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Sample records for pentosan polysulfate resulted

  1. Pentosan Polysulfate

    MedlinePlus

    Pentosan polysulfate is used to relieve bladder pain and discomfort related to interstitial cystitis, a disease that causes swelling and scarring of the bladder wall. Pentosan polysulfate is similar to a class of medications called ...

  2. Massive bleeding on a bladder protectant: a case report of pentosan polysulfate sodium-induced coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Gill, Sharlene; Naiman, Sheldon C; Jamal, Abeed; Vickars, Linda M

    2002-07-22

    Pentosan polysulfate sodium (Elmiron; Alza Pharmaceuticals, Mountain View, Calif) is an oral preparation of pentosan polysulfate used in the symptomatic management of interstitial cystitis. While pentosan polysulfate has a known heparin-like effect in its parenteral form, there have been no previous reports of coagulopathy with oral use. We present an interesting case of inadvertent systemic anticoagulation resulting in serious bleeding complications in a young woman taking oral pentosan polysulfate for interstitial cystitis.

  3. 77 FR 58399 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Recommendations for Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Recommendations for Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium Capsule; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance for industry entitled ``Bioequivalence Recommendations for Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium.'' The... drug applications (ANDAs) for pentosan polysulfate sodium capsule. DATES: Although you can comment...

  4. Separation of enantiomers by capillary electrophoresis using pentosan polysulfate.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lee, J T; Armstrong, D W

    1999-01-01

    Pentosan polysulfate, a semisynthetic polysaccharide, was employed as a chiral run buffer additive in capillary electrophoresis. Twenty-eight racemic analytes were resolved. The separations were successful only at low pH when the analytes were significantly protonated. This suggests that ionic interactions were the dominant associative interactions between the anionic pentosan polysulfate and the positively charged analytes. Compared to other linear, carbohydrate-based chiral selectors (i.e., chondroitin sulfates, heparin and dextran sulfate) pentosan polysulfate has some characteristics common of anionic polysaccharides; yet it has several differences in its structure and properties which account for its unusual enantioselectivity. The effects of pH, concentration of phosphate buffer, concentration of pentosan polysulfate and the type and concentration of organic modifier on the enantiomeric separations were investigated. The optimization of these separations were dependent on the nature of the analytes and could be achieved by the proper choice of experimental conditions.

  5. 75 FR 53704 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Use of Pentosan Polysulfate To Treat Certain Conditions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... December 07, 2004, entitled, ``USE OF PENTOSAN POLYSULFATE TO TREAT CERTAIN CONDITIONS OF THE PROSTATE... worldwide, and the field of use may be limited to ``the use of pentosan polysulfate for the treatment or... Hyperplasia (BHP) using the oral medication pentosan polysulfate (PPS). PPS is a well known,...

  6. Calcium pentosan polysulfate and sodium pentosan polysulfate may be used to treat intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia-Guo; Wang, Jia; Xin, Qi; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Sheng-Fei; Qi, Feng; Mao, Dong; Zhang, Zhi-Cheng

    2011-04-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a major health problem world-wide, and several spinal disorders are closely associated with it. Although people have invested a great deal of time and effort, how to prevent and reverse the IDD for the researchers is still a difficult and hot issue. Intervertebral disc belongs to cartilage tissue, and IDD also is the cartilage degeneration disease. A large quantity of studies have shown that Calcium pentosan polysulfate (CaPPS) and sodium pentosan polysulfate (NaPPS) possess chondroprotective activities and play an important role in maintaining cartilage integrity. We reasonably hypothesize that NaPPS and CaPPS may be used to treat IDD. The possible mechanism may include that: (1) the significant effects of NaPPS and CaPPS in improving capillary blood flow could maintain nutritional supply to intervertebral disc, and preserve intervertebral disc tissue against degeneration; (2) CaPPS and NaPPS preserve cartilage integrity, proteoglycan synthesis, and improve cartilage biomechanical properties; (3) as the multifaceted exosite inhibitors of proteinases NaPPS and CaPPS strongly impede the activity and production of proteinases; (4) promotion of the balance between proteinases and TIMPs also may be involved in treating IDD; (5) NaPPS and CaPPS exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects, and then reduce inflammation-induced IDD. If the hypothesis were conformed, the symptoms caused by IDD and its related diseases would be a corresponding alleviation or even disappearance, which could greatly alleviate the suffering of patients from disc degeneration diseases. Certainly, many roles of CaPPS and NaPPS, such as effectiveness, safety and side effects, need to be tested, and further works such as animal model and clinical trial, need to be done to prove this hypothesis.

  7. Improvements in pentosan polysulfate sodium quality assurance using fingerprint electropherograms.

    PubMed

    Schirm, B; Benend, H; Wätzig, H

    2001-04-01

    Complex samples from polymer production, plant extracts or biotechnology mixtures can be characterized by fingerprints. Currently, the standard approach for sample characterization employs near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy fingerprinting. Up to now, however, fingerprints obtained by chromatography or electrophoresis could only be visually evaluated. This type of inspection is very labor-intensive and difficult to validate. In order to transfer the use of fingerprints from spectroscopy to electrophoresis, spectra-like properties must be obtained through a complete alignment of the electropherograms. This has been achieved by interpolation and wavelet filtering of the baseline signal in the present work. The resulting data have been classified by several algorithms. The methods under survey include self-organizing maps (SOMs), artificial neural networks (ANNs), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) and k-nearest neighbors (KNNs). In order to test the performance of this combined approach in practice, it was applied to the quality assurance of pentosan polysulfate (PPS). A recently developed capillary electrophoresis (CE) method using indirect UV detection was employed in these studies [1]. All algorithms were well capable of classifying the examined PPS test batches. Even minor variations in the PPS composition, not perceptible by visual inspection, could be automatically detected. The whole method has been validated by classifying various (n = 400) unknown PPS quality assurance samples, which have been correctly identified without exception.

  8. The effect of heparin and pentosan polysulfate on the thermal stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Paulíková, H; Molnárová, M; Podhradský, D

    1998-12-01

    Heparin and pentosan polysulfate as organic polyanions inhibit yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of heparin and pentosan polysulfate on the thermostability of alcohol dehydrogenase. Spectral and kinetic analyses showed that these compounds increase the thermal stability of the enzyme and eliminate entirely thermal aggregation. The thermostabilizing effect of unfractionated heparin and pentosan polysulfate was accelerated in the presence of NAD+. The addition of NAD+ (11 microM) to the incubation medium decreased the inhibition of the YADH activity in the presence of pentosan polysulfate (1.32 microM). Moreover, 38% of the residual activity of YADH was found after a 5-min incubation at 70 degrees C. These findings indicate that heparinoids not only modulate the enzyme activity but also can prevent the protein's thermal denaturation.

  9. Potentiation of carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxicity by pentosan polysulfate in rats.

    PubMed

    Zim, M C A; Silveira, T R; Schwartsmann, G; Cerski, T; Motta, A

    2002-11-01

    Few data are available in the literature regarding the effect of pentosan polysulfate (PPS) on normal and fibrotic rat livers. In addition, the combination of PPS and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) has not been studied so far. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of PPS on rat livers treated or not with CCl4 for the induction of liver fibrosis. The study consisted of four stages: 1) hepatic fibrosis induction with CCl4 (N = 36 rats); 2) evaluation of the effect of PPS on CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis (N = 36 rats); 3) evaluation of the effect of higher doses of PPS in combination with CCl4 (N = 50 rats); 4) evaluation of the presence of an enzymatic inductor effect by PPS (N = 18 rats) using the sodium pentobarbital test which indirectly evaluates hepatic microsomal enzyme activity in vivo. Adult (60 to 70 days) male Wistar rats weighing 180 to 220 g were used. All animals receiving 0.5 ml 8% CCl4 (N = 36) developed hepatic fibrosis, and after 8 weeks they also developed cirrhosis. No delay or prevention of hepatic fibrosis was observed with the administration of 5 mg/kg PPS (N = 8) and 1 mg/kg PPS (N = 8) 1 h after the administration of CCl4, but the increased hepatotoxicity resulting from the combination of the two substances caused massive hepatic necrosis in most rats (N = 45). PPS (40 mg/kg) alone caused hepatic congestion only after 8 weeks, but massive hepatic necrosis was again observed in association with 0.5 ml CCl4 after 1 to 4 weeks of treatment. Unexpectedly, sleeping time increased with time of PPS administration (1, 2, or 3 weeks). This suggests that PPS does not function as an activator of the hepatic microsomal enzymatic system. Further studies are necessary in order to clarify the unexpected increase in hepatotoxicity caused by the combination of CCl4 and high doses of PPS, which results in massive hepatic necrosis.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of warfarin when coadministered with pentosan polysulfate sodium.

    PubMed

    Modi, Nishit B; Kell, Sherron; Simon, Mary; Vargas, Ramon

    2005-08-01

    The effect of pentosan polysulfate sodium on warfarin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was investigated in healthy subjects. Warfarin was titrated to an international normalized ratio between 1.4 and 1.8. Subjects continued their titrated dose of warfarin and received pentosan polysulfate sodium 100 mg or placebo every 8 hours for 7 days. The Cmax of R- and S-warfarin was approximately 840 to 890 ng/mL and 680 to 730 ng/mL, respectively, and was similar in the absence and presence of pentosan polysulfate sodium. The half-life for R- and S-warfarin was 52 to 56 hours and 36 to 40 hours, respectively. Prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, and the international normalized ratio for warfarin + placebo and warfarin + pentosan polysulfate sodium were comparable. The AUC(INR) indicated no treatment effect (P = .772); however, there was a period effect. Analysis of variance for the treatments by period indicated no treatment effect (P > .1). Adverse events were mild and included headache, epistaxis, and rash. Most adverse events were unrelated to treatment and were seen during warfarin titration. Pentosan polysulfate sodium did not affect warfarin pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics.

