaluation of new ultrasound imaging technology and estimation method of blood velocity. PMID:27478840

  10. Simultaneous assessment of red blood cell aggregation and oxygen saturation under pulsatile flow using high-frequency photoacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of photoacoustic (PA) imaging for assessing the correlation between red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and the oxygen saturation (sO2) in a simulated pulsatile blood flow system. For the 750 and 850 nm illuminations, the PA amplitude (PAA) increased and decreased as the mean blood flow velocity decreased and increased, respectively, at all beat rates (60, 120 and 180 bpm). The sO2 also cyclically varied, in phase with the PAA for all beat rates. However, the linear correlation between the sO2 and the PAA at 850 nm was stronger than that at 750 nm. These results suggest that the sO2 can be correlated with RBC aggregation induced by decreased mean shear rate in pulsatile flow, and that the correlation is dependent on the optical wavelength. The hemodynamic properties of blood flow assessed by PA imaging may be used to provide a new biomarker for simultaneous monitoring blood viscosity related to RBC aggregation, oxygen delivery related to the sO2 and their clinical correlation. PMID:27446705

  11. Changes in Bone Mineral Density and Metabolic Parameters after Pulsatile Gonadorelin Treatment in Young Men with Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Xi; Tang, Song-Tao; Zhang, Qiu

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of osteoporosis in young men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and to investigate the changes of BMD and metabolic parameters, a total of 22 young male patients with HH and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. BMD, biochemical, and hormonal parameters were measured in two groups. Osteoporosis was more prevalent in HH patients (45.45%) than the control subjects (10.00%) (P < 0.001). The patients with HH had lower BMD in lumbar spine 2–4, femoral neck, and total hip (P < 0.001, for all) and higher fasting insulin (P = 0.001), HOMA-IR (P = 0.002), and SHBG (P < 0.001) compared to the controls. After 6 months of pulsatile gonadorelin treatment, BMI (P = 0.021) and BMD in lumbar spine 2–4, femoral neck, and total hip (P = 0.002, P = 0.003, and P = 0.003, resp.) increased dramatically and total cholesterol (P = 0.034), fasting insulin (P = 0.025), HOMA-IR (P = 0.021), and SHBG (P = 0.001) decreased significantly in HH patients. The study shows a higher prevalence of osteoporosis in young men with HH. Long-term pulsatile gonadorelin treatment indicates a positive effect on BMD and metabolic parameters of HH patients. PMID:26417369

  12. An Ultrasound Simulation Model for the Pulsatile Blood Flow Modulated by the Motion of Stenosed Vessel Wall

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Kexin; Gao, Lian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an ultrasound simulation model for pulsatile blood flow, modulated by the motion of a stenosed vessel wall. It aims at generating more realistic ultrasonic signals to provide an environment for evaluating ultrasound signal processing and imaging and a framework for investigating the behaviors of blood flow field modulated by wall motion. This model takes into account fluid-structure interaction, blood pulsatility, stenosis of the vessel, and arterial wall movement caused by surrounding tissue's motion. The axial and radial velocity distributions of blood and the displacement of vessel wall are calculated by solving coupled Navier-Stokes and wall equations. With these obtained values, we made several different phantoms by treating blood and the vessel wall as a group of point scatterers. Then, ultrasound echoed signals from oscillating wall and blood in the axisymmetric stenotic-carotid arteries were computed by ultrasound simulation software, Field II. The results show better consistency with corresponding theoretical values and clinical data and reflect the influence of wall movement on the flow field. It can serve as an effective tool not only for investigating the behavior of blood flow field modulated by wall motion but also for quantitative or qualitative evaluation of new ultrasound imaging technology and estimation method of blood velocity. PMID:27478840

  13. Simultaneous assessment of red blood cell aggregation and oxygen saturation under pulsatile flow using high-frequency photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the feasibility of photoacoustic (PA) imaging for assessing the correlation between red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and the oxygen saturation (sO2) in a simulated pulsatile blood flow system. For the 750 and 850 nm illuminations, the PA amplitude (PAA) increased and decreased as the mean blood flow velocity decreased and increased, respectively, at all beat rates (60, 120 and 180 bpm). The sO2 also cyclically varied, in phase with the PAA for all beat rates. However, the linear correlation between the sO2 and the PAA at 850 nm was stronger than that at 750 nm. These results suggest that the sO2 can be correlated with RBC aggregation induced by decreased mean shear rate in pulsatile flow, and that the correlation is dependent on the optical wavelength. The hemodynamic properties of blood flow assessed by PA imaging may be used to provide a new biomarker for simultaneous monitoring blood viscosity related to RBC aggregation, oxygen delivery related to the sO2 and their clinical correlation. PMID:27446705

  14. Numerical and experimental studies on pulsatile flow in aneurysms arising laterally from a curved parent vessel at various angles.

    PubMed

    Liou, Tong-Miin; Li, Yi-Chen; Juan, Wei-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Both numerical and experimental studies have been performed to characterize the fluid flow inside the lateral aneurysms arising from the curved parent vessels at various angles gamma. The implicit solver was based on the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations of incompressible laminar flow. Solutions were generated by a cell-center finite-volume method that used second order upwind and second order center flux difference splitting for the convection and diffusion term, respectively. The second order Crank-Nicolson method was used in the time integration term while the SIMPLEC algorithm was adopted to handle the pressure-velocity coupling. Complementarily, the particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) was used to measure the velocity fields. The conditions selected were to simulate an internal carotid artery with a diameter of 5 mm by similarity rules. The values of gamma explored were 0 degrees, 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 135 degrees. Pulsatile flow with Wormersley number 3.9 and Reynolds numbers varying from 350 to 850 was considered. The computed results are firstly verified by the PTV measured ones. Discussion of the results is in terms of pulsatile main and secondary velocity vector fields, inflow rates into the aneurysm, and the distributions of wall shear stress and static pressure. It is found that among the angles examined gamma=45( composite function) is the riskiest angle from a fluid dynamics point of view and the aneurysmal dome is at risk.

  15. Geophysical Logs, Aquifer Tests, and Water Levels in Wells in and Near the North Penn Area 7 Superfund Site, Upper Gwynedd Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 2002-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Conger, Randall W.; Bird, Philip H.

    2008-01-01

    Ground water in the vicinity of several industrial facilities in Upper Gwynedd Township and Lansdale Borough, Montgomery County, Pa., is contaminated with several volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The 2-square-mile area was placed on the National Priorities List as the North Penn Area 7 Superfund Site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1989. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical logging, aquifer testing, water-level monitoring, and streamflow measurements in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 from October 2002 through December 2006. This followed work that began in 2000 to assist the USEPA in developing an understanding of the hydrogeologic framework in the area as part of the USEPA Remedial Investigation. The study area is underlain by Triassic- and Jurassic-age sandstones, siltstones, and shales of the Lockatong Formation and the Brunswick Group. Regionally, these rocks strike northeast and dip to the northwest. The sequence of rocks form fractured-rock aquifers that act as a set of confined to semi-confined layered aquifers of differing permeabilities. The aquifers are recharged by precipitation and discharge to streams and wells. The Wissahickon Creek headwaters are less than 1 mile northeast of the study area. This stream flows southwest approximately parallel to strike and bisects North Penn Area 7. Ground water is pumped in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 for industrial use and public supply. The USGS collected geophysical logs for 42 wells that ranged in depth from 40 to 477 ft. Aquifer-interval-isolation testing was done in 17 of the 42 wells, for a total of 122 zones tested. A multiple-well aquifer test was conducted by monitoring the response of 14 wells to pumping and shutdown of a 600-ft deep production well in November-December 2004. In addition, water levels were monitored continuously in four wells in the area from October 2002 through September 2006, and streamflow was measured quarterly at two sites on

  16. Physiological role of somatostatin-mediated autofeedback regulation for growth hormone: importance of growth hormone in triggering somatostatin release during a trough period of pulsatile growth hormone release in conscious male rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Chihara, K; Kita, T; Kashio, Y; Okimura, Y; Kitajima, N; Fujita, T

    1989-08-01

    In mammals including human, it is generally accepted that growth hormone (GH) can regulate its own secretion through an autofeedback mechanism in which somatostatin (SRIF) may be involved. To explore a physiological role of SRIF-mediated GH autoregulation, the effect of exogenous human GH administration on plasma rat GH response to [D-Ala2, Nle27]-human GH-releasing hormone-(1-28)-agmatine (hGHRH-analog), which does not crossreact with anti-rat GH-releasing hormone gamma-globulin (GHRH-Ab), was examined in conscious male rats treated with GHRH-Ab in the absence and presence of anti-SRIF gamma-globulin (SRIF-Ab). Enhanced SRIF release during a trough period of natural pulsatile GH secretion, suggested by the blunted GH response to exogenous hGHRH-analog, no longer occurred when major GH secretory bursts were abolished by GHRH-Ab treatment. On the other hand, when hGH was administered in GHRH-Ab-treated rats so as to simulate the quantity and dynamic change of GH in hypophysial portal circulation in rats exhibiting pulsatile GH secretion, hGHRH-analog-induced GH rises were significantly suppressed during the period corresponding to a GH trough. This suppression was completely prevented by simultaneous treatment with SRIF-Ab. Furthermore, administration of bovine GH, but not ovine prolactin, resulted in significant suppression of hGHRH-analog-provoked GH rises. These findings suggest that enhanced SRIF release during a trough period of spontaneous GH secretory rhythm is induced by the preceding GH secretory burst, and also suggest a possible role for SRIF-mediated GH autoregulation in a physiological state.

  17. Floating-pulsatile release multiparticulate system for chronopharmacotherapy: effect of some hydrophobic additives on the buoyancy and release behavior of particles.

    PubMed

    Maghsoodi, M

    2014-01-01

    A blend of floating and pulsatile principles of a drug delivery system would have the advantage that a drug can be released in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract after a lag period, which is anticipated for chronotherapy. In this study, microballoons were prepared by an emulsion solvent diffusion technique using Eudragit S100, and hydrophobic additive (magnesium stearate, stearic acid or talc) for time- and site-specific drug release of piroxicam. The effect of hydrophobic additives on the production yield of floating microparticles, buoyant ability for 8 h, release of drug in simulated GI fluids (simulated gastric fluid [SGF] and simulated intestinal fluid [SIF]), mean particle size, apparent particle density, encapsulation efficiency of drug and physical state of incorporated drug were studied. Both production yield and buoyancy of the microballoons were affected by additives in the following order: magnesium stearate, stearic acid>free-additive>talc. The observed difference in yield and the buoyancy of the microballoons could be attributed to the hydrophobic character of the additives and the shell rigidity of the obtained microballoons. Incorporation of hydrophobic additives in the microballoons was found to impart the desired release properties to the microballoons by providing a 2-phase release pattern with initial slow release (5-6%) through 8 h in SGF followed by rapid pulse release (>92%) in SIF through 15 min. The microballoons co-formulated with magnesium stearate or stearic acid, combining excellent buoyancy and suitable drug release pattern of piroxicam, could be useful in chronopharmacotherapy in arthritis. PMID:23950100

  18. Atrazine inhibits pulsatile luteinizing hormone release without altering pituitary sensitivity to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist in female Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Foradori, Chad D; Hinds, Laura R; Hanneman, William H; Legare, Marie E; Clay, Colin M; Handa, Robert J

    2009-07-01

    Atrazine [2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-tri-azine] is one of the most commonly used herbicides in the United States. Atrazine has been shown to suppress luteinizing hormone (LH) release and can lead to a prolongation of the estrous cycle in the rat. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of atrazine on normal tonic release of LH and to elucidate the site of action of atrazine in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Episodic release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the corresponding release of LH from the anterior pituitary gland are required for normal reproductive function. To determine if atrazine affects pulsatile LH release, ovariectomized adult female Wistar rats were administered atrazine (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg of body weight daily by gavage) or vehicle control for 4 days. On the final day of atrazine treatment, blood samples were obtained using an indwelling right atrial cannula. In the group receiving 200 mg/kg, there was a significant reduction in LH pulse frequency and a concomitant increase in pulse amplitude. To determine if the effects of atrazine on LH release were due to changes at the level of the pituitary, animals were passively immunized against endogenous GnRH, treated with atrazine, and challenged with a GnRH receptor agonist. Atrazine failed to alter pituitary sensitivity to the GnRH receptor agonist at any dose used. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that high doses of atrazine affect the GnRH pulse generator in the brain and not at the level of gonadotrophs in the pituitary.

  19. Floating-pulsatile release multiparticulate system for chronopharmacotherapy: effect of some hydrophobic additives on the buoyancy and release behavior of particles.

    PubMed

    Maghsoodi, M

    2014-01-01

    A blend of floating and pulsatile principles of a drug delivery system would have the advantage that a drug can be released in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract after a lag period, which is anticipated for chronotherapy. In this study, microballoons were prepared by an emulsion solvent diffusion technique using Eudragit S100, and hydrophobic additive (magnesium stearate, stearic acid or talc) for time- and site-specific drug release of piroxicam. The effect of hydrophobic additives on the production yield of floating microparticles, buoyant ability for 8 h, release of drug in simulated GI fluids (simulated gastric fluid [SGF] and simulated intestinal fluid [SIF]), mean particle size, apparent particle density, encapsulation efficiency of drug and physical state of incorporated drug were studied. Both production yield and buoyancy of the microballoons were affected by additives in the following order: magnesium stearate, stearic acid>free-additive>talc. The observed difference in yield and the buoyancy of the microballoons could be attributed to the hydrophobic character of the additives and the shell rigidity of the obtained microballoons. Incorporation of hydrophobic additives in the microballoons was found to impart the desired release properties to the microballoons by providing a 2-phase release pattern with initial slow release (5-6%) through 8 h in SGF followed by rapid pulse release (>92%) in SIF through 15 min. The microballoons co-formulated with magnesium stearate or stearic acid, combining excellent buoyancy and suitable drug release pattern of piroxicam, could be useful in chronopharmacotherapy in arthritis.

  20. Frequency-Dependent Regulation of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β by Pulsatile Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Is Mediated by Functional Antagonism of bZIP Transcription Factors ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Xu, Shuyun; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Carroll, Rona S.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2010-01-01

    Oscillatory synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), under the control of pulsatile hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), is essential for normal reproductive development and fertility. The molecular mechanisms by which various patterns of pulsatile GnRH regulate gonadotrope responsiveness remain poorly understood. In contrast to the α and LHβ subunit genes, FSHβ subunit transcription is preferentially stimulated at low rather than high frequencies of pulsatile GnRH. In this study, mutation of a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) within the FSHβ promoter resulted in the loss of preferential GnRH stimulation at low pulse frequencies. We hypothesized that high GnRH pulse frequencies might stimulate a transcriptional repressor(s) to attenuate the action of CRE binding protein (CREB) and show that inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) fulfills such a role. ICER was not detected under basal conditions, but pulsatile GnRH stimulated ICER to a greater extent at high than at low pulse frequencies. ICER binds to the FSHβ CRE site to reduce CREB occupation and abrogates both maximal GnRH stimulation and GnRH pulse frequency-dependent effects on FSHβ transcription. These data suggest that ICER production antagonizes the stimulatory action of CREB to attenuate FSHβ transcription at high GnRH pulse frequencies, thereby playing a critical role in regulating cyclic reproductive function. PMID:20008557

  1. Bedside assistance in freehand ultrasonic diagnosis by real-time visual feedback of 3D scatter diagram of pulsatile tissue-motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, M.; Kawata, K.; Nakamori, N.; Kitsunezuka, Y.

    2011-03-01

    By real-time visual feedback of 3D scatter diagram of pulsatile tissue-motion, freehand ultrasonic diagnosis of neonatal ischemic diseases has been assisted at the bedside. The 2D ultrasonic movie was taken with a conventional ultrasonic apparatus (ATL HDI5000) and ultrasonic probes of 5-7 MHz with the compact tilt-sensor to measure the probe orientation. The real-time 3D visualization was realized by developing an extended version of the PC-based visualization system. The software was originally developed on the DirectX platform and optimized with the streaming SIMD extensions. The 3D scatter diagram of the latest pulsatile tissues has been continuously generated and visualized as projection image with the ultrasonic movie in the current section more than 15 fps. It revealed the 3D structure of pulsatile tissues such as middle and posterior cerebral arteries, Willis ring and cerebellar arteries, in which pediatricians have great interests in the blood flow because asphyxiated and/or low-birth-weight neonates have a high risk of ischemic diseases such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and periventricular leukomalacia. Since the pulsatile tissue-motion is due to local blood flow, it can be concluded that the system developed in this work is very useful to assist freehand ultrasonic diagnosis of ischemic diseases in the neonatal cranium.

  2. Pulsatile compared with nonpulsatile perfusion using a centrifugal pump for cardiopulmonary bypass during coronary artery bypass grafting. Effects on systemic haemodynamics, oxygenation, and inflammatory response parameters.

    PubMed

    Driessen, J J; Dhaese, H; Fransen, G; Verrelst, P; Rondelez, L; Gevaert, L; van Becelaere, M; Schelstraete, E

    1995-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of pulsatile or nonpulsatile flow delivery with a centrifugal pump for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) during coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in two randomized groups of 19 patients each. All patients received a standard anaesthetic and surgical protocol. Pulsatile perfusion during CPB was created by accelerating the baseline pump speed of the Sarns centrifugal pump at a rate of 50 cycles per minute. Measurements included perioperative systemic haemodynamics and oxygen exchange, total haemolytic complement (CH50), polymorphonuclear (neutrophil) granulocyte (PMN) count and plasma granulocyte elastase bound to alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (E-alpha 1-PI). Laboratory measurements were corrected for haemodilution. During and after CPB there were only a few significant differences between the groups in systemic haemodynamics and oxygenation, i.e. a lower mean arterial blood pressure after the end of CPB in the nonpulsatile group (65 mmHg, SD = 11 vs 76 mmHg, SD = 11) and a lower SvO2 during rewarming on CPB in the nonpulsatile group (62%, SD = 8 vs 67%, SD = 8). The decrease in percentage of PMNs in the total white blood cell count during CPB was greater in the nonpulsatile group than in the pulsatile group (from 61 to 46% vs 63 to 53% of prebypass value). The steep increase of PMN count at the end of CPB and postoperatively was comparable in both groups. The maximal decrease of CH50 levels, occurring after surgery, was significantly higher in the nonpulsatile group (70% SD = 15 vs 79%, SD = 16, of baseline value), suggesting a greater complement activation. E-alpha 1-PI levels increased significantly in both groups during and after CPB with higher peak levels, obtained at one hour after admission to an intensive care unit, in the nonpulsatile group (316 micrograms/l, SD = 102) than in the pulsatile group (247 micrograms/l, SD = 106). There was a partly inverse correlation between the peak postoperative elastase levels and

  3. Basic study of intrinsic elastography: Relationship between tissue stiffness and propagation velocity of deformation induced by pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Arakawa, Mototaka; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2015-07-01

    We proposed an estimation method for a tissue stiffness from deformations induced by arterial pulsation, and named this proposed method intrinsic elastography (IE). In IE, assuming that the velocity of the deformation propagation in tissues is closely related to the stiffness, the propagation velocity (PV) was estimated by spatial compound ultrasound imaging with a high temporal resolution of 1 ms. However, the relationship between tissue stiffness and PV has not been revealed yet. In this study, the PV of the deformation induced by the pulsatile pump was measured by IE in three different poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) phantoms of different stiffnesses. The measured PV was compared with the shear wave velocity (SWV) measured by shear wave imaging (SWI). The measured PV has trends similar to the measured SWV. These results obtained by IE in a healthy male show the possibility that the mechanical properties of living tissues could be evaluated by IE.

