Science.gov

Sample records for pentobarbital induced hypnotic

  1. Hypnotic Effect of Ocimum basilicum on Pentobarbital-Induced Sleep in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Askari, Vahid Reza; Baradaran Rahimi, Vafa; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Rakhshandeh, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background Sleep disorders are accompanied by several complications, and currently used soporific drugs can induce unwanted effects such as psychomotor impairment, tolerance, amnesia, and rebound insomnia. Objectives The present study was carried out to investigate if Ocimum basilicum has a sleep-prolonging effect. Materials and Methods This work was an experimental study on 72 mice which were randomly divided into 9 groups: saline (control); diazepam (3 mg/kg, positive control); hydro-alcoholic extract (HAE) of Ocimum basilicum (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg); ethyl acetate fraction (EAF, 50 mg/kg); n-butanol fraction (NBF, 50 mg/kg); water fraction (WF, 50 mg/kg); and saline containing 10% DMSO (vehicle for EAF and NBF). All the test compounds were injected intraperitoneally (IP) 30 minutes before pentobarbital administration (30 mg/kg). Duration and latency of pentobarbital-induced sleep were recorded. Also, LD50 of HAE was determined and the cytotoxicity of HAE was tested on neural and fibroblast cells using the MTT assay. Results HAE increased the duration of pentobarbital-induced sleep at doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg (P < 0.001). The hypnotic effect of HAE was comparable to that induced by diazepam. Similarly, WF, EAF, and NBF at 50 mg/kg could increase sleep duration. The sleep latency was decreased by HAE (P < 0.01 - P < 0.001) and NBF (P < 0.001), but not by WF and EAF. The LD50 value for HAE was found to be 2.4 g/kg. HAE had no effect on the viability of neuronal PC12 cells and L929 fibroblast cells. Conclusions The present data demonstrated that Ocimum basilicum potentiates sleeping behaviors without any cytotoxicity. The main component (s) responsible for the hypnotic effects of this plant is most likely a non-polar agent (s) which is found in NBF. Isolation of the active constituents may yield a novel sedative drug. PMID:27651944

  2. Potentiating Effects of Lactuca sativa on Pentobarbital-Induced Sleep.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Ahmad; Rakhshandeh, Hassan; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, Lactuca sativa (lettuce) has been recommended for its hypnotic property. The present study was planned to investigate sleep-prolonging effect of this plant. The hydro-alcoholic extract (HAE) of lettuce and its water fraction (WF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF), and n-butanol fraction (NBF) were administrated (IP) to mice 30 min before the pentobarbital injection. Moreover, both in-vivo and in-vitro toxicity of the extracts were determined. The quality of HAE and NBF was also evaluated using HPLC fingerprint. The HAE prolonged the pentobarbital-induced sleep duration at dose of 400 mg/Kg. The NBF was the only fraction which could increase the sleep duration and decrease sleep latency. The effects of NBF were comparable to those of induced by diazepam. The LD50-value for HAE was found to be 4.8 g/Kg. No neurotoxic effect was observed either by HAE or by its fractions in cultured PC12 neuron-like cells. The results suggest that lettuce potentiates pentobarbital hypnosis without major toxic effect. The main component(s) responsible for this effect is most likely to be non-polar agent(s) which found in NBF of this plant.

  3. Potentiating Effects of Lactuca sativa on Pentobarbital-Induced Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Ahmad; Rakhshandeh, Hassan; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, Lactuca sativa (lettuce) has been recommended for its hypnotic property. The present study was planned to investigate sleep-prolonging effect of this plant. The hydro-alcoholic extract (HAE) of lettuce and its water fraction (WF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF), and n-butanol fraction (NBF) were administrated (IP) to mice 30 min before the pentobarbital injection. Moreover, both in-vivo and in-vitro toxicity of the extracts were determined. The quality of HAE and NBF was also evaluated using HPLC fingerprint. The HAE prolonged the pentobarbital-induced sleep duration at dose of 400 mg/Kg. The NBF was the only fraction which could increase the sleep duration and decrease sleep latency. The effects of NBF were comparable to those of induced by diazepam. The LD50-value for HAE was found to be 4.8 g/Kg. No neurotoxic effect was observed either by HAE or by its fractions in cultured PC12 neuron-like cells. The results suggest that lettuce potentiates pentobarbital hypnosis without major toxic effect. The main component(s) responsible for this effect is most likely to be non-polar agent(s) which found in NBF of this plant. PMID:24250615

  4. Potentiation of decursinol angelate on pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors via the activation of GABAA-ergic systems in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jae Hoon; Ha, Tae-Woo; Kang, Jae-Seon; Hong, Jin Tae

    2017-01-01

    Angelicae Gigantis Radix (AGR, Angelica gigas) has been used for a long time as a traditional folk medicine in Korea and oriental countries. Decursinol angelate (DCA) is structurally isomeric decursin, one of the major components of AGR. This study was performed to confirm whether DCA augments pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors via the activation of GABAA-ergic systems in animals. Oral administration of DCA (10, 25 and 50 mg/kg) markedly suppressed spontaneous locomotor activity. DCA also prolonged sleeping time, and decreased the sleep latency by pentobarbital (42 mg/kg), in a dose-dependent manner, similar to muscimol, both at the hypnotic (42 mg/kg) and sub-hypnotic (28 mg/kg) dosages. Especially, DCA increased the number of sleeping animals in the sub-hypnotic dosage. DCA (50 mg/kg, p.o.) itself modulated sleep architectures; DCA reduced the counts of sleep/wake cycles. At the same time, DCA increased total sleep time, but not non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. In the molecular experiments. DCA (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 µg/ml) increased intracellular Cl- influx level in hypothalamic primary cultured neuronal cells of rats. In addition, DCA increased the protein expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67) and GABAA receptors subtypes. Taken together, these results suggest that DCA potentiates pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors through the activation of GABAA-ergic systems, and can be useful in the treatment of insomnia. PMID:28066138

  5. Effects of morphine on pentobarbital-induced responses in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Y; Ho, I K; Jang, C G; Tanaka, S; Ma, T; Loh, H H; Ko, K H

    2001-03-15

    Effects of morphine on the potentiation of pentobarbital-induced responses were investigated using mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. The duration of loss of righting reflex, hypothermia, and loss of motor coordination induced by pentobarbital were measured after pretreatment with either morphine or saline. Morphine pretreatment failed to show potentiation of both pentobarbital-induced loss of righting reflex and hypothermia in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice, while it significantly potentiated these responses in the wild-type controls. For motor incoordination test, morphine potentiated pentobarbital-induced motor incoordination in the wild-type mice. However, morphine may have opposite effects in the mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. These results demonstrate that synergism between morphine and pentobarbital is not detected in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice and that potentiation of pentobarbital-induced loss of righting reflex and hypothermia by morphine is mediated through mu-opioid receptor. It was interesting to note that pentobarbital-induced decrease in body temperature was less severe in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice than in wild-type mice.

  6. Gomisin N isolated from Schisandra chinensis augments pentobarbital-induced sleep behaviors through the modification of the serotonergic and GABAergic system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenning; Mao, Xin; Zhao, Xu; Liu, Zhi; Liu, Bing; Li, Huan; Bi, Kaishun; Jia, Ying

    2014-07-01

    The fruits of Schisandra chinensis have been used for the treatment of insomnia in oriental countries for more than thousands of years. However, the pharmacological properties and the mechanism of sedative and hypnotic effects have not yet been studied. Gomisin N is one of the major bioactive constituents from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis, and in this paper we reported a detailed study on the effects and mechanisms of Gomisin N on its sedative and hypnotic activity for the first time. These results implied that Gomisin N possessed weak sedative effects on locomotion activity in normal mice, and produced a dose-dependent(5-45 mg/kg, i.p.) increase in sleep duration in pentobarbital-treated mice, thus, itself did not induce sleep at higher dose which was used in this experiment (45 mg/kg, i.p.). It also can reverse the rodent models of insomnia induced by p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) and caffeine, which could exhibit a synergistic effect with 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) as well; furthermore, the hypnotic effects of Gomisin N were inhibited by flumazenil (a specific GABAA-BZD receptor antagonist). Altogether, these results indicated that Gomisin N produced beneficial sedative and hypnotic bioactivity, which might be mediated by the modification of the serotonergic and GABAergic system.

  7. Alterations in glucose kinetics induced by pentobarbital anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J.

    1986-03-05

    Pentobarbital is a common anesthetic agent used in animal research that is known to alter sympathetic function and may also affect carbohydrate metabolism. The in vivo effects of iv pentobarbital on glucose homeostasis were studied in chronically catheterized fasted rats. Whole body glucose kinetics, assessed by the constant iv infusion of (6-/sup 3/H)- and (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose, were determined in all rats in the conscious state. Thereafter, glucose metabolism was followed over the next 4 hr in 3 subgroups of rats; conscious, anesthetized with body temperature maintained, and anesthetized with body temperature not maintained. Hypothermia (a 5/sup 0/C decrease) developed spontaneously in anesthetized rats kept at ambient temperature (22/sup 0/C). No differences were seen in MABP and heart rate between conscious and normothermic anesthetized rats; however, hypothermic anesthetized rats showed a decrease in MABP (20%) and heart rate (35%). Likewise, plasma glucose and lactate concentrations, the rate of glucose appearance (Ra), recycling and metabolic clearance (MCR) did not differ between conscious and normothermic anesthetized animals. In contrast, hypothermic anesthetized rats showed a 50% reduction in plasma lactate, a 40% drop in glucose Ra, and a 30-40% decrease in glucose recycling and MCR. Thus, pentobarbital does not appear to alter in vivo glucose kinetics, compared to unanesthetized controls, provided that body temperature is maintained.

  8. Alterations in glucose kinetics induced by pentobarbital anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Hargrove, D.M.; Hyde, P.M.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1987-12-01

    Because pentobarbital is often used in investigations related to carbohydrate metabolism, the in vivo effect of this drug on glucose homeostasis was studied. Glucose kinetics assessed by the constant intravenous infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose, were determined in three groups of catheterized fasted rats: conscious, anesthetized and body temperature maintained, and anesthetized but body temperature not maintained. After induction of anesthesia, marked hypothermia developed in rats not provided with external heat. Anesthetized rats that developed hypothermia showed a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (25%) and heart rate (40%). Likewise, the plasma lactate concentration and the rates of glucose appearance, recycling, and metabolic clearance were reduced by 30-50% in the hypothermic anesthetized rats. Changes in whole-body carbohydrate metabolism were prevented when body temperature was maintained. Because plasma pentobarbital levels were similar between the euthermic and hypothermic rats during the first 2 h of the experiment, the rapid reduction in glucose metabolism in this latter group appears related to the decrease in body temperature. The continuous infusion of epinephrine produced alterations in glucose kinetics that were not different between conscious animals and anesthetized rats with body temperature maintained. Thus pentobarbital-anesthetized rats became hypothermic when kept at room temperature and exhibited marked decreases in glucose metabolism. Such changes were absent when body temperature was maintained during anesthesia.

  9. Effects of acute low-level microwaves on pentobarbital-induced hypothermia depend on exposure orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Horita, A.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    Two series of experiments were performed to study the effects of acute exposure (45 min) to 2,450-MHz circularly polarized, pulsed microwaves (1 mW/cm2, 2-mus pulses, 500 pps, specific absorption rate (SAR) 0.6 W/kg) on the actions of pentobarbital in the rat. In the first experiment, rats were irradiated with microwaves and then immediately injected with pentobarbital. Microwave exposure did not significantly affect the extent of the pentobarbital-induced fall in colonic temperature. However, the rate of recovery from the hypothermia was significantly slower in the microwave-irradiated rats and they also took a significantly longer time to regain their righting reflex. In a second experiment, rats were first anesthetized with pentobarbital and then exposed to microwaves with their heads either pointing toward the source of microwaves (anterior exposure) or pointing away (posterior exposure). Microwave radiation significantly retarded the pentobarbital-induced fall in colonic temperature regardless of the orientation of exposure. However, the recovery from hypothermia was significantly faster in posterior-exposed animals compared to those of the anterior-exposed and sham-irradiated animals. Furthermore, the posterior-exposed rats took a significantly shorter time to regain their righting reflex than both the anterior-exposed and sham-irradiated animals.

  10. Rosmarinic Acid Potentiates Pentobarbital-Induced Sleep Behaviors and Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) Sleep through the Activation of GABAA-ergic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yeong Ok; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2017-01-01

    It has been known that RA, one of major constituents of Perilla frutescens which has been used as a traditional folk remedy for sedation in oriental countries, shows the anxiolytic-like and sedative effects. This study was performed to know whether RA may enhance pentobarbital-induced sleep through γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A-ergic systems in rodents. RA (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the locomotor activity in mice. RA decreased sleep latency and increased the total sleep time in pentobarbital (42 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced sleeping mice. RA also increased sleeping time and number of falling sleep mice after treatment with sub-hypnotic pentobarbital (28 mg/kg, i.p.). In electroencephalogram (EEG) recording, RA (2.0 mg/kg) not only decreased the counts of sleep/wake cycles and REM sleep, but also increased the total and NREM sleep in rats. The power density of NREM sleep showed the increase in δ-waves and the decrease in α-waves. On the other hand, RA (0.1, 1.0 and 10 μg/ml) increased intracellular Cl− influx in the primary cultured hypothalamic cells of rats. RA (p.o.) increased the protein expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67) and GABAA receptors subunits except β1 subunit. In conclusion, RA augmented pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors through GABAA-ergic transmission. Thus, it is suggested that RA may be useful for the treatment of insomnia. PMID:27469144

  11. Spike Timing Rigidity Is Maintained in Bursting Neurons under Pentobarbital-Induced Anesthetic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Risako; Yamanaka, Masanori; Yokota, Eiko; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Pentobarbital potentiates γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission by prolonging the open time of GABAA receptors. However, it is unknown how pentobarbital regulates cortical neuronal activities via local circuits in vivo. To examine this question, we performed extracellular unit recording in rat insular cortex under awake and anesthetic conditions. Not a few studies apply time-rescaling theorem to detect the features of repetitive spike firing. Similar to these methods, we define an average spike interval locally in time using random matrix theory (RMT), which enables us to compare different activity states on a universal scale. Neurons with high spontaneous firing frequency (>5 Hz) and bursting were classified as HFB neurons (n = 10), and those with low spontaneous firing frequency (<10 Hz) and without bursting were classified as non-HFB neurons (n = 48). Pentobarbital injection (30 mg/kg) reduced firing frequency in all HFB neurons and in 78% of non-HFB neurons. RMT analysis demonstrated that pentobarbital increased in the number of neurons with repulsion in both HFB and non-HFB neurons, suggesting that there is a correlation between spikes within a short interspike interval (ISI). Under awake conditions, in 50% of HFB and 40% of non-HFB neurons, the decay phase of normalized histograms of spontaneous firing were fitted to an exponential function, which indicated that the first spike had no correlation with subsequent spikes. In contrast, under pentobarbital-induced anesthesia conditions, the number of non-HFB neurons that were fitted to an exponential function increased to 80%, but almost no change in HFB neurons was observed. These results suggest that under both awake and pentobarbital-induced anesthetized conditions, spike firing in HFB neurons is more robustly regulated by preceding spikes than by non-HFB neurons, which may reflect the GABAA receptor-mediated regulation of cortical activities. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording in

  12. Pentobarbital-Induced Myocardial Stunning in Status Epilepticus Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Molaie, Donna; Nurok, Michael; Rosengart, Axel; Lahiri, Shouri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Mild hypotension is a well-recognized complication of intravenous pentobarbital; however fulminant cardiopulmonary failure has not been previously reported. Case Report. A 28-year-old woman developed pentobarbital-induced cardiopulmonary failure that was successfully treated with maximal medical management including arteriovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. She made an excellent cardiopulmonary and neurological recovery. Discussion and Conclusion. Pentobarbital is underrecognized as a potential cause of myocardial stunning. The mechanism involves direct myocardial depression and inhibition of autonomic neuroanatomical structures including the medulla and hypothalamus. Early recognition and implementation of aggressive cardiopulmonary support are essential to optimize the likelihood of a favorable outcome. PMID:27529037

  13. Identification of a molecular target mediating the general anesthetic actions of pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Anja; Arras, Margarete; Jurd, Rachel; Rudolph, Uwe

    2007-03-01

    Barbiturates were introduced into medical practice in 1934. They are widely used today as general anesthetics. Although in vitro studies revealed that the activity of a variety of ligand-gated channels is modulated by barbiturates, the target(s) mediating the anesthetic actions of barbiturates in vivo are unknown. Studying pentobarbital action in beta3(N265M) mice harboring beta3-containing GABAA receptors insensitive to a variety of general anesthetic agents, we found that the immobilizing action of pentobarbital is mediated fully, and the hypnotic action is mediated in part by this receptor subtype. It was surprising that the respiratory depressant action of pentobarbital is indistinguishable between beta3(N265M) and wild-type mice and thus is mediated by other as-yet-unidentified targets. Whereas the target for the immobilizing and hypnotic actions of pentobarbital seems to be the same as for etomidate and propofol, these latter agents' respiratory depressant actions are mediated by beta3-containing GABAA receptors. Thus, in contrast to etomidate and propofol, pentobarbital can elicit respiratory depression by a beta3-independent pathway. Pentobarbital reduced heart rate and body temperature to a slightly smaller extent in beta3(N265M) mice compared with wild-type mice, indicating that these actions are largely mediated by other targets. Pentobarbital-induced increase of heart rate variability and prolongation of ECG intervals are seen in both beta3(N265M) mice and wild-type mice, suggesting that they are not dependent on beta3-containing GABAA receptors. In summary, we show a clear pharmacological dissociation of the immobilizing/hypnotic and respiratory/cardiovascular actions of pentobarbital.

  14. Reduction in radiation-induced brain injury by use of pentobarbital or lidocaine protection

    SciTech Connect

    Oldfield, E.H.; Friedman, R.; Kinsella, T.; Moquin, R.; Olson, J.J.; Orr, K.; DeLuca, A.M. )

    1990-05-01

    To determine if barbiturates would protect brain at high doses of radiation, survival rates in rats that received whole-brain x-irradiation during pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia were compared with those of control animals that received no medication and of animals anesthetized with ketamine. The animals were shielded so that respiratory and digestive tissues would not be damaged by the radiation. Survival rates in rats that received whole-brain irradiation as a single 7500-rad dose under pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia was increased from between from 0% and 20% to between 45% and 69% over the 40 days of observation compared with the other two groups (p less than 0.007). Ketamine anesthesia provided no protection. There were no notable differential effects upon non-neural tissues, suggesting that pentobarbital afforded protection through modulation of ambient neural activity during radiation exposure. Neural suppression during high-dose cranial irradiation protects brain from acute and early delayed radiation injury. Further development and application of this knowledge may reduce the incidence of radiation toxicity of the central nervous system (CNS) and may permit the safe use of otherwise unsafe doses of radiation in patients with CNS neoplasms.

  15. Pentobarbital overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of a pentobarbital overdose may include: Coma Confusion Decreased energy Delirium (confusion and agitation) Difficulty breathing Headache Large blisters Rash Sleepiness Slowed or stopped breathing Slurred speech Unsteady gait

  16. Hydroalcoholic extract of needles of Pinus eldarica enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep: possible involvement of GABAergic system

    PubMed Central

    Forouzanfar, Fatemeh; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Rakhshandeh, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Insomnia is accompanied by several health complications and the currently used soporific drugs can induce several side effects such as psychomotor impairment, amnesia, and tolerance. The present study was planned to investigate the sleep prolonging effect of Pinus eldarica. Materials and Methods: Hydroalcoholic extract (HAE) of P. eldarica, its water fraction (WF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) and n-butanol fraction (NBF) were injected (intraperitoneally) to mice 30 min before administration of pentobarbital. Then, the latent period and continuous sleeping time were recorded. Also, LD50 of P. eldarica extract was determined and the possible neurotoxicity of the extract was tested on neural PC12 cells. Results: The HAE and NBF decreased the latency of sleep (p<0.05) and significantly increased duration of sleep (p<0.05) induced by pentobarbital. These effects of P. eldarica were reversed by flumazenil. The LD50 value for HAE was found to be 4.8 g/Kg. HAE and its fractions did not show neurotoxic effects in cultured PC12-cell line. Conclusion: The present data indicate that P. eldarica potentiated pentobarbital hypnosis without major toxic effect. Most probably, the main components responsible for this effect are non-polar agents which are found in NBF of this plant. PMID:27516986

  17. Positive effects of β-amyrin on pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice via GABAergic neurotransmitter system.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se Jin; Park, Ho Jae; Gao, Qingtao; Lee, Hyung Eun; Park, Se Jin; Hong, Eunyoung; Jang, Dae Sik; Shin, Chan Young; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2015-09-15

    Sleep loss, insomnia, is considered a sign of imbalance of physiological rhythm, which can be used as pre-clinic diagnosis of various neuropsychiatric disorders. The aim of the present study is to understand the pharmacological actions of α- or β-amyrin, natural triterpene compound, on the sleep in mice. To analyze the sleeping behavior, we used the well-known pentobarbital-induced sleeping model after single administration of either α- or β-amyrin. The sleeping onset time was remarkably decreased and duration was prolonged by β-amyrin (1, 3, or 10mg/kg) but not by α-amyrin (1, 3, or 10mg/kg). These effects were significantly blocked by GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. Moreover, β-amyrin increased brain GABA level compared to the vehicle administration. Overall, the present study suggests that β-amyrin would enhance the total sleeping behavior in pentobarbital-induced sleeping model via the activation of GABAergic neurotransmitter system through GABA content in the brain.

  18. Hypnotic effect of the essential oil from the leaves of Myrtus communis on mice

    PubMed Central

    Birhanie, Muluken Walle; Walle, Bizuayehu; Rebba, Kidist

    2016-01-01

    Background Myrtus communis has been suggested as a sleep aid in unconventional medicine. Moreover, previous studies have also indicated its sedative- and hypnotic-like activity. In this study, the hypnotic effect of M. communis was investigated. Methods Essential oil (EO) of M. communis (600, 800, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally to Swiss albino mice of both sex, and the hypnotic effect was evaluated. In addition, the EO of M. communis (500, 600, 800, and 1,000 mg/kg) was administered orally to Swiss albino mice of both sex 60 minutes prior to pentobarbital injection (50 mg/kg). Latency to sleep and sleep duration were recorded. The effect of the EO on motor coordination and muscle relaxation was evaluated using chimney and traction tests, 60 and 90 minutes after administration of the respective doses of the EO, respectively. Results There was no induction of hypnosis as the presence of the righting reflex was intact. However the EO prolonged pentobarbital-induced sleeping time and there was also 50% negative response on the chimney and traction test in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion The EO of M. communis did not produce a hypnotic effect, but it potentiated a hypnotic effect with significant central nervous system depressant activity. PMID:27574478

  19. [Substance-induced sleep disorders and abuse of hypnotics].

    PubMed

    Riemann, D; Nissen, C

    2011-12-01

    The intake of a large variety of substances has a negative impact on sleep. Widely used, readily available substances like alcohol, nicotine, or caffeine need to be mentioned here. Illicit drugs (e.g., heroin or ecstasy) have different mechanisms of action with a high sleep-disrupting potential. Prescription drugs, i.e., corticosteroids or β-blockers, may also negatively affect sleep. An important question is whether the intake of hypnotics, especially benzodiazepines, may have a negative long-term effect on sleep. Classical benzodiazepines (BZ) initially lead to a reduction of nocturnal wake time and prolong total sleep time as a desired effect. Regarding the microstructure of sleep, BZ lead to a reduction of slow frequencies and an increase of fast frequencies in the EEG. With many BZ, tolerance may occur, thus, leading to unwanted dose increases. Further problems include rebound effects that occur upon discontinuation of BZ, including a drastic deterioration of sleep upon drug withdrawal. This phenomenon may pave the way for the development of drug dependency. Further unwanted side-effects (e.g., nocturnal falls) and the question of BZ abuse and dependency will be discussed.

  20. Alteration of lymphocyte function due to anesthesia: in vivo and in vitro suppression of mitogen-induced blastogenesis by sodium pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Formeister, J F; MacDermott, R P; Wickline, D; Locke, D; Nash, G S; Reynolds, D G; Roberson, B S

    1980-05-01

    The mechanism of decreased lymphocyte responsiveness after major surgery is unclear. Because sodium pentobarbital, and intermediately long-acting barbiturate, will reproducibly induce anesthesia in experimental animals, we utilized a canine model to investigate its effect on lymphocyte proliferation induced by the mitogenic lectins erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (E-PHA) and leukoagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (L-PHA). Although no effect was observed at 10 minutes or 1 hour after an anesthetic dose of sodium pentobarbital, after 1 and 3 hours of anesthesia, canine lymphocytes were significantly suppressed, as demonstrated by decreased responsiveness to E-PHA and L-PHA mitogen stimulation. After 3-hours the majority of animals had mitogenesis values of less than 50% of the preanesthetic control values. Recovery, as measured by a return to at least 70% of the preanesthetic mitogenesis value, was noted in the majority of animals at 24, 48, and 72 hours. In order to investigate the machanisms of the in vivo capability of sodium pentobarbital to induce immunosuppression of lymphocyte transformation, in vitro studies were carried out. Sodium pentobarbital was found to significantly inhibit mitogen-induced canine mononuclear cell blastogenesis at anesthetic (1.5 to 3.0 mg%) drug concentrations in vitro. Lymphocytes pretreated with barbiturate and washed prior to plating did not show this inhibiting effect. Our findings suggest that depression of the immune response reported in patients after operation could result from short-acting barbiturates administered during the induction phase of clinical anesthesia. Furthermore, the suppression may involve in vivo metabolism of pentobarbital, hormones or other in vivo factors, since washed lymphocytes from the in vivo but not the in vitro experiments demonstrated suppression. These results indicate that anesthesia may be an important factor in the immunosuppression reported after major surgery.

  1. Gastrodiae Rhizoma Ethanol Extract Enhances Pentobarbital-Induced Sleeping Behaviors and Rapid Eye Movement Sleep via the Activation of GABAA-ergic Transmission in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Joon; Oh, Eun-Hye; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Chung, Youn Bok; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2014-01-01

    This research was designed to identify whether Gastrodiae Rhizoma ethanol extract (GREE) enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep via  γ-aminobutyric acid- (GABA-) ergic systems and modulated sleep architectures in animals. GREE (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) inhibited locomotor activity in mice, in a dose-dependent manner. GREE not only prolonged total sleep time, but also reduced sleep latency time in pentobarbital (42 mg/kg)-treated mice. Subhypnotic pentobarbital (28 mg/kg, i.p.) also increased the number of total sleeping animals in concomitant administration of GREE. GREE (100 mg/kg) alone reduced the count of sleep-wake cycles in electroencephalogram. Furthermore, GREE increased total sleep time and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. From the in vitro experiments, GREE increased intracellular chloride level in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells. Protein expressions of glutamine acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GABAA receptors subtypes by western blot were increased. Therefore, our study suggested that GREE enhances pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors and increased REM via the activation of GABAA-ergic transmission in rodents. PMID:25614750

  2. Effect of calcium hypochlorite and chloramine on blood biochemistry and sodium pentobarbital induced sleeping time in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Sidra; Rasheed, Muhammad Adil; Ashraf, Muhammad; Altaf, Imran; Rehmat, Saima; Fatima, Ghulam

    2016-09-01

    Disinfectants are chemical agents used to eradicate, deactivate or kill microorganisms. Chemical disinfectants especially chlorine compound are extensively used for water sanitization. Among these calcium hypochlorite and chloramines are commonly used now a day. Large number of chemical compounds, drugs and endogenous substances are metabolized by hepatic enzymes known as cytochrome P450 enzyme system. Many chemicals are capable of enzyme induction. Enzyme induction may change the metabolism of other drugs and endogenous substances which may alter the plasma concentration of these chemicals. To evaluate the enzyme inducing ability of calcium hypochlorite and chloramine, sleeping time induced by sodium pentobarbital was noted in mice. Normal saline was taken as negative control. Rifampicin, chloramphenicol and grapefruit juice were taken as positive control group. On completion of dosing after 4 weeks, alteration in sleep induction and recovery times was noted and compared. Histological evaluation of liver was observed. A significant decrease in sleeping time was observed in calcium hypochlorite and chloramine treated groups. Both calcium hypochlorite and chloramine caused a significant change in liver enzymes and in the values of complete blood count. In histological evaluation both caused fat deposition in the hepatocytes. It was concluded from the study that both calcium hypochlorite and chloramine were hepatic microsomal enzyme inducer.

  3. Sedative-hypnotic profile of novel isatin ketals.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Pontes, Luana B; Gabriel, Daniele; Mendes, Thaiana C F; Ribeiro, Núbia M; Pinto, Angelo C; Trachez, Margarete M; Sudo, Roberto T

    2007-04-01

    Isatin (1H-indol-2,3-dione) is an endogenous compound found in many tissues and fluids. Isatin and its derivatives exert pharmacological effects on the central nervous system, including anxiogenic, sedative and anticonvulsant activities. Two new groups of isatin derivatives were synthesized (nine dioxolane ketals and nine dioxane ketals) and studied for their sedative, hypnotic and anesthetic effects using pentobarbital-induced sleeping time, locomotor activity evaluation and intravenous infusion. The dioxolane ketals were more potent than dioxane ketals for inducing sedative-hypnotic states, causing up to a three-fold increase in pentobarbital hypnosis. The dioxolane ketals produced sedation, demonstrated by decreased spontaneous locomotor activity in an open field. Hypnosis and anesthesia were observed during intravenous infusion of 5'-chlorospiro-[1,3-dioxolane-2,3'-indolin]-2'-one (T3) in conscious Wistar rats. Complete recovery from hypnosis and anesthesia required 39.1+/-7.3 and 6.8+/-2.4 min, respectively. Changes in hemodynamic parameters after infusion of 5.0 mg/kg/min were minimal. These findings suggest that these new isatin derivatives represent potential candidates for the development of new drugs that act on the central nervous system and may lead to a new centrally acting anesthetic with no toxic effects on the cardiovascular or respiratory systems.

  4. Interaction between different extracts of Hypericum perforatum L. from Serbia and pentobarbital, diazepam and paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Rašković, Aleksandar; Cvejić, Jelena; Stilinović, Nebojša; Goločorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Vukmirović, Saša; Mimica-Dukić, Neda; Mikov, Momir

    2014-03-28

    Herb-drug interactions are an important safety concern and this study was conducted regarding the interaction between the natural top-selling antidepressant remedy Hypericum perforatum (Hypericaceae) and conventional drugs. This study examined the influence of acute pretreatment with different extracts of Hypericum perforatum from Serbia on pentobarbital-induced sleeping time, impairment of motor coordination caused by diazepam and paracetamol pharmacokinetics in mice. Ethanolic extract, aqueous extract, infusion, tablet and capsule of Hypericum perforatum were used in this experiment. The profile of Hypericum perforatum extracts as well as paracetamol plasma concentration was determined using RP-HPLC analysis. By quantitative HPLC analysis of active principles, it has been proven that Hypericum perforatum ethanolic extract has the largest content of naphtodianthrones: hypericin (57.77 µg/mL) and pseudohypericin (155.38 µg/mL). Pretreatment with ethanolic extract of Hypericum perforatum potentiated the hypnotic effect of pentobarbital and impairment of motor coordination caused by diazepam to the greatest extent and also increased paracetamol plasma concentration in comparison to the control group. These results were in correlation with naphtodianthrone concentrations. The obtained results have shown a considerable influence of Hypericum perforatum on pentobarbital and diazepam pharmacodynamics and paracetamol pharmacokinetics.

  5. Influence of ozone on pentobarbital pharmacokinetics in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, J.A.; Menzel, D.B.; Mole, M.L.; Miller, F.J.; Gardner, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    It had been shown that 3- to 5-hr exposures to ambient concentrations of ozone (O/sub 3/) increase pentobarbital-induced sleeping time in female mice, hamsters, and rats without decreasing heptatic cytochrome P-450 levels or selected mixed function oxidases. To elucidate potential mechanisms involved, clearance of pentobarbital from the blood of O/sub 3/-exposed mice was examined. Pentobarbital clearance followed first-order kinetics with a one-compartment model. Mice exposed to 1960 micrograms per cu. m. (1ppm) for 5 hr had a 71% increase in the plasma half-life of pentobarbital. It therefore appears possible that pentobarbital-induced sleeping time is increased due to a decrease in hepatic metabolism of pentobarbital.

  6. Anxiolytic and Hypnotic Effects of Aqueous and Ethanolic Extracts of Aerial Parts of Echium italicum L. in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Shahandeh, Shabnam; Shahsavand, Shabnam

    2012-01-01

    Background Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has clearly improved in recent decades. Self-administration of herbal medicines has been the most popular therapeutic alternative to standard medicine. Objectives Since the extract of Echium amoenum exhibits an anxiolytic effect, the aim of this study is to evaluate the anxiolytic and hypnotic effects in mice of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of aerial parts of E. italicum, a member of the Boraginaceae family. Materials and Methods Mice were administered the agents intraperitoneally before the start of the experiments for evaluation of hypnotic activity (induced by sodium pentobarbital, 30 mg/kg, i.p.), anxiolytic activity (elevated plus-maze [EPM] test), locomotor activity (open field test), and motor coordination (rotarod test). Result The ethanolic and aqueous extracts of E. italicum, at doses of 1.2 and 2.1 g/kg, increased the percentage of time-spent and the percentage of arm entries in the open arms of the EPM and decreased the percentage of time-spent in the closed arms of the EPM. Moreover, both extracts decreased the pentobarbital-induced latency to sleep and significantly increased the total sleeping time induced by pentobarbital. In addition, locomotor activity was affected by aqueous extracts and ethanolic extract (at higher doses). Both extracts showed no effect in the rotarod test. Conclusions These results suggest that both ethanolic and aqueous extracts of E. italicum may have anxiolytic effects and sedative activity but no effect on muscle relaxation. PMID:24624158

  7. Gene expression in the rat cerebral cortex: comparison of recovery sleep and hypnotic-induced sleep.

    PubMed

    Wisor, J P; Morairty, S R; Huynh, N T; Steininger, T L; Kilduff, T S

    2006-08-11

    Most hypnotic medications currently on the market target some aspect of GABAergic neurotransmission. Although all such compounds increase sleep, these drugs differentially affect the activity of the cerebral cortex as measured by the electroencephalogram. Whereas benzodiazepine medications such as triazolam tend to suppress slow wave activity in the cortex, the GABA(B) ligand gamma-hydroxybutyrate greatly enhances slow wave activity and the non-benzodiazepine, zolpidem, which binds to the omega1 site on the GABA(A) receptor/Cl(-) ionophore complex, is intermediate in this regard. Our previous studies have demonstrated that a small number of genes exhibit increased expression in the cerebral cortex of the mouse and rat during recovery sleep after sleep deprivation: egr-3, fra-2, grp78, grp94, ngfi-b, and nr4a3. Using these genes as a panel of biomarkers associated with sleep, we asked whether hypnotic medications induce similar molecular changes in the rat cerebral cortex to those observed when both sleep continuity and slow wave activity are enhanced during recovery sleep. We find that, although each drug increases the expression of a subset of genes in the panel of biomarkers, no drug fully replicates the molecular changes in the cortex associated with recovery sleep. Furthermore, high levels of slow wave activity in the cortex are correlated with increased expression of fra-2 whereas the expression of grp94 is correlated with body temperature. These results demonstrate that sleep-related changes in gene expression may be affected by physiological covariates of sleep and wakefulness rather than by vigilance state per se.

  8. Chemical constituents of Eleutherococcus sessiliflorus extract and its sedative-hypnotic effect.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Yang, Chun-Juan; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Zhao, Nan; Feng, Xue-Song; Meng, Fan-Hao

    2017-01-04

    The present study was designed to investigate the chemical constituents and bioactivities of the roots of Eleutherococcus sessiliflorus (E. sessiliflorus). The compounds were isolated through various chromatography techniques and elucidated by mass spectrometric (MS), 1D- and 2D-NMR analyses. The sedative-hypnotic effect of E. sessiliflorus ethanol extract and its fractions (acetic ether, n-butanol and water fraction) were also investigated. In the chemical constituent study, one new compound, 3-ethyl-5-hydroxy-3-(hydroxymethyl) pentyl-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) acrylate and fourteen known compounds were isolated and identified. The chromatographic fingerprint of E. sessiliflorus was established by UPLC-PDA-MS/MS analysis. In bioactivity study, it was found that the water fraction of E. sessiliflorus extract could prolong pentobarbital-induced sleeping time more than that of the other fractions of E. sessiliflorus extract in mice, which provided a basis for future study on sedative-hypnotic effect of the chemical constituents in E. sessiliflorus.

  9. Theacrine, a special purine alkaloid with sedative and hypnotic properties from Cammelia assamica var. kucha in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie-Kun; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Zhao, Liang; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The central nervous system activities of theacrine (1,3,7,9-tetramethyluric acid), a purine alkaloid which is abundantly present in Camellia assamica var. kucha, were investigated in ambulatory activity, pentobarbital-induced sleep and forced swimming test in mice, compared with two other purine alkaloids, caffeine and theobromine. Caffeine treatment led to a marked increase in the ambulatory activity accompanied with decreasing of the immobility time in forced swimming test at both 10 and 30 mg/kg. Under the same conditions, neither theacrine nor theobromine showed obvious excited efficacy. Both doses of theacrine could significantly prolong the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital, while caffeine and theobromine exhibited an inverted effect. These results indicated that theacrine possessed potent sedative and hypnotic properties and its central nervous system effects were different from those of caffeine and theobromine.

  10. Sedative-Hypnotic and Receptor Binding Studies of Fermented Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Hye-Young; Kang, Young Mi; Lee, Bae-Jin; Chung, Sun Yong; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the sedative-hypnotic activity of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-enriched fermented marine organisms (FMO), including sea tangle (FST) and oyster (FO) by Lactobacillus brevis BJ20 (L. brevis BJ20). FST and FO were tested for their binding activity of the GABAA-benzodiazepine and 5-HT2C receptors, which are well-known molecular targets for sleep aids. We also measured the sleep latency and sleep duration during pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice after oral administration of FST and FO. In GABAA and 5-HT2C receptor binding assays, FST displayed an effective concentration-dependent binding affinity to GABAA receptor, similar to the binding affinity to 5-HT2C receptor. FO exhibited higher affinity to 5-HT2C receptor, compared with the GABAA receptor. The oral administration of FST and FO produced a dose-dependent decrease in sleep latency and increase in sleep duration in pentobarbital-induced hypnosis. The data demonstrate that FST and FO possess sedative-hypnotic activity possibly by modulating GABAA and 5-HT2C receptors. We propose that FST and FO might be effective agents for treatment of insomnia. PMID:26336589

  11. Deepening Sleep by Hypnotic Suggestion

    PubMed Central

    Cordi, Maren J.; Schlarb, Angelika A.; Rasch, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Slow wave sleep (SWS) plays a critical role in body restoration and promotes brain plasticity; however, it markedly declines across the lifespan. Despite its importance, effective tools to increase SWS are rare. Here we tested whether a hypnotic suggestion to “sleep deeper” extends the amount of SWS. Design: Within-subject, placebo-controlled crossover design. Setting: Sleep laboratory at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. Participants: Seventy healthy females 23.27 ± 3.17 y. Intervention: Participants listened to an auditory text with hypnotic suggestions or a control tape before napping for 90 min while high-density electroencephalography was recorded. Measurements and Results: After participants listened to the hypnotic suggestion to “sleep deeper” subsequent SWS was increased by 81% and time spent awake was reduced by 67% (with the amount of SWS or wake in the control condition set to 100%). Other sleep stages remained unaffected. Additionally, slow wave activity was significantly enhanced after hypnotic suggestions. During the hypnotic tape, parietal theta power increases predicted the hypnosis-induced extension of SWS. Additional experiments confirmed that the beneficial effect of hypnotic suggestions on SWS was specific to the hypnotic suggestion and did not occur in low suggestible participants. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of hypnotic suggestions to specifically increase the amount and duration of slow wave sleep (SWS) in a midday nap using objective measures of sleep in young, healthy, suggestible females. Hypnotic suggestions might be a successful tool with a lower risk of adverse side effects than pharmacological treatments to extend SWS also in clinical and elderly populations. Citation: Cordi MJ, Schlarb AA, Rasch B. Deepening sleep by hypnotic suggestion. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1143-1152. PMID:24882909

  12. Gan-Dan-Liang-Yi-Tang alleviates p-chlorophenylalanine-induced insomnia through modification of the serotonergic and immune system

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuan; Wang, Yu-Nin; Zhang, Gang-Qiang; Dong, Xian-Zhe; Liu, Wan-Wan; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Gan-Dan-Liang-Yi-Tang (GDLYT) is a Traditional Chinese Medicine that has been historically used for the treatment of insomnia. However, investigations into its pharmacological ingredients and the mechanism underlying its sedative and hypnotic effects remain limited. The present study reported the detailed mechanisms underlying the sedative and hypnotic effects of GDLYT. Kunming mice were administered GDLYT at various sub-hypnotic doses, which underwent sodium pentobarbital treatment test, pentetrazole induced convulsant studies and p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) induced insomnia model. Potentiated hypnotic and sedative effects in mice was studied, and also the changes in related neurotransmitter and immune factors were evaluated. The results suggested that GDLYT possessed weak sedative effects on pentetrazole-induced convulsive activity in normal mice at a dose of 1.3 mg/kg, with an increase in sleep onset in subhypnotic dose of sodium pentobarbital-treated mice. GDLYT was also able to alleviate insomnia induced by PCPA in the rodent models, and increased 5-hydroxytryptamine levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and corpus striatum of PCPA-treated rats. Furthermore, the hypnotic effects of GDLYT were modified, which allowed for PCPA-induced immune system changes, including increased interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-2 expression levels. The results of the present study indicated that GDLYT induced sedative and hypnotic bioactivity by regulating serotonergic activity in the central nervous system and immune system. PMID:27882122

  13. Effects of first- and second-generation histamine-H1-receptor antagonists on the pentobarbital-induced loss of the righting reflex in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Junzo; Hirano, Shoko; Miyata, Shigeo; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Onodera, Kenji

    2005-02-01

    The second-generation histamine-H(1)-receptor antagonists, such as epinastine and cetirizine, are used as non-sedating antihistamines for treating allergic symptoms due to their poor ability to penetrate blood-brain barrier. Because it has been reported that the blood-brain barrier system is disturbed in diabetes, it is possible that second-generation histamine-H(1)-receptor antagonists may easily penetrate the blood-brain barrier and cause potent sedation in diabetics. In the present study, we investigated the effects of first-generation (diphenhydramine) and second-generation (epinastine and cetirizine) histamine-H(1)-receptor antagonists on the duration of pentobarbital-induced loss of the righting reflex (LORR) in non-diabetic and diabetic mice. Systemic treatment with diphenhydramine (3 - 30 mg/kg, s.c.), and intracerebroventricular treatment with epinastine (0.03 - 0.3 microg/mouse) and cetirizine (0.03 - 0.3 microg/mouse) dose-dependently and significantly increased the duration of pentobarbital-induced LORR in both non-diabetic and diabetic mice. Although systemic treatment with epinastine (3 - 30 mg/kg, s.c.) and cetirizine (3 - 30 mg/kg, s.c.) did not affect the duration of pentobarbital-induced LORR in non-diabetic mice, these treatments significantly prolonged it in diabetic mice. Our results suggest that the systemic administration of second-generation histamine-H(1)-receptor antagonists may produce a central nervous system depressant effect in diabetes.

  14. [Lormetazepam in preoperative sleeplessness. Dose dependance of the effect and comparison with 100 mg pentobarbital (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ott, H; Doenicke, A; Abress, C; Fischl, R; Hemmerling, K G; Fichte, K

    1979-01-01

    Lormetazepam (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 mg)--a new benzodiazepine--was tested versus Pentobarbital (100 mg) under double blind conditions on 240 preoperative inpatients for night-time sedative and side effects after acute oral intake. Results are based on p less than 0.05. Additionally p less than 0.125 in binomial-two-sample-tests was accepted. Lormetazepam shows dose dependent increase in hypnotic effects (e.g. reduction in sleep latency and number of awakenings, increase of total sleep duration), and side effects (e.g. dopiness, dizziness), but no relevant change in vital signs. About 0.5 mg of Lormetazepam are equivalent to 100 mg of Pentobarbital. 2 mg of Lormetazepam seem to be the optimum dose regarding the relation between hypnotic and side effects. In the view of anaesthesists Lormetazepam is preferable to Pentobarbital because of more favorable safety aspects.

  15. Nicotine enhances the hypnotic and hypothermic effects of alcohol in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Cassandra A.; Jackson, Asti; Muldoon, Pretal P.; Dawson, Anton; O’Brien, Megan; Soll, Lindsey G.; Abdullah, Rehab; Carroll, F. Ivy; Tapper, Andrew R.; Miles, Michael F.; Banks, Matthew L.; Bettinger, Jill C.; Damaj, M. Imad

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethanol and nicotine abuse are two leading causes of preventable mortality in the world, but little is known about the pharmacological mechanisms mediating co-abuse. Few studies have examined the interaction of the acute effects of ethanol and nicotine. Here, we examine the effects of nicotine administration on the duration of ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex (LORR) and characterize the nature of their pharmacological interactions in C57BL/6J mice. Methods We assessed the effects of ethanol and nicotine and the nature of their interaction in the LORR test using isobolographic analysis after acute injection in C57BL/6J male mice. Next, we examined the importance of receptor efficacy using nicotinic partial agonists varenicline and sazetidine. We evaluated the involvement of major nAChR subtypes using nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine and nicotinic α4 and α7 knockout mice. The selectivity of nicotine’s actions on ethanol-induced LORR was examined by testing nicotine’s effects on the hypnotic properties of ketamine and pentobarbital. We also assessed the development of tolerance after repeated nicotine exposure. Lastly, we assessed if the effects of nicotine on ethanol-induced LORR extends to hypothermia and ethanol intake in the Drinking in the Dark (DID) paradigm. Results We found that acute nicotine injection enhances ethanol’s hypnotic effects in a synergistic manner and that receptor efficacy plays an important role in this interaction. Furthermore, tolerance developed to the enhancement of ethanol’s hypnotic effects by nicotine after repeated exposure of the drug. α4* and α7 nAChRs seem to play an important role in nicotine-ethanol interaction in the LORR test. In addition, the magnitude of ethanol-induced LORR enhancement by nicotine was more pronounced in C57BL/6J than DBA/2J mice. Furthermore, acute nicotine enhanced ketamine and pentobarbital hypnotic effects in the mouse. Finally, nicotine enhanced ethanol-induced hypothermia

  16. Role of effective composition on antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, sedative-hypnotic capacities of 6 common edible Lilium varieties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Huang, Hanhan; Zhang, Yao; Li, Xia; Li, Hongfa; Jiang, Qianqian; Gao, Wenyuan

    2015-04-01

    Nine Lilium samples (belong to 6 different cultivars with different maturity stage) were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed of total phenolics (TP), total flavonoids (TF), total saponins (TS), total carbohydrates (TC, polysaccharides), and soluble proteins contents (SP), and the monomeric components were quantified utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector (HPLC-PAD) associated with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Antioxidant activity (reducing power and DPPH radical scavenging activity), anti-inflammatory (xylene-induced mouse ear edema detumescent assay and carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema detumescent assay), and sedative-hypnotic capacities (sodium pentobarbital-induced sleep assay) were comparatively evaluated in mouse model. Additionally, correlation analysis and principal component analysis were carried out to detect clustering and elucidate relationships between components' concentrations and bioactivities to clarify the role of effective composition. Lilium bulbs in later maturity stage preliminary evidenced higher saponins content, and lower phenolic acids and flavonoids content. The result demonstrated that Lilium bulbs generally had distinct antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and sedative-hypnotic capacities. Varieties statistically differed (P < 0.05) in chemical composition and bioactivities. Lilium varieties of Dongbei and Lanzhou presented potent sedative-hypnotic effect and anti-inflammatory activity. The antioxidant capacity was related to the phenolic acids and flavonoids contents, the anti-inflammatory and sedative-hypnotic capacities were related to the saponins content. This is first study presenting comprehensive description of common edible Lilium bulbs' chemical compositions, sedative-hypnotic, and anti-inflammatory capacities grown in China. It would informatively benefit the genetic selection and cultivated optimization of Lilium varieties to improve nutritional quality, and

  17. Effects of thalidomide and pentobarbital on neuronal activity in the preoptic area during sleep and wakefulness in the cat.

    PubMed

    Kaitin, K I

    1985-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that sleep produced by thalidomide, unlike that of pentobarbital, is associated with increased neuronal activity in the preoptic area (POA), the spontaneous activity of 96 POA neurons was recorded in chronically prepared cats during alert wakefulness (W), deep slow-wave sleep (SWS), and REM sleep in a drug-free preparation and after administration of thalidomide (4 mg/kg) and pentobarbital (4 or 8 mg/kg). Thalidomide, unlike pentobarbital, at a dose that significantly increased the amount of SWS, failed to depress neuronal activity in the POA compared to drug-free controls. Mean discharge rates during thalidomide treatment were similar to drug-free rates. In contrast, rates during low-dose pentobarbital treatment were significantly less than those of drug-free and thalidomide-treated animals. Rates during high-dose pentobarbital treatment were significantly less than those in all other groups. Thalidomide, compared with the other groups, in addition to increasing the amount of SWS, significantly increased the total amount of REM sleep as well as REM sleep as a percent of total sleep, but did not produce ataxia or behavioral excitement. These results do not confirm the initial hypothesis, but suggest that hypnotic drugs that do not depress neuronal activity in the POA may be devoid of some of the unwanted side effects often associated with the more commonly prescribed hypnotic medications.

  18. Mechanism of blockade of neuromuscular transmission by pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Seyama, I; Narahashi, T

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of block of neuromuscular transmission by pentobarbital has been studied in the frog sciatic nerve-sartorius muscle preparation by means of intracellular microelectrode and voltage clamp techniques. The resting membrane potential was decreased by pentobarbital only to a small extent (less than 15 mV) in both end-plate and non-end-plate regions. Both sodium and potassium components of end-plate current underwent drastic changes after application of pentobarbital. The peak amplitude was decreased with an apparent dissociation constant of 0.9 mM for both currents. The maximum rate of rise of end-plate current was reduced, with apparent dissociation constants of 0.9 and 1.2 mM for sodium and potassium currents, respectively. The times for sodium and potassium end-plate current to reach their peaks were shortened only to a negligible extent. The falling phase of end-plate current was greatly accelerated, sodium current being affected more than potassium current. The transient end-plate depolarization induced by iontophoretic application of acetylcholine was suppressed more effectively than end-plate potential by application of pentobarbital. The falling phase of the former was also shortened. The quantal content of end-plate potential tended to increase at 0.5 mM, but underwent no appreciable change at 1.0 and 1.4 mM. Pentobarbital has a dual action on both quantal content and end-plate membrane depending on the concentration, and the block of neuromuscular transmission is due primarily to a suppression of the end-plate sensitivity to acetylcholine. The differential effect of pentobarbital on sodium and potassium components of end-plate current is compatible with the notion that these two ionic conductances are separate entities.

  19. Hypnotic dreams as a lens into hypnotic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Raz, Amir; Schweizer, Heather R; Zhu, Hongtu; Bowles, Elizabeth Nellie

    2010-01-01

    The hypnotic relationship is an important parameter for both experimental and therapeutic contexts. Hypnotic dreams may serve as a lens to examine the hypnotic relationship. By answering 5 questions per item, 70 judges rated 12 accounts of brief hypnotic dreams conducted as part of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C. The data show that the judges were able to correctly discern highly from less hypnotizable individuals. Interestingly, highly hypnotizable females coached by a male hypnotic operator had more sexually charged dreams than either less hypnotizable females or males regardless of hypnotizability. These findings contextualize for further research and therapy transference issues related to the hypnotic relationship and the use of hypnotic dreams.

  20. The reduction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha release and tissue damage by pentobarbital in the experimental endotoxemia model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fwu Lin; Li, Chi Han; Hsu, Bang Gee; Tsai, Nu-Man; Lin, Shinn Zong; Harn, Horng Jyh; Chen, Hsing I; Liao, Kuang Wen; Lee, Ru Ping

    2007-09-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death for intensive care patients. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration to animals under anesthesia is a strategy for the study of uncontrolled release of proinflammatory cytokines. Anesthetics have been indicated that they can specially affect immune responses, such as the inflammatory response. Pentobarbital is an anesthetic used mainly in animal studies. Thus, the effect of pentobarbital on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release was determined. The results revealed that pentobarbital suppressed the expression of TNF-alpha mRNA and its proteins, which may result from the decrease in the activities of nuclear factor-kappaB and activator protein 1 and the reduction of the expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase by pentobarbital. After the inhibitory activity of the pentobarbital for TNF-alpha release was proven in vivo, the cytotoxic effects of LPS were examined in vivo with or without pentobarbital treatments. In vivo results indicated that plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactic dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, serum urea nitrogen, and amylase decreased dramatically in the anesthetic group with pentobarbital administration. Finally, the effect of pentobarbital on TNF-alpha-related cell death was monitored in vitro, and the results indicated the pentobarbital could directly enhance the viabilities of cells under the treatment of TNF-alpha and protected cells from apoptosis induced by deferoxamine mesylate-induced hypoxia. These results suggest that pentobarbital significantly influences the LPS-induced inflammatory response and protects cells from death directly and indirectly induced by TNF-alpha. The information provides a perspective to re-evaluate the results of the experiments in which animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital. The anti-inflammatory effects of the drugs may have been caused by the synergistic effect of pentobarbital.

  1. Cerebral radioprotection by pentobarbital: Dose-response characteristics and association with GABA agonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Orr, K.; Delaney, T.; Oldfield, E.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Pentobarbital reduces cerebral radiation toxicity; however, the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. As an anesthetic and depressant of cerebral metabolism, pentobarbital induces its effects on the central nervous system by stimulating the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to its receptor and by inhibiting postsynaptic excitatory amino acid activity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of these actions as well as other aspects of the radioprotective activity of pentobarbital. Fischer 344 rats were separated into multiple groups and underwent two dose-response evaluations. In one set of experiments to examine the relationship of radioprotection to pentobarbital dose, a range of pentobarbital doses (0 to 75 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally prior to a constant-level radiation dose (70 Gy). In a second series of experiments to determine the dose-response relationship of radiation protection to radiation dose, a range of radiation doses (10 to 90 Gy) were given with a single pentobarbital dose. Further groups of animals were used to evaluate the importance of the timing of pentobarbital administration, the function of the (+) and (-) isomers of pentobarbital, and the role of an alternative GABA agonist (diazepam). In addition, the potential protective effects of alternative methods of anesthesia (ketamine) and induction of cerebral hypometabolism (hypothermia) were examined. Enhancement of survival time from acute radiation injury due to high-dose single-fraction whole-brain irradiation was maximal with 60 mg/kg of pentobarbital, and occurred over the range of all doses examined between 30 to 90 Gy. Protection was seen only in animals that received the pentobarbital before irradiation. Administration of other compounds that enhance GABA binding (Saffan and diazepam) also significantly enhanced survival time.

  2. Artemisia capillaris Thunberg Produces Sedative-Hypnotic Effects in Mice, Which are Probably Mediated Through Potentiation of the GABAA Receptor.

    PubMed

    dela Peña, Irene Joy I; Hong, Eunyoung; Kim, Hee Jin; de la Peña, June Bryan; Woo, Tae Sun; Lee, Yong Soo; Cheong, Jae Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The Artemisia group of plants has long been used as a traditional remedy for various conditions. The present study assessed the sleep-promoting (sedative-hypnotic) effects of Artemisia capillaris Thunberg (A. capillaris), and elucidated a possible mechanism behind its effect. ICR mice were given A. capillaris extract (oral) at different dosages (50, 100, 200, 300, or 400 mg/kg), distilled water (oral; control), or diazepam (intraperitoneal; reference drug). One hour after administration, locomotion (open-field test) and motor coordination (rota-rod test) were assessed. The extract's effect on pentobarbital-induced sleep was also evaluated. Additionally, electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were measured in rats. To evaluate a possible mechanism behind its effects, changes in chloride ( Cl (-)) ion influx were measured in human neuroblastoma cells. As compared to the control group, mice treated with A. capillaris demonstrated significantly decreased locomotor activity and impaired motor balance and coordination. The extract also shortened the onset and lengthened the duration of sleep induced by pentobarbital sodium. These effects were comparable to that induced by diazepam. Furthermore, A. capillaris-treated rats showed increased delta and decreased alpha EEG waves; an electroencephalographic pattern indicative of relaxation or sedation. In neuroblastoma cells, the extract dose-dependently increased Cl (-) ion influx, which was blocked by co-administration of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor competitive antagonist, suggesting that its effects are mediated through the GABAA receptor- Cl (-) ion channel complex. Altogether, the results of the present study demonstrate that A. capillaris possesses potent sedative-hypnotic effects, which are probably mediated through potentiation of the GABAA receptor- Cl (-) ion channel complex.

  3. Hypnotic Treatment of Smoking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastien, Samuel A., IV; Kessler, Marc

    Prior studies of hypnotic treatment of smoking have reported abstinence rates of between 17 and 88 percent at six months, but few have investigated procedures or forms of suggestions. To compare the effectiveness of positive and negative hypnotic suggestions and self-hypnosis for cessation of smoking, 32 subjects were assigned to one of four…

  4. Behavioral effects of pentobarbital, lorazepam, ethanol and chlorpromazine substitution in pentobarbital-dependent baboons.

    PubMed

    Lamb, R J; Griffiths, R R

    1993-04-01

    Baboons were given continuous intragastric infusions of 100 mg/kg/day of pentobarbital before and during these experiments. The baboons responded under a fixed-ratio (FR) 30-response schedule of food presentation from 10:00 A.M. of one day to 8:00 A.M. of the next day. Terminating pentobarbital administration (i.e., substituting water for pentobarbital) from 8:00 A.M. of one day to 8:00 A.M. of the next day produced large decreases in the number of pellets earned. Repeated 24-h terminations of pentobarbital administration at 1-week intervals produced similar decreases in the pellets earned. In another experiment, the effects of terminating pentobarbital administration for several days were examined. The number of pellets earned decreased within 2 h of terminating pentobarbital administration was maximally suppressed during the first day, and recovered over 3 to 5 days. When different doses of pentobarbital were substituted for 24 h, the disruption of responding seen after pentobarbital termination was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In another experiment, the effects of substituting lorazepam, ethanol or chlorpromazine for pentobarbital for 24 h were examined. Lorazepam produced a dose-dependent attenuation of the effects of pentobarbital termination, whereas ethanol did not. Chlorpromazine did not attenuate the effects of pentobarbital termination in two of the three baboons tested, and produced erratic results in the third.

  5. Mortality Risk of Hypnotics: Strengths and Limits of Evidence.

    PubMed

    Kripke, Daniel F

    2016-02-01

    Sleeping pills, more formally defined as hypnotics, are sedatives used to induce and maintain sleep. In a review of publications for the past 30 years, descriptive epidemiologic studies were identified that examined the mortality risk of hypnotics and related sedative-anxiolytics. Of the 34 studies estimating risk ratios, odds ratios, or hazard ratios, excess mortality associated with hypnotics was significant (p < 0.05) in 24 studies including all 14 of the largest, contrasted with no studies at all suggesting that hypnotics ever prolong life. The studies had many limitations: possibly tending to overestimate risk, such as possible confounding by indication with other risk factors; confusing hypnotics with drugs having other indications; possible genetic confounders; and too much heterogeneity of studies for meta-analyses. There were balancing limitations possibly tending towards underestimates of risk such as limited power, excessive follow-up intervals with possible follow-up mixing of participants taking hypnotics with controls, missing dosage data for most studies, and over-adjustment of confounders. Epidemiologic association in itself is not adequate proof of causality, but there is proof that hypnotics cause death in overdoses; there is thorough understanding of how hypnotics euthanize animals and execute humans; and there is proof that hypnotics cause potentially lethal morbidities such as depression, infection, poor driving, suppressed respiration, and possibly cancer. Combining these proofs with consistent evidence of association, the great weight of evidence is that hypnotics cause huge risks of decreasing a patient's duration of survival.

  6. 21 CFR 522.1704 - Sodium pentobarbital injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium pentobarbital injection. 522.1704 Section... § 522.1704 Sodium pentobarbital injection. (a)(1) Specifications. Sodium pentobarbital injection is sterile and contains in each milliliter 64.8 milligrams of sodium pentobarbital. (2) Sponsor. See...

  7. 21 CFR 522.1704 - Sodium pentobarbital injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium pentobarbital injection. 522.1704 Section... § 522.1704 Sodium pentobarbital injection. (a)(1) Specifications. Sodium pentobarbital injection is sterile and contains in each milliliter 64.8 milligrams of sodium pentobarbital. (2) Sponsor. See...

  8. A preliminary phenomenological study of being hypnotized and hypnotizing.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Fredrick James

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents phenomenological research conducted following Woodard's phenomenological and perceptual research methodology for understanding hypnotic experiencing. The research emphasizes examining the internal experiencings of individuals involved in hypnotic experiencing. Examples are presented of Individual Situated Structures and the General Structures from both a group of 8 participants who hypnotized their clients and another group of 17 individuals who volunteered to be hypnotized. The explicated themes identified in hypnotic experiencing (the hypnotic relationship, phenomenology of trance, use of imagination, problem with psychic energy, a gestalt of experiencing, and linear-nonlinear experiencing) are discussed. The author discusses limitations of this study and suggestions for further work.

  9. Hypnotic effects and GABAergic mechanism of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) ethanol extract and its major flavonoid constituent glabrol.