  11. Calcium pentosan polysulfate is a multifaceted exosite inhibitor of aggrecanases.

    PubMed

    Troeberg, Linda; Fushimi, Kazunari; Khokha, Rama; Emonard, Hervé; Ghosh, Peter; Nagase, Hideaki

    2008-10-01

    Degradation of the cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan is a key early event in the development of osteoarthritis. Adamalysin with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) -4 and ADAMTS-5 are considered to be the main enzymes responsible for aggrecan breakdown, making them attractive drugs targets. Here we show that calcium pentosan polysulfate (CaPPS), a chemically sulfated xylanopyranose from beechwood, is a multifaceted exosite inhibitor of the aggrecanases and protects cartilage against aggrecan degradation. CaPPS interacts with the noncatalytic spacer domain of ADAMTS-4 and the cysteine-rich domain of ADAMTS-5, blocking activity against their natural substrate aggrecan with inhibitory concentration 50 values of 10-40 nM but only weakly inhibiting hydrolysis of a nonglycosylated recombinant protein substrate. In addition, CaPPS increased cartilage levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP-3), an endogenous inhibitor of ADAMTS-4 and -5. This was due to the ability of CaPPS to block endocytosis of TIMP-3 mediated by low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. CaPPS also increased the affinity of TIMP-3 for ADAMTS-4 and -5 by more than 100-fold, improving the efficacy of TIMP-3 as an aggrecanase inhibitor. Studies with TIMP-3-null mouse cartilage indicated that CaPPS inhibition of aggrecan degradation is TIMP-3 dependent. These unique properties make CaPPS a prototypic disease-modifying agent for osteoarthritis.

  12. Pentosan polysulfate as an inhibitor of extracellular HIV-1 Tat.

    PubMed

    Rusnati, M; Urbinati, C; Caputo, A; Possati, L; Lortat-Jacob, H; Giacca, M; Ribatti, D; Presta, M

    2001-06-22

    HIV-1 Tat protein, released from HIV-infected cells, may act as a pleiotropic heparin-binding growth factor. From this observation, extracellular Tat has been implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and of AIDS-associated pathologies. Here we demonstrate that the heparin analog pentosan polysulfate (PPS) inhibits the interaction of glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Tat protein with heparin immobilized to a BIAcore sensor chip. Competition experiments showed that Tat-PPS interaction occurs with high affinity (K(d) = 9.0 nm). Also, GST.Tat prevents the binding of [(3)H]heparin to GST.Tat immobilized to glutathione-agarose beads. In vitro, PPS inhibits GST.Tat internalization and, consequently, HIV-1 long terminal repeat transactivation in HL3T1 cells. Also, PPS inhibits cell surface interaction and mitogenic activity of GST.Tat in murine adenocarcinoma T53 Tat-less cells. In all assays, PPS exerts its Tat antagonist activity with an ID(50) equal to approximately 1.0 nm. In vivo, PPS inhibits the neovascularization induced by GST.Tat or by Tat-overexpressing T53 cells in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. In conclusion, PPS binds Tat protein and inhibits its cell surface interaction, internalization, and biological activity in vitro and in vivo. PPS may represent a prototypic molecule for the development of novel Tat antagonists with therapeutic implications in AIDS and AIDS-associated pathologies, including Kaposi's sarcoma.

  13. Pentosan polysulfate protects brain endothelial cells against bacterial lipopolysaccharide-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Veszelka, Szilvia; Pásztói, Mária; Farkas, Attila E; Krizbai, István; Ngo, Thi Khue Dung; Niwa, Masami; Abrahám, Csongor S; Deli, Mária A

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation can aggravate local brain inflammation and neuronal death. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key player in the event. On a relevant in vitro model of primary rat brain endothelial cells co-cultured with primary rat astroglia cells lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced changes in several BBB functions have been investigated. LPS-treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the integrity of endothelial monolayers: transendothelial electrical resistance dropped, while flux of permeability markers fluorescein and albumin significantly increased. Immunostaining for junctional proteins ZO-1, claudin-5 and beta-catenin was significantly weaker in LPS-treated endothelial cells than in control monolayers. LPS also reduced the intensity and changed the pattern of ZO-1 immunostaining in freshly isolated rat brain microvessels. The activity of P-glycoprotein, an important efflux pump at the BBB, was also inhibited by LPS. At the same time production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide was increased in brain endothelial cells treated with LPS. Pentosan polysulfate, a polyanionic polysaccharide could reduce the deleterious effects of LPS on BBB permeability, and P-glycoprotein activity. LPS-stimulated increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide was also decreased by pentosan treatment. The protective effect of pentosan for brain endothelium can be of therapeutical significance in bacterial infections affecting the BBB.

  14. Pentosan polysulfate: a review of its use in the relief of bladder pain or discomfort in interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Vanessa R; Perry, Caroline M

    2006-01-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (pentosan polysulfate sodium; ELMIRON), a heparin-like, sulfated polysaccharide, is used to manage bladder pain and discomfort in adults with interstitial cystitis (IC). Preliminary clinical models suggest that pentosan polysulfate repairs damaged glycosaminoglycan (GAG) layers lining the urothelium and in vitro data suggest it may provide an anti-inflammatory effect in patients with IC. Pentosan polysulfate shows beneficial effects in a proportion of patients with IC in terms of the improvement of a patient's overall condition and the relief of pain, and it is a generally well tolerated therapy. It is the only US FDA-approved oral treatment for the relief of bladder pain or discomfort associated with IC, and data support its role as an important option in the treatment of patients with IC.

  15. Intravesical instillation of pentosan polysulfate encapsulated in a liposome nanocarrier for interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Lander, Elliot B; See, Jackie R

    2014-01-01

    We determined the effect of intravesical instillation of pentosan polysulfate encapsulated in liposomes for refractory interstitial cystitis patients. This was an open label uncontrolled study. Subjects were recruited from a private urology practice. Inclusion criteria included patients who met NIDDK criteria for Interstitial Cystitis (IC) and who were responding poorly to conventional treatments. Exclusion criteria included evidence of a urinary tract infection, bladder cancer, or other forms of chronic cystitis. Patients received 400 mg of Pentosan Polysulfate (PP) encapsulated into liposomes as an intravesical instillation performed every 2 weeks for 3 months. Baseline and post treatment outcome measures were obtained that included the O'Leary-Sant Interstitial Cystitis Symptom and Problem Questionnaire and the Pelvic Pain and Urgency/Frequency Patient symptom Scale tests. A total of 37 instillations were used and no adverse events occurred. Clinically significant decreases in symptom scores greater than 50% were seen in virtually all outcome measures at 3 month follow up. All subjects reported remarkable subjective improvement in pain symptoms marked by decreased use of narcotics and increased enjoyment of daily activities. No patients developed systemic symptoms or poor tolerance of the instillations. Intravesical Pentosan Polysulfate encapsulated into liposomes can significantly decrease frequency, urgency, pain and improve quality of life for two months after deployment. Additional studies are needed to determine cellular effects of glycosaminoglycan restoration, ideal doses, dosing intervals, safety and cost-effectiveness of this therapy.

  16. Effect of pentosan polysulfate (SP 54) on the reverse transcriptase activity of several retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sydow, G; Klöcking, H P

    1987-01-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (SP 54), a low molecular weight sulfated polysaccharide, was studied in vitro for its effect on the reverse transcriptase activity of seven retroviruses. Six of them possess an enzyme with high sensitivity against SP 54, while the enzyme of one virus (bovine leucosis virus) proved to be insensitive within the concentration range tested. In comparison with other polyanionic compounds so far tested, SP 54 seems to be one of the most active in vitro inhibitors of retrovirus-specific reverse transcriptase. PMID:2445339

  17. Is there a role for pentosan polysulfate in the prevention of calcium oxalate stones?

    PubMed

    Jones, Marklyn; Monga, Manoj

    2003-12-01

    The clinical role for pentosan polysulfate (PPS) in the prevention of calcium oxalate urolithiasis is not known. Crystallization and aggregation are important steps in calcium oxalate stone formation, and PPS has been shown to inhibit these steps, both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, PPS has a role in repairing injured urothelium and inhibiting adhesion to epithelial defects. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study appears warranted to assess the utility of PPS in the prevention of recurrent calcium oxalate stones.

  18. Effects of pentosan polysulfate sodium on the estrogen-induced pituitary prolactinoma in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Mucha, Slawomir; Melen-Mucha, Gabriela; Stepien, Tomasz; Godlewski, Andrzej; Stepien, Henryk

    2002-01-01

    The development of estrogen-induced pituitary prolactinoma in Fischer 344 (F344) rats is associated with enhanced neovascularization. This type of tumor is a rich source of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), which possesses strong mitogenic and angiogenic properties. Pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS) has been shown to exert antitumor activity by antagonizing the binding of bFGF to cell surface receptors. We have examined the effects of pentosan on tumor growth, hyperprolactinemia and angiogenesis in diethylstilbestrol-induced anterior pituitary adenoma in F344 rats. Chronic treatment with PPS did not cause any changes in the pituitary weight and serum prolactin concentration in comparison with untreated animals. The density of microvessels identified by CD-31 was also not affected by the tested drug. On the other hand, pentosan has been found to decrease cell proliferation evaluated by a number of PCNA-positive stained cell nuclei. Moreover, the TUNEL method has revealed an increased number of apoptotic bodies within the anterior pituitary after treatment with PPS. Despite the antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity of pentosan, the drug failed to inhibit tumor growth. This fact might be due to the lack of antiangiogenic activity of PPS in this experimental design.