  4. Different effects of subnormal levels of progesterone on the pulsatile and surge mode secretion of luteinizing hormone in ovariectomized goats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungjoon; Tanaka, Tomomi; Kamomae, Hideo

    2003-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that endocrinological threshold levels of progesterone that induce negative feedback effects on the pulsatile and surge modes of LH secretion are different. Our approach was to examine the effects of subnormal progesterone concentrations on LH secretion. Long-term ovariectomized Shiba goats that had received implants of silastic capsules containing estradiol were divided into three groups. The high progesterone (high P) group received a subcutaneous implant of a silastic packet (50 x 70 mm) containing progesterone, and the low progesterone (low P) group received a similar implant of a small packet (25 x 40 mm) containing progesterone. The control (non-P) group received no treatment with exogenous progesterone. Blood samples were collected daily throughout the experiment for the analysis of gonadal steroid hormone levels and at 10-min intervals for 8 h on Days 0, 3, and 7 (Day 0: just before progesterone treatment) for analysis of the pulsatile frequency of LH secretion. Then estradiol was infused into the jugular vein of all animals at a rate of 3 microg/h for 16 h on Day 8 to determine whether an LH surge was induced. Blood samples were collected every 2 h from 4 h before the start of the estradiol infusion until 48 h after the start of the infusion. In each group, the mean +/- SEM concentration after progesterone implant treatment was 3.3 +/- 0.1 ng/ml for the high P group, 1.1 +/- 0.1 ng/ml for the low P group, and <0.1 ng/ml for the non-P group, concentrations similar to the luteal levels, subluteal levels, and follicular phase levels of the normal estrous cycle, respectively. The estradiol concentration ranged from 4 to 8 pg/ml after estradiol capsule implants in all groups. The LH pulse frequency was significantly (P < 0.05) suppressed on Day 3 (6.2 +/- 0.5 pulses/8 h) and on Day 7 (2.6 +/- 0.9 pulses/8 h) relative to Day 0 (9.0 +/- 0.5 pulses/8 h) in the high P group. In both the low P and non-P groups, however, the changes

  5. The linear relationship between transcranial Doppler pulsatility indices and intracranial pressure is influenced by traumatic brain injury and vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Thomas C; Sherma, Arun K; McArthur, David L; Hu, Xiao; Hanuscin, Christopher R; Furreedan, Mehjabeen S; Hovda, David A; Vespa, Paul M; Martin, Neil A

    2012-01-01

    The pulsatility index (PI) and the intracranial -pressure (ICP) may or may not be correlated; the evidence to date differs widely. A study of multiple measures of PI and the corresponding ICP in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) showed that some of the relationships were moderately strong when calculated as conventional Pearson correlation coefficients. However, that method makes no adjustment of any kind for statistical outliers in the data. With the TBI patients demonstrating a large fraction of skewed measurements, a set of robust correlations were calculated that demonstrated that the apparent relationships between PI and ICP were entirely attributable to the statistical outliers. We conclude that the fundamental relationship of PI to ICP is weakly positive at best.

  6. An efficient approach to study the pulsatile blood flow in femoral and coronary arteries by Differential Quadrature Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Seiyed E.; Hatami, M.; Hatami, J.; Sahebi, S. A. R.; Ganji, D. D.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, flow analysis for a non-Newtonian third grade blood in coronary and femoral arteries is simulated numerically. Blood is considered as the third grade non-Newtonian fluid under periodic body acceleration motion and pulsatile pressure gradient. Differential Quadrature Method (DQM) and Crank Nicholson Method (CNM) are used to solve the Partial Differential Equation (PDE) governing equation by which a good agreement between them was observed in the results. The influences of some physical parameters such as amplitude, lead angle and body acceleration frequency on non-dimensional velocity and profiles are considered. For instance, the results show that increasing the amplitude, Ag, and reducing the lead angle of body acceleration, ϕ, make higher velocity profiles in the center line of both arteries.

  7. Pulsatile Flow through Annular Space Bounded by Outer Porous Cylinder and an Inner Cylinder of Permeable Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, M. M.; Keimanesh, M.; Rajvanshi, S. C.; Wasu, S.

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the problem of pulsatile flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid through annular space bounded by an outer porous cylinder and an inner cylinder of permeable material. The coupled flow has been analyzed by solving Navier-Stokes equations in the free fluid region and Darcy's equation in the porous region. Beaver-Joseph slip-condition has been used at the free fluid-permeable medium interface. The similarity transformation for the governing equations gives a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations which are analytically solved by the homotopy analysis method (HAM). The analytical solutions have been obtained in the form of a series. An admissible interval for the convergence of the series solutions has been indicated. Graphical results are presented to show the influence of different parameters on velocity profiles, pressure drop, and skin friction. Comparison between the solutions obtained by the HAM and the numerical solution shows good agreement.

  8. Piecewise function parameters as responses of the design of experiment in the development of a pulsatile release chronopharmaceutical system.

    PubMed

    Vonica-Gligor, Andreea Loredana; Tomuţă, Ioan; Leucuţa, Sorin E

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a pulsatile release system with metoprolol for chronotherapeutical use by coating swellable mini-tablets with Eudragit RS. To study the influence of the formulation factors (amount of coating polymer, plasticizer percentage in film coating and swelling agent percentage in mini-tablets), a Box-Behnken design of experiment (DoE) was used. To evaluate the influence of the studied factors on the sigmoid shape of the dissolution profile, piecewise function parameters were used as the responses of DoE. The results show that higher concentrations of coating polymer and higher concentrations of plasticizer polymer led to a thicker and more elastic polymeric film, which led to a delay in drug release. Using the parameters of the piecewise function as DoE responses, an optimum formulation with a sigmoid shape dissolution profile and a 2.5-h lag time followed by rapid drug release were obtained. PMID:27279062

  9. Hydrogeology and geochemistry of acid mine drainage in ground water in the vicinity of Penn Mine and Camanche Reservoir, Calaveras County, California; first-year summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamlin, S.N.; Alpers, C.N.

    1995-01-01

    Acid drainage from the Penn Mine in Calaveras County, California, has caused contamination of ground water between Mine Run Dam and Camanche Reservoir. The Penn Mine was first developed in the 1860's primarily for copper and later produced lesser amounts of zinc, lead, silver, and gold from steeply dipping massive sulfide lenses in metamorphic rocks. Surface disposal of sulfidic waste rock and tailings from mine operations has produced acidic drainage with pH values between 2.3 and 2.7 and elevated concentrations of sulfate and metals, including copper, zinc, cadmium, iron, and aluminum. During the mine's operation and after its subsequent abandonment in the late 1950's, acid mine drainage flowed down Mine Run into the Mokelumne River. Construction of Camanche Dam in 1963 flooded part of the Mokelumne River adjacent to Penn Mine. Surface-water diversions and unlined impoundments were constructed at Penn Mine in 1979 to reduce runoff from the mine, collect contaminated surface water, and enhance evaporation. Some of the contaminated surface water infiltrates the ground water and flows toward Camanche Reservoir. Ground- water flow in the study area is controlled by the local hydraulic gradient and the hydraulic characteristics of two principal rock types, a Jurassic metavolcanic unit and the underlying Salt Spring slate. The hydraulic gradient is west from Mine Run impoundment toward Camanche Reservoir. The median hydraulic conductivity was about 10 to 50 times higher in the metavolcanic rock (0.1 foot per day) than in the slate (0.002 to 0.01 foot per day); most flow occurs in the metavolcanic rock where hydraulic conductivity is as high as 50 feet per day in two locations. The contact between the two rock units is a fault plane that strikes N20?W, dips 20?NE, and is a likely conduit for ground-water flow, based on down-hole measurements with a heatpulse flowmeter. Analyses of water samples collected during April 1992 provide a comprehensive characterization of

  10. Developmental changes in hypothalamic Kiss1 expression during activation of the pulsatile release of luteinising hormone in maturing ewe lambs.

    PubMed

    Redmond, J S; Baez-Sandoval, G M; Spell, K M; Spencer, T E; Lents, C A; Williams, G L; Amstalden, M

    2011-09-01

    Onset of puberty is characterised by a marked increase in the frequency of release of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinising hormone (LH). The Kiss1 gene plays a critical role in pubertal development, and its product, kisspeptin, stimulates GnRH and LH release. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Kiss1 gene expression in the preoptic area (POA) and hypothalamus increases during maturation of the reproductive neuroendocrine axis in association with increased LH pulsatility. Ovariectomised, oestradiol-replaced lambs were euthanised at 25, 30 and 35 weeks of age. Blood samples were collected before euthanasia to characterise the pattern of LH release. Kiss1 mRNA was detected in coronal sections of the POA and hypothalamus and Kiss1-expressing cells were identified on the basis of silver grain density. The mean number of Kiss1-expressing cells in the POA/periventricular (PeV) areas increased from 25 to 30 weeks of age. No further increase at 35 weeks of age was observed, and the changes in Kiss1 expression in the POA/PeV were independent of changes in LH pulse frequency. The mean number of Kiss1-expressing cells in the arcuate (ARC) nucleus did not differ among age groups, although it was greater in the middle ARC of lambs exhibiting increased frequency of LH release. The density of silver grains per cell did not differ among groups in any of the areas studied. The results obtained indicate that the Kiss1 gene is activated in the POA/PeV and ARC of ewe lambs during juvenile development, and that kisspeptin neurones in the middle ARC, in particular, are involved in the acceleration of pulsatile LH release during maturation of the reproductive neuroendocrine axis in ewe lambs.

  11. Pulsatile motion of the trabecular meshwork in healthy human subjects quantified by phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Shen, Tueng T.; Johnstone, Murray; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous leaves the anterior chamber of eye by passing through the trabecular meshwork (TM), a tissue thought to be responsible for increased outflow resistance in glaucoma. Motion assessment could permit characterization of TM biomechanical properties necessary to maintain intra-ocular pressure (IOP) within a narrow homeostatic range. In this paper, we report the first in vivo identification of TM motion in humans. We use a phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) system with sub-nanometer sensitivity to detect and image dynamic pulse-induced TM motion. To permit quantification of TM motion and relationships we develop and apply a phase compensation algorithm permitting removal of the otherwise evitable confounding effects of bulk motion. Twenty healthy human eyes from 10 subjects are imaged. The results permit visualization of pulsatile TM motion visualization by PhS-OCT; correlation with the digital/cardiac pulse is highly significant. The correlation permits assessment of the phase lag and time delay between TM motion and the cardiac pulse. In this study, we find that the digital pulse leads the pulsatile TM motion by a mean phase of 3.53 ± 0.48 rad and a mean time of 0.5 ± 0.14 s in the fundamental frequency. A significant linear relationship is present between the TM phase lag and the heart rate (p value < 0.05). The TM phase lag is also affected by age, the relationship not quite reaching significance in the current study. PhS-OCT reveals pulse-induced motion of the TM that may provide insights into the biomechanics of the tissues involved in the regulation of IOP. PMID:24156063

  12. Altitude and configuration of the potentiometric surface in the Upper Triassic sedimentary rocks at and near the North Penn Area 12 Superfund site, Worcester Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, July 20-27, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grazul, Kevin E.

    1996-01-01

    A map showing the altitude of the potentiometric surface defined by measured water levels near the North Penn Area 12 Superfund Site in Worcester Township, Montgomery County, Pa., was constructed from water levels measured in 35 wells from July 20-27, 1995. Observed water-level altitudes range from 435 feet above sea level in a well near Church Road to 261 feet above sea level in a well near Land Road in Worcester Township.

  13. Geophysical Logs, Specific Capacity, and Water Quality of Four Wells at Rogers Mechanical (former Tate Andale) Property, North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site, Lansdale, Pennsylvania, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Bird, Philip H.

    2010-01-01

    As part of technical assistance to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in the remediation of properties on the North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site in Lansdale, Pa., the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2006-07 collected data in four monitor wells at the Rogers Mechanical (former Tate Andale) property. During this period, USGS collected and analyzed borehole geophysical and video logs of three new monitor wells (Rogers 4, Rogers 5, and Rogers 6) ranging in depth from 80 to 180 feet, a borehole video log and additional heatpulse-flowmeter measurements (to quantify vertical borehole flow) in one existing 100-foot deep well (Rogers 3S), and water-level data during development of two wells (Rogers 5 and Rogers 6) to determine specific capacity. USGS also summarized results of passive-diffusion bag sampling for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the four wells. These data were intended to help understand the groundwater system and the distribution of VOC contaminants in groundwater at the property.

  14. Follow-up of the Bacillus cereus emetic toxin production in penne pasta under household conditions using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Delbrassinne, Laurence; Andjelkovic, Mirjana; Rajkovic, Andreja; Bottledoorn, Nadine; Mahillon, Jacques; Van Loco, Joris

    2011-08-01

    Two outbreak-related Bacillus cereus emetic strains were investigated for their growth and cereulide production potential in penne pasta at 4, 8 and 25 °C during 7-day storage. Cereulide production was detected and quantified by LC-MS method (LOD of 1 ng/ml, LOQ of 5 ng/ml) and growth was determined by culture-based enumeration. Inoculated B. cereus strains (10(5) CFU/g) were able to reach counts of more than 10(8) CFU/g and cereulide production of about 500 ng/g already after 3 days of storage at 25 °C. Interestingly, a constant increase of the toxin was noticed during incubation at ambient temperature storage: the cereulide was continuously produced during the bacterial stationary growth phase reaching maximal amounts at the end of the experiment (7 days, concentration of about 1000 ng/g). Strictly respected cold chain temperature as 4 °C did not allow any detectable cereulide production for any of the two tested strains. At the limited temperature abuse of 8 °C, a detectable amount of cereulide was observed after two days for one of the strain (TIAC303) (

  15. Turbulence detection in a stenosed artery bifurcation by numerical simulation of pulsatile blood flow using the low-Reynolds number turbulence model.

    PubMed

    Ghalichi, Farzan; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2003-01-01

    The pulsatile blood flow in a partially blocked artery is significantly altered as the flow regime changes through the cardiac cycle. This paper reports on the application of a low-Reynolds turbulence model for computation of physiological pulsatile flow in a healthy and stenosed carotid artery bifurcation. The human carotid artery was chosen since it has received much attention because atherosclerotic lesions are frequently observed. The Wilcox low-Re k-omega turbulence model was used for the simulation since it has proven to be more accurate in describing transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Using the FIDAP finite element code a validation showed very good agreement between experimental and numerical results for a steady laminar to turbulent flow transition as reported in a previous publication by the same authors. Since no experimental or numerical results were available in the literature for a pulsatile and turbulent flow regime, a comparison between laminar and low-Re turbulent calculations was made to further validate the turbulence model. The results of this study showed a very good agreement for velocity profiles and wall shear stress values for this imposed pulsatile laminar flow regime. To explore further the medical aspect, the calculations showed that even in a healthy or non-stenosed artery, small instabilities could be found at least for a portion of the pulse cycle and in different sections. The 40% and 55% diameter reduction stenoses did not significantly change the turbulence characteristics. Further results showed that the presence of 75% stenoses changed the flow properties from laminar to turbulent flow for a good portion of the cardiac pulse. A full 3D simulation with this low-Re-turbulence model, coupled with Doppler ultrasound, can play a significant role in assessing the degree of stenosis for cardiac patients with mild conditions.

  16. Dogmas and controversies in the handling of nitrogenous wastes: 5-HT2-like receptors are involved in triggering pulsatile urea excretion in the gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta.

    PubMed

    McDonald, M Danielle; Walsh, Patrick J

    2004-05-01

    When injected arterially, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) has been shown to elicit naturally sized urea pulse events in the gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta. The goal of the present study was to determine which 5-HT receptor(s) was involved in mediating this serotonergic stimulation of the pulsatile excretion mechanism. Toadfish were surgically implanted with caudal arterial catheters and intraperitoneal catheters and injected with either 8-OH-DPAT (1 micro mol kg(-1)), a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, alpha-methyl-5-HT (1 micro mol kg(-1)), a 5-HT(2) receptor agonist, or ketanserin, a 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist (0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 micro mol kg(-1)) plus alpha-methyl-5-HT. 8-OH-DPAT injection did not mediate an increase in urea excretion, ruling out the involvement of 5-HT(1A) receptors in pulsatile excretion. However, within 5 min, alpha-methyl-5-HT injection caused an increase in the excretion of urea in >95% (N=27) of the fish injected, with an average pulse size of 652+/-102 micro mol N kg(-1) (N=26). With alpha-methyl-5-HT injection there was no corresponding increase in ammonia or [(3)H]PEG 4000 permeability. Urea pulses elicited by alpha-methyl-5-HT were inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion by the 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist ketanserin, which at low doses caused a significant inhibition of pulse size and at higher doses significantly inhibited the occurrence of pulsatile excretion altogether. However, neither 8-OH-DPAT nor alpha-methyl 5-HT injection had an effect on plasma cortisol or plasma urea concentrations. These findings suggest the involvement of a 5-HT(2)-like receptor in the regulation of pulsatile urea excretion. PMID:15143134

  17. Biological factors in plasma from diabetes mellitus patients enhance hyperglycaemia and pulsatile shear stress-induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, X F; Yu, J Q; Dalan, R; Liu, A Q; Luo, K Q

    2014-05-01

    People suffering from Diabetes Mellitus (DM) are prone to an array of vascular complications leading to end organ damage. The hallmark of these vascular complications is endothelium dysfunction, which is caused by endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis. Although the endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by hyperglycaemia and fluid shear stress has been studied, the effects of biological factors in the blood of DM patients on EC integrity have not been reported in the in vitro models that mimic the physiological pulsatile nature of the vascular system. This study reports the development of a hemodynamic lab-on-a-chip system to investigate this issue. The pulsatile flow was applied to a monolayer of endothelial cells expressing a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor that changes colour from green to blue in response to caspase-3 activation during apoptosis. Plasma samples from healthy volunteers and DM patients were compared to identify biological factors that are critical to endothelial disruption. Three types of microchannels were designed to simulate the blood vessels under healthy and partially blocked pathological conditions. The results showed that EC apoptosis rates increased with increasing glucose concentration and levels of shear stress. The rates of apoptosis further increased by a factor of 1.4-2.3 for hyperglycaemic plasma under all dynamic conditions. Under static conditions, little difference was detected in the rate of EC apoptosis between experiments using plasma from DM patients and glucose medium, suggesting that the effects of hyperglycaemia and biological factors on the induction of EC apoptosis are all shear flow-dependent. A proteomics study was then conducted to identify biological factors, demonstrating that the levels of eight proteins, including haptoglobin and clusterin, were significantly down-regulated, while six proteins, including apolipoprotein C-III, were significantly up-regulated in the plasma of DM patients

  18. Role of phosphodiesterases in the shaping of sub-plasma-membrane cAMP oscillations and pulsatile insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Tian, Geng; Sågetorp, Jenny; Xu, Yunjian; Shuai, Hongyan; Degerman, Eva; Tengholm, Anders

    2012-11-01

    Specificity and versatility in cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling are governed by the spatial localisation and temporal dynamics of the signal. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are important for shaping cAMP signals by hydrolyzing the nucleotide. In pancreatic β-cells, glucose triggers sub-plasma-membrane cAMP oscillations, which are important for insulin secretion, but the mechanisms underlying the oscillations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of different PDEs in the generation of cAMP oscillations by monitoring the concentration of cAMP in the sub-plasma-membrane space ([cAMP](pm)) with ratiometric evanescent wave microscopy in MIN6 cells or mouse pancreatic β-cells expressing a fluorescent translocation biosensor. The general PDE inhibitor IBMX increased [cAMP](pm), and whereas oscillations were frequently observed at 50 µM IBMX, 300 µM-1 mM of the inhibitor caused a stable increase in [cAMP](pm). The [cAMP](pm) was nevertheless markedly suppressed by the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, indicating IBMX-insensitive cAMP degradation. Among IBMX-sensitive PDEs, PDE3 was most important for maintaining a low basal level of [cAMP](pm) in unstimulated cells. After glucose induction of [cAMP](pm) oscillations, inhibitors of PDE1, PDE3 and PDE4 inhibitors the average cAMP level, often without disturbing the [cAMP](pm) rhythmicity. Knockdown of the IBMX-insensitive PDE8B by shRNA in MIN6 cells increased the basal level of [cAMP](pm) and prevented the [cAMP](pm)-lowering effect of 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine after exposure to IBMX. Moreover, PDE8B-knockdown cells showed reduced glucose-induced [cAMP](pm) oscillations and loss of the normal pulsatile pattern of insulin secretion. It is concluded that [cAMP](pm) oscillations in β-cells are caused by periodic variations in cAMP generation, and that several PDEs, including PDE1, PDE3 and the IBMX-insensitive PDE8B, are required for shaping the sub-membrane cAMP signals and pulsatile insulin release.