    PubMed

    Cho, Suengmok; Park, Ji-Hae; Pae, Ae Nim; Han, Daeseok; Kim, Dongsoo; Cho, Nam-Chul; No, Kyoung Tai; Yang, Hyejin; Yoon, Minseok; Lee, Changho; Shimizu, Makoto; Baek, Nam-In

    2012-06-01

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra, GG) is one of the most frequently used herbal medicines worldwide, and its various biological activities have been widely studied. GG is reported to have neurological properties such as antidepressant, anxiolytic, and anticonvulsant effects. However, its hypnotic effects and the mechanism of GG and its active compounds have not yet been demonstrated. In this study, GG ethanol extract (GGE) dose-dependently potentiated pentobarbital-induced sleep and increased the amount of non-rapid eye movement sleep in mice without decreasing delta activity. The hypnotic effect of GGE was completely inhibited by flumazenil, which is a well-known γ-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine (GABA(A)-BZD) receptor antagonist, similar to other GABA(A)-BZD receptor agonists (e.g., diazepam and zolpidem). The major flavonoid glabrol was isolated from the flavonoid-rich fraction of GGE; it inhibited [(3)H] flumazenil binding to the GABA(A)-BZD receptors in rat cerebral cortex membrane with a binding affinity (K(i)) of 1.63 μM. The molecular structure and pharmacophore model of glabrol and liquiritigenin indicate that the isoprenyl groups of glabrol may play a key role in binding to GABA(A)-BZD receptors. Glabrol increased sleep duration and decreased sleep latency in a dose-dependent manner (5, 10, 25, and 50mg/kg); its hypnotic effect was also blocked by flumazenil. The results imply that GGE and its flavonoid glabrol induce sleep via a positive allosteric modulation of GABA(A)-BZD receptors.

  10. [Benzodiazepine and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaki; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of insomnia shows an age-associated increase. Especially, persons with age over 60 years frequently suffer from arousal during sleep and early-morning awakening. The reason of this phenomenon can be explained by age-related change in sleepwake regulation, comorbid diseases and psycho-social status. Benzodiazepine derivatives and benzodiazepine agonists have been widely used for treatment of insomnia. These GABA-A receptor agonist hypnotics have sedative effect, possibly causing various adverse events, i.e. falls and hip fracture, anterograde amnesia, next morning hangover especially in the elderly. When making a choice of treatment drugs for the elderly, low dose benzodiazepine hypnotics with relatively high Ω1-selectivity, and newer hypnotics including melatonic receptor agonist or orexin receptor antagonist can become important candidates considering their comorbid diseases or drug interaction with other medications.

  11. Furnishing hypnotic instructions with implementation intentions enhances hypnotic responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Pfau, Florian; Gollwitzer, Peter M

    2012-06-01

    Forming implementation intentions has been consistently shown to be a powerful self-regulatory strategy. As the self-regulation of thoughts is important for the experience of involuntariness in the hypnotic context, investigating the effectiveness of implementation intentions on the suppression of thoughts was the focus of the present study. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions (hypnotic instruction plus implementation intention, hypnotic instruction, implementation intention, and control condition). Results showed that participants who received information included in the "Carleton Skill Training Program" and in addition formed implementation intentions improved their hypnotic responsiveness as compared to all of the other three groups on measures of objective responding and involuntary responding. Thus, in line with the nonstate or cognitive social-psychological view of hypnosis stating that an individual's hypnotic suggestibility is not dispositional but modifiable, our results suggest that hypnotic responsiveness can be heightened by furnishing hypnotic instructions with ad hoc implementation intentions.

  12. Effects of the use of hypnotics on cognition.

    PubMed

    Vermeeren, Annemiek; Coenen, Anton M L

    2011-01-01

    Hypnotic drugs are intended to induce sedation and promote sleep. As a result, they have deteriorating effects on cognitive performance following intake. Most hypnotics are benzodiazepine receptor agonists which can have effects on memory in addition to their sedative effects. Other sedating drugs, such as histamine H1 antagonists or melatonin agonists, may have less effect on memory and learning. Hypnotics with other mechanisms of action are currently being investigated for efficacy and safety. For patients using hypnotic drugs, the effects on cognition are relevant to the extent that a drug dose affects daytime performance. Use of benzodiazepine hypnotics is associated with increased risk of car accidents and falling. Therefore, most hypnotics are studied to determine whether they produce residual sedation and impairing effects on performance the morning after bedtime use. Experimental studies using a standardized driving test clearly show that some drugs and doses produce severe residual effects, whereas others seem to have no or only minor impairing effects on next-day performance. No hypnotic has been found yet to improve daytime performance. Studies on long-term use of benzodiazepine hypnotics suggest that effects on daytime performance may diminish over time due to tolerance. However, there are also studies showing that performance may improve after discontinuation of chronic benzodiazepine use, which suggests that tolerance may not be complete.

  13. Midazolam and pentobarbital for refractory status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Holmes, G L; Riviello, J J

    1999-04-01

    Status epilepticus, a serious, life-threatening emergency characterized by prolonged seizure activity, occurs most commonly in pediatric patients. Although initial therapies with agents such as diazepam, phenytoin, or phenobarbital generally terminate seizure activity within 30-60 minutes, patients with refractory status epilepticus (RSE) lasting longer require additional intervention. High-dose pentobarbital has been the most commonly prescribed agent for the management of RSE in children; however, midazolam has emerged as a new treatment option. This review compares the use of midazolam with pentobarbital in published reports of pediatric RSE. Both drugs effectively terminated refractory seizure activity, although pentobarbital use was complicated by hypotension, delayed recovery, pneumonia, and other adverse effects. Midazolam use was effective and well tolerated, affirming its value in pediatric RSE management.

  14. 21 CFR 522.1704 - Pentobarbital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... The drug is administered intravenously “to effect”. For general surgical anesthesia, the usual dose is... administered intravenously “to effect”. The drug may be administered intraperitoneally. When given... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pentobarbital. 522.1704 Section 522.1704 Food...

  15. Sleep and hypnotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Johns, M W

    1975-01-01

    In recent years the effectiveness of hypnotic drugs has had to be assessed in terms of a greatly increased knowledge of the physiology and pathology of sleep. The normal pattern of sleep and wakefulness involves a cyclic alternation between three rather than two basically dissimilar states of the brain and body - alert wakefulness, rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep and non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep. The pattern of this alternation in individual people results from the interaction of many influences - biological (including genetic, early developmental and later degenerative influences), psychological, social and environmental factors, various physical and psychiatric disorders, and most drugs which affect the central nervous system. The quality of sleep is not related in any simple or constant manner either to its duration or to the proprotions of time spent in each stage of sleep. Among the disorders of sleep, insomnia is a far more common problem of medical management than are enuresis, narcolepsy, somnambulism or nightmares. With a few exceptions, most hypnotic drugs now in widespread use cease to be effective in treating insomnia after the first few nights. However, the ineffective treatment is often continued because insomnia will be even worse during the initial period of drug withdrawal. These factors and the toxicity of hypnotic drugs when taken in overdose make the long-term treatment of insomnia more difficult than was previously supposed. Barbiturates should no longer be prescribed. Some of the non-barbiturates, such as glutethimide and methaqualone, have no advantage over the barbiturates. The benzodiazepine hypnotics, nitrazepam and flurazepam, are less toxic in overdose and are relatively effective in treating insomnia. Chloral hydrate and its derivates are useful alternative drugs for short-term use. Measures to improve sleep without drugs deserve greater emphasis than they have had in the past.

  16. Hypnotic effect of Coriandrum sativum, Ziziphus jujuba, Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis extracts in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Safaei, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate hypnotic effect of Coriandrum sativum, Ziziphus jujuba, Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis hydroalcoholic extracts in mice to select the most effective ones for a combination formula. Three doses of the extracts (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg of C. sativum and Z. jujuba and 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg of L. angustifolia and M. officinalis) were orally administered to male Swiss mice (20-25 g) and one hour later pentobarbital (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to induce sleep. Onset of sleep and its duration were measured and compared. Control animals and reference group received vehicle (10 ml/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (3 mg/kg, i.p.), respectively. C. sativum and Z. jujuba failed to change sleep parameters. L. angustifolia at doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg shortened sleep onset by 7.6%, 50% and 51.5% and prolonged sleep duration by 9.9%, 43.1% and 80.2%, respectively. Compared with control group the same doses of M. officinalis also decreased sleep onset by 24.7%, 27.5% and 51.2% and prolonged sleep duration by 37.9%, 68.7% and 131.7% respectively. Combinations of L. angustifolia and M. officinalis extracts showed additive effect and it is suggested that a preparation containing both extracts may be useful for insomnia. PMID:26779267

  17. Hypnotic effect of Coriandrum sativum, Ziziphus jujuba, Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis extracts in mice.

    PubMed

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Safaei, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate hypnotic effect of Coriandrum sativum, Ziziphus jujuba, Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis hydroalcoholic extracts in mice to select the most effective ones for a combination formula. Three doses of the extracts (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg of C. sativum and Z. jujuba and 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg of L. angustifolia and M. officinalis) were orally administered to male Swiss mice (20-25 g) and one hour later pentobarbital (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to induce sleep. Onset of sleep and its duration were measured and compared. Control animals and reference group received vehicle (10 ml/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (3 mg/kg, i.p.), respectively. C. sativum and Z. jujuba failed to change sleep parameters. L. angustifolia at doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg shortened sleep onset by 7.6%, 50% and 51.5% and prolonged sleep duration by 9.9%, 43.1% and 80.2%, respectively. Compared with control group the same doses of M. officinalis also decreased sleep onset by 24.7%, 27.5% and 51.2% and prolonged sleep duration by 37.9%, 68.7% and 131.7% respectively. Combinations of L. angustifolia and M. officinalis extracts showed additive effect and it is suggested that a preparation containing both extracts may be useful for insomnia.

  18. Clobazam--a new hypnotic?

    PubMed Central

    Kesson, C M; Gray, J M; Lawson, D H

    1978-01-01

    1 A double-blind randomized trial to compare the relative efficacy of the 1,5-benzodiazepine, clobazam, the 1,4-benzodiazepine nitrazepam, and placebo as hypnotics was carried out. 2 A preference technique was used and the analyses were performed sequentially. 3. The results confirmed that nitrazepam was superior to placebo as a hypnotic but failed to show that clobazam was superior to either placebo or nitrazepam in a ratio of 2:1. Thus, it seems likely that the hypnotic properties of clobazam are minimal. 4 Clobazam is not suitable for use as a hypnotic in hospitalized patients. PMID:687502

  19. Classroom Seating and Hypnotic Susceptibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackeim, Harold A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether people who differ in behavioral and self-report measures of lateralized seating preferences also differ in hypnotic susceptibility. Only right-handed subjects were used, and the associations between hypnotic susceptibility and seating preference were examined separately for males and females.…

  20. Hypnotic activity of brotizolam

    PubMed Central

    Uzzan, B.; Warot, D.; Chermat, P.; Dantlo, B.; Bornstein, S.; Simon, P.

    1983-01-01

    1 A double-blind, crossover study was carried out in general practice on the hypnotic activity of 0.25 mg brotizolam in patients aged between 18 and 70 years complaining of insomnia (11 men, 28 women). 2 Patients reported that they slept better, that they awoke less frequently and that they slept longer with brotizolam than with placebo. Overall the patients preferred brotizolam to placebo, and subjective assessments of well-being after brotizolam did not differ from those after placebo. Brotizolam was well tolerated and there were no incidents of note. PMID:6362701

  1. Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase reduce carrageenan-induced hind paw inflammation in pentobarbital-treated mice: comparison with indomethacin and possible involvement of cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Holt, Sandra; Comelli, Francesca; Costa, Barbara; Fowler, Christopher J

    2005-10-01

    The in vivo effect of inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) upon oedema volume and FAAH activity was evaluated in the carrageenan induced hind paw inflammation model in the mouse. Oedema was measured at two time points, 2 and 4 h, after intraplantar injection of carrageenan to anaesthetised mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the FAAH inhibitor URB597 (0.1, 0.3, 1 and 3 mg kg(-1)) 30 min prior to carrageenan administration, dose-dependently reduced oedema formation. At the 4 h time point, the ED(50) for URB597 was approximately 0.3 mg kg(-1). Indomethacin (5 mg kg(-1) i.p.) completely prevented the oedema response to carrageenan. The antioedema effects of indomethacin and URB597 were blocked by 3 mg kg(-1) i.p. of the CB(2) receptor antagonist SR144528. The effect of URB597 was not affected by pretreatment with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonist bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (30 mg kg(-1) i.p.) or the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (10 mg kg(-1) i.p.), when oedema was assessed 4 h after carrageenan administration. The CB(1) receptor antagonists AM251 (3 mg kg(-1) i.p.) and rimonabant (0.5 mg kg(-1) i.p.) gave inconsistent effects upon the antioedema effect of URB597. FAAH measurements were conducted ex vivo in the paws, spinal cords and brains of the mice. The activities of FAAH in the paws and spinal cords of the inflamed vehicle-treated mice were significantly lower than the corresponding activities in the noninflamed mice. PMSF treatment almost completely inhibited the FAAH activity in all three tissues, as did the highest dose of URB597 (3 mg kg(-1)) in spinal cord samples, whereas no obvious changes were seen ex vivo for the other treatments. In conclusion, the results show that in mice, treatment with indomethacin and URB597 produce SR144528-sensitive anti-inflammatory effects in the carrageenan model of acute inflammation.

  2. Effects of hypnotic analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain.

    PubMed

    DeBenedittis, G; Panerai, A A; Villamira, M A

    1989-01-01

    Mechanisms of hypnotic analgesia are still poorly understood and conflicting data are reported regarding the underlying neurochemical correlates. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of hypnotically induced analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain, taking into account pain and distress tolerance as well as the neurochemical correlates. 11 high hypnotizable Ss and 10 low hypnotizable Ss, as determined by scores on the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (Weitzenhoffer & E. R. Hilgard, 1962), were administered an ischemic pain test in both waking and hypnotic conditions. The following variables were measured: (a) pain and distress tolerance, (b) anxiety levels, and (c) plasma concentrations of beta-endorphin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Results confirmed significant increases of pain and distress tolerance during hypnosis as compared to the waking state, with positive correlations between pain and distress relief and hypnotizability. Moreover, a hypnotically induced dissociation between the sensory-discriminative and the affective-motivational dimensions of pain experience was found, but only in high hypnotizable Ss. Hypnotic analgesia was unrelated to anxiety reduction and was not mediated either by endorphins or by ACTH.

  3. Hypnotics and Sedatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabra, Pokar M.; Koo, Howard Y.; Marton, Laurence J.

    In recent years, most large hospitals have observed a marked increase in the admission of patients suffering from drug overdose. Overdose of narcotic drugs, such as the opiates, represent less of a problem on a day-to-day basis than do overdoses of prescribed drugs, such as sedatives and hypnotics. Clinical signs and symptoms for a narcotic drug overdose are very distinct, and in the majority of cases can be easily recognized by the attending physicians without the help of a toxicology laboratory. Loomis (1) reported that the majority of fatal poisonings owed to one, or a combination, of four agents: barbiturates, carbon monoxide, ethyl alcohol, and salicylates. Berry (2) estimated that 5-5'-disubstituted barbiturates were the second commonest cause of fatal poisoning in England, and that the frequency of their use was increasing. Other nonbarbiturate hypnotics involved in coma-producing incidents include glutethimide (Doriden®), methyprylon (Noludar®), and meprobamate (3, 4). In the last five years, diazepam (Valium®) has become one of the leading misused drugs (5).

  4. Marijuana Usage and Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzini, Louis R.; McDonald, Roy D.

    1973-01-01

    Anonymous self-reported drug usage data and hypnotic susceptibility scores were obtained from 282 college students. Frequent marijuana users (more than 10 times) showed greater susceptibility to hypnosis than nonusers. (Author)

  5. Hypnotic Psychotherapy with Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Sullivan; Briggs, Wanda P.; Magnus, Virginia

    2005-01-01

    The authors review the literature on the prevalence of sex offenders; multiple treatment modalities; and implications of the use of hypnotic psychotherapy, coupled with cognitive behavioral treatment programs, for treating sex offenders. (Contains 2 tables.)

  6. Hyperbaric nitrogen and pentobarbital on synaptosomal membrane lipids and free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kostopanagiotou, G; Hamamoto, I; Hartwell, V; Nemoto, E M

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen at high pressures and anesthetics increase lipid monolayer surface pressure and in turn modulates monolayer associated lipolytic enzyme activity that could alter membrane lipids. We tested the hypothesis that nitrogen at pressures of 5 and 10 megapascals (MPa) and pentobarbital induce alterations in synaptosomal membrane phospholipid and free fatty acid (FFA). Rat cortical synaptosomes in Krebs-Henseleit buffer were placed in steel chambers and incubated for four hours at 37 degrees C: at 5 or 10 MPa of O2/balance N2; at one 0.1 MPa on room air, and with 10 mg pentobarbital. Free fatty acids (FFA) were quantified by thin-layer and gas chromatography, and neutral and acidic lipids by high-pressure thin layer chromatography and protein by Biorad colorimetric assay. Statistical analyses were by ANOVA and posthoc analysis by Neuman-Keuls and Kruskal-Wallis tests at p < 0.05. Sphyngomyelin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, cerebroside and cholesterol were unchanged by 5 and 10 MPa nitrogen and pentobarbital. Free fatty acids (16:00, 18:00, 18:01, 20:00, 22:0, 22:01 and 24:01) at 10 MPa were reduced compared to 5 MPa (p < 0.05) but unaffected by pentobarbital. The decrease in synaptosomal membrane FFA at 10 MPa suggests attenuated hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids without detectable alterations in membrane phospholipid composition.

  7. Hypnotic metaphor and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, L G

    1987-01-01

    Although hypnosis can be very effective in alleviating sexual problems, few sex therapists use hypnotic methods. This paper seeks to encourage a greater use of hypnosis among clinicians by presenting: a description of the new hypnosis exemplified in the work of Milton H. Erickson; an explanation of one of Erickson's most important and innovative methods, the use of multiple embedded metaphors; and case histories illustrating the application of hypnotic approaches to sexual dysfunction.

  8. Hypnotic Involuntariness: A Social Cognitive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Steven Jay; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A framework for understanding involuntary experiences which draws from social, psychological and cognitive perspectives on hypnotic responding is presented. Five reasons are suggested to reject the hypothesis that hypnotic responding is automatic and involuntary. (SLD)

  9. Neuropsychological Test Performance and Hypnotic Susceptibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Query, William T.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Examined the relationship between brain-behavior and hypnotic susceptibility in 70 alcoholic patients, using the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale and its Fromm-Weingarten modification. Results showed the two scales were interchangeable insofar as they measured the same ability, and indicated that hypnotic susceptibility is related to…

  10. Effect of an imidazobenzodiazepine, Ro15-4513, on the incoordination and hypothermia produced by ethanol and pentobarbital

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, P.L.; Tabakoff, B.; Szabo, G.; Suzdak, P.D.; Paul, S.M.

    1987-08-03

    The imidazobenzodiazepine, Ro15-4513, which is a partial inverse agonist at brain benzodiazepine receptors, reversed the incoordinating effect of ethanol in mice, as measured on an accelerating Rotarod. This effect was blocked by benzodiazepine receptor antagonists. In contrast, Ro15-4513 had no effect on ethanol-induced hypothermia in mice. However, Ro15-4513 reversed the hypothermic effect of pentobarbital, and, at higher dose, also reversed the incoordinating effect of pentobarbital in mice. The data support the hypothesis that certain of the pharmacological effects of ethanol are mediated by actions at the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor-coupled chloride channel. 35 references, 2 figures.

  11. 40-Hz EEG activity during hypnotic induction and hypnotic testing.

    PubMed

    DePascalis, V; Penna, P M

    1990-04-01

    The present study evaluates changes in left and right 40-Hz EEG production for 19 high and 20 low hypnotizable female Ss during the hypnotic induction and the administration of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C) of the Weitzenhoffer and Hilgard (1962). Scalp recorded 40-Hz EEG density was obtained from the middle of the O1-P3-T5 and O2-P4-T6 triangles. As the hypnotic induction proceeded, high hypnotizable Ss exhibited a shift to greater right-hemisphere activity as compared to a waking-state rest condition. In contrast, low hypnotizable Ss, showed a reduction in left- and right-hemisphere activity. No differences between groups for SHSS:C ideomotor items were observed. A main effect for Hypnotizability among SHSS:C imaginative items was found. A Hypnotizability x Hemisphere x Trial interaction was found for both sensory distortion and imaginative SHSS:C items. A comparison was made between low versus high hypnotizable Ss of 40-Hz EEG activity while they passed the same item. The results of these comparisons indicate that differences in brain activity might be partially related to the differences between experiencing a hypnotic suggestion or failing to do so. Significant relationships between 40-Hz EEG production and hypnotizability and 40-Hz EEG production and level of amnesia were also found.

  12. Echocardiographic assessment of cats anesthetized with xylazine-sodium pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Allen, D G; Downey, R S

    1983-07-01

    Left ventricular echocardiographic parameters in cats were recorded, measured and analyzed to study the effects of a combination of xylazine and sodium pentobarbital on left ventricular function. The depressant effects of a combination of xylazine and sodium pentobarbital on the left ventricular dimension at end diastole, the percent change in minor diameter and the velocity of circumferential fibre shortening were compared to echocardiographic values of unanesthetized cats. No change in heart rate was noted. Stroke volume and cardiac output were depressed.

  13. [Hypnotics--state of the science].

    PubMed

    Nissen, C; Frase, L; Hajak, G; Wetter, T C

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the indications and effects of sleep-inducing drugs. Pharmacological treatment should only be considered in cases of insufficient response to non-pharmacological interventions. Benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine receptor agonists are indicated for the short-term treatment of acute insomnia. Due to the risk of tolerance and dependency, sedative antihistamines and antidepressants are widely used as long-term hypnotics. Other substances, including herbal compounds and melatonin have few side effects; however, the therapeutic efficacy is very limited. Currently, long-term data on the efficacy and tolerability of sleep-inducing substances are lacking. Specifically in cases of non-response to first line treatment, extended psychiatric and somatic evaluation and treatment of associated disorders are recommended.

  14. Effects of repeated high dosage of chloral hydrate and pentobarbital sodium anesthesia on hepatocellular system in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianhong; Sun, Xuehui; Sang, Guifeng

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the possible effects of repeated high dosage of chloral hydrate and pentobarbital sodium anesthesia on hepatocellular system in rats. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: control group (group A), chloral hydrate group (group B) and pentobarbital sodium group (group C). Antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione s transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) activities and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level as well as serum biochemical parameters alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total bilirubin (T-BIL) were determined. Liver histopathological examinations were performed at termination. Furthermore, Bax and Bcl-2 expression, and caspase-3 activity were also evaluated. The SOD, GSH-Px, GST and CAT activities significantly decreased but TBARS levels increased in group B and C compared with group A. Hepatic injury was evidenced by a significant increase in serum ALT, AST and ALP activities in group B and C, which also confirmed by the histopathological alterations. Moreover, administration of chloral hydrate and pentobarbital sodium could induce certain hepatic apoptosis accompanied by the upregulated Bax expression, the downregulated Bcl-2 expression and Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and the increase of caspase-3 activity. Repeated high dosage of chloral hydrate and pentobarbital sodium anesthesia could produce hepatotoxicity.

  15. 21 CFR 522.1704 - Sodium pentobarbital injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) The drug is administered intravenously “to effect”. For general surgical anesthesia, the usual dose is..., the injection should be administered intravenously “to effect”. The drug may be given... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium pentobarbital injection. 522.1704...

  16. Blood -brain barrier disruption was less under isoflurane than pentobarbital anesthesia via a PI3K/Akt pathway in early cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chi, Oak Z; Mellender, Scott J; Kiss, Geza K; Liu, Xia; Weiss, Harvey R

    2017-02-24

    One of the important factors altering the degree of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in cerebral ischemia is the anesthetic used. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway has been reported to be involved in modulating BBB permeability and in isoflurane induced neuroprotection. This study was performed to compare the degree of BBB disruption in focal cerebral ischemia under isoflurane vs pentobarbital anesthesia and to determine whether inhibition of PI3K/Akt would affect the disruption in the early stage of focal cerebral ischemia. Permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion was performed in rats under 1.4% isoflurane or pentobarbital (50mg/kg i.p.) anesthesia with controlled ventilation. In half of each group LY294002, which is a PI3K/Akt inhibitor, was applied on the ischemic cortex immediately after MCA occlusion. After one hour of MCA occlusion, the transfer coefficient (Ki) of (14)C-α-aminoisobutyric acid ((14)C-AIB) was determined to quantify the degree of BBB disruption. MCA occlusion increased the Ki both in the isoflurane and pentobarbital anesthetized rats. However, the value of Ki was lower under isoflurane (11.5±6.0μL/g/min) than under pentobarbital (18.3±7.1μL/g/min) anesthesia. The Ki of the contralateral cortex of the pentobarbital group was higher (+74%) than that of the isoflurane group. Application of LY294002 on the ischemic cortex increased the Ki (+99%) only in the isoflurane group. The degree of BBB disruption by MCA occlusion was significantly lower under isoflurane than pentobarbital anesthesia in the early stage of cerebral ischemia. Our data demonstrated the importance of choice of anesthetics and suggest that PI3K/Akt signaling pathway plays a significant role in altering BBB disruption in cerebral ischemia during isoflurane but not during pentobarbital anesthesia.

  17. Patterns of Hypnotic Response, Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kihlstrom, John F.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been speculated that there are discrete patterns of responsiveness to hypnotic suggestions, perhaps paralleling the factor structure of hypnotizability. An earlier study by Brenneman & Kihlstrom (1986), employing cluster analysis, found evidence for 12 such profiles. A new study by Terhune (2015), employing latent profile analysis, found evidence for three such patterns among highly hypnotizable subjects, and a fourth comprising subjects of medium hypnotizability. Some differences between the two studies are described. Convincing identification of discrete “types” of high hypnotizability, such as dissociative and nondissociative, may require a larger dataset than is currently available, but also data pertaining directly to divisions in conscious awareness and experienced involuntariness. PMID:26551995

  18. Dependence on Hypnotic Drugs in General Practice

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, John; Clift, A. D.

    1968-01-01

    Of the patients in an industrial general practice 1.3% required hypnotic drugs regularly. They were predominantly in the older age groups (mean 62.7 years), with an excess of widows. Only 0.02% were severely dependent; the remainder were mildly so, though they had been taking hypnotics for long periods (mean 5.6 years). There were three main original indications for hypnotics—namely, medical (pain), psychiatric, and onset insomnia in anxious personality disorder. One-fifth of the patients first took hypnotics while in hospital. The group as a whole manifested a high degree of abnormal psychological disposition. It is suggested that many patients who take hypnotics regularly may be placebo reactors, and a more critical attitude to hypnotic prescribing is required both in hospital and in general practice. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:5723365

  19. Brain and body temperature homeostasis during sodium pentobarbital anesthesia with and without body warming in rats.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Brown, P Leon

    2005-03-31

    High-speed, multi-site thermorecording offers the ability to follow the dynamics of heat production and flow in an organism. This approach was used to study brain-body temperature homeostasis during the development of general anesthesia induced by sodium pentobarbital (50 mg/kg, ip) in rats. Animals were chronically implanted with thermocouple probes in two brain areas, the abdominal cavity, and subcutaneously, and temperatures were measured during anesthesia both with and without (control) body warming. In control conditions, temperature in all sites rapidly and strongly decreased (from 36-37 degrees C to 32-33 degrees C, or 3.5-4.5 degrees C below baselines). Relative to body core, brain hypothermia was greater (by 0.3-0.4 degrees C) and skin hypothermia was less (by approximately 0.7 degrees C). If the body was kept warm with a heating pad, brain hypothermia was three-fold weaker ( approximately 1.2 degrees C), but the brain-body difference was significantly augmented (-0.6 degrees C). These results suggest that pentobarbital-induced inhibition of brain metabolic activity is a major factor behind brain hypothermia and global body hypothermia during general anesthesia. These data also indicate that body warming is unable to fully compensate for anesthesia-induced brain hypothermia and enhances the negative brain-body temperature differentials typical of anesthesia. Since temperature strongly affects various underlying parameters of neuronal activity, these findings are important for electrophysiological studies performed in anesthetized animal preparations.

  20. PHYTO-PHARMACOGNOSTICAL INVESTIGATION AND EVALUATION OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND SEDATIVE HYPNOTIC ACTIVITY OF THE LEAVES OF ERYTHRINA INDICA Lam

    PubMed Central

    Verma, S. M.; Amrisha; Prakash, J.; Sah, V.K.

    2005-01-01

    Pharmacognostical investigations were carried out on the Erythrina indica leaves, followed by phytochemical investigation. On the methanolic extract of leaves, TLC was performed and indole alkaloids were identified with selected solvent system. The UV analysis was also performed on the components confirming the presence of the indole nucleus. Anti-inflammatory activity was carried out on albino rats. Further, anti-inflammatory activity was compared to that of the standard drug indomethacin and percent inhibition of oedema was determined. Sedative hypnotic activity was also evaluated using pentobarbital which showed mild sedation. PMID:22557197

  1. Relationships of hypnotic susceptibility to paranormal beliefs and claimed experiences: implications for hypnotic absorption.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, R P

    1994-07-01

    This study examined the relationships of hypnotic susceptibility level to belief in and claimed experience with paranormal phenomena. The Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A) and the Inventory of Paranormal Beliefs and Experiences were administered on consecutive days to 43 undergraduate students (14 men, 29 women) at a midwestern university. A significant multiple correlation was obtained (r = .55, p < .001). A partial correlation between hypnotic susceptibility and belief in paranormal phenomena was also significant (r = .53, p < .001), while hypnotic susceptibility was not found to be significantly related to claimed paranormal experiences. Implications of these relationships for the role of absorption in hypnosis are discussed.

  2. Hypnotic suggestion: a musical mathaphor.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, I

    1997-04-01

    Conceptually, hypnotizability has always been associated with the increase in suggestibility produced by hypnosis. In practice, hypnotizability is measured as suggestibility following a hypnotic induction. Our understanding of hypnosis and suggestion has been hampered by this discordance between the conceptual and operational definitions of hypnotizability. For example, despite hundreds of studies purporting to use standardized scales to assess hypnotizability, we know next to nothing about that construct, as it has been defined conceptually. Neither the hypothesis that it is a stable trait nor the hypothesis that it is modifiable have been tested in any study, and correlations between hypnotizability and other psychological or physiological variables have not yet been assessed. Conversely, we have learned much about hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility. Suggestibility has been measured on reliable and valid instruments, and we have abundant data on its stability, modifiability, and correlates. Hypnosis enhances suggestibility to a modest degree and increases the effectiveness of psychotherapy.

  3. Pentobarbital poisoning in Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae).

    PubMed

    Jurczynski, Kerstin; Zittlau, Erhard

    2007-12-01

    Three Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae) at the Heidelberg Zoo in Germany presented with severe neurologic signs. Physical examination and diagnostic tests did not reveal a definitive diagnosis. Two days after initial presenting signs, all of the animals appeared clinically normal. An investigation into this outbreak revealed that all animals received horse meat on the evening before the incident. A toxicologic examination was initiated and serum analysis of the affected female tiger cub and the horse meat revealed contamination with pentobarbital.

  4. Hypnotic Approaches for Chronic Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Patterson, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The empirical support for hypnosis for chronic pain management has flourished over the past two decades. Clinical trials show that hypnosis is effective for reducing chronic pain, although outcomes vary between individuals. The findings from these clinical trials also show that hypnotic treatments have a number of positive effects beyond pain control. Neurophysiological studies reveal that hypnotic analgesia has clear effects on brain and spinal-cord functioning that differ as a function of the specific hypnotic suggestions made, providing further evidence for the specific effects of hypnosis. The research results have important implications for how clinicians can help their clients experience maximum benefits from hypnosis and treatments that include hypnotic components. PMID:24547802

  5. Suggestibility, expectancy, trance state effects, and hypnotic depth: I. Implications for understanding hypnotism.

    PubMed

    Pekala, Ronald J; Kumar, V K; Maurer, Ronald; Elliott-Carter, Nancy; Moon, Edward; Mullen, Karen

    2010-04-01

    This paper reviews the relationships between trance or altered state effects, suggestibility, and expectancy as these concepts are defined in the theorizing of Weitzenhoffer (2002), Holroyd (2003), Kirsch (1991), and others, for the purpose of demonstrating how these concepts can be assessed with the PCI-HAP (Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory: Hypnotic Assessment Procedure; Pekala, 1995a, b). In addition, how the aforementioned variables may relate to the nature of hypnosis/hypnotism as a function of self-reported hypnotic depth are discussed, along with how the PCI-HAP may be used as a means to measure hypnotic responsivity from a more phenomenological state perspective, in contrast to more traditional behavioral trait assessment instruments like the Harvard, the Stanford C, or the HIP. A follow-up paper (Pekala, Kumar, Maurer, Elliott-Carter, Moon, & Mullen, 2010) will present research data on the PCI-HAP model and how this model can be useful for better understanding hypnotism.

  6. Analgesic and hypnotic activities of Laghupanchamula: A preclinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ghildiyal, Shivani; Gautam, Manish K.; Joshi, Vinod K.; Goel, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Ayurvedic classics, two types of Laghupanchamula -five plant roots (LP) have been mentioned containing four common plants viz. Kantakari, Brihati, Shalaparni, and Prinshniparni and the fifth plant is either Gokshura (LPG) or Eranda (LPE). LP has been documented to have Shothahara (anti-inflammatory), Shulanashka (analgesic), Jvarahara (antipyretic), and Rasayana (rejuvenator) activities. Aim: To evaluate the acute toxicity (in mice), analgesic and hypnotic activity (in rats) of 50% ethanolic extract of LPG (LPGE) and LPE (LPEE). Materials and Methods: LPEG and LPEE were prepared separately by using 50% ethanol following the standard procedures. A graded dose (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) response study for both LPEE and LPGE was carried out for analgesic activity against rat tail flick response which indicated 500 mg/kg as the optimal effective analgesic dose. Hence, 500 mg/kg dose of LPEE and LPGE was used for hot plate test and acetic acid induced writhing model in analgesic activity and for evaluation of hypnotic activity. Results: Both the extracts did not produce any acute toxicity in mice at single oral dose of 2.0 g/kg. Both LPGE and LPEE (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) showed dose-dependent elevation in pain threshold and peak analgesic effect at 60 min as evidenced by increased latency period in tail-flick method by 25.1-62.4% and 38.2-79.0% respectively. LPGE and LPEE (500 mg/kg) increased reaction time in hot-plate test at peak 60 min analgesic effect by 63.2 and 85.8% and reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhes by 55.9 and 65.8% respectively. Both potentiated pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis as indicated by increased duration of sleep in treated rats. Conclusion: The analgesic and hypnotic effects of LP formulations authenticate their uses in Ayurvedic system of Medicine for painful conditions. PMID:25364205

  7. Brain correlates of hypnotic paralysis-a resting-state fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Pyka, M; Burgmer, M; Lenzen, T; Pioch, R; Dannlowski, U; Pfleiderer, B; Ewert, A W; Heuft, G; Arolt, V; Konrad, C

    2011-06-15

    Hypnotic paralysis has been used since the times of Charcot to study altered states of consciousness; however, the underlying neurobiological correlates are poorly understood. We investigated human brain function during hypnotic paralysis using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), focussing on two core regions of the default mode network and the representation of the paralysed hand in the primary motor cortex. Hypnotic suggestion induced an observable left-hand paralysis in 19 participants. Resting-state fMRI at 3T was performed in pseudo-randomised order awake and in the hypnotic condition. Functional connectivity analyses revealed increased connectivity of the precuneus with the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, angular gyrus, and a dorsal part of the precuneus. Functional connectivity of the medial frontal cortex and the primary motor cortex remained unchanged. Our results reveal that the precuneus plays a pivotal role during maintenance of an altered state of consciousness. The increased coupling of selective cortical areas with the precuneus supports the concept that hypnotic paralysis may be mediated by a modified representation of the self which impacts motor abilities.

  8. EEG sLORETA functional imaging during hypnotic arm levitation and voluntary arm lifting.

    PubMed

    Cardeña, Etzel; Lehmann, Dietrich; Faber, Pascal L; Jönsson, Peter; Milz, Patricia; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D; Kochi, Kieko

    2012-01-01

    This study (N = 37 with high, medium, and low hypnotizables) evaluated depth reports and EEG activity during both voluntary and hypnotically induced left-arm lifting with sLORETA functional neuroimaging. The hypnotic condition was associated with higher activity in fast EEG frequencies in anterior regions and slow EEG frequencies in central-parietal regions, all left-sided. The voluntary condition was associated with fast frequency activity in right-hemisphere central-parietal regions and slow frequency activity in left anterior regions. Hypnotizability did not have a significant effect on EEG activity, but hypnotic depth correlated with left hemisphere increased anterior slow EEG and decreased central fast EEG activity. Hypnosis had a minimal effect on depth reports among lows, a moderate one among mediums, and a large one among highs. Because only left-arm data were available, the full role of the hemispheres remains to be clarified.

  9. Hypnotic devices may be more than placebo.

    PubMed

    Page, R A; Handley, G W; Rudin, S A

    2001-10-01

    The study attempted to assess the effectiveness of two devices in facilitating the induction of hypnosis in subjects preselected as low in hypnotizability. Undergraduates were exposed to no treatment (control) or one of four combinations of devices during the induction phase of being administered the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form B of Weitzenhoffer and Hilgard (1959). Analyses revealed only one of the conditions resulted in a significant difference in subjects' realness ratings of hypnotic items and an increase in hypnotizability score. If the effect is more than a chance significance of placebo, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown.

  10. 21 CFR 522.2444b - Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2444b Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection. (a) Specifications. Each gram of the drug contains 750 milligrams of sodium thiopental and 250 milligrams of...

  11. 21 CFR 522.2444b - Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2444b Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection. (a) Specifications. Each gram of the drug contains 750 milligrams of sodium thiopental and 250 milligrams of...

  12. 21 CFR 522.2444b - Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2444b Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection. (a) Specifications. Each gram of the drug contains 750 milligrams of sodium thiopental and 250 milligrams of...

  13. 21 CFR 522.2444b - Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2444b Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection. (a) Specifications. Each gram of the drug contains 750 milligrams of sodium thiopental and 250 milligrams of...

  14. Comparison between the effects of pentobarbital or ketamine/nitrous oxide anesthesia on metabolic and endothelial components of coronary reactive hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Rastaldo, R; Penna, C; Pagliaro, P

    2001-06-29

    Barbiturates induce reduction of myocardial contractility and metabolism, whereas ketamine exerts a sympathomimetic effect that can mask its direct depressant effect on contractility. However, it is unclear whether barbiturates, which interfere with the cytochrome P-450 pathway, or ketamine, which inhibits nitric oxide synthesis, also alter the responsiveness of the coronary vessels to vasodilator stimuli. We hypothesized that the parameters of coronary reactive hyperemia (CRH), which reflect both the degree of myocardial metabolism and vascular reactivity, could be modified by the type of anesthesia used. In two groups of goats, anesthesia was induced either using ketamine plus nitrous oxide or pentobarbital alone. To record coronary flow an electromagnetic flow-probe was placed around the left circumflex coronary artery. In the ketamine group (n = 14) and in the pentobarbital group (n = 16) CRH was studied using the indices of myocardial metabolism and vascular dilator responsiveness. In the pentobarbital group all of the indices of myocardial metabolism were lower than in the ketamine group (i.e. the excess to debt flow ratio was 2.3+/-0.8 vs. 4.6+/-2.4; p< 0.001). Yet, some indices of vascular responsiveness (time derivative of coronary flow and the peak to basal flow ratio) were not different in the two groups. Moreover, the duration of the reactive hyperemia was shorter in the ketamine than in the pentobarbital group (118+/-47 vs. 153+/-45 s, p<0.05). It is suggested that pentobarbital decreases the indices of CRH related to metabolic activity, whereas ketamine reduces the duration of the hyperemic response, which suggests an impairment of endothelial function.

  15. Time-course of motor inhibition during hypnotic paralysis: EEG topographical and source analysis.

    PubMed

    Cojan, Yann; Archimi, Aurélie; Cheseaux, Nicole; Waber, Lakshmi; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2013-02-01

    Cognitive hypotheses of hypnotic phenomena have proposed that executive attentional systems may be either inhibited or overactivated to produce a selective alteration or disconnection of some mental operations. Recent brain imaging studies have reported changes in activity in both medial (anterior cingulate) and lateral (inferior) prefrontal areas during hypnotically induced paralysis, overlapping with areas associated with attentional control as well as inhibitory processes. To compare motor inhibition mechanisms responsible for paralysis during hypnosis and those recruited by voluntary inhibition, we used electroencephalography (EEG) to record brain activity during a modified bimanual Go-Nogo task, which was performed either in a normal baseline condition or during unilateral paralysis caused by hypnotic suggestion or by simulation (in two groups of participants, each tested once with both hands valid and once with unilateral paralysis). This paradigm allowed us to identify patterns of neural activity specifically associated with hypnotically induced paralysis, relative to voluntary inhibition during simulation or Nogo trials. We used a topographical EEG analysis technique to investigate both the spatial organization and the temporal sequence of neural processes activated in these different conditions, and to localize the underlying anatomical generators through minimum-norm methods. We found that preparatory activations were similar in all conditions, despite left hypnotic paralysis, indicating preserved motor intentions. A large P3-like activity was generated by voluntary inhibition during voluntary inhibition (Nogo), with neural sources in medial prefrontal areas, while hypnotic paralysis was associated with a distinctive topography activity during the same time-range and specific sources in right inferior frontal cortex. These results add support to the view that hypnosis might act by enhancing executive control systems mediated by right prefrontal areas, but

  16. Acute pentobarbital treatment impairs spatial learning and memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Tan, Tao; Tu, Man; He, Wenting; Dong, Zhifang; Han, Huili

    2015-10-01

    Reports of the effects of pentobarbital on learning and memory are contradictory. Some studies have not shown any interference with learning and memory, whereas others have shown that pentobarbital impairs memory and that these impairments can last for long periods. However, it is unclear whether acute local microinjections of pentobarbital affect learning and memory, and if so, the potential mechanisms are also unclear. Here, we reported that the intra-hippocampal infusion of pentobarbital (8.0mM, 1μl per side) significantly impaired hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory retrieval. Moreover, in vitro electrophysiological recordings revealed that these behavioral changes were accompanied by impaired hippocampal CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) and suppressed neuronal excitability as reflected by a decrease in the number of action potentials (APs). These results suggest that acute pentobarbital application causes spatial learning and memory deficits that might be attributable to the suppression of synaptic plasticity and neuronal excitability.

  17. Utilizing Hypnotic Language in Adventure Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itin, Christian

    1995-01-01

    Hypnotic language can increase the transference of learning from an adventure activity to a therapeutic goal by absorbing the client in the experience, ratifying that absorption, and eliciting the client's resources to address problematic situations. Provides examples of using this approach in adventure therapy to enhance a client's experience and…

  18. Alterations in pentobarbital pharmacokinetics in response to parenteral and enteral alimentation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Knodell, R G; Spector, M H; Brooks, D A; Keller, F X; Kyner, W T

    1980-12-01

    Recent in vitro observations suggest that the intestine, in addition to the liver, may be an important organ of first-pass drug metabolism. While a variety of changes in intestinal morphology and function in response to continuous parenteral and enteral nutrition have been documented, the effect of different routes of alimentation on intestinal drug metabolism has not been previously investigated. Objectives of this study were to assess the contribution of intestinal pentobarbital metabolism to overall in vivo pentobarbital pharmacokinetics in the rat and to determine if differences in pentobarbital pharmacokinetics were seen between parenterally and enterally nourished animals. After 7 days of continuous infusion of amino acid-glucose mixture via a gastric or jugular vein catheter, pharmacokinetic parameters were determined after 40 mg/kg of pentobarbital was given orally or into the portal or femoral vein. Reduced systemic availability of pentobarbital after oral administration as compared to portal vein injection was seen in both alimentation groups indicating that significant intestinal metabolism of pentobarbital occurred in vivo. Total area under the pentobarbital plasma concentration-time curve was significantly greater in parenterally nourished animals as compared with enterally alimented animals after oral, portal vein and systemic vein drug administration. Differences in pentobarbital, pharmacokinetics between the two alimentation groups appeared to be primarly due to effects on hepatic pentobarbital metabolism. While the mechanism producing these changes has not been defined, differences in gut hormones release and/or pancreatic secretion in response to the two routes of alimentation may be contributory. The widespread use of enteral and parenteral alimentation in clinical medicine suggests that studies to determine if nutrition route of administration similarly influences drug metabolism in humans may be indicated.

  19. Age-dependent inhibition of pentobarbital sleeping time by ozone in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Canada, A.T.; Calabrese, E.J.; Leonard, D.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of age on the metabolism of pentobarbital in mice and rats was investigated following exposure to 0.3 ppm of ozone for 3.75 hr. Young animals were 2.5 months of age and the mature were 18 months. The pentobarbital sleeping time was significantly prolonged following the ozone exposure in both the mice and rats when compared with an air control. No ozone effect on sleeping time was found in the young animals. The results indicate that there may be an age-related sensitivity to the occurrence of ozone-related inhibition of pentobarbital metabolism.

  20. Hypnosis and Hypnotism in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Gaetan

    1992-01-01

    This article attempts to define and demystify hypnosis and to present the range of its applications in family medicine. The author reviews definitions and describes hypnotic phenomena, suggestibility, and the use of suggestion, as well as traditional, semitraditional, and Ericksonian induction methods, precautions, and dangers. Clinical uses are then presented for the family physician to apply to surgery, obstetrics, pain treatment, psychosomatic disorders, and psychotherapy. Imagesp2076-a PMID:21221278

  1. [Sleep disorder and pain: the good hypnotic].

    PubMed

    Perrig, S; Espa-Cervena, K; Pépin, J L

    2011-06-29

    Chronic pain and sleep disorder can put the patient in a vicious circle (bidirectional relation between those two morbid entities). Clinical management must be global. The physiopathology includes chronic sleep deficit, mainly in deep sleep (the "restoring" sleep) generated principally by the prefrontal regions. These areas are also implicated in the modulation of pain. To break this "loops", we advocate an approach based on three main components: hygiene principles, cognitive and behavioral therapy, medications with analgesic and hypnotic proprieties.

  2. Electroencephalographic properties of zaleplon, a non-benzodiazepine sedative/hypnotic, in rats.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hideaki; Kitazumi, Kazuhiro; Mori, Megumi; Shiba, Toshiharu

    2004-03-01

    The encephalographic (EEG) properties of zaleplon were investigated in comparison with those of other sedative hypnotics in conscious rats with chronically implanted electrodes. The oral administration of zaleplon (0.25-1.0 mg/kg), triazolam (0.0625-0.25 mg/kg), zopiclone (1.0-4.0 mg/kg), brotizolam (0.0625-0.25 mg/kg), and nitrazepam (0.125-0.5 mg/kg) lengthened the total sleep in a dose-dependent manner. On distribution of sleep-wakefulness stages, zaleplon, in particular, increased the slow wave deep sleep (SWDS), whereas triazolam, brotizolam, and nitrazepam increased the slow wave light sleep (SWLS) in a dose-dependent manner. Zopiclone significantly increased the SWDS at a dose of 2 mg/kg and both the SWLS and the SWDS at a dose of 4 mg/kg. All tested hypnotics caused no influence on fast wave sleep (FWS) at doses tested. The appearance of the sleep-inducing activity of zaleplon was more rapid than those of any compounds tested, and zaleplon significantly increased the relative EEG power density in the delta frequency band over that of triazolam at 20 and 30 min after the administration in the spectral analysis. Therefore, the present findings suggest that the non-benzodiazepine zaleplon can be expected to exhibit high practical potential as a hypnotic and is characterized by an increase in SWDS with rapid onset of hypnotic action.

  3. Effects of Pentobarbital on Respiratory Functional Dynamics in Chronically Instrumented Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP 06 15 sodium pentobarbital; respiration; chronic single unit 06 04 recording...on redpirasrfuncsiond ’ namics in chronically instrumented guinea pigs. BRAIN RES BULL 26(l) 123-132. 1991.-Respiratory effects of sodium ...in chronicall’ instrumented guinea pigs. BRAIN RES BULL 26(1) 123-132, 1991.-Respiratory effects of sodium pentobarbital (35 mg/kg; IP) were studied in

  4. Effects of pentobarbital on plasma glucose and free fatty acids in the rat.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L.; Neville, E. D.; Talarico, K. S.; Feller, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    Hyperglycemia and hypolipemia were observed in rats after the injection of sodium pentobarbital. The observed changes were independent of whether the blood was collected by decapitation or by needle puncture of the aorta. The hyperglycemic response was caused by two factors including the stress of the injection per se and the pharmacological action of the drug. Hyperlipemia was observed at 5 min postinjection. However, pentobarbital decreased plasma free fatty acids by 15 min postinjection. Both the hyperglycemia and hypolipemia responses were dose dependent.

  5. Consumer hypnotic-like suggestibility: possible mechanism in compulsive purchasing.

    PubMed

    Prete, M Irene; Guido, Gianluigi; Pichierri, Marco

    2013-08-01

    The authors hypothesize a concept, Consumer Hypnotic-Like Suggestibility (CHLS), defined as an altered state of consciousness, as a state causing a tendency to respond positively to messages aimed at inducing consumers to make unplanned purchases. This study aims to investigate the associations of CHLS with interpersonal variables and compulsive purchasing--a frequent and uncontrollable preoccupation with buying or impulses to buy. A study was conducted on a sample of 232 subjects (n = 111 men; M age = 41 yr.), through the administration of a questionnaire, which measured: CHLS, compulsive purchasing, consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence (the necessity to enhance one's image in the opinion of others through the consumption of products), and consumer atmospherics, i.e., environmental stimuli known to influence purchasing decisions. Modeling and mediation analyses suggested that internal and external drivers--Consumer Susceptibility to Interpersonal Influence and atmospherics--are positively related to CHLS which affects compulsive purchasing.

  6. Smoking Cessation: Uni-Modal and Multi-Modal Hypnotic and Non-Hypnotic Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habicht, Manuela H.

    A survey of Queensland's population in 1993 determined that 24% of the adults were smokers. National data compiled in 1992 indicated that 72% of the drug-related deaths were related to tobacco use. In light of the need for effective smoking cessation approaches, a literature review was undertaken to determine the efficacy of hypnotic and…

  7. Hidden Hypnotic Patterns: Implications for Counseling and Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnison, Hugh; Renick, T. F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines the hypothesis that subtle hypnotic patterns used by Milton H. Erickson are found in the person-centered approach to counseling of Carl Rogers. Points out that counselors and supervisors should be aware of the possible hypnotic elements in simple suggestions. Presents examples of counselor-client and supervisor-trainee dialogue to…

  8. Possibility that certain hypnotics might cause cancer in skin.

    PubMed

    Kripke, Daniel F

    2008-09-01

    Fifteen epidemiologic studies have associated hypnotic drugs with excess mortality, especially excess cancer deaths. Until recently, insufficient controlled trials were available to demonstrate whether hypnotics actually cause any cancers. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Approval History and Documents were accessed for zaleplon, eszopiclone and ramelteon. Since zolpidem was used as a comparison drug in zaleplon trials, some zolpidem data were also available. Incident cancers occurring during randomized hypnotics administration or placebo administration were tabulated. Combining controlled trials for the four drugs, there were 6190 participants given hypnotics and 2535 given placebo in parallel. There were eight mentions of incident non-melanoma skin cancers among participants receiving hypnotics but no comparable mentions of cancers among those receiving placebo (P = 0.064, one-tailed). There were also four mentions of incident tumors of uncertain malignancy among those receiving hypnotics but none among those receiving placebo, so combining uncertain and definite malignancies yielded a more significant contrast (P = 0.016). FDA files revealed that all four of the new hypnotics were associated with cancers in rodents. Three had been shown to be clastogenic. Together with the epidemiologic data and laboratory studies, the available evidence signals that new hypnotics may increase cancer risk. Due to limitations in available data, confirmatory research is needed.

  9. Effects of hypnotic drugs on performance before and after sleep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kales, A.; Bixler, E. O.; Kales, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of various hypnotics on sleep stage parameters and on the parameters of effectiveness were evaluated along with the effects of several commonly used yet distinctly different hypnotics on daytime performance. The effects on daytime performance of two nonhypnotics commonly used in the space program were also examined.

  10. Hypnopraxia, a new hypnotic technique for hypnoanesthesia.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Nicolas; Chedeau, Guy

    2017-02-01

    Various hypnotic techniques are used in anesthesia, either on their own or as adjuncts. A new hypnotic technique, hypnopraxia, was tested in 5 patients undergoing various procedures (4 colonoscopies, 1 inguinal hernia repair, and 1 transobturator tape procedure). The patients were accompanied throughout the procedure by an anesthetist trained in hypnoanesthesia and hypnopraxia. Initially developed for use in hypnotherapy, the accompaniment with hypnopraxia relied on the closeness of the link between the anesthetist and the patient. This was constantly built in the present moment, here and now, by giving back to the patient what the anesthetist observed of the manifestations of the patient's unconscious mind (the patient's speech and choice of words, facial microexpressions, involuntary bodily movements, and emotions). The anesthetist's verbal accompaniment was therefore determined by the patient. No other anesthetic technique was needed during the colonoscopies. For the 2 surgical procedures, some sufentanil was given and local anesthetic was applied by the surgeon. All 5 patients were well satisfied after the procedure. They were especially pleased at having been able to go through their procedure without needing any drug anesthesia, and at being in charge throughout. This preliminary experience with hypnopraxia would tend to show that this technique could be useful in the anesthetic setting. More experience is obviously required with hypnopraxia in anesthesia so as to improve the technique further, and to determine its implications, if any, for the patients and for the procedures. Furthermore, it will be of the greatest interest to determine, before carrying out any procedure with hypnoanesthesia, which patient will benefit most from which hypnotic technique.

  11. Prenatal toxicity of simultaneously administered ethanol and pentobarbital in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, L A; Persaud, T V

    1978-01-01

    The use and abuse of drugs has reached epidemic proportions among individuals of child-bearing age. The frequency with which alcohol and pentobarbital are used in our society increases the probability that they will be taken simultaneously. Experiments were designed to investigate the prenatal toxicity of alcoho and pentobarbital interaction in the rat. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were treated intraperitoneally with one of three doses of ethanol (0.56 to 1.4 g/kg) in combination with 5, 15, or 25 mg/kg pentobarbital on days 9 through 12 of gestation. Maternal and fetal toxicities were evaluated and compared with the results of previous studies using the same doses of ethanol and pentobarbital. In pregnant rats treated with combinations of the two drugs, there was no consistent pattern of response. With respect to the offspring, there was no evidence that combinations of ethanol and pentobarbital, at the dose levels used here, had any more deleterious effect on fetal development than either drug acting independently.

  12. Effects of schedule of reinforcement on a pentobarbital discrimination in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Snodgrass, S H; McMillan, D E

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the schedule of reinforcement on a pentobarbital discrimination in rats. Five rats were trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg pentobarbital from saline under a multiple fixed-interval 180-s fixed-ratio 20 schedule of reinforcement. During both saline and pentobarbital training sessions, subjects emitted a higher percentage of correct responses under the fixed-ratio component as compared to the fixed-interval component of the multiple schedule. Determination of the pentobarbital dose-response curve under the fixed-ratio component resulted in a steep curve characterized by responding on the saline lever at low doses and on the drug lever at higher doses. Under the fixed-interval component, a graded dose-effect curve was produced, with considerable responding on both levers after intermediate doses of pentobarbital. The administration of phencyclidine and MK-801 resulted in an intermediate level of drug-lever responding for some subjects. Administration of d-amphetamine resulted in saline (nondrug) appropriate responding. The results of this study demonstrate that the schedule of reinforcement is a determinant of drug stimulus control, just as it is a determinant of other drug effects. PMID:1955819

  13. Hypnotic Taper with or without Self-Help Treatment of Insomnia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belleville, Genevieve; Guay, Catherine; Guay, Bernard; Morin, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a minimal intervention focusing on hypnotic discontinuation and cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for insomnia. Fifty-three adult chronic users of hypnotics were randomly assigned to an 8-week hypnotic taper program, used alone or combined with a self-help CBT. Weekly hypnotic use decreased in both…

  14. Hypnosis, hypnotic suggestibility, memory, and involvement in films.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Reed; Lynn, Steven Jay; Condon, Liam

    2015-05-01

    Our research extends studies that have examined the relation between hypnotic suggestibility and experiential involvement and the role of an hypnotic induction in enhancing experiential involvement (e.g., absorption) in engaging tasks. Researchers have reported increased involvement in reading (Baum & Lynn, 1981) and music-listening (Snodgrass & Lynn, 1989) tasks during hypnosis. We predicted a similar effect for film viewing: greater experiential involvement in an emotional (The Champ) versus a non-emotional (Scenes of Toronto) film. We tested 121 participants who completed measures of absorption and trait dissociation and the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility and then viewed the two films after either an hypnotic induction or a non-hypnotic task (i.e., anagrams). Experiential involvement varied as a function of hypnotic suggestibility and film clip. Highly suggestible participants reported more state depersonalization than less suggestible participants, and depersonalization was associated with negative affect; however, we observed no significant correlation between hypnotic suggestibility and trait dissociation. Although hypnosis had no effect on memory commission or omission errors, contrary to the hypothesis that hypnosis facilitates absorption in emotionally engaging tasks, the emotional film was associated with more commission and omission errors compared with the non-emotional film.

  15. Cross-evidence for hypnotic susceptibility through nonlinear measures on EEGs of non-hypnotized subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarucci, Riccardo; Madeo, Dario; Loffredo, Maria I.; Castellani, Eleonora; Santarcangelo, Enrica L.; Mocenni, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Assessment of hypnotic susceptibility is usually obtained through the application of psychological instruments. A satisfying classification obtained through quantitative measures is still missing, although it would be very useful for both diagnostic and clinical purposes. Aiming at investigating the relationship between the cortical brain activity and the hypnotic susceptibility level, we propose the combined use of two methodologies - Recurrence Quantification Analysis and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis - both inherited from nonlinear dynamics. Indicators obtained through the application of these techniques to EEG signals of individuals in their ordinary state of consciousness allowed us to obtain a clear discrimination between subjects with high and low susceptibility to hypnosis. Finally a neural network approach was used to perform classification analysis.

  16. Cross-evidence for hypnotic susceptibility through nonlinear measures on EEGs of non-hypnotized subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chiarucci, Riccardo; Madeo, Dario; Loffredo, Maria I.; Castellani, Eleonora; Santarcangelo, Enrica L.; Mocenni, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of hypnotic susceptibility is usually obtained through the application of psychological instruments. A satisfying classification obtained through quantitative measures is still missing, although it would be very useful for both diagnostic and clinical purposes. Aiming at investigating the relationship between the cortical brain activity and the hypnotic susceptibility level, we propose the combined use of two methodologies - Recurrence Quantification Analysis and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis - both inherited from nonlinear dynamics. Indicators obtained through the application of these techniques to EEG signals of individuals in their ordinary state of consciousness allowed us to obtain a clear discrimination between subjects with high and low susceptibility to hypnosis. Finally a neural network approach was used to perform classification analysis. PMID:25002038

  17. Hypnotic responsiveness: expectancy, attitudes, fantasy proneness, absorption, and gender.

    PubMed

    Green, Joseph P; Lynn, Steven Jay

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effect of providing information linking participants' attitudes toward hypnosis with later hypnotic performance. Using total scale scores from McConkey's Opinions About Hypnosis scale, as well as subscale scores, the authors found a weak association between attitudes and performance among 460 student participants; however, the correlation was unaffected by prehypnotic information specifically connecting attitudes and performance. A brief, 3-item measure of hypnotic expectancies generated the strongest correlation with hypnotic responsiveness. The authors also found that the association between fantasy proneness and hypnotizability was unaffected by the order of scale administration. Finally, the study highlighted gender differences across measures of fantasy proneness, absorption, expectancy, and hypnotizability.

  18. [Hypnotic communication and hypnosis in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Wehrli, Hans

    2014-07-02

    In addition to usual medical care it is often critical to consider the patient's inner world in order to sensitively differentiate between harmful and helpful suggestive elements. The respective abilities in terms of hypnotic communication can be easily learned. Confident, empathic attention and a calm, understanding and figurative language narrowing the focus on positive emotions and positive change, which have been shown to improve the patient's chances of healing, are of particular importance. Proper clinical hypnosis goes one step further: it makes explicit use of suggestions, trance, and trance phenomena. The major clinical indications for hypnosis include psychosomatic disorders, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, depression, and pain syndromes. Hypnosis can also be employed as an adjunct for surgical therapy.

  19. Terahertz spectroscopic study of benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Fusheng; Shen, Jingling; Wang, Xianfeng

    2011-08-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is used to the pure active ingredient of three benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics with similar molecular structure. The absorption spectra of them are studied in the range of 0.2~2.6THz. Based on the experiment, the theoretical simulation results of diazepam, nitrazepam and clonazepam are got by the Gaussian03 package of DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* method in single-molecule models. The experimental results show that even if the molecular structure and medicine property of them are similar, the accurate identification of them can still be done with their characteristic absorption spectra. Theoretical simulation results are well consistent with the experimental results. It demonstrates that absorption peaks of them in THz range mainly come from intra-molecular forces and are less affected by the intermolecular interaction and crystal effects.ô

  20. Involuntariness in hypnotic responding and dissociative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Dell, Paul F

    2010-01-01

    Clark Hull's (1933) research on dissociation was based on a 'straw man' formulation of dissociation; he claimed that dissociation requires noninterference. Hull completely ignored the then-current paradigm of dissociation--dissociation as automatism--and claimed that he had refuted the validity of the phenomenon of dissociation. Hull's view of dissociation held sway in the hypnosis field for 60 years. This essay seeks to retrieve the Janetian paradigm of dissociation as automatism. Automatisms are unexpected, uninitiated, involuntary behaviors that just 'happen.' The author argues that human sensitivity to the experience of involuntariness (a) is quite important, (b) was selected by evolution, and (c) is central to both hypnotic responses and dissociative symptoms. This editorial urges the hypnosis field and the dissociation field to jointly undertake a renewed investigation of the experience of involuntariness and to follow recent neuroimaging studies which indicate that the parietal cortex underlies the experience of involuntariness.

  1. Hypnotic hypermnesia: the empty set of hypermnesia.

    PubMed

    Erdelyi, M H

    1994-10-01

    Although a long tradition exists suggesting that hypnosis can enhance memory (hypnotic hypermnesia), the experimental literature is quite mixed. When, however, laboratory studies are classified according to the type of stimulus and memory tests employed, a remarkable orderliness of outcomes emerges: Recall tests for high-sense stimuli (e.g., poetry, meaningful pictures) almost always produce hypermnesia, but not recognition tests for low-sense stimuli (e.g., nonsense syllables, word lists). An important methodological issue is whether the recall increments for high-sense stimuli constitute enhanced memory or enhanced reporting (laxer response criteria). Recent laboratory literatures show that, beyond response criterion effects, true memory enhancement (hypermnesia) exists. Experiments conducted over the past decade, however, demonstrate that it is repeated retrieval effort and not hypnosis that is responsible for hypermnesia: Repeated testing without hypnosis yields as much hypermnesia as with hypnosis.