  19. The preventive effect of sodium pentosan polysulfate against renal stone formation in hyperoxaluric rats.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Tatsuya; Ishii, Keiichi; Yoneda, Yukio; Kamikawa, Sadanori; Kanazawa, Toshinao; Sugimoto, Toshikado; Osswald, Hartmut

    2002-10-01

    Sodium pentosan polysulfate (SPP), a semi-synthetic glycosaminoglycan, was administered to rats with hyperoxaluria, induced by a vitamin B6 deficient diet, as a model of calcium oxalate stone formation. We studied the preventive effects of SPP on stone formation as well as its inhibitory effects on stone growth by autoradiography and radioluminography after intravenous injection of (14)C-oxalate. The rats were divided into non-treated and SPP-treated groups. The non-treated rats were divided into three groups: one group was fed a regular diet, while the other two groups were fed a vitamin B6 deficient diet for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. The SPP-treated rats were divided into two groups: one group was intravenously injected with SPP from the start of the vitamin B6 deficient diet for a total of 4 weeks and the other group was injected with the same amount of SPP after 2 weeks of the diet for 2 weeks. (14)C-oxalate renal macroautoradiograms were prepared, and calcium oxalate deposits in the renal tissues were compared between the non-treated and SPP-treated groups. The preventive effects on calcium oxalate stone formation were clearly observed in the group injected with SPP for 4 weeks. Even in the other SPP-treated group, in which the administration of SPP was started at 2 weeks after the start of the diet when calcium oxalate stone formation was already observed, the size of the calcium oxalate deposits observed after 4 weeks was smaller than that in the non-treated group fed a vitamin B6 deficient diet for 4 weeks. In conclusion, our results show that SPP has not only preventive effects on calcium oxalate stone formation but also growth inhibitory effects on stones in hyperoxaluric rats.

  20. Calcium pentosan polysulfate directly inhibits enzymatic activity of ADAMTS4 (aggrecanase-1) in osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Masayuki; Yatabe, Taku; Okada, Aiko; Chijiiwa, Miyuki; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Ghosh, Peter; Okada, Yasunori

    2008-08-20

    Aggrecanases that include ADAMTS1, 4, 5, 8, 9 and 15 are considered to play key roles in aggrecan degradation in osteoarthritic cartilage. Here we demonstrate that calcium pentosan polysulfate (CaPPS) directly inhibits the aggrecanase activity of ADAMTS4 without affecting the mRNA expression of the ADAMTS species in interleukin-1alpha-stimulated osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Synthetic peptides corresponding to specific regions of the thrombospondin type 1 repeat, cysteine-rich or spacer domain of ADAMTS4 inhibit the binding to immobilized CaPPS. These data suggest that CaPPS could function as chondroprotective agent for the treatment of osteoarthritis by inhibition of ADAMTS4 through interaction with the C-terminal ancillary domain.

  1. Metabolism of [3H]pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS) in healthy human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Simon, M; McClanahan, R H; Shah, J F; Repko, T; Modi, N B

    2005-08-01

    Pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS) is the active ingredient in ELMIRON, a drug approved for the relief of bladder pain associated with interstitial cystitis. The study objective was to characterize the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profiles of PPS following oral dosing of [3H]PPS. As specific assays for PPS do not exist, metabolic profiling was accomplished through multiple fraction collections and radiochromatographic techniques. Two groups of eight healthy female subjects sequentially received a single oral dose of 200 microCi [3H]PPS supplemented with 300 mg unlabelled PPS or 300 microCi [3H]PPS supplemented with 450 mg unlabelled PPS. Most of the administered dose (84%) was excreted in faeces as intact PPS, and a smaller percentage (6%) was excreted in urine. In summary, orally administered PPS was very poorly absorbed, with the majority of the drug being excreted in faeces as intact PPS and in urine as low molecular weight and desulfated PPS.

  2. Pentosan polysulfate as a prophylactic and therapeutic agent against prion disease.

    PubMed

    Dealler, Stephen; Rainov, Nikolai G

    2003-05-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (PPS) acts by imitating the physiological roles of the heparans. It binds to heparan binding sites on proteins and alters the physiological actions of these proteins. PPS acts as a prophylactic agent against infection with prions both in vivo and in vitro. Low concentrations (10 mg/ml) are needed extracellularly for this effect to be seen but, due to cellular uptake, it is believed that a much higher concentration is found intracellularly. The prophylactic effect of PPS is observed if the drug is administered to mice between 3 months before and approximately 30 days after the inoculation of the disease. After that point it is considered that the infection has entered the nervous system, and that the drug cannot penetrate the blood-brain barrier. The prophylaxis of humans with oral PPS and the current therapeutic activity of the drug when given by intracerebroventricular infusion to symptomatic, prion-infected animals are discussed.

  3. Enhanced ileal absorption of a hydrophilic macromolecule, pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS).

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Yum, Alicia; Nguyen, Joe; Wong, Pat

    2004-01-01

    An in situ gelling, bioadhesive liquid formulation was developed to enhance the bioavailbility (BA) of a polysaccharide, pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS). The formulation was tested to determine its bioavailability enhancement in a non-flush/non-ligated rat ileal model. A potent synergistic effect was found with a gelling agent Cremophor and a permeation enhancer sodium salicylate. The absolute bioavailabilities were 1.9%, 4.6%, 6.3% and 46.4%, respectively, for the PPS solution in saline, sodium salicylate/PPS, Cremophor/PPS and Cremophor/sodium salicylate/PPS. Therefore, we successfully demonstrated the approach of utilizing an in situ gelling/bioadhesive liquid carrier to enhancing the bioavailability of a hydrophilic macromolecule at the distal small intestine.

  4. Interstitial cystitis: a retrospective analysis of treatment with pentosan polysulfate and follow-up patient survey.

    PubMed

    Waters, M G; Suleskey, J F; Finkelstein, L J; Van Overbeke, M E; Zizza, V J; Stommel, M

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS) in relieving symptoms of interstitial cystitis, the authors retrospectively reviewed charts of 260 patients in whom interstitial cystitis had been diagnosed. Subsequently, they conducted a follow-up phone interview or mail survey of those patients who were treated with PPS to investigate changes in the patients' symptoms, adverse effects, and change in quality of life. The control group consisted of patients whose interstitial cystitis had been diagnosed at cystoscopy and had a duration of at least 1 year and who had taken at least one or more oral medications for their symptoms. The average length of treatment was 9.3 months among the 27 subjects on PPS therapy. The mean length of time that they had diagnosed interstitial cystitis was 35.63 months and 48.78 months for the PPS-treated and control groups, respectively, with no statistically significant difference. Changes in frequency, urgency, and pain were greater in the treatment group and statistically significant (P = .11, P = .49, and P = .004, respectively). No change occurred in the rate of nocturia in the PPS-treated group compared with that in the control group. Symptoms of both groups improved over time, but improvement was statistically significantly greater in the treatment group (P = .001) over the treatment interval. The most common side effect attributable to PPS was diarrhea in 15% of subjects. Pentosan proved to be an efficacious option for reducing the debilitating symptoms of interstitial cystitis.

  5. Pentosan Polysulfate: Oral Versus Subcutaneous Injection in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Simonaro, Calogera M.; Tomatsu, Shunji; Sikora, Tracy; Kubaski, Francyne; Frohbergh, Michael; Guevara, Johana M.; Wang, Raymond Y.; Vera, Moin; Kang, Jennifer L.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Schuchman, Edward H.; Haskins, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of pentosan polysulfate (PPS) in a rat model of mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VI. Reduction of inflammation, reduction of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) storage, and improvement in the skeletal phenotype were shown. Herein, we evaluate the long-term safety and therapeutic effects of PPS in a large animal model of a different MPS type, MPS I dogs. We focused on the arterial phenotype since this is one of the most consistent and clinically significant features of the model. Methodology/Principal Findings MPS I dogs were treated with daily oral or biweekly subcutaneous (subQ) PPS at a human equivalent dose of 1.6 mg/kg for 17 and 12 months, respectively. Safety parameters were assessed at 6 months and at the end of the study. Following treatment, cytokine and GAG levels were determined in fluids and tissues. Assessments of the aorta and carotid arteries also were performed. No drug-related increases in liver enzymes, coagulation factors, or other adverse effects were observed. Significantly reduced IL-8 and TNF-alpha were found in urine and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). GAG reduction was observed in urine and tissues. Increases in the luminal openings and reduction of the intimal media thickening occurred in the carotids and aortas of PPS-treated animals, along with a reduction of storage vacuoles. These results were correlated with a reduction of GAG storage, reduction of clusterin 1 staining, and improved elastin integrity. No significant changes in the spines of the treated animals were observed. Conclusions PPS treatment led to reductions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and GAG storage in urine and tissues of MPS I dogs, which were most evident after subQ administration. SubQ administration also led to significant cytokine reductions in the CSF. Both treatment groups exhibited markedly reduced carotid and aortic inflammation, increased vessel integrity, and improved histopathology. We conclude that PPS may be a