  19. Effect of Deletion of Ghrelin-O-Acyltransferase on the Pulsatile Release of Growth Hormone in Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, T Y; Ngo, S T; Veldhuis, J D; Jeffery, P L; Chopin, L K; Tschöp, M; Waters, M J; Tolle, V; Epelbaum, J; Chen, C; Steyn, F J

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin, a gut hormone originating from the post-translational cleavage of preproghrelin, is the endogenous ligand of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a). Within the growth hormone (GH) axis, the biological activity of ghrelin requires octanoylation by ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT), conferring selective binding to the GHS-R1a receptor via acylated ghrelin. Complete loss of preproghrelin-derived signalling (through deletion of the Ghrl gene) contributes to a decline in peak GH release; however, the selective contribution of endogenous acyl-ghrelin to pulsatile GH release remains to be established. We assessed the pulsatile release of GH in ad lib. fed male germline goat(-/-) mice, extending measures to include mRNA for key hypothalamic regulators of GH release, and peripheral factors that are modulated relative to GH release. The amount of GH released was reduced in young goat(-/-) mice compared to age-matched wild-type mice, whereas pulse frequency and irregularity increased. Altered GH release did not coincide with alterations in hypothalamic Ghrh, Srif, Npy or Ghsr mRNA expression, or pituitary GH content, suggesting that loss of Goat does not compromise canonical mechanisms that contribute to pituitary GH production and release. Although loss of Goat resulted in an irregular pattern of GH release (characterised by an increase in the number of GH pulses observed during extended secretory events), this did not contribute to a change in the expression of sexually dimorphic GH-dependent liver genes. Of interest, circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 were elevated in goat(-/-) mice. This rise in circulating levels of IGF-1 was correlated with an increase in GH pulse frequency, suggesting that sustained or increased IGF-1 release in goat(-/-) mice may occur in response to altered GH release patterning. Our observations demonstrate that germline loss of Goat alters GH release and patterning. Although the biological relevance of

  20. Pulsatile flow and simple flow control method during weaning period in centrifugal pump: toward more expanded usage in open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Nishida, H; Koyanagi, H; Endo, M; Suzuki, S; Oshiyama, H; Nojiri, C; Fukasawa, H; Akutsu, T

    1994-09-01

    To expand the usage of the centrifugal pump (CP) in open heart surgery, we performed two studies. In the first, we evaluated pulsatile flow in the CP. In vitro pump performance of the Terumo Capiox pump (TCP) and the Sarns Delphin pump (SDP) and increase of free hemoglobin (mg/dl) after driving 6 h were investigated using bovine blood. A roller pump (RP) was used as a comparison. Equally effective pulsatile flow was obtained in both CPs. Hemolysis was less severe in TCP (120 mg/dl) than SDP (210 mg/dl) and RP (320 mg/dl). In the second study, we evaluated a simple flow control method. Flow rate was easily controlled with step-wise clamping of 3-pronged tubing (Triple-flow) without changing rotational speed, regardless of afterload. Fluctuation of flow was much less with this method than with the rotational speed change method. The use of pulsatile flow of TCP, with its minimum increase of hemolysis and the easier flow control method during the weaning process, may expand the usage of CP in open heart surgery.

  1. Effect of pulse frequency and amplitude of D-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone on the pulsatile secretion of prolactin and LH.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, T; Bordiu, E; Rubio, J A; Duran, A; Charro, A L

    1993-09-01

    This work analyzes the effect of the pulse amplitude and frequency of a potent LHRH analog, D-Trp6-LHRH, in a perfusion system of isolated rat pituitary cells. To this purpose, we studied the LH and PRL secretion in different conditions: basal secretion, secretion after increasing concentrations of D-Trp6-LHRL (0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 nM) secretion in function of the pulses frequency (2,3, and 4 pulses per h) and amplitude (0.1, 1 and 10 nM). The principal findings were: 1. The basal LH and PRL secretions was pulsatile; 2. The stimulation of LH by the analog was not dose-dependent; 3. When more than 2 pulses per h were administered, a rapid desensitization of gonadotroph to release LH (at 20-30 min) occurred; 4. There was a loss of pulsatility of PRL secretion with an increase in the pulse frequency and amplitude of the D-Trp6-LHRH, which was produced parallelly to the desensitization of the gonadotroph to release LH. In summary, these findings suggest that a rapid loss of pulsatility of the PRL when the D-Trp6-LHRH pulse frequency and amplitude is increased might be due to the early desensitization of the gonadotroph to the analog.

  2. Beneficial Effect of Short Pretransplant Period of Hypothermic Pulsatile Perfusion of the Warm-Ischemic Kidney after Cold Storage: Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Humanes, Blanca; Jado, Juan Carlos; Mojena, Marina; González-Nicolás, María Ángeles; del Cañizo, Juan Francisco; Lledó-García, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Warm ischemia (WI) produces a significant deleterious effect in potential kidney grafts. Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) seems to improve immediate graft function after transplant. Our aim was to analyze the effect of short pretransplant periods of pulsatile HMP on histology and renal injury in warm-ischemic kidneys. Twelve minipigs were used. WI was achieved in the right kidney by applying a vascular clamp for 45 min. After nephrectomy, autotransplant was performed following one of two strategies: cold storage of the kidneys or cold storage combined with perfusion in pulsatile HMP. The graft was removed early to study renal morphology, inflammation (fibrosis), and apoptosis. Proinflammatory activity and fibrosis were less pronounced after cold storage of the kidneys with HMP than after cold storage only. The use of HMP also decreased apoptosis compared with cold storage only. The detrimental effects on cells of an initial and prolonged period of WI seem to improve with a preservation protocol that includes a short period of pulsatile HMP after cold storage and immediately before the transplant, in comparison with cold storage only. PMID:27556029

  3. Family Literacy: A Research Agenda to Build the Future. Report from Penn State's Goodling Institute for Research in Family Literacy Think Tank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askov, Eunice N.

    A think tank on researching family literacy was held to brainstorm a national research agenda for family literacy. The think tank brought together 12 researchers, policymakers, and practitioners involved in family literacy. Key themes emerging during the think tank were as follows: (1) family literacy is difficult to research because it is…

  4. A resolution congratulating the Penn State University women's volleyball team for winning the 2013 National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Volleyball Championship.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Toomey, Pat [R-PA

    2014-02-04

    02/04/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S773-774; text as passed Senate: CR S767-768) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Comparison of the standard roller pump and a pulsatile centrifugal pump for extracorporeal circulation during routine coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Driessen, J J; Fransen, G; Rondelez, L; Schelstraete, E; Gevaert, L

    1991-01-01

    The present prospective study compared the standard nonpulsatile twin roller pump with the Sarns centrifugal pump, in the pulsatile mode, as arterial pumps for extracorporeal circulation during coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The study was conducted in two consecutive groups of 25 patients receiving a standard anaesthetic and surgical protocol. The investigated parameters included haemodynamic profiles, oxygen exchange, blood gas and acid-base homeostasis, haematology, coagulation and complement consumption. With comparable settings for pump flow, gas flow and delivered oxygen concentrations, there was no difference between the groups in the main haemodynamic parameters during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, a tenfold lower dose of sodium nitroprusside was required to keep systemic vascular resistance within physiologic limits during CPB in the centrifugal group (C group) compared with the roller group (R group). During rewarming oxygen extraction was higher in the C group than in the R group. During the first eight hours after CPB no differences in haemodynamics, oxygenation parameters and pulmonary shunt between the groups were observed. During, as well as after, CPB there was no significant difference in blood gas and acid-base homeostasis between either group. Average postoperative blood loss via chest tubes, total transfusions of blood products, haemoglobin and coagulation did not differ between the two groups. However, the white blood cell count, corrected for changes in haematocrit, decreased during the early phase of CPB in the R group, but not in the C group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Flow characteristics past jellyfish and St. Vincent valves in the aortic position under physiological pulsatile flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Morsi, Y S; Sakhaeimanesh, A A

    2000-07-01

    Thrombus formation and hemolysis have been linked to the dynamic flow characteristics of heart valve prostheses. To enhance our understanding of the flow characteristics past the aortic position of a Jellyfish (JF) valve in the left ventricle, in vitro laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were carried out under physiological pulsatile flow conditions. The hemodynamic performance of the JF valve was then compared with that of the St. Vincent (SV) valve. The comparison was given in terms of mean systolic pressure drop, back flow energy losses, flow velocity, and shear stresses at various locations downstream of both valves and at cardiac outputs of 3.5 L/min, 4.5 L/min, and 6.5 L/min respectively. The results indicated that both valves created disturbed flow fields with elevated levels of turbulent shear stress as well as higher levels of turbulence in the immediate vicinity of the valve and up to 1 diameter of the pipe (D) downstream of the valve. At a location further downstream, the JF valve showed better flow characteristics than the SV in terms of velocity profiles and turbulent shear stresses. The closure volume of the SV valve was found to be 2.5 times higher than that of the JF valve. Moreover, the total back flow losses and mean systolic pressure drop also were found to be higher in the SV than the JF valve.

  7. Gastroretentive pulsatile release tablets of lercanidipine HCl: development, statistical optimization, and in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Gagganapalli Santhoshi; Nayak, Usha Yogendra; Deshpande, Praful Balavant; Mutalik, Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed at the development of gastroretentive floating pulsatile release tablets (FPRTs) of lercanidipine HCl to enhance the bioavailability and treat early morning surge in blood pressure. Immediate release core tablets containing lercanidipine HCl were prepared and optimized core tablets were compression-coated using buoyant layer containing polyethylene oxide (PEO) WSR coagulant, sodium bicarbonate, and directly compressible lactose. FPRTs were evaluated for various in vitro physicochemical parameters, drug-excipient compatibility, buoyancy, swelling, and release studies. The optimized FPRTs were tested in vivo in New Zealand white rabbits for buoyancy and pharmacokinetics. DoE optimization of data revealed FPRTs containing PEO (20% w/w) with coat weight 480 mg were promising systems exhibiting good floating behavior and lag time in drug release. Abdominal X-ray imaging of rabbits after oral administration of the tablets, confirmed the floating behavior and lag time. A quadratic model was suggested for release at 7th and 12th h and a linear model was suggested for release lag time. The FPRT formulation improved pharmacokinetic parameters compared to immediate release tablet formulation in terms of extent of absorption in rabbits. As the formulation showed delay in drug release both in vitro and in vivo, nighttime administration could be beneficial to reduce the cardiovascular complications due to early morning surge in blood pressure. PMID:25525619

  8. 2D Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Human Ventricle System Based on Fluid-Solid Interaction and Pulsatile Flow.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Framanzad, F; Zamanian, Behnam; Seddighi, A S; Moosavi, M H; Najarian, S; Bastani, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases are related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics. Therefore, understanding the hydrodynamics of CSF flow and intracranial pressure is helpful for obtaining deeper knowledge of pathological processes and providing better treatments. Furthermore, engineering a reliable computational method is promising approach for fabricating in vitro models which is essential for inventing generic medicines. A Fluid-Solid Interaction (FSI)model was constructed to simulate CSF flow. An important problem in modeling the CSF flow is the diastolic back flow. In this article, using both rigid and flexible conditions for ventricular system allowed us to evaluate the effect of surrounding brain tissue. Our model assumed an elastic wall for the ventricles and a pulsatile CSF input as its boundary conditions. A comparison of the results and the experimental data was done. The flexible model gave better results because it could reproduce the diastolic back flow mentioned in clinical research studies. The previous rigid models have ignored the brain parenchyma interaction with CSF and so had not reported the back flow during the diastolic time. In this computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, the CSF pressure and flow velocity in different areas were concordant with the experimental data.

  9. A fluid--structure interaction finite element analysis of pulsatile blood flow through a compliant stenotic artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathe, M.; Kamm, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    A new model is used to analyze the fully coupled problem of pulsatile blood flow through a compliant, axisymmetric stenotic artery using the finite element method. The model uses large displacement and large strain theory for the solid, and the full Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid. The effect of increasing area reduction on fluid dynamic and structural stresses is presented. Results show that pressure drop, peak wall shear stress, and maximum principal stress in the lesion all increase dramatically as the area reduction in the stenosis is increased from 51 to 89 percent. Further reductions in stenosis cross-sectional area, however, produce relatively little additional change in these parameters due to a concomitant reduction in flow rate caused by the losses in the constriction. Inner wall hoop stretch amplitude just distal to the stenosis also increases with increasing stenosis severity, as downstream pressures are reduced to a physiological minimum. The contraction of the artery distal to the stenosis generates a significant compressive stress on the downstream shoulder of the lesion. Dynamic narrowing of the stenosis is also seen, further augmenting area constriction at times of peak flow. Pressure drop results are found to compare well to an experimentally based theoretical curve, despite the assumption of laminar flow.

  10. Predictive value of middle cerebral artery to uterine artery pulsatility index ratio in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Adiga, Prashanth; Kantharaja, Indumathi; Hebbar, Shripad; Rai, Lavanya; Guruvare, Shyamala; Mundkur, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. (i) To determine the predictive value of cerebrouterine (CU) ratio (middle cerebral artery to uterine artery pulsatility index, MCA/UT PI) in assessing perinatal outcome among hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. (ii) To compare between CU ratio and CP ratio (MCA/Umbilical artery PI) as a predictor of adverse perinatal outcome. Methods. A prospective observational study was done in a tertiary medical college hospital, from September 2012 to August 2013. One hundred singleton pregnancies complicated by hypertension peculiar to pregnancy were enrolled. Both CU and CP ratios were estimated. The perinatal outcomes were studied. Results. Both cerebrouterine and cerebroplacental ratios had a better negative predictive value in predicting adverse perinatal outcome. However, both CU and CP ratios when applied together were able to predict adverse outcomes better than individual ratios. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and the negative predictive values for an adverse neonatal outcome with CU ratio were 61.3%, 70.3%, 56%, and 78.9%, respectively, compared to 42%, 57.5%, 62%, and 76% as with CP ratio. Conclusion. Cerebrouterine ratio and cerebroplacental ratio were complementary to each other in predicting the adverse perinatal outcomes. Individually, both ratios were reassuring for favorable perinatal outcome with high negative predictive value.

  11. Gonadal and pituitary responsiveness of stallions is not down-regulated by prolonged pulsatile administration of GnRH.

    PubMed

    Brinsko, S P; Squires, E L; Pickett, B W; Nett, T M

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if prolonged pulsatile administration of homologous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) at therapeutic or 5x therapeutic doses would cause down-regulation of the stallion's hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. Fifteen stallions were randomly assigned to three treatment groups (n=5/group) and received a 0.5 ml subcutaneous dose of saline (group 1), 50 microg GnRH (group 2), or 250 microg GnRH (group 3) every 2 hours for 75 days. Weekly evaluations of follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and testosterone and monthly evaluations of daily sperm output and spermatozoal motility failed to demonstrate any decreased pituitary or gonadal responsiveness within or among treatment groups (P > 0.1) as a result of treatment with GnRH. Results of this study demonstrate that the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicularaxis of the stallion, unlike that of other domestic species, is remarkably refractory to GnRH-induced down-regulation.