  2. Hypnotic Susceptibility and Frequency Reports to Illusory Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Benjamin; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Explores the possibility that measurable individual differences in hypnotic susceptibility or the ability to attend selectively to informational cues may account for a portion of the variability found in several types of geometrical visual illusions. (Author/RK)

  3. 21 CFR 522.380 - Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate. 522.380 Section 522.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE...

  4. 21 CFR 522.380 - Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... effect is produced. Cattle usually require a lower dosage on the basis of body weight. When used as a... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution. 522.380 Section 522.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  5. 21 CFR 522.380 - Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... effect is produced. Cattle usually require a lower dosage on the basis of body weight. When used as a... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution. 522.380 Section 522.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  6. 21 CFR 522.380 - Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... effect is produced. Cattle usually require a lower dosage on the basis of body weight. When used as a... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution. 522.380 Section 522.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG...

  7. Hypnotic theorizing: spring cleaning is long overdue.

    PubMed

    Laurence, J R

    1997-07-01

    Since the beginnings of animal magnetism and hypnosis, clinical and experimental theories have developed mostly in isolation. On the clinical side, armchair theorizing, based on clinicians' observations and interpretations of their clients' narratives, have laid the foundations of most theories, past and present. On the experimental side, attachment to specific theories has guided researchers in their choice of methodologies and designs. What seemed important was to show how correct one's preferred view was or how incorrect the "other" could be. This unfortunate one-sided perception led to an experimental stalemate where most experiments could be interpreted from any point of view. If the tendency to theorize on what one sees, hears, and believes must come to an end, the practice of performing truncated experiments dedicated to the glory of one's preferred theory must also be relegated to the past. And while we are at it, whether clinical or experimental, the use of concepts or constructs that cannot be clearly operationalized should be dismissed to avoid the type of serious social consequences the hypnotic community has been facing in the past decades.

  8. The Existence of a Hypnotic State Revealed by Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Sakari; Hyönä, Jukka; Revonsuo, Antti; Sikka, Pilleriin; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    Hypnosis has had a long and controversial history in psychology, psychiatry and neurology, but the basic nature of hypnotic phenomena still remains unclear. Different theoretical approaches disagree as to whether or not hypnosis may involve an altered mental state. So far, a hypnotic state has never been convincingly demonstrated, if the criteria for the state are that it involves some objectively measurable and replicable behavioural or physiological phenomena that cannot be faked or simulated by non-hypnotized control subjects. We present a detailed case study of a highly hypnotizable subject who reliably shows a range of changes in both automatic and volitional eye movements when given a hypnotic induction. These changes correspond well with the phenomenon referred to as the “trance stare” in the hypnosis literature. Our results show that this ‘trance stare’ is associated with large and objective changes in the optokinetic reflex, the pupillary reflex and programming a saccade to a single target. Control subjects could not imitate these changes voluntarily. For the majority of people, hypnotic induction brings about states resembling normal focused attention or mental imagery. Our data nevertheless highlight that in some cases hypnosis may involve a special state, which qualitatively differs from the normal state of consciousness. PMID:22039474

  9. Sex-related toxicity of somatostatin and its interaction with pentobarbital and strychnine.

    PubMed

    Caprino, L; Borrelli, F; Antonetti, F; Cantelmo, A

    1983-06-01

    The intravenous LD50 of the hypothalamic tetradecapeptide somatostatin was determined in mice and rats of both sexes. It was found that somatostatin has a sex-related toxicity both in mice and rats. The interaction of low and high doses of peptide with the LD50s of two central nervous system (CNS) drugs, namely pentobarbital and strychnine, was also studied in male and female mice. Differential effects were observed as follows: a very low dose (0.1 mg/kg) of somatostatin does not affect the toxicity of these compounds, whereas the injection of 1 mg/kg of peptide increased pentobarbital toxicity and decreased the toxicity of strychnine. However, an increase in the toxicity of both substances was obtained with very high non-lethal doses of peptide (20 and 30 mg/kg, in female and male mice, respectively).

  10. Hypnotic induction of an epileptic seizure: a brief communication.

    PubMed

    Bryant, R A; Somerville, E

    1995-07-01

    This case study investigated the utility of hypnosis to precipitate a seizure in a patient with refractory epilepsy. The patient was twice administered a hypnotic induction and a suggestion to age regress to a day when he was distressed and suffered repeated seizures. The patient did not respond to the first hypnotic suggestion; however, an epileptic seizure was observed in the second hypnotic session. Videorecording and subdural electroencephalograph recording confirmed that he suffered an epileptic seizure. Postexperimental inquiry revealed that the patient used deliberate cognitive strategies to avoid seizure onset in the first session but adopted a more constructive cognitive style in the second session. Findings are discussed in terms of emotions, hypnosis, and cognitive style as mediating factors in the experimental precipitation of epileptic seizures.

  11. Effect of ketamine, pentobarbital, and morphine on Tc-99m-DISIDA hepatobiliary kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Durakovic, A.; Dubois, A.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate hapatobiliary kinetics of Tc-99m-DISIDA in dogs after administration of anesthetic sedative or narcotic agents. Four groups of six male Beagle dogs were studied as a non-treated control group and after parenteral administration of ketamine (30 mg/kg IM), pentobarbital (25 mg/kg IV) or morphine (1 mg/kg IV). Each animal was injected with 4 mCi Tc-99m-DISIDA and hepatobiliary scintigraphic studies were obtained using a gamma camera with parallel hole multipurpose collimator and an A/sup 3/ MDS computer. The authors determined; peak activity of Tc-99m-DISIDA in the liver, visualization and peak activity of gallbladder, and intestinal visualization of Tc-99m-DISIDA. Total bilirubin, LDH, SGOT and SGPT were not modified significantly after any drug compared to control. The results showed that two commonly used anesthetics and sedatives (ketamine and pentobarbital) have dramatic and opposite effects on extrahepatic biliary kinetics. Furthermore, ketamine, but not pentobarbital, significantly accelerates intrahepatic biliary kinetics. Finally, as expected, morphine delayed extrahepatic biliary kinetics. Thus, studies of biliary kinetics should be interpreted with caution when measurements are made after administration of anesthetic, sedative or narcotic agents.

  12. Is suvorexant a better choice than alternative hypnotics?

    PubMed Central

    Kripke, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Suvorexant is a novel dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA) newly introduced in the U.S. as a hypnotic, but no claim of superiority over other hypnotics has been offered.  The manufacturer argued that the 5 and 10 mg starting doses recommended by the FDA might be ineffective.  The manufacturer's main Phase III trials had not even included the 10 mg dosage, and the 5 mg dosage had not been tested at all in registered clinical trials at the time of approval.  Popular alternative hypnotics may be similarly ineffective, since the FDA has also reduced the recommended doses for zolpidem and eszopiclone.  The "not to exceed" suvorexant dosage of 20 mg does slightly increase sleep.  Because of slow absorption, suvorexant has little effect on latency to sleep onset but some small effect in suppressing wakening after sleep onset and in improving sleep efficiency. The FDA would not approve the manufacturer's preferred 40 mg suvorexant dosage, because of concern with daytime somnolence, driving impairment, and possible narcolepsy-like symptoms.  In its immediate benefits-to-risks ratio, suvorexant is unlikely to prove superior to currently available hypnotics—possibly worse—so there is little reason to prefer over the alternatives this likely more expensive hypnotic less-tested in practice.  Associations are being increasingly documented relating hypnotic usage with incident cancer, with dementia risks, and with premature death.  There is some basis to speculate that suvorexant might be safer than alternative hypnotics in terms of cancer, dementia, infections, and mortality.  These safety considerations will remain unproven speculations unless adequate long-term trials can be done that demonstrate suvorexant advantages. PMID:26594338

  13. Olprinone/dopamine combination for improving diaphragmatic fatigue in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2006-01-01

    Background: Diaphragmatic fatigue might contribute to the development of respiratory failure. In particular, the spontaneous, natural rate of phrenic nerve discharge occurs mainly in low-frequency ranges making low-frequency fatigue clinically important in both humans and animals. Olprinone, a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor, improves contractility in fatigued diaphragm, but is also associated with hypotension. Dopamine might be used concomitantly for treating related hypotension. Objective: The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of olprinoneplus dopamine on diaphragmatic fatigue in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. Methods: This nonblinded study was conducted at the Department ofAnesthesiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba, Japan. Diaphragmatic fatigue (assessed by a decrease in diaphragmatic contractility) was induced by intermittent supramaximal bilateral electrophrenic stimulation at a frequency of 20 Hz applied for 30 minutes. Immediately after the fatigue-producing period, groups 2, 3, and 4 received an initial 10 μg/kg dose of olprinone. Group 2 then received maintenance olprinone of 0.3 μg/kg · min; group 3 received maintenance olprinone 0.3 μg/kg · min plus dopamine 2 μg/kg · min; and group 4 received maintenance olprinone 0.3 μg/kg · min plus dopamine 5 μg/kg · min. Group 1 received no study drug. Olprinone and dopamine were administered IV for 30 minutes. Diaphragmatic contractility was assessed by measuring the maximal transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) generated by test stimuli after airway occlusion at functional residual capacity. Hypotension induced by the study drugs was defined as a >10 mm Hg decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), calculated by diastolic pressure plus ⅓ pulse pressure, from baseline. Results: Twenty-eight mongrel dogs (18 males and 10 females, weighing 10-15 kg)were used in the study; 7 dogs were randomly assigned to each treatment group. When fatigue was established in each group, mean (SD) Pdi

  14. A Comparison of Authoritarian and Permissive Wording of Hypnotic Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Robert B.; Church, Jay K.

    The authoritarian/permissive dimension of hypnosis refers to the manner in which hypnotic suggestions are phrased. In the authoritarian mode suggestions imply the subject is under control of the hypnotist; permissive suggestions are phrased to emphasize the subject's own thinking. To compare the permissive suggestions of the Creative Imagination…

  15. Hypnotic Susceptibility, Suggestion, and Reports of Autokinetic Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Benjamin; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of hypnotic susceptibility and of suggestion of direction on four measures of autokinetic movement: the mean number of changes in direction reported per trial, the latency of reported movement, the estimated direction, and the reported magnitude of movement. (Editor)

  16. Hypnotic Susceptibility and Personality as Measured by the MMPI-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Wayne D.

    This study evaluated personality variables that underlie hypnotic susceptibility. It was correlational, did not require ongoing contact with participants, and included a validation study as an integral component. The subjects were 359 college students (250 in the original sample and 109 in the cross validation study) taking undergraduate courses…

  17. Hypnotic treatment of Sleep Terror Disorder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Koe, G G

    1989-07-01

    This case report describes the hypnotic treatment of Sleep Terror Disorder in a 16-year-old male who was resistant to other forms of treatment. In this patient, night terrors seemed to be precipitated by nocturnal noises wakening him from deep sleep. Posthypnotic suggestions reducing awareness of nocturnal sensory stimulation successfully eliminated his night terrors.

  18. Correction for Inhibition Leads to an Allosteric Co-Agonist Model for Pentobarbital Modulation and Activation of α1β3γ2L GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Alexis M.; Forman, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pentobarbital, like propofol and etomidate, produces important general anesthetic effects through GABAA receptors. Photolabeling also indicates that pentobarbital binds to some of the same sites where propofol and etomidate act. Quantitative allosteric co-agonist models for propofol and etomidate account for modulatory and agonist effects in GABAA receptors and have proven valuable in establishing drug site characteristics and for functional analysis of mutants. We therefore sought to establish an allosteric co-agonist model for pentobarbital activation and modulation of α1β3γ2L receptors, using a novel approach to first correct pentobarbital activation data for inhibitory effects in the same concentration range. Methods Using oocyte-expressed α1β3γ2L GABAA receptors and two-microelectrode voltage-clamp, we quantified modulation of GABA responses by a low pentobarbital concentration and direct effects of high pentobarbital concentrations, the latter displaying mixed agonist and inhibitory effects. We then isolated and quantified pentobarbital inhibition in activated receptors using a novel single-sweep “notch” approach, and used these results to correct steady-state direct activation for inhibition. Results Combining results for GABA modulation and corrected direct activation, we estimated receptor open probability and optimized parameters for a Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric co-agonist model. Inhibition by pentobarbital was consistent with two sites with IC50s near 1 mM, while co-agonist model parameters suggest two allosteric pentobarbital agonist sites characterized by KPB ≈ 5 mM and high efficacy. The results also indicate that pentobarbital may be a more efficacious agonist than GABA. Conclusions Our novel approach to quantifying both inhibitory and co-agonist effects of pentobarbital provides a basis for future structure-function analyses of GABAA receptor mutations in putative pentobarbital binding sites. PMID:27110714

  19. Brain Oscillations and Diurnal Variations in Hypnotic Responsiveness—A Commentary on “Diurnal Variations in Hypnotic Responsiveness: Is There an Optimal Time to be Hypnotized?”

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    A recent study published in the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis reported an interesting diurnal pattern of hypnotic responsivity; specifically, the authors found higher hypnotic responsiveness in a large sample of undergraduates in the morning and early evening. However, they did not have an explanation for this pattern of findings. This pattern is consistent, however, with the theta hypothesis of hypnotic responsivity. Further examination of the associations between brain oscillations and response to hypnosis is needed to determine if specific oscillations such as theta (1) actually facilitate response to some hypnotic suggestions, (2) merely reflect hypnotic responding, or (3) reflect another factor that itself plays a causal role in response to hypnosis. PMID:26599996

  20. Postischemic alteration of muscarinic acetylcholine and adenosine A1 binding sites in gerbil brain. Protective effects of a novel vinca alkaloid derivative, vinconate, and pentobarbital using an autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Kato, H; Kogure, K

    1992-01-01

    We studied the alterations in the binding of muscarinic cholinergic and adenosine A1 receptors following transient cerebral ischemia in Mongolian gerbils and examined the effects of the novel vinca alkaloid derivative vinconate and pentobarbital against the alterations in the binding of these receptors. Animals were allowed to survive for 5 h and 7 days after 10 min of cerebral ischemia induced by bilateral occlusion of common carotid arteries. [3H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and [3H]cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) were used to label muscarinic cholinergic and adenosine A1 receptors, respectively. The [3H]QNB and [3H]CHA bindings showed no significant alteration in the gerbil brain 5 h after ischemia. However, these bindings in the striatum, the hippocampal CA1 sector, and the hippocampal CA3 sector revealed a significant reduction 7 days after ischemia. The [3H]CHA binding also showed a significant decline in the dentate molecular layer 7 days after ischemia. Intraperitoneal application of vinconate (100 and 300 mg/kg) 10 min and pentobarbital (40 mg/kg) 30 min before ischemia showed a mild reduction in the [3H]CHA binding in the brain 5 h after ischemia. Especially, the reduction was found in the hippocampal CA1 sector and the dentate molecular layer. However, the [3H]QNB binding revealed no significant alteration in the brain 5 h after ischemia. Seven days after ischemia, both drugs prevented a marked reduction in the [3H]CHA binding in the striatum, but not in the hippocampal CA1 sector, the hippocampal CA3 sector, and the dentate molecular layer. By contrast, vinconate and pentobarbital failed to prevent the reduction in the [3H]QNB binding in the striatum. Morphological study indicated that vinconate and pentobarbital ameliorated the neuronal damage to the striatum, but not the hippocampal damage 7 days after ischemia. This histological finding was relatively consistent with the alteration in the [3H]CHA binding. These receptor autoradiographic and histological

  1. Neuro-hypnotism: prospects for hypnosis and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Kihlstrom, John F

    2013-02-01

    The neurophysiological substrates of hypnosis have been subject to speculation since the phenomenon got its name. Until recently, much of this research has been geared toward understanding hypnosis itself, including the biological bases of individual differences in hypnotizability, state-dependent changes in cortical activity occurring with the induction of hypnosis, and the neural correlates of response to particular hypnotic suggestions (especially the clinically useful hypnotic analgesia). More recently, hypnosis has begun to be employed as a method for manipulating subjects' mental states, both cognitive and affective, to provide information about the neural substrates of experience, thought, and action. This instrumental use of hypnosis is particularly well-suited for identifying the neural correlates of conscious and unconscious perception and memory, and of voluntary and involuntary action.

  2. Neuro-Hypnotism: Prospects for Hypnosis and Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Kihlstrom, John F.

    2012-01-01

    The neurophysiological substrates of hypnosis have been subject to speculation since the phenomenon got its name. Until recently, much of this research has been geared toward understanding hypnosis itself, including the biological bases of individual differences in hypnotizability, state-dependent changes in cortical activity occurring with the induction of hypnosis, and the neural correlates of response to particular hypnotic suggestions (especially the clinically useful hypnotic analgesia). More recently, hypnosis has begun to be employed as a method for manipulating subjects' mental states, both cognitive and affective, to provide information about the neural substrates of experience, thought, and action. This instrumental use of hypnosis is particularly well-suited for identifying the neural correlates of conscious and unconscious perception and memory, and of voluntary and involuntary action. PMID:22748566

  3. Creating past-life identity in hypnotic regression.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Young Don

    2015-01-01

    To examine the role of hypnotic suggestion in identity in past-life regression, 2 experiments were conducted at the request of Korea's major national television companies. A real historical person and a fictional character were selected as past-life identities. After hypnotic induction, a past-life regression suggestion was given. While counting backward to past-life, the suggestion of a specific identity was interspersed 3 times. In 5 of 6 subjects, the same past-life identity that had been suggested was produced, with relatively rich content accompanied by emotional and historical facts identical to the suggested identity. This study found that it was quite simple and easy to manipulate past-life identity. The role of suggestion in the formation of past-life memories during hypnosis is crucial.

  4. Finding the hypnotic virtuoso--another look: a brief communication.

    PubMed

    Green, J P; Lynn, S J; Carlson, B W

    1992-04-01

    Student volunteers who scored 9 (N = 20), 10 (N = 19), 11 (N = 26), and 12 (N = 15) on a live-administered Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility (HGSHS:A) of Shor and E. Orne (1962) were retested with the individually administered Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale (SHSS:C) of Weitzenhoffer and Hilgard (1962). There appeared to be a break in HGSHS:A's predictive ability at 11 suggestions passed. Whereas a majority of Ss who passed at least 11 HGSHS:A suggestions retested in SHSS:C "virtuoso" range (i.e., passed at least 11 suggestions), a relatively small percentage of Ss who passed fewer than 11 HGSHS:A suggestions retested as SHSS:C virtuosos. These results are generally consistent with previous research (Register & Kihlstrom, 1986) using a standard taped-recorded HGSHS:A induction.

  5. Italian norms for the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C.

    PubMed

    De Pascalis, V; Bellusci, A; Russo, P M

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents norms for an Italian translation of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C; Weitzenhoffer & Hilgard, 1962). Archival data on hypnosis research subjects recruited over a 10-year period of research on hypnosis were pooled, resulting in an aggregate sample of 356 participants (263 female and 93 male). Score distribution, item difficulty levels, and reliability of the SHSS:C were computed. Of this group, 218 subjects were administered the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility approximately 3 weeks prior to administration of the SHSS:C. The remaining 138 subjects received only the SHSS:C. Results suggest that the Italian version of the SHSS:C is a reliable and valid measure.

  6. Mexican norms for the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Armáss, Omar; Barabasz, Arreed F

    2005-07-01

    Normative data for the Mexican adaptation of the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C) are presented. Twenty-seven raters administered the scale to 513 Mexican volunteers. Score distribution, item analysis, and reliability of the SHSS:C are presented and compared to other international norming studies. The findings show that the Mexican adaptation of the SHSS:C has psychometric properties essentially comparable to those of the Dutch, German, Italian, and United States reference samples. However, the elevated sample mean suggests Mexicans may have an elevated ability to engage in hypnotic behavior, thus they would likely be especially good candidates for hypnotherapeutic interventions that would better the health options currently available.

  7. Hypnotic color blindness and performance on the Stroop test.

    PubMed

    Mallard, D; Bryant, R A

    2001-10-01

    A suggestion for hypnotic color blindness was investigated by administering a reverse Stroop color-naming task. Prior to the suggestion for color blindness, participants learned associations between color names and shapes. Following the color blindness suggestion, participants were required to name the shapes when they appeared in colors that were either congruent or incongruent with the learned associations. The 18 high hypnotizable participants who passed the suggestion were slower to name (a) shapes in which the color name was incongruent with the color in which it was printed, (b) "unseen" rather than "seen" shapes, and (c) color-incongruent shapes that were printed in the color in which they were "color-blind." These patterns are discussed in terms of potential cognitive and social mechanisms that may mediate responses to hypnotic color blindness.

  8. Anxiolytic, sedative, and hypnotic activities of aqueous extract of Morinda citrifolia fruit

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sridharan; Manickam, Shanti; RajaMohammed, Meher Ali

    2014-01-01

    Morinda citrifolia (Indian mulberry or noni) fruit has been long used as a folk medicine for a wide range of health purposes as it is claimed to have analgesic, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, detoxifier, and cell-rejuvenator properties. A recent study has revealed central nervous system suppressant nature of its extract. Hence, the present study has evaluated the anxiolytic, sedative, and hypnotic effects of the aqueous extracts of Morinda citrifolia in rodents in comparison to diazepam. Anxiety was assessed by ‘Isolation-induced aggression’ model, sedation by ‘Spontaneous locomotor activity using actophotometer’ and hypnotic activity by ‘Prolongation of ketamine-induced sleeping time’. Six male mice were used for each of the groups and postdose, all the six that received diazepam had shown an inhibition of aggression, whereas in the test group, five of six mice and none in the control group had shown an inhibition of aggression (P = 0.0007). Similarly, for the sedative activity, the total number of spontaneous locomotor activity at 30 min following drug administration was found to be 364.67 ± 10.74, 123.16 ± 8.33, and 196.67 ± 3.7, while at 60 min it was found to be 209 ± 12.98, 49 ± 5.78, and 92 ± 2.5 (mean ± SD) for the control, standard, and test groups of mice respectively (P < 0.001). Hypnotic activity was measured by prolongation of ketamine-induced sleeping time wherein the onset and duration of loss of righting reflex were compared among each group of mice. The time in minutes for the onset in control, standard, and test groups was 4.01 ± 0.22, 1.23 ± 0.05, and 2.23 ± 0.07, respectively. The duration of loss of righting reflex was 44.23 ± 0.59, 56.03 ± 1.34, and 50.57 ± 0.36, respectively. Both these were statistically significant (P < 0.001). However, more clinical studies are needed to assess the long-term effects of the extract in humans. PMID:24948855

  9. Damned if you do, damned if you don't? The Lundbeck case of pentobarbital, the guiding principles on business and human rights, and competing human rights responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Buhmann, Karin

    2012-01-01

    In 2011 it emerged that to induce the death penalty, United States authorities had begun giving injections of pentobarbital, a substance provided by Danish pharmaceutical company Lundbeck. Lundbeck's product pentobarbital is licensed for treatment of refractory forms of epilepsy and for usage as an anaesthetic, thus for a very different purpose. The Lundbeck case offers a difficult, but also interesting Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) dilemma between choices facing a pharmaceutical company to stop the distribution of a medical substance in order to avoid complicity in human rights violations, or to retain distribution of the substance in order not to impede access to the medicine for those patients who need it. The dilemma arose at a time when the United Nations (UN) Secretary General's Special Representative on Business and Human Rights, Professor John Ruggie, was finalizing a set of Guiding Principles to operationalize recommendations on business and human rights that he had presented to the UN Human Rights Council in 2008. The article discusses the dilemma in which Lundbeck was placed in from the perspective of the Guiding Principles on business and human rights and the 2008 Protect, Respect, Remedy UN Framework. The analysis seeks to assess what guidance may be gauged from the Guiding Principles in relation to the dilemma at hand and discusses the adequacy the Guiding Principles for dealing with acute human rights dilemmas of conflicting requirements in which a decision to avoid one type of violation risks causing violation of another human right. The article concludes by drawing up perspectives for further development of guidance on implementation of the UN Framework that could be considered by the newly established Working Group on Business and Human Rights and related UN bodies.

  10. Prevalence and associated factors of hypnotics dependence among Japanese outpatients with psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Akiko; Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Komada, Yoko; Ishikawa, Jun; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-12-30

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of the dependence for benzodiazepine or their agonist (BZDs) hypnotics, as well as factors associated with this dependence among Japanese psychiatric outpatients. One thousand and forty-three patients in the psychiatric outpatient clinic of Tokyo Medical University Hospital receiving treatment with BZDs hypnotics were analyzed. The subjects answered questionnaires including demographic variables, subjective sleep difficulty assessed by the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), duration of hypnotics medication, dose of diazepam equivalent BZDs hypnotics, the presence or absence of subjective side effects due to BZDs hypnotics (dizziness, fatigue, daytime sleepiness, amnesia, and headache), and dependency assessed by the Dependency 2-A (D 2-A) score. Subjects with a D 2-A score ≥10 were considered as having BZDs hypnotics dependence, and the variables associated with the presence of dependence were examined using logistic regression analyses. Eighty-two out of the 1043 subjects (7.9%) were determined to have BZDs hypnotics dependence. Compared with the non-dependence group, the dependence group had a significantly higher proportion of positive respondents for all the side effects. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that the dependence was significantly associated with younger age, higher total PSQI score, and higher daily dose of BZDs hypnotics. Younger age, higher total PSQI score, and higher dose may be associated with BZDs hypnotics dependence. The finding that patients with BZDs hypnotics dependence frequently suffered from subjective side effects and had greater sleep difficulty encourages the establishment of alternative treatments for patients with insomnia symptoms refractory to BZDs hypnotics treatment.

  11. Dependence of pentobarbital kinetics upon the dose of the drug and its pharmacodynamic effects.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, K H; Szaykowski, A; Danysz, A

    1977-01-01

    Pentobarbital (PB), at dose range of 20--50 mg/kg, displays in rabbits non-linear, dose-dependent kinetics. Pharmacokinetics parameters of drug elimination depend largely upon the dose, while the distribution phase is dose-independent. The rate of disappearance of PB from the central compartment (plasma) decreases with the increase of the dose. The analysis of pharmacodynamic parameters has shown that this dose-dependent retardation of PB elimination is probably caused by an impairment of metabolic processes, resulting from disturbance of the circulatory system. A close correlation has been found between the hypotensive effect of PB and the elimination constant, k13, and also between the hypotensive effect and beta.Vd(extrap), a coefficient proportional to the rate of metabolism of PB [23, 29]. The results indicate the necessity of considering the changes in the functional state of the organism, related to the action of a drug, in pharmacokinetic studies.

  12. In vitro adsorption of sodium pentobarbital by SuperChar, USP and Darco G-60 activated charcoals

    SciTech Connect

    Curd-Sneed, C.D.; Parks, K.S.; Bordelon, J.G.; Stewart, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the in vitro adsorption of sodium pentobarbital by three activated charcoals. Solutions of sodium pentobarbital (20 mM) were prepared in distilled water and in 70% sorbitol (w/v). Radiolabeled (/sup 14/C) sodium pentobarbital was added to each solution to serve as a concentration marker. Two ml of each drug solution was added to test tubes containing 40 mg of either Darco G-60, USP, or SuperChar activated charcoal. The drug-charcoal mixtures were incubated at 37 degrees C for O, 2.5, 5, 7.5 or 10 min. Equilibrium, indicated by a constant percentage of drug bound for two consecutive time periods, was established immediately for the aqueous mixtures and for Darco G-60 in sorbitol. The time to equilibrium was prolonged for USP (2.5 min) and SuperChar (5 min) in the presence of sorbitol. In the second series of experiments, solutions of sodium pentobarbital (1.25 to 160 mM) were prepared in either distilled water or sorbitol. Amount of drug bound by 10 to 320 mg of activated charcoal within a 10 min incubation period was determined. Scatchard analysis determined maximum binding capacity (Bmax) and dissociation constants (Kd) for each activated charcoal. In water, Bmax (mumoles/gm) was greatest for SuperChar (1141), followed by USP (580) and Darco G-60 (381), while the Kd's did not differ. Sorbitol did not change the Bmax or Kd of USP or Darco G-60, but the additive significantly decreased the Bmax (717) and increased the Kd for SuperChar (3.3 to 10.1 mM). The results suggest that relative binding capacity of activated charcoal is directly proportional to surface area, and that sorbitol significantly reduces sodium pentobarbital binding to SuperChar.

  13. Mediation and Moderation of Psychological Pain Treatments: Response Expectancies and Hypnotic Suggestibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milling, Leonard S.; Reardon, John M.; Carosella, Gina M.

    2006-01-01

    The mediator role of response expectancies and the moderator role of hypnotic suggestibility were evaluated in the analogue treatment of pain. Approximately 1,000 participants were assessed for hypnotic suggestibility. Later, as part of a seemingly unrelated experiment, 188 of these individuals were randomly assigned to distraction,…

  14. A Simple Hypnotic Approach to Treat Test Anxiety in Medical Students and Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Stephen W.

    1984-01-01

    A simple hypnotic procedure to treat test anxiety is described that was used successfully with medical students and residents at the Wake Forest University Medical Center. A light trace is obtained and then the student is told to take such a hypnotic "journey" the evening prior to the test. (MLW)

  15. Further Investigation of the Relationship between Hypnotic Susceptibility and Classroom Seating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stam, Henderikus J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    In an attempt to replicate the finds of Sackeim, Paulhus, and Weiman (1979), three classrooms of college students were tested for hypnotic susceptibility, handedness, and seating preferences. No relationships between variables were found for males. For females, relationships were inconsistent. Relationships between hypnotic susceptibility and…

  16. "Trance" versus "Skill" Hypnotic Inductions: The Effects of Credibility, Expectancy, and Experimenter Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council, James R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Compared a hypnotic induction procedure based on social learning principles (skill induction) with a traditional eye-fixation/relaxation trance induction, a placebo, and a control. Results suggested that hypnotic responses are elicited by expectancy and that induction procedures are a means of increasing subjects' expectancies for hypnotic…

  17. The Computer-Assisted Hypnosis Scale: Standardization and Norming of a Computer-Administered Measure of Hypnotic Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Carolyn D.; Nash, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    In a counterbalanced, within subjects, repeated measures design, 130 undergraduates were administered the Computer-Assisted Hypnosis Scale (CAHS) and the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale and were hypnotized. The CAHS was shown to be a psychometrically sound instrument for measuring hypnotic ability. (SLD)

  18. Placebo versus "standard" hypnosis rationale: attitudes, expectancies, hypnotic responses, and experiences.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Michelle; Cleere, Colleen; Lynn, Steven Jay; Kirsch, Irving

    2013-10-01

    In this study participants were provided with either the standard rationale that accompanies the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility: A (Shor & Orne, 1962) or a rationale that presented hypnosis as a nondeceptive placebo, consistent with Kirsch's (1994) sociocognitive perspective of hypnosis. The effects of the placebo and standard rationales were highly comparable with respect to hypnotic attitudes; prehypnotic expectancies; objective, subjective, and involuntariness measures of hypnotic responding; as well as a variety of subjective experiences during hypnosis, as measured by the Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory (Pekala, 1982). Differences among correlations were not evident when measures were compared across groups. However, indices of hypnotic responding were correlated with attitudes in the hypnosis but not the placebo condition, and, generally speaking, the link between subjective experiences during hypnosis and measures of hypnotic responding were more reliable in the placebo than the hypnosis group. Researcher findings are neutral with respect to providing support for altered state versus sociocognitive models of hypnosis.

  19. Non Benzodiazepines Hypnotics: Another Way to Induce Sleep

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    Management", held in Venice, Italy, 3-4 June 1999, and published in RTO MP-31. 3-2 network of excitatory and inhibitory interneurones lying A major...excitatory interneurones of the RAS are believed to use insomnia and favour the evolution of transient insomnia glutamic acid as their neurotransmitter, and...Benzodiazepines, zopiclone and zolpidem all interact an underlying pathology, or of a change in life-style, with the same receptor in the brain, the a

  20. Long-term Use of Z-Hypnotics and Co-medication with Benzodiazepines and Opioids.

    PubMed

    Sakshaug, Solveig; Handal, Marte; Hjellvik, Vidar; Berg, Christian; Ripel, Åse; Gustavsen, Ingebjørg; Mørland, Jørg; Skurtveit, Svetlana

    2017-03-01

    Benzodiazepine-like drugs (z-hypnotics) are the most commonly used drugs for treatment of insomnia in Norway. Z-hypnotics are recommended for short-term treatment not exceeding 4 weeks. We aimed to study the use of z-hypnotics in the adult population in Norway with focus on recurrent use in new users, treatment intensity and co-medication with benzodiazepines and opioids in long-term users. Data were obtained from the Norwegian Prescription Database. New users in 2009 were followed through 2013. Recurrent z-hypnotic use was defined as new fillings at least once in each of the four 365-day follow-up periods. Age groups of 18-39, 40-64 and 65+ years were analysed separately for men and women. In 2013, 354,571 (8.9%) of the population filled at least one prescription of z-hypnotics and the prevalence was relatively stable over time. Among the 92,911 new users of z-hypnotics in 2009, 13,996 (16.8%) received z-hypnotics all four 365-day periods of follow-up. In these long-term recurrent users, the treatment intensity was high already the second year, with mean annual amounts of 199 and 169 DDDs per patient in men and women, respectively. The interquartile differences were greatest in the youngest age group. 27.9% of the long-term recurrent users of z-hypnotics used benzodiazepines the fourth year and 33.9% used opioids. The proportions with co-medication increased with level of z-hypnotic treatment intensity. Overall, many z-hypnotic users had medicines dispensed for longer periods than recommended, and co-medications with drugs that may reinforce the central depressing and intoxicating effects were common.

  1. Middle-of-the-Night Hypnotic Use in a Large National Health Plan

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Thomas; Berglund, Patricia; Shahly, Victoria; Shillington, Alicia C.; Stephenson, Judith J.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Although difficulty maintaining sleep (DMS) is the most common nighttime insomnia symptom among US adults, many FDA-approved hypnotics have indications only for sleep onset, stipulating bedtime administration to offset residual sedation. Given the well-known self-medication tendencies of insomniacs, concern arises that maintenance insomniacs might be prone to self-administer their prescribed hypnotics middle-of-the-night (MOTN) after nocturnal awakenings, despite little efficacy-safety data supporting such use. However, no US data characterize the actual population prevalence or correlates of MOTN hypnotic use. Methods: Telephone interviews assessed patterns of prescription hypnotic use in a national sample of 1,927 commercial health plan members (ages 18-64) receiving prescription hypnotics within 12 months of study. The Brief Insomnia Questionnaire assessed insomnia symptoms. Results: 20.2% of respondents reported MOTN hypnotic use, including 9.0% who sometimes used twice-per-night (once at bedtime plus once MOTN) and another 11.2% who sometimes used MOTN, but never twice-per-night. The remaining 79.8% used exclusively at bedtime. Among exclusive MOTN users, only 14.0% used MOTN on the advice of their physician (52.6% of those seen by sleep medicine specialists and 42.6% by psychiatrists vs. 5.2% to 13.6% seen by other physicians). MOTN use predictors included DMS being the most bothersome sleep problem, long duration of hypnotic use, and low frequency of DMS. Conclusions: One-fifth of patients with prescription hypnotics used MOTN, only a minority on advice from their physicians. Since significant next-day cognitive and psychomotor impairment is documented with off-label MOTN hypnotic use, prescribing physicians should question patients about unsupervised MOTN dosing. Citation: Roth T; Berglund P; Shahly V; Shillington AC; Stephenson JJ; Kessler RC. Middle-of-the-night hypnotic use in a large national health plan. J Clin Sleep Med 2013

  2. The hypnotic diagnostic interview for hysterical disorders, pediatric form.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Alex; Iglesias, Adam

    2009-07-01

    This article reports on the use of hypnosis to facilitate the diagnostic process in two cases of pediatric hysterical reactions. The Hypnotic Diagnostic Interview for Hysterical Disorders (HDIHD), an interview tool, specifically designed for these cases, is reported. The first case was an adolescent male with motor Conversion Disorder manifested as paralysis of his lower limbs. The second was a preadolescent girl with sensory Conversion Disorder manifested as reduction of visual field in her right eye. Freudian conceptualization of hysterical reactions was employed as the conceptual basis in the formulation of these cases. This orientation posits hysterical phenomena a psychological defense employed by individuals exposed to traumatic experiences in order to effectuate a defense from intolerable affective material. The emotionally overwhelming material converts into physical reactivity free of the traumatic consequences by keeping the intolerable images and emotions deeply repressed within the subconscious. As the focus on these cases was diagnostic, treatment efforts were avoided. As it turned out, environmental interventions, based on the obtained information from the hypnotic interviews, extinguished the symptoms. The children were symptom free at follow-up.

  3. Clinical evaluation of hypnotic drugs: contributions from sleep laboratory studies.

    PubMed

    Kales, A; Scharf, M B; Soldatos, C R; Bixler, E O

    1979-07-01

    The most thorough and clinically relevant approach to hypnotic drug evaluation is one that balances the strengths and weaknesses of clinical trials and sleep laboratory evaluations. Advantages of clinical trials include the ability to evaluate large numbers of subjects and specific target groups and to thoroughly assess and quantify a drug's side effects, whereas sleep laboratory studies are very limited in all of these areas. Sleep laboratory studies however provide a rigorous, precise, and comprehensive profile of a drug's activity since there is more control over experimental variables and measurements are objective as well as continuous throughout the night. These benefits offset the shortcomings of clinical trials, which include a lack of objective measurements, less control over experimental variables, failure to evaluate a drug's effectiveness with continued use, and inattention to drug interaction and withdrawal effect. Several basic principles derived from sleep laboratory findings have been incorporated into both the clinical trials and sleep laboratory evaluations recommended in the new FDA Guidelines for the Clinical Evaluation of Hypnotic Drugs. These principles include provision for adequate baseline and withdrawal periods, use of multiple consecutive drug nights to assess a drug's effectiveness with continued use, and inclusion of an adequate washout period when a cross-over design is used. The guidelines do not emphasize either clinical trials or sleep laboratory studies at the expense of each other, but rather stress their complementary utilization.

  4. Hypnotic susceptibility as related to gestalt closure tasks.

    PubMed

    Crawford, H J

    1981-02-01

    The investigation was concerned primarily with the relationship of gestalt closure tasks to hypnotizability on a test of the hypothesis that the more highly hypnotizable do better on a task of holistic visuospatial functioning than those less responsive to hypnosis. Several other cognitive tasks were included: visualization, disembedding of hidden figures, and syllogistic reasoning. Sex differences were inconsistent in the four studies reported. In Study 1 (22 male and 20 female university students), high hypnotizables scored significantly higher than low hypnotizables on the gestalt closure tasks, but there were no significant correlations between hypnotizability and the other cognitive tasks. In Study 2 (25 male and 25 female university students) and Study 3 (41 male and 37 female university students), females showed significant correlations between hypnotic susceptibility and gestalt closure scores. In Study 4 (37 male and 27 female high school students), a significant correlation between hypnotic susceptibility and gestalt closure was found for males. The results are consistent with studies of different types of cognitive functioning (hemispheric preference, creativity, attentional distribution, imaginative involvement, and absorption), all indicating differences in cognitive abilities associated with high hypnotizability.

  5. Detection of thiopental and pentobarbital in head and pubic hair in a case of drug-facilitated sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Frison, Giampietro; Favretto, Donata; Tedeschi, Luciano; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2003-04-23

    The quali-quantitative determination of two barbiturates, thiopental and its metabolite pentobarbital, in head and pubic hair samples of a woman who had been sexually assaulted during hospitalisation, is reported. Hair was analysed by means of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-multiple mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS), in chemical ionisation conditions. Thiopental and pentobarbital were found in three proximal head hair segments (sample 1A: 0.30 and 0.40 ng/mg; sample 1B: 0.20 and 0.20 ng/mg; sample 3: 0.15 and 0.20 ng/mg) and pubic hair sample. Two distal head hair segments were negative for both barbiturates. Despite the lack of collection and toxicological analysis of blood or urine samples within the hospital setting, analytical findings from hair revealed the use of the anaesthetic agent thiopental to sedate the victim quickly and deeply and commit sexual assault.

  6. Hypnotic drug risks of mortality, infection, depression, and cancer: but lack of benefit.

    PubMed

    Kripke, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of hypnotic drug risks and benefits, reassessing and updating advice presented to the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (United States FDA). Almost every month, new information appears about the risks of hypnotics (sleeping pills). This review includes new information on the growing USA overdose epidemic, eight new epidemiologic studies of hypnotics' mortality not available for previous compilations, and new emphasis on risks of short-term hypnotic prescription. The most important risks of hypnotics include excess mortality, especially overdose deaths, quiet deaths at night, infections, cancer, depression and suicide, automobile crashes, falls, and other accidents, and hypnotic-withdrawal insomnia. The short-term use of one-two prescriptions is associated with greater risk per dose than long-term use. Hypnotics are usually prescribed without approved indication, most often with specific contraindications, but even when indicated, there is little or no benefit. The recommended doses objectively increase sleep little if at all, daytime performance is often made worse, not better, and the lack of general health benefits is commonly misrepresented in advertising. Treatments such as the cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia and bright light treatment of circadian rhythm disorders might offer safer and more effective alternative approaches to insomnia.

  7. Pentobarbital Toxicity after Self-Administration of Euthasol Veterinary Euthanasia Medication

    PubMed Central

    Crellin, Steven Jason; Katz, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    Suicide attempt via sodium pentobarbital is uncommon. A 48-year-old woman with a history of depression and prior suicide attempt was found unresponsive by her veterinarian spouse near a syringe containing pink solution. Upon EMS' arrival, the patient was experiencing apnea, hypoxemia, and miotic pupils; her blood glucose level measured 73 mg/dL. She was bradycardic and administered atropine with transient improvement in heart rate and transported to an emergency department; 2 mg of intravenous naloxone was administered without effect. She was endotracheally intubated via rapid sequence intubation. Rapid urine drug screening detected both benzodiazepines and barbiturates. The patient was transferred to an intensive care unit where she demonstrated a nearly absent radial pulse. Emergent fasciotomy to the left forearm and carpal tunnel was performed for acute compartment syndrome; “Euthasol” had been self-administered into the antecubital fossa. Expanded toxicological analysis via liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy detected caffeine, atropine, 7-aminoclonazepam, phenytoin, citalopram, and naproxen. The patient's coma resolved over 48 hours and she was successfully extubated without complication. Emergency physicians must closely monitor patients exposed to veterinary euthanasia agents who develop central nervous system and respiratory depression, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypotension, or skin injury. Consultation with a regional poison center and medical toxicologist is recommended. PMID:26881149

  8. Nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates among rural and urban women with protective orders.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jennifer; Logan, T K

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors for lifetime nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates among a sample of rural and urban women with recent partner violence victimization (n=756). Nearly one third of the sample (32.8%) reported ever using illicit sedative-hypnotics or opiates. Nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates was significantly associated with lifetime cumulative exposure to interpersonal victimization, rural Appalachian residency, past-year use of other substances and other substance-related problems, and lifetime unmet health care needs. Findings have implications for substance abuse prevention and treatment and victim advocacy programs.

  9. [Are z-hypnotics better and safer sleeping pills than benzodiazepines?].

    PubMed

    Mellingsaeter, Trude C; Bramness, Jørgen G; Slørdal, Lars

    2006-11-16

    Benzodiazepines and the benzodiazepine-like z-hypnotics (zopiclone, zolpidem, and zaleplon) have the same mode of action and many of the same effects. The use of z-hypnotics has had a steady and large increase since their introduction in Norway, and sales data suggest extensive use among the elderly. The relatively short half-lives of these drugs may cause less hangover effects, but z-hypnotics are hardly more effective or safer than benzodiazepines. The two classes of drugs should be prescribed with similar caution.

  10. Hypnosis and belief: A review of hypnotic delusions.

    PubMed

    Connors, Michael H

    2015-11-01

    Hypnosis can create temporary, but highly compelling alterations in belief. As such, it can be used to model many aspects of clinical delusions in the laboratory. This approach allows researchers to recreate features of delusions on demand and examine underlying processes with a high level of experimental control. This paper reviews studies that have used hypnosis to model delusions in this way. First, the paper reviews studies that have focused on reproducing the surface features of delusions, such as their high levels of subjective conviction and strong resistance to counter-evidence. Second, the paper reviews studies that have focused on modelling underlying processes of delusions, including anomalous experiences or cognitive deficits that underpin specific delusional beliefs. Finally, the paper evaluates this body of research as a whole. The paper discusses advantages and limitations of using hypnotic models to study delusions and suggests some directions for future research.

  11. Expanding hypnotic pain management to the affective dimension of pain.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Jeffrey B

    2009-01-01

    Experimental (Price & Barber, 1987) and neuroimaging studies (Rainville, Carrier, Hofbauer, Bushnell, & Duncan, 1999), suggest that it is the affective dimension of pain as processed in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) that is most associated with suffering and autonomic arousal. Conversely, pain related emotions (Rainville, Bao, & Chretien, 2005) and expectations (Koyama, McHaffie, Laurenti, & Coghill, 2005) modulate pain perception and associated pain affect. This paper presents both the scientific background and the general clinical steps involved in a practical hypnotic approach that uses emotion specific wording and the elicitation of prior positive experience to intervene at both the affective and sensory dimensions of pain. Such an approach enables patients to therapeutically use hypnosis to reduce their subjective distress even if they are not able to greatly reduce the sensation of pain. The utilization of positive state dependent learning (Rossi, 1986), following the advice of Milton Erickson to "discover their patterns of happiness" (Parsons-Fein, 2005) is emphasized.

  12. Sedative-Hypnotic Drug Withdrawal Syndrome: Recognition And Treatment.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cynthia; Olmedo, Ruben E

    2017-03-01

    Sedative-hypnotic drugs include gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic agents such as benzodiazepines, barbiturates, gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid [GHB], gamma-Butyrolactone [GBL], baclofen, and ethanol. Chronic use of these substances can cause tolerance, and abrupt cessation or a reduction in the quantity of the drug can precipitate a life-threatening withdrawal syndrome. Benzodiazepines, phenobarbital, propofol, and other GABA agonists or analogues can effectively control symptoms of withdrawal from GABAergic agents. Managing withdrawal symptoms requires a patient-specific approach that takes into account the physiologic pathways of the particular drugs used as well as the patient's age and comorbidities. Adjunctive therapies include alpha agonists, beta blockers, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics. Newer pharmacological therapies offer promise in managing withdrawal symptoms.

  13. The Psychophysics of Cold Pressor Pain and Its Modification through Hypnotic Suggestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgard, Ernest R.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Earlier reports of the pain of putting hand and forearm in circulating ice water were recomputed to study how subjects scale that pain and to find appropriate measures of its reduction under hypnotic analgesia. (Editor)

  14. Thirteen days: Joseph Delboeuf versus Pierre Janet on the nature of hypnotic suggestion.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, André

    2004-01-01

    The problem of post-hypnotic suggestion was introduced in 1884. Give a hypnotic subject the post-hypnotic command to return in 13 days. Awake, the subject remembers nothing yet nonetheless fulfills the command to return. How then does the subject count 13 days without knowing it? In 1886, Pierre Janet proposed the concept of dissociation as a solution, arguing that a second consciousness kept track of time outside of the subject's main consciousness. Joseph Delboeuf, in 1885, and Hippolyte Bernheim, in 1886, proposed an alternative solution, arguing that subjects occasionally drifted into a hypnotic state in which they were reminded of the suggestion. This article traces the development of these competing solutions and describes some of Delboeuf's final reflections on the problem of simulation and the nature of hypnosis.

  15. Electromyographic investigation of hypnotic arm levitation: differences between voluntary arm elevation and involuntary arm levitation.

    PubMed

    Peter, Burkhard; Schiebler, Philipp; Piesbergen, Christoph; Hagl, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Thirty-three volunteers were randomly exposed to 3 conditions: hypnotic arm levitation, holding up the arm voluntarily without hypnosis, and imagined arm lifting without hypnosis. Trapezius, deltoid, extensor digitorum, flexor digitorum profundus, biceps brachii, and triceps brachii muscles were measured. Strain and muscle activity during lifting and holding up the right arm for 3 minutes were used as dependent variables. During hypnotic arm levitation, the total muscle activity was lower than during holding it up voluntarily (p < .01); the activity in the deltoid was 27% lower (p < .001). Without hypnosis, the muscle activity showed a positive correlation with strain. However, there was no such correlation in the hypnotic condition. Apparently, it is possible to reduce strain and to objectively measure muscle activity in an uplifted arm through hypnotic arm levitation.

  16. [Comparative evaluation of the hypnotic drugs under conditions of brain injury].

    PubMed

    Belozertsev, Iu A; Shchelkanova, O A; Belozertsev, F Iu; Iuntsev, S V

    2012-01-01

    The effect of hypnotic drugs on the brain stability with respect to complete ischemia posttraumatic convulsive reactions and hypoxia has been studied in animals with model brain injury. It is established that zopiclone exhibits pronounced hypnotic effect during the first and second week after brain injury, while nitrazepam, zolpidem, and melaxen are effective in the first week. The neuroprotective effects of zopiclone and zolpidem are more pronounced than those of melaxen and nitrazepam.

  17. The effect of halothane and pentobarbital sodium on brain ependymal cilia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effect of anesthetic agents on ependymal ciliary function is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of halothane and pentobarbital sodium on brain ependymal ciliary function. Methods We used an ex vivo rat brain slice model to measure ependymal ciliary beat frequency by high speed video photography at 37°C. Results Exposure to halothane caused a significant reduction in ciliary beat frequency of 2 % (P = 0.006), 15.5 % (P < 0.001), and 21.5 % (P < 0.001) for halothane concentrations of 1.8 %, 3.4 % and 4.4 %, respectively, compared to controls. Following a one-hour wash-out period, there was no significant difference between control samples and cilia that had been exposed to 1.8 % (P = 0.5) and 3.4 % (P = 0.3) halothane. The beat frequency of cilia exposed to 4.4 % halothane had increased following the wash-out period but cilia were still beating significantly more slowly than cilia from the control group (P = <0.001). Pentobarbitone at concentrations of 25 and 50 μg/ml had no effect on ciliary beat frequency compared to controls (P = 0.6 and 0.4 respectively). A significant (P = 0.002) decrease in ciliary beat frequency was seen following incubation with a pentobarbitone concentration of 250 μg/ml (mean (SD) frequency, 24(8) Hz compared to controls, 38(9) Hz). Conclusions Halothane reversibly inhibits the rate at which ependymal cilia beat. Pentobarbitone has no effect on ciliary activity at levels used for anesthesia. It is unclear whether the slowing of ependymal ciliary by halothane is responsible for some of the secondary central nervous system effects of volatile anesthetic agents. PMID:23351190

  18. Eliminating stroop effects with post-hypnotic instructions: Brain mechanisms inferred from EEG.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Anoushiravan; Stuermer, Birgit; Hatami, Javad; Rostami, Reza; Sommer, Werner

    2017-02-01

    The classic Stroop task demonstrates the persistent and automatic effects of the meaning of color words that are very hard to inhibit when the task is to name the word color. Post-hypnotic instructions may enable highly-hypnotizable participants to inhibit the automatic access to word meaning. Here we compared the consequences of hypnosis alone and hypnosis with post-hypnotic instructions on the Stroop effect and its facilitation and inhibition components. Importantly, we studied the mechanisms of the hypnosis effects at the neural level by analyzing EEG frequencies. Highly hypnotizable participants performed the Stroop task in a counterbalanced design following (1) post-hypnotic suggestions that words had lost their meaning, (2) after hypnosis alone, and (3) in a control condition without hypnosis. The overall Stroop effect and both its facilitation and interference components, were not significant after the post-hypnotic suggestion but in both other conditions. Hypnosis alone neither affected the Stroop effect nor - in contrast to some previous reports and claims - overall performance. EEG recorded during the Stroop task showed a significant increase in both frontal theta and frontal beta power when participants were under the impact of post-hypnotic suggestions, in comparison to the two other sessions. Together, these findings indicate that post-hypnotic suggestions - but not hypnosis alone - are powerful tools for eliciting top down processes. Our EEG findings could be interpreted as clue that this is due to the investment of additional cognitive control.

  19. Use of benzodiazepines, hypnotics, and anxiolytics in major depressive disorder: association with chronic pain diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianchen; Ye, Wenyu; Watson, Peter; Tepper, Ping

    2010-08-01

    We examined the use of benzodiazepines (BZD), hypnotics, and anxiolytics and their associations with chronic pain diseases (CPD) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). A retrospective analysis of 153,913 MDD patients (18-64 years) in a large administrative insured claims database during the year 2006 was performed. Results showed that during the study year, 33.1% of the patients had been prescribed BZD; 16.9%, hypnotics; and 6.1%, anxiolytics. The use of BZD and hypnotics increased with age. Patients with CPD were more likely than those without CPD to use BZD (41.2% vs. 27.0%, p < 0.001), hypnotics (21.7% vs. 13.3%, p < 0.001), and anxiolytics (7.8% vs. 4.8%, p < 0.01). After adjustment for demographics and comorbidities, CPD was still significantly associated with increased use of BZD (OR = 1.62), hypnotics (OR = 1.49), and anxiolytics (OR = 1.51). Further research is needed to examine the long-term benefits and risks of BZD and hypnotics in the treatment of MDD and CPD.

  20. Hypnotic drug risks of mortality, infection, depression, and cancer: but lack of benefit

    PubMed Central

    Kripke, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of hypnotic drug risks and benefits, reassessing and updating advice presented to the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (United States FDA). Almost every month, new information appears about the risks of hypnotics (sleeping pills). This review includes new information on the growing USA overdose epidemic, eight new epidemiologic studies of hypnotics’ mortality not available for previous compilations, and new emphasis on risks of short-term hypnotic prescription. The most important risks of hypnotics include excess mortality, especially overdose deaths, quiet deaths at night, infections, cancer, depression and suicide, automobile crashes, falls, and other accidents, and hypnotic-withdrawal insomnia. The short-term use of one-two prescriptions is associated with greater risk per dose than long-term use. Hypnotics are usually prescribed without approved indication, most often with specific contraindications, but even when indicated, there is little or no benefit. The recommended doses objectively increase sleep little if at all, daytime performance is often made worse, not better, and the lack of general health benefits is commonly misrepresented in advertising. Treatments such as the cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia and bright light treatment of circadian rhythm disorders might offer safer and more effective alternative approaches to insomnia. PMID:27303633

  1. Individual differences in afterimage persistence: relationships to hypnotic susceptibility and visuospatial skills.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, R P; Crawford, H J

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the moderating role of individual differences in hypnotic susceptibility and visuospatial skills on afterimage persistence, we presented a codable (cross) flash of light to 40 men and 46 women who had been dark adapted for 20 min. In an unrelated classroom setting, subjects had previously been given two standardized scales of hypnotic susceptibility (Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Shor & Orne, 1962; Group Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C, Crawford & Allen, 1982) and the Mental Rotations Test (Vandenberg & Kuse, 1978). The first afterimage interval and the afterimage duration correlated significantly with hypnotic responsiveness, supporting Wallace (1979), but did not show the anticipated relationships with mental rotation visuospatial skills. Individuals in the high hypnotizable group had (a) significantly longer afterimage intervals between its first appearance and first disappearance than did those in medium or low groups, as well as (b) significantly longer afterimages between the first appearance and the final disappearance than did those in low groups, but those in medium groups did not differ significantly from the other groups. Discriminant analysis using the afterimage persistence measures classified correctly 65.2% of high hypnotizables, 37.5% of medium hypnotizables, and 54.8% of low hypnotizables. Hypothesized cognitive skills that assist in the maintenance of afterimages and underlie hypnotic susceptibility include abilities to maintain focused attention and resist distractions over time and to maintain vivid visual images.

  2. Postoperative use of hypnotics is associated with increased length of stay after uncomplicated surgery for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Noack, Morten Westergaard; Bisgård, Anne Sofie; Klein, Mads; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Hypnotics are used to treat perioperative sleep disorders. These drugs are associated with a higher risk of adverse effects among patients undergoing surgery. This study aims to quantify the use of hypnotics and factors influencing the administration of hypnotics in relation to colorectal cancer surgery. Method: A retrospective cohort study of 1979 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. Results: In all, 381 patients (19%) received new treatment with hypnotics. Two of the six surgical centres used hypnotics less often (odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 0.24 (0.16–0.38) and 0.20 (0.12–0.35)). Active smokers (odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 1.57 (1.11–2.24)) and patients receiving perioperative blood transfusion (odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 1.58 (1.10–2.26)) had increased likelihood of receiving hypnotics. In the uncomplicated cases, a multivariable linear regression analysis showed that consumption of hypnotics postoperatively was significantly associated with increased length of stay (1.5 (0.9–2.2) days). Conclusion: One in five patients began treatment with hypnotics after colorectal cancer surgery. Postoperative use of hypnotics was associated with an increased length of stay for uncomplicated cases of colorectal cancer surgery. PMID:27660704

  3. Extension of time until cardiac arrest after injection of a lethal dose of pentobarbital in the hibernating Syrian hamster.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Seiji; Shiina, Takahiko; Takewaki, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yasutake

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether entry of peripherally injected drugs into the central nervous system is reduced during hibernation. When a lethal dose of pentobarbital was injected intraperitoneally, the time until cardiac arrest was significantly longer in hibernating hamsters than in active controls. The time difference was not a consequence of low body temperature or diminished circulation, because mimicking these parameters in artificial hypothermia did not prolong the time. In contrast, there was no difference in the time until cardiac arrest after intracerebroventricular injection of the anesthetic. These results indicate that entry of peripherally injected anesthetics into the central nervous system may be suppressed during hibernation.

  4. Hypnotic trait and specific phobia: EEG and autonomic output during phobic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gemignani, Angelo; Sebastiani, Laura; Simoni, Alfredo; Santarcangelo, Enrica L; Ghelarducci, Brunello

    2006-03-31

    In a previous study we showed that healthy highly hypnotizable subjects, during the suggestion of a moderately unpleasant situation administered in awake conditions, exhibited a sympathetic response greatly attenuated with respect to non-hypnotizable individuals. This was interpreted as a natural protection of hypnotizable subjects against the cardiovascular effects of cognitive stress. Aim of the present study was to investigate whether the hypnotic trait is able to modulate the autonomic and cerebral activities also in specific phobic awake hypnotizable (Highs) and non-hypnotizable (Lows) subjects. Electroencephalogram, electrooculogram, electromiogram of corrugator muscle, electrocardiogram, respirogram and tonic electrodermal activity were recorded during a guided mental imagery of an animal phobic object. Phobic stimulation induced in both groups the rise of heart and respiratory frequency and the lowering of skin resistance. These changes are less pronounced in Highs than in Lows and are sustained by a different modulation of the sympatho-vagal balance. During phobic stimulation both groups exhibited a similar significant increase of EEG gamma relative power. At variance, significant stimulation-related decrements of alpha1, theta1 and theta2 activities were found only in Highs that exhibited similar changes during the control and phobic stimulation. Results suggest that hypnotizability is able to modulate cerebral and autonomic responses also in specific phobic subjects. However, the presence of a specific phobia attenuates the effectiveness of hypnotizability as a protective factor against possible stress-related cardiac illness.

  5. Antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics in pregnancy and lactation

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Daya; Gandotra, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Untreated perinatal depression and anxiety disorders are known to have significant negative impact on both maternal and fetal health. Dilemmas still remain regarding the use and safety of psychotropics in pregnant and lactating women suffering from perinatal depression and anxiety disorders. The aim of the current paper was to review the existing evidence base on the exposure and consequences of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics in women during pregnancy and lactation and to make recommendations for clinical decision making in management of these cases. Materials and Methods: We undertook a bibliographic search of Medline/PubMed (1972 through 2014), Science Direct (1972 through 2014), Archives of Indian Journal of Psychiatry databases was done. References of retrieved articles, reference books, and dedicated websites were also checked. Results and Conclusions: The existing evidence base is extensive in studying multiple outcomes of the antidepressant or anxiolytic exposure in neonates, and some of the findings appear conflicting. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the most researched antidepressants in pregnancy and lactation. The available literature is criticized mostly on the lack of rigorous well designed controlled studies as well as lacunae in the methodologies, interpretation of statistical information, knowledge transfer, and translation of information. Research in this area in the Indian context is strikingly scarce. Appropriate risk-benefit analysis of untreated mental illness versus medication exposure, tailor-made to each patient's past response and preference within in the context of the available evidence should guide clinical decision making. PMID:26330654

  6. Oxytocin impedes the effect of the word blindness post-hypnotic suggestion on Stroop task performance.

    PubMed

    Parris, Benjamin A; Dienes, Zoltan; Bate, Sarah; Gothard, Stace

    2014-07-01

    The ability to enhance sensitivity to relevant (post)hypnotic suggestions has implications for creating clinically informed analogues of psychological and neuropsychological conditions and for the use of hypnotic interventions in psychological and medical conditions. The aim of this study was to test the effect of oxytocin inhalation on a post-hypnotic suggestion that previously has been shown to improve the selectivity of attention in the Stroop task. In a double-blind placebo-controlled between-subjects study, medium hypnotizable individuals performed the Stroop task under normal conditions and when they had been given a post-hypnotic suggestion that they would perceive words as meaningless symbols. In line with previous research, Stroop interference was substantially reduced by the suggestion in the placebo condition. However, contrary to expectations, oxytocin impeded the effect of the word blindness suggestion on performance. The results are explained in terms of the requirement for the re-implementation of the word blindness suggestion on a trial-by-trial basis and the need to sustain activation of the suggestion between trials. The findings contrast with a recent study showing a beneficial effect of oxytocin on sensitivity to (post)hypnotic suggestions but are consistent with findings showing a detrimental effect of oxytocin on memory processes.

  7. Hypnotic taper with or without self-help treatment of insomnia: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Belleville, Geneviève; Guay, Catherine; Guay, Bernard; Morin, Charles M

    2007-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a minimal intervention focusing on hypnotic discontinuation and cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for insomnia. Fifty-three adult chronic users of hypnotics were randomly assigned to an 8-week hypnotic taper program, used alone or combined with a self-help CBT. Weekly hypnotic use decreased in both conditions, from a nearly nightly use at baseline to less than once a week at posttreatment. Nightly dosage (in lorazepam equivalent) decreased from 1.67 mg to 0.12 mg. Participants who received CBT improved their sleep efficiency by 8%, whereas those who did not remained stable. Total wake time decreased by 52 min among CBT participants and increased by 13 min among those receiving the taper schedule alone. Total sleep time remained stable throughout withdrawal in both CBT and taper conditions. The present findings suggest that a systematic withdrawal schedule might be sufficient in helping chronic users stop their hypnotic medication. The addition of a self-help treatment focusing on insomnia, a readily available and cost-effective alternative to individual psychotherapy, produced greater sleep improvement.