  6. Pentosan Polysulfate: a Novel Glycosaminoglycan-Like Molecule for Effective Treatment of Alphavirus-Induced Cartilage Destruction and Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Suan-Sin; Sheng, Kuo-Ching; Chen, Weiqiang; Forwood, Mark R.; Bucala, Richard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arthritogenic alphaviruses such as Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV) cause large-scale epidemics of severe musculoskeletal disease and have been progressively expanding their global distribution. Since its introduction in July 2014, CHIKV now circulates in the United States. The hallmark of alphavirus disease is crippling pain and inflammation of the joints, a similar immunopathology to rheumatoid arthritis. The use of glycans as novel therapeutics is an area of research that has increased in recent years. Here, we describe the promising therapeutic potential of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-like molecule pentosan polysulfate (PPS) to alleviate virus-induced arthritis. Mouse models of RRV and CHIKV disease were used to characterize the extent of cartilage damage in infection and investigate the potential of PPS to treat disease. This was assessed using histological analysis, real-time PCR, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Alphaviral infection resulted in cartilage destruction, the severity of which was alleviated by PPS therapy during RRV and CHIKV clinical disease. The reduction in cartilage damage corresponded with a significant reduction in immune infiltrates. Using multiplex bead arrays, PPS treatment was found to have significantly increased the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 and reduced proinflammatory cytokines, typically correlated with disease severity. Furthermore, we reveal that the severe RRV-induced joint pathology, including thinning of articular cartilage and loss of proteoglycans in the cartilage matrix, was diminished with treatment. PPS is a promising new therapy for alphavirus-induced arthritis, acting to preserve the cartilage matrix, which is damaged during alphavirus infection. Overall, the data demonstrate the potential of glycotherapeutics as a new class of treatment for infectious arthritis. IMPORTANCE The hallmark of alphavirus disease is crippling pain and joint arthritis, which often

  7. Continuous intraventricular infusion of pentosan polysulfate: clinical trial against prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Yoshio; Doh-Ura, Katsumi; Yamada, Tatsuo

    2009-10-01

    Prion diseases are progressive neurological disorders due to abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition in the central nervous system. At present, there is no effective treatment available for any form of prion disease. Pentosan polysulfate (PPS) has been shown to prolong significantly the incubation period in mice with PrP(Sc) infection when administered to the cerebral ventricles in preclinical trials. In human studies conducted in European countries and Japan, intraventricular PPS was administered to patients with different forms of prion disease and was well tolerated. We report 11 patients with prion disease treated with intraventricular PPS at Fukuoka University from 2004. Cases included three familial CJD (two with V180I mutation, one GSS with P102L mutation), two iatrogenic CJD, and six sporadic CJD cases. At present, average survival period after treatment was 24.2 months (range, 4-49). Seven cases died of sepsis and pneumonia. Subdural effusion with various degrees was seen on CT scan in most cases. Except for these, adverse effects did not occur in the treatment period. Although our preliminary study of the new treatment with PPS by continuous intraventricular infusion showed no apparent improvement of clinical features in patients with prion disease, the possibility of extended survival in some patients receiving long-term PPS was suggested.

  8. Pentosan polysulfate inhibits atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits: differential modulation of metalloproteinase-2 and -9.

    PubMed

    Lupia, Enrico; Zheng, Feng; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Tack, Ivan; Doublier, Sophie; Elliot, Sharon J; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E

    2012-02-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (PPS), a heparinoid compound essentially devoid of anticoagulant activity, modulates cell growth and decreases inflammation. We investigated the effect of PPS on the progression of established atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits. After severe atherosclerosis developed on an atherogenic diet, WHHL rabbits were treated with oral PPS or tap water for 1 month. The aortic intima-to-media ratio and macrophage infiltration were reduced, plaque collagen content was increased, and plaque fibrous caps were preserved by PPS treatment. Plasma lipid levels and post-heparin hepatic lipase activity remained unchanged. However, net collagenolytic activity in aortic extracts was decreased, and the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) activity were increased by PPS. Moreover, PPS treatment decreased tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-stimulated proinflammatory responses, in particular activation of nuclear factor-κB and p38, and activation of MMPs in macrophages. In conclusion, oral PPS treatment prevents progression of established atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits. This effect may be partially mediated by increased MMP-2 and TIMP activities in the aortic wall and reduced TNFα-stimulated inflammation and MMP activation in macrophages. Thus, PPS may be a useful agent in inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis.

  9. Experimental treatments for human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: is there a role for pentosan polysulfate?

    PubMed

    Rainov, N G; Tsuboi, Y; Krolak-Salmon, P; Vighetto, A; Doh-Ura, K

    2007-05-01

    Human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), also known as prion diseases, are caused by the accumulation of an abnormal isoform of the prion protein in the CNS. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in its sporadic form is the most frequent type of human TSE. At present, there is no proven specific or effective treatment available for any form of TSE. Pentosan polysulfate (PPS) has been shown to prolong the incubation period when administered to the cerebral ventricles in a rodent TSE model. Cerebroventricular administration of PPS has been carried out in 26 patients with TSEs and has been shown to be well tolerated in doses < or = 220 microg/kg/day. Proof of efficacy has been difficult because the specific and objective criteria for measurement of response have not been established yet. Preliminary clinical experience confirms extended survival in patients with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease receiving intraventricular PPS; however, it is still not clear if this is due to PPS itself. Further prospective investigations of long-term intraventricular PPS administration are essential for the assessment of its effects.

  10. Pentosan polysulfate prevents glomerular hypertension and structural injury despite persisting hypertension in 5/6 nephrectomy rats.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, N A; Tack, I; Tapia, E; Sánchez-Lozada, L G; Santamaría, J; Jiménez, F; Striker, L J; Striker, G E; Herrera-Acosta, J

    2001-10-01

    Five/six nephrectomy induces systemic and glomerular hypertension, glomerulosclerosis, proteinuria, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Polysulfate pentosan (PPS) decreases mesangial proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation. The aim of this study was to determine whether PPS prevents glomerular hemodynamic changes and renal damage. Micropuncture studies were performed in three groups of eight male Wistar rats. Two groups included rats with 5/6 nephrectomy-one of which was treated with PPS in drinking water (100 mg/kg body wt) and the second of which received normal drinking water-and the third group consisted of normal rats that served as controls. Five/six nephrectomy produced systemic hypertension, a 50% reduction in GFR, and a 67% increase in single-nephron GFR due to elevated glomerular pressure and single-nephron plasma flow as well as proteinuria. Hypertension persisted in PPS-treated animals. Despite a similar reduction in GFR, PPS prevented the rise in single-nephron GFR, glomerular capillary hydrostatic pressure, and proteinuria. By morphometry, glomerular volume was increased by 46% and mesangial area by 94%. Fractional glomerular capillary area decreased by 24%. PPS prevented these changes. Tubular dilatation, epithelial cell atrophy, and increased interstitial area were largely prevented by PPS, as was the interstitial inflammatory infiltrate. These results suggest that the renal protection conferred by PPS was mediated both by prevention of glomerular hypertension as well as suppression of the inflammatory response. It was postulated that this was partly due to the preservation of a greater fraction of functional nephrons.

  11. Comparison of CR36, a new heparan mimetic, and pentosan polysulfate in the treatment of prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Larramendy-Gozalo, Claire; Barret, Agnès; Daudigeos, Estelle; Mathieu, Emilie; Antonangeli, Lucie; Riffet, Cécile; Petit, Emmanuel; Papy-Garcia, Dulce; Barritault, Denis; Brown, Paul; Deslys, Jean-Philippe

    2007-03-01

    Sulfated polyanions, including pentosan polysulfate (PPS) and heparan mimetics, number among the most effective drugs that have been used in experimental models of prion disease and are presumed to act in competition with endogenous heparan sulfate proteoglycans as co-receptors for prion protein (PrP) on the cell surface. PPS has been shown to prolong the survival of animals after intracerebral perfusion and is in limited use for the experimental treatment of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Here, PPS is compared with CR36, a new heparan mimetic. Ex vivo, CR36 was more efficient than PPS in reducing PrPres in scrapie-infected cell cultures and showed long-lasting activity. In vivo, CR36 showed none of the acute toxicity observed with PPS and reduced PrPres accumulation in spleens, but had only a marginal effect on the survival time of mice infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy. In contrast, mice treated with PPS that survived the initial toxic mortality had no detectable PrPres in the spleens and lived 185 days longer than controls (+55%). These results show, once again, that anti-TSE drugs cannot be encouraged for human therapeutic trials solely on the basis of in vitro or ex vivo observations, but must first be subjected to in vivo animal studies.

  12. Pentosan polysulfate increases affinity between ADAMTS-5 and TIMP-3 through formation of an electrostatically driven trimolecular complex.

    PubMed

    Troeberg, Linda; Mulloy, Barbara; Ghosh, Peter; Lee, Meng-Huee; Murphy, Gillian; Nagase, Hideaki

    2012-04-01

    The semi-synthetic sulfated polysaccharide PPS (pentosan polysulfate) increases affinity between the aggrecan-degrading ADAMTSs (adamalysins with thrombospondin motifs) and their endogenous inhibitor, TIMP (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases)-3. In the present study we demonstrate that PPS mediates the formation of a high-affinity trimolecular complex with ADAMTS-5 and TIMP-3. A TIMP-3 mutant that lacks extracellular-matrix-binding ability was insensitive to this affinity increase, and truncated forms of ADAMTS-5 that lack the Sp (spacer) domain had reduced PPS-binding ability and sensitivity to the affinity increase. PPS molecules composed of 11 or more saccharide units were 100-fold more effective than those of eight saccharide units, indicating the involvement of extended or multiple protein-interaction sites. The formation of a high-affinity trimolecular complex was completely abolished in the presence of 0.4 M NaCl. These results suggest that PPS enhances the affinity between ADAMTS-5 and TIMP-3 by forming electrostatically driven trimolecular complexes under physiological conditions.