  12. Differences in the Pulsatile Component of the Skin Hemodynamic Response to Verbal Fluency Tasks in the Forehead and the Fingertip

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toshimitsu; Takikawa, Yoriko; Kawagoe, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have claimed that hemodynamic signals measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) on the forehead exhibit different patterns during a verbal fluency task (VFT) in various psychiatric disorders, whereas many studies have noted that NIRS signals can reflect task-related changes in skin blood flow. If such a task-related skin hemodynamic response is also observed in the fingertip, a simpler biomarker may be developed. Furthermore, determining the difference in the response pattern may provide physiological insights into the condition. We found that the magnitude of the pulsatile component in skin hemodynamic signals increased on the forehead (p < 0.001 for N = 50, p = 0.073 for N = 8) but decreased on the fingertip (p < 0.001, N = 8) during the VFT, whereas the rate in both areas increased (p < 0.02, N = 8). We also did not find a repetition effect in both the rate and the magnitude on the fingertip, whereas the effect was present in the magnitude (p < 0.02, N = 8) but not in the rate on the forehead. These results suggest that the skin vasomotor system in the forehead could have a different vessel mechanism to psychological tasks compared to the fingertip. PMID:26905432

  13. CCAP and FMRFamide-like peptides accelerate the contraction rate of the antennal accessory pulsatile organs (auxiliary hearts) of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Julia M; Jones, Talitha H; Murphree, Steven C; Hillyer, Julián F

    2016-08-01

    Insects rely on specialized accessory pulsatile organs (APOs), also known as auxiliary hearts, to propel hemolymph into their antennae. In most insects, this is accomplished via the pulsations of a pair of ampulla located in the head, each of which propels hemolymph across an antenna via an antennal vessel. Once at the distal end of the appendage, hemolymph returns to the head via the antennal hemocoel. Although the structure of the antennal hearts has been elucidated in various insect orders, their hormonal modulation has only been studied in cockroaches and other hemimetabolous insects within the superorder Polyneoptera, where proctolin and FMRFamide-like peptides accelerate the contraction rate of these auxiliary hearts. Here, we assessed the hormonal modulation of the antennal APOs of mosquitoes, a group of holometabolous (Endopterygota) insects within the order Diptera. We show that crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), FMRFamide and SALDKNFMRFamide increase the contraction rate of the antennal APOs and the heart of Anopheles gambiae Both antennal hearts are synchronously responsive to these neuropeptides, but their contractions are asynchronous with the contraction of the heart. Furthermore, we show that these neuropeptides increase the velocity and maximum acceleration of hemolymph within the antennal space, suggesting that each contraction is also more forceful. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that hormones of a holometabolous insect modulate the contraction dynamics of an auxiliary heart, and the first report that shows that the hormones of any insect accelerate the velocity of hemolymph in the antennal space.

  14. Pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous blood vessels using a third grade non-Newtonian fluids model.

    PubMed

    Akbarzadeh, Pooria

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the unsteady pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous arteries concerning the influence of externally imposed periodic body acceleration and a periodic pressure gradient are numerically simulated. Blood is taken into account as the third-grade non-Newtonian fluid. Besides the numerical solution, for small Womersley parameter (such as blood flow through arterioles and capillaries), the analytical perturbation method is used to solve the nonlinear governing equations. Consequently, analytical expressions for the velocity profile, wall shear stress, and blood flow rate are obtained. Excellent agreement between the analytical and numerical predictions is evident. Also, the effects of body acceleration, magnetic field, third-grade non-Newtonian parameter, pressure gradient, and porosity on the flow behaviors are examined. Some important conclusions are that, when the Womersley parameter is low, viscous forces tend to dominate the flow, velocity profiles are parabolic in shape, and the center-line velocity oscillates in phase with the driving pressure gradient. In addition, by increasing the pressure gradient, the mean value of the velocity profile increases and the amplitude of the velocity remains constant. Also, when non-Newtonian effect increases, the amplitude of the velocity profile.

  15. Gastroretentive Pulsatile Release Tablets of Lercanidipine HCl: Development, Statistical Optimization, and In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Gagganapalli Santhoshi; Nayak, Usha Yogendra; Deshpande, Praful Balavant; Mutalik, Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed at the development of gastroretentive floating pulsatile release tablets (FPRTs) of lercanidipine HCl to enhance the bioavailability and treat early morning surge in blood pressure. Immediate release core tablets containing lercanidipine HCl were prepared and optimized core tablets were compression-coated using buoyant layer containing polyethylene oxide (PEO) WSR coagulant, sodium bicarbonate, and directly compressible lactose. FPRTs were evaluated for various in vitro physicochemical parameters, drug-excipient compatibility, buoyancy, swelling, and release studies. The optimized FPRTs were tested in vivo in New Zealand white rabbits for buoyancy and pharmacokinetics. DoE optimization of data revealed FPRTs containing PEO (20% w/w) with coat weight 480 mg were promising systems exhibiting good floating behavior and lag time in drug release. Abdominal X-ray imaging of rabbits after oral administration of the tablets, confirmed the floating behavior and lag time. A quadratic model was suggested for release at 7th and 12th h and a linear model was suggested for release lag time. The FPRT formulation improved pharmacokinetic parameters compared to immediate release tablet formulation in terms of extent of absorption in rabbits. As the formulation showed delay in drug release both in vitro and in vivo, nighttime administration could be beneficial to reduce the cardiovascular complications due to early morning surge in blood pressure. PMID:25525619

  16. Fluid Dynamic Characterization of a Polymeric Heart Valve Prototype (Poli-Valve) tested under Continuous and Pulsatile Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    De Gaetano, Francesco; Serrani, Marta; Bagnoli, Paola; Brubert, Jacob; Stasiak, Joanna; Moggridge, Geoff D.; Costantino, Maria Laura

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Only mechanical and biological heart valve prostheses are currently commercially available. The former show longer durability but require anticoagulant therapy, the latter display better fluid dynamic behaviour but do not have adequate durability. New Polymeric Heart Valves (PHVs) could potentially combine the haemodynamic properties of biological valves with the durability of mechanical valves. This work presents a hydrodynamic evaluation of two groups of newly developed supra-annular tri-leaflet prosthetic heart valves made from styrenic block copolymers (SBC): Poli-Valves. Methods Two types of Poli-Valves made of SBC differing in polystyrene fraction content were tested under continuous and pulsatile flow conditions as prescribed by ISO 5840 Standard. An ad - hoc designed pulse duplicator allowed the valve prototypes to be tested at different flow rates and frequencies. Pressure and flow were recorded; pressure drops, effective orifice area (EOA), and regurgitant volume were computed to assess the valve’s behaviour. Results Both types Poli-Valves met the minimum requirements in terms of regurgitation and EOA as specified by ISO 5840 Standard. Results were compared with five mechanical heart valves (MHVs) and five tissue heart valves (THVs), currently available on the market. Conclusion Based on these results, polymeric heart valves based on styrenic block copolymers, as Poli-Valves are, can be considered as promising alternative for heart valve replacement in near future. PMID:26689146

  17. Pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous blood vessels using a third grade non-Newtonian fluids model.

    PubMed

    Akbarzadeh, Pooria

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the unsteady pulsatile magneto-hydrodynamic blood flows through porous arteries concerning the influence of externally imposed periodic body acceleration and a periodic pressure gradient are numerically simulated. Blood is taken into account as the third-grade non-Newtonian fluid. Besides the numerical solution, for small Womersley parameter (such as blood flow through arterioles and capillaries), the analytical perturbation method is used to solve the nonlinear governing equations. Consequently, analytical expressions for the velocity profile, wall shear stress, and blood flow rate are obtained. Excellent agreement between the analytical and numerical predictions is evident. Also, the effects of body acceleration, magnetic field, third-grade non-Newtonian parameter, pressure gradient, and porosity on the flow behaviors are examined. Some important conclusions are that, when the Womersley parameter is low, viscous forces tend to dominate the flow, velocity profiles are parabolic in shape, and the center-line velocity oscillates in phase with the driving pressure gradient. In addition, by increasing the pressure gradient, the mean value of the velocity profile increases and the amplitude of the velocity remains constant. Also, when non-Newtonian effect increases, the amplitude of the velocity profile. PMID:26792174

  18. Experimental and theoretical investigations of Lantana camara oil diffusion from polyacrylonitrile membrane for pulsatile drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Balasubramanian, K

    2014-08-01

    Porous composite membrane of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and Lantana camara essential oil was synthesized by solvent casting method. Stability of oil in PAN solution was measured by XiGo nano tool indicating constant relaxation time of 1487 time/s. Pore size of few microns confirmed by electron microscopy was supported by atomic force microscopy indicating roughness factor of 0.9 nm. Contact angle of 2° inveterates superhydrophilicity of the composite membrane. Membrane showed excellent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli with a 7-10mm zone of inhibition. In vitro release of Lantana oil from the composite membrane was carried out in isotonic phosphate buffer solution (pH=7.4). Lantana oil was released for 9h, lag time of 3h with constant 33% release confirmed PAN membranes as potential system for pulsatile drug delivery applications. Diffusion of E-caryophyllene (antibacterial component of oil) which was studied through molecular simulation using Material Studio software ensued diffusion coefficient value of 1.11∗10(-9) m(2)/s. Biocompatibility of the composite membrane was assessed by mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line (NIH 3T3) through MTT assay indicating more than 91% viable cell even at 200 μg/mL concentration. Such membranes can be efficiently used in biomedical applications as antibacterial and antifungal agent. PMID:24907763

  19. High-frequency photoacoustic imaging of erythrocyte aggregation and oxygen saturation: probing hemodynamic relations under pulsatile blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of high-frequency photoacoustic (PA) imaging to study the shear rate dependent relationship between red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and oxygen saturation (SO2) in a simulated blood flow system. The PA signal amplitude increased during the formation of aggregates and cyclically varied at intervals corresponding to the beat rate (30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 bpm) for all optical wavelengths of illumination (750 and 850 nm).The SO2 also cyclically varied in phase with the PA signal amplitude for all beat rates. In addition, the mean blood flow velocity cyclically varied at the same interval of beat rate, and the shear rate (i.e. the radial gradient of flow velocity) also cyclically varied. On the other hand, the phase of the cyclic variation in the shear rate was reversed compared to that in the PA signal amplitude. This study indicates that RBC aggregation induced by periodic changes in the shear rate can be correlated with the SO2 under pulsatile blood flow. Furthermore, PA imaging of flowing blood may be capable of providing a new biomarker for the clinical application in terms of monitoring blood viscosity, oxygen delivery and their correlation.

  20. 2D Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Human Ventricle System Based on Fluid-Solid Interaction and Pulsatile Flow.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Nafiseh; Framanzad, F; Zamanian, Behnam; Seddighi, A S; Moosavi, M H; Najarian, S; Bastani, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Many diseases are related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics. Therefore, understanding the hydrodynamics of CSF flow and intracranial pressure is helpful for obtaining deeper knowledge of pathological processes and providing better treatments. Furthermore, engineering a reliable computational method is promising approach for fabricating in vitro models which is essential for inventing generic medicines. A Fluid-Solid Interaction (FSI)model was constructed to simulate CSF flow. An important problem in modeling the CSF flow is the diastolic back flow. In this article, using both rigid and flexible conditions for ventricular system allowed us to evaluate the effect of surrounding brain tissue. Our model assumed an elastic wall for the ventricles and a pulsatile CSF input as its boundary conditions. A comparison of the results and the experimental data was done. The flexible model gave better results because it could reproduce the diastolic back flow mentioned in clinical research studies. The previous rigid models have ignored the brain parenchyma interaction with CSF and so had not reported the back flow during the diastolic time. In this computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, the CSF pressure and flow velocity in different areas were concordant with the experimental data. PMID:25337330

  1. Pulsatile exposure to simulated reflux leads to changes in gene expression in a 3D model of oesophageal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Green, Nicola H; Nicholls, Zoe; Heath, Paul R; Cooper-Knock, Jonathan; Corfe, Bernard M; MacNeil, Sheila; Bury, Jonathan P

    2014-06-01

    Oesophageal exposure to duodenogastroesophageal refluxate is implicated in the development of Barrett's metaplasia (BM), with increased risk of progression to oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The literature proposes that reflux exposure activates NF-κB, driving the aberrant expression of intestine-specific caudal-related homeobox (CDX) genes. However, early events in the pathogenesis of BM from normal epithelium are poorly understood. To investigate this, our study subjected a 3D model of the normal human oesophageal mucosa to repeated, pulsatile exposure to specific bile components and examined changes in gene expression. Initial 2D experiments with a range of bile salts observed that taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC) impacted upon NF-κB activation without causing cell death. Informed by this, the 3D oesophageal model was repeatedly exposed to TCDC in the presence and absence of acid, and the epithelial cells underwent gene expression profiling. We identified ~300 differentially expressed genes following each treatment, with a large and significant overlap between treatments. Enrichment analysis (Broad GSEA, DAVID and Metacore™; GeneGo Inc) identified multiple gene sets related to cell signalling, inflammation, proliferation, differentiation and cell adhesion. Specifically NF-κB activation, Wnt signalling, cell adhesion and targets for the transcription factors PTF1A and HNF4α were highlighted. Our data suggest that HNF4α isoform switching may be an early event in Barrett's pathogenesis. CDX1/2 targets were, however, not enriched, suggesting that although CDX1/2 activation reportedly plays a role in BM development, it may not be an initial event. Our findings highlight new areas for investigation in the earliest stages of BM pathogenesis of oesophageal diseases and new potential therapeutic targets.

  2. Dopamine receptor dysregulation in hippocampus of aged rats underlies chronic pulsatile L-Dopa treatment induced cognitive and emotional alterations.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Vito S; Luquín, Sonia; Jáuregui-Huerta, Fernando; Corona-Morales, Aleph A; Medina, Mauricio P; Ruíz-Velasco, Silvia; Zhang, Limei

    2014-07-01

    L-Dopa is the major symptomatic therapy for Parkinson's disease, which commonly occurs in elderly patients. However, the effects of chronic use on mood and cognition in old subjects remain elusive. In order to compare the effects of a chronic pulsatile L-Dopa treatment on emotional and cognitive functions in young (3 months) and old (18 months) intact rats, an L-Dopa/carbidopa treatment was administered every 12 h over 4 weeks. Rats were assessed for behavioural despair (repeated forced swimming test, RFST), anhedonia (sucrose preference test, SPT) and spatial learning (Morris water maze, MWM) in the late phase of treatment (T). Neuronal expression of Fos in the hippocampus at the early and late phases of T, as well as after MWM was studied. The density and ratio of dopamine D5r, D3r and D2r receptors were also evaluated in the hippocampus using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Young rats showed similar patterns during behavioural tests, whereas aged treated rats showed increased immobility counts in RFST, diminished sucrose liquid intake in SPT, and spatial learning impairment during MWM. Fos expression was significantly blunted in the aged treated group after MWM. The density of D5r, D3r and D2r was increased in both aged groups. The treatment reduced the ratio of D5r/D3r and D5r/D2r in both groups. Moreover, aged treated subjects had significant lower values of D5r/D3r and higher values of D5r/D2r when compared with young treated subjects. These results indicate that chronic L-Dopa treatment in itself could trigger emotional and cognitive dysfunctions in elderly subjects through dopamine receptor dysregulation.

  3. Male sexual development in the monkey. II. Cross-sectional analysis of pulsatile hypothalamic-pituitary secretion in castrated males.

    PubMed

    Bercu, B B; Lee, B C; Spiliotis, B E; Pineda, J L; Denman, D W; Hoffman, H J; Brown, T J

    1983-06-01

    Pulsatile secretion of serum gonadotropins was studied in 16 castrated monkeys from 4 weeks of age through adult life. Animals were castrated at various ages from birth through adult life. Although some studies of the gonadotropin-secretory patterns were longitudinal in nature, most comparisons were cross-sectional. On the basis of our observations, we have arbitrarily grouped the animals into 4 developmental ages: postnatal (less than 7 months), prepubertal or juvenile (7-27 months), pubertal (28-59 months), and adult (greater than or equal to 60 months). In carrying out these studies, blood was withdrawn at 15-min intervals over 24 h without anesthesia using a mobile vest and tether assembly to support an indwelling catheter. GnRH challenge tests were done on 1 or more occasions on all animals. Plasma samples were analyzed for concentrations of FSH and LH by established RIAs and an in vitro bioassay for LH. During the frequent sampling period (24 h for all except postnatal animals), the amplitude of gonadotropin pulses was greatest in adult animals followed by postnatal and pubertal monkeys. During pubertal development, there was a marked increase in the magnitude of gonadotropin pulses, and remarkedly, there was a substantial increase in the LH bioassay: RIA (greater than 5:1) by adult life. GnRH challenge tests of gonadotropins correlated with these observations. Time series analysis was applied to the data for objective statistical characterization of cyclic patterns. Our findings can be summarized: 1) during pubertal maturation there is a change in amplitude but not frequency of gonadotropin pulses, 2) pubertal development of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis advances in the absence of gonadal feedback, and 3) there is a significant increase in the LH bioassay: RIA during pubertal development. We conclude that the castrate monkey is a valuable adjunct to direct clinical investigations of the mechanisms controlling human sexual development.

  4. Pulsatile blood flow in human bone assessed by laser-Doppler flowmetry and the interpretation of photoplethysmographic signals.

    PubMed

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Tchernin, David; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noël; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Richiardi, Jonas

    2013-03-01

    Human bone blood flow, mean blood speed and the number of moving red blood cells were assessed (in arbitrary units), as a function of time, during one cardiac cycle. The measurements were obtained non-invasively on five volunteers by laser-Doppler flowmetry at large interoptode spacing. The investigated bones included: patella, clavicle, tibial diaphysis and tibial malleolus. As hypothesized, we found that in all bones the number of moving cells remains constant during cardiac cycles. Therefore, we concluded that the pulsatile nature of blood flow must be completely determined by the mean blood speed and not by changes in blood volume (vessels dilation). Based on these results, it is finally demonstrated using a mathematical model (derived from the radiative transport theory) that photoplethysmographic (PPG) pulsations observed by others in the literature, cannot be generated by oscillations in blood oxygen saturation, which is physiologically linked to blood speed. In fact, possible oxygen saturation changes during pulsations decrease the amplitude of PPG pulsations due to specific features of the PPG light source. It is shown that a variation in blood oxygen saturation of 3% may induce a negative change of ∼1% in the PPG signal. It is concluded that PPG pulsations are determined by periodic 'positive' changes of the reduced scattering coefficient of the tissue and/or the absorption coefficient at constant blood volume. No explicit experimental PPG measurements have been performed. As a by-product of this study, an estimation of the arterial pulse wave velocity obtained from the analysis of the blood flow pulsations give a value of 7.8 m s(-1) (95% confidence interval of the sample mean distribution: [6.7, 9.5] m s(-1)), which is perfectly compatible with data in the literature. We hope that this note will contribute to a better understanding of PPG signals and to further develop the domain of the vascular physiology of human bone.

  5. Pulsatile Stress in Middle-Aged Patients With Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes Compared With Nondiabetic Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Jean-Christophe; Marchand, Monique; Scheen, André J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Arterial pulse pressure is considered to be an independent cardiovascular risk factor. We compared pulse pressure during an active orthostatic test in middle-aged patients with type 1 diabetes and with type 2 diabetes and corresponding nondiabetic control subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Forty patients with type 1 diabetes (mean age 50 years, diabetes duration 23 years, and BMI 23.0 kg/m2) were compared with 40 nonhypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes (respectively, 50 years, 8 years, and 29.7 kg/m2). Patients taking antihypertensive agents or with renal insufficiency were excluded. All patients were evaluated with a continuous noninvasive arterial blood pressure monitoring (Finapres) in standing (1 min), squatting (1 min), and again standing position (1 min). Patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes were compared with two groups of 40 age-, sex- and BMI-matched healthy subjects. RESULTS Patients with type 1 diabetes and patients with type 2 diabetes showed significantly higher pulse pressure, heart rate, and double product of pulse pressure and heart rate (PP×HR) (type 1: 5,263 vs. 4,121 mmHg/min, P = 0.0004; type 2: 5,359 vs. 4,321 mmHg, P = 0.0023) levels than corresponding control subjects. There were no significant differences between patients with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes regarding pulse pressure (59 vs. 58 mmHg), heart rate (89 vs. 88/min), and PP×HR (5,263 vs. 5,359 mmHg/min). CONCLUSIONS Patients with type 1 diabetes have increased levels of peripheral PP, an indirect marker of arterial stiffness, and PP×HR, an index of pulsatile stress, comparable to those of nonhypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes at similar mean age of 50 years. PMID:20693351

  6. Disruption of endocrine rhythms in sleeping sickness with preserved relationship between hormonal pulsatility and the REM-NREM sleep cycles.