  8. THE EFFICACY OF HYPNOTIC ANALGESIA IN ADULTS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    Stoelb, Brenda L.; Molton, Ivan R.; Jensen, Mark P.; Patterson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    This article both summarizes the previous reviews of randomized, controlled trials of hypnotic analgesia for the treatment of chronic and acute pain in adults, and reviews similar trials which have recently been published in the scientific literature. The results indicate that for both chronic and acute pain conditions: (1) hypnotic analgesia consistently results in greater decreases in a variety of pain outcomes compared to no treatment/standard care; (2) hypnosis frequently out-performs non-hypnotic interventions (e.g. education, supportive therapy) in terms of reductions in pain-related outcomes; and (3) hypnosis performs similarly to treatments that contain hypnotic elements (such as progressive muscle relaxation), but is not surpassed in efficacy by these alternative treatments. Factors that may influence the efficacy of hypnotic analgesia interventions are discussed, including, but not limited to, the patient's level of suggestibility, treatment outcome expectancy, and provider expertise. Based upon this body of literature, suggestions are offered for practitioners who are using, or would like to use, hypnosis for the amelioration of pain problems in their patients or clients. PMID:20161034

  9. The Social Before Sociocognitive Theory: Explaining Hypnotic Suggestion in German-Speaking Europe, 1900-1960.

    PubMed

    Kauders, Anthony D

    2017-04-01

    The article intends to retrace and review German discourse on hypnotic suggestion from 1900 onward, demonstrating the variety of arguments advanced to account for the social relationship in the hypnotic setting well before the emergence of sociocognitive theory. Using Spanos's distinction between "happenings" and "doings," it shows how, in the case of the "social" in early 20th century German texts on (hypnotic) suggestion, the passive observer, recipient, or victim of hypnosis, a trope familiar to the discipline for many decades, was called into question. This image, however, was not called into question by scientists experimenting in laboratories. On the contrary, the neurologists, psychologists, and philosophers who proffered a new way of seeing suggestion, one that privileged the hypnotic as well as the reciprocity between hypnotist and hypnotic, were part of a wider movement within the social sciences (grounded in hermeneutics, phenomenology, and Gestalt theory) that distanced itself from "positivistic" methodologies and "scientistic" verities. The article, then, seeks to remind readers that the sociocognitive perspective does not define the sociopsychological study of hypnosis.

  10. Nonbenzodiazepine Sedative Hypnotics and Risk of Fall-Related Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Sarah E.; Wickwire, Emerson M.; Park, Yujin; Albrecht, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that use of zolpidem, eszopiclone, and zaleplon would be associated with increased risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hip fracture. Methods: We conducted a case-crossover study on a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 y or older hospitalized with either TBI (n = 15,031) or hip fracture (n = 37,833) during 2007–2009. Use of zolpidem, eszopiclone, or zaleplon during the 30-day period prior to injury hospitalization was compared to use during four control periods at 3, 6, 9, and 12 mo prior to injury. The primary outcome was hospitalization for TBI or hip fracture. Results: Zolpidem use during the month prior to injury was associated with increased risk of TBI (odds ratio [OR] 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.56, 2.25); however, eszopiclone use during the same period was not associated with increased risk (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.40, 1.13). Zolpidem use during the month prior to injury was associated with increased risk of hip fracture (OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.41, 1.79); however, eszopiclone use during the same period was not associated with increased risk (OR 1.12; 95% CI 0.83, 1.50). Analysis of zaleplon use in the month prior to injury was limited by low drug utilization but was not associated with increased risk of TBI (OR 0.85; 95% CI 0.21, 3.34) or hip fracture (OR 0.92; 95% CI 0.40, 2.13) in this study. Conclusions: For the treatment of insomnia in older adults, eszopiclone may present a safer alternative to zolpidem, in terms of fall-related injuries. Citation: Tom SE, Wickwire EM, Park Y, Albrecht JS. Nonbenzodiazepine sedative hypnotics and risk of fall-related injury. SLEEP 2016;39(5):1009–1014. PMID:26943470

  11. Effects of Experimenter Modeling, Demands for Honesty, and Initial Level of Suggestibility on Response to "Hypnotic" Suggestions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comins, Jeffrey R.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Subjects were pretested on objective and subjective responses to test suggestions of the Barber Suggestibility Scale. After being exposed to one of three treatments--experimenter modeling, hypnotic induction, or control--each subject was retested. Experimenter modeling was as effective as hypnotic induction in enhancing responsiveness to test…

  12. Relationship of Sedative-Hypnotic Response to Self-Injurious Behavior and Stereotypy by Mentally Retarded Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Jennifer; Sandman, Curt A.

    1983-01-01

    Groups of 100 mentally retarded adolescents, exhibiting both self-injurious behavior (SIB) and stereotypy, stereotypy alone, SIB alone, or neither of these types of behavior were rated in terms of response to sedative-hypnotic medication. Results suggested that the paradoxical response to sedative-hypnotics may be a form of withdrawal. (Author/CL)

  13. The brain under self-control: modulation of inhibitory and monitoring cortical networks during hypnotic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Cojan, Yann; Waber, Lakshmi; Schwartz, Sophie; Rossier, Laurent; Forster, Alain; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2009-06-25

    Brain mechanisms of hypnosis are poorly known. Cognitive accounts proposed that executive attentional systems may cause selective inhibition or disconnection of some mental operations. To assess motor and inhibitory brain circuits during hypnotic paralysis, we designed a go-no-go task while volunteers underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in three conditions: normal state, hypnotic left-hand paralysis, and feigned paralysis. Preparatory activation arose in right motor cortex despite left hypnotic paralysis, indicating preserved motor intentions, but with concomitant increases in precuneus regions that normally mediate imagery and self-awareness. Precuneus also showed enhanced functional connectivity with right motor cortex. Right frontal areas subserving inhibition were activated by no-go trials in normal state and by feigned paralysis, but irrespective of motor blockade or execution during hypnosis. These results suggest that hypnosis may enhance self-monitoring processes to allow internal representations generated by the suggestion to guide behavior but does not act through direct motor inhibition.

  14. [Cognitive-behavioral treatment of insomnia and its use during withdrawal of hypnotic medication].

    PubMed

    Belleville, Geneviève; Bélanger, Lynda; Morin, Charles M

    2003-01-01

    Insomnia is a widespread health problem that often leads to the use of hypnotic medication. Among the available pharmacological agents to treat insomnia, benzodiazepines (BZD) present some undesirable effects, entailing risks of tolerance and dependence, and increased risk of automobile accidents, falls and fractures in the elderly. Cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) of insomnia, which focuses on psychological and behavioral factors that play a role in maintaining sleep-related problems, is efficient to improve sleep in the elderly who suffer from primary insomnia. This treatment may represent an alternative to pharmacotherapy or again be complementary during discontinuation of hypnotic medication. The CBT of insomnia may include different components such as stimulus control, sleep restriction, relaxation, cognitive restructuring and sleep hygiene. For people who are dependent to BZD or other hypnotic medication, a supervised tapering based on attaining successive objectives is generally added to the CBT of insomnia.

  15. Hypnotics use but not insomnia increased the risk of dementia in traumatic brain injury patients.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Lin, En-Yuan; Wei, Li; Lin, Jiann-Her; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Fan, Yen-Chun; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2015-12-01

    This study was intended to determine whether the use of hypnotics is associated with dementia in traumatic-brain-injury (TBI) patients. Data retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. TBI patients who received a diagnosis of insomnia at 2 or more independent examinations after the index date of TBI were included. The comparison cohort consisted of randomly selected TBI patients who were matched to insomnia cohort patients based on sex and age. The 2 cohorts of TBI patients were subsequently divided into the following 4 study groups: hypnotics users with insomnia (TBI-IH, N=599), insomniacs who did not use hypnotics (TBI-I, N=931), hypnotics users without insomnia (TBI-H, N=199), and people without insomnia who did not use hypnotics (TBI-C, N=4271). Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to determine the difference in dementia-free survival among the 4 study groups, after adjusting for the propensity score. The adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of the TBI-IH and TBI-H groups showed that they had a higher risk of dementia (aHRs: 1.86 and 3.98; 95% CIs: 1.15-3.00 and 2.44-6.47, respectively), compared with that of the TBI-C group. However, the risk of dementia in the TBI-I group was not significantly different from that of the TBI-C group (aHR: 1.36; 95% CI: 0.85-2.19). This study suggests that the use of hypnotics is associated with an increased risk of dementia in TBI patients with or without insomnia, whereas insomnia alone is not.

  16. Norms of German adolescents for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A.

    PubMed

    Peter, Burkhard; Geiger, Emilia; Prade, Tanja; Vogel, Sarah; Piesbergen, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A) has not been explicitly tested on an adolescent population. In this study, the German version of the HGSHS:A was administered to 99 German adolescents aged 15 to 19. In contrast to other studies, the gender distribution was relatively balanced: 57% female and 43% male. Results were comparable to 14 earlier studies with regard to distribution, mean, and standard deviation. Some peculiarities in contrast to the 14 previous studies are pointed out. It is concluded that the HGSHS:A can be used as a valid and reliable instrument to measure hypnotic suggestibility in adolescent samples.

  17. Alert Hypnotic Inductions: Use in Treating Combat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Eads, Bruce; Wark, David M

    2015-10-01

    Alert hypnosis can be a valuable part of the treatment protocol for the resolution of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Research indicates that combat veterans with PTSD are more hypnotically susceptible than the general population. For that reason, it is hypothesized that they should be better able to use hypnosis in treatment. As opposed to the traditional modality, eyes-open alert hypnosis allows the patient to take advantage of hypnotic phenomena while participating responsibly in work, social life, and recreation. Three case studies are reported on combat veterans with PTSD who learned to overcome their symptoms using alert hypnosis.

  18. [Clinical Practice Guideline for the proper use and cessation of hypnotics].

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    "Clinical Practice Guideline for the proper use and cessation of hypnotics" has been developed by focusing on insomnia treatments with acceptable safety and effectiveness. In this guideline, forty clinical questions encountered in clinical practice starting from the initial treatment of insomnia, optimization of pharmacotherapy, sleep hygiene instruction and cognitive behavioral therapy, specific treatment for insomnia with various medical conditions, responding to chronic insomnia, goal setting of treatment and methods for cessation of hypnotics, have been set. Based on the existing evidence associated with the clinical questions, also on the basis of expert consensus if sufficient evidence does not exist, we set clinical recommendations for the physicians and accessible information for patients.

  19. Pentobarbital modifies the lipid raft-protein interaction: A first clue about the anesthesia mechanism on NMDA and GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Valdez, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Suárez, J C; Delint-Ramirez, Ilse

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that anesthetic agents alter the physical properties of lipid rafts on model membranes. However, if this destabilization occurs in brain membranes, altering the lipid raft-protein interaction, remains unknown. We analyzed the effects produced by pentobarbital (PB) on brain plasma membranes and lipid rafts in vivo. We characterized for the first time the thermotropic behavior of plasma membranes, synaptosomes, and lipid rafts from rat brain. We found that the transition temperature from the ordered gel to disordered liquid phase of lipids is close to physiological temperature. We then studied the effect of PB on protein composition of lipid rafts. Our results show a reduction of the total protein associated to rafts, with a higher reduction of the NMDAR compared to the GABAA receptor. Both receptors are considered the main targets of PB. In general, our results suggest that lipid rafts could be plausible mediators in anesthetic action.

  20. Hypnotic Depth and the Incidence of Emergence Agitation and Negative Postoperative Behavioral Changes

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, Debra J.; Twite, Mark D.; Zuk, Jeannie; Pan, Zhaoxing; Wallen, Brett; Friesen, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Emergence agitation (EA) and negative postoperative behavioral changes (NPOBC) are common in children, though the etiology remains unclear. We investigated whether longer times under deep hypnosis as measured by Bispectral Index™ (BIS) monitoring would positively correlate with a greater incidence of EA in the post anesthesia care unit (PACU) and a greater occurrence of NPOBC in children after discharge. Methods We enrolled 400 children, ages 1–12 years old, scheduled for dental procedures under general anesthesia. All children were induced with high concentration sevoflurane and BIS monitoring was continuous from induction through recovery in the PACU. A BIS reading <45 was considered deep hypnosis. The presence of EA was assessed in the PACU using the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale (PAED). NPOBC were assessed using the Post-Hospital Behavior Questionnaire (PHBQ), completed by parents 3–5 days post-operatively. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, with a p<0.05 considered statistically significant. Results The incidence of EA was 27% (99/369) and the incidence of NPOBC was 8.8% (28/318). No significant differences in the incidence of EA or NPOBC were seen with respect to length of time under deep hypnosis as measured by a BIS value of less than 45. Conclusion Our data revealed no significant correlation between the length of time under deep hypnosis (BIS<45) and the incidence of EA or NPOBC. Within this population, these behavioral disturbances do not appear to be related to the length of time under a deep hypnotic state as measured by the BIS. PMID:19968807

  1. Are You Suggesting That's My Hand? The Relation Between Hypnotic Suggestibility and the Rubber Hand Illusion.

    PubMed

    Walsh, E; Guilmette, D N; Longo, M R; Moore, J W; Oakley, D A; Halligan, P W; Mehta, M A; Deeley, Q

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotic suggestibility (HS) is the ability to respond automatically to suggestions and to experience alterations in perception and behavior. Hypnotically suggestible participants are also better able to focus and sustain their attention on an experimental stimulus. The present study explores the relation between HS and susceptibility to the rubber hand illusion (RHI). Based on previous research with visual illusions, it was predicted that higher HS would lead to a stronger RHI. Two behavioral output measures of the RHI, an implicit (proprioceptive drift) and an explicit (RHI questionnaire) measure, were correlated against HS scores. Hypnotic suggestibility correlated positively with the implicit RHI measure contributing to 30% of the variation. However, there was no relation between HS and the explicit RHI questionnaire measure, or with compliance control items. High hypnotic suggestibility may facilitate, via attentional mechanisms, the multisensory integration of visuoproprioceptive inputs that leads to greater perceptual mislocalization of a participant's hand. These results may provide insight into the multisensory brain mechanisms involved in our sense of embodiment.

  2. The Role of Expectancy in Eliciting Hypnotic Responses as a Function of Type of Induction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Irving; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined the relationship between expectancy and suggestibility in hypnosis as a function of type of induction (N=100). Results showed subjects were able to predict their responses to a cognitive skill induction with great accuracy but were not very accurate in predicting responses to a hypnotic trance induction. (JAC)

  3. Achievement Motivation, Socialization, and Hypnotic Susceptibility Among Youths from Four Israeli Subcultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotenberg, Mordechai; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The impact of child rearing practices on achievement motivation, hypnotic susceptibility, and brain wave patterns of children from Israeli subcultures are examined. Of the four subgroups studied, although they differed in school performance, their need achievement scores were similiar. (Author/DEP)

  4. Cognitive Skill and Traditional Trance Hypnotic Inductions: A Within-Subjects Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickery, Anne R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compared a traditional trance hypnotic induction and a cognitive skill induction using a within-subjects design with college students (N=40). The skill induction enhanced responses to suggestions and produced marginally significant increments in behavioral responses when preceded by the trance induction, but there were no significant differences…

  5. Experiential Response to Auditory and Visual Hallucination Suggestions in Hypnotic Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanos, Nicholas P.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The effects of several attitudinal, cognitive skill, and personality variables in response to auditory and visual hallucination suggestions to hypnotic subjects are assessed. Cooperative attitudes toward hypnosis and involvement in everyday imaginative activities (absorption) correlated with response to auditory and visual hallucination…

  6. Hypnotic Susceptibility and Personality: The Consequences of Diazepam and the Sex of the Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, H. B.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis being tested is that a tranquillizing drug will either "increase" or "decrease" hypnotic susceptibility according to the personality characteristics of the individual subject. Such a view may further understanding of the conflicting evidence which is supplied by the relevant experimental literature. (Author/RK)

  7. Evaluation of anxiolytic-like effects of some short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics in mice.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tomomi; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Takechi, Kenshi; Kamei, Chiaki

    2008-07-01

    Anxiolytic-like effects of some short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics were examined with experimental paradigms of anxiety using an elevated plus-maze in male ICR mice. Diazepam was used as a positive control. The drug at a dose of 1 mg/kg significantly increased the percentage of time spent in the open arms and percentage of the number of open arm entries in the elevated plus-maze. Triazolam, brotizolam, rilmazafone, and lormetazepam also showed an anxiolytic-like effect as indicated by the significant increase in the percentage of time spent in the open arms and percentage of the number of open arm entries. Effects of short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics used in the study were more potent than those of diazepam. In addition, the doses affecting the elevated plus-maze by benzodiazepine hypnotics were much smaller than those that showed muscle-relaxant activity measured by the rotarod test, indicating that anxiolytic-like effects of benzodiazepine hypnotics had high specificity and selectivity.

  8. Restoration of Eidetic Imagery via Hypnotic Age Regression: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Neil S.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Eidetic imagery involves the ability to examine a visual stimulus briefly and later project onto a neutral surface an image that represents an exact duplication of the original. This study uses the differential frequency of eidetic imagery ability between children and adults as a basis for testing the validity of hypnotic age regression.…

  9. Predisposition for Nightmares: A Study of Hypnotic Ability, Vividness of Imagery, and Absorption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belicki, Kathryn; Belicki, Denis

    1986-01-01

    Examined relationships of nightmare frequency to hypnotic ability, vividness of visual imagery, and the tendency to become absorbed in fantasy-like experiences. Use of Mark's Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire, and Rotenberg and Bowers' Absorption scale showed individuals with frequent nightmares to score higher on hypnotizability,…

  10. Characteristics and Trends in Hypnotics Consumption in the Largest Health Care System in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Rennert, G.; Stein, N.; Landsman, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To quantify and characterize hypnotics consumption habits among adult patients insured by Clalit Health Services (CHS), the largest health care provider in Israel, in 2000 and 2010. Methods. A retrospective analysis of CHS computerized pharmacy records. Data were collected for all patients over the age of 18 years who were prescribed hypnotics in 2000 and in 2010. Results. Sleep medications were consumed by 8.7% of the adult CHS population in 2000 and by 9.6% in 2010. About one-quarter of consumers were treated for more than 6 months in both years. Multiple sleeping drugs were consumed more often in 2010 (45.2%) than a decade before (22%). While in 2000 benzodiazepines accounted for 84.5% of hypnotics, in 2010 this was reduced to 73.7% (p < 0.05). Of all patients treated for longer than 6 months only 11% in 2000 and 9% in 2010 required a dose escalation suggesting the absence of tolerance. Conclusions. Nine percent of the Israeli population consumes hypnotics. There is a major increase in prescription of combination of medications between 2000 and 2010, with an increase in Z class medications use and reduction in benzodiazepines. Most patients chronically treated did not escalate dosage, suggesting the absence of tolerance. PMID:27660727

  11. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist varenicline increases the ataxic and sedative-hypnotic effects of acute ethanol administration in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamens, Helen M.; Andersen, Jimena; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The costs associated with alcohol abuse are staggering, therefore much effort has been put into developing new pharmacological strategies to decrease alcohol abuse. Recently, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist varenicline has been shown to decrease ethanol consumption in both humans and animal models. Methods We examined the effects of varenicline on the ataxic and sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol. First, varenicline was administered prior to placement in a locomotor activity chamber to determine if varenicline influenced baseline locomotor activity. To determine the effect of nicotinic modulation on ethanol-induced motor incoordination, varenicline was administered 30 min prior to an acute ethanol injection and then mice were tested on the balance beam, dowel test or fixed-speed rotarod. To examine ethanol's sedative-hypnotic effects, varenicline was administered 30 min prior to 4 g/kg ethanol and the duration of loss of righting reflex (LORR) was measured. Results Varenicline markedly reduced baseline locomotor activity in C57BL/6J mice. Varenicline increased ethanol-induced ataxia when measured on the balance beam and dowel test, but had no effect when measured on the fixed-speed rotarod. Pretreatment with varenicline increased the duration of LORR. Conclusions These data provide evidence that nAChRs may be involved in the ataxic and sedative effects of ethanol. It is possible that one mechanism which could contribute to the ability of varenicline to decrease ethanol consumption may be through increasing negative behavioral effects of alcohol. PMID:20946306

  12. The Use of Hypnotics and Mortality - A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tzuo-Yun; Zeng, Ya-Fang; Tang, Gau-Jun; Kao, Hui-Chuan; Chiu, Hsien-Jane; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Ho, Hsiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep disorders, especially chronic insomnia, have become major health problem worldwide and, as a result, the use of hypnotics is steadily increasing. However, few studies with a large sample size and long-term observation have been conducted to investigate the relationship between specific hypnotics and mortality. Methods We conducted this retrospective cohort study using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Information from claims data including basic characteristics, the use of hypnotics, and survival from 2000 to 2009 for 1,320,322 individuals were included. The use of hypnotics was divided into groups using the defined daily dose and the cumulative length of use. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated from a Cox proportional hazards model, with two different matching techniques to examine the associations. Results Compared to the non-users, both users of benzodiazepines (HR = 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.78–1.85) and mixed users (HR = 1.44; 95% CI = 1.42–1.47) had a higher risk of death, whereas the users of other non-benzodiazepines users showed no differences. Zolpidem users (HR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.71–0.75) exhibited a lower risk of mortality in the adjusted models. This pattern remained similar in both matching techniques. Secondary analysis indicated that zolpidem users had a reduced risk of major cause-specific mortality except cancer, and that this protective effect was dose-responsive, with those using for more than 1 year having the lowest risk. Conclusions The effects of different types of hypnotics on mortality were diverse in this large cohort with long-term follow-up based on representative claims data in Taiwan. The use of zolpidem was associated with a reduced risk of mortality. PMID:26709926

  13. The impacts of hypnotic susceptibility on chaotic dynamics of EEG signals during standard tasks of Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale.

    PubMed

    Yargholi, Elahe'; Nasrabadi, Ali Motie

    2013-05-01

    Chaotic features of hypnotic EEG (electroencephalograph), recorded during standard tasks of Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of hypnotic susceptibility (WSGS), were used to investigate the underlying dynamic of tasks and analyse the effect of hypnotic depth and concentration on EEG signals. Results demonstrate: (1) More efficiency of Higuchi dimension in comparison with Correlation dimension to distinguish subjects from different hypnotizable groups, (2) Channels with significantly different chaotic features among people from various hypnotizability levels in tasks, (3) High level of consistency among discriminating channels of tasks with function of brain's lobes, (4) Most affectability of medium hypnotizable subjects and (5) Rise in fractal dimensions due to increase in hypnosis depth.

  14. Anticonvulsant, anxiolytic and hypnotic effects of aqueous bulb extract of Crinum glaucum A. chev (Amaryllidaceae): role of GABAergic and nitrergic systems.

    PubMed

    Ishola, Ismail O; Olayemi, Sunday O; Idowu, Abidemi R

    2013-08-01

    Crinum glaucum A. Chev (Amaryllidaceae) (CG) is a bulbous plant widely used in folk medicine in the treatment of cough, asthma and convulsions. This study was carried out to investigate the anticonvulsant, anxiolytic and hypnotic effects of the aqueous bulb extract of C. glaucum and its possible mechanism (s) of action. The anticonvulsant activity of C. glaucum extract (400-1200 mg kg(-1) p.o.) was investigated using picrotoxin, strychnine, isoniazid, pentylenetetrazol and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced seizures in mice while the elevated plus maze test (EPM) and hexobarbitone-induced sleeping time (HIST) were used to evaluate the anxiolytic and hypnotic effects, respectively. Animals were pretreated with flumazenil (3 mg kg(-1); i.p. GABA(A) receptor antagonist), cyproheptadine (4 mg kg(-1); i.p. 5-HT2 receptor antagonist), L-arginine (500 mg kg(-1); p.o. Nitric Oxide (NO) precursor) and L-Nitroarginine (L-NNA) (10 mg kg(-1) i.p. Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) inhibitor) were used to investigate the probable mechanism (s) of anticonvulsant activity. Oral administration of CG significantly (p < 0.001) delayed the onset of seizures induced by picrotoxin, strychnine, isoniazid and pentylenetetrazol with peak effect at 1200 mg kg(-1) in comparison to control groups. CG (800 and 1200 mg kg(-1)) strongly antagonized NMDA-induced turning behavior. Pretreatment of mice with cyproheptadine could not reverse the anticonvulsant effect of CG. However, pretreatment with flumazenil and L-NNA significantly (p < 0.05) reversed the anticonvulsant effect of CG while L-arginine pretreatment significantly (p < 0.001) delayed the onset of seizures when compared with control and extract (1200 mg kg(-1) only). CG potentiated hexobarbitone-induced sleeping time with peak effect at 400 mg kg(-1) and also significantly (p < 0.05) increased open arm exploration in EPM and had its peak anxiolytic effect at 100 mg kg(-1). The data obtained suggests that aqueous bulb extract of Crinum

  15. Study of Sedative-Hypnotic Effects of Aloe vera L. Aqueous Extract through Behavioral Evaluations and EEG Recording in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahnejad, Fatemeh; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Nasoohi, Sanaz; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Faizi, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the sedative and hypnotic effects of the aqueous extract of Aloe vera on rats. In order to evaluate the overall hypnotic effects of the Aloe vera extract, open field and loss of righting reflex tests were primarily used. The sedative and hypnotic effects of the extract were then confirmed by detection of remarkable raise in the total sleeping time through analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings of animals. Analysis of the EEG recordings showed that there is concomitant change in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) and None Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep in parallel with the prolonged total sleeping time. Results of the current research show that the extract has sedative-hypnotic effects on both functional and electrical activities of the brain. PMID:27610170

  16. Monaural and binaural response properties of neurons in the inferior colliculus of the rabbit: effects of sodium pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Kuwada, S; Batra, R; Stanford, T R

    1989-02-01

    1. We studied the effects of sodium pentobarbital on 22 neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the rabbit. We recorded changes in the sensitivity of these neurons to monaural stimulation and to ongoing interaural time differences (ITDs). Monaural stimuli were tone bursts at or near the neuron's best frequency. The ITD was varied by delivering tones that differed by 1 Hz to the two ears, resulting in a 1-Hz binaural beat. 2. We assessed a neuron's ITD sensitivity by calculating three measures from the responses to binaural beats: composite delay, characteristic delay (CD), and characteristic phase (CP). To obtain the composite delay, we first derived period histograms by averaging, showing the response at each stimulating frequency over one period of the beat frequency. Second, the period histograms were replotted as a function of their equivalent interaural delay and then averaged together to yield the composite delay curve. Last, we calculated the composite peak or trough delay by fitting a parabola to the peak or trough of this composite curve. The composite delay curve represents the average response to all frequencies within the neuron's responsive range, and the peak reflects the interaural delay that produces the maximum response. The CD and CP were estimated from a weighted fit of a regression line to the plot of the mean interaural phase of the response versus the stimulating frequency. The slope and phase intercept of this regression line yielded estimates of CD and CP, respectively. These two quantities are thought to reflect the mechanism of ITD sensitivity, which involves the convergence of phase-locked inputs on a binaural cell. The CD estimates the difference in the time required for the two inputs to travel from either ear to this cell, whereas the CP reflects the interaural phase difference of the inputs at this cell. 3. Injections of sodium pentobarbital at subsurgical dosages (less than 25 mg/kg) almost invariably altered the neuron's response

  17. The relation of self-reports of hypnotic depth in self-hypnosis to hypnotizability and imagery production.

    PubMed

    Kahn, S P; Fromm, E; Lombard, L S; Sossi, M

    1989-10-01

    The relationship of self-reports of hypnotic depth obtained during self-hypnosis to hypnotizability and to the kinds of imagery produced during self-hypnosis is investigated. The sample consisted of 22 highly hypnotizable Ss who practiced self-hypnosis in 1-hour daily sessions for 4 weeks and kept daily journals in which they detailed the contents of their self-hypnosis experiences. The journals were coded for imagery production by scoring for both reality-oriented and primary process imagery. Ss had been taught to monitor their hypnotic depth using a slightly revised version of the Extended North Carolina Scale (ENCS) of Tart (1979). Previously, ENCS has been used only with heterohypnotic Ss. The self-reports of depth using ENCS correlated highly with hypnotizability as measured by the Revised Stanford Profile Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility. Form I of Weitzenhoffer and Hilgard (1967) and with imagery production. Results demonstrate that ENCS scores are also a valid indicator of self-hypnotic depth among highly hypnotizable Ss. Furthermore, they indicate that both hetero-hypnotizability and imagery production are related to self-hypnotic depth, but that the association between imagery and hypnotizability is due to their individual relationships to self-hypnotic depth.

  18. Hypnotic relaxation therapy for treatment of hot flashes following prostate cancer surgery: a case study.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Gary R; Kendrick, Cassie; Koep, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    This case study reports on a 69-year-old African American male who presented with hot flashes following a diagnosis of prostate cancer and subsequent prostatectomy. Measures include both self-reported and physiologically measured hot flash frequency and sleep quality. The intervention involved 7 weekly sessions of hypnotic relaxation therapy directed toward alleviation of hot flashes. Posttreatment self-reported hot flashes decreased 94%; physiologically measured hot flashes decreased 100%; and sleep quality improved 87.5%. At week 12, both self-reported and physiologically measured hot flashes decreased 95% and sleep quality improved 37.5% over baseline, suggesting hypnotic relaxation therapy may be an effective intervention for men with hot flashes following treatment for prostate cancer.

  19. Hungarian norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A.

    PubMed

    Költő, András; Gősi-Greguss, Anna C; Varga, Katalin; Bányai, Éva I

    2015-01-01

    Hungarian norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A) are presented. The Hungarian translation of the HGSHS:A was administered under standard conditions to 434 participants (190 males, 244 females) of several professions. In addition to the traditional self-scoring, hypnotic behavior was also recorded by trained observers. Female participants proved to be more hypnotizable than males and so were psychology students and professionals as compared to nonpsychologists. Hypnotizability varied across different group sizes. The normative data-including means, standard deviations, and indicators of reliability-are comparable with previously published results. The authors conclude that measuring observer-scores increases the ecological validity of the scale. The Hungarian version of the HGSHS:A seems to be a reliable and valid measure of hypnotizability.

  20. Chinese medicines with sedative-hypnotic effects and their active components.

    PubMed

    Shi, Man-Man; Piao, Jin-Hua; Xu, Xi-Lin; Zhu, Liang; Yang, Li; Lin, Fu-Lan; Chen, Jian; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    The main pharmacological effects of sedative agents are sedation, hypnosis, antianxiety, and antidepression. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a long history of clinical experience in treating insomnia. This review focuses mainly on the role of active ingredients from TCM in the treatment of insomnia. Single herbs and their active ingredients from TCM with hypnotic effects are summarized through reviewing the relevant literature published in the past 20 y. The active ingredients are divided into alkaloids, terpenoids, and volatile oils, flavonoids, lignanoids and coumarins, saponins, and others. Current studies on TCM in treating insomnia are described from the aspects of active ingredients, sources, experimental models and methods, results, and mechanisms. In addition, Chinese compound prescriptions developed from a variety of single herbs with sedative-hypnotic effects are introduced. The acting pathways of TCM are covered from the perspectives of regulating central neurotransmitters, influencing sleep-related cytokines, and improving the structure of the central nervous system.

  1. The neural correlates of movement intentions: A pilot study comparing hypnotic and simulated paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Vera U; Seitz, Jochen; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos; Höse, Annett; Abler, Birgit; Hole, Günter; Goebel, Rainer; Walter, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    The distinct feeling of wanting to act and thereby causing our own actions is crucial to our self-perception as free human agents. Disturbances of the link between intention and action occur in several disorders. Little is known, however, about the neural correlates of wanting or intending to act. To investigate these for simple voluntary movements, we used a paradigm involving hypnotic paralysis and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eight healthy women were instructed to sequentially perform left and right hand movements during a normal condition, as well as during simulated weakness, simulated paralysis and hypnotic paralysis of the right hand. Right frontopolar cortex was selectively hypoactivated for attempted right hand movement during simulated paralysis while it was active in all other conditions. Since simulated paralysis was the only condition lacking an intention to move, the activation in frontopolar cortex might be related to the intention or volition to move.

  2. Non-benzodiazepine hypnotics and older adults: what are we learning about zolpidem?

    PubMed

    Levy, Hedva B

    2014-01-01

    Zolpidem and other non-benzodiazepine (BZD) hypnotic agents have become preferred drugs to manage insomnia. They are widely used among older adults because of perceived improved safety profiles compared with traditional BZDs. Accumulating data in recent years in patients over the age of 65, however, shed light on possible safety concerns of these medications and zolpidem specifically. Recent information regarding potential for excessive blood concentrations, effects on balance and memory and fracture risk data briefly is described. Clinicians should be aware of these most recent data. Non-drug therapies, as recommended in clinical guidelines, should be fully utilized for managing insomnia. Until better studies or pharmacovigilance data become available to guide patient selection for prescribing zolpidem and other non-BZDs, judicious use of these hypnotic agents in older adults is warranted.

  3. A study in mice of bromo and chloro acylurea analogues of the sedative-hypnotic bromureides.

    PubMed

    Mrongovius, R I; Rand, M J

    1977-01-01

    1. A series of 1-(2-chloroacyl)ureas, related to the sedative-hypnotic drugs bromvaletone and carbromal, was synthesized and tested in mice to determine central depressant and acute toxic effects. Four 1-(2-bromoacyl)ureas and two 3-halo compounds were included for comparison. 2. Large variations in potency were seen between the compounds. Much of this can be ascribed to differences in lipophilicity. Among homologous 1-(2-chloroacyl)ureas, those with 6 acyl carbons had maximal potency. Among groups of structural isomers, the most potent were 2-halo, 3-alkyl substituted compounds. 3. The most potent compounds were also those with the largest ratios of hypnotic to lethal activity. 4. The variation in the onset and duration of action of these compounds enables a choice to be made for a compound with a particular set of characteristics.

  4. Hypnotic suggestion modulates cognitive conflict: the case of the flanker compatibility effect.

    PubMed

    Iani, Cristina; Ricci, Federico; Gherri, Elena; Rubichi, Sandro

    2006-08-01

    The present work was aimed at investigating whether the flanker compatibility effect can be eliminated by means of a posthypnotic suggestion influencing attentional focusing. In Experiment 1, participants who scored high and low on hypnotic susceptibility performed the flanker compatibility task when naturally awake and when under a posthypnotic suggestion aimed at increasing the target's discriminability from the flankers. Results showed that the posthypnotic suggestion effectively eliminated the flanker compatibility effect in highly susceptible participants, whereas low-susceptibility participants did not show any reduction in the effect. In Experiment 2, highly susceptible participants performed the task after receiving a suggestion but without the induction of hypnosis. Results showed that the suggestion alone was not sufficient to reduce the flanker compatibility effect. These results support the view that in highly susceptible participants, hypnotic suggestion can influence the ability to focus on relevant information.

  5. The Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C: normative data of a Dutch student sample.

    PubMed

    Näring, G W; Roelofs, K; Hoogduin, K A

    2001-04-01

    Norms for the Dutch language version of the Standford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C; Weitzenhoffer & Hilgard, 1962) are presented. These norms are based upon a sample of 135 students at a Dutch university. Generally, the psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the SHSS:C are similar to other language versions. However, the mean score was somewhat lower than that found in the original norming studies at Stanford University.

  6. Adverse Respiratory Events Associated With Hypnotics Use in Patients of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wei-Sheng; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Insomnia is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted a population-based case-control study to evaluate the effects of hypnotics on the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD. The case-control study was investigated using data retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with newly diagnosed adverse respiratory events (pneumonia, COPD with acute exacerbation, acute respiratory failure, and cardiopulmonary arrest) were included in the case group. Patients with COPD and no history of adverse respiratory events were randomly selected for the control group, which was frequency-matched with the case group according to index date, age (per 10 years), and sex. Patients who had used hypnotics within 1 month meant active users. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of were calculated using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. Most of the study participants were male (71.6%), and the mean ages of the participants in the case and control groups were 69.2 (±12.4) and 67.5 (±12.3) years, respectively. After potential confounding factors were adjusting for, the adjusted ORs of adverse respiratory events were 12.0 for active users of benzodiazepines (95% CI, 8.11–17.6) and 10.5 for active users of nonbenzodiazepines (95% CI, 7.68–14.2) compared with the adjusted ORs of those who never used hypnotics. The results of this epidemiological study suggested that hypnotics increased the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD. PMID:26166105

  7. [Investigation on insomnia and use of hypnotics among an adult population].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q

    1993-02-01

    An epidemiological enquiry about the sleep status and use of hypnotics in 1289 adults (742 men and 547 women), including 266 workers, 195 peasants, 275 intellectuals and 553 college students, was done in 1989. A questionnaire including 15 questions on sleep habits, sleep disorders and consumption of hypnotics was used. The response percentages were compared with chi-square test between different sexes, age groups, professions and places of residence. 52.9% and 5.4% of the sample complained of transient and persistent insomnia, respectively. Our data did not reveal sex difference as insomnia is concerned. The response percentages for transient insomnia did not correlate with age, while persistent insomnia definitely increased from middle age. Both transient and persistent insomnia were present much less in rural residents than in towns folks. No significant difference in the incidence of insomnia was found between intellectuals and workers. Only 1.1% of the sample used hypnotics regularly and 10.9% had ever taken sleeping pills.

  8. Hypnotic susceptibility: a personal and historical note regarding the development and naming of the Stanford Scales.

    PubMed

    Weitzenhoffer, A M

    1997-04-01

    Certain misleading, if not inaccurate, allegations that have been made regarding the foundations of the Stanford scales are corrected. No special meaning was intended when the scales were designated susceptibility scales. A retrospective examination, however, indicates that grounds existed for making certain differentiations. SHSS:C and RSPS:I and RSPS:II should more appropriately have been designated as suggestibility and depth scales. On the other hand, whereas SHSS:A and SHSS:B also assess depth of hypnosis, they include a feature that permits using the obtained depth as a measure of hypnotic capacity and a predictor of future hypnotic performance. The possibility of using the same measure, suggestibility, to assess hypnotic responsiveness in dissimilar contexts may have been partially responsible for the confusing variety of labels that have been attached to what in the past has appeared to many to be one and the same thing. Further confusion more recently has been introduced by researchers and clinicians who have used the term depth, previously and conventionally attached to assessments based on observed overt responses, in reference to now certain subjectively based assessments.

  9. Benzodiazepine-like hypnotics and the associated risk of road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Orriols, L; Philip, P; Moore, N; Castot, A; Gadegbeku, B; Delorme, B; Mallaret, M; Lagarde, E

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the association between the use of benzodiazepine or benzodiazepine-like hypnotics and the risk of road traffic accidents. Data from three French national databases were matched: the health-care insurance database, police reports, and the police database of injury-related traffic accidents. A total of 72,685 drivers involved in injury-related road traffic accidents in France, from 2005 to 2008, were included in the study. The risk of being responsible for a traffic accident was higher in users of benzodiazepine hypnotics (odds ratio (OR) = 1.39 (1.08-1.79)) and in the 155 drivers to whom a dosage of more than one pill of zolpidem a day had been dispensed during the 5 months before the collision (OR = 2.46 (1.70-3.56)). No association was found between the use of zopiclone and risk of traffic accidents. Although this study did not find any association between the use of zolpidem as recommended and causation of traffic accidents, the potential risk related to possible abuse of the drug and risky driving behaviors should be further investigated. The results related to benzodiazepine hypnotics are consistent with those of previous studies.

  10. Changes in ventral respiratory column GABAaR ε- and δ-subunits during hibernation mediate resistance to depression by EtOH and pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Hengen, K B; Gomez, T M; Stang, K M; Johnson, S M; Behan, M

    2011-02-01

    During hibernation in the 13-lined ground squirrel, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, the cerebral cortex is electrically silent, yet the brainstem continues to regulate cardiorespiratory function. Previous work showed that neurons in slices through the medullary ventral respiratory column (VRC) but not the cortex are insensitive to high doses of pentobarbital during hibernation, leading to the hypothesis that GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)R) in the VRC undergo a seasonal modification in subunit composition. To test whether alteration of GABA(A)R subunits are responsible for hibernation-associated pentobarbital insensitivity, we examined an array of subunits using RT-PCR and Western blots and identified changes in ε- and δ-subunits in the medulla but not the cortex. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that during hibernation, the expression of ε-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs nearly doubles in the VRC. We also identified a population of δ-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs adjacent to the VRC that were differentially expressed during hibernation. As δ-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs are particularly sensitive to ethanol (EtOH), multichannel electrodes were inserted in slices of medulla and cortex from hibernating squirrels and EtOH was applied. EtOH, which normally inhibits neuronal activity, excited VRC but not cortical neurons during hibernation. This excitation was prevented by bicuculline pretreatment, indicating the involvement of GABA(A)Rs. We propose that neuronal activity in the VRC during hibernation is unaffected by pentobarbital due to upregulation of ε-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs on VRC neurons. Synaptic input from adjacent inhibitory interneurons that express δ-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs is responsible for the excitatory effects of EtOH on VRC neurons during hibernation.

  11. Hypnotic induction is followed by state-like changes in the organization of EEG functional connectivity in the theta and beta frequency bands in high-hypnotically susceptible individuals.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Graham A; Burgess, Adrian P

    2014-01-01

    Altered state theories of hypnosis posit that a qualitatively distinct state of mental processing, which emerges in those with high hypnotic susceptibility following a hypnotic induction, enables the generation of anomalous experiences in response to specific hypnotic suggestions. If so then such a state should be observable as a discrete pattern of changes to functional connectivity (shared information) between brain regions following a hypnotic induction in high but not low hypnotically susceptible participants. Twenty-eight channel EEG was recorded from 12 high susceptible (highs) and 11 low susceptible (lows) participants with their eyes closed prior to and following a standard hypnotic induction. The EEG was used to provide a measure of functional connectivity using both coherence (COH) and the imaginary component of coherence (iCOH), which is insensitive to the effects of volume conduction. COH and iCOH were calculated between all electrode pairs for the frequency bands: delta (0.1-3.9 Hz), theta (4-7.9 Hz) alpha (8-12.9 Hz), beta1 (13-19.9 Hz), beta2 (20-29.9 Hz) and gamma (30-45 Hz). The results showed that there was an increase in theta iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition in highs but not lows with a large proportion of significant links being focused on a central-parietal hub. There was also a decrease in beta1 iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition with a focus on a fronto-central and an occipital hub that was greater in high compared to low susceptibles. There were no significant differences for COH or for spectral band amplitude in any frequency band. The results are interpreted as indicating that the hypnotic induction elicited a qualitative change in the organization of specific control systems within the brain for high as compared to low susceptible participants. This change in the functional organization of neural networks is a plausible indicator of the much theorized "hypnotic-state."

  12. Hypnotic induction is followed by state-like changes in the organization of EEG functional connectivity in the theta and beta frequency bands in high-hypnotically susceptible individuals

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Graham A.; Burgess, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    Altered state theories of hypnosis posit that a qualitatively distinct state of mental processing, which emerges in those with high hypnotic susceptibility following a hypnotic induction, enables the generation of anomalous experiences in response to specific hypnotic suggestions. If so then such a state should be observable as a discrete pattern of changes to functional connectivity (shared information) between brain regions following a hypnotic induction in high but not low hypnotically susceptible participants. Twenty-eight channel EEG was recorded from 12 high susceptible (highs) and 11 low susceptible (lows) participants with their eyes closed prior to and following a standard hypnotic induction. The EEG was used to provide a measure of functional connectivity using both coherence (COH) and the imaginary component of coherence (iCOH), which is insensitive to the effects of volume conduction. COH and iCOH were calculated between all electrode pairs for the frequency bands: delta (0.1–3.9 Hz), theta (4–7.9 Hz) alpha (8–12.9 Hz), beta1 (13–19.9 Hz), beta2 (20–29.9 Hz) and gamma (30–45 Hz). The results showed that there was an increase in theta iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition in highs but not lows with a large proportion of significant links being focused on a central-parietal hub. There was also a decrease in beta1 iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition with a focus on a fronto-central and an occipital hub that was greater in high compared to low susceptibles. There were no significant differences for COH or for spectral band amplitude in any frequency band. The results are interpreted as indicating that the hypnotic induction elicited a qualitative change in the organization of specific control systems within the brain for high as compared to low susceptible participants. This change in the functional organization of neural networks is a plausible indicator of the much theorized “hypnotic-state.” PMID:25104928

  13. Searching for perfect sleep: the continuing evolution of GABAA receptor modulators as hypnotics.

    PubMed

    Nutt, David J; Stahl, S M

    2010-11-01

    The non-benzodiazepine GABA(A) receptor modulators ('Z-drugs') - zaleplon, zolpidem, zopiclone and eszopiclone - have become the accepted treatments for insomnia where they are available. However, recent randomized, placebo-controlled trials suggest that, for these drugs, there may be particular efficacy and tolerability profiles and distinct clinical outcomes in specific patient populations. This is particularly apparent when hypnotic/ selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor co-therapy is used to treat patients with co-morbid insomnia and psychiatric disorders, as patient recovery appears to be accelerated and enhanced by some drugs but not others. Emerging evidence of why this should be the case is that these hypnotic drugs may differ significantly from each other in their pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. Functional selectivity for specific GABA(A) receptor subtypes may determine each drug's clinical attributes, while the pharmacokinetic characteristics of Z-drugs also determine to a large extent how they perform in the clinic. For example, activity at GABA(A) alpha 1 receptor subtypes may be associated with sedative effects, whereas activity at alpha 2 and alpha 3 receptor subtypes may be associated with anxiolytic and antidepressant effects. In summary, the distinct clinical outcomes of zaleplon, zolpidem, zopiclone and eszopiclone may be explained by each drug's unique GABA(A) receptor subunit selectivity and pharmacokinetic profile. Further investigation of GABA( A) receptor subtype effects would help to increase understanding of current hypnotic drug effects, while knowledge of each drug's specific binding profile should enable clinicians to tailor treatment to individual patient's needs.

  14. Observed differences in learning ability of heart rate self-regulation as a function of hypnotic susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of eight male and female subjects (aged 20-27 yr) categorized by low and high hypnotic susceptibility were taught to control their heart rates by means of an appropriate autogenic therapy/biofeedback technique. The experimental groups were trained by autogenic therapy and biofeedback, while the control group received only biofeedback. Significant differences are observed in all psychological test scores between subjects of high and low hypnotic susceptibility. The results confirm that (1) there are qualitative and quantitative differences between the performance of individuals with high and low hypnotic susceptibility; (2) interindividual-variability tests yield data relevant to individual performance in visceral learning tasks; (3) the combined autogenic therapy/biofeedback/verbal feedback technique is suitable for conditioning large stable autonomic responses in humans; and (4) this kind of conditioning is effective in eliminating or alleviating physiological reactions to some environmental stressors.

  15. Increased response time of primed associates following an "episodic" hypnotic amnesia suggestion: a case of unconscious volition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Caleb Henry; Oakley, David A; Morton, John

    2013-12-01

    Following a hypnotic amnesia suggestion, highly hypnotically suggestible subjects may experience amnesia for events. Is there a failure to retrieve the material concerned from autobiographical (episodic) memory, or is it retrieved but blocked from consciousness? Highly hypnotically suggestible subjects produced free-associates to a list of concrete nouns. They were then given an amnesia suggestion for that episode followed by another free association list, which included 15 critical words that had been previously presented. If episodic retrieval for the first trial had been blocked, the responses on the second trial should still have been at least as fast as for the first trial. With semantic priming, they should be faster. In fact, they were on average half a second slower. This suggests that the material had been retrieved but blocked from consciousness. A goal-oriented information processing framework is outlined to interpret these and related data.

  16. Factors associated with long-term use of hypnotics among patients with chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Komada, Yoko; Asaoka, Shoichi; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Inoue, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated factors associated with long-term use of benzodiazepines (BZDs) or benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BzRAs) as hypnotics in patients with chronic insomnia. Consecutive patients (n = 140) with chronic insomnia were enrolled in this study (68 men and 72 women; mean age, 53.8 ± 10.8 years). All patients filled out a self-assessment questionnaire asking clinical descriptive variables at the baseline of the treatment period; patients received the usual dose of a single type of BZD or BzRA. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale were self-assessed at the baseline, and the former was re-evaluated at the time of cessation of medication or at the end of the 6-month treatment period. The PSQI included the following sub-items: evaluating sleep quality (C1), sleep latency (C2), sleep duration (C3), habitual sleep efficiency (C4), frequency of sleep disturbance (C5), use of sleeping medication (C6), and daytime dysfunction (C7). Among the patients, 54.6% needed to continue hypnotics for a 6-month treatment period. Logistic regression analysis revealed that, among descriptive variables, only the PSQI score appeared as a significant factor associated with long-term use {odds ratio (OR) = 2.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.0-4.0}. The receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis identified that the cut-off PSQI total score at the baseline for predicting long-term use was estimated at 13.5 points (area under the curve = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.8-0.92). Among the sub-items of PSQI, the increases in C1: (OR = 8.4, 95% CI = 2.4-30.0), C3: (OR = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.1-11.5), C4: (OR = 11.1, 95% CI = 3.6-33.9), and C6: (OR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.9-6.2) scores were associated with long-term use. This study revealed that a high PSQI score at the baseline, particularly in the sub-items relating to sleep maintenance disturbance, is predictive of long-term hypnotic treatment. Our results imply the limitation of the effectiveness of

  17. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Deynes-Exclusa, Yazmin; Sayers-Montalvo, Sean K; Martinez-Taboas, Alfonso

    2011-04-01

    The only hypnotizability scale that has been translated and validated for the Puerto Rican population is the Barber Suggestibility Scale (BSS). In this article, the Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale (SHCS) was translated and validated for this population. The translated SHCS ("Escala Stanford de Hipnosis Clinica" [ESHC]) was administered individually to 100 Puerto Rican college students. There were no significant differences found between the norms of the original SHCS samples and the Spanish version of the SHCS. Both samples showed similar distributions. The Spanish version's internal reliability as well as the item discrimination index were adequate. The authors conclude that the ESHC is an adequate instrument to measure hypnotizability in the Puerto Rican population.

  18. Postural instability and consequent falls and hip fractures associated with use of hypnotics in the elderly: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Allain, Hervé; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Polard, Elisabeth; Akwa, Yvette; Patat, Alain

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this review is to establish the relationship between treatment with hypnotics and the risk of postural instability and as a consequence, falls and hip fractures, in the elderly. A review of the literature was performed through a search of the MEDLINE, Ingenta and PASCAL databases from 1975 to 2005. We considered as hypnotics only those drugs approved for treating insomnia, i.e. some benzodiazepines and the more recently launched 'Z'-compounds, i.e. zopiclone, zolpidem and zaleplon. Large-scale surveys consistently report increases in the frequency of falls and hip fractures when hypnotics are used in the elderly (2-fold risk). Benzodiazepines are the major class of hypnotics involved in this context; falls and fractures in patients taking Z-compounds are less frequently reported, and in this respect, zolpidem is considered as at risk in only one study. It is important to note, however, that drug adverse effect relationships are difficult to establish with this type of epidemiological data-mining. On the other hand, data obtained in laboratory settings, where confounding factors can be eliminated, prove that benzodiazepines are the most deleterious hypnotics at least in terms of their effects on body sway. Z-compounds are considered safer, probably because of their pharmacokinetic properties as well as their selective pharmacological activities at benzodiazepine-1 (BZ(1)) receptors. The effects of hypnotics on balance, gait and equilibrium are the consequence of differential negative impacts on vigilance and cognitive functions, and are highly dose- and time-dependent. Z-compounds have short half-lives and have less cognitive and residual effects than older medications. Some practical rules need to be followed when prescribing hypnotics in order to prevent falls and hip fractures as much as possible in elderly insomniacs, whether institutionalised or not. These are: (i) establish a clear diagnosis of the sleep disorder; (ii) take into account chronic

  19. Effects of promazine, chlorpromazine, d-amphetamine, and pentobarbital on treadle pressing by pigeons under a signalled shock-postponement schedule.

    PubMed

    Leander, J D

    1976-11-01

    The effects of promazine on treadle pressing to postpone the presentation of electric shock were studied in three pigeons. The effects of chlorpromazine, d-amphetamine, and pentobarbital were studied in two of these pigeons. Each treadle press postponed electric shock for 20 sec and presentation of a preshock stimulus for 14 sec. Selected doses of both promazine and chlorpromazine increased the rates of treadle pressing in all birds. The response-rate increases produced by promazine and chlorpromazine were due to increased conditional probabilities of treadle pressing both before and during the preshock stimulus. d-Amphetamine (1 and 3 mg/kg) slightly increased responding in one of the birds, but not to the extent that promazine or chlorpromazine did. In the other bird, the 10 mg/kg dose of d-amphetamine increased shock rate but did not change response rate. Some doses of d-amphetamine increased the conditional probabilities of responding both in the absence of the preshock signal and during the preshock signal in both birds. Pentobarbital only decreased response rates and increased shock rates.

  20. Talking to the senses: modulation of tactile extinction through hypnotic suggestion

    PubMed Central

    Maravita, Angelo; Cigada, Mario; Posteraro, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Following brain damage, typically of the right hemisphere, patients can show reduced awareness of sensory events occurring in the space contralateral to the brain damage. The present work shows that a hypnotic suggestion can temporarily reduce tactile extinction to double bilateral stimulation, i.e., a loss of contralesional stimuli when these are presented together with ipsilesional ones. Patient EB showed an improved detection of contralesional targets after a single 20-min hypnosis session, during which specific suggestions were delivered with the aim of increasing her insight into somatosensory perception on both sides of the body. Simple overt attention orienting toward the contralesional side, or a hypnotic induction procedure not accompanied by specifically aimed suggestions, were not effective in modulating extinction. The present result is the first systematic evidence that hypnosis can temporarily improve a neuropsychological condition, namely Extinction, and may open the way for the use of this technique as a fruitful rehabilitative tool for brain-damaged patients affected by neuropsychological deficits. PMID:22822395

  1. Heart rate variability in subjects with different hypnotic susceptibility receiving nociceptive stimulation and suggestions of analgesia.

    PubMed

    Balocchi, R; Varanini, M; Menicucci, D; Santarcangelo, E L; Migliorini, S; Fontani, G; Carli, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible hypnotizability-related modulation of heart activity during nociceptive stimulation (pressor pain) and during nociceptive stimulation associated with the suggestion of analgesia in not hypnotized healthy individuals with a high (Highs) and a low (Lows) hypnotic susceptibility. ECG and respirogram were recorded. Standard time and frequency domain indexes were evaluated, together with the sd1 and sd2 values of the Poincaré plot over the RR series. Results showed self reports of analgesia in Highs and a significant increase of the respiratory frequency during stimulation in both groups. Very few significant differences between groups and among conditions were detected for mean RR and heart rate variability (HRV) through spectral analysis. and through the Poincaré indexes evaluation. On the contrary, a promising approach seems to be the study of the correlations among standard and Poincaré variables. In particular, different changes in (or even lost of) correlations were enlightened in Highs and Lows, suggesting a different modulation of RR in the two groups, probably due to the very low frequency components of HRV. Different roles of sympathetic and parasympathetic activities during stimulation can be suggested.

  2. Sedative-hypnotic Effect of Ash of Silver in Mice: A Reverse Pharmacological Study

    PubMed Central

    Inder, Deep; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    Ash of silver is used in traditional systems of medicine for various neurological conditions like insomnias, neuralgias, anxiety disorders, and convulsions. The present study was conducted to evaluate the sedative-hypnotic activity of ash of silver in comparison to pentobarbitone (standard drug) in albino mice. The mice were divided into four groups as follows: Group 1 (control): Gum acacia [GA; 1% per os (p.o.)], group 2 (standard): Pentobarbitone [50 mg/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.)], group 3 (test): Ash of silver (50 mg/kg p.o.), and group 4: Ash of silver (50 mg/kg p.o.) given 30 min prior to administration of pentobarbitone (50 mg/kg i.p.). Time of onset, recovery, and total duration of loss of righting reflex were studied. Ash of silver (test) produced significant sedation (P < 0.01) compared to control (GA 1%), but the effect was significantly less compared to that of standard pentobarbitone at the doses used. Also, significant potentiation (P < 0.001) of the sedative-hypnotic effect of pentobarbitone was observed with the test drug. PMID:25379470

  3. Improving working memory performance in brain-injured patients using hypnotic suggestion.

    PubMed

    Lindeløv, Jonas K; Overgaard, Rikke; Overgaard, Morten

    2017-02-04

    Working memory impairment is prevalent in brain injured patients across lesion aetiologies and severities. Unfortunately, rehabilitation efforts for this impairment have hitherto yielded small or no effects. Here we show in a randomized actively controlled trial that working memory performance can be effectively restored by suggesting to hypnotized patients that they have regained their pre-injury level of working memory functioning. Following four 1-h sessions, 27 patients had a medium-sized improvement relative to 22 active controls (Bayes factors of 342 and 37.5 on the two aggregate outcome measures) and a very large improvement relative to 19 passive controls (Bayes factor = 1.7 × 1013). This was a long-term effect as revealed by no deterioration following a 6.7 week no-contact period (Bayes factors = 7.1 and 1.3 in favour of no change). To control for participant-specific effects, the active control group was crossed over to the working memory suggestion and showed superior improvement. By the end of the study, both groups reached a performance level at or above the healthy population mean with standardized mean differences between 1.55 and 2.03 relative to the passive control group. We conclude that, if framed correctly, hypnotic suggestion can effectively improve working memory following acquired brain injury. The speed and consistency with which this improvement occurred, indicate that there may be a residual capacity for normal information processing in the injured brain.

  4. Synthesis and Evaluation of Fluorine-Substituted Phenyl Acetate Derivatives as Ultra-Short Recovery Sedative/Hypnotic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng; Xu, Xiangqing; Chen, Yin; Qiu, Yinli; Liu, Xin; Liu, Bi-Feng; Zhang, Guisen

    2014-01-01

    Background Soft drugs are molecules that are purposefully designed to be rapidly metabolized (metabolically labile). In anesthesia, the soft drug is useful because it enables precise titration to effect and rapid recovery, which might allow swift and clear-headed recovery of consciousness and early home readiness. Propofol may cause delayed awakening after prolonged infusion. Propanidid and AZD3043 have a different metabolic pathway compared to propofol, resulting in a short-acting clinical profile. Fluorine imparts a variety of properties to certain medicines, including an enhanced absorption rate and improved drug transport across the blood-brain barrier. We hypothesized that the introduction of fluorine to the frame structure of propanidid and AZD3043 would further accelerate the swift and clear-headed recovery of consciousness. To test this hypothesis, we developed a series of fluorine-containing phenyl acetate derivatives. Methodology/Principal Findings Fluorine-containing phenyl acetate derivatives were synthesized, and their hypnotic potencies and durations of LORR following bolus or infusion administration were determined in mice, rats and rabbits. The metabolic half-lives in the blood of various species were determined chromatographically. In vitro radioligand binding and γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor electrophysiology studies were performed. Among the 12 synthesized fluorine-containing phenyl acetate derivatives, compound 5j induced comparable duration of LORR with AZD3043, but more rapid recovery than AZD3043, propanidid and propofol. The time of compound 5j to return to walk and behavioral recovery are approximately reduced by more than 50% compared to AZD3043 in mice and rats and rabbits. The HD50 of compound 5j decreased with increasing animal size. Conclusions/Significance The rapid recovery might make compound 5j suitable for precise titration and allow swift and clear-headed recovery of consciousness and early home readiness. PMID:24796695

  5. Zolpidem Induced Hyponatremia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    DL, Britto; T, Saravanan

    2014-01-01

    Zolpidem is a non-benzodiazepine hypnotic that acts by binding to (GABAA) receptor. This is a case report of a patient with chronic insomnia for which he had initially been receiving benzodiazepine hypnotic alprazolam and for the past three years, he had switched himself to non-benzodiazepine hypnotic, zolpidem and had progressively increased the dose to 20 mg. The patient presented with history of drowsiness, nausea and vomiting of short duration. Investigations revealed that the patient had hyponatremia. Decreased serum sodium, elevated urine sodium with normal urine osmolarity was detected. Therefore, we report this as a case of drug induced syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) as other likely causes were ruled out by appropriate investigations. The causality assessment was done according to the WHO scale and found to be “Probable”. PMID:25386461

  6. Hypnotic Seminar.

    PubMed

    Haley, Jay

    2015-01-01

    In this transcription of a lecture given in 2000, Jay Haley begins by answering the question, "What is hypnosis?"  Haley reviews the circumstances of Gregory Bateson encouraging him to meet with Milton Erickson to discuss the history of hypnosis and the paradoxical nature of trance induction. Haley expresses many original thoughts about multiple personalities, regression to past lives, and how to handle memories that historically may be false. Sophisticated and subtle, this is Haley at his best.

  7. French Norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A.

    PubMed

    Anlló, Hernán; Becchio, Jean; Sackur, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    The authors present French norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A). They administered an adapted translation of Shor and Orne's original text (1962) to a group of 126 paid volunteers. Participants also rated their own responses following our translation of Kihlstrom's Scale of Involuntariness (2006). Item pass rates, score distributions, and reliability were calculated and compared with several other reference samples. Analyses show that the present French norms are congruous with the reference samples. Interestingly, the passing rate for some items drops significantly if "entirely voluntary" responses (as identified by Kihlstrom's scale) are scored as "fail." Copies of the translated scales and response booklet are available online.

  8. Use of Neurofeedback to Enhance Response to Hypnotic Analgesia in Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Gianas, Ann; George, Holly R; Sherlin, Leslie H; Kraft, George H; Ehde, Dawn M

    2016-01-01

    This proof of principle study examined the potential benefits of EEG neurofeedback for increasing responsiveness to self-hypnosis training for chronic pain management. The study comprised 20 individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) who received 5 sessions of self-hypnosis training--1 face-to-face session and 4 prerecorded sessions. Participants were randomly assigned to have the prerecorded sessions preceded by either (a) EEG biofeedback (neurofeedback) training to increase left anterior theta power (NF-HYP) or (b) a relaxation control condition (RLX-HYP). Eighteen participants completed all treatment sessions and assessments. NF-HYP participants reported greater reductions in pain than RLX-HYP participants. The findings provide support for the potential treatment-enhancing effects of neurofeedback on hypnotic analgesia and also suggest that effective hypnosis treatment can be provided very efficiently.