  13. Pentosan polysulfate decreases prostate smooth muscle proliferation and extracellular matrix turnover.

    PubMed

    Elliot, S J; Zorn, B H; McLeod, D G; Moul, J W; Nyberg, L; Striker, L J; Striker, G E

    2003-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) involves proliferation of smooth muscle cells and increased deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM). We recently found that pentosan polysulfate (PPS) has marked effects on growth and ECM of smooth muscle cells derived from vascular tissues. We examined smooth muscle cells cultured from human prostates and the effects of PPS on their growth and ECM production. Fragments of surgical prostatectomy specimens were diced, digested with collagenase (0.01%), and placed in culture medium supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum. Outgrowths of elongated cells were characterized by light microscopic examination and immunohistochemical techniques by the presence of F-actin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, and myosin, which is a characteristic of smooth muscle cells. Two independent isolates were propagated, and growth curves and ECM production were assessed in the presence and absence of PPS (10 or 100 microg/ml). PPS decreased cell number beginning at day 1 and throughout the incubation period, up to 4 days. The amount of the ECM degradative enzymes, metallo-proteinases MMP-9 and MMP-2, was examined by zymography. PPS did not alter the amount of MMP-2 in the supernatants but MMP-9 was increased 234.4 +/- 17.23-fold over control cells. Tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMPS), examined by reverse zymography, increased 200% over control. The amount of alpha I type (IV) and alpha I type (I) collagen released in the supernatant, measured by ELISA, significantly decreased in PPS-treated cultures. In conclusion, we found that the administration of PPS decreased proliferation as well as ECM production in prostate smooth muscle. Since smooth muscle proliferation and ECM are involved in the pathophysiology of BPH, PPS may have therapeutic potential.

  14. [Pentosan polysulfate sodium prevents kidney morphological changes and albuminuria in rats with type 1 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Mathison Natera, Y; Finol, H J; Quero, Z; González, R; González, J

    2010-01-01

    Decreased levels of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) have been observed in the kidney and other organs, in human and animal models of diabetes. Long-term administration of heparins and other glycosaminoglycans has demonstrated a beneficial effect on morphological and functional kidney abnormalities in diabetic rats. We assessed the effect of pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS), a semi-synthetic glycosaminoglycan with low anticoagulant activity, on kidney involvement in streptozotocin diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by i.v. administration of streptozotocin (STZ). Animals were randomly allocated to three groups: C = control, STZ and STZ + PPS = pretreated with PPS (15 mg/kg, s.c.). After three months of follow-up, blood and 24 h-urine samples were obtained, the animals were sacrificed and the kidney microdissected for morphometric analysis. Urinary albumin excretion was markedly increased in untreated diabetic rats (C = 0.26 ± 0.03 vs STZ = 7.75 ± 1.8 mg/24 h) and PPS treatment partially prevented the albumin rise (3.7 ± 0.7 mg/24 h), without affecting the metabolic control HbA1c (C = 3.6 ± 1.7; STZ = 8.82 ± 0.47; STZ + PPS = 8.63 ± 0.54). Electron microscope observation revealed typical renal lesions described in experimental diabetes (STZ group). PPS administration prevents the tubular basement membrane thickening and the loss of cytoarchitecture induced by experimental diabetes. Our data demonstrate that long-term administration of PPS has a favourable effect on morphological and functional abnormalities in kidneys of diabetic rats and suggests a potential therapeutic use for this compound.

  15. Phase I trial of orally administered pentosan polysulfate in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J L; Wellstein, A; Rae, J; DeLap, R J; Phipps, K; Hanfelt, J; Yunmbam, M K; Sun, J X; Duchin, K L; Hawkins, M J

    1997-12-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critically important to tumor growth and metastasis. We have shown that pentosan polysulfate (PPS) is an effective inhibitor of heparin-binding growth factors in vitro and can effectively inhibit the establishment and growth of tumors in nude mice. Following completion of our Phase I trial of s.c. administered PPS, we performed a Phase I trial of p.o. administered PPS in patients with advanced cancer to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and toxicity profile and to search for any evidence for biological activity in vivo. Patients diagnosed with advanced, incurable malignancies who met standard Phase I criteria and who did not have a history of bleeding complications were enrolled, in cohorts of three, to receive PPS p.o. t.i.d., at planned doses of 180, 270, 400, 600, and 800 mg/m2. Patients were monitored at least every 2 weeks with physical exams and weekly with hematological, chemistry, stool hemoccult, and coagulation blood studies, and serum and urine samples for PPS and basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF) levels were also taken. The PPS dose was escalated in an attempt to reach the MTD. Eight additional patients were enrolled at the highest dose to further characterize the toxicity profile and biological in vivo effects of PPS. A total of 21 patients were enrolled in the three cohorts of doses 180 (n = 4), 270 (n = 3), and 400 (n = 14) mg/m2. The most severe toxicities seen were grade 3 proctitis and grade 4 diarrhea; however, 20 of the 21 patients had evidence of grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These toxicities became evident at a much earlier time point as the dose was increased, but their severities were similar at all dose levels. There were no objective responses, although three patients had prolonged stabilization of previously progressing disease. Pharmacokinetic analysis suggested marked accumulation of PPS upon chronic administration. Serum and urine bFGF levels failed to show a consistent, interpretable

  16. Pentosan polysulfate promotes proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This study was undertaken to determine whether the anti-osteoarthritis drug pentosan polysulfate (PPS) influenced mesenchymal precursor cell (MPC) proliferation and differentiation. Methods Human MPCs were maintained in monolayer, pellet or micromass cultures (MMC) for up to 10 days with PPS at concentrations of 0 to 20 μg/ml. MPC viability and proliferation was assessed using the WST-1 assay and 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA, while apoptosis was monitored by flow cytometry. Proteoglycan (PG) biosynthesis was determined by 35SO42- incorporation and staining with Alcian blue. Proteoglycan and collagen type I and collagen type II deposition in pellet cultures was also examined by Toluidine blue and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. The production of hyaluronan (HA) by MPCs in MMC was assessed by ELISA. The relative outcome of PPS, HA, heparin or dextran sulfate (DS) on PG synthesis was compared in 5-day MMC. Gene expression of MPCs in 7-day and 10-day MMC was examined using real-time PCR. MPC differentiation was investigated by co-culturing with PPS in osteogenic or adipogenic inductive culture media for 28 days. Results Significant MPC proliferation was evident by day 3 at PPS concentrations of 1 to 5 μg/ml (P < 0.01). In the presence of 1 to 10 μg/ml PPS, a 38% reduction in IL-4/IFNγ-induced MPC apoptosis was observed. In 5-day MMC, 130% stimulation of PG synthesis occurred at 2.5 μg/ml PPS (P < 0.0001), while 5.0 μg/ml PPS achieved maximal stimulation in the 7-day and 10-day cultures (P < 0.05). HA and DS at ≥ 5 μg/ml inhibited PG synthesis (P < 0.05) in 5-day MMC. Collagen type II deposition by MMC was significant at ≥ 0.5 μg/ml PPS (P < 0.001 to 0.05). In MPC-PPS pellet cultures, more PG, collagen type II but less collagen type I was deposited than in controls. Real-time PCR results were consistent with the protein data. At 5 and 10 μg/ml PPS, MPC osteogenic differentiation was suppressed (P < 0.01). Conclusions This is

  17. Pentosan polysulfate preserves renal microvascular P2X1 receptor reactivity and autoregulatory behavior in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhengrong; Singletary, Sean T; Cha, Haword; Van Beusecum, Justin P; Cook, Anthony K; Pollock, Jennifer S; Pollock, David M; Inscho, Edward W

    2016-03-15

    Inflammation contributes to ANG II-associated impairment of renal autoregulation and microvascular P2X1 receptor signaling, but its role in renal autoregulation in mineralocorticoid-induced hypertension is unknown. Autoregulatory behavior was assessed using the blood-perfused juxtamedullary nephron preparation. Hypertension was induced in uninephrectomized control rats (UNx) by subcutaneous implantation of a DOCA pellet plus administration of 1% NaCl in the drinking water (DOCA-salt) for 3 wk. DOCA-salt rats developed hypertension that was unaltered by anti-inflammatory treatment with pentosan polysulfate (DOCA-salt+PPS) but was suppressed with "triple therapy" (hydrochlorothiazide, hydralazine, and reserpine; DOCA-salt+TTx). Baseline arteriolar diameters were similar across all groups. UNx rats exhibited pressure-dependent vasoconstriction with diameters declining to 69 ± 2% of control at 170 mmHg, indicating intact autoregulation. DOCA-salt treatment significantly blunted this pressure-mediated vasoconstriction. Diameters remained between 91 ± 4 and 98 ± 3% of control over 65-170 mmHg, indicating impaired autoregulation. In contrast, pressure-mediated vasoconstriction was preserved in DOCA-salt+PPS and DOCA-salt+TTx rats, reaching 77 ± 7 and 75 ± 3% of control at 170 mmHg, respectively. ATP is required for autoregulation via P2X1 receptor activation. ATP- and β,γ-methylene ATP (P2X1 receptor agonist)-mediated vasoconstriction were markedly attenuated in DOCA-salt rats compared with UNx (P < 0.05), but significantly improved by PPS or TTx (P < 0.05 vs. DOCA-salt) treatment. Arteriolar responses to adenosine and UTP (P2Y2 receptor agonist) were unaffected by DOCA-salt treatment. PPS and TTx significantly reduced MCP-1 and protein excretion in DOCA-salt rats. These results support the hypothesis that hypertension triggers inflammatory cascades but anti-inflammatory treatment preserves renal autoregulation in DOCA-salt rats, most likely by normalizing renal