    PubMed

    Brandenberger, G; Buguet, A; Spiegel, K; Stanghellini, A; Muanga, G; Bogui, P; Dumas, M

    1996-09-01

    In human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), sleep and wake episodes are sporadically distributed throughout the day and the night. To determine whether these sleep disturbances affect the 24-h hormone profiles and the normal relationships between hormone pulsatility and sleep stages, polygraphic sleep recordings and concomitant hormone profiles were obtained in 6 African patients with sleeping sickness and in 5 healthy African subjects selected from Abidjan on the Ivory Coast. Polysomnographic recordings were continuous, and blood was taken every 10 min throughout the 24-h period. Plasma was analyzed for cortisol, prolactin, and plasma renin activity (PRA). The 24-h rhythm of cortisol, considered to be an endogenous circadian rhythm, was attenuated in all of the patients except one. However, as in normal subjects, slow wave sleep (SWS) remained associated with the declining phases of the cortisol secretory episodes. Prolactin and PRA profiles, which are strongly influenced by the sleep-wake cycle, did not manifest the nocturnal increase normally associated with the sleep period; instead, they reflected a sporadic distribution of the sleep and wake episodes throughout the 24-h period. In patients with sleeping sickness as in normal subjects, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep began during the descending phases of prolactin pulses. In both groups, PRA reflected the sleep stage distribution with non REM (NREM) sleep occurring during the ascending phases and REM sleep during the descending phases of the PRA oscillations. However, in sleeping sickness patients, the marked sleep fragmentation often did not allow sufficient time for PRA to increase significantly, as is normally the case in subjects with regular NREM-REM sleep cycles. These results demonstrate that, together with the disruption of the sleep-wake cycle, there are profound differences in the temporal organization of the 24-h hormone profiles in humans with African trypanosomiasis. However, the

  7. Time-frequency analysis of neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies for selective detection of pulsatile tissues by avoiding probe-motion artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Tabata, Yuki; Izuwaki, Yusuke; Nakamori, Nobuyuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2015-03-01

    In order to detect the pulsatile tissues in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies by avoiding probe-motion artifact, a time-frequency analysis has been performed in several movie fragments at typical three scenes: (a) a brain-lost, (b) a brain-captured and probe-stabilized, and (c) a brain-captured and probe-swayed ones. The pulsatile tissue, which is a key point of pediatric diagnosis, had successfully detected with an algorithm based on Fourier transform but it had required us to extract the probe-stabilized scene manually by visual observation of the movie. A spatial mean square of echo intensity Etot and a total AC power Ptot over a fan-shape of field of view were evaluated according to a power spectrum of a time-variation of 64 samples of echo intensity at each pixel in each movie fragment split from actual B-mode ultrasonic movies taken at coronal sections of a neonate. The results revealed that (1) significant low Etot was found at the brain-lost scene rather than that at the other scenes, and (2) lower Ptot was found at the probe-stabilized scene rather than the probe-swayed ones. This fact strongly suggests that the Etot and Ptot are promising features for automatic extraction of probe-stabilized scenes. It must lead to detect the pulsatile tissues selectively by avoiding probe-motion artifact and to realize systematic analysis of the whole of our extensive movie archives, which is useful not only for retrospective study of ischemic diseases but also for bedside diagnosis to stabilize the freehand ultrasonic probe.

  8. Finite Element Simulation of Two-Dimensional Pulsatile Blood Flow Through a Stenosed Artery in the Presence of External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimohamadi, Haleh; Imani, Mohsen

    2014-07-01

    This paper introduces the impact of external magnetic field on blood flow patterns in a stenosis artery. Considering the fatty deposited lump, arterial walls as porous media, and pulsatile inflow base on human-heart-beating rate closes our model to the actual stenosis blood artery. In this study, by solving transient fluid dynamic equations in coupled porous and free media, the velocity, temperature, and shear stress distribution along the lump are investigated. The results show that applying 105 magnetic field intensity (MnF) creates two vortexes on the lumps' edges and 15X (16.6X) higher shear stress (temperature) in the stenosis region.

  9. A new kind of auxiliary heart in insects: functional morphology and neuronal control of the accessory pulsatile organs of the cricket ovipositor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In insects, the pumping of the dorsal heart causes circulation of hemolymph throughout the central body cavity, but not within the interior of long body appendages. Hemolymph exchange in these dead-end structures is accomplished by special flow-guiding structures and/or autonomous pulsatile organs (“auxiliary hearts”). In this paper accessory pulsatile organs for an insect ovipositor are described for the first time. We studied these organs in females of the cricket Acheta domesticus by analyzing their functional morphology, neuroanatomy and physiological control. Results The lumen of the four long ovipositor valves is subdivided by longitudinal septa of connective tissue into efferent and afferent hemolymph sinuses which are confluent distally. The countercurrent flow in these sinuses is effected by pulsatile organs which are located at the bases of the ovipositor valves. Each of the four organs consists of a pumping chamber which is compressed by rhythmically contracting muscles. The morphology of the paired organs is laterally mirrored, and there are differences in some details between the dorsal and ventral organs. The compression of the pumping chambers of each valve pair occurs with a left-right alternating rhythm with a frequency of 0.2 to 0.5 Hz and is synchronized between the dorsal and ventral organs. The more anteriorly located genital chamber shows rhythmical lateral movements simultaneous to those of the ovipositor pulsatile organs and probably supports the hemolymph exchange in the abdominal apex region. The left-right alternating rhythm is produced by a central pattern generator located in the terminal ganglion. It requires no sensory feedback for its output since it persists in the completely isolated ganglion. Rhythm-modulating and rhythm-resetting interneurons are identified in the terminal ganglion. Conclusion The circulatory organs of the cricket ovipositor have a unique functional morphology. The pumping apparatus at the base

  10. Rapid Response to High-Dose, Pulsatile Erlotinib in Afatinib-Refractory Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis from Adenocarcinoma of the Lung: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Frank S.

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis occurred in an old female patient who was on a standard dose of afatinib for the treatment of her non-small cell lung cancer harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors when extracranial lesions were still under control. Shifting to high-dose, pulsatile erlotinib dramatically saved her from the devastating condition in a very short period of time. Inadequate afatinib concentration in cerebrospinal fluid is reasonably suspected, and there is a call for clinical trials testing high-dose afatinib in leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. PMID:27790117

  11. Internal Jugular Vein Cross-Sectional Area and Cerebrospinal Fluid Pulsatility in the Aqueduct of Sylvius: A Comparative Study between Healthy Subjects and Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Clive B.; Magnano, Christopher; Belov, Pavel; Krawiecki, Jacqueline; Ramasamy, Deepa P.; Hagemeier, Jesper; Zivadinov, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Constricted cerebral venous outflow has been linked with increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsatility in the aqueduct of Sylvius in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and healthy individuals. This study investigates the relationship between CSF pulsatility and internal jugular vein (IJV) cross-sectional area (CSA) in these two groups, something previously unknown. Methods 65 relapsing-remitting MS patients (50.8% female; mean age = 43.8 years) and 74 healthy controls (HCs) (54.1% female; mean age = 43.9 years) were investigated. CSF flow quantification was performed on cine phase-contrast MRI, while IJV-CSA was calculated using magnetic resonance venography. Statistical analysis involved correlation, and partial least squares correlation analysis (PLSCA). Results PLSCA revealed a significant difference (p<0.001; effect size = 1.072) between MS patients and HCs in the positive relationship between CSF pulsatility and IJV-CSA at C5-T1, something not detected at C2-C4. Controlling for age and cardiovascular risk factors, statistical trends were identified in HCs between: increased net positive CSF flow (NPF) and increased IJV-CSA at C5-C6 (left: r = 0.374, p = 0.016; right: r = 0.364, p = 0.019) and C4 (left: r = 0.361, p = 0.020); and increased net negative CSF flow and increased left IJV-CSA at C5-C6 (r = -0.348, p = 0.026) and C4 (r = -0.324, p = 0.039), whereas in MS patients a trend was only identified between increased NPF and increased left IJV-CSA at C5-C6 (r = 0.351, p = 0.021). Overall, correlations were weaker in MS patients (p = 0.015). Conclusions In healthy adults, increased CSF pulsatility is associated with increased IJV-CSA in the lower cervix (independent of age and cardiovascular risk factors), suggesting a biomechanical link between the two. This relationship is altered in MS patients. PMID:27135831

  12. In vitro pulsatile flow visualization on extracardiac conduits for the right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction: qualitative considerations.

    PubMed

    Yuan, S M; Chang, Q; Guo, Y R; Guo, J Q

    1998-05-01

    Valved homograft conduits play an important role in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) reconstruction for the surgical treatment of complex congenital heart disease. An excellent immediate rather than long-term outcome could be obtained. The hemodynamics for late failure, however, remained unclear. In vitro pulsatile flow visualization was not conducted before. A simplified right heart duplicator system was set up and driven under physiologic conditions. Polystyrene of 0.18 mm in diameter was applied as the tracing particle. Flow characteristics of models of normal pulmonary circulation as well as pulmonary artery atresia with the RVOT reconstructed utilizing valved and non-valved extracardiac conduits were observed. Flow patterns in the normal pulmonary circulatory model were mainly of axial flow associated with small scope of flow disturbances. A single vortex in the right ventricle was noted in diastole. In the pulmonary artery atresia model, a couple of vortexes were found in the right ventricle, a secondary flow in the main pulmonary artery, and a stronger secondary flow than in the normal pulmonary circulatory model in the two branches in both systole and diastole. A secondary flow was found in the proximal, an axial flow was observed in the distal portion of the extracardiac conduit with normal bioprosthetic valves and a secondary flow was observed in the entire conduit with stenotic bioprosthetic valves. The secondary flow intensity became stronger with the development of the stenosis. Severe insufficiency occurred in the bileaflet ceramic tilting-disc prosthesis during the entire cardiac circle, i.e., the prosthesis was in a maximum open position. Severe reverse flow could be found in the extracardiac conduit in the deceleration phase. Concavity of the crank shaft was found by examination to be filled with tracing particles and the prosthesis became stuck. Model of RVOT reconstruction with non-valved conduit yielded reverse flow inside the

  13. Circulating nitric oxide in women affected by weight loss amenorrhea during pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Valenti, S; Cavallero, D; Fazzuoli, L; Minuto, F; Giusti, M

    2005-10-01

    No specific markers of the severity or prognosis of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis disturbances associated with weight loss amenorrhea (WLA) are currently available. Circulating nitric oxide (NO), which is involved in the control of the reproductive function in women and is correlated with body mass index (BMI), at least in over-weight and obese subjects, might be a marker of the severity and/or progression of WLA. To test this hypothesis, we studied circulating NO levels in 11 women (age 27.1 +/- 1.59 yr) affected by WLA for 5.1 +/- 1.0 yr; in all patients hormonal therapy had been discontinued 10.0 +/- 3.15 months earlier. NO, determined by measuring its stable catabolite nitrite/nitrates (NOx), was compared with some clinical parameters and sex hormone levels. Subsequently, changes in NOx during pulsatile GnRH therapy (120 ng/kg bw sc every 120 min) were compared with the clinical and hormonal data. Fifteen normal women (27.3 +/- 1.6 yr) served as a control group. NOx was significantly lower (p<0.01) in WLA (8.8 +/- 2.0 micromol/l) than in control (18.7 +/- 2.5 micromol/l) subjects. No correlation between NOx and clinical parameters was noted in either WLA or control subjects. As a result of GnRH therapy, ovulatory cycles reappeared in 91% of WLA women. During the 1st cycle, periovulatory 17beta-estradiol levels were 110% higher than those noted in controls. During the 2nd cycle, NOx showed a slight increase in the follicular phase (+12% vs 1st cycle) followed by a drop during the luteal phase (-40% from the follicular phase); indeed, at that time, NOx correlated negatively with progesterone in both WLA (rS -0.32, p<0.05) and control (rS -0.48, p<0.05) subjects. NOx correlated with BMI at the time of the 2nd cycle (rS 0.71, p<0.05). In conclusion, this study shows that in WLA patients: 1) NO is low, as in other conditions of chronic anovulation; 2) it does not correlate with clinical data; 3) it takes longer than sex steroids to increase and show normal

  14. Investigation of the effects of dynamic change in curvature and torsion on pulsatile flow in a helical tube.

    PubMed

    Selvarasu, N K C; Tafti, Danesh K

    2012-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death in the world, making the understanding of hemodynamics and the development of treatment options imperative. The effect of motion of the coronary artery due to the motion of the myocardium is not extensively studied. In this work, we focus our investigation on the localized hemodynamic effects of dynamic changes in curvature and torsion. It is our objective to understand and reveal the mechanism by which changes in curvature and torsion contribute towards the observed wall shear stress distribution. Such adverse hemodynamic conditions could have an effect on circumferential intimal thickening. Three-dimensional spatiotemporally resolved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of pulsatile flow with moving wall boundaries were carried out for a simplified coronary artery with physiologically relevant flow parameters. A model with stationary walls is used as the baseline control case. In order to study the effect of curvature and torsion variation on local hemodynamics, this baseline model is compared to models where the curvature, torsion, and both curvature and torsion change. The simulations provided detailed information regarding the secondary flow dynamics. The results suggest that changes in curvature and torsion cause critical changes in local hemodynamics, namely, altering the local pressure and velocity gradients and secondary flow patterns. The wall shear stress (WSS) varies by a maximum of 22% when the curvature changes, by 3% when the torsion changes, and by 26% when both the curvature and torsion change. The oscillatory shear stress (OSI) varies by a maximum of 24% when the curvature changes, by 4% when the torsion changes, and by 28% when both the curvature and torsion change. We demonstrate that these changes are attributed to the physical mechanism associating the secondary flow patterns to the production of vorticity (vorticity flux) due to the wall movement. The secondary flow patterns

  15. Viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump for a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Terumi; Hara, Shintaro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    Estimation of pressure and flow has been an important subject for developing implantable artificial hearts. To realize real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow for a total artificial heart, we propose the table estimation method with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump in which systolic high flow and diastolic low flow phased are generated. The table estimation method utilizes three kinds of tables: viscosity, pressure and flow tables. Viscosity is estimated from the characteristic that differential value in motor speed between systolic and diastolic phases varies depending on viscosity. Potential of this estimation method was investigated using mock circulation system. Glycerin solution diluted with salty water was used to adjust viscosity of fluid. In verification of this method using continuous flow data, fairly good estimation could be possible when differential pulse width modulation (PWM) value of the motor between systolic and diastolic phases was high. In estimation under quasi-pulsatile condition, inertia correction was provided and fairly good estimation was possible when the differential PWM value was high, which was not different from the verification results using continuous flow data. In the experiment of real-time estimation applying moving average method to the estimated viscosity, fair estimation could be possible when the differential PWM value was high, showing that real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow would be possible with this novel estimation method when the differential PWM value would be set high.

  16. Effect of counter-pulsation control of a pulsatile left ventricular assist device on working load variations of the native heart

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background When using a pulsatile left ventricular assist device (LVAD), it is important to reduce the cardiac load variations of the native heart because severe cardiac load variations can induce ventricular arrhythmia. In this study, we investigated the effect of counter-pulsation control of the LVAD on the reduction of cardiac load variation. Methods A ventricular electrocardiogram-based counter-pulsation control algorithm for a LVAD was implemented, and the effects of counter-pulsation control of the LVAD on the reduction of the working load variations of the left ventricle were determined in three animal experiments. Results Deviations of the working load of the left ventricle were reduced by 51.3%, 67.9%, and 71.5% in each case, and the beat-to-beat variation rates in the working load were reduced by 84.8%, 82.7%, and 88.2% in each ease after counter-pulsation control. There were 3 to 12 premature ventricle contractions (PVCs) before counter-pulsation control, but no PVCs were observed during counter-pulsation control. Conclusions Counter-pulsation control of the pulsatile LVAD can reduce severe cardiac load variations, but the average working load is not markedly affected by application of counter-pulsation control because it is also influenced by temporary cardiac outflow variations. We believe that counter-pulsation control of the LVAD can improve the long-term safety of heart failure patients equipped with LVADs. PMID:24708625

  17. Interleukin 1. alpha. inhibits prostaglandin E sub 2 release to suppress pulsatile release of luteinizing hormone but not follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F. ); Karara, A. ); Gonzalez, M.C. )

    1991-04-01

    Interleukin 1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), a powerful endogenous pyrogen released from monocytes and macrophages by bacterial endotoxin, stimulates corticotropin, prolactin, and somatotropin release and inhibits thyrotropin release by hypothalamic action. The authors injected recombinant human IL-1{alpha} into the third cerebral ventricle, to study its effect on the pulsatile release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in conscious, freely moving, ovariectomized rats. Intraventricular injection of 0.25 pmol of IL-1{alpha} caused an almost immediate reduction of plasma LH concentration. To determine the mechanism of the suppression of LH release, mediobasal hypothalamic fragments were incubated in vitro with IL-1{alpha} (10 pM) and the release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} into the medium was measured by RIA in the presence or absence of nonrepinephrine. 1{alpha} reduced basal LHRH release and blocked LHRH release induced by nonrepinephrine. In conclusion, IL-1{alpha} suppresses LH but not FSH release by an almost complete cessation of pulsatile release of LH in the castrated rat. The mechanism of this effect appears to be by inhibition of prostaglandin E{sub 2}-mediated release of LHRH.