  9. The center core in ego state therapy and other hypnotically facilitated psychotherapies.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Claire

    2013-07-01

    Center core phenomena have been utilized in the practice of ego state therapy and other forms of hypnotically facilitated psychotherapy for nearly 40 years. Despite the frequency with which they are employed, many confusions, contradictions, and questions remain concerning them. In this article relevant center core phenomena literature is reviewed and an essential differentiation between two different kinds of center core phenomena is clarified. Psychodynamic explanations are offered for the therapeutic benefits of archetypal center core experiences such as inner strength and inner wisdom. The information provided offers clinicians a sturdier platform from which to decide whether to incorporate center core experiences into clinical practice. The persistent question of whether center core phenomena are ego states is revisited and addressed.

  10. Effect of sedative-hypnotics, anesthetics and analgesics on sleep architecture in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Dan M; Kirkpatrick, Daniel R; Kerfeld, Mitchell J; Hambsch, Zakary J; Reisbig, Mark D; Agrawal, Devendra K; Youngblood, Charles F

    2014-11-01

    The perioperative care of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients is currently receiving much attention due to an increased risk for complications. It is established that postoperative changes in sleep architecture occur and this may have pathophysiological implications for OSA patients. Upper airway muscle activity decreases during rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). Severe OSA patients exhibit exaggerated chemoreceptor-driven ventilation during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS), which leads to central and obstructive apnea. This article critically reviewed the literature relevant to preoperative screening for OSA, prevalence of OSA in surgical populations and changes in postoperative sleep architecture relevant to OSA patients. In particular, we addressed three questions in regard to the effects of sedative-hypnotics, anesthetics and analgesics on sleep architecture, the underlying mechanisms and the relevance to OSA. Indeed, these classes of drugs alter sleep architecture, which likely significantly contributes to abnormal postoperative sleep architecture, exacerbation of OSA and postoperative complications.

  11. Autonomic and EEG correlates of emotional imagery in subjects with different hypnotic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, L; Simoni, A; Gemignani, A; Ghelarducci, B; Santarcangelo, E L

    2003-04-15

    The autonomic and EEG correlates of the response to a cognitive unpleasant stimulation (US) verbally administered to awake hypnotizable and non hypnotizable subjects were studied. They were compared with the values obtained during a resting condition immediately preceding the stimulus and with those produced by a cognitive neutral stimulation (NS), also administered after a basal resting period. Results showed hypnotic trait effects on skin resistance, heart and respiratory rate as well as on EEG theta, alpha, beta and gamma relative power changes. The autonomic and EEG patterns observed indicated different strategies in the task execution for hypnotizable and non hypnotizable subjects and a discrepancy between the autonomic and EEG changes associated to the US in susceptible subjects. Results support dissociation theories of hypnosis and suggest for hypnotizable persons an active mechanism of protection against cardiac hazard.

  12. Conscious/Unconscious Dissociation Induction: Increasing Hypnotic Performance With "Resistant" Clients.

    PubMed

    Lankton, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    Milton H. Erickson promoted several approaches to psychotherapy using hypnosis. In the last decades of his life, his work moved away from the use of redundant suggestion and a predominance of direct suggestion in favor of indirect suggestion. In addition, he frequently employed a type of storytelling (that has come to be called therapeutic metaphor) to indirectly convey learning. Another change that occurred during the last decade was his definition of the cause of a symptom. However, there were two important areas of his work that he did not change during his career. These two components of his work he did not change were his definition of a cure and the importance of a naturalistic induction. This article concerns his naturalistic approach to hypnotic induction and especially his use of conscious/unconscious dissociation in the induction process and how indirect suggestion and therapeutic binds can be used to facilitate that type of induction and a cure.

  13. Romanian norms for the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A.

    PubMed

    David, Daniel; Montgomery, Guy; Holdevici, Irina

    2003-01-01

    A Romanian-language version of the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:A) was administered to 340 subjects (218 females and 122 males) recruited from 1998 to 1999 in Romania. Data were collected from three samples of participants to provide greater heterogeneity within the sample. The results from the Romanian version of the HGSHS:A were compared to those from Australian, Canadian, Danish, Finnish, German, Italian, Spanish, and original U.S. samples. The Romanian normative data are consistent with earlier normative studies in score distribution, item difficulty levels, and reliability. The mean score of the Romanian sample did not differ from those in the German and Italian samples but did significantly differ from the remaining samples. The total score reliability (.71) and item reliability of the Romanian sample was also comparable with published reference samples. No differences between women and men were found.

  14. [Gazing into the depths of the soul: hypnotism in documentary and instructional film (1920-1936)].

    PubMed

    Ledebur, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    Although part of the medical fold since the 1870s, hypnosis was long relegated to the margins, recognised and used by only a relatively small group of medical professionals. In the decades around 1900 hypnotic techniques were monopolised as a form of medical treatment through a long and in no way linear process. Hypnosis of laymen was vehemently opposed, however, denounced as being far too dangerous. And yet, medical participation in the aura of spectacular intervention into the human psyche garnered support. The medium of both documentary and instructional film served an important function in this regard, conveying popular interest in acknowledging hypnosis as a scientific method. On the basis of four medically accredited films on hypnosis from 1920 to 1936, this paper attempts to investigate how medical experts and these genres, as part of their effort to claim hypnosis from the realm of public spectacle and parapsychological experimentation, worked to stabilise hypnosis as a purified form of medical and psychiatric practice.

  15. Long-term outcome of hypnotic-analgesia treatment for chronic pain in persons with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Barber, Joseph; Hanley, Marisol A; Engel, Joyce M; Romano, Joan M; Cardenas, Diana D; Kraft, George H; Hoffman, Amy J; Patterson, David R

    2008-04-01

    Data from 26 participants in a case series of hypnotic analgesia for chronic pain were examined to determine the long-term effects of hypnosis treatment. Statistically significant decreases in average daily pain intensity, relative to pretreatment values, were observed at posttreatment and at 3- and 9-month follow-up but not at 6- or 12-month follow-up. The percent of participants who reported clinically meaningful decreases in pain were 27%, 19%, 19%, and 23%, at the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-up points, respectively. Moreover, at 12-months posttreatment, 81% of the sample reported that they still used the self-hypnosis skills learned in treatment. Overall, the results indicate that about 20% of the sample obtained substantial and lasting long-term reductions in average daily pain following hypnosis treatment and that many more continue to use self-hypnosis up to 12 months following treatment.

  16. A comparison between chlormethiazole and nitrazepam as hypnotics in psycho-geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Harenko, A

    A double-blind crossover study was carried out in 68 demented elderly patients (mean age 77 years) to compare the hypnotic effects of chlormethiazole and nitrazepam. Chlormethiazole was administered as a 5% mixture (500 mg. chlormethiazole edisylate) in a 10 ml. dose: the corresponding single dose of nitrazepam was 10 mg. Treatment was discontinued in 6 patients and interrupted for from 1 to 3 days in a further 18 due to side-effects and 'hang-over' problems or because of intercurrent infections. Of these 24 drop-outs, 3 occurred during chlormethiazole treatment (1 severe 'hang-over'; 2 refused to take medication) and 21 during nitrazepam (15 severe 'hang-over' effects, including sleepiness and muscular weakness; 2 nausea; 4 intercurrent infection). Both preparations were equally effective as hypnotics, there being no noteworthy differences in time of onset or in duration of sleep. Of the 44 patients completing the trial without interuption, observations were carried out for 308 nights on each preparation. Chlormethiazole patients slept for more than 6 hours on 244 of the 308 nights without 'hang-over' effect the next day compared with 163 out of 308 nights of those on nitrazepam. The difference is statistically significant in favour of chlormethiazole. The high incidence of 'hang-over' effect during nitrazepam treatment indicates that a single 10 mg. dose is too large for use in the elderly. Overall assessment of treatment was made in 62 patients. Chlormethiazole was judged to be the most suitable drug in 37, nitrazepam in 11, and both preparations equally useful in the remaining 14 patients. This difference is statistically significant.

  17. Primary care hypnotic and anxiolytic prescription: Reviewing prescribing practice over 8 years

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Lloyd D.; Raitt, Neil; Riaz, Muhammed Awais; Baldwin, Sarah-Jane; Erskine, Kay; Graham, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Over the last few years, hypnotic and anxiolytic medications have had their clinical efficacy questioned in the context of concerns regarding dependence, tolerance alongside other adverse effects. It remains unclear how these concerns have impacted clinical prescribing practice. Materials and Methods: This is a study reviewing community-dispensed prescribing data for patients on the East Practice Medical Center list in Arbroath, Scotland, in 2007, 2011 and 2015. Anxiolytic and hypnotic medications were defined in accordance with the British National Formulary chapter 4.1.1 and chapter 4.1.2. All patients receiving a drug within this class in any of the study years were collated and anonymized using primary care prescribing data. The patients’ age, gender, name of the prescribed drug(s), and total number of prescriptions in this class over the year were extracted. Results: The proportion of patients prescribed a benzodiazepine medication decreased between 2007 and 2015: 83.8% (n = 109) in 2007, 70.5% (n = 122) in 2011, and 51.7% (n = 138) in 2015 (P = 0.006). The proportion of these patients prescribed a nonbenzodiazepine drug increased between 2007 and 2015: 30% (n = 39) in 2007, 46.2% (n = 80) in 2011, and 52.4% (n = 140) in 2015 (P = 0.001). There was a significant increase in the number of patients prescribed melatonin (P = 0.020). Discussion: This study reports a reduction in benzodiazepine prescriptions in primary care alongside increases in nonbenzodiazepine and melatonin prescribing, with an increase in prescribing rates of this drug class overall. Conclusion: Changes in this prescribing practice may reflect the medicalization of insomnia, local changes in prescribing practice and alongside national recommendations. PMID:28217600

  18. Integrating the Forensic Sciences in Wildlife Case Investigations: A Case Report of Pentobarbital and Phenytoin Toxicosis in a Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Viner, T C; Hamlin, B C; McClure, P J; Yates, B C

    2016-09-01

    The application of medical knowledge to the purpose of law is the foundation of forensic pathology. A forensic postmortem examination often involves the expertise of multiple scientific disciplines to reconstruct the full story surrounding the death of an animal. Wildlife poses additional challenges in forensic investigations due to little or no associated history, and the disruptive effects of decomposition. To illustrate the multidisciplinary nature of wildlife forensic medicine, the authors outline a case of secondary pentobarbital/phenytoin toxicosis in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). The eagle was the single fatality in a group of 8 birds that fed on euthanized domestic cat remains that had been improperly disposed of in a landfill. Cooperation between responding law enforcement officers, pathologists, and other forensic scientists led to the successful diagnosis and resolution of the case.

  19. Crime, hysteria and belle époque hypnotism: the path traced by Jean-Martin Charcot and Georges Gilles de la Tourette.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Walusinski, Olivier; Veyrunes, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Hysteria and hypnotism became a favorite topic of studies in the fin de siècle neurology that emerged from the school organized at La Salpêtrière by Jean-Martin Charcot, where he had arrived in 1861. Georges Gilles de la Tourette started working with Charcot in 1884 and probably remained his most faithful student, even after his mentor's death in 1893. This collaboration was particularly intense on 'criminal hypnotism', an issue on which Hippolyte Bernheim and his colleagues from the Nancy School challenged the positions taken by the Salpêtrière School. Bernheim claimed that hypnotism was not a diagnostic feature of hysteria and that there were real-life examples of murders suggested under hypnosis, while hypnosis susceptibility was identified with hysteria by Charcot and Gilles de la Tourette, who saw rape as the only crime associated with hypnotism. The quarrel was particularly virulent during a series of famous criminal cases which took place between 1888 and 1890. At the time, it was considered that La Salpêtrière had succeeded over Nancy, since the role of hypnotism was discarded during these famous trials. However, the theories of Charcot and Gilles de la Tourette were also damaged by the fight, which probably triggered the conceptual evolution leading to Joseph Babinski's revision of hysteria in 1901. Gilles de la Tourette's strong and public interest in hypnotism nearly cost him his life, when a young woman who claimed to have been hypnotized against her will shot him in the head at his own home in 1893. It was subsequently shown that hypnotism had nothing to do with it. The delusional woman was interned at Sainte-Anne for mental disturbance, thus escaping trial. Ironically, Gilles de la Tourette may have been partly responsible, since he had been one of the strongest proponents of placing mentally-ill criminals in asylums instead of prisons.

  20. Concurrent Use of Hypnotic Drugs and Chinese Herbal Medicine Therapies among Taiwanese Adults with Insomnia Symptoms: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuei-Hua; Tsai, Yueh-Ting; Lai, Jung-Nien; Lin, Shun-Ku

    2013-01-01

    Background. The increased practice of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) worldwide has raised concerns regarding herb-drug interactions. The purpose of our study is to analyze the concurrent use of Chinese herbal products (CHPs) among Taiwanese insomnia patients taking hypnotic drugs. Methods. The usage, frequency of services, and CHP prescribed among 53,949 insomnia sufferers were evaluated from a random sample of 1 million beneficiaries in the National Health Insurance Research Database. A logistic regression method was used to identify the factors that were associated with the coprescription of a CHP and a hypnotic drug. Cox proportional hazards regressions were performed to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) of hip fracture between the two groups. Results. More than 1 of every 3 hypnotic users also used a CHP concurrently. Jia-Wei-Xiao-Yao-San (Augmented Rambling Powder) and Suan-Zao-Ren-Tang (Zizyphus Combination) were the 2 most commonly used CHPs that were coadministered with hypnotic drugs. The HR of hip fracture for hypnotic-drug users who used a CHP concurrently was 0.57-fold (95% CI = 0.47–0.69) that of hypnotic-drug users who did not use a CHP. Conclusion. Exploring potential CHP-drug interactions and integrating both healthcare approaches might be beneficial for the overall health and quality of life of insomnia sufferers. PMID:24204397

  1. The Use of Antidepressants, Anxiolytics, and Hypnotics in People with Type 2 Diabetes and Patterns Associated with Use: The Hoorn Diabetes Care System Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rauh, S. P.; Groeneveld, L.; Koopman, A. D.; Beulens, J. W. J.; Jansen, A. P. D.; Bremmer, M.; van der Heijden, A. A. W. A.; Elders, P. J.; Dekker, J. M.; Nijpels, G.; Hugtenburg, J. G.; Rutters, F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. With depression being present in approximately 20% of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), we expect equally frequent prescription of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics. Nevertheless, prescription data in people with T2DM is missing and the effect of depression on glycaemic control is contradictory. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics use in a large, managed, primary care system cohort of people with T2DM and to determine the sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, T2DM medication, and metabolic control associated with its use. Method. The prevalence of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics use in the years 2007–2012 was assessed in the Hoorn Diabetes Care System Cohort from the Netherlands. Results. From the 7016 people with T2DM, 500 people (7.1%) used antidepressants only, 456 people (6.5%) used anxiolytics and/or hypnotics only, and 254 people (3.6%) used a combination. Conclusion. We conclude that in our managed, primary care system 17% of all people with T2DM used antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics. Users of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics were more often female, non-Caucasian, lower educated, and more often treated with insulin. PMID:28232942

  2. The Use of Antidepressants, Anxiolytics, and Hypnotics in People with Type 2 Diabetes and Patterns Associated with Use: The Hoorn Diabetes Care System Cohort.

    PubMed

    Mast, R; Rauh, S P; Groeneveld, L; Koopman, A D; Beulens, J W J; Jansen, A P D; Bremmer, M; van der Heijden, A A W A; Elders, P J; Dekker, J M; Nijpels, G; Hugtenburg, J G; Rutters, F

    2017-01-01

    Objective. With depression being present in approximately 20% of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), we expect equally frequent prescription of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics. Nevertheless, prescription data in people with T2DM is missing and the effect of depression on glycaemic control is contradictory. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics use in a large, managed, primary care system cohort of people with T2DM and to determine the sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, T2DM medication, and metabolic control associated with its use. Method. The prevalence of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics use in the years 2007-2012 was assessed in the Hoorn Diabetes Care System Cohort from the Netherlands. Results. From the 7016 people with T2DM, 500 people (7.1%) used antidepressants only, 456 people (6.5%) used anxiolytics and/or hypnotics only, and 254 people (3.6%) used a combination. Conclusion. We conclude that in our managed, primary care system 17% of all people with T2DM used antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics. Users of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics were more often female, non-Caucasian, lower educated, and more often treated with insulin.

  3. [Studies of time-course changes in human body balance after ingestion of long-acting hypnotics].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masahiro; Ishii, Masanori; Niwa, Yoji; Yamazaki, Momoko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2004-02-01

    Falling accidents are a serious nocosomial problem, with balance disorders after the ingestion of hypnotics said to be a cause. Based on the results of animal studies, it was postulated that this problem involves the muscle relaxation that is a pharmacological effect of benzodiazepines (BZP). No reports have, to our knowledge, been made of time-course changes in human body balance after ingestion of hypnotics. Accordingly, we used quazepam (Doral), a long-acting hypnotic considered to show comparatively weak muscle relaxation, to study static balance after drug ingestion in human volunteers. Briefly, informed consent was obtained from 8 healthy adults, then a gait analytic system (Gangas) was used to test static balance after drug ingestion (Mann and Romberg tests). We also measured circulating drug concentration over time. Our results showed that balance disorders occurred after quazepam ingestion with an unstable posture particularly striking. Given the function of quazepam receptors, it is difficult to surmise that balance disorders after drug ingestion were due to the drug's muscle relaxation. We surmised that inhibition from the central nervous system in connection with nerves awakening was involved. We found a strong correlation between the manifestation of balance disorders after drug ingestion and circulating drug concentration.

  4. Hypnotic accumulation and hangover in elderly inpatients: a controlled double-blind study of temazepam and nitrazepam.

    PubMed

    Cook, P J; Huggett, A; Graham-Pole, R; Savage, I T; James, I M

    1983-01-08

    The hypnotic and residual sedative effects of the first and seventh of seven regular night-time doses of nitrazepam 5 mg, temazepam 20 mg, and placebo were studied in 58 elderly inpatients. Plasma temazepam and nitrazepam concentrations rose by about 50% and 113% respectively between the mornings of day 1 and day 7. Patients reported sleeping well more often after the first dose of either hypnotic (p less than 0.05), but there was no difference after the seventh dose. Reaction time was unchanged on the morning after the first dose but was significantly prolonged after the seventh dose of both hypnotics (p less than 0.01). The time taken to eliminate the letter E from a page of prose tended to be prolonged after the first dose of both drugs (temazepam v placebo, p less than 0.05; nitrazepam v placebo, not significant) and was further prolonged on the morning after the seventh dose of nitrazepam (nitrazepam v placebo, p less than 0.05). Thus plasma accumulation of the drug was associated with a deterioration in daytime performance. This change in performance did not correlate with age, cerebral blood flow, or plasma concentration, but patients of low intelligence tended to be more severely affected.

  5. Effects of different cyclodextrins on the morphology, loading and release properties of poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide)-microparticles containing the hypnotic agent etizolam.

    PubMed

    Lopedota, A; Cutrignelli, A; Trapani, A; Boghetich, G; Denora, N; Laquintana, V; Trapani, G; Liso, G

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into the feasibility of using microparticles (MPs) constituted by the biodegradable poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and a number of cyclodextrins (CDs) as an orally sustained delivery system of the hypnotic agent etizolam (ETZ). A further aim of the work was to investigate the effects of different CDs on the morphology, loading, and release properties of the MPs prepared. For these purposes, ETZ alone, and ETZ/CD-PLGA loaded MPs were prepared by the W/O/W emulsion-solvent evaporation method. It was found that the release of ETZ in vitro was more prolonged over three days with a kinetic constant proportional to t(1/2). It was also demonstrated that the CDs in these MPs are able to modulate several properties such as morphology, drug loading, and release properties. In fact, marked differences in shape, surface, and encapsulation efficiencies were noted depending on the presence, hydrophilicity, and charge of the CD employed. The obtained results induce us to consider the present ETZ-containing formulations as new valuable tools for the treatment of different insomnia categories.

  6. Use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics in the elderly: are all agents the same?

    PubMed

    Dolder, Christian; Nelson, Michael; McKinsey, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Sleep disorders, especially insomnia, are common in older adults. These disorders are frequently treated using non-benzodiazepine hypnotics. Nonetheless, there is a relative lack of data regarding the use of these agents in the elderly, and whether any of these medications is superior to any other in the class when used in the elderly is also unclear. In this article, we review, by way of the published literature, the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, efficacy and safety of zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone, eszopiclone and ramelteon in the elderly. Special emphasis is placed on identifying relevant differences between these medications when used in older adults with insomnia. Based primarily on data from placebo-controlled trials, the non-benzodiazepines reviewed were found to be most effective at improving sleep latency and sleep quality, and least effective at enhancing total sleep time. The efficacy of ramelteon was limited to improving sleep latency, while all other agents, especially at higher doses, were found to produce improvement in both sleep latency and some improvement in total sleep time. All of the medications were found to be well tolerated in the elderly. From pharmacokinetic and drug-drug interaction perspectives, zaleplon and ramelteon offer the advantage of not being primarily metabolised via the cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme. In conclusion, based on relatively limited data, zopiclone, zolpidem, zaleplon, eszopiclone and ramelteon represent modestly effective and generally well tolerated treatments for insomnia in older adults. While some actual and potential differences exist among these medications, more comparative trials are needed.

  7. Antinociceptive and hypnotic activities of pregabalin in a neuropathic pain-like model in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Xiao; Yin, Dou; Guo, Wei; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Ya-Dong; Qu, Wei-Min; Han, Wu-Jian; Hong, Zong-Yuan; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the antinociceptive and hypnotic effects of pregabalin, we established a neuropathic pain-like model in mice using partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL), and examined thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, electroencephalogram, rota-rod testing, and c-Fos expression in the anterior cingulate cortex. Gabapentin was used as a reference drug in the study. Pregabalin administered i.g. at 12.5 and 25mg/kg prolonged the duration of thermal latencies by 1.4- and 1.6-fold and increased the mechanical threshold by 2.2- and 3.1-fold 3h after administration, respectively, but did not affect motor coordination in PSNL mice, compared with vehicle control. Pregabalin (12.5 and 25mg/kg) given at 6:30 increased the amount of non-rapid eye movement sleep in a 4-h period by 1.3- and 1.4-fold, respectively, in PSNL mice. However, pregabalin (25mg/kg) given at 20:30 did not alter the sleep pattern in normal mice. Immunohistochemical study showed that PSNL increased c-Fos expression in the neurons of anterior cingulate cortex by 2.1-fold, which could be reversed by pregabalin. These results indicate that pregabalin is an effective treatment for both neuropathic pain and sleep disturbance in PSNL mice.

  8. Admissibility and per se exclusion of hypnotically elicited recall in American courts of law.

    PubMed

    Perry, C

    1997-07-01

    State v. Mack (1980) ruled that hypnotically elicited testimony is per se excluded from Minnesota law courts; this court also ruled that police could employ hypnosis in an attempt to construct an independently corroborated case. In recent years, there have been moves to rescind this exclusion; this raises a question of the probative value of such additional information when it is uncorroborated. This situation is compared with that of the polygraph as an index of deception: Like hypnosis, it is excluded per se in most American jurisdictions. Some legal decisions in Wisconsin are used to illustrate one alternative to the per se exclusion approach. Admissibility of scientific evidence in American courts of law has been based on a criterion of "general acceptability within the relevant scientific community," as first elucidated in Frye v. United States (1923). Recently, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the Frye decision in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (1993), by making general acceptability but one of several admissibility criteria. Three Daubert-based decisions, one involving hypnosis and all concerned with "recovered repressed memories," indicate some problems in law posed by Daubert.

  9. Zopiclone as positive control in studies examining the residual effects of hypnotic drugs on driving ability.

    PubMed

    Verster, Joris C; Spence, D Warren; Shahid, Azmeh; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Roth, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Zopiclone (7.5 mg) is frequently used as a positive control in studies that examine the residual effects of hypnotic drugs on driving ability and related skills. This review summarizes studies examining the effects of zopiclone, and discusses its usefulness as a comparator drug for investigations of residual effects of novel sleep medication. A literature review (Pubmed and Embase) was conducted searching for studies that tested zopiclone on driving. Cross references were checked for additional papers. Eight studies utilizing the standardized on-the-road driving test consistently showed that in the morning following bedtime administration zopiclone (7.5 mg) significantly impaired driving performance. A total of 191 healthy volunteers were tested after placebo and zopiclone (7.5 mg). Meta analyses showed no significant differences in driving performance after zopiclone (7.5 mg) between adult and elderly healthy volunteers. The combined effect size (ES) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) for healthy volunteers was 0.782 (0.620, 0.944). Relative to placebo, an average increment of 3.0 cm in Standard Deviation of Lateral Position (SDLP) was observed when treated with zopiclone (7.5 mg). This deviation was higher than the increment in SDLP reported for drivers with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.05% (+2.4 cm). Results from driving simulators and psychometric tests are consistent with the on-road driving test results. In conclusion, zopiclone (7.5 mg) is a reliable positive control, that consistently shows significant and meaningful impairment on the on-the-road driving test.

  10. Determination of illegally abused sedative-hypnotics in hair samples from drug offenders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sooyeun; Han, Eunyoung; In, Sanghwan; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2011-06-01

    As several sedative-hypnotics are distributed illegally and are available domestically through media like the internet, their abuse is becoming a serious social problem. In the present study, four legal cases involving abuse of diazepam, midazolam, and/or zolpidem were proved by hair analysis using a simultaneous quantification method for the determination of diazepam (and its metabolites), lorazepam, midazolam, and zolpidem, which are often illegally abused in Korea, in hair that was developed and validated. Drugs and metabolites in hair were extracted using methanol followed by solid-phase extraction. The extracts were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring mode. The validation parameters of the method, including selectivity, linearity, limits of detection and quantification (LOQ), recovery, intra- and interassay precision and accuracy, and processed sample stability, were satisfactory. Moreover, the developed method was successfully applied to actual cases. In case 1, which involved a pop singer who was detained for suspected drug abuse, the concentrations of diazepam and nordiazepam were 5.7 and 2.0 ng/mg in nonpigmented hair and 6.6 and 1.8 ng/mg in pigmented hair, respectively. In case 2, 0.4 ng/mg zolpidem was detected in hair from a drug abuser who purchased illegally through the internet, and 0.2 ng/mg midazolam was detected in hair from an illegal drug seller in case 3. In case 4, diazepam (lower than the LOQ), nordiazepam (0.7 ng/mg), and zolpidem (0.7 ng/mg) were detected in hair from a medical doctor who abused drugs using forged prescriptions.

  11. [Tolerance to exertion after sleep reduction and after taking a hypnotic: zolpidem].

    PubMed

    Mougin, F; Simon-Rigaud, M L; Davenne, D; Bourdin, H; Guilland, J C; Kantelip, J P; Magnin, P

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a delayed bedtime (3 a.m.), an advanced rising (3 a.m.), a sleep under placebo and under a hypnotic compound, i.e. 10 mg of zolpidem (Stilnox) on sleep structure and on the adaptations to a subsequent exercise in 8 male athletes. The chronology of these nights was randomized and each treatment administered in a double blind fashion. During each experimental night, subjects were monitored with conventional EEG/EOG/EMG polygraphic recordings. The next day, athletic performance was tested using a bicycle ergometer. A codified exercise was performed and consisted to a 10 min warm up followed by a 30 min steady state cycling corresponding to 75% of predetermined VO2 max. Then the work load increased progressively by steps of 10 W every minute until exhaustion. The recovery lasted 30 min. Heart rate, ventilation, VO2, ERO2 were monitored during all exercise and recovery. Plasma lactates and catecholamines were also measured at the same time. The data concerning sleep recordings showed that both nights with partial sleep deprivation resulted in a drop of time spent in slow wave sleep II (decrease of 55%) and in rapid eye movement sleep (decrease of 45%) while the amount of slow wave sleep III and IV were identical to that observed after the reference night. The sleep onset latency and the amount of sleep in stage I was reduced only after the delayed bedtime. Sleep data under zolpidem did not show any significantly difference in the amount of different sleep stages.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. [Determination of 10 sedative-hypnotics in human plasma using pulse splitless injection technique and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Ma, Hongying; Wang, Fangjie; Ou, Honglian; Zou, Ming

    2011-11-01

    A simple, precise and sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method coupled with pulse splitless injection technique was developed for the determination of 10 sedative-hypnotics (barbital, amobarbital, phenobarbital, oxazepam, diazepam, nitrazepam, clonazepam, estazolam, alprazolam, triazolam) in human plasma. The drugs spiked in plasma were extracted with ethyl acetate after alkalization with 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. The organic solvent was evaporated under nitrogen stream, and the residues were redissolved by ethyl acetate. The separation was performed on an HP-5MS column (30 m x 250 microm x 0.25 microm). The analytes were determined and identified using selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode and scan mode, respectively. The internal standard method was used for the determination. The target analytes were well separated from each other on their SIM chromatograms and also on the total ion current (TIC) chromatograms. The blank extract from human plasma gave no peaks that interfered with all the analytes on the chromatogram. The calibration curves for 10 sedative-hypnotics showed excellent linearity. The correlation coefficients of all the drugs were higher than 0.9954. The recoveries of the drugs spiked in human plasma ranged from 92.28% to 111.7%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of intra-day and inter-day determinations were from 4.09% to 14.26%. The detection limits ranged from 2 to 20 microg/L. The method is simple, reliable, rapid and sensitive for the determination and the quantification of 10 sedative-hypnotics in human plasma and seems to be useful in the practice of clinical toxicological cases.

  13. [Controlled release melatonin (Circadin) in the treatment of insomnia in older patients: efficacy and safety in patients with history of use and non-use of hypnotic drugs].

    PubMed

    Zisapel, Nava

    2009-05-01

    Circadin is a prolonged-release 2 mg melatonin formulation which, when taken before bedtime, mimics the physiological pattern of the endogenous hormone excreted during the night. It was approved by the EU-EMEA in June 2007 for the short-term treatment of primary insomnia characterized by poor quality of sleep in patients aged 55 or over. Placebo controlled clinical trials demonstrated, beyond the shortening of sleep Latency seen with traditional hypnotics, concomitant improvements in sleep quality and next day alertness and subsequently, quality of life. In contrast to traditional sedative hypnotics, Circadin has shown no evidence of impairing cognitive and psychomotor skills, of rebound, dependence or abuse potential and no significant adverse events compared to placebo. It can be used concomitantly with most medications but may potentiate the effects of GABA-A receptor modulators. Analyses presented here show that Circadin has comparable efficacy and safety in patients with and without history of hypnotic drug use.

  14. Risk of Dementia in Patients with Insomnia and Long-term Use of Hypnotics: A Population-based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei-Zen; Oyang, Yen-Jen; Fuh, Jong-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypnotics have been reported to be associated with dementia. However, the relationship between insomnia, hypnotics and dementia is still controversial. We sought to examine the risk of dementia in patients with long-term insomnia and the contribution of hypnotics. Methods Data was collected from Taiwan’s Longitudinal Health Insurance Database. The study cohort comprised all patients aged 50 years or older with a first diagnosis of insomnia from 2002 to 2007. The comparison cohort consisted of randomly selected patients matched by age and gender. Each patient was individually tracked for 3 years from their insomnia index date to identify whether the patient had a first diagnosis of dementia. Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results We identified 5693 subjects with long-term insomnia and 28,465 individuals without. After adjusting for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and stroke, those with long-term insomnia had significantly higher risks of dementia (HR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.92–2.85). Patients with long-term insomnia and aged 50 to 65 years had a higher increased risk of dementia (HR, 5.22; 95% CI, 2.62–10.41) than those older than 65 years (HR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.90–2.88). The use of hypnotics with a longer half-life and at a higher prescribed dose predicted a greater increased risk of dementia. Conclusions Patients with long-term use of hypnotics have more than a 2-fold increased risk of dementia, especially those aged 50 to 65 years. In addition, the dosage and half-lives of the hypnotics used should be considered, because greater exposure to these medications leads to a higher risk of developing dementia. PMID:23145088

  15. Preliminary study of relationships between hypnotic susceptibility and personality disorder functioning styles in healthy volunteers and personality disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypnotic susceptibility is one of the stable characteristics of individuals, but not closely related to the personality traits such as those measured by the five-factor model in the general population. Whether it is related to the personality disorder functioning styles remains unanswered. Methods In 77 patients with personality disorders and 154 healthy volunteers, we administered the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSSC) and the Parker Personality Measure (PERM) tests. Results Patients with personality disorders showed higher passing rates on SHSSC Dream and Posthypnotic Amnesia items. No significant correlation was found in healthy volunteers. In the patients however, SHSSC Taste hallucination (β = 0.26) and Anosmia to Ammonia (β = -0.23) were significantly correlated with the PERM Borderline style; SHSSC Posthypnotic Amnesia was correlated with the PERM Schizoid style (β = 0.25) but negatively the PERM Narcissistic style (β = -0.23). Conclusions Our results provide limited evidence that could help to understand the abnormal cognitions in personality disorders, such as their hallucination and memory distortions. PMID:21801440

  16. Three-Year Follow-Up of Insomnia and Hypnotics after Controlled Internet Treatment for Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Kerstin; Jernelöv, Susanna; Rück, Christian; Lindefors, Nils; Kaldo, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    insomnia and hypnotics after controlled internet treatment for insomnia. SLEEP 2016;39(6):1267–1274. PMID:27091535

  17. A Multifaceted GABAA Receptor Modulator: Functional Properties and Mechanism of Action of the Sedative-Hypnotic and Recreational Drug Methaqualone (Quaalude)

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Harriet; Bader, Benjamin M.; Ehnert, Corina; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Bunch, Lennart; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Schroeder, Olaf H.-U.; Bastlund, Jesper F.; Gramowski-Voß, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have elucidated the functional characteristics and mechanism of action of methaqualone (2-methyl-3-o-tolyl-4(3H)-quinazolinone, Quaalude), an infamous sedative-hypnotic and recreational drug from the 1960s–1970s. Methaqualone was demonstrated to be a positive allosteric modulator at human α1,2,3,5β2,3γ2S GABAA receptors (GABAARs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes, whereas it displayed highly diverse functionalities at the α4,6β1,2,3δ GABAAR subtypes, ranging from inactivity (α4β1δ), through negative (α6β1δ) or positive allosteric modulation (α4β2δ, α6β2,3δ), to superagonism (α4β3δ). Methaqualone did not interact with the benzodiazepine, barbiturate, or neurosteroid binding sites in the GABAAR. Instead, the compound is proposed to act through the transmembrane β(+)/α(–) subunit interface of the receptor, possibly targeting a site overlapping with that of the general anesthetic etomidate. The negligible activities displayed by methaqualone at numerous neurotransmitter receptors and transporters in an elaborate screening for additional putative central nervous system (CNS) targets suggest that it is a selective GABAAR modulator. The mode of action of methaqualone was further investigated in multichannel recordings from primary frontal cortex networks, where the overall activity changes induced by the compound at 1–100 μM concentrations were quite similar to those mediated by other CNS depressants. Finally, the free methaqualone concentrations in the mouse brain arising from doses producing significant in vivo effects in assays for locomotion and anticonvulsant activity correlated fairly well with its potencies as a modulator at the recombinant GABAARs. Hence, we propose that the multifaceted functional properties exhibited by methaqualone at GABAARs give rise to its effects as a therapeutic and recreational drug. PMID:26056160

  18. Effects of P-glycoprotein on the intestine and blood-brain barrier transport of YZG-331, a promising sedative-hypnotic compound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihao; Mi, Jiaqi; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Manman; Li, Yan; Sheng, Li

    2016-11-15

    YZG-331 is a synthetic adenosine analogue which exhibits the sedative and hypnotic effects by binding to the adenosine receptor. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) on the intestine and brain distribution of YZG-331 in vitro and in vivo as well as related binding mechanisms. The activity of P-gp ATPase was both induced by YZG-331 and verapamil, a typical P-gp inhibitor, but affinity of YZG-331 for P-gp was lower than that of verapamil. The docking analyses further elucidated the binding relationship of YZG-331 and P-gp. The directional transport of YZG-331 was disappeared in Caco-2 and MDCK-MDR1 cells when the P-gp activity was blocked. However, the penetration of digoxin, a P-gp known substrate, was not change in MDCK-MDR1 cells along with YZG-331. In the everted intestinal sac model, the influx of YZG-331 was significantly reduced in the presence of verapamil in all the segments except for the colon. In the in situ and in vivo study, the brain exposure of YZG-331 was promoted after co-administered of verapamil. Furthermore, the Kp value changed from 0.03 to 0.05 after drug combination. Taken together, these results indicated that YZG-331 is a substrate but may not an inhibitor of P-gp. The intestine and brain permeability of YZG-331 can be restricted, at least in part, by P-gp. The drug interactions should be awarded when YZG-331 and other P-gp-related drugs used together.

  19. Respiratory depression in rats induced by alcohol and barbiturate and rescue by ampakine CX717.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Ding, Xiuqing; Greer, John J

    2012-10-01

    Barbiturate use in conjunction with alcohol can result in severe respiratory depression and overdose deaths. The mechanisms underlying the additive/synergistic actions were unresolved. Current management of ethanol-barbiturate-induced apnea is limited to ventilatory and circulatory support coupled with drug elimination. Based on recent preclinical and clinical studies of opiate-induced respiratory depression, we hypothesized that ampakine compounds may provide a treatment for other types of drug-induced respiratory depression. The actions of alcohol, pentobarbital, bicuculline, and the ampakine CX717, alone and in combination, were measured via 1) ventral root recordings from newborn rat brain stem-spinal cord preparations and 2) plethysmographic recordings from unrestrained newborn and adult rats. We found that ethanol caused a modest suppression of respiratory drive in vitro (50 mM) and in vivo (2 g/kg ip). Pentobarbital induced an ∼50% reduction in respiratory frequency in vitro (50 μM) and in vivo (28 mg/kg for pups and 56 mg/kg for adult rats ip). However, severe life-threatening apnea was induced by the combination of the agents in vitro and in vivo via activation of GABA(A) receptors, which was exacerbated by hypoxic (8% O(2)) conditions. Administration of the ampakine CX717 alleviated a significant component of the respiratory depression in vitro (50-150 μM) and in vivo (30 mg/kg ip). Bicuculline also alleviated ethanol-/pentobarbital-induced respiratory depression but caused seizure activity, whereas CX717 did not. These data demonstrated that ethanol and pentobarbital together caused severe respiratory depression, including lethal apnea, via synergistic actions that blunt chemoreceptive responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia and suppress central respiratory rhythmogenesis. The ampakine CX717 markedly reduced the severity of respiratory depression.

  20. Neonatal N-(-2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) treatment modifies the vulnerability to phenobarbital- and ethanol-evoked sedative-hypnotic effects in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Bortel, Aleksandra; Słomian, Lucyna; Nitka, Dariusz; Swierszcz, Michał; Jaksz, Mirella; Adamus-Sitkiewicz, Beata; Nowak, Przemysław; Jośko, Jadwiga; Kostrzewa, Richard M; Brus, Ryszard

    2008-01-01

    To study the influence of the central noradrenergic system on sensitivity to sedative-hypnotic effects mediated by the aminobutyric acid (GABA) system, intact rats were contrasted with rats in which noradrenergic nerves were largely destroyed shortly after birth with the neurotoxin DSP-4 [N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine; 50 mg/kg sc x2, P1 and P3]. At 10 weeks, loss of the righting reflex (LORR) was used as an index to study the acute sedative-hypnotic effects of phenobarbital (100 mg/kg ip) and ethanol (4 g/kg ip, 25% v/v). Additionally, GABA concentration in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, cerebellum and brainstem was estimated by an HPLC/ED method. Neonatal DSP-4 treatment diminished the sedative-hypnotic effects of both phenobarbital and ethanol in adult rats. While the endogenous GABA content in the PFC, hippocampus, brainstem and cerebellum of DSP-4-treated rats was not altered, phenobarbital significantly decreased GABA content of both intact and DSP-4-lesioned rats by approximately 40% in the hippocampus and by approximately 20% in other brain regions at 1 h. Ethanol reduced GABA content by approximately 15-30% but only in the hippocampus and brainstem of both intact and lesioned rats. These findings indicate that the noradrenergic system exerts a prominent influence on sedative-hypnotics acting via GABAergic systems in the brain without directly altering GABA levels in the brain.

  1. Screening of central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for sedative and hypnotic effects using chick models.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-05

    The chick has a practical advantage in the screening process in that chicks require only small quantities of drugs. The chick separation stress paradigm has traditionally been recognized as a valid form of anxiolytic screening. Further, chick behavior involving standing motionless with eyes closed or sitting motionless with head drooped is nearly always associated with electrophysiological sleep. When centrally administered, some DNA-encoded L-α-amino acids, as well as some DNA-non-encoded amino acids, such as metabolites of L-α-amino acids, D-amino acid and β-amino acid, have shown sedative and/or hypnotic effects in chicks. The effects of some of these amino acids have subsequently been confirmed in humans. In conclusion, the chick model is convenient and useful for screening central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for hypnosis and sedation.

  2. Can grapheme-color synesthesia be induced by hypnosis?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Hazel P; Seth, Anil K; Dienes, Zoltan; Ward, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Grapheme-color synesthesia is a perceptual experience where graphemes, letters or words evoke a specific color, which are experienced either as spatially coincident with the grapheme inducer (projector sub-type) or elsewhere, perhaps without a definite spatial location (associator sub-type). Here, we address the question of whether synesthesia can be rapidly produced using a hypnotic color suggestion to examine the possibility of "hypnotic synesthesia", i.e., subjectively experienced color hallucinations similar to those experienced by projector synesthetes. We assess the efficacy of this intervention using an "embedded figures" test, in which participants are required to detect a shape (e.g., a square) composed of local graphemic elements. For grapheme-color synesthetes, better performance on the task has been linked to a higher proportion of graphemes perceived as colored. We found no performance benefits on this test when using a hypnotic suggestion, as compared to a no-suggestion control condition. The same result was found when participants were separated according to the degree to which they were susceptible to the suggestion (number of colored trials perceived). However, we found a relationship between accuracy and subjective reports of color in those participants who reported a large proportion of colored trials: trials in which the embedded figure was accurately recognized (relative to trials in which it was not) were associated with reports of more intense colors occupying a greater spatial extent. Collectively, this implies that hypnotic color was only perceived after shape detection rather than aiding in shape detection via color-based perceptual grouping. The results suggest that hypnotically induced colors are not directly comparable to synesthetic ones.

  3. Adjunctive self-hypnotic relaxation for outpatient medical procedures: a prospective randomized trial with women undergoing large core breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elvira V; Berbaum, Kevin S; Faintuch, Salomao; Hatsiopoulou, Olga; Halsey, Noami; Li, Xinyu; Berbaum, Michael L; Laser, Eleanor; Baum, Janet

    2006-12-15

    Medical procedures in outpatient settings have limited options of managing pain and anxiety pharmacologically. We therefore assessed whether this can be achieved by adjunct self-hypnotic relaxation in a common and particularly anxiety provoking procedure. Two hundred and thirty-six women referred for large core needle breast biopsy to an urban tertiary university-affiliated medical center were prospectively randomized to receive standard care (n=76), structured empathic attention (n=82), or self-hypnotic relaxation (n=78) during their procedures. Patients' self-ratings at 1 min-intervals of pain and anxiety on 0-10 verbal analog scales with 0=no pain/anxiety at all, 10=worst pain/anxiety possible, were compared in an ordinal logistic regression model. Women's anxiety increased significantly in the standard group (logit slope=0.18, p<0.001), did not change in the empathy group (slope=-0.04, p=0.45), and decreased significantly in the hypnosis group (slope=-0.27, p<0.001). Pain increased significantly in all three groups (logit slopes: standard care=0.53, empathy=0.37, hypnosis=0.34; all p<0.001) though less steeply with hypnosis and empathy than standard care (p=0.024 and p=0.018, respectively). Room time and cost were not significantly different in an univariate ANOVA despite hypnosis and empathy requiring an additional professional: 46 min/161 dollars for standard care, 43 min/163 dollars for empathy, and 39 min/152 dollars for hypnosis. We conclude that, while both structured empathy and hypnosis decrease procedural pain and anxiety, hypnosis provides more powerful anxiety relief without undue cost and thus appears attractive for outpatient pain management.

  4. Melatonin agonists in primary insomnia and depression-associated insomnia: are they superior to sedative-hypnotics?

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujan; Brzezinski, Amnon; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Spence, D Warren; Cardinali, Daniel P; Brown, Gregory M

    2011-06-01

    Current pharmacological treatment of insomnia involves the use of sedative-hypnotic benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine drugs. Although benzodiazepines improve sleep, their multiple adverse effects hamper their application. Adverse effects include impairment of memory and cognitive functions, next-day hangover and dependence. Non-benzodiazepines are effective for initiating sleep but are not as effective as benzodiazepines for improving sleep quality or efficiency. Furthermore, their prolonged use produces adverse effects similar to those observed with benzodiazepines. Inasmuch as insomnia may be associated with decreased nocturnal melatonin, administration of melatonin is a strategy that has been increasingly used for treating insomnia. Melatonin can be effective for improving sleep quality without the adverse effects associated with hypnotic-sedatives. Ramelteon, a synthetic analog of melatonin which has a longer half life and a stronger affinity for MT1 and MT2 melatonergic receptors, has been reportedly effective for initiating and improving sleep in both adult and elderly insomniacs without showing hangover, dependence, or cognitive impairment. Insomnia is also a major complaint among patients suffering from depressive disorders and is often aggravated by conventional antidepressants especially the specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The novel antidepressant agomelatine, a dual action agent with affinity for melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors and 5-HT2c antagonistic properties, constitutes a new approach to the treatment of major depressive disorders. Agomelatine ameliorates the symptoms of depression and improves the quality and efficiency of sleep. Taken together, the evidence indicates that MT1/MT2 receptor agonists like ramelteon or agomelatine may be valuable pharmacological tools for insomnia and for depression-associated insomnia.

  5. AZD-3043: A Novel, Metabolically-Labile Sedative/Hypnotic Agent with Rapid and Predictable Emergence from Hypnosis

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Talmage D.; Obara, Shinju; Jenkins, Thomas E.; Jaw-Tsai, Sarah S.; Amagasu, Shanti; Cook, Daniel R.; Steffensen, Scott C.; Beattie, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Propofol can be associated with delayed awakening after prolonged infusion. The aim of this study was to characterize the preclinical pharmacology of AZD-3043, a positive allosteric modulator of the γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor containing a metabolically-labile ester moiety. We postulated that its metabolic pathway would result in a short acting clinical profile. Methods The effects of AZD-3043, propofol and propanidid were studied on GABAA receptor-mediated chloride currents in embryonic rat cortical neurons. Radioligand binding studies were also performed. The in vitro stability of AZD-3043 in whole blood and liver microsomes was evaluated. The duration of the loss of righting reflex and effects on the electroencephalograph evoked by bolus or infusion intravenous (IV) administration were assessed in rats. A mixed-effects kinetic-dynamic model using minipigs permitted exploration of the clinical pharmacology of AZD-3043. Results AZD-3043 potentiated GABAA receptor-mediated chloride currents and inhibited [35S]tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding to GABAA receptors. AZD-3043 was rapidly hydrolyzed in liver microsomes from humans and animals. AZD-3043 produced hypnosis and electroencephalograph depression in rats. Compared to propofol, AZD-3043 was shorter acting in rats and pigs. Computer simulation using the porcine kinetic-dynamic model demonstrated that AZD-3043 has very short 50 and 80% decrement times independent of infusion duration. Conclusions AZD-3043 is a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor in vitro and a sedative/hypnotic agent in vivo. The esterase dependent metabolic pathway results in rapid clearance and short duration of action even for long infusions. AZD-3043 may have clinical potential as a sedative/hypnotic agent with rapid and predictable recovery. PMID:22531340

  6. Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Patients With Nonapnea Sleep Disorders in Using Different Types of Hypnotics: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ling; Yeh, Mei-Chang; Harnod, Tomor; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    There has been insufficient evidence on whether exposure to hypnotics affects the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The aim of this study was to examine patients with nonapnea sleep disorders using zolpidem, benzodiazepines (BZDs), or a combination of both, and their risk of T2DM. This was a population-based retrospective cohort study using data from 1997 to 2011. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database were employed for this study. A total of 45,602 patients with nonapnea sleep disorders and use of hypnotics were identified as the study cohort. The control cohort comprised 40,799 age- and sex-matched patients. We conducted a Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to estimate the effects of hypnotics on risk of T2DM. The overall incidence of T2DM was 20.1 per 1000 person-years for patients using zolpidem, which was significantly higher than that of the control group (11.9 per 1000 person-years). Overall, patients with nonapnea sleep disorders using zolpidem had a higher risk of T2DM compared with patients not using zolpidem and the control cohort (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.35-1.48). We also observed a significantly higher risk of T2DM in patients with both zolpidem and BZD use (adjusted HR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.64-1.91) than that of those without zolpidem use and BZD use. Compared with patients not using hypnotics, patients using zolpidem had a higher risk of developing T2DM; the risk was particularly pronounced in those using both zolpidem and BZDs.

  7. Adverse Respiratory Events Associated With Hypnotics Use in Patients of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wei-Sheng; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    Insomnia is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).We conducted a population-based case-control study to evaluate the effects of hypnotics on the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD.The case-control study was investigated using data retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with newly diagnosed adverse respiratory events (pneumonia, COPD with acute exacerbation, acute respiratory failure, and cardiopulmonary arrest) were included in the case group. Patients with COPD and no history of adverse respiratory events were randomly selected for the control group, which was frequency-matched with the case group according to index date, age (per 10 years), and sex. Patients who had used hypnotics within 1 month meant active users. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of were calculated using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models.Most of the study participants were male (71.6%), and the mean ages of the participants in the case and control groups were 69.2 (±12.4) and 67.5 (±12.3) years, respectively. After potential confounding factors were adjusting for, the adjusted ORs of adverse respiratory events were 12.0 for active users of benzodiazepines (95% CI, 8.11-17.6) and 10.5 for active users of nonbenzodiazepines (95% CI, 7.68-14.2) compared with the adjusted ORs of those who never used hypnotics.The results of this epidemiological study suggested that hypnotics increased the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD.

  8. Highway driving in the elderly the morning after bedtime use of hypnotics: a comparison between temazepam 20 mg, zopiclone 7.5 mg, and placebo.

    PubMed

    Leufkens, Tim R M; Vermeeren, Annemiek

    2009-10-01

    A major problem related to hypnotic drug use is residual sedation the morning after bedtime administration. This constitutes a particular safety hazard for patients who have to drive a car the next morning. Information on the severity of residual effects is mainly derived from studies conducted with young healthy volunteers. However, most users of hypnotics are older people who may be more sensitive to drug effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the residual effects the morning after evening doses of temazepam 20 mg and zopiclone 7.5 mg on driving performance in healthy elderly drivers. Eighteen healthy elderly drivers (10 females and 8 males; mean age, 64.3 years) participated in a double-blind, 3-way crossover study. Treatments were single oral doses of temazepam 20 mg, zopiclone 7.5 mg, and placebo administered at bedtime. Subjects performed a standardized highway driving test between 10 and 11 hours after hypnotic intake. Before and after the driving test, cognitive performance was assessed. Driving performance did not differ between temazepam and placebo but was significantly impaired after zopiclone 7.5 mg (P < 0.002). The results of the laboratory tests were in line with the effects on driving of both hypnotics. Temazepam 20 mg is unlikely to impair driving 10 hours or more after bedtime administration in healthy elderly aged 75 years or younger. Zopiclone 7.5 mg moderately impairs driving in the elderly at least until 11 hours after administration. The magnitude of impairing effects in the elderly was comparable with those found previously in younger volunteers.

  9. ‘Looking as Little Like Patients as Persons Well Could’: Hypnotism, Medicine and the Problem of the Suggestible Subject in Late Nineteenth-Century Britain

    PubMed Central

    Chettiar, Teri

    2012-01-01

    During the late nineteenth century, many British physicians rigorously experimented with hypnosis as a therapeutic practice. Despite mounting evidence attesting to its wide-ranging therapeutic uses publicised in the 1880s and 1890s, medical hypnosis remained highly controversial. After a decade and a half of extensive medical discussion and debate surrounding the adoption of hypnosis by mainstream medical professionals – including a thorough inquiry organised by the British Medical Association – it was decisively excluded from serious medical consideration by 1900. This essay examines the complex question of why hypnosis was excluded from professional medical practice by the end of the nineteenth century. Objections to its medical adoption rarely took issue with its supposed effectiveness in producing genuine therapeutic and anaesthetic results. Instead, critics’ objections were centred upon a host of social and moral concerns regarding the patient’s state of suggestibility and weakened ‘will-power’ while under the physician’s hypnotic ‘spell’. The problematic question of precisely how far hypnotic ‘rapport’ and suggestibility might depart from the Victorian liberal ideal of rational individual autonomy lay at the heart of these concerns. As this essay demonstrates, the hypnotism debate was characterised by a tension between physicians’ attempts to balance their commitment to restore patients to health and pervasive middle-class concerns about the rapid and ongoing changes transforming British society at the turn of the century. PMID:23002303

  10. Prescription trajectories and effect of total hip arthroplasty on the use of analgesics, hypnotics, antidepressants, and anxiolytics: results from a population of total hip arthroplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Blågestad, Tone; Nordhus, Inger H; Grønli, Janne; Engesæter, Lars B; Ruths, Sabine; Ranhoff, Anette H; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Pallesen, Ståle

    2016-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been shown to reduce pain and improve function. In addition, it is suggested that THA improves sleep and alleviates symptoms of anxiety and depression. Patients with chronic pain are frequent users of analgesic and psychotropic drugs and thereby risk adverse drug events. The impact of THA on such drug use has not been thoroughly investigated. Based on merged data from the Norwegian Prescription Database and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, this study sought to investigate redeemed medications in a complete population (N = 39,688) undergoing THA in 2005 to 2011. User rates and redeemed drug volume of analgesics (nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, and nonopioids) and psychotropics (hypnotics, anxiolytics, and antidepressants) were calculated for 4 quarters before and 4 quarters after surgery. We analysed preoperative prescription trends (Q1 vs Q4), postoperative prescription (Q4 vs Q5), and long-term effect of surgery (Q4 vs Q8). Before surgery, use of all drug groups increased from Q1 to Q4. Use of opioids, nonopioids, and hypnotics dramatically increased from Q4 to Q5. Long-term (Q4 vs Q8) surgery reduced prescriptions of analgesics, hypnotics, and anxiolytics, but not antidepressants. Overall, the present results extend the positive effects of THA to include reduced reliance on medication to alleviate symptoms.

  11. First Trimester Exposure to Anxiolytic and Hypnotic Drugs and the Risks of Major Congenital Anomalies: A United Kingdom Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Lu; West, Joe; Gibson, Jack E.; Fiaschi, Linda; Sokal, Rachel; Doyle, Pat; Hubbard, Richard; Smeeth, Liam; Tata, Laila J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite their widespread use the effects of taking benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics during pregnancy on the risk of major congenital anomaly (MCA) are uncertain. The objectives were to estimate absolute and relative risks of MCAs in children exposed to specific anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs taken in the first trimester of pregnancy, compared with children of mothers with depression and/or anxiety but not treated with medication and children of mothers without diagnosed mental illness during pregnancy. Methods We identified singleton children born to women aged 15–45 years between 1990 and 2010 from a large United Kingdom primary care database. We calculated absolute risks of MCAs for children with first trimester exposures of different anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs and used logistic regression with a generalised estimating equation to compare risks adjusted for year of childbirth, maternal age, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status. Results Overall MCA prevalence was 2.7% in 1,159 children of mothers prescribed diazepam, 2.9% in 379 children with temazepam, 2.5% in 406 children with zopiclone, and 2.7% in 19,193 children whose mothers had diagnosed depression and/or anxiety but no first trimester drug exposures. When compared with 2.7% in 351,785 children with no diagnosed depression/anxiety nor medication use, the adjusted odds ratios were 1.02 (99% confidence interval 0.63–1.64) for diazepam, 1.07 (0.49–2.37) for temazepam, 0.96 (0.42–2.20) for zopiclone and 1.27 (0.43–3.75) for other anxiolytic/hypnotic drugs and 1.01 (0.90–1.14) for un-medicated depression/anxiety. Risks of system-specific MCAs were generally similar in children exposed and not exposed to such medications. Conclusions We found no evidence for an increase in MCAs in children exposed to benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics in the first trimester of pregnancy. These findings suggest that prescription of these drugs during early

  12. Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography with Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Quantitation of Seventeen Sedative Hypnotics in Six Common Toxicological Matrices.

    PubMed

    Mata, Dani C; Davis, John F; Figueroa, Ariana K; Stanford, Mary June

    2016-01-01

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method for the quantification of 14 benzodiazepines and three sedative hypnotics is presented. The fast and inexpensive assay was developed for California's Orange County Crime Lab for use in antemortem (AM) and postmortem casework. The drugs were rapidly cleaned up from AM blood, postmortem blood, urine, liver, brain and stomach contents using DPX(®) Weak Anion Exchange (DPX WAX) tips fitted on a pneumatic extractor, which can process up to 48 samples at one time. Assay performance was determined for validation based on recommendations by the Scientific Working Group for Forensic Toxicology for linearity, limit of quantitation, limit of detection, bias, precision (within run and between run), dilution integrity, carry-over, selectivity, recovery, ion suppression and extracted sample stability. Linearity was verified using the therapeutic and toxic ranges of all 17 analytes. Final verification of the method was confirmed by four analysts using 20 blind matrix matched samples. All results were within 20% of each other and the expected value.

  13. Prenatal exposure to anxiolytic and hypnotic medication in relation to behavioral problems in childhood: A population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Radojčić, Maja R; El Marroun, Hanan; Miljković, Branislava; Stricker, Bruno H C; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; White, Tonya; Tiemeier, Henning

    2017-03-01

    Benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-related medications (BBRMs) are anxiolytics and hypnotics acting on γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)A receptors. BBRMs are assumed to have a low potential for major congenital malformations, but research on more subtle and protracted developing symptoms of these medications is lacking. Therefore, we prospectively investigated the association between BBRM use in pregnancy and long-term effects on child behavior in a large population-based cohort study. The study population consisted of 104 children prenatally exposed to BBRM, 527 children exposed to maternal prenatal anxiety or phobic anxiety symptoms (without exposure to BBRM), and 5609 control children. At child age, 6years, Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), Aggressive Behavior and Anxiety Problems were assessed by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) reported by the mother and the Teacher Report Form (TRF). Children prenatally exposed to BBRM had higher scores of ODD and aggressive behavior, but not of anxiety. However, these associations were explained by maternal anxiety symptoms during pregnancy. Moreover, prenatal exposure to anxiety (without exposure to BBRM) was associated with increased scores of child ODD, aggressive behavior, and anxiety. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that prenatal BBRM exposure was not independently associated with ODD and aggressive behavior in childhood when prenatal anxiety symptoms were taken into account.

  14. Using Hypnotic Suggestion to Model Loss of Control and Awareness of Movements: An Exploratory fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, David A.; Bell, Vaughan; Koppel, Cristina; Mehta, Mitul A.; Halligan, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    The feeling of voluntary control and awareness of movement is fundamental to our notions of selfhood and responsibility for actions, yet can be lost in neuropsychiatric syndromes (e.g. delusions of control, non-epileptic seizures) and culturally influenced dissociative states (e.g. attributions of spirit possession). The brain processes involved remain poorly understood. We used suggestion and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate loss of control and awareness of right hand movements in 15 highly hypnotically suggestible subjects. Loss of perceived control of movements was associated with reduced connectivity between supplementary motor area (SMA) and motor regions. Reduced awareness of involuntary movements was associated with less activation in parietal cortices (BA 7, BA 40) and insula. Collectively these results suggest that the sense of voluntary control of movement may critically depend on the functional coupling of SMA with motor systems, and provide a potential neural basis for the narrowing of awareness reported in pathological and culturally influenced dissociative phenomena. PMID:24205198

  15. Impact of cognitive behavior therapy on health-related quality of life among adult hypnotic users with chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Simon; Morgan, Kevin; Mathers, Nigel; Thompson, Joanne; Tomeny, Maureen

    2006-01-01

    Results were combined from representative surveys of health related quality of life (HRQoL; n=11,877; age range=16-104) with data from a randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavior therapy for chronic insomnia (n=209; age range=31-92). Secondary analyses of scores from the SF-36 measure of HRQoL were conducted in order: (a) to compare the health related quality of life profiles of adult hypnotic users with chronic insomnia with those of population norms, and (b) to assess the impact of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for insomnia on HRQoL outcomes over 6 months. Compared with the primary care reference values, HRQoL among the trial participants at baseline was generally poorer. The magnitude of these decrements reduced markedly with advancing age. In the evaluation of the CBT intervention, statistically significant differences in SF-36 scores in favor of the intervention were present for physical functioning, emotional role limitation, and mental health over 6 months. Overall, this study shows that the SF-36 can play an important role in describing HRQoL in this patient group, and in the evaluation of interventions within this group.

  16. Eszopiclone-induced Parasomnia with Suicide Attempt: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Pennington, J Gibson; Guina, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Eszopiclone is a benzodiazepine-like hypnotic that is commonly prescribed to treat insomnia. However, eszopiclone's efficacy has been questionable in several clinical trials, and its pharmacologic profile makes its effects on sleep and behavior difficult to predict. We report a case demonstrating an instance of eszopiclone-induced parasomnia involving paranoia and a suicide attempt in a patient taking eszopiclone. We explore possible biochemical explanations examining the pharmacologic profile of eszopiclone and its potential for drug-drug interactions, especially with concomitant administration of monoaminergic medications such as antidepressants. Caution should be exercised when prescribing these medications, and evidence-based treatments for insomnia (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy, biofeedback, sedating antidepressants) should be considered prior to sedative-hypnotic administration.