  18. Pentosan polysulfate regulates scavenger receptor-mediated, but not fluid-phase, endocytosis in immortalized cerebral endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Deli, M A; Abrahám, C S; Takahata, H; Katamine, S; Niwa, M

    2000-12-01

    1. Effects of pentosan polysulfate (PPS) and the structurally related sulfated polyanions dextran sulfate, fucoidan, and heparin on the scavenger receptor-mediated and fluidphase endocytosis in GP8 immortalized rat brain endothelial cells were investigated. 2. Using 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarboxyamine perchlorate-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-AcLDL), we found a binding site with high affinity and low binding capacity, and another one with low affinity and high binding capacity. Increasing ligand concentrations could not saturate DiI-AcLDL uptake. DiI-AcLDL uptake, but not binding, was sensitive to pretreatment with filipin, an inhibitor of caveola formation. 3. PPS (20-200 microg/ml) significantly reduced the binding of DiI-AcLDL after coincubation for 3 hr, though this effect was less expressed after 18 hr. Among other polyanions, only fucoidan decreased the DiI-AcLDL binding after 3 hr, whereas dextran sulfate significantly increased it after 18 hr. PPS treatment induced an increase in DiI-AcLDL uptake, whereas other polysulfated compounds caused a significant reduction. 4. Fluid-phase endocytosis determined by the accumulation of Lucifer yellow was concentration and time dependent in GP8 cells. Coincubation with PPS or other sulfated polyanions could not significantly alter the rate of Lucifer yellow uptake. 5. In conclusion. PPS decreased the binding and increased the uptake of DiI-AcLDL in cerebral endothelial cells, an effect not mimicked by the other polyanions investigated.

  19. Psychometric validation of the O'leary-Sant interstitial cystitis symptom index in a clinical trial of pentosan polysulfate sodium.

    PubMed

    Lubeck, D P; Whitmore, K; Sant, G R; Alvarez-Horine, S; Lai, C

    2001-06-01

    The O'Leary-Sant Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index (ICSI) has been proposed as a treatment outcome measure in interstitial cystitis (IC). The psychometric properties of the ICSI were assessed for reliability and validity in a randomized, double-blind clinical study of 300, 600, and 900 mg daily dose of pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS) in patients with IC. The ICSI contains 4 items that measure urgency and frequency of urination, nighttime urination, and pain or burning. The ICSI index score is the sum of the item scores (range: 0-20). ICSI scores were obtained at baseline, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, and 32 weeks of treatment. Patients' overall ratings of improvement of symptoms (PORIS) scores evaluating improvements in pain, urgency, and overall IC symptoms were also collected except at baseline. A total of 376 patients were included in the analysis. Psychometric properties evaluated included variability (range), test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]), internal consistency (the Cronbach alpha), construct validity (convergent, discriminant), responsiveness, and clinically meaningful change. The ICSI items and index score had good variability and test-retest reliability. The ICSI demonstrated internal consistency reliability and was responsive to change. Participants indicating a 75% improvement in PORIS had a 48% mean reduction in the ICSI score, while participants reporting 100% improvement in PORIS had a 77% mean reduction in the ICSI score. The ICSI is a valid, reliable, and responsive measure of change in IC symptoms. This outcome measure should be utilized in future treatment outcomes studies in IC.

  20. Optimisation for the separation of the oligosaccharide, sodium Pentosan Polysulfate by reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis using a central composite design.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, S; Mulholland, M; Lloyd-Jones, A

    2003-02-01

    The separation by reverse polarity capillary zone electrophoresis of the therapeutically developed sodium salt of Pentosan Polysulfate was optimised through the analysis of response surface methodologies, modeled using a central composite design. The optimisation investigated injection pressure, injection time and voltage and the effect of the conditions on retention times, peak areas, separation efficiency and the method sensitivity. The overall goal was to develop the most sensitive results with no decrease in separation efficiency. The following results were obtained: (1) retention times generally decreased as injection pressure, injection time and voltage increased, injection time having the least effect; (2) as expected peak areas increased as injection pressure and injection time increased but decreased as voltage increased; (3) separation efficiencies generally increased as injection pressure and injection time decreased, with voltage having almost no effect. For the optimum condition, the sample was introduced at the inlet vial at the cathode hydrodynamically, at optimal setting of 44 s at 35 mbar. The optimal voltage was -20 kV. In comparison with other methods, the optimum showed increased sensitivity, resolution and separation efficiency. Repeatability studies were performed on the optimum parameter conditions. Relative standard deviation values obtained were between 0.9 and 5.4%.

  1. Reconstitution of degenerated ovine lumbar discs by STRO-3-positive allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells combined with pentosan polysulfate.

    PubMed

    Oehme, David; Ghosh, Peter; Goldschlager, Tony; Itescu, Silviu; Shimon, Susan; Wu, Jiehua; McDonald, Courtney; Troupis, John M; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Jenkin, Graham

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Disc degeneration and associated low-back pain are major causes of suffering and disability. The authors examined the potential of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs), when formulated with pentosan polysulfate (PPS), to ameliorate disc degeneration in an ovine model. METHODS Twenty-four sheep had annular incisions made at L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 to induce degeneration. Twelve weeks after injury, the nucleus pulposus of a degenerated disc in each animal was injected with ProFreeze and PPS formulated with either a low dose (0.1 million MPCs) or a high dose (0.5 million MPCs) of cells. The 2 adjacent injured discs in each spine were either injected with PPS and ProFreeze (PPS control) or not injected (nil-injected control). The adjacent noninjured L1-2 and L5-6 discs served as noninjured control discs. Disc height indices (DHIs) were obtained at baseline, before injection, and at planned death. After necropsy, 24 weeks after injection, the spines were subjected to MRI and morphological, histological, and biochemical analyses. RESULTS Twelve weeks after the annular injury, all the injured discs exhibited a significant reduction in mean DHI (low-dose group 17.19%; high-dose group 18.01% [p < 0.01]). Twenty-four weeks after injections, the discs injected with the low-dose MPC+PPS formulation recovered disc height, and their mean DHI was significantly greater than the DHI of PPS- and nil-injected discs (p < 0.001). Although the mean Pfirrmann MRI disc degeneration score for the low-dose MPC+PPS-injected discs was lower than that for the nil- and PPS-injected discs, the differences were not significant. The disc morphology scores for the nil- and PPS-injected discs were significantly higher than the normal control disc scores (p < 0.005), whereas the low-dose MPC+PPS-injected disc scores were not significantly different from those of the normal controls. The mean glycosaminoglycan content of the nuclei pulposus of the low-dose MPC+PPS-injected discs was significantly

  2. A novel role of fibroblast growth factor-2 and pentosan polysulfate in the pathogenesis of intestinal bleeding in mice.

    PubMed

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Wong, Edward; Przygodzki, Ronald; Tang, Pingtao; Ray, Patricio E

    2007-02-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (PPS) is a heparin-like polysaccharide that can affect the binding interactions of fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) with its high-affinity receptors. Patients with angiogenic tumors frequently show high levels of FGF-2 in the circulation. Since FGF-2 is a heparin-binding angiogenic growth factor, PPS has been used successfully to block its activity in patients with angiogenic tumors. However, because of its heparin-like activity, the major toxic effect of PPS is the development of bleeding disorders. The role that circulating FGF-2 plays in the pathogenesis of bleeding disorders in patients treated with PPS is currently unknown. Here we hypothesized that FGF-2 might play a physiological role in the pathogenesis of intestinal bleeding induced by PPS. This hypothesis is supported by previous studies showing that PPS is accumulated in the intestine and that circulating FGF-2 specifically binds to and modulates the angiogenic activity of intestinal submucosal endothelial cells. We used recombinant adenoviral vectors carrying a secreted form of FGF-2 and LacZ control vectors to determine whether high levels of circulating FGF-2 facilitate the development of intestinal bleeding disorders in FVB/N and C57BL/6J mice treated with PPS. We found that PPS, acting together with FGF-2, induced structural changes in intestinal vessels leading to the development of lethal intestinal hemorrhages. These findings might have wider clinical implications for the systemic use of PPS and other heparinoids in the treatment of patients with angiogenic diseases associated with high levels of circulating FGF-2.

  3. Dose Responsive Effects of Subcutaneous Pentosan Polysulfate Injection in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI Rats and Comparison to Oral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Frohbergh, Michael; Ge, Yi; Meng, Fanli; Karabul, Nesrin; Solyom, Alexander; Lai, Alon; Iatridis, James; Schuchman, Edward H.; Simonaro, Calogera M.