  18. On the characterization of a non-Newtonian blood analog and its response to pulsatile flow downstream of a simplified stenosis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Andrew M; Johnston, Clifton R; Rival, David E

    2014-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to investigate the influence of a non-Newtonian blood analog of aqueous xanthan gum on flow separation in laminar and transitional environments and in both steady and pulsatile flow. Initial steady pressure drop measurements in laminar and transitional flow for a Newtonian analog showed an extension of laminar behavior to Reynolds number (Re) ~ 2900 for the non-Newtonian case. On a macroscale level, this showed good agreement with porcine blood. Subsequently, PIV was used to measure flow patterns and turbulent statistics downstream of an axisymmetric stenosis in the aqueous xanthan gum solution and for a Newtonian analog at Re ~ 520 and Re ~ 1250. The recirculation length for the non-Newtonian case was reduced at Re ~ 520 resultant from increased viscosity at low shear strain rates. At Re ~ 1250, peak turbulent intensities and turbulent shear stresses were dampened by the non-Newtonian fluid in close proximity to the blockage outlet. Although the non-Newtonian case's recirculation length was increased at peak pulsatile flow, turbulent shear stress was found to be elevated for the Newtonian case downstream from the blockage, suggesting shear layer fragmentation and radial transport. Our findings conclude that the xanthan gum elastic polymer prolongs flow stabilization, which in turn emphasizes the importance of non-Newtonian blood characteristics on the resulting flow patterns in such cardiovascular environments. PMID:23975383

  19. Pulsatile flow characterization in a vessel phantom with elastic wall using ultrasonic particle image velocimetry technique: the impact of vessel stiffness on flow dynamics.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ming; Niu, Lili; Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Abbott, Derek; Zhou, Qifa; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to experimentally investigate the impact of vessel stiffness on the flow dynamics of pulsatile vascular flow. Vessel phantoms with elastic walls were fabricated using polyvinyl alcohol cryogel to result in stiffness ranging from 60.9 to 310.3 kPa and tested with pulsatile flows using a flow circulation set-up. Two-dimensional instantaneous and time-dependent flow velocity and shear rate vector fields were measured using ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV). The waveforms of peak velocities measured by EchoPIV were compared with the ultrasonic pulse Doppler spectrum, and the measuring accuracy was validated. The cyclic vessel wall motion and flow pressure were obtained as well. The results showed that vessel stiffening influenced the waveforms resulting from vessel wall distension and flow pressure, and the fields of flow velocity and shear rate. The stiffer vessel had smaller inner diameter variation, larger pulse pressure and median pressure. The velocity and shear rate maximized at peak systole for all vessels. The results showed a decrease in wall shear stress for a stiffer vessel, which can initiate the atherosclerotic process. Our study elucidates the impact of vessel stiffness on several flow dynamic parameters, and also demonstrates the EchoPIV technique to be a useful and powerful tool in cardiovascular research.

  20. Viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump for a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, Terumi; Hara, Shintaro; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Abe, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    Estimation of pressure and flow has been an important subject for developing implantable artificial hearts. To realize real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow for a total artificial heart, we propose the table estimation method with quasi-pulsatile modulation of rotary blood pump in which systolic high flow and diastolic low flow phased are generated. The table estimation method utilizes three kinds of tables: viscosity, pressure and flow tables. Viscosity is estimated from the characteristic that differential value in motor speed between systolic and diastolic phases varies depending on viscosity. Potential of this estimation method was investigated using mock circulation system. Glycerin solution diluted with salty water was used to adjust viscosity of fluid. In verification of this method using continuous flow data, fairly good estimation could be possible when differential pulse width modulation (PWM) value of the motor between systolic and diastolic phases was high. In estimation under quasi-pulsatile condition, inertia correction was provided and fairly good estimation was possible when the differential PWM value was high, which was not different from the verification results using continuous flow data. In the experiment of real-time estimation applying moving average method to the estimated viscosity, fair estimation could be possible when the differential PWM value was high, showing that real-time viscosity-adjusted estimation of pressure head and pump flow would be possible with this novel estimation method when the differential PWM value would be set high. PMID:27022734

  1. Non-pulsatile subjective tinnitus without hearing loss may be caused by undetectable sounds originating from venous system of the brain.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Devrim; Caylan, Refik

    2008-08-01

    Tinnitus is a common otologic symptom, which can interfere with the daily activities of life. Subjective tinnitus is perception of sound only heard by the patient. The most common type of tinnitus is non-pulsatile subjective tinnitus (NST), which is believed to originate from auditory pathway, mostly from central nervous system. This hypothesis proposes that an important percentage of NST cases are actually misdiagnosed venous type tinnitus cases. Recent studies have demonstrated that dural-jugular system is dominant only in the horizontal body position. Jugular flow is at maximum during this position possibly making any noise generated within the dural-jugular system louder. As body assumes more vertical positions it gradually leaves its function to the extrajugular venous system of the brain. When there is an objective and/or a pulsating sound it is easier to suspect a vascular etiology and diagnose it clinically or radiologically. However, if a vascular pathology causes a non-pulsatile complaint that can not be heard by the examiner or can not be detected clinically or radiologically, it is bound to be misdiagnosed as central tinnitus. Most NST cases experience their symptoms especially at night. Night time usually allows the combination of silent ambience and horizontal body position to take place. We believe that in some NST cases, especially those without hearing loss (HL), the main cause of tinnitus is venous in origin.

  2. Evaluation of pulsatility index and diameter of the jugular vein and superficial body temperature as physiological indices of temperament in weaned beef calves: relationship with serum cortisol concentrations, rectal temp..

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between temperament, pulsatility index and diameter of the jugular vein, and body temperature was assessed in Angus crossbred calves (262±24.9 days old). Temperament scores were used to classify calves as calm (n=31), intermediate (n=32), or temperamental (n=28). Blood samples were ...

  3. Experimental studies of pulsatile flows through compliant tubes undergoing forced wall motion: Applications to hemodynamics and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Victoria Carolyn Savedge

    higher Sexl-Womersley number, and imposed physiological wall motion is found to introduce reverse flow near the wall that is not present if the tube is instead allowed to move freely. Additionally, work done in stented coronary geometries showed reduced wall shear stress downstream of simulated drug-eluting stents as opposed to traditional stents, suggesting a possible mechanism of complication. In the second series of experiments, sinusoidal input flow is driven through a compliant silicone model in a series of experiments to investigate the effects of wall motion. In these experiments, the tube wall is deformed sinusoidally with an amplitude of approximately ten percent of its radius. Experiments are conducted using varying values of the parameters alpha and b=Dxnn where Deltax is the cross-stream averaged periodic displacement of a fluid particle undergoing pulsatile motion. The transitional behavior of these flows is analyzed via their energy spectra, and their stability and wall shear stress behaviors are examined under varied offsets between the timing of the wall motion waveform and the flow rate waveform. At the lowest value of beta studied, namely beta = 240, it was found that the energy spectrum was independent of phase for alpha = 10.6, whereas for smaller values of alpha or higher values of beta, a strong phase-dependence was observed in the energy spectrum of the flow, with the energy values peaking twice with each wave period. This continuously unstable behavior at high alpha is found to be in good agreement with the locations of instability predicted by applying the Fjortoft condition to an elastic tube flow theory. Additionally, in experiments conducted with a phase offset between the sinusoidal input flow and the sinusoidal wall motion, it was found that wall shear stress oscillates in phase with the wall motion, and that the distinct two-peak cycle of the energy spectrum is disrupted as the offset grows.

  4. Interpretation of geophysical logs, aquifer tests, and water levels in wells in and near the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Upper Gwynedd Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 2000-02

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Cinotto, Peter J.; Conger, Randall W.; Bird, Philip H.; Pracht, Karl A.

    2005-01-01

    Ground water in the vicinity of various industrial facilities in Upper Gwynedd Township and Lansdale Borough, Montgomery County, Pa., is contaminated with various volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The 2-square-mile area was placed on the National Priorities List as the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1989. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical logging, aquifer testing, water-level monitoring, and streamflow measurements in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 beginning autumn 2000 to assist the USEPA in developing an understanding of the hydrogeologic framework in the area as part of the USEPA Remedial Investigation. The study area is underlain by Triassic and Jurassic-age sandstones, siltstones, and shales of the Lockatong Formation and the Brunswick Group. Regionally, these rocks strike northeast and dip to the northwest. The sequence of rocks form a fractured-sedimentary-rock aquifer that acts as a set of confined to partially confined layered aquifers of differing permeabilities. The aquifers are recharged by precipitation and discharge to streams and wells. The Wissahickon Creek headwaters are less than 1 mile northeast of the study area, and this stream flows southwest to bisect North Penn Area 7. Ground water is pumped in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 for industrial use and public supply. The USGS collected geophysical logs for 16 wells that ranged in depth from 50 to 623 feet. Aquifer-interval-isolation testing was done in 9 of the 16 wells, for a total of 30 zones tested. A multiple-well aquifer test was conducted by monitoring the response of 14 wells to pumping a 600-ft deep production well in February and March 2002. In addition, water levels were monitored continuously in three wells in the area and streamflow was measured quarterly at two sites on Wissahickon Creek from December 2000 through September 2002. Geophysical logging identified water-bearing zones associated with

  5. Borehole geophysical logging and aquifer-isolation tests conducted in well MG-1693 at North Penn Area 5 Superfund Site near Colmar, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, Philip H.

    2006-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logging and aquifer-isolation (packer) tests were conducted in well MG-1693 (NP-87) at the North Penn Area 5 Superfund Site near Colmar, Montgomery County, Pa. Objectives of the study were to identify the depth and yield of water-bearing zones, occurrence of vertical borehole flow, and effects of pumping on water levels in nearby wells. Caliper, natural-gamma, single-point-resistance, fluid-temperature, fluid-resistivity, heatpulse-flowmeter, and borehole-video logs were collected. Vertical borehole-fluid movement direction and rate were measured under nonpumping conditions. The suite of logs was used to locate water-bearing fractures, determine zones of vertical borehole-fluid movement, and select depths to set packers. Aquifer-isolation tests were conducted to sample discrete intervals and to determine specific capacities of water-bearing zones and effects of pumping individual zones on water levels in two nearby monitor wells. Specific capacities of isolated zones during aquifer-isolation tests ranged from 0.03 to 3.09 (gal/min)/ft (gallons per minute per foot). Fractures identified by borehole geophysical methods as water-producing or water-receiving zones produced water when isolated and pumped. Water enters the borehole primarily through high-angle fractures at 416 to 435 ft bls (feet below land surface) and 129 to 136 ft bls. Water exits the borehole through a high-angle fracture at 104 to 107 ft bls, a broken casing joint at 82 ft bls, and sometimes as artesian flow through the top of the well. Thirteen intervals were selected for aquifer-isolation testing, using a straddle-packer assembly. The specific capacity of interval 1 was 2.09 (gal/min)/ft. The specific capacities of intervals 2, 3, and 4 were similar: 0.27, 0.30, and 0.29 (gal/min)/ft,respectively. The specific capacities of intervals 5, 6, 7, 8, and 10 were similar: 0.03, 0.04, 0.09, 0.09, and 0.04 (gal/min)/ft,respectively. Intervals 9, 11, and 12 each showed a strong

  6. The Effect of Intermittent Alcohol Vapor or Pulsatile Heroin on Somatic and Negative Affective Indices during Spontaneous Withdrawal in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Angela M.; Reis, Daniel J.; Powell, Alexa S.; Neira, Louis J.; Nealey, Kathryn A.; Ziegler, Cole E.; Kloss, Nina; Bilimoria, Jessica L.; Smith, Chelsea E.; Walker, Brendan M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Once dependent on alcohol or opioids, negative affect may accompany withdrawal. Dependent individuals are hypothesized to “self-medicate” in order to cope with withdrawal, which promotes escalated drug or alcohol use. Objectives The current study aimed to develop a reliable animal model to assess symptoms that occur during spontaneous alcohol and opioid withdrawal. Methods Dependence was induced using intermittent alcohol exposure or pulsatile heroin delivery and assessed for the presence of withdrawal symptoms during acute withdrawal by measuring somatic signs, behavior in the forced swim test (FST) and air-puff induced 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs). Additional animals subjected to eight weeks of alcohol vapor exposure were evaluated for altered somatic signs, operant alcohol self-administration and 22-kHz USV production, as well as performance in the elevated plus-maze (EPM). Results During spontaneous withdrawal from pulsatile heroin or intermittent alcohol vapor, animals displayed increased somatic withdrawal signs, FST immobility and 22-kHz USV production, but did not show any behavioral change in the EPM unless the duration of exposure was extended to four weeks. Following eight weeks of alcohol vapor exposure, animals displayed somatic withdrawal signs, escalated alcohol self-administration and increased 22-kHz USVs. Conclusions These paradigms provide consistent methods to evaluate the behavioral ramifications, and neurobiological substrates, of alcohol and opioid dependence during spontaneous withdrawal. As immobility in the FST and percent open-arm time in the EPM were dissociable, with 22-kHz USVs paralleling immobility in the FST, assessment of air-puff induced 22-kHz USVs could provide an ethologically-valid alternative to the FST. PMID:22461104

  7. A resolution congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon (THON) on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Specter, Arlen [D-PA

    2010-04-19

    04/19/2010 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S2427) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. A resolution congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2012-03-29

    03/29/2012 Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S2257) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. A resolution congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon ("THON") on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2011-03-29

    03/30/2011 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (text: CR S2000) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. A resolution congratulating the Pennsylvania State University IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon ("THON") on its continued success in support of the Four Diamonds Fund at Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2014-03-11

    03/11/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S1527-1528; text as passed Senate: CR S1521-1522) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. Comparison of a pulsatile blood pump and a peristaltic roller pump during hemoperfusion treatment in a canine model of paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Chan; Park, Chan Young; Choi, Seong Wook; Kim, Jeong Chul; Lim, Ki Moo; Kim, Kyuseok; Jung, Sung Koo; Kwak, Young Ho; Shin, Sang Do; Jo, Ik Joon; Suh, Gil Joon; Min, Byoung Goo

    2008-07-01

    This study examined the treatment efficacy and the damage to the blood during hemoperfusion for treating paraquat poisoning using two blood pump mechanisms. Paraquat-poisoned animal models were prepared. A conventional hemodialysis machine, AK90, with a peristaltic roller pump and a cardiopulmonary support system, T-PLS, with a pulsatile blood pump were used during the animal experiments. A total of 12 dogs were treated with hemoperfusion using a charcoal column. Six dogs were treated with hemoperfusion and T-PLS, and the other six were treated with AK90. A paraquat dose of 30 mg/kg was administrated by an intravenous injection. Both pumps maintained blood flow rates of 125 mL/min measured by an ultrasonic flowmeter. For anticoagulation, heparin was administrated by an initial bolus (250 IU/kg) and a continuous injection (100 IU/kg/h). During the experiments, T-PLS and AK90 showed a similar toxin removal efficacy. Both devices decreased the plasma paraquat concentration to 10% of the initial dose within 4-h hemoperfusion. The two pumps showed similar hemolysis properties with acceptable levels. Although T-PLS was developed as a cardiopulmonary bypass system, it can also be used as a hemoperfusion treatment device. PMID:18638308

  12. Differential effects of short-term fasting on pulsatile thyrotropin, gonadotropin, and alpha-subunit secretion in healthy men--a clinical research center study.

    PubMed

    Samuels, M H; Kramer, P

    1996-01-01

    In healthy subjects, short term fasting suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes, with decreased serum levels of TSH and LH. However, effects of fasting on pulsatile release of TSH, LH, FSH, and alpha-subunit are less clear. Eleven healthy young men each underwent two 2-day studies: a baseline study during normal caloric intake and a fasting study during 56 h of caloric deprivation. During the final 24 h of each study, blood samples were drawn every 15 min for measurement of serum TSH, LH, FSH, and alpha-subunit pulses. Fifty-six hours of fasting caused a 50% suppression of mean TSH levels and TSH pulse amplitude, without altering TSH pulse frequency. Nocturnal TSH pulse amplitude decreased by 60%, with abolition of the usual nocturnal TSH surge. Fasting suppressed mean LH levels and LH pulse amplitude by 30%, without affecting LH pulse frequency. In contrast, mean FSH levels only decreased by 13%, without changes in FSH pulse parameters, whereas mean alpha-subunit levels and pulse amplitude decreased by 20%. These data show that short term fasting has a greater suppressive effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis than on the HPG axis. Within the HPG axis, FSH is more resistant to fasting-induced suppression than LH, implying discordant regulation of the two gonadotropins during nutritional deprivation. alpha-Subunit suppression during fasting appears to parallel that seen for LH.

  13. Central Pulsatile Pressure and Flow Relationship in the Time and Frequency Domain to Characterise Hydraulic Input to the Brain and Cerebral Vascular Impedance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Ok; O'Rourke, Michael F; Adji, Audrey; Avolio, Alberto P

    2016-01-01

    In the time domain, pulsatile flow and pressure can be characterised as the ratio of the late systolic boost of flow or pressure to the pulse amplitude so as to estimate the hydraulic input to the brain. While vascular impedance has been widely used to represent the load presented to the heart by the systemic circulation, it has not been applied to the cerebral circulation.We set out to study the relationship between the pressure and the flow augmentation index (AIx) in the time domain and to determine cerebral vascular impedance using aortic blood pressure and cerebral blood flow waveforms in the frequency domain. Twenty-four young subjects (aged 21-39 years) were recruited; aortic pressure was derived using SphygmoCor from radial pressure. Flow waveforms were recorded from the middle cerebral artery. In three subjects, we performed the Valsalva manoeuvre to investigate their response to physiological intervention. There was a linear relationship between flow and pressure AIx, and cerebral impedance values were similar to those estimated for low resistance vascular beds. Substantial change in pressure and flow wave contour was observed during the Valsalva manoeuvre; however, the relationship in both the time and the frequency domains were unchanged. This confirms that aortic pressure and cerebral flow waveform can be used to study cerebral impedance. PMID:27165927

  14. Full dimensional computer simulations to study pulsatile blood flow in vessels, aortic arch and bifurcated veins: Investigation of blood viscosity and turbulent effects.

    PubMed

    Sultanov, Renat A; Guster, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    We report computational results of blood flow through a model of the human aortic arch and a vessel of actual diameter and length. A realistic pulsatile flow is used in all simulations. Calculations for bifurcation type vessels are also carried out and presented. Different mathematical methods for numerical solution of the fluid dynamics equations have been considered. The non-Newtonian behaviour of the human blood is investigated together with turbulence effects. A detailed time-dependent mathematical convergence test has been carried out. The results of computer simulations of the blood flow in vessels of three different geometries are presented: for pressure, strain rate and velocity component distributions we found significant disagreements between our results obtained with realistic non-Newtonian treatment of human blood and the widely used method in the literature: a simple Newtonian approximation. A significant increase of the strain rate and, as a result, the wall shear stress distribution, is found in the region of the aortic arch. Turbulent effects are found to be important, particularly in the case of bifurcation vessels. PMID:19964834

  15. Association of Renal Resistive Index, Renal Pulsatility Index, Systemic Hypertension, and Albuminuria with Survival in Dogs with Pituitary-Dependent Hyperadrenocorticism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Yin; Lien, Yu-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    An increased renal resistive index (RI) and albuminuria are markers of target organ damage secondary to systemic hypertension. This study evaluated associations between systemic blood pressure (SBP), renal RI, pulsatility index (PI), and albuminuria in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH). Predictors of overall mortality were investigated. Twenty client-owned dogs with PDH and 20 clinically healthy client-owned dogs as matched controls were included. Incidence rates of systemic hypertension (SBP ≥ 160 mmHg), albuminuria, and increased renal RI (≥ 0.70) and PI (≥ 1.45) in the control group were 5%, 0%, 5%, and 0%, respectively, compared to 35%, 40%, 50%, and 35%, respectively, in the PDH group (P = 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P = 0.001, resp.). No association between systemic hypertension, renal RI, renal PI, and albuminuria was observed. PDH was the only predictor of albuminuria and increased renal RI. Survival was not affected by increased renal PI, systemic hypertension, or albuminuria. Increased renal RI (≥ 0.70) was the only predictor of overall mortality in dogs with PDH. PMID:27340403

  16. Association of educational achievement with pulsatile arterial diameter change of the common carotid artery: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study, 1987-1992.