  17. Eszopiclone-induced Parasomnia with Suicide Attempt: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Guina, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Eszopiclone is a benzodiazepine-like hypnotic that is commonly prescribed to treat insomnia. However, eszopiclone’s efficacy has been questionable in several clinical trials, and its pharmacologic profile makes its effects on sleep and behavior difficult to predict. We report a case demonstrating an instance of eszopiclone-induced parasomnia involving paranoia and a suicide attempt in a patient taking eszopiclone. We explore possible biochemical explanations examining the pharmacologic profile of eszopiclone and its potential for drug-drug interactions, especially with concomitant administration of monoaminergic medications such as antidepressants. Caution should be exercised when prescribing these medications, and evidence-based treatments for insomnia (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy, biofeedback, sedating antidepressants) should be considered prior to sedative-hypnotic administration. PMID:27974999

  18. [Fast screening of 24 sedative hypnotics illegally added in improving sleep health foods by high performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Gong, Xu; Tan, Li

    2015-03-01

    A fast screening method was established for the simultaneous determination of 24 sedative hypnotics illegally added in improving sleep health foods by high performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-IT MS). The method was based on the sonication assisted extraction of the improving sleep health food samples using methanol. The extract was then filtrated with 0.45 µm filter membrane and the filtrate was separated on a Phenomenex Luna C18 column with isocratic elution at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. A binary mobile phase was 0.05% (v/v) formic acid (solvent A)-methanol/acetonitrile (15:25, v/v, solvent B). The electrospray ionization (ESI) source in positive ion mode or negative ion mode was used to scan MS1-MS3 spectra for the 24 sedative hypnotics. The MS2 and MS3 spectra were used for qualitative analysis of samples. The calibration graphs were linear in their concentration ranges with the correlation coefficients (r2) more than 0.999. The limits of detection (LODs) were 4.0-446.6 µg/L. The recoveries for all the drugs in the improving sleep health foods were 88.6%-110.3% with the relative standard deviations no more than 9.8% at three spiked levels. Twenty-seven batches of the improving sleep health foods were tested. Melatonin was found in eighteen batches. The method is fast, specific, sensitive, easy and suitable for fast screening of 24 sedative hypnotics illegally added in improving sleep health foods.

  19. Trends in Off-Label Prescribing of Sedatives, Hypnotics and Antidepressants among Children and Adolescents - A Danish, Nationwide Register-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Eva Skovslund; Rasmussen, Lotte; Hellfritzsch, Maja; Thomsen, Per Hove; Nørgaard, Mette; Laursen, Torben

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, psychotropic drug use among children and adolescents in Europe and USA has increased. However, the majority of psychotropic drugs are not formally approved for use in children and adolescents, and consequently, use is often off-label. The objectives were to describe time trends in off-label prescribing rates and the most commonly used types of psychotropic drugs by age and gender in Danish children and adolescents. Using the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics, we identified all prescriptions for sedatives, hypnotics and antidepressants filled for children and adolescents in 2006-2012. Information on diagnoses was obtained from the Danish National Registry of Patients and allowed classification of prescriptions as either on- or off-label. We identified 186,831 prescriptions filled for 29,851 children and adolescents: 88.0% of these were classified as off-label. During 2006-2012, off-label rates for sedatives and hypnotics increased significantly, except for prescriptions for girls aged 15-17 years [range 24.1-98.2% (girls), 31.9% to 99.0% (boys)]. In the same period, the number of registered melatonin prescriptions (all off-label) increased expansively. For antidepressants, we found decreasing trends in off-label rates over time [range 94.5-65.6% (girls), 93.8-71.2% (boys)]. Off-label prescribing of psychotropic drugs to Danish children and adolescents is common. Off-label rates for sedatives and hypnotics increased in the period of 2006-2012, whereas off-label rates for antidepressants declined. Off-label rates might be underestimated and should be considered a conservative estimate.

  20. Hypnotic analgesia: 1. Somatosensory event-related potential changes to noxious stimuli and 2. Transfer learning to reduce chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Crawford, H J; Knebel, T; Kaplan, L; Vendemia, J M; Xie, M; Jamison, S; Pribram, K H

    1998-01-01

    Fifteen adults with chronic low back pain (M = 4 years), age 18 to 43 years (M = 29 years), participated. All but one were moderately to highly hypnotizable (M = 7.87; modified 11-point Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C [Weitzenhoffer & Hilgard, 1962]), and significantly reduced pain perception following hypnotic analgesia instructions during cold-pressor pain training. In Part 1, somatosensory event-related potential correlates of noxious electrical stimulation were evaluated during attend and hypnotic analgesia (HA) conditions at anterior frontal (Fp1, Fp2), midfrontal (F3, F4), central (C3, C4), and parietal (P3, P4) regions. During HA, hypothesized inhibitory processing was evidenced by enhanced N140 in the anterior frontal region and by a prestimulus positive-ongoing contingent cortical potential at Fp1 only. During HA, decreased spatiotemporal perception was evidenced by reduced amplitudes of P200 (bilateral midfrontal and central, and left parietal) and P300 (right midfrontal and central). HA led to highly significant mean reductions in perceived sensory pain and distress. HA is an active process that requires inhibitory effort, dissociated from conscious awareness, where the anterior frontal cortex participates in a topographically specific inhibitory feedback circuit that cooperates in the allocation of thalamocortical activities. In Part 2, the authors document the development of self-efficacy through the successful transfer by participants of newly learned skills of experimental pain reduction to reduction of their own chronic pain. Over three experimental sessions, participants reported chronic pain reduction, increased psychological well-being, and increased sleep quality. The development of "neurosignatures of pain" can influence subsequent pain experiences (Coderre, Katz, Vaccarino, & Melzack, 1993; Melzack, 1993) and may be expanded in size and easily reactivated (Flor & Birbaumer, 1994; Melzack, 1991, 1993). Therefore, hypnosis and

  1. Understanding and reducing the prescription of hypnotics and sedatives at the interface of hospital care and general practice: a protocol for a mixed-methods study

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Stephanie; Weiß, Vivien; Straube, Kati; Nau, Roland; Grimmsmann, Thomas; Himmel, Wolfgang; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hypnotics and sedatives, especially benzodiazepines and Z-drugs, are frequently prescribed for longer periods than recommended—in spite of potential risks for patients. Any intervention to improve this situation has to take into account the interplay between different actors, interests and needs. The ultimate goal of this study is to develop—together with the professionals involved—ideas for reducing the use of hypnotics and sedatives and then to implement and evaluate adequate interventions in the hospital and at the primary and secondary care interface. Methods and analysis The study will take place in a regional hospital in northern Germany and in some general practices in this region. We will collect data from doctors, nurses, patients and a major social health insurer to define the problem from multiple perspectives. These data will be explored and discussed with relevant stakeholders to develop interventions. The interventions will be implemented and, in a final step, evaluated. Both quantitative and qualitative data, including surveys, interviews, chart reviews and secondary analysis of social health insurance data, will be collected to obtain a full understanding of the frequency and the reasons for using hypnotics and sedatives. Ethics and dissemination Approval has been granted from the ethics review committee of the University Medical Center Göttingen, Germany. Results will be disseminated to researchers, clinicians and policy makers in peer-reviewed journal articles and conference publications. One or more dissemination events will be held locally during continuous professional development events for local professionals, including (but not confined to) the study participants. PMID:27496238

  2. Sleep and Alertness Management III: Effects of a Nap and Hypnotics on Performance During the Late Evening, Night and Early Morning in Marmosets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    hypnotics on performance Info-DenV@tno.nl during the late evening, night and early morning in marmosets Date November 2006 Author(s) Dr. I.H.C.I.M...so-called post-nap hangovers. In this study, the marmoset monkey model was validated as a model for testing the effects of drugs on performance during...evening, night and early morning missions was tested. It was proven that the homeostasis in marmoset monkeys after sleep deprivation is similar to the

  3. Pharmacological studies on Myristica fragrans--antidiarrheal, hypnotic, analgesic and hemodynamic (blood pressure) parameters.

    PubMed

    Grover, J K; Khandkar, S; Vats, V; Dhunnoo, Y; Das, D

    2002-12-01

    Recurrent diarrhea is prevalent in developing countries, particularly in tropical regions. A natural based antidiarrheal home remedy can serve as an ideal health tool to limit diarrhea-related morbidity and mortality. In the traditional Indian medical science of Ayurveda, nutmeg is one such plant said to possess antidiarrheal activity. A study was therefore planned to assess the various pharmacological effects (antidiarrheal, sedative, analgesic and blood pressure) of nutmeg. Both Nutmeg crude suspension (NMC) and petroleum ether (PE), but not aqueous extract (Aq), decreased the mean number of loose stools or increased the latency period. NMC increased intestinal tone while PE had no such effect. PE had no effect on guinea pig ileum, but inhibited the contraction produced by acetylcholine, histamine and prostaglandin. NMC but not PE extract showed a significant but weak analgesic effect. While PE effectively potentiated both phenobarbitone and pentobarbitone-induced sleeping time, NMC was considerably less effective. NMC administered intraduodenally did not produce much effect on blood pressure (BP), but potentiated the action of exogenously administered adrenaline and nor-adrenaline. On the other hand, PE in higher, but not lower, doses caused a precipitous fall in BP not blocked by atropine. Thus, overall extracts of nutmeg showed a good antidiarrheal effect, with a significant sedative property. The extracts possessed only a weak analgesic effect, with no harmful effects on blood pressure and ECG.

  4. Synthesis, Anticonvulsant, Sedative and Anxiolytic Activities of Novel Annulated Pyrrolo[1,4]benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Sorra, Kumaraswamy; Chen, Chien-Shu; Chang, Chi-Fen; Pusuluri, Srinivas; Mukkanti, Khagga; Wu, Chi-Rei; Chuang, Ta-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Four new pentacyclic benzodiazepine derivatives (PBDTs 13–16) were synthesized by conventional thermal heating and microwave-assisted intramolecular cyclocondensation. Their anticonvulsant, sedative and anxiolytic activities were evaluated by drug-induced convulsion models, a pentobarbital-induced hypnotic model and an elevated plus maze in mice. PBDT 13, a triazolopyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepin-8-one fused with a thiadiazolone ring, exhibited the best anticonvulsant, sedative and anxiolytic effects in our tests. There was no significant difference in potency between PBDT 13 and diazepam, and we proposed that the action mechanism of PBDT 13 could be similar to that of diazepam via benzodiazepine receptors. PMID:25238414

  5. Topiramate-induced somnambulism in a migraineur: a probable idiosyncratic adverse effect.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Thomas; Sarma, G R K; Nadig, Raghunandan; Varghese, Raji

    2012-04-15

    Somnambulism (sleepwalking) is a disorder of arousal that falls under "parasomnia" group and is more common in children. These phenomena occur as primary sleep events or secondary to systemic disease or can be drug induced. Medications that can cause sleepwalking include neuroleptics, hypnotics, lithium, amitriptyline, and β-blockers. This report presents an unusual adverse effect of topiramate on sleep in a patient with migraine.

  6. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport

    PubMed Central

    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-01-01

    Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide galanin in human erythrocytes in vitro. The potencies of nootropic drugs in opposing scopolamine-induced memory loss correlate with their potencies in antagonising pentobarbital inhibition of erythrocyte glucose transport in vitro (P<0.01). Less potent nootropics, D-levetiracetam and D-pyroglutamate, have higher antagonist Ki's against pentobarbital inhibition of glucose transport than more potent L-stereoisomers (P<0.001). Piracetam and TRH have no direct effects on net glucose transport, but competitively antagonise hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport. Other nootropics, like aniracetam and levetiracetam, while antagonising pentobarbital action, also inhibit glucose transport. Analeptics like bemigride and methamphetamine are more potent inhibitors of glucose transport than antagonists of hypnotic action on glucose transport. There are similarities between amino-acid sequences in human glucose transport protein isoform 1 (GLUT1) and the benzodiazepine-binding domains of GABAA (gamma amino butyric acid) receptor subunits. Mapped on a 3D template of GLUT1, these homologies suggest that the site of diazepam and piracetam interaction is a pocket outside the central hydrophilic pore region. Nootropic pyrrolidone antagonism of hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport in vitro may be an analogue of TRH antagonism of galanin-induced narcosis. PMID:15148255

  7. Pentobarbital Produces Activation and Block of α1β2γ2S GABAA Receptors in Rapidly Perfused Whole Cells and Membrane Patches: Divergent Results Can Be Explained by Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Burkat, Paul M.; Roberts, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Millimolar concentrations of the barbiturate pentobarbital (PB) activate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors (GABARs) and cause blockade reported by a paradoxical current increase or “tail” upon washout. To explore the mechanism of blockade, we investigated PB-triggered currents of recombinant α1β2γ2S GABARs in whole cells and outside-out membrane patches using rapid perfusion. Whole cell currents showed characteristic bell-shaped concentration dependence where high concentrations triggered tail currents with peak amplitudes similar to those during PB application. Tail current time courses could not be described by multi-exponential functions at high concentrations (≥3,000 μM). Deactivation time course decayed over seconds and was slowed by increasing PB concentration and application time. In contrast, macropatch tail currents manifested eightfold greater relative amplitude, were described by multi-exponential functions, and had millisecond rise times; deactivation occurred over fractions of seconds and was insensitive to PB concentration and application time. A parsimonious gating model was constructed that accounts for macropatch results (“patch” model). Lipophilic drug molecules migrate slowly through cells due to avid partitioning into lipophilic subcellular compartments. Inclusion of such a pharmacokinetic compartment into the patch model introduced a slow kinetic component in the extracellular exchange time course, thereby providing recapitulation of divergent whole cell results. GABA co-application potentiated PB blockade. Overall, the results indicate that block is produced by PB concentrations sixfold lower than for activation involving at least three inhibitory PB binding sites, suggest a role of blocked channels in GABA-triggered activity at therapeutic PB concentrations, and raise an important technical question regarding the effective rate of exchange during rapid perfusion of whole cells with PB. PMID:19171770

  8. Determination of sedative hypnotics in sewage sludge by pressurized liquid extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arbeláez, Paula; Granados, Judith; Borrull, Francesc; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Pocurull, Eva

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes a method for the determination of eight sedative hypnotics (benzodiazepines and barbiturates) in sewage sludge using pressurized liquid extraction and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Pressurized liquid extraction operating conditions were optimized and maximum recoveries were reached using methanol under the following operational conditions: 100ºC, 1500 psi, extraction time of 5 min, one extraction cycle, flush volume of 60% and purge time of 120 s. Pressurized liquid extraction recoveries were higher than 88% for all the compounds except for carbamazepine (55%). The repeatability and reproducibility between days, expressed as relative standard deviation (n = 5), were lower than 6 and 10%, respectively. The detection limits for all compounds were lower than 12.5 μg/kg of dry weight. The method was applied to determine benzodiazepines and barbiturates in sewage sludge from urban sewage treatment plants, and carbamazepine showed the highest concentration (7.9-18.9 μg/kg dry weight).

  9. Benzodiazepines and sedative-hypnotics in blood of drivers under the influence and their association with other common illegal drug use and national sales figures.

    PubMed

    Blencowe, Tom; Raaska, Kari; Lillsunde, Pirjo

    2011-02-01

    The authors examined benzodiazepine and sedative-hypnotic positive cases of drivers under the influence (DUI) in Finland from 1997 to 2008. Factors studied were the number of cases positive for the most commonly encountered of these pharmaceuticals, simultaneous use of amphetamine and/or cannabis, and the relationship between the number of DUI cases and overall sales in Finland for the individual pharmaceuticals. Data for 20037 cases positive for the relevant drugs were retrieved from the laboratory database of the Alcohol and Drug Analytics Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare. Toxicological results were from blood analysis. Drug sales figures for each pharmaceutical were obtained from the Finnish Medicines Agency. An increase in DUI cases that were positive for the drugs studied was evident, which reflected the overall increase in positive DUI cases detected annually. The proportion of relevant cases was typically 75% or higher of all positive DUI cases up to 2003, the year that the Finnish zero tolerance law was introduced, and then decreased to 66.2% in 2008. Diazepam was consistently the most commonly detected nonmetabolite drug. The prevalence of clonazepam and alprazolam increased sharply from 2004 onward. Metabolites of diazepam, nordiazepam, temazepam, and oxazepam, were other common findings. Associated use of amphetamine and/or cannabis was also common in these DUI cases, typically between 56% and 66% of cases. An increase in the number of DUI cases showing combined use of benzodiazepines and sedative-hypnotics with amphetamines in particular was apparent after zero tolerance legislation and the introduction in 2005 of an effective on-site screening device for the stimulant. Ratios of DUI cases to sales figures showed an increase in detection of clonazepam-positive DUI cases from 2003. Diazepam, midazolam, and alprazolam also exhibited relatively high ratios, which increased from 1997 to 2008.

  10. Intramuscular administration of morphine reduces mustard-oil-induced craniofacial-muscle pain behavior in lightly anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung R; Lee, Min K; Lim, Koang H; Yang, Gwi Y; Jeon, Hye J; Ju, Jin S; Yoon, Young W; Kim, Sung K; Ahn, Dong K

    2008-04-01

    The present study investigated the role of peripheral opioid receptors in mustard oil-induced nociceptive behavior and inflammation in the masseter muscles of lightly anesthetized rats. Experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing between 300 and 400 g. After initial anesthesia with sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg, i.p.), one femoral vein was cannulated and connected to an infusion pump for the intravenous infusion of sodium pentobarbital. The rate of infusion was adjusted to provide a constant level of anesthesia. Mustard oil (MO, 30 microl) was injected into the mid-region of the left masseter muscle via a 30-gauge needle. Intramuscularly-administered morphine significantly reduced shaking behavior but not MO-induced inflammation. Intramuscular pretreatment with naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, reversed antinociception produced by intramuscularly-administered morphine, while intracisternal administration of naloxone did not affect the antinociception of peripheral morphine. Pretreatment with d-Pen-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), a mu opioid receptor antagonist, but not naltrindole, a delta opioid receptor antagonist, nor norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI), a kappa opioid receptor antagonist, reversed intramuscularly-administered morphine-induced antinociception. These results indicate that intramuscularly-administered morphine produces antinociception in craniofacial muscle nociception and that this intramuscularly-administered morphine-induced antinociception is mediated by a peripheral mu opioid receptor. Our observations further support the clinical approach of administering opioids in the periphery for the treatment of craniofacial muscle nociception.

  11. Cognitive-behavioral therapy of insomnia: a clinical case series study of patients with co-morbid disorders and using hypnotic medications.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Diana C; Taylor, Daniel J; Bramoweth, Adam D; Rosenthal, Leon D

    2010-04-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTi) has demonstrated considerable efficacy within randomized clinical trials and case-series designs. This case-series study in a community sleep medicine clinic assessed the effectiveness of an eight-session CBTi protocol chronic insomnia patients who were allowed to continue their use of hypnotics (intent-to-treat n = 48), administered by a clinical psychology doctoral student receiving training and supervision in CBTi by a behavioral sleep medicine certified clinician. Outcome measures included daily sleep diaries, self-report measures on insomnia severity, dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep, daytime sleepiness, as well as medication usage. Patients showed significant improvements in sleep onset latency, wake time after sleep onset, sleep efficiency, insomnia severity, and dysfunctional sleep beliefs from pre- to post-treatment. No changes were seen in daytime sleepiness - patients were not excessively sleepy either before or after treatment. Use of sleep medication declined significantly from 87.5% pre-treatment to 54% post-treatment, despite no active efforts to encourage patients to withdraw. Results demonstrate that a CBTi conducted in a community sleep medicine clinic with patients not required to discontinue sleep-related medications can have similar effects as therapy delivered among those not on medication.

  12. Psychedelic drugs, hippie counterculture, speed and phenobarbital treatment of sedative-hypnotic dependence: a journey to the Haight Ashbury in the Sixties.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Donald R

    2011-01-01

    The 1960s were a time of social upheaval, wars, vibrant creativity and missed opportunity. Mainstream culture and a psychedelic drug-using counterculture shared a belief in "better living through chemistry'," but they disagreed about the particular chemistry. The Vietnam war and the cold war with the Soviet Union, racial discrimination, and gender roles fueled political activism. "Yes we can" was not a slogan of the time but political activists clearly believed they could change the beliefs, attitudes and behavior of mainstream culture; and they did. Hippie counterculture on the other hand was largely alienated and strove primarily to develop a separate culture with its own mores, beliefs and lifestyles. Although there was some overlap between hippies and activists, hippies didn't generally have the same sense of political empowerment. Hippie enclaves developed in New York; Boston; Seattle; Austin, Texas and elsewhere; but the epicenter was arguably the Haight-Asbury District of San Francisco. Psychedelic drugs, marijuana and the Vietnam war were among many wedge issues. This paper conjures up a personal history related to the evolution of the hippie counterculture, changing drug use patterns in the Haight-Ashbury, and the origins of a technique of withdrawing patients from barbiturates and other sedative-hypnotics using phenobarbital variously known as the "Phenobarbital Withdrawal Protocol, or the "Smith and Wesson Protocol."

  13. Preliminary randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of tryptophan combined with fluoxetine to treat major depressive disorder: antidepressant and hypnotic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, R D; Shen, J H; Jindal, R; Driver, H S; Kennedy, S H; Shapiro, C M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because the initial phase of treatment of depression with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is often complicated by a delayed onset of action of the antidepressant or severe insomnia or both, we investigated whether tryptophan, an amino acid with both antidepressant-augmenting and hypnotic effects, would benefit patients with depression at the beginning of treatment with fluoxetine. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. PATIENTS: Thirty individuals with major depressive disorder. INTERVENTIONS: Treatment over 8 weeks with 20 mg of fluoxetine per day and either tryptophan (2 to 4 g per day) or placebo. OUTCOME MEASURES: Mood was assessed using the 29-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-29) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Laboratory sleep studies were done at baseline and after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment using standard procedures. RESULTS: During the first week of treatment, there was a significantly greater decrease in HDRS-29 depression scores, and a similar trend in BDI scores, in the tryptophan/fluoxetine group than in the placebo/fluoxetine group. No significant differences were noted at later time points. With respect to sleep measures, there was a significant group-by-time interaction for slow-wave sleep at week 4. Further analysis revealed a significant decrease in slow-wave sleep after 4 weeks of treatment in the placebo/fluoxetine group, but not in the tryptophan/fluoxetine group. No cases of serotonin syndrome occurred, and the combination was well tolerated, although the 4 g per day dosage of tryptophan produced daytime drowsiness. CONCLUSIONS: Combining 20 mg of fluoxetine with 2 g of tryptophan daily at the outset of treatment for major depressive disorder appears to be a safe protocol that may have both a rapid antidepressant effect and a protective effect on slow-wave sleep. Further large-scale studies are needed to confirm these initial findings. PMID:11022398

  14. UFLC-MS/MS method for simultaneous determination of six lignans of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. in normal and insomniac rats brain microdialysates and homogenate samples: towards an in-depth study for its sedative-hypnotic activity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Binbin; Li, Qing; Fan, Ronghua; Su, Dan; Ou, Xiuli; Chen, Kelin; Chen, Xiaohui; Jia, Ying; Bi, Kaishun

    2013-04-01

    Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill., a traditional Chinese medicine, has been clinically used for the treatment of insomnia for centuries. The insomnia mechanism and the possible active ingredients of S. chinensis remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to develop a method to detect its components which could pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB) by determining the brain microdialysate and brain tissue homogenate samples and then obtain the pharmacokinetic profile in brain for comprehensive understanding of its hypnotic clinical efficacy. Therefore, an efficient, sensitive and selective ultra fast liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of six sedative and hypnotic lignans (schisandrin, schisandrol B, schisantherin A, deoxyshisandrin, γ-schisandrin and gomisin N) of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. in rat brain tissue homogenate and brain microdialysates has been developed and validated. The analysis was performed on a Shim-pack XR-ODS column (75 mm × 3.0 mm, 2.2 µm) using gradient elution with the mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid water. The method was validated in brain homogenate and microdialysate samples, which all showed good linearity over a wide concentration range (r(2)> 0.99), and the obtained lower limit of quantification was 0.1 ng · ml(-1) for the analytes in brain microdialysate samples. The intra- and inter-day assay variability was less than 15% for all analytes. The study proved the six lignans, as sedative and hypnotic ingredients, could pass through the BBB with brain targeting, distributed mainly in the hypothalamus and possessed complete pharmacokinetics process in brain. The results also indicated that significant difference in pharmacokinetic parameters of the analytes was observed between two groups, while absorptions of these analytes in insomniac group were significantly better than those in normal group.

  15. Development of an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry method for the rapid detection and confirmation of illegal adulterated sedative-hypnotics in dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuyin; Tan, Huijie; Guo, Changchuan; Gong, Liping; Shi, Feng

    2015-01-01

    A novel method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap) was developed and validated for the simultaneous screening, identification and quantification of sedative-hypnotics in dietary supplements. Chromatographic conditions were optimised and a full data-dependent MS(2) scan (MS/dd-MS(2)) in positive and negative ion mode was used. A single injection was sufficient to perform the simultaneous screening and identification/quantification of samples. The response showed a good linear relationship with analyte concentrations over wide ranges (e.g., 1.0-1000 ng g(-1) for diazepam) with all the determination coefficients (r(2)) > 0.9985. The method was validated, obtaining accuracy (intra- and inter-day) in the range of 94.5-105.3% and precision (intra- and inter-day) in the range of 0.4-8.9%, respectively. The detection limits (LODs) were in the range of 0.3-1.0 ng g(-1) for different analytes. Recoveries were performed and ranged from 74.1% to 90.2%, while all matrix effects were over the range of 85.4-93.6%. Finally, this method was used to detect sedative-hypnotics in commercial dietary supplements. Of a total of 45 batches of dietary supplements, only three batches were found to be positive samples with concentrations of diazepam, clonazepam and alprazolam at high levels (≥ 8.22 mg g(-1)).

  16. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling study of thiadiazolo[3,2-a][1,3]diazepine analogues of HIE-124 as a new class of short acting hypnotics.

    PubMed

    El-Subbagh, Hussein I; Hassan, Ghada S; El-Taher, Kamal E H; El-Messery, Shahenda M; Al-Azab, Adel S; Abdelaziz, Alaa A-M; Hefnawy, Mohamed M

    2016-11-29

    A new series of 6,7-dihydro-[1,3,4]thiadiazolo[3,2-a][1,3]diazepine analogues were synthesized, and biological evaluated. Compound GS-62 (33) exhibited potent in vivo short acting hypnotic activity with onset time, duration of sleep and therapeutic index of 6.4 ± 0.2, 94.8 ± 5.3 min, 6.62, respectively), in comparison to thiopental sodium (6). Compounds 33 did not show any sign of acute tolerance reported with the maintenance dose of 6. Meanwhile 33 potentiated the in vivo hypnotic effect of 6 in an equimolar amounts (0.06 mmol) combination showing an onset and duration of 7.5 ± 1.3, 62.5 ± 5.9 min, respectively. This combination allowed the use of lower doses of both drugs to avoid the undesirable side effects. Docking studies revealed favorable interactions and binding to BDZ binding site of the GABAA receptor especially with Arg87, Arg149, and Thr151 amino acid residues.

  17. Cognitive Factors in Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Robert D.; Field, Peter B.

    1971-01-01

    This research explored the influence of cognitive variables on susceptibility to hypnosis. The three variables of concern in the present study are automatization, attention, and body experience. The results are summarized. (Author)

  18. Inhaled linalool-induced sedation in mice.

    PubMed

    Linck, Viviane Moura; da Silva, Adriana Lourenço; Figueiró, Micheli; Piato, Angelo Luis; Herrmann, Ana Paula; Dupont Birck, Franciele; Caramão, Elina Bastos; Nunes, Domingos Sávio; Moreno, Paulo Roberto H; Elisabetsky, Elaine

    2009-04-01

    Linalool is a monoterpene often found as a major component of essential oils obtained from aromatic plant species, many of which are used in traditional medical systems as hypno-sedatives. Psychopharmacological evaluations of linalool (i.p. and i.c.v.) revealed marked sedative and anticonvulsant central effects in various mouse models. Considering this profile and alleged effects of inhaled lavender essential oil, the purpose of this study was to examine the sedative effects of inhaled linalool in mice. Mice were placed in an inhalation chamber during 60 min, in an atmosphere saturated with 1% or 3% linalool. Immediately after inhalation, animals were evaluated regarding locomotion, barbiturate-induced sleeping time, body temperature and motor coordination (rota-rod test). The 1% and 3% linalool increased (p<0.01) pentobarbital sleeping time and reduced (p<0.01) body temperature. The 3% linalool decreased (p<0.01) locomotion. Motor coordination was not affected. Hence, linalool inhaled for 1h seems to induce sedation without significant impairment in motor abilities, a side effect shared by most psycholeptic drugs.

  19. Occurrence of a barbiturate-inducible catalytically self-sufficient 119,000 dalton cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase in bacilli.

    PubMed

    Fulco, A J; Ruettinger, R T

    1987-05-04

    In a recent publication (Narhi, L.O. and Fulco, A.J.[1986] J. Biol. Chem. 261, 7160-7169) we described the characterization of a catalytically self-sufficient 119,000 Dalton cytochrome P-450 fatty acid monooxygenase (P-450BM-3) induced by barbiturates in Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581. We have now examined cell-free preparations from 12 distinct strains of B. megaterium and from one or two strains each of B. alvei, B. brevis, B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. macerans, B. pumilis and B. subtilis for the presence of this inducible enzyme. Using Western blot analyses in combination with assays for fatty acid hydroxylase activity and cytochrome P-450, we were able to show that 11 of the 12 B. megaterium strains contained not only a strongly pentobarbital-inducible fatty acid monooxygenase identical to or polymorphic with P-450BM-3 but also significant levels of two smaller P-450 cytochromes that were the same as or similar to cytochromes P-450BM-1 and P-450BM-2 originally found in ATCC 14581. Unlike the 119,000 Dalton P-450, however, the two smaller P-450s were generally easily detectable in cultures grown to stationary phase in the absence of barbiturates and, with some exceptions, were not strongly induced by pentobarbital. None of the non-megaterium species of Bacillus tested exhibited significant levels of either fatty acid monooxygenase activity or cytochrome P-450. The one strain of B. megaterium that lacked inducible P-450BM-3 was also negative for BM-1 and BM-2. However, this strain (ATCC 13368) did contain a small but significant level of another P-450 cytochrome that others have identified as the oxygenase component of a steroid 15-beta-hydroxylase system. Our evidence suggests that the BM series of P-450 cytochromes is encoded by chromosomal (rather than by plasmid) DNA.

  20. Determination of monoamine and amino acid neurotransmitters and their metabolites in rat brain samples by UFLC-MS/MS for the study of the sedative-hypnotic effects observed during treatment with S. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Binbin; Li, Qing; Fan, Ronghua; Su, Dan; Chen, Xiaohui; Jia, Ying; Bi, Kaishun

    2014-01-01

    Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. has been used as a sedative and hypnotic agent in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. The purpose of this study was to reveal the influence of insomnia on the levels of the neurotransmitters: glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), noradrenaline (NE), dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites (5-HIAA, DOPAC and HVA), and to study the role of S. chinensis in the treatment of insomnia. To achieve this goal, an efficient, sensitive and selective method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of these five neurotransmitters and their metabolites in rat brain samples using ultra fast liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS). The analysis was performed on a Synergi Fusion-RP 80A ODS column (150mm×2.0mm, 4.0μm) using gradient elution, with the mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 0.05% formic acid in water. The method was validated using rat brain homogenate samples and showed a good linearity over a wide concentration range (r(2)>0.99) with a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) at 4-16ngmL(-1). The intra and inter-day assay variability was less than 15% for all analytes. The results indicated that the condition of insomnia elevated GABA, NE, DA, DOPAC and HVA, and reduced 5-HT, 5-HIAA levels in rat brain. The oral administration of S. chinensis (7.5gkg(-1)day(-1), eight days) influenced insomnia by significantly increasing or reducing the levels of the neurotransmitters parameters mentioned above. These results suggested that S. chinensis could alter the levels of these brain neurotransmitters and their metabolites through its sedative-hypnotic effects.

  1. Inhibition of stress induced hyperglucagonemia by administration of glucose in normal and alloxan-diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Klimes, I; Jurcovicová, J; Németh, S; Jezová, D; Vigas, M

    1981-01-01

    The increase in plasma pancreatic glucagon which is known to occur under several stress conditions was confirmed in fed and 18 h prefasted rats subjected to a low, "stress producing" dose of the Noble-collip drum procedure (400 revolutions per 400 s). A single dose of exogenous glucose ( 1 g kg-1) injected 3 min and 20 s before stress into the jugular vein of intact fasted or fed animals anesthetized with pentobarbital 930 mg kg-1) completely abolished their hyperglucagonemic response in stress. In alloxan-diabetic hyperglycemic rats the stress-hyperglucagonemia was exaggerated, but was also suppressible by exogenous glucose. It was concluded that: 1. the stress induced hyperglucagonemic response of both intact and alloxan-diabetic rats was completely suppressible by administration of i.v. bolus of exogenous glucose; 2. the site inhibiting effect of glucose might be located either at the level of A cell or at the level of "'glucoreceptors" in hypothalamus.

  2. Suggestion-Induced Modulation of Semantic Priming during Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Martin; Kiefer, Markus; Bongartz, Walter; Grön, Georg; Hoenig, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a primed visual lexical decision task, we investigated the neural and functional mechanisms underlying modulations of semantic word processing through hypnotic suggestions aimed at altering lexical processing of primes. The priming task was to discriminate between target words and pseudowords presented 200 ms after the prime word which was semantically related or unrelated to the target. In a counterbalanced study design, each participant performed the task once at normal wakefulness and once after the administration of hypnotic suggestions to perceive the prime as a meaningless symbol of a foreign language. Neural correlates of priming were defined as significantly lower activations upon semantically related compared to unrelated trials. We found significant suggestive treatment-induced reductions in neural priming, albeit irrespective of the degree of suggestibility. Neural priming was attenuated upon suggestive treatment compared with normal wakefulness in brain regions supporting automatic (fusiform gyrus) and controlled semantic processing (superior and middle temporal gyri, pre- and postcentral gyri, and supplementary motor area). Hence, suggestions reduced semantic word processing by conjointly dampening both automatic and strategic semantic processes. PMID:25923740

  3. Acute hyperglycemia induced by ketamine/xylazine anesthesia in rats: mechanisms and implications for preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Saha, Joy K; Xia, Jinqi; Grondin, Janet M; Engle, Steven K; Jakubowski, Joseph A

    2005-11-01

    The effects of anesthetic agents, commonly used in animal models, on blood glucose levels in fed and fasted rats were investigated. In fed Sprague-Dawley rats, ketamine (100 mg/kg)/xylazine (10 mg/kg) (KX) produced acute hyperglycemia (blood glucose 178.4 +/- 8.0 mg/dl) within 20 min. The baseline blood glucose levels (104.8 +/- 5.7 mg/dl) reached maximum levels (291.7 +/- 23.8 mg/dl) at 120 min. Ketamine alone did not elevate glucose levels in fed rats. Isoflurane also produced acute hyperglycemia similar to KX. Administration of pentobarbital sodium did not produce hyperglycemia in fed rats. In contrast, none of these anesthetic agents produced hyperglycemia in fasted rats. The acute hyperglycemic effect of KX in fed rats was associated with decreased plasma levels of insulin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and corticosterone and increased levels of glucagon and growth hormone (GH). The acute hyperglycemic response to KX was dose-dependently inhibited by the specific alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine (1-4 mg/kg). KX-induced changes of glucoregulatory hormone levels such as insulin, GH, ACTH, and corticosterone were significantly altered by yohimbine, whereas the glucagon levels remained unaffected. In conclusion, the present study indicates that both KX and isoflurane produce acute hyperglycemia in fed rats. The effect of KX is mediated by modulation of the glucoregulatory hormones through stimulation of alpha2-adrenergic receptors. Pentobarbital sodium did not produce hyperglycemia in either fed or fasted rats. Based on these findings, it is suggested that caution needs to be taken when selecting anesthetic agents, and fed or fasted state of animals in studies of diabetic disease or other models where glucose and/or glucoregulatory hormone levels may influence outcome and thus interpretation. However, fed animals are of value when exploring the hyperglycemic response to anesthetic agents.

  4. Development and validation of a fast ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction procedure combined with LC-MS/MS analysis for the quantification of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-like hypnotics in whole blood.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Marieke; Missotten, Sophie; Dehaen, Wim; Tytgat, Jan; Cuypers, Eva

    2017-05-01

    To date, thorough clean-up of complex biological samples remains an essential part of the analytical process. The solid phase extraction (SPE) technique is the well-known standard, however, its main weaknesses are the labor-intensive and time-consuming protocols. In this respect, dispersive liquid-liquid microextractions (DLLME) seem to offer less complex and more efficient extraction procedures. Furthermore, ionic liquids (ILs) - liquid salts - are emerging as new promising extraction solvents, thanks to their non-flammable nature, negligible vapor pressure and easily adaptable physiochemical properties. In this study, we investigated whether ILs can be used as an extraction solvent in a DLLME procedure for the extraction of a broad range of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-like hypnotics in whole blood samples. 1.0mL whole blood was extracted using an optimized 30-min IL-based DLLME procedure, followed by LC-ESI(+)-MS/MS analysis in scheduled MRM scan mode. The optimized analytical method was successfully validated for 7-aminoflunitrazepam, alprazolam, bromazepam, clobazam, clonazepam, clotiazepam, diazepam, estazolam, ethyl loflazepate, etizolam, flurazepam, lormetazepam, midazolam, oxazepam, prazepam, temazepam, triazolam, zolpidem and zopiclone. The method showed good selectivity for endogenous interferences based on 12 sources of blank whole blood. No benzodiazepine interferences were observed, except for clorazepate and nordiazepam, which were excluded from the quantitative method. Matrix-matched calibration curves were constructed covering the whole therapeutic range, including low toxic plasma concentrations. Accuracy and precision results met the proposed acceptance criteria for the vast majority of compounds, except for brotizolam, chlordiazepoxide, cloxazolam, flunitrazepam, loprazolam, lorazepam and nitrazepam, which can only be determined in a semi-quantitative way. Recoveries were within the range of 24.7%-127.2% and matrix effects were within 20

  5. Neurobehavioral effect of essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus in mice.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M M; Costa, C A R A; Freire, A O; Santos, J G; Costa, M

    2009-03-01

    Tea obtained from leaves of Cymbopogon citratus (DC) Stapf is used for its anxiolytic, hypnotic and anticonvulsant properties in Brazilian folk medicine. Essential oil (EO) from fresh leaves was obtained by hydrodistillation and orally administered to Swiss male mice 30 min before experimental procedures. EO at 0.5 or 1.0 g/kg was evaluated for sedative/hypnotic activity through pentobarbital sleeping time, anxiolytic activity by elevated plus maze and light/dark box procedures and anticonvulsant activity through seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole and maximal electroshock. EO was effective in increasing the sleeping time, the percentage of entries and time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze as well as the time spent in the light compartment of light/dark box. In addition, EO delayed clonic seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole and blocked tonic extensions induced by maximal electroshock, indicating the elevation of the seizure threshold and/or blockage of seizures spread. These effects were observed in the absence of motor impairment evaluated on the rotarod and open field test. Our results are in accord with the ethnopharmacological use of Cymbopogon citratus, and after complementary toxicological studies it can support investigations assessing their use as anxiolytic, sedative or anticonvulsive agent.

  6. Inhibition of cyclophosphamide-induced teratogenesis by beta-ionone.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Carneiro, M R; De-Oliveira, A C A X; De-Carvalho, R R; Araujo, I B; Souza, C A M; Kuriyama, S N; Paumgartten, F J R

    2003-03-03

    Beta-ionone (BI) is a degraded (C 13) sesquiterpene found in plant essential oils. It has been used in the synthesis of perfume chemicals and vitamin A. Recently, it was reported that BI is a rather potent in vitro inhibitor of CYP2B1-catalysed reactions in rat liver microsomes. The present study was performed to investigate whether inhibition of CYP2B1 reactions by BI could lead to an attenuation of cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced embryotoxicity in the rat. In a preliminary experiment, a dose-dependent prolongation of pentobarbital sleeping time in male and female Wistar rats suggested that BI inhibits CYP2B1 in vivo as well. In a second experiment, rats were treated by gavage with BI (0, 250, 500, 750 or 1000 mg/kg body wt) 45 min prior to a subcutaneous injection of either CP (7.5 mg/kg body wt) or its vehicle (saline) on day 11 of pregnancy. BI alone, at the highest dose tested, caused a high proportion of resorptions. Lower doses of BI, however, clearly attenuated CP-induced embryolethality and teratogenicity. These results seem to support the view that, as far as rats are concerned, CYP2B1 plays an important role in the conversion of CP into its embryolethal and teratogenic metabolites.

  7. The evaluation of the applicability of a high pH mobile phase in ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-like hypnotics in urine and blood.

    PubMed

    Verplaetse, Ruth; Cuypers, Eva; Tytgat, Jan

    2012-08-03

    A sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for simultaneous detection of benzodiazepines, benzodiazepine-like hypnotics and some metabolites (7-aminoflunitrazepam, alprazolam, bromazepam, brotizolam, chlordiazepoxide, chlornordiazepam, clobazam, clonazepam, clotiazepam, cloxazolam, diazepam, ethylloflazepate, flunitrazepam, flurazepam, loprazolam, lorazepam, lormetazepam, midazolam, N-desmethylflunitrazepam, nitrazepam, N-methylclonazepam (internal standard), nordiazepam, oxazepam, prazepam, temazepam, tetrazepam, triazolam, zaleplon, zolpidem, zopiclone) in urine and whole blood. Sample preparation was performed on a mixed-mode cation exchange solid phase extraction cartridge. Electrospray ionization was found to be more efficient than atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The use of a mobile phase of high pH resulted in higher retention and higher electrospray ionization signals than the conventional low pH mobile phases. Considering the benefits of a high pH mobile phase on both chromatography and mass spectrometry, its use should be encouraged. In the final method, gradient elution with 10 mM ammonium bicarbonate (pH 9) and methanol was performed on a small particle column (Acquity C18, 1.7 μm, 2.1 mm × 50 mm). The optimized method was fully validated.

  8. Effects of the 5-HT(1A) Receptor Agonist Tandospirone on ACTH-Induced Sleep Disturbance in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Ryuki; Shinomiya, Kazuaki; Sendo, Toshiaki; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Kamei, Chiaki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the serotonin (5-HT)1A receptor agonist tandospirone versus that of the benzodiazepine hypnotic flunitrazepam in a rat model of long-term adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-induced sleep disturbance. Rats implanted with electrodes for recording electroencephalogram and electromyogram were injected with ACTH once daily at a dose of 100 µg/rat. Administration of ACTH for 10 d caused a significant increase in sleep latency, decrease in non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep time, and increase in wake time. Tandospirone caused a significant decrease in sleep latency and increase in non-REM sleep time in rats treated with ACTH. The effect of tandospirone on sleep patterns was antagonized by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. In contrast, flunitrazepam had no significant effect on sleep parameters in ACTH-treated rats. These results clearly indicate that long-term administration of ACTH causes sleep disturbance, and stimulating the 5-HT1A receptor by tandospirone may be efficacious for improving sleep in cases in which benzodiazepine hypnotics are ineffective.

  9. 21 CFR 522.1704 - Sodium pentobarbital injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... general anesthetic in dogs and cats. Although it may be used as a general surgical anesthetic for horses... local anesthetic. It may also be used in dogs for the symptomatic treatment of strychnine poisoning. (ii) The drug is administered intravenously “to effect”. For general surgical anesthesia, the usual dose...

  10. Mechanisms of GABA- and glycine-induced increases of cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations in chick embryo ciliary ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, M; Rhee, J S; Shimura, M; Akaike, N

    1997-08-01

    We used fura-2 microfluorometry and the gramicidin-perforated patch clamp technique in an attempt to clarify the mechanisms underlying the GABA- and glycine-induced increases in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]in) in acutely isolated chick embryo ciliary ganglion neurons. GABA, glycine, and isoguvacine, but not baclofen, increased [Ca]in in a dose- and a Ca2+-dependent manner. The GABA-induced [Ca]in increase was inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin, and potentiated by pentobarbital, flunitrazepam, and alphaxalone, whereas the glycine-induced [Ca]in increase was inhibited by strychnine but not by bicuculline or picrotoxin. L- and N-type Ca2+ channel blockers inhibited the GABA- and glycine-induced [Ca]in increases, whereas Bay K-8644 potentiated these responses. These responses were also substantially potentiated by blockers of various K+ channels and by lowering the external Cl- concentrations. The high KCI- and nicotine-induced [Ca]in increases were substantially reduced during continuous stimulation with either 2 microM GABA or 1 mM glycine. Electrophysiological studies indicated that the reversal potential of the GABA-induced current exhibited a more depolarized value than the resting membrane potential in 17 of the 25 cells examined. Taken together, these results suggest that both GABA and glycine depolarize the membrane potentials by increasing Cl- conductance via respective receptors and thus increase the Ca2+ influxes through L- and N-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels.

  11. Channel opening by anesthetics and GABA induces similar changes in the GABAA receptor M2 segment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ayelet; Bali, Moez; Horenstein, Jeffrey; Akabas, Myles H

    2007-05-01

    For many general anesthetics, their molecular basis of action involves interactions with GABA(A) receptors. Anesthetics produce concentration-dependent effects on GABA(A) receptors. Low concentrations potentiate submaximal GABA-induced currents. Higher concentrations directly activate the receptors. Functional effects of anesthetics have been characterized, but little is known about the conformational changes they induce. We probed anesthetic-induced conformational changes in the M2 membrane-spanning, channel-lining segment using disulfide trapping between engineered cysteines. Previously, we showed that oxidation by copper phenanthroline in the presence of GABA of the M2 6' cysteine mutants, alpha(1)T261Cbeta(1)T256C and alpha(1)beta(1)T256C resulted in formation of an intersubunit disulfide bond between the adjacent beta-subunits that significantly increased the channels' spontaneous open probability. Oxidation in GABA's absence had no effect. We examined the effect on alpha(1)T261Cbeta(1)T256C and on alpha(1)beta(1)T256C of oxidation by copper phenanthroline in the presence of potentiating and directly activating concentrations of the general anesthetics propofol, pentobarbital, and isoflurane. Oxidation in the presence of potentiating concentration of anesthetics had little effect. Oxidation in the presence of directly activating anesthetic concentrations significantly increased the channels' spontaneous open probability. We infer that activation by anesthetics and GABA induces a similar conformational change at the M2 segment 6' position that is related to channel opening.

  12. Simvastatin attenuates chromium-induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Zahra; Karami, Esmaeil; Ahmadizadeh, Massumeh

    2017-01-01

    Background Hexavalent Chromium (Cr (VI)) compounds are extremely toxic and have been demonstrated to induce nephrotoxicity associated with oxidative stress in humans and animals. The wide environmental distribution of these agents lead to an increase interest of preventive effects of its adverse effects. Objectives The propose of the present study was to determine the potential protective effects of simvastatin (SIMV) on Cr (VI)-induced nephrotoxicity in rat. Materials and Methods Forty-eight adult male Wistar rats (180-220 g BW) were randomly assigned to eight groups (n = 6). Group one received SIMV 20 mg/kg/day. Group two was given vehicle only. Groups three, five and seven received intraperitoneally (i.p) sodium dichromate (Cr (VI)) at doses of 8, 12 and 16 mg/kg body weight. Groups four, six and eight pretreated with the 20 mg/kg SIMV 30 minutes to prior administration of Cr (VI) at doses of 8, 12 and 16 mg/kg, respectively. The experiment repeated for eight consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the last administration, animals were killed with overdose of sodium pentobarbital. Kidney tissues were excised for measuring malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and histopathological examination. Results Chromium induced a dose dependent elevation of MDA and reduction of GSH levels. Histopathological manifestations were observed in Cr (VI)-treated rats. SIMV administration restored Cr (VI) produced biochemical and morphological changes in rat kidney. SIMV decreased MDA values and increased GSH levels in Cr (VI)-treated rats. SIMV clearly reversed the microscopic damage, demonstrating its protective effects against Cr (VI)-induced kidney injury. Conclusions This observation suggests that SIMV may have a protective effect against Cr (VI)-induced oxidative stress in rat kidney. PMID:28042547

  13. Acetylcholine-Atropine Interactions: Paradoxical Effects on Atrial Fibrillation Inducibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Scherlag, Benjamin J; Fan, Youqi; Xia, Wenfang; Huang, He; Po, Sunny S

    2017-03-21

    Atropine (ATr) is well known as a cholinergic antagonist, however, at low concentrations ATr could paradoxically accentuate the parasympathetic actions of acetylcholine (ACh). In 22 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs, via a left and right thoracotomy, a leak proof barrier was attached to isolate the atrial appendages (AAs) from the rest of the atria. In Group 1(Ach+ATr+Ach), ACh, 100 mM, was placed on the AA followed by the application of ATr, 2mg/cc. The average AFdur was 17±7 minutes. After ATr was applied to the AA and ACh again tested, the AFdur was markedly attenuated (2±2 minutes, p<0.05). In Group 2 (ATr+Ach), ATr was initially applied to the AA followed by the application of ACh, 100 mM. There was no significant difference in AF duration (16±4 minutes vs 18±2 minutes, p=NS). The inhibitory effect of ATr on induced HR reduction (electrical stimulation of the anterior right ganglionated plexi and vagal nerves) was no difference between Groups 1 and 2. These observations suggest that when ATr is initially administered it attaches to the allosteric site of the muscarinic ACh receptor (M2 AChRs) leaving the orthosteric site free to be occupied by ACh. The M3 receptor that controls HR slowing does not show the same allosteric properties.

  14. The inhibition and potentiation of procarbazine on hepatic mixed-function oxidases in phenobarbital tolerant and nontolerant mice.

    PubMed

    Onoda, K; Ho, I K

    1980-01-01

    The effect of procarbazine on mixed-function oxidases was investigated in naive and pentobarbital tolerant mice. In mice receiving procarbazine, 200 mg/kg, i.p. 1 hr earlier, metabolisms of pentobarbital, aniline and ethylmorphine in vitro and cytochrome P-450 content of hepatic microsomes were significantly decreased. The drug binding of either aniline or pentobarbital to cytochrome P-450 was also decreased. However, procarbazine failed to exert this effect after the enzymes had been induced by continuous administration of pentobarbital. Interestingly, procarbazine enhanced the barbiturate induced hepatic microsomal mixed-function oxidase activities when it was administered before the implantation of pentobarbital pellet. Both cytochrome P-450 and cytochrome b5 content after pentobarbital pellet implantation were further increased by pretreatment with procarbazine. This finding was further substantiated by the increase in pentobarbital and aniline binding to cytochrome P-450. The present studies may provide another model for studying the nature of hepatic mixed-function oxidase induction process.

  15. Glutamate transporter type 3 knockout mice have a decreased isoflurane requirement to induce loss of righting reflex.

    PubMed

    Lee, S N; Li, L; Zuo, Z

    2010-12-15

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) uptake extracellular glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. EAAT type 3 (EAAT3), the main neuronal EAAT, is expressed widely in the CNS. We have shown that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases EAAT3 activity and trafficking to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that EAAT3 mediates isoflurane-induced anesthesia. To test this hypothesis, the potency of isoflurane to induce immobility and hypnosis, two major components of general anesthesia, was compared in the CD-1 wild-type mice and EAAT knockout mice that had a CD-1 strain gene background. Hypnosis was assessed by loss of righting reflex in this study. The expression of EAAT1 and EAAT2, two widely expressed EAATs in the CNS, in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord was not different between the EAAT3 knockout mice and wild-type mice. The concentration required for isoflurane to cause immobility to painful stimuli, a response involving primarily reflex loops in the spinal cord, was not changed by EAAT3 knockout. However, the EAAT3 knockout mice were more sensitive to isoflurane-induced hypnotic effects, which may be mediated by hypothalamic sleep neural circuits. Interestingly, the EAAT3 knockout mice did not have an altered sensitivity to the hypnotic effects caused by ketamine, an i.v. anesthetic that is a glutamate receptor antagonist and does not affect EAAT3 activity. These results suggest that EAAT3 modulates the sensitivity of neural circuits to isoflurane. These results, along with our previous findings which suggests that isoflurane increases EAAT3 activity, indicate that EAAT3 may regulate isoflurane-induced behavioral changes, including anesthesia.

  16. Effect of nicotinic acid on the sleep time and tolerance induced by ethanol in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Basilio, C.; Toro, A.; Yojay, L.

    1986-05-01

    The intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration (50 mg/kg) of nicotinic acid (NA), markedly decreased the sleep time of rats pretreated (10 min before), post-treated (10 min after) or simultaneously treated with ethanol (4 g/Kg i.p.). A similar effect was observed on the sleep time induced by pentobarbital (37 mg/Kg i.p.). Blood alcohol levels (BAL) were the same or slightly higher in the animals pretreated with NA than in the control animals pre-injected with saline. Nicotinamide and NAD had no effect. A total of three doses of ethanol, each one administered weekly or biweekly, induced tolerance, which persisted for approximately six weeks. After this period, a hypersensitivity to ethanol appeared to develop. This phenomenon was not observed when NA was pre-injected 10 min before each dose of ethanol. The sleep time of the latter animals did not change neither during the treatment period nor after six weeks without any treatment. BAL were slightly higher in NA treated than in control animals. The authors concluded that the effect of NA on the sleep time and tolerance induced by ethanol is not due to an increased rate of its metabolism and/or elimination but to a long-lasting effect that decreases the sensitivity of the nervous cells to ethanol. The mechanisms involved in the shortening of the sleep time as well as those responsible for the loss of the capacity to develop tolerance are under current investigation.

  17. Sex difference in psychological behavior changes induced by long-term social isolation in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming; Wu, Chun Fu; Liu, Wen; Yang, Jing Yu; Chen, Duo

    2004-01-01

    Social isolation can induce psychological behavior changes. It is interesting to know whether there is sex difference in responding to social isolation or not. The present study compared the behavior difference between male and female mice isolated for 1-4 months. The results showed that the isolated male mice had higher accounts of locomotor activity than the isolated female and group-housed ones. Both isolated male and female mice spent shorter time in the dark box than the group-housed mice in the light/dark test, and isolated male mice spent less time in the closed arms than isolated female and group-housed mice when isolated for 2, 3 and 4 months in the elevated plus-maze test. These results suggest that isolation induce an anxiolytic-like effect. The immobile time in the forced swimming test was shortened in male mice isolated for 1 and 2 months. Both isolated male and female mice showed shorter time in pentobarbital-induced loss of righting reflex and less body weight gain. These results demonstrated that there was a sex difference in psychological behavior changes in mice undergoing social isolation and the male mice were more easily affected by isolation.

  18. Hepatoprotective Effect of Low Doses of Caffeine on CCl4-Induced Liver Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cachón, Andrés Uc; Quintal-Novelo, Carlos; Medina-Escobedo, Gilberto; Castro-Aguilar, Gaspar; Moo-Puc, Rosa E

    2017-03-04

    Several studies have shown the hepatoprotective effect of the consumption of coffee and tea, which is mainly attributed to caffeine. Many experimental studies have demonstrated this effect; however, these studies used high caffeine doses that are not related to human consumption. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of low doses of caffeine on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated rats. Low doses of caffeine (CAFF) 5 and 10 mg/kg (CAFF5 and CAFF10) were evaluated in chronic liver damage induced by CCl4 (0.75 mL/kg) in rats. CAFF treatment was administered once a day and CCl4 administration was twice weekly for 10 weeks. Liver function tests (biochemical markers) and functional (sleeping time) and histological (hematoxylin-eosin and Masson trichrome stains) parameters were carried out at the end of damage treatment. Daily treatments of CAFF5 and CAFF10 exhibited a hepatoprotective effect supported by a decrease of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (AP) serum activities and bilirubin serum levels compared with control and also restored serum albumin levels and liver glutathione (GSH). Moreover, CAFF prevented CCl4-induced prolongation in pentobarbital sleeping time and a decrease of liver fibrosis and cell death. Our results demonstrated that low doses of CAFF exert a hepatoprotective effect against CCl4 -induced liver damage in rats.

  19. Ameliorative effect of Grewia tenax (Forssk) fiori fruit extract on CCl(4)-induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Said, Mansour S; Mothana, Ramzi A; Al-Sohaibani, Mohammed O; Rafatullah, Syed

    2011-01-01

    The ethanol extract of Grewia tenax (GTE) fruit was tested for possible efficacy against carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) induced liver toxicity in Wistar albino rats. GTE at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg were administered orally to CCl(4)-treated rats. Acute toxicity test and sleeping time determination were done with mice. The results showed that oral administration of GTE for 3 wk to rats significantly reduced the CCl(4)-induced elevated levels of serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, cholesterol, high-density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins, very low density lipoproteins, and triglycerides. Moreover, it was found that the treatment with GTE significantly elevated the hemoglobin level in serum and increased the nonprotein sulfhydryl and total protein contents in the liver tissue, and a significant diminution was observed in the CCl(4)-induced elevated levels of malondialdehyde in the liver tissue. The biochemical findings were supported by an evaluation with liver histopathology. Pentobarbital-induced prolongation of narcolepsy in mice was shortened significantly by the extract. The observed hepatoprotective effect is believed to occur due to antioxidant properties of the contents of G. tenax extract, which may provide a new drug to be used for fighting liver diseases and it validates its folkloric use in anemic and other conditions.

  20. Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Indigofera tinctoria on Chemically-Induced Seizures and Brain GABA Levels in Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Garbhapu, Asuntha; Yalavarthi, Prasannaraju; Koganti, Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Objective(s) Indigofera tinctoria Linn. of Fabaceae family is claimed to be useful to control epileptic seizures in the Indian system of folkore medicine. This study was designed to evaluate tinctoria and to verify the claim. Materials and Methods Seizures were induced in male albino rats with pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). The test group animals were administered ethanolic extract of Indigofera tinctoria (EEIT) orally. The time of onset and duration of clonic convulsions were recorded. Maximal electroshock seizures (MES) were induced in animals. The duration of hind limb tonic extension (HLTE) was recorded. GABA levels and GABA transaminase activity in brain were estimated. Results In PTZ model, EEIT significantly (P< 0.01, P< 0.001) delayed the onset of convulsions and reduced the duration of seizures in a dose dependent manner. A significant (P< 0.05) reduction in the duration of HLTE at higher doses of EEIT was observed in MES model. Increase in brain GABA levels was observed on treatment with EEIT at 500 and 1000 mg/kg doses, suggested that the plant may be acting by facilitating GABAergic transmission. A significant reduction (P< 0.05) in the activity of brain GABA transaminase was observed at higher doses. No neurotoxic signs were observed with rotarod test, pentobarbital induced sleeping time, locomotor activity and haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Conclusion The ethanolic extract of tinctoria was found to be useful to control and treat the variety of seizures. PMID:23493444

  1. Sedative-Hypnotics and Human Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    though there was an increase in serum level of nitrazepam and of the active metabolite of flurazepam, especially during the first 7-10 days. Oswald et al...Siegler et al., 1966). Simulator Studies Inferences to drug effects on real-life daily activities , from results of tests used in the laboratory, are...Most studies have used young adult normal males. 2. Drug-related improvement in daytime performance was not found and, in comparing active drug to

  2. Induced Abortion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Induced Abortion Home For Patients Search FAQs Induced Abortion Page ... Induced Abortion FAQ043, May 2015 PDF Format Induced Abortion Special Procedures What is an induced abortion? What ...

  3. Midazolam provides cytoprotective effect during corticosterone-induced damages in rat astrocytes by stimulating steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-Zhi; Miao, Yu-Liang; An, Li-Na; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Pan, Ning-Ling; Ma, Ya-Qun; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Nan; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yun-Feng; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2013-06-28

    Midazolam is a benzodiazepine derivative drug that has powerful anxiolytic, amnestic, hypnotic, and sedative properties. The cytoprotective effect of midazolam on brain astrocytes is poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the cytoprotective effect of midazolam on astrocytes exposed to corticosterone, a stress-produced glucocorticoid. We found that midazolam stimulated pregnenolone and progesterone secretion in astrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Midazolam protected astrocytes from corticosterone-induced damages in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we demonstrated that progesterone reduced corticosterone-induced damages. Finally, we applied trilostane, an inhibitor of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, to inhibit pregnenolone metabolism and found that pretreatment with trilostane significantly inhibited the cytoprotective effect of midazolam on corticosterone-induced cytotoxicity in rat astrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrate that midazolam has cytoprotective effect on astrocytes. This is, at least partially, derived from midazolam-induced steroidogenesis including progesterone and downstream products in astrocytes. Our data provide new insights into the cytoprotective effect of midazolam.

  4. Afferent fibers involved in the bradykinin-induced cardiovascular reflexes from the ovary in rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae; Kagitani, Fusako; Hotta, Harumi

    2015-12-01

    Bleeding or rupture of the ovary often accompanies ovarian cysts and causes severe pain and autonomic responses such as hypotension. It would be expected that ovarian afferents contribute to cardiovascular responses induced by ovarian failure. The present study examined cardiovascular responses to noxious chemical stimulation of the ovary by bradykinin, an algesic substance released by tissue damage, and explored the role of ovarian afferents in the ovarian-cardiovascular responses in anesthetized rats. Non-pregnant adult rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital and artificially ventilated. The carotid artery was cannulated to monitor blood pressure and heart rate. Noxious chemical stimulation was achieved by applying a small piece of cotton soaked with bradykinin to the surface of the ovary for 30s. Application of bradykinin (10(-4) M) to the ovary decreased heart rate and blood pressure. These cardiovascular responses were not significantly influenced by severance of the vagal nerves or the superior ovarian nerve, but were abolished by severance of the ovarian nerve plexus (ONP). Application of bradykinin (10(-4) M) to the ovary evoked afferent activity of the ONP both in vivo and in vitro preparations. These results indicate that the decreases in heart rate and blood pressure following chemical noxious stimulation of the ovary with bradykinin are reflex responses, whose afferent nerve pathway is mainly through afferent fibers in the ONP.

  5. Receptive-field changes induced by peripheral nerve stimulation in SI of adult cats.

    PubMed

    Recanzone, G H; Allard, T T; Jenkins, W M; Merzenich, M M

    1990-05-01

    1. Receptive fields (RFs) of neurons in the primary somatosensory (SI) cortex were defined before, during, and after electrical stimulation of myelinated fibers in the dorsal cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve in adult pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized cats. 2. This stimulation resulted in an approximately threefold increase of SI multiunit RF sizes. Substantial changes were first recorded within 1-2 h of stimulation. RFs typically enlarged continuously over a several-hour stimulation period, then stabilized. 3. RF-area increases were observed within both the forepaw and hindpaw representational zones in the SI cortex contralateral to the stimulated forepaw nerve. RF sizes did not increase in the ipsilateral SI body surface representation or in sham-stimulation control animals. 4. Preliminary studies indicate that stimulation-induced changes can be halted and often reversed by the intravenous administration of the opiate antagonist naloxone. 5. These observations suggest a global naloxone-sensitive modulatory system that operates on large-diameter afferent inputs in the cat somatosensory system. The increases in RF size occur under nerve-stimulation conditions similar to those that result in the generation of widespread analgesia (Chung et al. 1984a,b; Gamble and Milne 1986; Toda and Ichioka 1978).