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated the benefits of daily, oral pentosan polysulfate (PPS) treatment in a rat model of mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VI. Herein we compare these effects to once weekly, subcutaneous (sc) injection. The bioavailability of injected PPS is greater than oral, suggesting better delivery to difficult tissues such as bone and cartilage. Injected PPS also effectively treats osteoarthritis in animals, and has shown success in osteoarthritis patients. Methodology/Principal Findings One-month-old MPS VI rats were given once weekly sc injections of PPS (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg, human equivalent dose (HED)), or daily oral PPS (4 mg/kg HED) for 6 months. Serum inflammatory markers and total glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were measured, as were several histological, morphological and functional endpoints. Overall, weekly sc PPS injections led to similar or greater therapeutic effects as daily oral administration. Common findings between the two treatment approaches included reduced serum inflammatory markers, improved dentition and skull lengths, reduced tracheal deformities, and improved mobility. Enhanced effects of sc treatment included GAG reduction in urine and tissues, greater endurance on a rotarod, and better improvements in articular cartilage and bone in some dose groups. Optimal therapeutic effects were observed at 2 mg/kg, sc. No drug-related increases in liver enzymes, coagulation factor abnormalities or other adverse effects were identified following 6 months of sc PPS administration. Conclusions Once weekly sc administration of PPS in MPS VI rats led to equal or better therapeutic effects than daily oral administration, including a surprising reduction in urine and tissue GAGs. No adverse effects from sc PPS administration were observed over the 6-month study period. PMID:24964042

  4. Inhibitory effects of pentosan polysulfate sodium on MAP-kinase pathway and NF-κB nuclear translocation in canine chondrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sunaga, Takafumi; Oh, Namgil; Hosoya, Kenji; Takagi, Satoshi; Okumura, Masahiro

    2012-06-01

    Pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS) has a heparin-like structure and is purificated from the plant of European beech wood. PPS has been used for the treatment of interstitial cystitis for human patients. Recent years, it was newly recognised that PPS reduce pain and inflammation of OA. The molecular biological mechanism of PPS to express its clinical effects is not fully understood. The purpose of the present study is to investigate a mechanism of action of PPS on inflammatory reaction of chondrocytes in vitro. It was evaluated that effects of PPS on interleukin (IL)-1β-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-actiated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 production in cultured articular chondrocytes. As a result, in the presence of PPS existence, IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of p38 and ERK were certainly inhibited, while JNK phosphorylation was not affected. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB and MMP-3 production were suppressed by PPS pretreatment prior to IL-1β stimulation. In conclusion, it is strongly suggested that PPS treatment prevents inflammatory intracellular responses induced by IL-1 β through inhibition of phosphorylation of certain MAPKs, p38 and ERK and then nuclear translocation of NF-κB in cultured chondrocytes. These PPS properties may contribute to suppressive consequence of catabolic MMP-3 synthesis. These data might translate the clinical efficacy as PPS treatment could inhibit the cartilage catabolism and related clinical symptoms of OA in dogs.

  5. Studies on the structural variations of pentosan polysulfate sodium (NaPPS) from different sources by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, M; Ghosh, P; Wätzig, H

    2001-01-01

    Commercial pentosan polysulfate sodium salts (NaPPS) are highly sulfated polysaccharides derived from beechwood hemicellulose by sulfate esterification with a Mrel range of 1500-6000. The polysaccharide backbone of NaPPS consists of repeating linear units of 1-4 linked beta-D-xylopyranose with laterally substituted 4-methylglucopyranosyluronic acid units glycosidically linked to the 2 position of the main chain at every 10th xylopyranose unit on average. For many years NaPPS has been used for antithrombotic prophylaxis in Europe and interstitial cystitis in the USA and Australia. More recently NaPPS has found veterinary application for the treatment of osteoarthritis and related conditions in domestic animals and is registered for this use in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, UK, Eire, and several Scandanavian countries. At present the use of NaPPS for human disorders is confined to material manufactured by one company. However, for veterinary applications, NaPPS from three manufactures have been described. Since it is well known that the biological activities of sulfated polysaccharides are dependent on their molecular structures we considered it important to characterise these various NaPPS preparations using an established method of analysis. Unfortunately, traditional analytical techniques such as TLC, OR, UV/Vis spectroscopy, and size exclusion chromatography were incapable of providing structural information which would distinguish these NaPPS preparations from each other. In contrast, a capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method facilitated characterisation of the different NaPPS by a highly reproducible fingerprint, using a benzene-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid buffer (8.75 mmol/L, pH = 4.9) with indirect UV detection (lambda = 217 nm) and a special capillary pre-treatment (1 M NaOH for 1 h at 25 degrees C, then running buffer for 120 min at 25 degrees C applying -20 kV). In the present study more than 20 batches of NaPPS from the three manufacturers have been

  6. Biosensor analysis of the molecular interactions of pentosan polysulfate and of sulfated glycosaminoglycans with immobilized elastase, hyaluronidase and lysozyme using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bojiang; Shimmon, Susan; Smith, Margaret M; Ghosh, Peter

    2003-02-01

    Pentosan polysulfate (NaPPS) and chondroitin sulfates (ChSs) have recently been shown to exhibit both symptom and disease modifying activities in osteoarthritis (OA), but their respective mechanisms of action are still the subject of conjecture. Excessive catabolism of joint articular cartilage is considered to be responsible for the initiation and progression of OA but the abilities of these drugs to mitigate this process has received only limited attention. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is a proteinase, which can degrade the collagens and proteoglycans (PGs) of the cartilage directly or indirectly by activating latent matrix metalloproteinases. Hyaluronidase (HAase) is an endoglycosidase, which degrades glycosaminoglycans including hyaluronan, which provides the aggregating component of the PG aggrecan complex. In the present study the molecular interactions between the NaPPS, ChSs and some other sulfated polysaccharides with immobilized HNE, HAase or lysozyme (a cationic protein implicated in PG metabolism) were studied using a SPR biosensor device-BIAcore2000. The above three enzymes were covalently immobilized to a biosensor chip CM5 separately using amine coupling. The binding affinity of each sulfated polysaccharide and the kinetics of NaPPS over the concentration range of 0.3-5.0 microg/ml were determined. The inhibition of HNE by the sulfated polysaccharides as determined using the synthetic substrate succinyl-Ala-Ala-Val-nitroanilide (SAAVNA) in a functional assay was compared with their respective binding affinities for this proteinase using the BIAcore system. The results obtained with the two independent techniques showed good correlation and indicated that the degree and ring positions of oligosaccharide sulfation were major determinants of enzyme inhibitory activity. The observed difference in order of binding affinities of the drugs to the immobilized HNE, HAase and lysozyme suggests a conformational relationship, in addition to the charge

  7. Inhibition of inflammation by pentosan polysulfate impedes the development and progression of severe diabetic nephropathy in aging C57B6 mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin; Guan, Tian-jun; Zheng, Shirong; Grosjean, Fabrizio; Liu, Weicheng; Xiong, Huabao; Gordon, Ronald; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary E; Zheng, Feng

    2011-10-01

    Inflammation has a key role in diabetic nephropathy (DN) progression. Pentosan polysulfate (PPS) has been shown to decreases interstitial inflammation and glomerulosclerosis in 5/6 nephrectomized rats. Since PPS has an excellent long-term safety profile in interstitial cystitis treatment, and we recently found that old diabetic C57B6 mice develop DN characterized by extensive tubulointerstitial inflammatory lesions that mimics human DN, we examined the effect of PPS on old diabetic mice. We also examined the anti-inflammatory properties of PPS in renal cells in vitro. Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin in 18 months female (early aging) C57B6 mice. Mice were then randomized to receive oral PPS (25 mg/kg/day) or water for 4 months. The effect of PPS on NF-κB activation and on TNFα, high glucose or advanced glycation end products (AGEs) stimulated proinflammatory gene expression in renal cells was examined. We found that PPS treatment preserved renal function, significantly reduced albuminuria, and markedly decreased the severity of renal lesions, including tubulointerstitial inflammation. PPS also reduced upregulation of TNFα and proinflammatory genes in aging diabetic kidneys. Furthermore, PPS suppressed NF-κB, decreased the proinflammatory actions of TNFα, and decreased high glucose and AGEs stimulated MCP-1 production in vitro. Finally, PPS decreased TNFα-induced increase in albumin permeability in podocyte monolayers. In conclusion, PPS treatment largely prevents the development/progression of nephropathy in aging diabetic mice. As this may be mediated by suppression of TNFα, high glucose, and AGE-stimulated NF-κB activation and inflammation in vitro, the in vivo blockade of DN may be due to the anti-inflammatory properties of PPS.

  8. Protease-resistant PrP and PrP oligomers in the brain in human prion diseases after intraventricular pentosan polysulfate infusion.

    PubMed

    Honda, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kensuke; Minaki, Haruhiko; Masui, Kenta; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Doh-Ura, Katsumi; Iwaki, Toru

    2012-04-01

    Intraventricular infusion of pentosan polysulfate (PPS) as a treatment for various human prion diseases has been applied in Japan. To evaluate the influence of PPS treatment we performed pathological examination and biochemical analyses of PrP molecules in autopsied brains treated with PPS (one case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, case 1), two cases of dura mater graft-associated CJD (dCJD, cases 2 and 4), and one case of Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS, case 3). Six cases of sCJD without PPS treatment were examined for comparison. Protease-resistant PrP (PrP(res) ) in the frontal lobe was evaluated by Western blotting after proteinase K digestion. Further, the degree of polymerization of PrP molecules was examined by the size-exclusion gel chromatography assay. PPS infusions were started 3-10 months after disease onset, but the treatment did not achieve any clinical improvements. Postmortem examinations of the treated cases revealed symmetrical brain lesions, including neuronal loss, spongiform change and gliosis. Noteworthy was GFAP in the cortical astrocytes reduced in all treated cases despite astrogliosis. Immunohistochemistry for PrP revealed abnormal synaptic deposits in all treated cases and further plaque-type PrP deposition in case 3 of GSS and case 4 of dCJD. Western blotting showed relatively low ratios of PrP(res) in case 2 of dCJD and case 3 of GSS, while in the treated sCJD (case 1), the ratio of PrP(res) was comparable with untreated cases. The indices of oligomeric PrP were reduced in one sCJD (case 1) and one dCJD (case 2). Although intraventricular PPS infusion might modify the accumulation of PrP oligomers in the brains of patients with prion diseases, the therapeutic effects are still uncertain.