    PubMed

    Din-Dzietham, R; Liao, D; Diez-Roux, A; Nieto, F J; Paton, C; Howard, G; Brown, A; Carnethon, M; Tyroler, H A

    2000-10-01

    Education is strongly inversely associated with common carotid artery intima-media thickness in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. The authors extended the ARIC study of preclinical atherosclerosis by evaluating the cross-sectional association of education with common carotid artery elasticity. This study included 10,091 Black and White men and women aged 45-64 years who were free of clinical coronary heart disease and stroke/transient ischemic attack. Arterial elasticity was assessed by pulsatile arterial diameter change (PADC), derived from phase-locked echo-tracking. The smaller the PADC, the stiffer the artery. Education was categorized into grade school, high school without graduation, high school with graduation, vocational school, some college, and graduate/professional school. PADC was directly associated with educational attainment. The mean PADCs, adjusted for age, height, diastolic diameter, systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure (linear and squared), ethnicity, gender, and smoking status, in successively higher education strata were 402 (standard error (SE) 5), 403 (SE 4), 407 (SE 3), 413 (SE 4), 416 (SE 2), and 417 (SE 4) microm (p = 0.007). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time such an association has been reported. If arterial dilation impairment precedes arterial wall thickening in the atherosclerotic process, as recent studies on endothelial dysfunction suggest, these results indicate that low socioeconomic status may be associated with early arterial pathophysiologic changes-an effect that appears to be mediated by established cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  17. Microseismic monitoring of CO2 injection at the Penn West Enhanced Oil Recovery pilot project, Canada: implications for detection of wellbore leakage.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Garzón, Patricia; Bohnhoff, Marco; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Zambrano-Narváez, Gonzalo; Chalaturnyk, Rick

    2013-09-02

    A passive seismic monitoring campaign was carried out in the frame of a CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) pilot project in Alberta, Canada. Our analysis focuses on a two-week period during which prominent downhole pressure fluctuations in the reservoir were accompanied by a leakage of CO2 and CH4 along the monitoring well equipped with an array of short-period borehole geophones. We applied state of the art seismological processing schemes to the continuous seismic waveform recordings. During the analyzed time period we did not find evidence of induced micro-seismicity associated with CO2 injection. Instead, we identified signals related to the leakage of CO2 and CH4, in that seven out of the eight geophones show a clearly elevated noise level framing the onset time of leakage along the monitoring well. Our results confirm that micro-seismic monitoring of reservoir treatment can contribute towards improved reservoir monitoring and leakage detection.

  18. An in situ method to quantitatively determine dissolved free drug concentrations in vitro in the presence of polymer excipients using pulsatile microdialysis (PMD).

    PubMed

    Vejani, Charchil; Bellantone, Robert A

    2015-12-30

    In drug formulations containing polymer excipients, the effects of the polymer on the dissolved free drug concentration and resulting dissolution or release can be important, especially for poorly soluble drugs. In this study, an in vitro method based on pulsatile microdialysis (PMD) was developed to quantitatively determine dissolved free concentrations of drugs in the presence of polymers in aqueous media in situ (e.g., in place within the system being characterized). Formulations were made by dissolving various ratios of the drug griseofulvin and polymer PVP K30 in water and allowing the mix to equilibrate. A PMD probe was immersed in each mixture and the dissolved free drug concentrations were determined in the PMD samples. The experimental procedure and the equations used for data analysis are presented. To assess the consistency of data, a binding model was fit to the data obtained using PMD by calculating the dissolved free drug fraction fD for each drug-polymer ratio in solution, and obtaining the product of the binding stoichiometry and binding constant (νK per mole of polymer) from the slope of a plot of (1-fD)/fD vs. the molar polymer concentration. For comparison, equilibrium binding experiments were also performed at 23C, and the determined value of νK was similar to the value found using PMD. Experiments were performed at three temperatures, and a plot of ln (νK) vs. 1/T was linear and a binding enthalpy of -110.9±4.4J/mol of monomer was calculated from its slope. It was concluded that PMD can be used to determine the dissolved free drug concentrations in situ, which allows characterization of the drug-polymer interaction, even for low drug concentrations. This information may be important in modeling the dissolution or release of drugs from formulations containing polymers.

  19. The NK3 Receptor Antagonist ESN364 Interrupts Pulsatile LH Secretion and Moderates Levels of Ovarian Hormones Throughout the Menstrual Cycle.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Graeme L; Hoveyda, Hamid R; Clarke, Iain J; Ramaswamy, Suresh; Plant, Tony M; Rose, Claudia; Millar, Robert P

    2015-11-01

    Women's health disorders such as uterine fibroids and endometriosis are currently treated by GnRH modulators that effectively suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R) is an alternative target with an important role in the modulation of this axis. In this report, we demonstrate that systemic administration of an NK3R antagonist (ESN364) prolongs the LH interpulse interval in ovarectomized ewes and significantly lowers plasma LH and FSH concentrations in castrated nonhuman primates (Macaca fascicularis). Moreover, daily oral dosing of ESN364 throughout the menstrual cycle in M fascicularis lowered plasma estradiol levels in a dose-dependent manner, although nadir levels of estradiol were maintained well above menopausal levels. Nevertheless, estradiol levels during the follicular phase were sufficiently inhibited at all doses to preclude the triggering of ovulation as evidenced by the absence of the LH surge and failure of a subsequent luteal phase rise in plasma progesterone concentrations, consistent with the absence of normal cycle changes in the uterus. Apart from the point at surge, FSH levels were not altered over the course of the menstrual cycle. These effects of ESN364 were reversible upon cessation of drug treatment. Together these data support the proposed role of neurokinin B-NK3R signaling in the control of pulsatile GnRH secretion. Furthermore, in contrast to GnRH antagonists, NK3R antagonists induce a partial suppression of estradiol and thereby offer a viable therapeutic approach to the treatment of ovarian sex hormone disorders with a mitigated risk of menopausal-like adverse events in response to long-term drug exposure.

  20. The NK3 Receptor Antagonist ESN364 Interrupts Pulsatile LH Secretion and Moderates Levels of Ovarian Hormones Throughout the Menstrual Cycle.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Graeme L; Hoveyda, Hamid R; Clarke, Iain J; Ramaswamy, Suresh; Plant, Tony M; Rose, Claudia; Millar, Robert P

    2015-11-01

    Women's health disorders such as uterine fibroids and endometriosis are currently treated by GnRH modulators that effectively suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R) is an alternative target with an important role in the modulation of this axis. In this report, we demonstrate that systemic administration of an NK3R antagonist (ESN364) prolongs the LH interpulse interval in ovarectomized ewes and significantly lowers plasma LH and FSH concentrations in castrated nonhuman primates (Macaca fascicularis). Moreover, daily oral dosing of ESN364 throughout the menstrual cycle in M fascicularis lowered plasma estradiol levels in a dose-dependent manner, although nadir levels of estradiol were maintained well above menopausal levels. Nevertheless, estradiol levels during the follicular phase were sufficiently inhibited at all doses to preclude the triggering of ovulation as evidenced by the absence of the LH surge and failure of a subsequent luteal phase rise in plasma progesterone concentrations, consistent with the absence of normal cycle changes in the uterus. Apart from the point at surge, FSH levels were not altered over the course of the menstrual cycle. These effects of ESN364 were reversible upon cessation of drug treatment. Together these data support the proposed role of neurokinin B-NK3R signaling in the control of pulsatile GnRH secretion. Furthermore, in contrast to GnRH antagonists, NK3R antagonists induce a partial suppression of estradiol and thereby offer a viable therapeutic approach to the treatment of ovarian sex hormone disorders with a mitigated risk of menopausal-like adverse events in response to long-term drug exposure. PMID:26305889

  1. Transmastoid reshaping of the sigmoid sinus: preliminary study of a novel surgical method to quiet pulsatile tinnitus of an unrecognized vascular origin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chong Sun; Kim, So Young; Choi, Hyunseok; Koo, Ja-Won; Yoo, Shin-Young; An, Gwang Seok; Lee, Kyogu; Choi, Inyong; Song, Jae-Jin

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE A dominant sigmoid sinus with focal dehiscence or thinning (DSSD/T) of the overlying bony wall is a commonly encountered, but frequently overlooked, cause of vascular pulsatile tinnitus (VPT). Also, the pathophysiological mechanism of sound perception in patients with VPT remains poorly understood. In the present study, a novel surgical method, termed transmastoid SS-reshaping surgery, was introduced to ameliorate VPT in patients with DSSD/T. The authors reviewed a case series, analyzed the surgical outcomes, and suggested the pathophysiological mechanism of sound perception. The theoretical background underlying VPT improvement after transmastoid SS-reshaping surgery was also explored. METHODS Eight patients with VPT that was considered attributable to DSSD/T underwent transmastoid SS-reshaping surgery between February 2010 and February 2015. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 9.5 months (range 4-13 months). Transmastoid SS-reshaping surgery featured simple mastoidectomy, partial compression of the SS using harvested cortical bone chips, and reinforcement of the bony SS wall with bone cement. Perioperative medical records, imaging results, and audiological findings were comprehensively reviewed. RESULTS In 7 of the 8 patients (87.5%), the VPT abated immediately after surgery. Statistically significant improvements in tinnitus loudness and distress were evident on numeric rating scales. Three patients with preoperative ipsilesional low-frequency hearing loss exhibited postoperative improvements in their low-frequency hearing thresholds. No major postoperative complications were encountered except in the first subject, who experienced increased intracranial pressure postoperatively. This subsided after a revision operation for partial decompression of the SS. CONCLUSIONS Transmastoid SS-reshaping surgery may be a good surgical option in patients with DSSD/T, a previously unrecognized cause of VPT. Redistribution of severely asymmetrical blood flow

  2. Characterization of waste rock associated with acid drainage at the Penn Mine, California, by ground-based visible to short-wave infrared reflectance spectroscopy assisted by digital mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montero, S.I.C.; Brimhall, G.H.; Alpers, C.N.; Swayze, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Prior to remediation at the abandoned Cu-Zn Penn Mine in the Foothills massive sulfide belt of the Sierra Nevada, CA, acid mine drainage (AMD) was created, in part, by the subaerial oxidation of sulfides exposed on several waste piles. To support remediation efforts, a mineralogical study of the waste piles was undertaken by acquiring reflectance spectra (measured in the visible to short-wave infrared range of light (0.35-2.5 ??m) using a portable, digitally integrated pen tablet PC mapping system with differential global positioning system and laser rangefinder support. Analysis of the spectral data made use of a continuum removal and band-shape comparison method, and of reference spectral libraries of end-member minerals and mineral mixtures. Identification of secondary Fe-bearing minerals focused on band matching in the region between 0.43 and 1.3 ??m. Identification of sheet and other silicates was based on band-shape analysis in the region between 1.9 and 2.4 ??m. Analysis of reflectance spectra of characterized rock samples from the mine helped in gauging the spectral response to particle size and mixtures. The resulting mineral maps delineated a pattern of accumulation of secondary Fe minerals, wherein centers of copiapite and jarosite that formed at low pH (<3) were surrounded successively by goethite and hematite, which mark progressive increases in pH. This pattern represents the evolution of acid solutions discharged from the pyritic waste piles and the subsequent accumulation of secondary precipitates by hydrolysis reactions. The results highlight the high capacity of the pyritic waste to release further acid mine drainage into the environment, as well as the effectiveness of the mapping method to detect subtle changes in surface mineralogy and to produce maps useful to agencies responsible for remediating the site. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of borehole geophysical logging, aquifer-isolation tests, distribution of contaminants, and water-level measurements at the North Penn Area 5 Superfund Site, Bucks and Montgomery counties, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, Philip H.; Conger, Randall W.

    2002-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logging and aquiferisolation (packer) tests were conducted at the North Penn Area 5 Superfund site in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, Pa. Caliper, naturalgamma, single-point-resistance, fluid-temperature, fluid-resistivity, heatpulse-flowmeter, and digital acoustic-televiewer logs and borehole television surveys were collected in 32 new and previously drilled wells that ranged in depth from 68 to 302 feet. Vertical borehole-fluid movement direction and rate were measured with a high-resolution heatpulse flowmeter under nonpumping conditions. The suite of logs was used to locate water-bearing fractures, determine zones of vertical borehole- fluid movement, select depths to set packers, and locate appropriate screen intervals for reconstructing new wells as monitoring wells. Aquifer-isolation tests were conducted in four wells to sample discrete intervals and to determine specific capacities of discrete water-bearing zones. Specific capacities of isolated zones during packer testing ranged from 0.12 to 15.30 gallons per minute per foot. Most fractures identified by borehole geophysical methods as water-producing or water-receiving zones produced water when isolated and pumped. The acoustic-televiewer logs define two basic fracture sets, bedding-plane partings with a mean strike of N. 62? E. and a mean dip of 27? NW., and high-angle fractures with a mean strike of N. 58? E. and a mean dip of 72? SE. Correlation of heatpulse-flowmeter data and acoustic-televiewer logs showed 83 percent of identified water-bearing fractures were high-angle fractures.

  4. A Reevaluation of the Question: Is the Pubertal Resurgence in Pulsatile GnRH Release in the Male Rhesus Monkey (Macaca mulatta) Associated With a Gonad-Independent Augmentation of GH Secretion?

    PubMed

    Shahab, M; Trujillo, M Vargas; Plant, T M

    2015-10-01

    A somatic signal has been posited to trigger the pubertal resurgence in pulsatile GnRH secretion that initiates puberty in highly evolved primates. That GH might provide such a signal emerged in 2000 as a result of a study reporting that circulating nocturnal GH concentrations in castrated juvenile male monkeys increased in a 3-week period immediately preceding the pubertal resurgence of LH secretion. The present study was conducted to reexamine this intriguing relationship, again in an agonadal model. Four castrated juvenile male monkeys were implanted with indwelling jugular catheters, housed in remote sampling cages, and subjected to 24 hours of sequential blood sampling (every 30 min) every 2 weeks from 19.5 to 22 months of age. Twenty-four-hour profiles of circulating GH concentrations were analyzed using the pulse detection algorithm, PULSAR, and developmental changes in pulsatile GH release with respect to the initiation of the pubertal rise of LH secretion (week 0; observed between 22.5 and 32 mo of age) were examined for significance by a repeated-measures ANOVA. Changes in the parameters of pulsatile GH secretion, including mean 24-hour GH concentration and GH pulse frequency and pulse amplitude for 3 (n = 4) and 6 (n = 3) months before week 0 were unremarkable and nonsignificant. These findings fail to confirm those of the earlier study and lead us to conclude that the timing of the pubertal resurgence of GnRH release in the male monkey is not dictated by GH. Reasons for the discrepancy between the two studies are unclear. PMID:26181107

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effect of Channa striatus Extract on Measurement of the Uterus, Pulsatility Index, Resistive Index of Uterine Artery and Superficial Skin Wound Artery in Post Lower Segment Caesarean Section Women

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Karim, Ahmad Helmy; Nik Hussain, Nik Hazlina; Mohd Noor, Norhayati; Omar, Julia; Bin Bai @ Bae, Saringat; Wan Mahmood, Wan Haslindawani; Abdul Razak, Asrenee; Yunus, Rohaizan

    2015-01-01

    Aim To compare the mean of anteroposterior (AP) measurements of the uterus in longitudinal and oblique transverse planes, and the pulsatility index (PI) and resistive index (RI) of the uterine artery and superficial skin wound artery between patients taking Channa striatus and placebo. Background Channa striatus, also known as haruan, is a fresh water snakehead fish consumed in many parts of Southeast Asia. Channa striatus is also normally consumed by women postpartum to promote wound healing as well as to reduce post-operative pain. Methodology This study is a randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled study conducted in women after Lower Segment Caesarean Section (LSCS). Subjects were randomised to either a Channa striatus or a placebo group and were given a daily dosage of 500 mg of Channa striatus extract or 500 mg maltodextrin, respectively, for six weeks post LSCS. The anteroposterior measurements of the uterus in the longitudinal and oblique transverse planes, and the pulsatility index (PI) and resistive index (RI) of the uterine and superficial skin wound arteries were assessed using pelvic Gray-scale ultrasound and Doppler ultrasound at baseline (Day 3) and at two weeks, four weeks and six weeks post-operatively. Results Sixty-six subjects were randomised into the study with 33 in the Channa striatus group and 33 in the placebo group. No significant differences were detected in terms of the pulsatility index (PI) and the resistive index (RI) of the uterine and superficial skin wound arteries between the Channa striatus and placebo groups. However, in the Channa striatus group, the AP measurements of the uterus on the longitudinal and oblique transverse planes were significantly lower compared to the placebo group (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion Daily intake of Channa striatus extract results in marked differences compared to placebo in terms of uterine involution and recovery in women post LSCS. Trial Registration www.isrctn.com 11960786

  6. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Increases Pulsatile Growth Hormone Secretion and Circulating Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 in a Time-Dependent Manner in Men With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Randomized Sham-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos, Camilla M.; Killick, Roo; Keenan, Daniel M.; Baxter, Robert C.; Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Liu, Peter Y.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the time-dependent effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) and pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion. Design: A randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled, parallel group study. Participants: Sixty-five middle-aged men with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea. Intervention: Active (n = 34) or sham (n = 31) CPAP for 12 weeks, followed by 12 weeks of active CPAP (n = 65). Measurements and Results: Fasting morning IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and IGFBP-1 blood levels at 0, 6, 12, and 24 weeks. Overnight GH secretion was calculated by mathematical deconvolution of serial GH measurements from serum samples collected every 10 min (22:00-06:00) during simultaneous polysomnography in a subset of 18 men (active n = 11, sham n = 7) at week 12. Active, compared with sham, CPAP increased IGF-1 at 12 weeks (P = 0.006), but not at 6 weeks (P = 0.44). Changes in IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-1 were not different between groups at 6 or 12 weeks (all P ≥ 0.15). At week 24, there was a further increase in IGF-1 and a decrease in IGFBP-1 in the pooled group (P = 0.0001 and 0.046, respectively). In the subset, total (P = 0.001) and pulsatile (P = 0.002) GH secretion, mean GH concentration (P = 0.002), mass of GH secreted per pulse (P = 0.01) and pulse frequency (P = 0.04) were all higher after 12 weeks of CPAP compared with sham. Basal secretion, interpulse regularity, and GH regularity were not different between groups (all P > 0.11). Conclusions: Twelve weeks, but not 6 weeks, of CPAP increases IGF-1, with a further increase after 24 weeks. Total and pulsatile GH secretion, secretory burst mass and pulse frequency are also increased by 12 weeks. CPAP improves specific elements of the GH/IGF-1 axis in a time-dependent manner. Clinical Trials Registration: Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Network, www.anzctr.org.au, number ACTRN12608000301369. Citation: Hoyos CM; Killick R; Keenan DM