  6. Effect of tramadol on lung injury induced by skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion: an experimental study*

    PubMed Central

    Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Jahanshahi, Amirali; Sotoudeh, Amir; Jahanshahi, Gholamreza; Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Aslani, Kimia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether tramadol has a protective effect against lung injury induced by skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion. METHODS: Twenty Wistar male rats were allocated to one of two groups: ischemia-reperfusion (IR) and ischemia-reperfusion + tramadol (IR+T). The animals were anesthetized with intramuscular injections of ketamine and xylazine (50 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, respectively). All of the animals underwent 2-h ischemia by occlusion of the femoral artery and 24-h reperfusion. Prior to the occlusion of the femoral artery, 250 IU heparin were administered via the jugular vein in order to prevent clotting. The rats in the IR+T group were treated with tramadol (20 mg/kg i.v.) immediately before reperfusion. After the reperfusion period, the animals were euthanized with pentobarbital (300 mg/kg i.p.), the lungs were carefully removed, and specimens were properly prepared for histopathological and biochemical studies. RESULTS: Myeloperoxidase activity and nitric oxide levels were significantly higher in the IR group than in the IR+T group (p = 0.001 for both). Histological abnormalities, such as intra-alveolar edema, intra-alveolar hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration, were significantly more common in the IR group than in the IR+T group. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of our histological and biochemical findings, we conclude that tramadol prevents lung tissue injury after skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:24068264

  7. The effect of long-term supplementation of vitamin C on pulpal blood flow in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Amatyakul, Supathra; Chakraphan, Daroonwan; Chotpaibulpan, Siriporn; Patumraj, Suthiluk

    2003-01-01

    To examine the effect of vitamin C on blood flow in diabetic dental pulp, the animal model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats (i.v. injection of STZ 55 mg/kg BW) was used. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250 g were divided into 3 groups: non-diabetes (CON), diabetes (STZ), and diabetes supplemented by vitamin C (STZ+Vit C). Vitamin C was supplemented by drinking water (1 g/l). At 12 weeks (wks) and 24 wks after the STZ injection, the laser Doppler flow-meter (Model ALF 21, USA) was used to measure pulpal blood flow (PBF) while the animals were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (50 mg/kg BW). The experimental results showed that at 12 and 24 wks after the STZ injection, hyperglycemia hypertension and loss of body weight were significantly developed. Simultaneously, decreased plasma vitamin C level was demonstrated significantly in STZ rats. The reduction of pulpal blood flow (PBF) in the lower incisors was observed in STZ rats at both monitored time points. Interestingly, the supplementation of vitamin C for 24 wks restored PBF. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that long-term supplementation of vitamin C, a natural antioxidant, could markedly prevent the diabetic-induced reduction in PBF.

  8. Effects of Melandrium firmum methanolic extract on testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Seo, Chang-Seob; Lee, Nam-Hun; Ha, Hye-Kyung; Son, Jong-Keun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disease of unknown aetiology characterized by prostatic enlargement coincident with distinct alterations in tissue histomorphology. Instead of therapeutic agents that can cause severe side effects, plant extracts are frequently used to treat BPH. In this study, we investigated whether the Melandrium firmum methanolic extract (MFME) improves BPH, using the testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH rat model. Castration was performed via the scrotal route under sodium pentobarbital anaesthesia. BPH in castrated rats was generated via daily subcutaneous injections of TP (3 mg kg(-1)) dissolved in corn oil, for 4 weeks. MFME was administered daily by oral gavage at a dose of 200 mg kg(-1) for 4 weeks, along with the TP injections. The control group received injections of corn oil subcutaneously. At the scheduled termination of the experiment, all rats were killed and their prostates weighed; the relative prostate weight (prostate/body weight ratio) was calculated, and histomorphological changes in the prostate were examined. Additionally, we measured the levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the serum and the prostate. Experimentally induced BPH led to marked decreases in the relative prostate weight and the DHT levels in the serum and the prostate. Histologically, BPH was evident in the ventral lobe of the prostate, and MFME treatment suppressed the severity of the lesions. These results indicate that MFME effectively inhibits the development of BPH induced by testosterone in a rat model. Further studies will be needed to identify the compound(s) responsibility for inducing the protective effect against BPH and determine its mechanism of action.

  9. Effects of Melandrium firmum methanolic extract on testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Seo, Chang-Seob; Lee, Nam-Hun; Ha, Hye-Kyung; Son, Jong-Keun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disease of unknown aetiology characterized by prostatic enlargement coincident with distinct alterations in tissue histomorphology. Instead of therapeutic agents that can cause severe side effects, plant extracts are frequently used to treat BPH. In this study, we investigated whether the Melandrium firmum methanolic extract (MFME) improves BPH, using the testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH rat model. Castration was performed via the scrotal route under sodium pentobarbital anaesthesia. BPH in castrated rats was generated via daily subcutaneous injections of TP (3 mg kg−1) dissolved in corn oil, for 4 weeks. MFME was administered daily by oral gavage at a dose of 200 mg kg−1 for 4 weeks, along with the TP injections. The control group received injections of corn oil subcutaneously. At the scheduled termination of the experiment, all rats were killed and their prostates weighed; the relative prostate weight (prostate/body weight ratio) was calculated, and histomorphological changes in the prostate were examined. Additionally, we measured the levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the serum and the prostate. Experimentally induced BPH led to marked decreases in the relative prostate weight and the DHT levels in the serum and the prostate. Histologically, BPH was evident in the ventral lobe of the prostate, and MFME treatment suppressed the severity of the lesions. These results indicate that MFME effectively inhibits the development of BPH induced by testosterone in a rat model. Further studies will be needed to identify the compound(s) responsibility for inducing the protective effect against BPH and determine its mechanism of action. PMID:22231294

  10. Endosulfan-alpha Induces CYP26 and CYP3A4 by Activating the Pregnane X Receptor But Not the Constitutive Androstane Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    our son. I also would like to dedicate this thesis to a friend and mentor, the late Dr. Randy L. Rose, whose guidance have been very instrumental in...Chem 22:2106-2113. Gupta PK and Gupta RC (1977) Effect of endosulfan pretreatment on organ weights and on pentobarbital hypnosis in rats. Toxicology 7...Br J Clin Pharmacol 52:349-355. Gupta PK and Gupta RC (1977) Effect of endosulfan pretreatment on organ weights and on pentobarbital hypnosis in rats

  11. The utility of bispectral index monitoring for prevention of rocuronium-induced withdrawal movement in children

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, Il Ok; Kim, Young Sung; Won, Young Ju; Kim, Heezoo; Kong, Myoung Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study was designed to determine whether a deep hypnotic state with a bispectral index (BIS) value less than 40 could alleviate withdrawal movement (WM) upon rocuronium injection during anesthesia induction in children. Methods: Finally, 135 healthy children (3–12 years) scheduled for minor elective surgery were studied. Without premedication, anesthesia was induced with thiopental sodium 5 mg/kg. Patients were randomized into 2 groups (control vs experimental) and then by virtue of rocuronium injection time, patients in the experimental group were allocated into 2 groups, as follows: in the control group (group C; n = 45), rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg was administered at the loss of eyelash reflex; in the 1st experimental group, rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg was administered when BIS fell to less than 40 (group T; n = 45); however, if BIS did not fall below 40 after thiopental sodium administration, manual ventilation was provided with oxygen 6 L/minute using sevoflurane 8% and then rocuronium was administered when BIS fell below 40 (the 2nd experimental group, group S; n = 45). Rocuronium-induced WM was evaluated using a 4-point scale (no movement; movement/withdrawal involving the arm only; generalized response, with movement/withdrawal of more than 1 extremity, but no requirement for restraint of the body; and generalized response which required restraint of the body and caused coughing or breath-holding). Results: No significant differences were found among the groups for patient characteristics including age, sex, height, and location of venous cannula. However, body weight, height, and body mass index in group S were all smaller than those in group T. The incidence of WM caused by rocuronium was 100% in group C, 95.6% in group T, and 80% in group S, and was significantly lower in group S than in group C. The grade of WM was 3.7 ± 0.6 in group C, 3.2 ± 0.9 in group T, and 2.6 ± 1.0 in group S. It was significantly

  12. Ginkgo Biloba Ameliorates Subfertility Induced by Testicular Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Adult Wistar Rats: A Possible New Mitochondrial Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Asmaa Ibrahim; El-Zawahry, Khaled Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Testicular torsion, a surgical emergency, could affect the endocrine and exocrine testicular functions. This study demonstrates histopathological and physiological effects of testicular ischemia/perfusion (I/R) injury and the possible protective effects of Ginkgo biloba treatment. Fifty adult male Wistar rats, 180–200 gm, were randomly divided into sham-operated, Gingko biloba supplemented, ischemia only, I/R, and Gingko biloba treated I/R groups. Overnight fasted rats were anaesthetized by Pentobarbital; I/R was performed by left testis 720° rotation in I/R and treated I/R groups. Orchiectomy was performed for histopathological studies and detection of mitochondrial NAD+. Determination of free testosterone, FSH, TNF-α, and IL1-β in plasma was performed. Plasma-free testosterone was significantly decreased, while plasma FSH, TNF-α, IL-1β, and testicular mitochondrial NAD+ were significantly increased in I/R group compared to control group. These parameters were reversed in Gingko biloba treated I/R group compared to I/R group. I/R caused marked testicular damage and increased APAF-1 in the apoptotic cells which were reversed by Ginkgo biloba treatment. It could be concluded that I/R caused subfertility induced by apoptosis and oxidative stress manifested by the elevated testicular mitochondrial NAD+, which is considered a new possible mechanism. Also, testicular injury could be reduced by Gingko biloba administration alone. PMID:28101298

  13. Effects of alpha adrenoceptor blockade on renal nerve stimulation-induced norepinephrine release and vasoconstriction in the dog kidney.

    PubMed

    Hisa, H; Araki, S; Tomura, Y; Hayashi, Y; Satoh, S

    1989-02-01

    Effects of alpha-antagonists on renal norepinephrine (NE) release and vasoconstriction induced by renal nerve stimulation (RNS) were examined in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. RNS at 1,2 and 3 Hz (1 msec duration, 10-20 V) for 1 min decreased renal blood flow (RBF) and increased both the renal venous NE concentration (NEC) and calculated renal NE efflux (NEE). The RBF responses to 2 and 3 Hz RNS and NEC responses to 1, 2 and 3 Hz RNS during intrarenal arterial infusion of yohimbine (1.0 micrograms/kg/min) were greater than those observed during the control period. The NEE responses to 1 and 2 Hz RNS, but not to 3 Hz RNS, were also potentiated by the yohimbine infusion. Prazosin treatment (0.2 mg/kg i.v.) attenuated the RBF responses. Subsequent infusion of yohimbine potentiated both the NEC and NEE responses to 1, 2 and 3 Hz RNS in this alpha-1 adrenoceptor-blocked state. These results suggest that an alpha-2 adrenoceptor-mediated inhibitory mechanism of neural NE release exists in the dog kidney, which can be activated by endogenously released catecholamines to modulate the neural control of renal hemodynamics. Alpha-1 adrenoceptor-mediated renal vasoconstriction may affect the evaluation of neural NE release by NEE when high-frequency RNS is applied during inhibition of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor-mediated mechanism.

  14. Loss of α1,6-fucosyltransferase inhibits chemical-induced hepatocellular carcinoma and tumorigenesis by down-regulating several cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqin; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Isaji, Tomoya; Lu, Jishun; Im, Sanghun; Hang, Qinglei; Gu, Wei; Hou, Sicong; Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Gu, Jianguo

    2015-08-01

    Up-regulation of core fucosylation catalyzed by α1,6-fucosyltransferase (Fut8) has been observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, to explore the role of Fut8 expression in hepatocarcinogensis, we established the chemical-induced HCC models in the male wild-type (WT; Fut8(+/+)), hetero (Fut8(+/-)), and knockout (KO; Fut8(-/-)) mice by use of diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and pentobarbital (PB). In the Fut8(+/+) and Fut8(+/-) mice, multiple large and vascularized nodules were induced with an increased expression of Fut8 after DEN and PB treatment. However, the formation of HCC in Fut8(-/-) mice was suppressed almost completely. This potent inhibitory effect of Fut8 deficiency on tumorigenesis was also confirmed by the abolished tumor formation of Fut8 KO human hepatoma cell line cells by use of a xenograft tumor model. Furthermore, loss of the Fut8 gene resulted in attenuated responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the HepG2 cell line, which provides the possible mechanisms for the contribution of Fut8 to hepatocarcinogensis. Taken together, our study clearly demonstrated that core fucosylation acts as a critical functional modulator in the liver and implicated Fut8 as a prognostic marker, as well as a novel, therapeutic target for HCC.

  15. Identification of a developmentally-regulated and psychostimulant-inducible novel rat gene mrt3 in the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Muraoka, Shin-ichiro; Kajii, Yasushi; Umino, Asami; Nishikawa, Toru

    2014-10-01

    The psychotomimetic effects of stimulant drugs including amphetamines and cocaine are known to change during the postnatal development in humans and experimental animals. To obtain an insight into the molecular basis of the onset of stimulant-induced psychosis, we have explored the gene transcripts that differentially respond to methamphetamine (MAP) in the developing rat brains using a differential cloning technique, the RNA arbitrarily-primed PCR. We identified from the rat neocortex a novel and developmentally regulated MAP-inducible gene mrt3 (MAP responsive transcript 3) that is transcribed to a presumable non-coding RNA of 3.8kb and is located on the reverse strand of the F-box/LRR-repeat protein 17-like gene mapped on the rat chromosome Xq12. The mrt3 mRNAs are predominantly expressed in the brain and lung. Acute MAP injection upregulated the mrt3 expression in the neocortex at postnatal day 50, but not days 8, 15 and 23, in a D1 receptor antagonist-sensitive manner. This upregulation was mimicked by another stimulant, cocaine, whereas pentobarbital and D1 antagonist failed to alter the mrt3 expression. Moreover, repeated treatment with MAP for 5 days inhibited the ability of the challenge dose of MAP or cocaine to increase the neocortical mrt3 expression without affecting the basal mrt3 mRNA levels on day 14 of withdrawal. These late-developing, cocaine-cross reactive, D1 antagonist-sensitive and long-term regulations of mrt3 by MAP are similar to those of stimulant-induced behavioral sensitization, a model of the onset and relapse of stimulant-induced psychosis and schizophrenia, and therefore may be associated with the pathophysiology of the model.

  16. Role of transmural dispersion of repolarization in the genesis of drug-induced torsades de pointes.

    PubMed

    Antzelevitch, Charles

    2005-11-01

    Torsades de pointes (TdP) is a potentially lethal arrhythmia that develops as a consequence of amplification of electrical heterogeneities intrinsic to the ventricular myocardium. These heterogeneities exist because of differences in the time course of repolarization of the three predominant cell types that make up the ventricular myocardium, giving rise to transmural voltage gradients and a dispersion of repolarization responsible for inscription of the ECG T wave. Antiarrhythmic agents with class III actions and/or the various mutations and cardiomyopathies associated with the long QT syndrome reduce net repolarizing current and amplify the intrinsic spatial dispersion of repolarization, thus creating the substrate for the development of reentry. The result is prolongation of the QT interval, abnormal T waves, and development of polymorphic reentrant ventricular tachycardia displaying characteristics of TdP. Prolongation of the QT interval apparently is not the sole determinant of a drug's potential to cause TdP. Agents that do not increase transmural dispersion of repolarization have little or no potential to induce TdP despite any ability to prolong the QT interval. In addition, drugs such as amiodarone and sodium pentobarbital can cause large QT prolongations but, by reducing transmural dispersion of repolarization, may reduce the likelihood of TdP. Arterially perfused wedge preparations of canine left ventricle can be used to explore the role of transmural dispersion of repolarization in the genesis of TdP. The purpose of this article is to review recent advances that have improved our understanding of these mechanisms, particularly the role of transmural dispersion of repolarization, in the genesis of drug-induced TdP and to examine how these advances can guide us toward the development of safer and more effective drugs.

  17. Acute pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure of the airways to staphylococcal enterotoxin type B in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Desouza, Ivani A. . E-mail: ivanidesouza@fcm.unicamp.br; Franco-Penteado, Carla F.; Camargo, Enilton A.; Lima, Carmen S.P.; Teixeira, Simone A.; Muscara, Marcelo N.; De Nucci, Gilberto; Antunes, Edson

    2006-11-15

    Staphylocococcus aureus is a gram-positive bacterium that produces several enterotoxins, which are responsible for most part of pathological conditions associated to staphylococcal infections, including lung inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the underlying inflammatory mechanisms involved in leukocyte recruitment in rats exposed to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium and intratracheally injected with either SEB or sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, 0.4 ml). Airways exposition to SEB (7.5-250 ng/trachea) caused a dose- and time-dependent neutrophil accumulation in BAL fluid, the maximal effects of which were observed at 4 h post-SEB exposure (250 ng/trachea). Eosinophils were virtually absent in BAL fluid, whereas mononuclear cell counts increased only at 24 h post-SEB. Significant elevations of granulocytes in bone marrow (mature and immature forms) and peripheral blood have also been detected. In BAL fluid, marked elevations in the levels of lipid mediators (LTB{sub 4} and PGE{sub 2}) and cytokines (TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and IL-10) were observed after SEB instillation. The SEB-induced neutrophil accumulation in BAL fluid was reduced by pretreatment with dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg), the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (3 mg/kg), the selective iNOS inhibitor compound 1400 W (5 mg/kg) and the lipoxygenase inhibitor AA-861 (200 {mu}g/kg). In separate experiments carried out with rat isolated peripheral neutrophils, SEB failed to induce neutrophil adhesion to serum-coated plates and chemotaxis. In conclusion, rat airways exposition to SEB causes a neutrophil-dependent lung inflammation at 4 h as result of the release of proinflammatory (NO, PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4}, TNF-{alpha}, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory mediators (IL-10)

  18. Influence of some agents that affect 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism and receptors on nitrazepam-induced sleep in mice.

    PubMed

    Wambebe, C

    1985-01-01

    The effects of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), citalopram, p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), cyproheptadine, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD-25), metitepine and NSD 1034 on nitrazepam-induced sleep were investigated in mice. Nitrazepam (1.6-25.6 mg kg-1, i.p.) induced a dose-dependent sedative-hypnotic effect. 5-HTP (8-128 mg kg-1 i.m.) did not induce behavioural sleep but sedated mice and significantly potentiated nitrazepam-induced sleep. Similarly, 5-HTP (4-32 mg kg-1, i.m.) increased pentobarbitone sleeping time. Citalopram (2.5-10 mg kg-1, i.p.) significantly potentiated nitrazepam sleep. PCPA (300-400 mg kg-1, i.p.) completely abolished nitrazepam sleep; 5-HTP (32 mg kg-1, i.m.) reversed this effect. NSD 1034 (75-150 mg kg-1, i.p.) antagonized the potentiating effect of 5-HTP (32 mg kg-1, i.m.) on nitrazepam sleep. Cyproheptadine (5-10 mg kg-1, i.p.) and LSD-25 (2.5-10 micrograms kg-1, i.p.) partially antagonized nitrazepam sleep. Similarly, 5-HTP-induced potentiation of nitrazepam sleep was antagonized by cyproheptadine and LSD-25. Metitepine (4-8 mg kg-1, i.p.) induced behavioural sleep and significantly potentiated nitrazepam sleep. Ro15-1788 (10 mg kg-1, i.p.) effectively antagonized nitrazepam-induced sleep. These results indicate that enhancement of central 5-HT neurotransmission may underlie nitrazepam-induced sleep in mice.

  19. Eszopiclone Prevents Excitotoxicity and Neurodegeneration in the Hippocampus Induced by Experimental Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Simon J.; Xi, Ming-Chu; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Yamuy, Jack; Sampogna, Sharon; Tsai, Kevin L.; Lim, Vincent; Morales, Francisco R.; Chase, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: This study was designed to determine the effects of eszopiclone on apnea-induced excitotoxic synaptic processes and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Design: Recurrent periods of apnea, which consisted of a sequence of apnea (75% SpO2), followed by ventilation with recovery to normoxia (> 95% SpO2), were induced for a period of three hours in anesthetized guinea pigs. The CA3 Schaffer collateral pathway in the hippocampus was stimulated and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) response was recorded in CA1. Animals in the experimental group received an intravenous injection of eszopiclone (3 mg/kg) 10 min prior to the initiation of the periods of recurrent apnea, and once every 60 min thereafter; control animals received comparable injections of vehicle. At the end of the 3-h period of recurrent apnea, the animals were perfused, and hippocampal sections were immunostained in order to determine the presence of apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Analyses and Results: Apnea resulted in a persistent increase in synaptic responsiveness of CA1 neurons as determined by analyses of the fEPSP. Eszopiclone antagonized the apnea-induced increase in the fEPSP. Morphological analyses revealed significant apoptosis of CA1 neurons in control animals; however, there was no significant apoptosis in eszopiclone-treated animals. Conclusions: Eszopiclone was determined to suppress the apnea-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA1 neurons, thereby reducing/eliminating neurotoxicity. These data lend credence to our hypothesis that eszopiclone, exclusive of its hypnotic actions, has the capacity to function as a potent neuroprotective agent. Citation: Fung SJ; Xi MC; Zhang JH; Yamuy J; Sampogna S; Tsai KL; Lim V; Morales FR; Chase MH. Eszopiclone prevents excitotoxicity and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus induced by experimental apnea. SLEEP 2009;32(12):1593-1601. PMID:20041595

  20. Evaluation of the calcium-antagonist, antidiarrhoeic and central nervous system activities of Baccharis serraefolia.

    PubMed

    Tortoriello, J; Aguilar-Santamaría, L

    1996-09-01

    Baccharis serraefolia is a widely used plant to treat diarrhoea in Mexican traditional medicine. Although the methanolic extract of this plant has shown an important dose-dependent spasmolytic activity, its underlying mechanism has not been studied. In the present work, the methanolic extract of B. serraefolia significantly delayed the onset of tonic seizures induced by strychnine and pentylenetetrazol; besides, it diminished the death rate and number of animals that exhibited convulsions. It produced potentiation of the hypnotic effect of pentobarbital. Oral administration produced an inhibition of gastrointestinal transit in mice as effective as that produced by loperamide. As to the effect on smooth muscles, the active extract produced an inhibition of contraction induced electrically, which could not be reversed by naloxone. The calcium concentration-contraction curve showed a rightward displacement when the extract was added to isolated guinea pig ileum depolarized with high K+ and cumulative concentrations of Ca2+. The results suggest that the methanolic extract does not interact with classical opiate receptors and its effects, at least that produced on smooth muscle, may be due to a probable interference with calcium influx and/or calcium release from an intra-cellular store.

  1. Antinociceptive effect of citronellal in mice.

    PubMed

    Melo, M S; Sena, L C S; Barreto, F J N; Bonjardim, L R; Almeida, J R G S; Lima, J T; De Sousa, D P; Quintans-Júnior, L J

    2010-04-01

    Citronellal is a monoterpene reported to be a major component of the essential oils in various aromatic species of plants. The present study evaluated the central nervous system depressant and antinociceptive properties of citronellal through behavioral experimental models. Following intraperitoneal injection, citronellal induced the reduction of spontaneous activity, ataxia, analgesia, and sedation. In pentobarbital-induced hypnosis, CTL (citronellal) at 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg (i.p.) significantly increased sleeping time (88.0 +/- 11.4, 100.2 +/- 16.4, and 119.5 +/- 20.9 min) when compared to vehicle solution injections (43.0 +/- 6.1). Citronellal (100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the number of writhes (66.4 and 81.9%) in a writhing test and the number of paw licks during phase 1 (47.0 and 66.8%) and phase 2 (71.1 and 79.2%) of a formalin test when compared to control group animals. In addition, the results of a hot plate test showed central analgesic properties for citronellal (p < 0.05). These results indicate depressant, hypnotic, and antinociceptive properties of this monoterpene.

  2. Social isolation induces deficit of latent learning performance in mice: a putative animal model of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Hirofumi; Ono, Kazuya; Murakami, Yukihisa; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2013-02-01

    Social isolation of rodents (SI) elicits a variety of stress responses such as increased aggressiveness, hyper-locomotion, and reduced susceptibility to pentobarbital. To obtain a better understanding of the relevance of SI-induced behavioral abnormalities to psychiatric disorders, we examined the effect of SI on latent learning as an index of spatial attention, and discussed the availability of SI as an epigenetic model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Except in specially stated cases, 4-week-old male mice were housed in a group or socially isolated for 3-70 days before experiments. The animals socially isolated for 1 week or more exhibited spatial attention deficit in the water-finding test. Re-socialized rearing for 5 weeks after 1-week SI failed to attenuate the spatial attention deficit. The effect of SI on spatial attention showed no gender difference or correlation with increased aggressive behavior. Moreover, SI had no effect on cognitive performance elucidated in a modified Y-maze or an object recognition test, but it significantly impaired contextual and conditional fear memory elucidated in the fear-conditioning test. Drugs used for ADHD therapy, methylphenidate (1-10 mg/kg, i.p.) and caffeine (0.5-1 mg/kg, i.p.), improved SI-induced latent learning deficit in a manner reversible with cholinergic but not dopaminergic antagonists. Considering the behavioral features of SI mice together with their susceptibility to ADHD drugs, the present findings suggest that SI provides an epigenetic animal model of ADHD and that central cholinergic systems play a role in the effect of methylphenidate on SI-induced spatial attention deficit.

  3. Cardiac arrhythmias induced by chloral hydrate in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Han, Pengfei; Song, Haibo; Yang, Pingliang; Xie, Huiqi; Kang, Y James

    2011-06-01

    Chloral hydrate has been long used as a safe sedative and hypnotic drug in humans. However, reports on its cardiovascular adverse effects have been published from time to time. The present study was undertaken to use Rhesus monkeys as a model to define the dose regiment of chloral hydrate at which cardiac arrhythmias can be induced and the consequences of the cardiac events. Male Rhesus monkeys of 2-3 years old were intravenously infused with chloral hydrate starting at 50 mg/kg with an increasing increment of 25 mg/kg until the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. In addition, a traditional up-and-down dosing procedure was applied to define a single dose level at which cardiac arrhythmias can be induced. The data obtained showed that when the sequentially escaladed dose reached 125 mg/kg, cardiac arrhythmias occurred in all monkeys tested. The single effective dose to cause cardiac arrhythmias calculated from the crossover analysis was 143 ± 4 mg/kg. This value would be equivalent to 68.6 ± 1.9 mg/kg for children and 46.4 ± 1.3 mg/kg for adults in humans. Under either multiple or single dose condition, cardiac arrhythmias did not occur before 40 min after the onset of anesthesia induced by chloral hydrate. Cardiac arrhythmias were recovered without help at the end of the anesthesia in most cases, but also continued after the regain of consciousness in some cases. The cardiac arrhythmias were accompanied with compromised cardiac function including suppressed fractional shortening and ejection fraction. This study thus suggests that cautions need to be taken when chloral hydrate is used above certain levels and beyond a certain period of anesthesia, and cardiac arrhythmias induced by chloral hydrate need to be closely monitored because compromised cardiac function may occur simultaneously. In addition, patients with cardiac arrhythmias induced by chloral hydrate should be monitored even after they are recovered from the anesthesia.

  4. Effect of oxcarbazepine pretreatment on convulsive activity and brain damage induced by kainic acid administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Guerrero, Fructuoso; Mexicano, Graciela; Campos-Sepúlveda, Efraín; Romero, Rosa María; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; González-Maciel, Angélica

    2008-11-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is one of the most common types of epilepsy. Progress in the understanding and treatment of this type of epilepsy would be greatly facilitated by the availability of an animal model, which reproduced the behavioral and electrographic features of this condition. In this context, kainic acid (KA, 2-carboxy-3-carboxymethyl-4-isopropenylpyrrolidine) administration causes a syndrome characterized by an acute status epilepticus and subsequent brain damage similar to that in temporal lobe epilepsy of humans. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether oxcarbazepine (10,11-dihydro-10-oxo-5 H -dibenz(b,f)azepine-5-carboxamide), an antiepileptic drug, protects against both epileptic activity and brain damage induced by KA administration. Chronically implanted adult male Wistar rats were polygraphically recorded during 10 continuous hours under 4 different conditions: a) control, b) after KA administration alone, c) after KA administration in oxcarbazepine pretreated animals and d) after the administration of oxcarbazepine alone. Animals treated with KA alone presented behavioral and electrophysiological convulsive activity as well as brain damage. Latency of seizure installation was lengthened significantly and convulsive activity was slightly reduced, however, brain damage was still present in oxcarbazepine pretreated animals. Administration of oxcarbazepine alone induced a hypnotic behavior and brain damage was also present.

  5. Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 Modulation of Adolescent Rat Ethanol-Induced Protein Kinase C Translocation and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Santerre, J. L.; Kolitz, E. B.; Pal, R.; Rogow, J. A.; Werner, D. F.

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol consumption typically begins during adolescence, a developmental period which exhibits many age-dependent differences in ethanol behavioral sensitivity. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity is largely implicated in ethanol-behaviors, and our previous work indicates that regulation of novel PKC isoforms likely contributes to decreased high-dose ethanol sensitivity during adolescence. The cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) signaling cascade selectivity modulates novel and atypical PKC isoform activity, as well as adolescent ethanol hypnotic sensitivity. Therefore, the current study was designed to ascertain adolescent cPLA2 activity both basally and in response to ethanol, as well as it's involvement in ethanol-induced PKC isoform translocation patterns. cPLA2 expression was elevated during adolescence, and activity was increased only in adolescents following high-dose ethanol administration. Novel, but not atypical PKC isoforms translocate to cytosolic regions following high-dose ethanol administration. Inhibiting cPLA2 with AACOCF3 blocked ethanol-induced PKC cytosolic translocation. Finally, inhibition of novel, but not atypical, PKC isoforms when cPLA2 activity was elevated, modulated adolescent high-dose ethanol-sensitivity. These data suggest that the cPLA2/PKC pathway contributes to the acute behavioral effects of ethanol during adolescence. PMID:25791059

  6. Behavioural effects of Passiflora incarnata L. and its indole alkaloid and flavonoid derivatives and maltol in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Soulimani, R; Younos, C; Jarmouni, S; Bousta, D; Misslin, R; Mortier, F

    1997-06-01

    Lyophilised hydroalcoholic and aqueous extracts of the aerial parts of Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloraceae) (Passion-flower), as well as chemical constituents of the plant, indole alkaloids (harman, harmin, harmalin, harmol, and harmalol) maltol and flavonoids (orientin, isoorientin, vitexin and isovitexin) were assessed for behavioral effects in mice. The accordance with the traditional use of P. incarnata, psychotropic properties were confirmed by some behavioral tests in mice. The anxiolytic properties of hydroalcoholic extract were confirmed at 400 mg/kg by the increase of rears and steps climbed in the staircase test (non-familiar environmental test), and the increase in locomotion and time spent in light side in the light/dark box choice test (non-familiar environmental test). The sedative properties of aqueous extract were confirmed at 400 g/kg by decrease of rears and steps climbed in the staircase test and the decrease of rears and locomotion in the free exploratory test. Moreover, the aqueous extract induced sleep in mice after treatment with a sub-hypnotic dose of pentobarbital.

  7. Guarana (Paullinia cupana): toxic behavioral effects in laboratory animals and antioxidants activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mattei, R; Dias, R F; Espínola, E B; Carlini, E A; Barros, S B

    1998-03-01

    The effects on toxic and behavioral levels of guarana (Paullinia cupana) were assessed in rats and mice subsequent to acute and chronic administrations and were compared to those produced by Ginseng (Panax ginseng). Experimental parameters included tests for antioxidant capacity in vitro and measured in vivo, toxicological screening, progress in weight, motor activity, death rate, and histopathological examination of the viscera. Guarana showed an antioxidant effect because, even at low concentrations (1.2 microg/ml), it inhibited the process of lipid peroxidation. In high doses of 1000-2000 mg/kg (i.p. and p.o.) it did not induce significant alterations in parameters for toxicological screening. No effects on motor activity were observed, neither did guarana alter the hypnotic effect of pentobarbital. Ginseng (250-1000 mg/kg i.p.), however, elicited reductions in motor activity, eyelid ptosis and bristling fur. Consumption of liquids containing guarana or ginseng and progress in weight of the animals remained at levels similar to the controls, even after prolonged administration. The percentage mortality was equivalent in control and in treated groups. The absence of toxicity of guarana was also demonstrated by histopathological examination, with no alteration being detected in heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, liver, pancreas, kidneys, bladder and spleen.

  8. Drug withdrawal convulsions and susceptibility to convulsants after short-term selective breeding for acute ethanol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Metten, P; Belknap, J K; Crabbe, J C

    1998-09-01

    High Alcohol Withdrawal (HAW) and Low Alcohol Withdrawal (LAW) mice were selectively bred from a foundation population of C57BL6/J (B6) x DBA/2J (D2) F2 intercross progeny for display of intense or mild handling-induced withdrawal convulsions, respectively, following a single injection of a hypnotic dose of ethanol (alcohol; 4 g/kg). The HAW line had significantly greater alcohol withdrawal severity scores compared to the LAW line after only a single generation of selection; the magnitude of the line difference was 8-fold by the fourth selected generation. We tested these lines for severity of withdrawal convulsions following the benzodiazepine, diazepam; the gaseous anesthetic, nitrous oxide; the imidazopyridine, zolpidem and the barbiturate, pentobarbital. In all cases, HAW mice had significantly greater withdrawal severity than mice of the LAW line. These results indicate that some genes influencing withdrawal convulsion severity following ethanol also affect withdrawal from other CNS depressants. D2 mice are more sensitive to a variety of convulsants than B6 mice (and have more severe withdrawal convulsions). We, therefore, tested separate groups of mice of both selectively bred lines for threshold sensitivity to pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and kainic acid (KA). No line differences were detected. These results indicate that genes influencing severity of withdrawal from several depressant drugs are largely different from those affecting susceptibility to GABAergic or glutamatergic convulsants.

  9. Evidence that the beta-acids fraction of hops reduces central GABAergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Zanoli, P; Zavatti, M; Rivasi, M; Brusiani, F; Losi, G; Puia, G; Avallone, R; Baraldi, M

    2007-01-03

    Humulus lupulus (hops) is traditionally used as a tranquilizing herbal remedy. Here, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro effect of hop beta-acids on central nervous system function. Oral administration of beta-acids (5-10mg/kg) in rats produced an increased exploratory activity in the open field, a reduction in the pentobarbital hypnotic activity and a worsening of picrotoxin-induced seizures. When dosed at 10mg/kg, beta-acids increased, in the elevated plus maze, open arm entries reducing in parallel those in closed arms. In the forced swimming test, we observed a reduction in the immobility time that could suggest an antidepressant-like activity. Electrophysiological studies performed on cerebellar granule cells in culture showed that the beta-acids fraction decreased GABA-evoked current in a dose-dependent way. The effect was not inhibited by the benzodiazepine antagonist Ro 15-1788. Benzodiazepine receptors involvement was also excluded by [(3)H]-Ro 15-1788 binding assay. In conclusion, the behavioral effects of beta-acids fraction could be explained by a reduction in the GABAergic activity although we cannot rule out the involvement of other neurotransmitter systems.

  10. NG-methyl-L-arginine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-induced hypotension: implications for the involvement of nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourn, R G; Gross, S S; Jubran, A; Adams, J; Griffith, O W; Levi, R; Lodato, R F

    1990-01-01

    Clinical assessment of the activity of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) against human cancer has been limited by a dose-dependent cardiovascular toxicity, most frequently hypotension. TNF is also thought to mediate the vascular collapse resulting from bacterial endotoxin. The present studies address the mechanism by which TNF causes hypotension and provide evidence for elevated production of nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator initially characterized as endothelium-derived relaxing factor. Nitric oxide is synthesized by several cell types, including endothelial cells and macrophages, from the guanidino nitrogen of L-arginine; the enzymatic pathway is competitively inhibited by NG-methyl-L-arginine. We found that hypotension induced in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs by TNF (10 micrograms/kg, i.v., resulting in a fall in mean systemic arterial pressure from 124.7 +/- 7 to 62.0 +/- 22.9 mmHg; 1 mmHg = 133 Pa) was completely reversed within 2 min following administration of NG-methyl-L-arginine (4.4 mg/kg, i.v.). In contrast, NG-methyl-L-arginine failed to reverse the hypotensive response to an equivalent depressor dose of nitroglycerin, a compound that acts by forming nitric oxide by a nonenzymatic, arginine-independent mechanism. The effect of NG-methyl-L-arginine on TNF-induced hypotension was antagonized, and the hypotension restored, by administration of excess L-arginine (100 mg/kg, i.v.). Our findings suggest that excessive nitric oxide production mediates the hypotensive effect of TNF. PMID:2333306

  11. Traffic noise-induced sleep disturbances and their correction by an anxiolytic sedative, OX-373.

    PubMed

    Saletu, B; Grünberger, J

    1981-01-01

    In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study the effect of nocturnal traffic noise and bedtime medication of a new benzodiazepine, OX-373, on objective and subjective sleep variables as well as on the quality of morning awakenings was investigated. 10 healthy subjects spent 17 nights in the sleep laboratory: 2 adaptation nights, 1 baseline night, 4 drug nights (20, 30, and 40 mg OX-373 and placebo) and 4 subsequent wash-out nights as well as 3 nights under traffic noise with placebo, 30 and 40 mg OX-373 and 3 subsequent wash-out nights. Nocturnal traffic noise with an intensity of 45-65 dB(A) induced sleep disturbances characterized by an increase in intermittent wakefulness and stage 1 and the number of nocturnal awakenings as well as by a decrease of spindle and REM sleep stages. Subjectively, a decrease of deep sleep and increase of light sleep and middle insomnia was reported. Upon awakening in the morning, mood was significantly deteriorated. The new benzodiazepine OX-373 attenuated the above-described traffic noise-induced changes and produced even oppositional alterations, such as a decrease in stage 1, number of awakenings and stage shifts while increasing stage 2. The drug alone decreased the number of awakenings and stage 1 and augmented stage 4 as compared with placebo, which was subjectively felt as an increase in deep sleep and as a decrease of light sleep, early and middle insomnia. In the morning, there were no signs of 'hangover', which was confirmed also by psychometry. Nor were there any clinically relevant alterations in blood pressure and pulse. Thus, our studies confirmed earlier pharmaco-EEG and psychometric investigations predicting OX-373 as well-tolerated anxiolytic sedative, and suggested further that traffic noise could eventually be utilized as an experimental provocative technique in order to induce a standardized sleep disturbance for early clinical drug evaluation of potentially hypnotic substances.

  12. The role of nitric oxide in saline-induced natriuresis and diuresis in rats.

    PubMed

    Noonan, W T; Banks, R O

    1999-09-01

    This study was designed to determine to what extent nitric oxide (NO) mediates the natriuretic and diuretic responses to acute isotonic saline (0.9 gram % NaCl) volume expansion (SVE, 0.5 ml min-1 kg-1). Studies were performed on 49 pentobarbital anesthetized (65 mg/kg) female Sprague-Dawley rats with or without a NO synthase inhibitor, Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (LNA). Group 1 received saline at 27 microliter/min for 1 hr (baseline) and then SVE for 1 hr; Groups 2-4 received LNA at 10, 150, and 200 microgram kg-1 min-1, respectively, for 1 hr followed by LNA + SVE. To determine to what extent inhibition of NOS would reverse an ongoing SVE-induced natriuresis and diuresis, Group 5 was saline-volume-expanded for hours 1 and 2 whereas Group 6 was administered SVE during the first hour and then SVE + 150 microgram kg -1 min-1 LNA during the second hour. SVE caused a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of Group 1 and the LNA-treated rats (Groups 2-4). This SVE-induced increase in the GFR occurred despite the fact that baseline GFR was significantly lower in the two groups of rats that were infused with the highest doses of LNA (Groups 3-4). SVE was also associated with similar increases in urine flow rate, sodium and potassium excretion, and total osmolar excretion in Groups 1-4. On the other hand, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in Group 2 during SVE + LNA and during the baseline as well as during the SVE periods in Groups 3-4; MAP was also significantly elevated in Group 6 during SVE + LNA. Thus, despite the fact that MAP was higher in LNA-treated rats, sodium and urine flow rates were the same as in Group 1 (i.e., there was no evidence of a pressure natriuresis or diuresis in these animals). Along these lines, there was a small but significant positive linear correlation coefficient (r = 0.41, P = 0.05) between sodium excretion values and corresponding MAP values in SVE control rats but not in Groups 3-4 during

  13. Effects of niflumic acid on alpha1-adrenoceptor-induced vasoconstriction in mesenteric artery in vitro and in vivo in two-kidney one-clip hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    He, Y; Tabrizchi, R

    1997-06-11

    The influence of niflumic acid (3 and 10 microM), a Cl- channel antagonist, on cirazoline-induced vasoconstriction in isolated perfused mesenteric artery (5 ml/min) from two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) hypertensive and sham normotensive rats was examined. In addition, the effect of a single i.v. bolus injection of niflumic acid (3 mg/kg) on cirazoline-mediated reduction in vascular conductance in superior mesenteric artery was determined in pentobarbital-anaesthetized hypertensive and normotensive rats. Bolus injections of cirazoline induced a dose-dependent transient increase in the perfusion pressure in vitro. In the presence of niflumic acid, cirazoline-mediated vasoconstriction was significantly inhibited. Cirazoline-induced vasoconstriction in isolated mesenteric beds was also significantly inhibited following perfusion with Cl(-)-free buffer. Pre-perfusion of mesenteric blood vessels with Cl(-)-free buffer resulted in a significantly greater inhibition of cirazoline-mediated vasoconstriction in sham normotensive rats than in hypertensive rats. We found that in Cl(-)-free buffer, cirazoline-mediated vasoconstriction could be further inhibited by niflumic acid. Intravenous infusion of cumulative doses of cirazoline in vivo caused a dose-dependent decrease in superior mesenteric vascular conductance. Pretreatment with niflumic acid significantly impaired cirazoline-mediated decreases in vascular conductance. Our results indicate that chloride ions play an important role in alpha1-adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in mesenteric blood vessels. In addition, the contribution of chloride ions in alpha1-adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in blood vessels from hypertensive rats appears to be reduced.

  14. Attenuation of capsaicin-induced acute and visceral nociceptive pain by alpha- and beta-amyrin, a triterpene mixture isolated from Protium heptaphyllum resin in mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Francisco A; Costa, Charllynton L S; Chaves, Mariana H; Almeida, Fernanda R C; Cavalcante, Italo J M; Lima, Alana F; Lima, Roberto C P; Silva, Regilane M; Campos, Adriana Rolim; Santos, Flavia A; Rao, Vietla S N

    2005-10-21

    The triterpene mixture, alpha- and beta-amyrin, isolated from Protium heptaphyllum resin was evaluated on capsaicin-evoked nociception in mice. Orally administered alpha- and beta-amyrin (3 to 100 mg/kg) significantly suppressed the nociceptive behaviors--evoked by either subplantar (1.6 microg) or intracolonic (149 microg) application of capsaicin. The antinociception produced by alpha- and beta-amyrin against subplantar capsaicin-induced paw-licking behavior was neither potentiated nor attenuated by ruthenium red (1.5 mg/kg, s.c.), a non-specific antagonist of vanilloid receptor (TRPV1), but was greatly abolished in animals pretreated with naloxone (2 mg/kg, s.c.), suggesting an opioid mechanism. However, participation of alpha2-adrenoceptor involvement was unlikely since yohimbine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) pretreatment failed to block the antinociceptive effect of alpha- and beta-amyrin in the experimental model of visceral nociception evoked by intracolonic capsaicin. The triterpene mixture (3 to 30 mg/kg, p.o.) neither altered significantly the pentobarbital sleeping time, nor impaired the ambulation or motor coordination in open-field and rota-rod tests, respectively, indicating the absence of sedative or motor abnormality that could account for its antinociception. Nevertheless, alpha- and beta-amyrin could significantly block the capsaicin (10 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced hyperthermic response but not the initial hypothermia. These results suggest that the triterpene mixture, alpha- and beta-amyrin has an analgesia inducing effect, possibly involving vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) and an opioid mechanism.

  15. Levo-tetrahydropalmatine, a natural, mixed dopamine receptor antagonist, inhibits methamphetamine self-administration and methamphetamine-induced reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaokang; Yue, Kai; Ma, Baomiao; Xing, Junqiao; Gan, Yongping; Wang, Daisong; Jin, Guozhang; Li, Chaoying

    2016-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence of methamphetamine (METH) use, no FDA-approved pharmacological treatment is currently available for individuals with a METH addiction. Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) is an alkaloid substance derived from corydalis and stephania that has been used in traditional Asian medicine for its analgesic, sedative and hypnotic properties. Previous pharmacological studies of l-THP indicated that it not only binds to D1 and D2 receptors but also has a low affinity for D3 receptors and may function as an antagonist. The unique pharmacological profile of l-THP suggests that it may have potential therapeutic effects on drug addiction; however, the effects of l-THP in individuals with METH addictions are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of l-THP on METH self-administration and METH-induced reinstatement. In our experiments, l-THP (1.25, 2.50 and 5.00 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased METH self-administration under the fixed-ratio 1 schedule. l-THP (2.50 and 5.00 mg/kg, i.p) also prevented the METH-induced reinstatement of METH-seeking behaviors. Interestingly, l-THP (1.25 and 2.50mg/kg, i.p) did not affect locomotor activity following METH injection (1mg/kg) suggesting that the observed effects of l-THP (2.50mg/kg) on METH-induced reinstatement were not due to motor impairments. Thus, l-THP (a natural, mixed dopamine (DA) receptor antagonist) attenuates METH self-administration and METH-induced reinstatement.

  16. Evaluation of the Antihyperglycemic Effect of Minor Steviol Glycosides in Normoglycemic and Induced-Diabetic Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Aranda-González, Irma; Moguel-Ordóñez, Yolanda; Chel-Guerrero, Luis; Segura-Campos, Maira; Betancur-Ancona, David

    2016-09-01

    Steviol glycosides are a family of compounds found in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni that are responsible for sweetness capacity. The antihyperglycemic effect of the two major steviol glycosides, Rebaudioside A and Stevioside, has been studied and it has been found that despite having the same common structure, only Stevioside exerts an antihyperglycemic effect. Although other steviol derivatives are found in smaller amounts (minor steviol glycosides) in S. rebaudiana, whether or not they possess antihyperglycemic activity has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antihyperglycemic effect of minor steviol glycosides in normoglycemic and diabetic (streptozotocin/nicotinamide) Wistar rats. Rats were subjected to an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) both before and after chronic treatment (28 days). After 6 h of fasting, IPGTT was conducted in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats using 1 g/kg of glucose plus 20 mg/kg of the minor glycoside (Dulcoside A, Rebaudioside B, C, D, or Steviolbioside) or control treatment (distilled water, glibenclamide, or metformin); the blood of the tip of the tail was collected at time 0, 15, 30, 60, and 120 min.; and blood glucose was measured, and its net area under the curve (AUCnet) was calculated. After 28-day chronic oral administration, IPGTT was again performed. Differences were considered significant at P < .05 by one-way ANOVA. Acute intraperitoneal or chronic oral administration of 20 mg/kg of minor steviol glycosides had no antihyperglycemic effect in normoglycemic or induced-diabetic Wistar rats. Considering the dose tested, it is unlikely that these glycosides have an effect on glucose in diabetic or normoglycemic humans.

  17. Nitric oxide mediates the anticonvulsant effects of thalidomide on pentylenetetrazole-induced clonic seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Payandemehr, Borna; Rahimian, Reza; Gooshe, Maziar; Bahremand, Arash; Gholizadeh, Ramtin; Berijani, Sina; Ahmadi-Dastgerdi, Mohammad; Aminizade, Mehdi; Sarreshte-Dari, Ali; Dianati, Vahid; Amanlou, Massoud; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-05-01

    Thalidomide is an old glutamic acid derivative which was initially used as a sedative medication but withdrawn from the market due to the high incidence of teratogenicity. Recently, it has reemerged because of its potential for counteracting number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Other than the antiemetic and hypnotic aspects, thalidomide exerts some anticonvulsant properties in experimental settings. However, the underlying mechanisms of thalidomide actions are not fully realized yet. Some investigations revealed that thalidomide could elicit immunomodulatory or neuromodulatory properties by affecting different targets, including cytokines (such as TNF α), neurotransmitters, and nitric oxide (NO). In this regard, we used a model of clonic seizure induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) in male NMRI mice to investigate whether the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide is affected through modulation of the l-arginine-nitric oxide pathway or not. Injection of a single effective dose of thalidomide (10 mg/kg, i.p. or higher) significantly increased the seizure threshold (P<0.05). On the one hand, pretreatment with low and per se noneffective dose of l-arginine [NO precursor] (10, 30 and 60 mg/kg) prevented the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide. On the other hand, NOS inhibitors [l-NAME and 7-NI] augmented the anticonvulsant effect of a subeffective dose of thalidomide (1 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) at relatively low doses. Meanwhile, several doses of aminoguanidine [an inducible NOS inhibitor] (20, 50 and 100 mg/kg) failed to alter the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide significantly. In summary, our findings demonstrated that the l-arginine-nitric oxide pathway can be involved in the anticonvulsant properties of thalidomide, and the role of constitutive nNOS is prominent in the reported neuroprotective feature.

  18. 21 CFR 522.380 - Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (3) Conditions of use. (i) It is used for general anesthesia and as a... level of 20 to 50 milliliters per 100 pounds of body weight for general anesthesia until the desired... sedative-relaxant, it is administered at a level of one-fourth to one-half of the anesthetic dosage...

  19. 21 CFR 522.2444b - Thiopental and pentobarbital powder for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. For total anesthesia, it is given at approximately..., and the dosage necessary for anesthesia is reduced. Usually 1/2 to 2/3 the normal amount is adequate. (2) Indications for use. It is used as an anesthetic for intravenous administration to dogs and...

  20. Levo-tetrahydropalmatine attenuates the development and expression of methamphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization and the accompanying activation of ERK in the nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, N; Chen, Y; Zhu, J; Wang, L; Cao, G; Dang, Y; Yan, C; Wang, J; Chen, T

    2014-01-31

    Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) is an alkaloid purified from corydalis and has been used in many traditional Chinese herbal preparations for its analgesic, sedative, and hypnotic properties. Previous studies indicated that l-THP has modest antagonist activity against dopamine receptors and thus it might have potential therapeutic effects on drug addiction. However, whether and how l-THP contributes to methamphetamine (METH)-induced locomotor sensitization remains unclear. Therefore, the current study aims to examine the roles of l-THP in the development and expression of METH-induced locomotor sensitization as well as the accompanying extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), caudate putamen (CPu) and prefrontal cortex (PFc) in mice. We found that moderate doses of METH (0.5 and 2 mg/kg) induced hyper-locomotor activity in mice on all METH injection days whereas high dose of METH (5 mg/kg)-treated mice displayed only acute locomotor response to METH and severe stereotyped behaviors on the first day after drug injection. Interestingly, only 2 mg/kg dose of METH-induced locomotor sensitization which was accompanied by the activation of ERK1/2 in the NAc and CPu in mice. Although l-THP (5 and 10 mg/kg) per se did not induce obvious changes in locomotor activities in mice, its co-administration with METH could significantly attenuate acute METH-induced hyper-locomotor activity, the development and expression of METH-induced locomotor sensitization, and the accompanying ERK1/2 activation in the NAc and CPu. These results suggest that l-THP has potential therapeutic effect on METH-induced locomotor sensitization, and the underlying molecular mechanism might be related to its inhibitory effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the NAc and CPu.

  1. Inducing labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... inducing labor is to "break the bag of waters" or rupture the membranes. Your health care provider will do a pelvic exam and will guide a small plastic probe with a hook on the end through your cervix to create a hole in the membrane. This does not hurt you ...

  2. The spirit of hypnosis: doing hypnosis versus being hypnotic.

    PubMed

    Yapko, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    The spirit of hypnosis is reflected in the belief that people are more resourceful than they realize and through hypnosis can create meaningful possibilities. Thus, it is puzzling why hypnosis isn't better regarded. Do we present as too internally conflicted to inspire others' confidence? Do we overstate the dangers of hypnosis and scare people away? Do we define hypnosis as such a unique approach that others don't see its relevance for their work? Self-exploration is important if we want to ensure we are not unwittingly adding to our image problems as a field. Beyond these considerations, the novel and spirited application of hypnosis in the context of captive elephant breeding is discussed, as is a personal acknowledgment of some of the pioneers who manifested the spirit of hypnosis.

  3. Influence of Some Hypnotist and Subject Variables on Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Robert P.; Land, Jay M.

    1971-01-01

    As predicted, subjects run by the objectively warmer, more competent appearing hypnosis obtained significantly higher susceptibility scores. Structured warmth produced significant differences only in subjects run by the objectively less warm hypnotists. Both structured warmth and experience affected subjects' subjective impressions of whether they…

  4. Multiple Hypnotizabilities: Differentiating the Building Blocks of Hypnotic Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Erik Z.; Barnier, Amanda J.; McConkey, Kevin M.

    2005-01-01

    Although hypnotizability can be conceptualized as involving component subskills, standard measures do not differentiate them from a more general unitary trait, partly because the measures include limited sets of dichotomous items. To overcome this, the authors applied full-information factor analysis, a sophisticated analytic approach for…

  5. Hypnotic Relaxation and Yoga to Improve Sleep and School Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Smith, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Sleep insufficiency, defined as inadequate sleep duration, poor sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness, has been linked with students' learning and behavioral outcomes at school. However, there is limited research on interventions designed to improve the sleep of school-age children. In order to promote more interest on this critical topic, we…

  6. Adaptive fuzzy modeling of the hypnotic process in anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Marrero, A; Méndez, J A; Reboso, J A; Martín, I; Calvo, J L

    2017-04-01

    This paper addresses the problem of patient model synthesis in anesthesia. Recent advanced drug infusion mechanisms use a patient model to establish the proper drug dose. However, due to the inherent complexity and variability of the patient dynamics, difficulty obtaining a good model is high. In this paper, a method based on fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms is proposed as an alternative to standard compartmental models. The model uses a Mamdani type fuzzy inference system developed in a two-step procedure. First, an offline model is obtained using information from real patients. Then, an adaptive strategy that uses genetic algorithms is implemented. The validation of the modeling technique was done using real data obtained from real patients in the operating room. Results show that the proposed method based on artificial intelligence appears to be an improved alternative to existing compartmental methodologies.

  7. Hypnotic activity of an imidazo-pyridine (zolpidem).

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, A N; Pascoe, P A

    1986-01-01

    Effects of an imidazo-pyridine (zolpidem: 10, 20 and 30 mg) on overnight sleep and on performance the next day were studied in young adults and in middle aged individuals. The young adults were used particularly as an homogenous group to establish any possible adverse effects of the drug on sleep and on performance the next day, and the middle aged subjects with their less restful sleep were used to study efficacy. In the young adults zolpidem led to a marked increase in slow wave sleep with a reduction in stage 2 sleep. There were no significant changes in REM sleep, though there was a tendency for REM sleep to be delayed. In the middle aged there was a reduction in awake activity and drowsy sleep with an increase in stage 2 sleep. The latency to REM sleep was increased but the duration of REM sleep over the whole night was not reduced. Digit symbol substitution and a complex reaction time task were used to study performance, but there were no residual effects with zolpidem (9 h after ingestion). Zolpidem is likely to prove useful in the management of transient and short-term insomnia in healthy middle aged individuals when impaired performance the next day is to be avoided. PMID:3954937

  8. A Hypnotic Intervention for Anger Reduction and Shifting Perceptual Predispositions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    Presents method of interventions that is designed to expedite therapy process by reducing client's tension state and providing him or her with new memory associations (affective, cognitive, proprioceptive, etc.) that allow the client to view the world from healthier perspective. Notes that intervention was developed by linking several different…

  9. The Clinical Use of Hypnotic Regression and Progression in Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    Discusses concept of time in therapy, presenting theoretical and clinical foundations to illustrate the validity of guiding patients into past lives and future lifetimes through hypnosis to resolve self-defeating sequences. (Author/TE)

  10. Observed medical and surgical complications of prolonged barbiturate coma for refractory status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Newey, Christopher R.; Wisco, Dolora; Nattanmai, Premkumar; Sarwal, Aarti

    2016-01-01

    Background: Refractory status epilepticus is often treated with third-line therapy, such as pentobarbital coma. However, its use is limited by side effects. Recognizing and preventing major and minor adverse effects of prolonged pentobarbital coma may increase good outcomes. This study retrospectively reviewed direct and indirect medical and surgical pentobarbital coma. Methods: Retrospective chart review of all patients with refractory status epilepticus treated with pentobarbital over a 1 year period at a large tertiary care center. We collected baseline data, EEG data, and complications that were observed. Results: Overall, nine patients [median age 46.4 (IQR 21.7, 75.5) years] were induced with pentobarbital coma median 11 (IQR 3, 33) days after seizure onset for a median of 9 (IQR 3.5, 45.4) days. A total of four to eight concurrent antiepileptics were tried prior to the pentobarbital coma. Phenobarbital, due to recurrence of seizures on weaning pentobarbital coma, was required in seven patients. Observed complications included peripheral neuropathy (77.8%), cerebral atrophy (33.3%), volume overload (44.4%), renal/metabolic (77.8%), gastrointestinal (66.6%), endocrine (55.6%), cardiac/hemodynamic/vascular (77.8%), respiratory (100%), and infectious (77.8%). The number of complications trended with duration of induced coma but was nonsignificant. Median ICU length of stay was 40 (IQR 28, 97.5) days. Overall, five patients were able to follow commands after a median 37 (IQR 25.5, 90) days from coma onset. There were eight patients that were discharged from hospital with three remaining in a prolonged unresponsive state. There was one patient that died prior to discharge. Conclusions: This study highlights the high morbidity in patients with refractory status epilepticus requiring pentobarbital coma. Anticipating and addressing the indirect and direct complications in prolonged pentobarbital coma may improve survival and functional outcomes in patients with

  11. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  12. Novel Interventions for Heat/Exercise Induced Sudden Death and Fatigue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    1 dose of diazepam 5 mg; lorazepam 1 mg 4 times separated by 1 minute each for a 4-mg total dose) and other sedative hypnotics (etomidate 3 mg 2...Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. 1

  13. Anesthetic effects of a combination of medetomidine, midazolam and butorphanol on the production of offspring in Japanese field vole, Microtus montebelli

    PubMed Central

    KAGEYAMA, Atsuko; TOHEI, Atsushi; USHIJIMA, Hitoshi; OKADA, Konosuke

    2016-01-01

    Pentobarbital sodium (Somnopentyl) can induce surgical anesthesia with a strong hypnotic effect that causes loss of consciousness. Animals have been known to die during experimental surgery under anesthesia with Somnopentyl, causing it to be declared inadequate as a general anesthetic for single treatment. An anesthetic combination of 0.3 mg/kg medetomidine, 4.0 mg/kg midazolam and 5.0 mg/kg butorphanol (M/M/B:0.3/4/5) was reported to induce anesthesia for a duration of around 40 min in ICR mice; similar anesthetic effects were reported in both male and female BALB/c and C57BL/6J strains of mice. However, the anesthetic effects of this combination in Japanese field vole, Microtus montebelli, remain to be evaluated. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Somnopentyl and different concentrations of anesthetic combination (M/M/B:0.3/4/5, 0.23/3/3.75 or 0.15/2/2.5) in Japanese field voles, by means of anesthetic scores. We also examined effect of these anesthetics on production of offspring. Death of the animals was observed only with Somnopentyl. The anesthetic score of Somnopentyl was lower than those of the other anesthetics, although there were no significant differences in duration, body weight and frequency of respiratory among the evaluated anesthetics. Abortion rate with Somnopentyl was significantly higher than that with the M/M/B:0.23/3/3.75 combination, although there was no significant difference in the number of offspring between two. In conclusion, results of this study provide basic information for achieving appropriate anesthetic concentrations in addition to indicating a new, safe and effective surgical anesthetic for Japanese field voles. PMID:27238159

  14. Anxiolytic and antidepressant like effects of natural food flavour (E)-methyl isoeugenol.

    PubMed

    Fajemiroye, James Oluwagbamigbe; Galdino, Pablinny Moreira; De Paula, Joelma Abadia Marciano; Rocha, Fagundes Fabio; Akanmu, Moses A; Vanderlinde, Frederico Argollo; Zjawiony, Jordan K; Costa, Elson Alves

    2014-08-01

    (E)-methyl isoeugenol (MIE) is a natural food flavour that constitutes 93.7% of an essential oil from Pimenta pseudocaryophyllus leaf. The leaf extracts of this species are used as a calming agent. As a ubiquitous food additive, the application of MIE for treating mood disorders appears to be globally attractive. Hence, we sought to evaluate general pharmacological activities, anticonvulsant, anxiolytic and antidepressant effects and the possible mechanisms of MIE actions. Administration of MIE was carried out prior to the exposure of a male Swiss mice to general behavioural tests, barbiturate sleep, PTZ-induced convulsion, light dark box (LDB), elevated plus maze (EPM), wire hanging, open field (OF) and forced swimming test (FST). The involvement of monoamine system was studied by mice pretreatment with WAY100635 (antagonist of 5-HT1A), α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT; depletor of catecholamine) or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA; depletor of serotonin storage). There was no record of neurotoxic effect or animal's death during the course of general pharmacological tests. MIE at 250 and 500 mg kg(-1) potentiated the hypnotic effect of sodium pentobarbital. However, MIE did not protect against PTZ-induced convulsion. Except for MIE at 500 mg kg(-1), parameters evaluated in the LDB, EPM and OF demonstrated an anxiolytic like property of MIE. This effect was blocked by WAY100635 pretreatment. MIE at 500 mg kg(-1) elicited a reduction in locomotor activity of the mice in the OF. Anti-immobility effect of MIE 250 mg kg(-1) in the FST suggested an antidepressive like property. Unlike AMPT, pretreatment with PCPA reversed the antidepressant like effect of MIE. Our findings demonstrated anxiolytic and antidepressant like properties of (E)-methyl isoeugenol and suggested the participation of serotonergic pathways.

  15. Impairment of locomotor activity induced by the novel N-acylhydrazone derivatives LASSBio-785 and LASSBio-786 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Silva, G.A.P.; Kummerle, A.E.; Antunes, F.; Fraga, C.A.M.; Barreiro, E.J.; Zapata-Sudo, G.; Sudo, R.T.