  7. Generalizing the OpenURL Framework beyond References to Scholarly Works: The Bison-Fute Model; Digital Libraries and Education: Trends and Opportunities; E-Books and Their Future in Academic Libraries: An Overview; Penn State Visual Image User Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van de Sompel, Herbert; Beit-Arie, Oren; Roes, Hans; Snowhill, Lucia; Pisciotta, Henry; Brisson, Roger; Ferrin, Eric; Dooris, Michael; Spink, Amanda

    2001-01-01

    Includes four articles that discuss a conceptual framework for open and context-sensitive reference linking for Web-based scholarly information; issues for academic libraries due to increased use of information and communication technologies; the future of electronic books in academic libraries; and an academic library user study on the needs for…

  8. Pre-Treatment Objective Diagnosis and Post-Treatment Outcome Evaluation in Patients with Vascular Pulsatile Tinnitus Using Transcanal Recording and Spectro-Temporal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inyong; Koo, Ja-Won; Lee, Kyogu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although vascular pulsatile tinnitus (VPT) has been classified as “objective”, VPT is not easily recognizable or documentable in most cases. In response to this, we have developed transcanal sound recording (TSR) and spectro-temporal analysis (STA) for the objective diagnosis of VPT. By refining our initial method, we were able to apply TSR/STA to post-treatment outcome evaluation, as well as pre-treatment objective diagnosis. Methods TSR was performed on seven VPT patients and five normal controls before and after surgical or interventional treatment. VPT was recorded using an inserted microphone with the subjects placed in both upright and supine positions with 1) a neutral head position, 2) head rotated to the tinnitus side, 3) head rotated to the non-tinnitus side, and 4) a neutral position with ipsi-lesional manual cervical compression. The recorded signals were analyzed in both time and time-frequency domains by performing a short-time Fourier transformation. Results The pre-treatment ear canal signals of all VPT patients demonstrated pulse-synchronous periodic structures and acoustic characteristics that were representative of their presumptive vascular pathologies, whereas those the controls exhibited smaller peaks and weak periodicities. Compared with the pre-treatment signals, the post-treatment signals exhibited significantly reduced peak- and root mean square amplitudes upon time domain analysis. Additionally, further sub-band analysis confirmed that the pulse-synchronous signal of all subjects was not identifiable after treatment and, in particular, that the signal decrement was statistically significant at low frequencies. Moreover, the post-treatment signals of the VPT subjects revealed no significant differences when compared to those of the control group. Conclusion We reconfirmed that the TSR/STA method is an effective modality to objectify VPT. In addition, the potential role of the TSR/STA method in the objective evaluation of

  9. Assessment of subgrid-scale models with a large-eddy simulation-dedicated experimental database: The pulsatile impinging jet in turbulent cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baya Toda, Hubert; Cabrit, Olivier; Truffin, Karine; Bruneaux, Gilles; Nicoud, Franck

    2014-07-01

    Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) in complex geometries and industrial applications like piston engines, gas turbines, or aircraft engines requires the use of advanced subgrid-scale (SGS) models able to take into account the main flow features and the turbulence anisotropy. Keeping this goal in mind, this paper reports a LES-dedicated experiment of a pulsatile hot-jet impinging a flat-plate in the presence of a cold turbulent cross-flow. Unlike commonly used academic test cases, this configuration involves different flow features encountered in complex configurations: shear/rotating regions, stagnation point, wall-turbulence, and the propagation of a vortex ring along the wall. This experiment was also designed with the aim to use quantitative and nonintrusive optical diagnostics such as Particle Image Velocimetry, and to easily perform a LES involving a relatively simple geometry and well-controlled boundary conditions. Hence, two eddy-viscosity-based SGS models are investigated: the dynamic Smagorinsky model [M. Germano, U. Piomelli, P. Moin, and W. Cabot, "A dynamic subgrid-scale eddy viscosity model," Phys. Fluids A 3(7), 1760-1765 (1991)] and the σ-model [F. Nicoud, H. B. Toda, O. Cabrit, S. Bose, and J. Lee, "Using singular values to build a subgrid-scale model for large eddy simulations," Phys. Fluids 23(8), 085106 (2011)]. Both models give similar results during the first phase of the experiment. However, it was found that the dynamic Smagorinsky model could not accurately predict the vortex-ring propagation, while the σ-model provides a better agreement with the experimental measurements. Setting aside the implementation of the dynamic procedure (implemented here in its simplest form, i.e., without averaging over homogeneous directions and with clipping of negative values to ensure numerical stability), it is suggested that the mitigated predictions of the dynamic Smagorinsky model are due to the dynamic constant, which strongly depends on the mesh resolution

  10. Development of self-assembled molecular structures on polymeric surfaces and their applications as ultrasonically responsive barrier coatings for on-demand, pulsatile drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Connie Sau-Kuen

    Nature in the form of DNA, proteins, and cells has the remarkable ability to interact with its environment by processing biological information through specific molecular recognition at the interface. As such, materials that are capable of triggering an appropriate biological response need to be engineered at the biomaterial surface. Chemically and structurally well-defined self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), biomimetics of the lipid bilayer in cell membranes, have been created and studied mostly on rigid metallic surfaces. This dissertation is motivated by the lack of methods to generate a molecularly designed surface for biomedical polymers and thus provides an enabling technology to engineer a polymeric surface precisely at a molecular and cellular level. To take this innovation one step further, we demonstrated that such self-assembled molecular structure coated on drug-containing polymeric devices could act as a stimulus-responsive barrier for controlled drug delivery. A simple, one-step procedure for generating ordered, crystalline methylene chains on polymeric surfaces via urethane linkages was successfully developed. The self-assemblies and molecular structures of these crystalline methylene chains are comparable to the SAM model surfaces, as evidenced by various surface characterization techniques (XPS, TOF-SIMS, and FTIR-ATR). For the first time, these self-assembled molecular structures are shown to function collectively as an ultrasound-responsive barrier membrane for pulsatile drug delivery, including delivery of low-molecular-weight ciprofloxacin and high-molecular-weight insulin. Encouraging results, based on the insulin-activated deoxyglucose uptakes in adipocytes, indicate that the released insulin remained biologically active. Both chemical and acoustic analyses suggest that the ultrasound-assisted release mechanism is primarily induced by transient cavitation, which causes temporary disruption of the self-assembled overlayer, and thus allows

  11. Zero-field Dissipationless Chiral Edge Current in Quantum Anomalous Hall State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Zhao, Weiwei; Kim, Duk Y.; Wei, Peng; Jain, J. K.; Liu, Chaoxing; Chan, Moses H. W.; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state is predicted to possess, at zero magnetic field, chiral edge channels that conduct spin polarized current without dissipation, and thus holds great promise for future high-performance information processing. In this talk, we will discuss our transport experiments that probe the QAH state with gate bias and temperature dependences, by local and nonlocal magnetoresistance measurements. This allows us to unambiguously distinguish the dissipationless edge transport from transport via other dissipative channels in the QAH system. Our experiments confirm a fundamental feature of the QAH state, namely the dissipationless transport by edge channels in zero applied fields, which will be crucial for future chiral interconnected electric and spintronic applications. This research is supported by the NSF Grants (DMR-1420620, Penn State MRSEC; in MIT by DMR-1207469 and the STC Center for Integrated Quantum Materials under NSF Grant DMR-1231319) and by ONR Grant N00014-13-1-0301.

  12. 1-D steady state analysis of a two-equation coupled system for determination of tissue temperature in liver during radio frequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tingying; O'Neill, David P; Payne, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    An analytical solution is provided for a two-equation coupled model for determination of liver tissue temperature during radio frequency ablation in the steady state with one-dimension in space. Both analytical analysis and model simulation were conducted to investigate the effects of two crucial system parameters: blood perfusion rate and convective heat transfer coefficient on the tissue temperature field. The quantitative criteria were also derived, under which the two-equation coupled system can be approximated to a conventional single bio-heat equation system such as the Pennes model.

  13. Parsing clinical text: how good are the state-of-the-art parsers?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Parsing, which generates a syntactic structure of a sentence (a parse tree), is a critical component of natural language processing (NLP) research in any domain including medicine. Although parsers developed in the general English domain, such as the Stanford parser, have been applied to clinical text, there are no formal evaluations and comparisons of their performance in the medical domain. Methods In this study, we investigated the performance of three state-of-the-art parsers: the Stanford parser, the Bikel parser, and the Charniak parser, using following two datasets: (1) A Treebank containing 1,100 sentences that were randomly selected from progress notes used in the 2010 i2b2 NLP challenge and manually annotated according to a Penn Treebank based guideline; and (2) the MiPACQ Treebank, which is developed based on pathology notes and clinical notes, containing 13,091 sentences. We conducted three experiments on both datasets. First, we measured the performance of the three state-of-the-art parsers on the clinical Treebanks with their default settings. Then we re-trained the parsers using the clinical Treebanks and evaluated their performance using the 10-fold cross validation method. Finally we re-trained the parsers by combining the clinical Treebanks with the Penn Treebank. Results Our results showed that the original parsers achieved lower performance in clinical text (Bracketing F-measure in the range of 66.6%-70.3%) compared to general English text. After retraining on the clinical Treebank, all parsers achieved better performance, with the best performance from the Stanford parser that reached the highest Bracketing F-measure of 73.68% on progress notes and 83.72% on the MiPACQ corpus using 10-fold cross validation. When the combined clinical Treebanks and Penn Treebank was used, of the three parsers, the Charniak parser achieved the highest Bracketing F-measure of 73.53% on progress notes and the Stanford parser reached the highest F

  14. Changes in the 5-HT2A receptor system in the pre-mammillary hypothalamus of the ewe are related to regulation of LH pulsatile secretion by an endogenous circannual rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Chemineau, Philippe; Daveau, Agnès; Pelletier, Jean; Malpaux, Benoît; Karsch, Fred J; Viguié, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Background We wanted to determine if changes in the expression of serotonin 2A receptor (5HT2A receptor) gene in the premammillary hypothalamus are associated with changes in reproductive neuroendocrine status. Thus, we compared 2 groups of ovariectomized-estradiol-treated ewes that expressed high vs low LH pulsatility in two different paradigms (2 groups per paradigm): (a) refractoriness (low LH secretion) or not (high LH secretion) to short days in pineal-intact Ile-de-France ewes (RSD) and (b) endogenous circannual rhythm (ECR) in free-running pinealectomized Suffolk ewes in the active or inactive stage of their reproductive rhythm. Results In RSD ewes, density of 5HT2A receptor mRNA (by in situ hybridization) was significantly higher in the high LH group (25.3 ± 1.4 vs 21.4 ± 1.5 grains/neuron, P < 0.05) and 3H-Ketanserin binding (a specific radioligand) of the median part of the premammillary hypothalamus tended to be higher in the high group (29.1 ± 4.0 vs 24.6 ± 4.2 fmol/mg tissu-equivalent; P < 0.10). In ECR ewes, density of 5HT2A receptor mRNA and 3H-Ketanserin binding were both significantly higher in the high LH group (20.8 ± 1.6 vs 17.0 ± 1.5 grains/neuron, P < 0.01, and 19.7 ± 5.0 vs 7.4 ± 3.4 fmol/mg tissu-equivalent; P < 0.05, respectively). Conclusions We conclude that these higher 5HT2A receptor gene expression and binding activity of 5HT2A receptor in the premammillary hypothalamus are associated with stimulation of LH pulsatility expressed before the development of refractoriness to short days and prior to the decline of reproductive neuroendocrine activity during expression of the endogenous circannual rhythm. PMID:12553884

  15. The effects of a continuous infusion of hexarelin on pulsatile growth hormone release, growth axis and galanin gene expression and on the response of the growth axis to growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Conley, L K; Brogan, R S; Giustina, A; Wehrenberg, W B

    2000-05-01

    The effect of a 6 hour continuous infusion of Hexarelin (100 micrograms/hour) on GH peak frequency, amplitude and duration, GH trough concentrations, the interval between successive peaks and the pituitary responsiveness to GHRH, as well as GH axis and galanin mRNA contents, were examined in conscious adult male rats. Plasma GH concentrations peaked within 15 minutes after the initiation of Hexarelin infusion, but returned to baseline levels by 60 minutes. No significant differences between Hexarelin and saline infused rats were noted for any of the parameters of pulsatile GH release analyzed. However, following a 6 hour infusion, rats treated with Hexarelin demonstrated a greater GH responsiveness to GHRH (delta GH: 57 +/- 16 ng/ml for Hexarelin infused; 21 +/- 7 ng/ml for saline infused; p < 0.05). Furthermore, the rats infused with Hexarelin demonstrated decreased GHRH and increased hypothalamic galanin mRNA contents as compared to the saline infused rats, while hypothalamic somatostatin and pituitary GH mRNA contents appeared unchanged. Rats infused with Hexarelin had lower pituitary galanin mRNA content than did the rats which were infused with saline. Collectively, these results suggest that Hexarelin may not act via alteration of somatostatin synthesis and that suppression of somatostatin's action at the pituitary can not be excluded. The current study also suggests that other hypothalamic pathways aside from those currently defined for the growth axis may be involved in the mechanism by which Hexarelin and the other GH-releasing peptides elicit GH release.

  16. Inner Ear Conductive Hearing Loss and Unilateral Pulsatile Tinnitus Associated with a Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: Case Based Review and Analysis of Relationship between Intracranial Vascular Abnormalities and Inner Ear Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Cassandro, Ettore; Cassandro, Claudia; Sequino, Giuliano; Scarpa, Alfonso; Petrolo, Claudio; Chiarella, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    While pulsatile tinnitus (PT) and dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) are not rarely associated, the finding of a conductive hearing loss (CHL) in this clinical picture is unusual. Starting from a case of CHL and PT, diagnosed to be due to a DAVF, we analyzed relationship between intracranial vascular abnormalities and inner ear fluids. DAVF was treated with endovascular embolization. Following this, there was a dramatic recovery of PT and of CHL, confirming their cause-effect link with DAVF. We critically evaluated the papers reporting this association. This is the first case of CHL associated with PT and DAVF. We describe the most significant experiences and theories reported in literature, with a personal analysis about the possible relationship between vascular intracranial system and labyrinthine fluids. In conclusion, we believe that this association may be a challenge for otolaryngologists. So we suggest to consider the possibility of a DAVF or other AVMs when PT is associated with CHL, without alterations of tympanic membrane and middle ear tests. PMID:26693371

  17. Pulsatile administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone does not alter the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) isoform distribution pattern of pituitary or circulating FSH in nutritionally growth-restricted ovariectomized lambs.

    PubMed

    Hassing, J M; Kletter, G B; I'Anson, H; Wood, R I; Beitins, I Z; Foster, D L; Padmanabhan, V

    1993-04-01

    The experimental induction of puberty by GnRH administration to prepubertal lambs increases serum bioactive FSH (B-FSH) as measured in the rat Sertoli cell aromatase induction bioassay. Serum immunoreactive FSH (I-FSH) levels are unchanged. The increase in serum B-FSH is associated with an increase in the proportion of less acidic and more biopotent FSH serum isoforms. However, it is unknown if this effect of GnRH on serum FSH microheterogeneity is direct or mediated by gonadal factors. We have used the nutritionally growth-restricted ovariectomized lamb as a model of the neuroendocrine regulation of FSH isoform microheterogeneity. With this model, the hypothalamic-pituitary component of the neuroendocrine axis may be isolated from gonadal factors. In the present study, using the nutritionally growth-restricted ovariectomized lamb as a model, we investigated the role of GnRH on the regulation of FSH microheterogeneity. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that GnRH increases the proportion of the less acidic (more biopotent) serum FSH isoforms. As an in vitro correlate, we investigated the effect of GnRH on gonadotropin secretion and FSH isoform distribution in ovine pituitary explant cultures. Seven ovariectomized nutritionally restricted lambs were administered GnRH (i.v., 2 ng/kg) for 36 h (at 2-h intervals for 24 h, then hourly for the final 12 h). Six others served as controls. Blood samples were withdrawn at 12-min intervals during the last 4 h for the measurement of serum immunoactive LH (I-LH) and I-FSH. Pituitary homogenates and serum from four animals from each group were individually chromatofocused, and the FSH isoform distribution patterns were determined. Pulsatile administration of GnRH to nutritionally growth-restricted lambs increased circulating I-LH concentrations from 0.6 +/- 1.0 to 5.9 +/- 3.1 ng/ml (P < 0.01), but did not significantly change circulating I-FSH (4.9 +/- 1.8 vs. 11.5 +/- 4.2 ng/ml) nor B-FSH concentrations (3.9 +/- 1.2 vs. 5

  18. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of intra-aortic balloon and control systems for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for intra-aortic balloon and control systems for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. Final order.

    PubMed

    2013-12-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify intra-aortic balloon and control system (IABP) devices when indicated for acute coronary syndrome, cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, or complications of heart failure, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for IABPs when indicated for septic shock or pulsatile flow generation. PMID:24383147

  19. Altitude and Configuration of the Potentiometric Surface in the Upper White Clay Creek and Lower West Branch Brandywine Creek Basins including Portions of Penn, London Grove, New Garden, Londonderry, West Marlborough, Highland, and East Fallowfield Townships and West Grove, Avondale, Modena, and South Coatesville boroughs, Chester County, Pennsylvania, May through July 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hale, Lindsay B.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Since 1984, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been mapping the altitude and configuration of the potentiometric surface in Chester County as part of an ongoing cooperative program to measure and describe the water resources of the county. These maps can be used to determine the general direction of ground-water flow and are frequently referenced by municipalities and developers to evaluate ground-water conditions for water supply and resource-protection requirements. For this study, the potentiometric surface was mapped for an area in south-central Chester County. The northern part of the map includes portions of Highland, East Fallowfield, Londonderry, and West Marlborough Townships and South Coatesville and Modena Boroughs. The southern part of the map includes portions of Londonderry, West Marlborough, Penn, London Grove, and New Garden Townships and West Grove and Avondale Boroughs. The study area is mostly underlain by metamorphic rocks of the Glenarm Supergroup including Peters Creek Schist, Octoraro Phyllite, Wissahickon Schist, Cockeysville Mrable, and Setters Quartzite; and by pegmatite, mafic gneiss, felsic gneiss, and diabase. Ground water is obtained from these bedrock formation