    2013-01-01

    The N-acylhydrazone (NAH) analogues N-methyl 2-thienylidene 3,4-benzoylhydrazine (LASSBio-785) and N-benzyl 2-thienylidene 3,4-benzoylhydrazine (LASSBio-786) were prepared from 2-thienylidene 3,4-methylenedioxybenzoylhydrazine (LASSBio-294). The ability of LASSBio-785 and LASSBio-786 to decrease central nervous system activity was investigated in male Swiss mice. LASSBio-785 or LASSBio-786 (30 mg/kg, ip) reduced locomotor activity from 209 ± 26 (control) to 140 ± 18 (P < 0.05) or 146 ± 15 crossings/min (P < 0.05), respectively. LASSBio-785 (15 or 30 mg/kg, iv) also reduced locomotor activity from 200 ± 15 to 116 ± 29 (P < 0.05) or 60 ± 16 crossings/min (P < 0.01), respectively. Likewise, LASSBio-786 (15 or 30 mg/kg, iv) reduced locomotor activity from 200 ± 15 to 127 ± 10 (P < 0.01) or 96 ± 14 crossings/min (P < 0.01), respectively. Pretreatment with flumazenil (20 mg/kg, ip) prevented the locomotor impairment induced by NAH analogues (15 mg/kg, iv), providing evidence that the benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor is involved. This finding was supported by the structural similarity of NAH analogues to midazolam. However, LASSBio-785 showed weak binding to the BDZ receptor. LASSBio-785 or LASSBio-786 (30 mg/kg, ip, n = 10) increased pentobarbital-induced sleeping time from 42 ± 5 (DMSO) to 66 ± 6 (P < 0.05) or 75 ± 4 min (P < 0.05), respectively. The dose required to achieve 50% hypnosis (HD50) following iv injection of LASSBio-785 or LASSBio-786 was 15.8 or 9.5 mg/kg, respectively. These data suggest that both NAH analogues might be useful for the development of new neuroactive drugs for the treatment of insomnia or for use in conjunction with general anesthesia. PMID:23558854

  16. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Exercise-Induced Asthma ... they choose. previous continue Tips for Kids With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with ...

  17. H(1) and H(2) receptors in the locus ceruleus are involved in the intracerebroventricular histamine-induced carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex resetting in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Qing; Sun, Wan-Ping; Zhu, Yong-Jin; Zou, Rong; Zhou, Xi-Ping

    2006-07-01

    Objective To investigate the role of H(1) and H(2) receptors in the locus ceruleus (LC) in carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex (CSR) resetting induced by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of histamine (HA). Methods The left and right carotid sinus regions were isolated from the systemic circulation in 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. The intracarotid sinus pressure (ISP) was altered in a stepwise manner in vivo. ISP-mean arterial pressure (MAP) relationship curve and its characteristic parameters were constructed by fitting to the logistic function with five parameters. The changes in CSR performance induced by i.c.v. HA and the effects of pretreatment with H(1) or H(2) receptors selective antagonist, chlorpheniramine (CHL) or cimetidine (CIM) into the LC, on the responses of CSR to HA were examined. Results I.c.v. HA (100 ng in 5 mu l) significantly shifted the ISP-MAP relationship curve upwards (P < 0.05) and obviously decreased the value of the reflex parameters such as MAP range and maximum gain (P < 0.05), but increased the threshold pressure, saturation pressure and ISP at maximum gain (P < 0.05). The pretreatment with CHL (0.5 mu g in 1 mu l) or CIM (1.5 mu g in 1 mu l) into the LC could obviously attenuate the changes mentioned above in CSR performance induced by HA, but the alleviative effect of CIM was less remarkable than that of CHL (P < 0.05). Respective microinjection of CHL or CIM alone into the LC with the corresponding dose and volume did not change CSR performance significantly (P > 0.05). Conclusion Intracerebroventricular administration of HA results in a rapid resetting of CSR and a decrease in reflex sensitivity, and the responses of CSR to HA may be mediated, at least in part, by H(1) and H(2) receptors activities in the LC, especially by H(1) receptors. Moreover, the effects of the central HA on CSR might be related to a histaminergic descending pathway from the hypothalamus to LC.

  18. Protective and antidiabetic effects of extract from Nigella sativa on blood glucose concentrations against streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic in rats: an experimental study with histopathological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes in humans induces chronic complications such as cardiovascular damage, cataracts and retinopathy, nephropathy and polyneuropathy. The most common animal model of human diabetes is streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in the rat. The present study investigated the effects of Nigella sativa hydroalcholic extract on glucose concentrations in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats. Methods In this study Twenty-five Wister-Albino rats (aged 8-9 weeks and weighing 200-250 g) were tested. Rats were divided into five experimental groups (control, untreated STZ-diabetic (60 mg/kg B.W., IP), treated STZ-diabetic with hydroalcholic extract of Nigella Sativa (NS) (5 mg/kg B.W, IP), treated STZ-diabetic with hydroalcholic extract of NS (10 mg/kg B.W., IP) and treated STZ-diabetic with hydroalcholic extract of NS (20 mg/kg B.W., IP and 32 days were evaluated to assess its effect on fasting blood glucose (FBG), and in different groups fasting blood glucose (FBG) and body weight (BW) were measured in the particular days (1, 16 and 32). At the end of the study, the animals were fasted overnight, anaesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of sodium pentobarbital (60 mg/kg), and sacrificed for obtaining tissues samples (liver, pancreases). The number of islets and cells were counted and the islet diameters were determined by calibrated micrometer. The glycogen content in the liver was examined by Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. Results Treatment with NS (5 mg/kg b.w.) markedly increased BW gain and the FBG level was significantly (p<0.001) reduced when compared to the control. Histopathological examination showed that the NS (5 mg/kg b.w.) partially recovered hepatic glycogen content and protected the great deal of the pancreatic islet cells. The number of islets, cells and islets diameter were found statistically significant when compared to the control (p<0.01, p<0.05). Conclusions Higher doses of NS did not exhibit any therapeutic effect. These results

  19. Carbon monoxide-bound red blood cells protect red blood cell transfusion-induced hepatic cytochrome P450 impairment in hemorrhagic-shock rats.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Shigeru; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions for massive hemorrhage induce systemic ischemic-reperfusion and influence the disposition and pharmacological activity of drugs as a result of a reduction in the level of expression and activity of cytochrome P450s (P450). It was reported that, when organ-preserving solutions are exposed to carbon monoxide (CO), the treatment was effective in suppressing the postreperfusion reduction in renal P450 levels in cases of kidney transplantation. Therefore, we hypothesized that transfusions with RBC that contain bound CO (CO-RBC) would protect the hepatic level of rat P450 during a massive hemorrhage, compared with plasma expanders and RBC resuscitation. To achieve this, we created 40% hemorrhagic-shock model rats, followed by resuscitation, with use of recombinant human serum albumin, RBCs, and CO-RBCs. At 1 hour after resuscitation, the expressions of hepatic P450 isoforms (1A2, 2C11, 2E1, and 3A2) were significantly decreased in the RBC resuscitation group, compared with the sham group. Such alterations in hepatic P450 significantly resulted in an increase in the plasma concentrations of substrate drugs (caffeine [1A2], tolbutamide [2C11], chlorzoxazone [2E1], and midazolam [3A2]) for each P450 isoform, and thus, the hypnotic action of midazolam could be significantly prolonged. Of interest, the reductions in hepatic P450 activity observed in the RBC group were significantly suppressed by CO-RBC resuscitation, and consequently, the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs and the pharmacological action of midazolam remained at levels similar to those under sham conditions. These results indicate that CO-RBC resuscitation has considerable potential in terms of achieving safe and useful drug therapy during massive hemorrhages.

  20. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton; Subbaraman, Maria R.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  1. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  2. SUBSTANTIA NIGRA PARS RETICULATA IS CRUCIALLY INVOLVED IN BARBITURATE AND ETHANOL WITHDRAWAL IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Kozell, Laura B.; Buck, Kari J.

    2011-01-01

    Sedative-hypnotic CNS depressant drugs are widely prescribed to treat a variety of disorders, and are abused for their sedative and euphoric effects. Physiological dependence and associated withdrawal episodes are thought to constitute a motivational force that sustains their use/abuse and may contribute to relapse in dependent individuals. Although no animal model duplicates depressant dependence, models for specific factors, like withdrawal, are useful for identifying potential neural determinants of liability in humans. Recent analyses implicate the caudolateral substantia nigra pars reticulata (clSNr) in withdrawal following acute and repeated ethanol exposures in mice, but did not assess its impact on withdrawal from other sedative-hypnotics or whether intrinsic neurons or fibers of passage are involved. Here, we demonstrate that bilateral chemical (ibotenic acid) lesions of the clSNr attenuate barbiturate (pentobarbital) and ethanol withdrawal. Chemical lesions did not affect convulsions in response to pentylenetetrazol, which blocks GABAA receptor-mediated transmission. Our results demonstrate that the clSNr nucleus itself rather than fibers of passage is crucial to its effects on barbiturate and ethanol withdrawal. These findings support suggest that clSNr could be one of the shared neural substrates mediating withdrawal from sedative-hypnotic drugs. PMID:20974184

  3. Flumazenil-induced ballism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Ko, Seok-Bum; Choi, Yeong-Bin; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2003-04-01

    Flumazenil, an imidazobenzodiazepine, is the first benzodiazepine antagonist and is being used to reverse the adverse pharmacological effects of benzodiazepine. There have been a few reports on the central nevous system side effects with its use. We report a patient with generalized ballism following administration of flumazenil. The mechanism through which flumazenil induced this symptom is unknown. It is conceivable that flumazenil may antagonize the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex and induce dopamine hypersensitivity, thus induce dyskinesic symptoms.

  4. Flumazenil-induced ballism.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Ko, Seok-Bum; Choi, Yeong-Bin; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2003-01-01

    Flumazenil, an imidazobenzodiazepine, is the first benzodiazepine antagonist and is being used to reverse the adverse pharmacological effects of benzodiazepine. There have been a few reports on the central nevous system side effects with its use. We report a patient with generalized ballism following administration of flumazenil. The mechanism through which flumazenil induced this symptom is unknown. It is conceivable that flumazenil may antagonize the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex and induce dopamine hypersensitivity, thus induce dyskinesic symptoms. PMID:12692435

  5. Infrared laser diode irradiation has no behavioral or biochemical effect on pain in the sciatic nerve ligation-induced mononeuropathy in rat.

    PubMed Central

    Parris, W. C.; Janicki, P. K.; Johnson, B. W.; Mathews, L.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acute and repeated (5 days) treatment with various types of infrared (IR) diode lasers and probes (single- vs cluster-beam) on the pain response in rats with peripheral mononeuropathy produced by sciatic nerve ligation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital, and the mid-thigh was surgically exposed to reveal the sciatic nerve, around which four ligatures were loosely tied. On postoperative day 5, the skin over the sciatic nerve lesion was subjected to a 30-min daily local exposure from a 904-nm IR diode laser (700 Hz, average output power 10 mW) with a single-beam probe, a 830-nm IR diode laser (700 Hz) with either a single-beam (average output power 50 mW) or cluster-beam probe (average output power 15 mW), or placebo for 5 consecutive days. Two pain responses (foot-withdrawal time and the hind-paw elevation time) were measured on both sides using the radiant heat method on days 5 and 9. In addition, cold allodynia was measured on day 9 of treatment by placing the rats on a chilled metal plate (4 degrees C) and measuring the duration of elevation of either of the hind paws. On day 9, the animals were sacrificed for collection of the samples of brain and lumbar spinal cord for the determination of the tissue concentrations of dynorphin A1-8-like immunoactivity (DYN) using specific radioimmunoassay (RIA). The hind-paw withdrawal and elevation times on the right side in all groups subjected to the various methods of IR laser irradiation did not differ significantly as compared with the placebo-treated group when measured on days 5 and 9 after surgery. No statistically significant differences in withdrawal response and elevation time of the unaffected left hind paw were noted either. The measurement of cold allodynia similarly failed to reveal any effect in laser-treated groups versus placebo. The RIA analysis found that tissue concentrations of DYN were significantly elevated in the

  6. Drug-induced nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Paueksakon, Paisit; Fogo, Agnes B

    2017-01-01

    Drugs are associated frequently with the development of various types of acute and chronic kidney diseases. Nephrotoxicity is associated most commonly with injury in the tubulointerstitial compartment manifested as either acute tubular injury or acute interstitial nephritis. A growing number of reports has also highlighted the potential for drug-induced glomerular disease, including direct cellular injury and immune-mediated injury. Recognition of drug-induced nephropathies and rapid discontinuation of the offending agents are critical to maximizing the likelihood of renal function recovery. This review will focus on the pathology and pathogenesis of drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis and drug-induced glomerular diseases.

  7. Teacher-Induced Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Kent C.

    Students of English as a second language (ESL) often come to the classroom with little or no experience in writing in any language and with inaccurate assumptions about writing. Rather than correct these assumptions, teachers often seem to unwittingly reinforce them, actually inducing errors into their students' work. Teacher-induced errors occur…

  8. Stress-induced flowering

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Kaede C

    2010-01-01

    Many plant species can be induced to flower by responding to stress factors. The short-day plants Pharbitis nil and Perilla frutescens var. crispa flower under long days in response to the stress of poor nutrition or low-intensity light. Grafting experiments using two varieties of P. nil revealed that a transmissible flowering stimulus is involved in stress-induced flowering. The P. nil and P. frutescens plants that were induced to flower by stress reached anthesis, fruited and produced seeds. These seeds germinated, and the progeny of the stressed plants developed normally. Phenylalanine ammonialyase inhibitors inhibited this stress-induced flowering, and the inhibition was overcome by salicylic acid (SA), suggesting that there is an involvement of SA in stress-induced flowering. PnFT2, a P. nil ortholog of the flowering gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) of Arabidopsis thaliana, was expressed when the P. nil plants were induced to flower under poor-nutrition stress conditions, but expression of PnFT1, another ortholog of FT, was not induced, suggesting that PnFT2 is involved in stress-induced flowering. PMID:20505356

  9. Space Station Induced Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a conference convened May 10-11, 1988, to review plans for monitoring the Space Station induced environment, to recommend primary components of an induced environment monitoring package, and to make recommendations pertaining to suggested modifications of the Space Station External Contamination Control Requirements Document JSC 30426. The contents of this report are divided as Follows: Monitoring Induced Environment - Space Station Work Packages Requirements, Neutral Environment, Photon Emission Environment, Particulate Environment, Surface Deposition/Contamination; and Contamination Control Requirements.

  10. Mania Induced by Opipramol

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Kazhungil; Khaleel, Asfia; Rajmohan, V; Kumar, Manoj; Raghuram, TM

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants have propensity to induce manic switch in patients with bipolar disorder. Opipramol is an atypical anxiolytic and antidepressant drug which predominantly acts on sigma receptors. Although structurally resembles tricyclic antidepressant imipramine it does not have inhibitory action on the reuptake of norepinephrine/serotonin and hence it is not presumed to cause manic switch in bipolar depression. Here, we describe a case of mania induced by opipramol, in a patient with bipolar affective disorder who was treated for moderate depressive episode with lithium and opipramol and we discuss neurochemical hypothesis of opipramol-induced mania. PMID:25722522

  11. Pathophysiological Alterations In The Basolateral Amygdala And Neurodegeneration Of Limbic Structures During Epileptogenesis Induced By Status Epilepticus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-05

    Crestani F, Martin JR, Möhler H, and Rudolph U (2000) Mechanism of action of the hypnotic zolpidem in vivo. Br J Pharmacol 131:1251–56...epilepsy laterality and reproductive hormone levels in women. Epilepsy Behav 4:407-13. Houser CR (1990) Granule cell dispersion in the dentate gyrus of...cortex from epileptic patients. Neurobiol Dis 8:459- 68. Kostarczyk EM (1986) The amygdala and male reproductive functions. I. Anatomical and

  12. Drug-induced catatonia.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Harpreet S; Singh, Ira

    2005-09-01

    Catatonia is a heterogeneous syndrome that varies in etiology, presentation, course and sequelae. Initially conceptualized as a subtype of schizophrenia, catatonia is now recognized to occur not only with other psychiatric conditions but also with medical conditions and drug-induced and toxic states. While drug-induced catatonia is now a recognized entity, most studies club it with catatonia due to general medical conditions or organic catatonia, thus precluding any meaningful interpretation of such cases. The literature on drug-induced catatonia mostly draws from scattered case reports. This article attempts to review the available literature in this realm and integrate the information in an attempt to explore the epidemiology, etiology, mechanism and treatment of drug-induced catatonia.

  13. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  14. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  15. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat and depigmented, but maintains the ...

  16. Statin induced myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, Sivakumar

    2012-06-01

    Statins are an effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and used extensively worldwide. However, myotoxicity induced by statins is a common adverse event and a major barrier to maximising cardiovascular risk reduction. The clinical spectrum of statin induced myotoxicity includes asymptomatic rise in creatine kinase concentration, myalgia, myositis and rhabdomyolysis. In certain cases, the cessation of statin therapy does not result in the resolution of muscular symptoms or the normalization of creatine kinase, raising the possibility of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy. There is increasing understanding and recognition of the pathophysiology and risk factors of statin induced myotoxicity. Careful history and physical examination in conjunction with selected investigations such as creatine kinase measurement, electromyography and muscle biopsy in appropriate clinical scenario help diagnose the condition. The management of statin induced myotoxicity involves statin cessation, the use of alternative lipid lowering agents or treatment regimes, and in the case of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy, immunosuppression.

  17. Glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Robert S

    2012-04-01

    Awareness of the need for prevention of glucocorticoid-induced fractures is growing, but glucocorticoid administration is often overlooked as the most common cause of nontraumatic osteonecrosis. Glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis develops in 9-40% of patients receiving long-term therapy although it may also occur with short-term exposure to high doses, after intra-articular injection, and without glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. The name, osteonecrosis, is misleading because the primary histopathological lesion is osteocyte apoptosis. Apoptotic osteocytes persist because they are anatomically unavailable for phagocytosis and, with glucocorticoid excess, decreased bone remodeling retards their replacement. Glucocorticoid-induced osteocyte apoptosis, a cumulative and unrepairable defect, uniquely disrupts the mechanosensory function of the osteocyte-lacunar-canalicular system and thus starts the inexorable sequence of events leading to collapse of the femoral head. Current evidence indicates that bisphosphonates may rapidly reduce pain, increase ambulation, and delay joint collapse in patients with osteonecrosis.

  18. Ethionamide-induced Pellagra.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yashashree; Shah, Ira

    2015-08-01

    Pellagra is a disorder characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia and eventually death, resulting from a deficiency of niacin or its precursor tryptophan. Ethionamide (a second-line antituberculosis agent)-induced pellagra is rarely encountered in clinical practice. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with nicotinamide can prevent life-threatening complications. To date, only three cases have been reported. We report a 13-year-old girl presenting with ethionamide-induced pellagra that resolved after the administration of niacin.

  19. Levodopa-induced myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Klawans, H L; Goetz, C; Bergen, D

    1975-05-01

    Twelve parkinsonian patients on long-term levodopa therapy developed intermittent, myoclonic body jerks. The movements consisted of single unilateral or bilateral abrupt jerks of the extremities and occurred most frequently during sleep. Although directly related to daily dosage of levodopa, the myoclonus was specifically blocked by the serotonin antagonist, methysergide. Levodopa-induced myoclonus may be related to intermittent increases of activity of serotonin in the brain and results from levodopa-induced dysregulation of serotonin activity.

  20. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  1. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  2. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  3. Drug-induced mania.

    PubMed

    Peet, M; Peters, S

    1995-02-01

    Mania can occur by chance association during drug treatment, particularly in patients predisposed to mood disorder. Single case reports are unreliable, and evidence must be sought from large series of treated patients, particularly those with a matched control group. Drugs with a definite propensity to cause manic symptoms include levodopa, corticosteroids and anabolic-androgenic steroids. Antidepressants of the tricyclic and monoamine oxidase inhibitor classes can induce mania in patients with pre-existing bipolar affective disorder. Drugs which are probably capable of inducing mania, but for which the evidence is less scientifically secure, include other dopaminergic anti-Parkinsonian drugs, thyroxine, iproniazid and isoniazid, sympathomimetic drugs, chloroquine, baclofen, alprazolam, captopril, amphetamine and phencyclidine. Other drugs may induce mania rarely and idiosyncratically. Management involves discontinuation or dosage reduction of the suspected drug, if this is medically possible, and treatment of manic symptoms with antipsychotic drugs or lithium.

  4. Crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinay; El Ters, Mireille; Kashani, Kianoush; Leung, Nelson; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-03-01

    Crystalline nephropathy refers to renal parenchymal deposition of crystals leading to kidney damage. The most common forms of crystalline nephropathy encountered in renal pathology are nephrocalcinosis and oxalate nephropathy. Less frequent types include urate nephropathy, cystinosis, dihydroxyadeninuria, and drug-induced crystalline nephropathy (e.g., caused by indinavir or triamterene). Monoclonal proteins can also deposit in the kidney as crystals and cause tissue damage. This occurs in conditions such as light chain proximal tubulopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, and crystalglobulinemia. The latter is a rare complication of multiple myeloma that results from crystallization of monoclonal proteins in the systemic vasculature, leading to vascular injury, thrombosis, and occlusion. In this report, we describe a case of crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy and discuss its pathophysiology and the differential diagnosis of paraprotein-induced crystalline nephropathy.

  5. Geomagnetism and induced voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-07-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of conceptual integrated science over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it is initiated by the change in the magnetic flux due to the Earth's magnetic field and movement. This simple and enjoyable experiment will demonstrate how basic concepts in physics and geology can help us think about possible health effects due to the induced voltage.

  6. Surgery induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Brian V; Peter, Mark B; Shenoy, Hrishikesh G; Horgan, Kieran; Hughes, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    Surgery and anaesthesia result in a variety of metabolic and endocrine responses, which result in a generalised state of immunosuppression in the immediate post-operative period. Surgery induced immunosuppression has been implicated in the development of post-operative septic complications and tumour metastasis formation. In addition the effectiveness of many treatments in the adjuvant setting is dependent on a functioning immune system. By understanding the mechanisms contributing to surgery-induced immunosuppression, surgeons may undertake strategies to minimise its effect and reduce potential short-term and long-term consequences to patients.

  7. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adike, Abimbola; Corral, Juan; Rybnicek, David; Sussman, Daniel; Shah, Samir; Quigley, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Olmesartan-induced enteropathy mimics celiac disease clinically and pathologically. As in celiac disease, the pathologic findings are villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes. Clinical presentation of olmesartan-induced enteropathy includes diarrhea, weight loss, and nausea. In contrast to celiac disease, tissue transglutaminase is not elevated and there is no response to a gluten-free diet. Including this entity in the differential diagnosis of sprue-like enteropathy is critical for its early diagnosis since replacing olmesartan with an alternative antihypertensive drug can simplify the diagnostic workup and provide both clinical and histologic improvement. PMID:28289500

  8. Managing insomnia: an overview of insomnia and pharmacologic treatment strategies in use and on the horizon

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Thomas L; Goradia, Viral

    2013-01-01

    This review explores basic sleep physiology, the mechanism of action for each class of hypnotic agents, their clinical application based on pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic factors, and potential pharmacologic sleep-inducing mechanisms of future hypnotics. The paper challenges the reader to understand the neuroscientific basis of insomnia and use this knowledge to guide prescription of hypnotic agents. Currently indicated hypnotic agents are discussed with regard to their mechanism of drug action and clinical application. A broader discussion is developed throughout this paper regarding other non-indicated agents that may improve sleep and describing newer pharmacological treatments that may become available in the future for use in sleep disorders and their comorbid conditions. PMID:24432044

  9. Injection-induced earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, William L

    2013-07-12

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  10. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOEpatents

    Meng, S.Y.

    1989-08-08

    An improvement in a pump is described including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means which cooperate with a first vortex cell and a series of secondary vortex cells to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow. 3 figs.

  11. [Chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Spaëth, Dominique; Rosso, Nathalie; Clivot, Laetitia

    2006-11-30

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is frequent with most chemotherapy regimens; mechanisms, evolution and small prevention tools are described. Scalp cooling (helmets or continuous cooling systems) can avoid or diminish hair loss in selected chemotherapy regimens but tolerance can be fair and long harmlessness needs to be confirmed by prospective studies. Drug prevention is only in the first steps of research.

  12. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…

  13. Drug-induced uveitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A number of medications have been associated with uveitis. This review highlights both well-established and recently reported systemic, topical, intraocular, and vaccine-associated causes of drug-induced uveitis, and assigns a quantitative score to each medication based upon criteria originally described by Naranjo and associates. PMID:23522744

  14. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  15. Injection-induced earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  16. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it…

  17. Shrouded inducer pump

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Sen Y.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in a pump including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means 32,36 which cooperate with a first vortex cell 38 and a series of secondary vortex cells 40 to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow.

  18. Statin-induced Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara; Redmond, Elizabeth; Harbor, Cathryn

    2012-05-01

    Heart disease (HD) is the number one killer in the United States.(1) In 2006, the direct and indirect costs associated with cardiovascular disease in the United States were estimated at 400 billion dollars.(2) Statin therapy for cholesterol reduction is a mainstay intervention for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as reflected in atorvastatin's status as the number one prescribed medication in the United States.(3) Statin therapy, however, is also associated with side effects that signal mitochondrial distress. A commonly reported statin-induced symptom is myalgia, which is defined as muscle pain without an associated elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK). In clinical trials, the reports of myalgia vary from less than 1% to 25% of patients.(4) Myopathy is a general term defined as an abnormal condition or disease of muscle tissue. Myopathy includes myalgia, myositis (inflammation of muscle tissue associated with elevated CK) and the very serious condition rhabdomyolysis (extreme myositis). Histological findings in statin-induced myopathy demonstrate electron chain dysfunction making "mitochondrial myopathy" the more precise term.(5) Mitochondrial myopathy has been associated with statin-induced CoQ10 depletion.(5) Given the density of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes, and CoQ10's role in mitochondrial energy production, depletion has long been associated with increased risk for heart disease.(6-7) In the case below, mitochondrial-specific organic acids, serum CoQ10, vitamin D and clinical history all suggest statin-induced mitochondrial myopathy, despite normal serum CK.

  19. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  20. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  1. Topological induced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    We propose a topological model of induced gravity (pregeometry) where both Newton’s coupling constant and the cosmological constant appear as integration constants in solving field equations. The matter sector of a scalar field is also considered, and by solving field equations it is shown that various types of cosmological solutions in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe can be obtained. A detailed analysis is given of the meaning of the BRST transformations, which make the induced gravity be a topological field theory, by means of the canonical quantization analysis, and the physical reason why such BRST transformations are needed in the present formalism is clarified. Finally, we propose a dynamical mechanism for fixing the Lagrange multiplier fields by following the Higgs mechanism. The present study clearly indicates that the induced gravity can be constructed at the classical level without recourse to quantum fluctuations of matter and suggests an interesting relationship between the induced gravity and the topological quantum-field theory (TQFT).

  2. Schedule-Induced Stereotypy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric; Howard, Denise

    1992-01-01

    The phenomena of the induction and entrainment of adjunctive behaviors was investigated in 8 people (ages 5-51) with severe or profound mental retardation who exhibited stereotypic behaviors. Seven of the eight demonstrated evidence of schedule-induced stereotypic behavior, whereas five also showed evidence of the entrainment of these behaviors by…

  3. Warfarin-induced erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Casey J; Robertson, Ivan; James, Daniel; McMeniman, Erin

    2015-02-01

    Erythroderma is a potentially serious and life-threatening skin disease with a number of possible aetiologies. Drug reactions are well-documented causes, with carbamazepine, penicillin and allopurinol being the most commonly implicated. This case describes a unique presentation of warfarin-induced erythroderma in a 78-year-old female patient.

  4. Friction induced rail vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralov, Ivan; Sinapov, Petko; Nedelchev, Krasimir; Ignatov, Ignat

    2012-11-01

    A model of rail, considered as multiple supported beam, subjected on friction induced vibration is studied in this work using FEM. The model is presented as continuous system and the mass and elastic properties of a real object are taken into account. The friction forces are nonlinear functions of the relative velocity during slipping. The problem is solved using Matlab Simulink.

  5. Heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Gounden, Ronald; Blockman, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT) is an acquired, transient prothrombotic disorder caused by heparin. The predominant problem is the creation of a prothrombotic milieu, accompanied by a fall in the platelet count. This explains the apparent paradox of thrombosis in the face of thrombocytopaenia and why non-heparin antithrombotic agents are integral to its management.

  6. Viral induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Stohlman, S A; Hinton, D R

    2001-01-01

    Viral induced demyelination, in both humans and rodent models, has provided unique insights into the cell biology of oligodendroglia, their complex cell-cell interactions and mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections in which no infectious virus is readily evident, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Although of interest in their own right, an understanding of the diverse mechanisms used by viruses to induce demyelination may shed light into the etiology and pathogenesis of the common demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). This notion is supported by the persistent view that a viral infection acquired during adolescence might initiate MS after a long period of quiescence. Demyelination in both humans and rodents can be initiated by infection with a diverse group of enveloped and non-enveloped RNA and DNA viruses (Table 1). The mechanisms that ultimately result in the loss of CNS myelin appear to be equally diverse as the etiological agents capable of causing diseases which result in demyelination. Although demyelination can be a secondary result of axonal loss, in many examples of viral induced demyelination, myelin loss is primary and associated with axonal sparing. This suggests that demyelination induced by viral infections can result from: 1) a direct viral infection of oligodendroglia resulting in cell death with degeneration of myelin and its subsequent removal; 2) a persistent viral infection, in the presence or absence of infectious virus, resulting in the loss of normal cellular homeostasis and subsequent oligodendroglial death; 3) a vigorous virus-specific inflammatory response wherein the virus replicates in a cell type other than oligodendroglia, but cytokines and other immune mediators directly damage the

  7. [Steroid-induced osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Perrot, Serge; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Bone-related steroid involvement is one of the most frequent complications of steroid treatment. Epidemiological data demonstrate that osteoporosis starts early during the treatment, predominantly involves trabecular bone and is correlated to dosage and treatment duration. Mechanisms and consequences of steroid bone involvement are related to osseous and extra-osseous mechanisms. In clinical practice, steroid-induced osteoporosis remains underdiagnosed and undertreated both in preventive and curative approaches. Recently, new molecules as teriparatide and zoledronic acid got indication for the treatment of steroid-induced osteoporosis. To guide treatment strategies, several recommendations are available: French, not updated recommendations since 2003 (Afssaps, 2003), European elaborated by the EULAR in 2007 and those of the ACR updated in 2010.

  8. Hypoxia-Inducible Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is vital for the existence of all multicellular organisms, acting as a signaling molecule regulating cellular activities. Specifically, hypoxia, which occurs when the partial pressure of oxygen falls below 5%, plays a pivotal role during development, regeneration, and cancer. Here we report a novel hypoxia-inducible (HI) hydrogel composed of gelatin and ferulic acid that can form hydrogel networks via oxygen consumption in a laccase-mediated reaction. Oxygen levels and gradients within the hydrogels can be accurately controlled and precisely predicted. We demonstrate that HI hydrogels guide vascular morphogenesis in vitro via hypoxia-inducible factors activation of matrix metalloproteinases and promote rapid neovascularization from the host tissue during subcutaneous wound healing. The HI hydrogel is a new class of biomaterials that may prove useful in many applications, ranging from fundamental studies of developmental, regenerative and disease processes through the engineering of healthy and diseased tissue models towards the treatment of hypoxia-regulated disorders. PMID:24909742

  9. Current induced interlayer coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Peter M.; Heide, Carsten; Zhang, Shufeng; Fert, Albert

    2001-03-01

    It has recently been shown that a perpendicular current in a magnetically multilayered structures induces an unusual bilinear coupling between the magnetizations of the layers [1]. While this was demonstrated in the ballistic regime, transport is likely to be diffusive in the structures where this may be relevant to the role of currents in switching the magnetization of the layers. We have derived the current induced coupling by using the Boltzmann equation in terms of the parameters used to describe the giant magnetoresistance of magnetically layered structures, and thereby estimate the strength of this coupling. Work supported in part by DARPA and ONR. [1] C.Heide and R.J.Elliott, Europhys. Lett. 50, 271 (2000).

  10. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure.

  11. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  12. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  13. Buckling-Induced Kirigami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the mechanical response of thin sheets perforated with a square array of mutually orthogonal cuts, which leaves a network of squares connected by small ligaments. Our combined analytical, experimental and numerical results indicate that under uniaxial tension the ligaments buckle out of plane, inducing the formation of 3D patterns whose morphology is controlled by the load direction. We also find that by largely stretching the buckled perforated sheets, plastic strains develop in the ligaments. This gives rise to the formation of kirigami sheets comprising periodic distribution of cuts and permanent folds. As such, the proposed buckling-induced pop-up strategy points to a simple route for manufacturing complex morphable structures out of flat perforated sheets.

  14. Buckling-Induced Kirigami.

    PubMed

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-02-24

    We investigate the mechanical response of thin sheets perforated with a square array of mutually orthogonal cuts, which leaves a network of squares connected by small ligaments. Our combined analytical, experimental and numerical results indicate that under uniaxial tension the ligaments buckle out of plane, inducing the formation of 3D patterns whose morphology is controlled by the load direction. We also find that by largely stretching the buckled perforated sheets, plastic strains develop in the ligaments. This gives rise to the formation of kirigami sheets comprising periodic distribution of cuts and permanent folds. As such, the proposed buckling-induced pop-up strategy points to a simple route for manufacturing complex morphable structures out of flat perforated sheets.

  15. Cocaine-Induced Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Mark; Paran, Daphna; Elkayam, Ori

    2016-01-01

    The use of cocaine continues to grow worldwide. One of the possible side-effects of cocaine is vasculitis. Two distinct vasculitic syndromes have been described due to cocaine. One is cocaine-induced midline destructive lesion, secondary to a direct vasoconstrictor effect of cocaine, inducing ischemic necrosis of the septal cartilage and perforation of the nasal septum, mimicking findings of granulomatosis with polyangiitis in the upper airways. The other is ANCA-associated vasculitis, attributed to the levamisole component that contaminates about 70% of the cocaine. This type of vasculitis may be myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3) positive, and its main manifestations are typical cutaneous findings, arthralgia, otolaryngologic involvement, and agranulocytosis. A high degree of suspicion and awareness is needed in order properly to diagnose and treat these patients. PMID:27824551

  16. Drug-induced hypokalaemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Hmouda, Houssem; Bouraoui, Kamel

    2009-01-01

    Hypokalaemia (defined as a plasma potassium concentration<3.5 mEq/L) is a common electrolyte abnormality in clinical practice. Drugs are a common cause of either asymptomatic or symptomatic hypokalaemia. Drug-induced hypokalaemia is an important problem particularly in the elderly and in patients with cardiovascular, renal or hepatic disease. Hypokalaemia can complicate the use of the drug in the therapeutic concentration range, and can also be precipitated with overdose or conditions leading to drug intoxication. Because the etiologies of hypokalaemia are numerous, the diagnosis of drug-induced hypokalaemia may be overlooked. Physicians should always pay close attention to this common side effect. Evaluation and management of a hypokalaemic patient should include a careful review of medications history to determine if a drug capable of causing or aggravating this electrolyte abnormality is present.

  17. Radiation-induced schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Reichenthal, E.; Borohov, H.

    1989-06-01

    The histopathology and clinical course of three patients with schwannomas of the brain and high cervical cord after therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancy and for ringworm of the scalp are described. Earlier reports in the literature indicated that radiation of the scalp may induce tumors in the head and neck. It is therefore suggested that therapeutic irradiation in these instances was a causative factor in the genesis of these tumors.

  18. Polarization induced doped transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  19. Drug-induced diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Chassany, O; Michaux, A; Bergmann, J F

    2000-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a relatively frequent adverse event, accounting for about 7% of all drug adverse effects. More than 700 drugs have been implicated in causing diarrhoea; those most frequently involved are antimicrobials, laxatives, magnesium-containing antacids, lactose- or sorbitol-containing products, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, prostaglandins, colchicine, antineoplastics, antiarrhythmic drugs and cholinergic agents. Certain new drugs are likely to induce diarrhoea because of their pharmacodynamic properties; examples include anthraquinone-related agents, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, lipase inhibitors and cholinesterase inhibitors. Antimicrobials are responsible for 25% of drug-induced diarrhoea. The disease spectrum of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea ranges from benign diarrhoea to pseudomembranous colitis. Several pathophysiological mechanisms are involved in drug-induced diarrhoea: osmotic diarrhoea, secretory diarrhoea, shortened transit time, exudative diarrhoea and protein-losing enteropathy, and malabsorption or maldigestion of fat and carbohydrates. Often 2 or more mechanisms are present simultaneously. In clinical practice, 2 major types of diarrhoea are seen: acute diarrhoea, which usually appears during the first few days of treatment, and chronic diarrhoea, lasting more than 3 or 4 weeks and which can appear a long time after the start of drug therapy. Both can be severe and poorly tolerated. In a patient presenting with diarrhoea, the medical history is very important, especially the drug history, as it can suggest a diagnosis of drug-induced diarrhoea and thereby avoid multiple diagnostic tests. The clinical examination should cover severity criteria such as fever, rectal emission of blood and mucus, dehydration and bodyweight loss. Establishing a relationship between drug consumption and diarrhoea or colitis can be difficult when the time elapsed between the start of the drug and the onset of symptoms is long, sometimes up to several

  20. Arsenic-Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Sean; Zancosky, Krysia; Farah, Katie

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide has brought about tremendous advancement in the treatment of acute promyelocytic myelogenous leukemia (APML). In most instances, the benefits of these treatments outweigh the risks associated with their respective safety profiles. Although acute pancreatitis is not commonly associated with arsenic toxicity, it should be considered as a possible side effect. We report a case of arsenic-induced pancreatitis in a patient with APML. PMID:22606427

  1. Ketamine-Induced Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Powers, A.R.; Gancsos, M.G.; Finn, E.S.; Morgan, P.T.; Corlett, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine, the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist drug, is increasingly employed as an experimental model of psychosis in healthy volunteers. At sub-anesthetic doses, it safely and reversibly causes delusion-like ideas, amotivation, and perceptual disruptions reminiscent of the aberrant salience experiences that characterize first-episode psychosis. However, auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), a hallmark symptom of schizophrenia, have not been reported consistently in healthy volunteers even at high doses of ketamine. Methods Here we present data from a set of healthy participants who received moderately dosed, placebo controlled ketamine infusions in the reduced stimulation environment of the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We highlight the phenomenological experiences of three participants who experienced particularly vivid hallucinations. Results Participants in this series reported auditory verbal and musical hallucinations at a ketamine dose that does not induce auditory hallucination outside of the scanner. Discussion We interpret the observation of ketamine-induced AVHs in the context of the reduced perceptual environment of the magnetic resonance scanner, and offer an explanation grounded in predictive coding models of perception and psychosis: the brain fills in expected perceptual inputs and it does so more in situations of reduced perceptual input. The reduced perceptual input of the MRI scanner creates a mismatch between top-down perceptual expectations and the heightened bottom-up signals induced by ketamine; such circumstances induce aberrant percepts including musical and auditory verbal hallucinations. We suggest that these circumstances might represent a useful experimental model of AVHs and highlight the impact of ambient sensory stimuli on psychopathology. PMID:26361209

  2. Allopurinol induced erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Geeta; Govil, Dinesh Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Allopurinol, a widely prescribed urate lowering agent is responsible for various adverse drug reactions, including erythroderma. A 45-year-old male patient was admitted with the complaints of fever, redness and scaling all over the body after 3-4 weeks of allopurinol treatment for asymptomatic hyperuricemia. Elevated liver enzymes were detected in his blood analysis. Skin biopsy was consistent with drug induced erythroderma. Allopurinol was stopped and steroids were started. Patient improved over a period of 2 weeks.

  3. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  4. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  5. Induced QCD I: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Lohmayer, Robert; Wettig, Tilo

    2016-11-01

    We explore an alternative discretization of continuum SU( N c ) Yang-Mills theory on a Euclidean spacetime lattice, originally introduced by Budzcies and Zirnbauer. In this discretization the self-interactions of the gauge field are induced by a path integral over N b auxiliary boson fields, which are coupled linearly to the gauge field. The main progress compared to earlier approaches is that N b can be as small as N c . In the present paper we (i) extend the proof that the continuum limit of the new discretization reproduces Yang-Mills theory in two dimensions from gauge group U( N c ) to SU( N c ), (ii) derive refined bounds on N b for non-integer values, and (iii) perform a perturbative calculation to match the bare parameter of the induced gauge theory to the standard lattice coupling. In follow-up papers we will present numerical evidence in support of the conjecture that the induced gauge theory reproduces Yang-Mills theory also in three and four dimensions, and explore the possibility to integrate out the gauge fields to arrive at a dual formulation of lattice QCD.

  6. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  7. Comparison of the Effects of Low-Dose Midazolam, Magnesium Sulfate, Remifentanil and Low-Dose Etomidate on Prevention of Etomidate-Induced Myoclonus in Orthopedic Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sedighinejad, Abbas; Naderi Nabi, Bahram; Haghighi, Mohammad; Biazar, Gelareh; Imantalab, Vali; Rimaz, Siamak; Zaridoost, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Etomidate is a potent hypnotic agent with several desirable advantages such as providing a stable cardiovascular profile with minimal respiratory adverse effects and better hemodynamic stability compared with other induction agents. This drug is associated, however, with myoclonic movements which is characterized by a sudden, brief muscle contractions as a disturbing side-effect. Objectives The present study was designed to compare the effectiveness of low- dose midazolam, magnesium sulfate, remifentanil and low-dose etomidate to suppress etomidate-induced myoclonus in orthopedic surgery. Patients and Methods A double-blind clinical trial study was conducted in an academic hospital from September 2014 to August 2015. Two hundred and eighty-four eligible patients, American society of anesthesiologists class I - II, scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery were randomly allocated into four equal groups (n = 71). They received premedication with intravenous low-dose midazolam 0.015 mg/kg, magnesium sulfate 30 mg/kg, remifentanil 1 μg/kg and low-dose etomidate 0.03 mg/kg two minutes before induction of anesthesia with 0.3 mg/kg intravenous etomidate. Then the incidence and intensity of myoclonus were evaluated on a scale of 0 - 3; 0 = no myoclonus; 1 = mild (movement at wrist); 2 = moderate (movement at arm only, elbow or shoulder); and 3 = severe, generalized response or movement in more than one extremity, within ninety seconds. Any adverse effect due to these premedication agents was recorded. Results The incidence and intensity of myoclonus were significantly lower in the low-dose etomidate group. The incidence rates of myoclonus were 51 (71.85%), 61 (85.9%), 30 (42.3%) and 41 (57.7%), and the percentages of patients who experienced grade III of myoclonus were 30 (58.8%), 32 (52.5%), 9 (30%) and 14 (34.1%) in the midazolam, magnesium sulfate, etomidate and remifentanil groups, respectively. The incidence and intensity of myoclonus were significantly

  8. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  9. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  10. Polycation induced actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Muhlrad, Andras; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil

    2011-04-01

    Three polycations, polylysine, the polyamine spermine and the polycationic protein lysozyme were used to study the formation, structure, ionic strength sensitivity and dissociation of polycation-induced actin bundles. Bundles form fast, simultaneously with the polymerization of MgATP-G-actins, upon the addition of polycations to solutions of actins at low ionic strength conditions. This indicates that nuclei and/or nascent filaments bundle due to attractive, electrostatic effect of polycations and the neutralization of repulsive interactions of negative charges on actin. The attractive forces between the filaments are strong, as shown by the low (in nanomolar range) critical concentration of their bundling at low ionic strength. These bundles are sensitive to ionic strength and disassemble partially in 100 mM NaCl, but both the dissociation and ionic strength sensitivity can be countered by higher polycation concentrations. Cys374 residues of actin monomers residing on neighboring filaments in the bundles can be cross-linked by the short span (5.4Å) MTS-1 (1,1-methanedyl bismethanethiosulfonate) cross-linker, which indicates a tight packing of filaments in the bundles. The interfilament cross-links, which connect monomers located on oppositely oriented filaments, prevent disassembly of bundles at high ionic strength. Cofilin and the polysaccharide polyanion heparin disassemble lysozyme induced actin bundles more effectively than the polylysine-induced bundles. The actin-lysozyme bundles are pathologically significant as both proteins are found in the pulmonary airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Their bundles contribute to the formation of viscous mucus, which is the main cause of breathing difficulties and eventual death in this disorder.

  11. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  12. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  13. Isoniazid-induced pellagra.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Calka, Omer; Altun, Faruk

    2011-12-01

    Pellagra is characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia and eventually death occurring as a result of niacin or its precursor tryptophan deficiency. Although pellagra is a well-known complication of isoniazid (INH) therapy, the clinical diagnosis may be missed or delayed that may cause life-threatening consequences. Due to the diversity of pellagra-related signs and symptoms, the diagnosis can be made with an appropriate index of suspicion. We report a 7-year-old boy presenting with INH-induced pellagra that resolved after the administration of the niacin therapy.

  14. Trastuzumab-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya; Cutro, Raymond; Mishkin, Joseph D

    2008-06-01

    Trastuzumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody used for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. It improves survival and increases response to chemotherapy. The major side effect of trastuzumab is cardiotoxicity manifesting as a reduction in left ventricular systolic function, either asymptomatic or with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Although reversible in most cases, cardiotoxicity frequently results in the discontinuation of trastuzumab. The objective of this review is to summarize facts about trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity and to highlight the areas of future investigations. We searched PubMed for trials involving trastuzumab used as an adjuvant therapy for breast cancer, including the metastatic breast cancer setting, and focused on cardiotoxicity.

  15. Bupropion-induced somnambulism.

    PubMed

    Khazaal, Yasser; Krenz, Sonia; Zullino, Daniele Fabio

    2003-09-01

    Whereas there are some case reports of bupropion-induced vivid dreaming and nightmares, until now it has not been associated with somnambulism. A case is reported of a patient treated with bupropion as a smoking cessation medication, who developed somnambulism during nicotine withdrawal. Furthermore, the sleepwalking episodes were associated with eating behaviour. Amnesia was reported for all episodes. As, on one hand,bupropion is a noradrenergic and dopaminergic drug and nicotine withdrawal, on the other hand, is associated with alterations in monoaminergic functions, an interaction at the level of these neurotransmitters is suggested as the underlying mechanism.

  16. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes.

  17. Drug-induced gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Ari; Dobs, Adrian

    2008-11-01

    Gynecomastia is caused by drugs in 10 - 25% of all cases. The pathophysiologic mechanism for some drugs includes exogenous estrogens exposure, medications that cause hypogonadism, anti-androgenic effects and hyperprolactinemia. This manuscript reviews common examples of drug-induced gynecomastia, discussing the mechanisms and possible treatments. Discontinuing the medication is always the best choice; however, if this is not possible, then testosterone replacement therapy may be needed for hypogonadism. When a man is euogonadal, a trial of the anti-estrogen, tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor may be an option.

  18. Inducing Pluripotency in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Taheri-Ghahfarokhi, Amir; Sumer, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming technologies in general and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in particular have opened the door to a vast number of practical applications in regenerative medicine and biotechnology. It also represents a possible alternative to the still evasive achievement of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) isolation from refractory species such as Bos. taurus. Herein, we described a protocol for bovine iPSCs (biPSCs) generation and characterization. The protocol is based on the overexpression of the exogenous transcription factors NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC, using a pantropic retroviral system.

  19. 5-fluorouracil induced pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Killu, Ammar; Madhavan, Malini; Prasad, Kavita; Prasad, Abhiram

    2011-04-15

    Cardiac toxicity is an infrequent, but potentially serious side effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The reported incidence of 5-FU-induced cardiotoxicity is approximately 3%, although estimates vary from 1.2% to 18%. Cardiac death occurs in less than 1%. The prompt recognition of cardiac toxicity demands a thorough understanding of the myriad of potential cardiac manifestations and a high index of suspicion. The most common presentation is angina pectoris while other manifestations, namely myocardial infarction, left ventricular dysfunction, arrhythmias and sudden death have been recognised. The authors report an unusual case of myopericarditis masquerading as myocardial infarction.

  20. Method for inducing hypothermia

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  1. Antacid-induced osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Boutsen, Y; Devogelaer, J P; Malghem, J; Noel, H; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1996-01-01

    The case of a 49-year-old woman suffering from generalized skeletal pain and multiple fractures accompanied by severe hypophosphataemia and low urinary phosphorus excretion is reported. She had been taking large amounts of antacids containing aluminum hydroxide for many years. A diagnosis of antacid-induced osteomalacia was made. It was confirmed by biological work-up, radiographs and bone biopsy. A dramatic biological, osteodensitometric, and clinical improvement was achieved by withdrawal of antacids and phosphorus administration. The literature concerning this unusual condition has been reviewed.

  2. Hypnotic Enhancement of Cognitive-Behavioral Weight Loss Treatments--Another Meta-reanalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Irving

    1996-01-01

    In a meta-analysis of the effect of adding hypnosis to cognitive-behavioral treatments for weight reduction, additional data were obtained from authors of two previous studies, and computational inaccuracies in the previous meta-analyses were corrected. Discusses findings. Correlational analyses indicated that the benefits of hypnosis increased…

  3. Reduction of Adolescent Drug Abuse Through Post-Hypnotic Cue Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Roger D.

    1974-01-01

    Six adolescents, all females, who were involved in a variety of drug misuse were self-referrals for treatment. Treatment consisted of an initial comprehensive psychological examination, three intensive sessions of hypnosis and a procedure to develop cue association in situations where the girls felt tense. Results were favorable. (Author)

  4. Clinical Report: Helping Habitual Smokers Using Flooding and Hypnotic Desensitization Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Douglas H.

    Most research in smoking cessation has shown no intervention clearly superior or successful. Of those who return to smoking after abstaining, a subgroup includes those who do so incrementally, eventually reaching their former level. An approach aimed at this subgroup, originally used in a group setting, involves intensifying the desire to smoke…

  5. Transmitting delusional beliefs in a hypnotic model of folie à deux.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Luke P; Cox, Rochelle E; Barnier, Amanda J

    2013-12-01

    Folie à deux is the transference of delusional ideas from one 'primary' individual to one or more 'secondary' individuals (Lasègue & Falret, 1877). However, it is difficult to investigate experimentally because often only one patient is identified as delusional. We investigated whether hypnosis could model the experiences of the secondary in this delusion. Our primary was a confederate, who displayed two delusional beliefs and attempted to transmit them to hypnotised subjects. We manipulated the status of the confederate so that they were portrayed as either "credible" or merely "interesting".Many high hypnotisable individuals adopted the confederate's beliefs and confabulated evidence in support of them.Also, subjects who interacted with a credible confederate extended their delusions beyond those displayed by the confederate. We discuss the strengths and limitations of this approach and suggest ways to improve the validity of this model.

  6. Placebo Effect upon Complex Reaction Time When Hypnotic Suggestibility is Controlled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eskridge, Veronica L.

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of a placebo (sugar pill) accompanied by suggestions that the pill would either (1) improve performance as a stimulant or (2) cause a deterioration in performance as a depressant when the performance in question was the subjects' complex reaction time to a light stimulus. The Harvard Group Scale of…

  7. 76 FR 19375 - Safety and Efficacy of Hypnotic Drugs; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... insomnia. The Division of Neurology Products (DNP) in FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and the... Margaret Bogie or Cathleen Michaloski (see Contact). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Insomnia is a common..., about the definition of insomnia and the classification of patients with the disorder. A...

  8. "Don't Know" Responding to Answerable and Unanswerable Questions during Misleading and Hypnotic Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoboria, Alan; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Kirsch, Irving

    2008-01-01

    "Don't know" (DK) responses to interview questions are conceptually heterogeneous, and may represent uncertainty or clear statements about the contents of memory. A study examined the subjective intent of DK responses in relation to the objective status of information queried, in the context of memory distorting procedures. Participants…

  9. A Symptom-Focused Hypnotic Approach to Accessing and Processing Previously Repressed/Dissociated Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratican, Kathleen L.

    1996-01-01

    The kinesthetic track back technique accesses the origins of current symptoms and may uncover previously repressed/dissociated material, if such material exists in the client's unconscious mind, is relevant to the symptoms, and is ready to be processed consciously. Case examples are given to illustrate proper use of this technique. (LSR)

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics following single and repeated nightly administrations of loprazolam, a new benzodiazepine hypnotic.

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, G T; Bunting, E A; Ings, R M; Robinson, J; Ankier, S I

    1985-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of oral loprazolam and pharmacodynamic responses on the morning following nightly drug administration were examined after single and after seven consecutive 1 mg doses in six non-fasting healthy subjects. The serum concentration-time profiles for unchanged loprazolam measured by a specific high pressure liquid chromatography/gas chromatography (h.p.l.c./g.c.) method and for benzodiazepine material measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) were qualitatively similar although RIA levels were consistently higher. Approximate elimination half-life of unchanged loprazolam after single doses was 8.0 h. For RIA measured material, approximate half-life was 11.7 h following acute administration and 12.8 h after seven consecutive doses. Compared to results after single doses, maximum serum concentration and AUC were greater following 1 week's treatment. Using RIA results, the increases were 27.2% (95% CL 6.9 to 47.4%) and 35.1% (95% CL 15.8 to 54.3%) respectively and using h.p.l.c./g.c. data, 11% (95% CL - 22.6% to 44.5%) and 41% (95% CL - 50.9 to 133.0%). After repeated doses of loprazolam, there were no significant changes with respect to results after single doses in psychomotor function assessed objectively by critical flicker fusion threshold or choice reaction time, or in sleep quality or behaviour on awakening assessed subjectively by 10 cm analogue scales. Mean time to maximum serum concentration was 4.95 h with considerable inter-individual variability (range 1-12 h) and there was a lag time of 1-1.5 h before drug was detectable in blood.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2860916

  11. Hypnotically facilitated exposure response prevention therapy for an OIF veteran with OCD.

    PubMed

    Proescher, Eric J

    2010-07-01

    The highly stressful conditions of a war zone may exacerbate or trigger a wide variety of symptoms including Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) once a service member returns home. Service members and new veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars present to treatment with multiple psychosocial concerns and co-morbid psychiatric conditions. Evidence-based treatments including exposure based therapies are commonly recommended for use with returning veterans. Although studies support the efficacy of Exposure Response Prevention (ERP) therapy for treating OCD, eligibility for these studies limits participation to subjects who self-report a well-defined, circumscribed complaint. This approach is not typical of clinic clients who, more often than not, report multiple psychological issues. The following individual case study demonstrates how integrating hypnosis facilitated the cognitive-behavioral ERP therapy and treatment for a patient suffering from OCD.

  12. Hypnotic overdoses and fairy tales: Snow White and the uses of disenchantment.

    PubMed

    Pommereau, X; Delile, J M; Caule, E

    1987-01-01

    In most Western countries, more than two-thirds of attempted suicides are among women suffering from drug overdoses. Explanations for women's use of less violent methods include the wish to avoid disfiguration, the influence of upbringing, and sex differences in cultural expectations. Many women under stress have a weaker intention to die, and their suicidal act is generally less a deliberate search for death than a desire to live another life, indicating a need to escape from a difficult situation. In this respect, the suicidal woman's desire to sleep through an overdose coma is very significant. We call to mind the strength of the kinship between death and sleep. Reinterpreting the fairy tale "Snow White" and making a parallel with some contemporary clinical cases, we show that the illusion of a nondefinitive death is often assimilated, in Western culture, with a step toward rebirth.

  13. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2005-04-15

    Autoantibodies and, less commonly, systemic rheumatic symptoms are associated with treatment with numerous medications and other types of ingested compounds. Distinct syndromes can be distinguished, based on clinical and laboratory features, as well as exposure history. Drug-induced lupus has been reported as a side-effect of long-term therapy with over 40 medications. Its clinical and laboratory features are similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, except that patients fully recover after the offending medication is discontinued. This syndrome differs from typical drug hypersensitivity reactions in that drug-specific T-cells or antibodies are not involved in induction of autoimmunity, it usually requires many months to years of drug exposure, is drug dose-dependent and generally does not result in immune sensitization to the drug. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that oxidative metabolites of the parent compound trigger autoimmunity. Several mechanisms for induction of autoimmunity will be discussed, including bystander activation of autoreactive lymphocytes due to drug-specific immunity or to non-specific activation of lymphocytes, direct cytotoxicity with release of autoantigens and disruption of central T-cell tolerance. The latter hypothesis will be supported by a mouse model in which a reactive metabolite of procainamide introduced into the thymus results in lupus-like autoantibody induction. These findings, as well as evidence for thymic function in drug-induced lupus patients, support the concept that abnormalities during T-cell selection in the thymus initiate autoimmunity.

  14. [Exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Gani, Federica; Selvaggi, Lucia; Roagna, Davide

    2008-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) was defined for the first time in 1980. EIA is associated with different kind of exercise, although jogging is the most frequently reported. The clinical manifestations progress from itching, erythema and urticaria to some combination of cutaneous angioedema, gastrointestinal and laryngeal symptoms and signs of angioedema and vascular collapse. Mast cell participation in the pathogenesis of this syndrome has been proved by the finding of an elevated serum histamine level during experimentally-induced attacks and by cutaneous degranulation of mast cells with elevated serum tryptase after attacks. As predisposing factors of EIA, a specific or even aspecific sensitivity to food has been reported and such cases are called "food-dependent EIA". Many foods are implicated but particularly wheat, vegetables, crustacean. Another precipitating factor includes drugs intake (non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), climate variations and menstrual cycle factors. Treatment of an attack should include all the manoeuvres efficacious in the management of conventional anaphylactic syndrome, including the administration of epinephrine and antihistamines. Prevention of the attacks may be achieved with the interruption of the exercise at the appearance of the first premonitory symptoms. To prevent the onset of EIA it is also suitable to delay the exercise practice after at least 4-6 hours from the swallowing of food.

  15. Interferon induced thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Yaron; Menconi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is used for the treatment of various disorders, most notable chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of the commonest side effects of IFNalpha therapy is thyroiditis, with up to 40% of HCV patients on IFNalpha developing clinical or subclinical disease. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. IIT can manifest as clinical autoimmune thyroiditis, presenting with symptoms of classical Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, or as non-autoimmune thyroiditis. Non-autoimmune thyroiditis can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, with early thyrotoxicosis and later hypothyroidism, or as non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of IIT have been well characterized the mechanisms causing IIT are still poorly understood. It is likely that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) itself plays a role in the disease, as the association between HCV infection and thyroiditis is well established. It is believed that IFNalpha induces thyroiditis by both immune stimulatory effects and by direct effects on the thyroid. Early detection and therapy of this condition are important in order to avoid complications of thyroid disease such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  16. [Gluten induced diseases].

    PubMed

    Frič, P; Zavoral, M; Dvořáková, T

    2013-05-01

    The introduction of cereals in human nutrition 10 000 years ago caused the occurrence of gluten induced diseases. This protein complex is involved in pathogenesis of wheat allergy, celiac disease, and gluten sensitivity. Wheat allergy and celiac disease are mediated by the system of adaptive immunity. Gluten sensitivity is a recently defined entity induced by innate immune mechanisms. These subjects present various intestinal and particularly extraintestinal symptoms. The differences between celiac disease and gluten intolerance include permeability of the intestinal mucosal barrier, histology of duodenal biopsy, and mucosal gene expression. The symptoms of gluten sensitivity may also have another genetic background of food intolerance independent of the HLADQ2, - DQ8 system and tissue transglutaminase (eg. in some psychiatric disorders). At present, there is no specific bio-marker of gluten sensitivity. The diagnosis is possible only by exclusion of other causes of symptoms and improvement on a glutenfree diet applied in a doubleblind placebo controlled manner with optional sequence of both stages to exclude the placebo effect due to nutritional intervention.

  17. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  18. Statin-induced myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Michał; Stępień, Karolina M; Tomaszewska, Joanna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2011-01-01

    Statins are considered to be safe, well tolerated and the most efficient drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, one of the main risk factor for atherosclerosis, and therefore they are frequently prescribed medications. The most severe adverse effect of statins is myotoxicity, in the form of myopathy, myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. Clinical trials commonly define statin toxicity as myalgia or muscle weakness with creatine kinase (CK) levels greater than 10 times the normal upper limit. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe adverse effect of statins, which may result in acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and death. The exact pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy is not fully known. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms may contribute to statin myotoxicity. This review focuses on a number of them. The prevention of statin-related myopathy involves using the lowest statin dose required to achieve therapeutic goals and avoiding polytherapy with drugs known to increase systemic exposure and myopathy risk. Currently, the only effective treatment of statin-induced myopathy is the discontinuation of statin use in patients affected by muscle aches, pains and elevated CK levels.

  19. Drug-induced exanthems.

    PubMed

    Yawalkar, Nikhil

    2005-04-15

    Cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs can comprise a broad spectrum of clinical and histopathological features. Recent evidence from immunohistological and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells suggest that distinct T-cell functions may be responsible for this broad spectrum of different clinical reactions. Maculopapular exanthems represent the most commonly encountered cutaneous drug eruption. Previous studies on maculopapular exanthems indicate that drug-specific CD4+ T cells expressing cytotoxic granule proteins such as perforin and granzyme B are critically involved in killing activated keratinocytes. These cells are particularly found at the dermo-epidermal junction and may contribute to the generation of vacuolar alteration and destruction of basal keratinocytes, which are typical found in drug-induced maculopapular exanthems. In contrast to maculopapular exanthems, the preferential activation of drug-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells may lead to more severe reactions like bullous drug eruptions. Furthermore, activation of drug-specific T with distinct cytokine and chemokines profiles may also explain the different clinical features of drug-induced exanthems. IL-5 and eotaxin are upregulated in maculopapular exanthems and explain the eosinophilia often found in these reactions.

  20. Neuropharmacological actions of panchagavya formulation containing Emblica officinalis Gaerth and Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn in mice.

    PubMed

    Achliya, Girish S; Wadodkar, Sudhir G; Avinash, K Dorle

    2004-05-01

    A panchagavya Ayurvedic formulation containing E. officinalis, G. glabra, and cow's ghee was evaluated for its effect on pentobarbital-induced sleeping time, pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures, maximal electroshock-induced seizures, spontaneous motor activity, rota-rod performance (motor coordination) and antagonism to amphetamine in mice. The formulation (300, 500 mg/kg, po) produced a significant prolongation of pentobarbital-induced sleeping time and reduced spontaneous locomotor activity. The formulation also significantly antagonised the amphetamine induced hyper-locomotor activity (500, 750 mg/kg, po) and protected mice against tonic convulsions induced by maximal electroshock (500, 750 mg/kg, po). The formulation slightly prolonged the phases of seizure activity but did not protect mice against lethality induced by pentylenetetrazole. The formulation did not show neurotoxicity. The results suggest that the panchagavya formulation is sedative in nature.