  9. Pentosan polysulfate treatment ameliorates motor function with increased serum soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in HTLV-1-associated neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Satoh, Katsuya; Fukuda, Taku; Kinoshita, Ikuo; Nishiura, Yoshihiro; Nagasato, Kunihiko; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Kenji; Niwa, Masami; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Hideki; Nishida, Noriyuki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2014-06-01

    The main therapeutic strategy against human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) characterized by lower extremity motor dysfunction is immunomodulatory treatment, with drugs such as corticosteroid hormone and interferon-α, at present. However, there are many issues in long-term treatment with these drugs, such as insufficient effects and various side effects. We now urgently need to develop other therapeutic strategies. The heparinoid, pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS), has been safely used in Europe for the past 50 years as a thrombosis prophylaxis and for the treatment of phlebitis. We conducted a clinical trial to test the effect of subcutaneous administration of PPS in 12 patients with HAM/TSP in an open-labeled design. There was a marked improvement in lower extremity motor function, based on reduced spasticity, such as a reduced time required for walking 10 m and descending a flight of stairs. There were no significant changes in HTLV-I proviral copy numbers in peripheral blood contrary to the inhibitory effect of PPS in vitro for intercellular spread of HTLV-I. However, serum soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM)-1 was significantly increased without significant changes of serum level of chemokines (CXCL10 and CCL2). There was a positive correlation between increased sVCAM-1and reduced time required for walking 10 m. PPS might induce neurological improvement by inhibition of chronic inflammation in the spinal cord, through blocking the adhesion cascade by increasing serum sVCAM-1, in addition to rheological improvement of the microcirculation. PPS has the potential to be a new therapeutic tool for HAM/TSP.

  10. Pentosan polysulfate treatment preserves renal autoregulation in ANG II-infused hypertensive rats via normalization of P2X1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhengrong; Fuller, Barry S; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Cook, Anthony K; Pollock, Jennifer S; Inscho, Edward W

    2010-05-01

    Inflammatory factors are elevated in animal and human subjects with hypertension and renal injury. We hypothesized that inflammation contributes to hypertension-induced renal injury by impairing autoregulation and microvascular reactivity to P2X(1) receptor activation. Studies were conducted in vitro using the blood-perfused juxtamedullary nephron preparation. Rats receiving ANG II (60 ng/min) infusion were treated with the anti-inflammatory agent pentosan polysulfate (PPS) for 14 days. The magnitude and progression of hypertension were similar in ANG II and ANG II+PPS-treated rats (169 ± 5 vs. 172 ± 2 mmHg). Afferent arterioles from control rats exhibited normal autoregulatory behavior with diameter decreasing from 18.4 ± 1.6 to 11.4 ± 1.7 μm when perfusion pressure was increased from 70 to 160 mmHg. In contrast, pressure-mediated vasoconstriction was markedly attenuated in ANG II-treated rats, and diameter remained essentially unchanged over the range of perfusion pressures. However, ANG II-treated rats receiving PPS exhibited normal autoregulatory behavior compared with ANG II alone rats. Arteriolar reactivity to ATP and β,γ-methylene ATP was significantly reduced in ANG II hypertensive rats compared with controls. Interestingly, PPS treatment preserved normal reactivity to P2 and P2X(1) receptor agonists despite the persistent hypertension. The maximal vasoconstriction was 79 ± 3 and 81 ± 2% of the control diameter for ATP and β,γ-methylene ATP, respectively, similar to responses in control rats. PPS treatment significantly reduced α-smooth muscle actin staining in afferent arterioles and plasma transforming growth factor-β1 concentration in ANG II-treated rats. In conclusion, PPS normalizes autoregulation without altering ANG II-induced hypertension, suggesting that inflammatory processes reduce P2X(1) receptor reactivity and thereby impair autoregulatory behavior in ANG II hypertensive rats.

  11. Comparison of the anti-prion mechanism of four different anti-prion compounds, anti-PrP monoclonal antibody 44B1, pentosan polysulfate, chlorpromazine, and U18666A, in prion-infected mouse neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akio; Hasebe, Rie; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2014-01-01

    Molecules that inhibit the formation of an abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in prion-infected cells are candidate therapeutic agents for prion diseases. Understanding how these molecules inhibit PrP(Sc) formation provides logical basis for proper evaluation of their therapeutic potential. In this study, we extensively analyzed the effects of the anti-PrP monoclonal antibody (mAb) 44B1, pentosan polysulfate (PPS), chlorpromazine (CPZ) and U18666A on the intracellular dynamics of a cellular isoform of prion protein (PrP(C)) and PrP(Sc) in prion-infected mouse neuroblastoma cells to re-evaluate the effects of those agents. MAb 44B1 and PPS rapidly reduced PrP(Sc) levels without altering intracellular distribution of PrP(Sc). PPS did not change the distribution and levels of PrP(C), whereas mAb 44B1 appeared to inhibit the trafficking of cell surface PrP(C) to organelles in the endocytic-recycling pathway that are thought to be one of the sites for PrP(Sc) formation. In contrast, CPZ and U18666A initiated the redistribution of PrP(Sc) from organelles in the endocytic-recycling pathway to late endosomes/lysosomes without apparent changes in the distribution of PrP(C). The inhibition of lysosomal function by monensin or bafilomycin A1 after the occurrence of PrP(Sc) redistribution by CPZ or U18666A partly antagonized PrP(Sc) degradation, suggesting that the transfer of PrP(Sc) to late endosomes/lysosomes, possibly via alteration of the membrane trafficking machinery of cells, leads to PrP(Sc) degradation. This study revealed that precise analysis of the intracellular dynamics of PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) provides important information for understanding the mechanism of anti-prion agents.

  12. Pentosan reduces osteonecrosis of femoral head in SHRSP.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Noriaki; Kumagai, Kenji; Osaki, Makoto; Murata, Masakazu; Tomita, Masato; Hozumi, Akira; Nozaki, Yoshihiro; Niwa, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress is considered one of the main causes of steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a steroid hormone and pentosan polysulfate sodium (pentosan), a heparin analog, in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) as a model of ONFH. One hundred twenty-three 13-week-old male SHRSP/Izm rats were divided into four groups: a control group (group C), pentosan-administered group (group P), steroid-administered group (group S), and group administered pentosan plus steroid (group PS). Methylprednisolone acetate, as the steroid hormone, at a dose of 4 mg (15 mg/kg) was administered at 15 weeks of age. Pentosan at a dose of 3 mg/day/kg was continuously administered intraperitoneally from 13 weeks of age for 4 weeks. Rats were sacrificed at 17 weeks of age, and heart blood and both femora were collected. Triglyceride levels were significantly lower in group PS than in group S, indicating that pentosan improves lipid metabolism. The incidence of histologic ONFH was significantly lower in group P, at 14.8% (10/71 femoral heads), than in group C, at 30.4% (17/56 femoral heads), and significantly lower in group PS, at 40.8% (29/71 femoral heads), than in group S, at 91.3% (42/46 femoral heads), indicating that pentosan markedly inhibits ONFH. Immunohistochemical staining for oxidative stress showed that the stainability was significantly lower in group PS than in group S. Pentosan seems to reduce the incidence of ONFH in SHRSP by improving lipid metabolism and decreasing oxidative stress.

  13. 21 CFR 522.1850 - Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan. 522.1850 Section 522.1850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1850 Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan....

  14. Kinetic study of pentosan solubility during heating and reacting processes of steam treatment of green bamboo.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaolin; Ma, Xiaojuan; Hu, Huichao; Li, Canghai; Cao, Shilin; Huang, Liulian; Chen, Lihui

    2013-02-01

    Green bamboo was hydrolyzed over a range of durations at different temperatures. A simple pseudo-homogeneous irreversible first order kinetic model was developed to describe pentosan solubility during steam treatment of green bamboo. To avoid the influence of soluble pentosan during heating process, kinetic parameters were effectively dissolved based on the data in the reacting process. Moreover, the pentosan solubility during heating process was also well modeled by numerical algorithm method. According to the origin of H factor, a modified parameter called steam treatment factor (f(P)) was proposed in this paper based on the determined kinetic constants. Finally, residual pentosan in whole process could be predicted properly based on the f(P) and the introducing of potential hydrolysis degree (h(d)). After using f(P) to combine reaction temperature and time into a single factor, comparative result showed that steam treatment is more effective for removing pentosan compared with hot water extraction.

  15. Capillary electrophoresis as a tool for the characterization of pentosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Haq, Hanin; Bossù, Elena

    2012-09-28

    Because capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) showed higher resolution for highly charged large carbohydrates and complex structures when compared to other chromatographic separation methods, it was chosen for the characterization of nanoparticles (NPs) of pentosan polysulfate (PPS). Thus, using the CZE technique, we developed a reliable, sensitive and rapid protocol that allowed the detection and characterization of PPS NPs. This protocol was able to determine the profile of both the NPs and the species of PPS entrapped into them, and to quantify free and bound PPS showing high reproducibility, acceptable accuracy and a good degree of precision. Moreover, it allowed the evaluation of the size and charge of the NPs. This protocol might be suitable for the characterization of other kinds of NPs also.

  16. 21 CFR 522.1850 - Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan. 522.1850 Section 522.1850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... canine synovial joints. (ii) Amount. 2 mg per pound of body weight by intramuscular injection...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1850 - Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan. 522.1850 Section 522.1850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... canine synovial joints. (ii) Amount. 2 mg per pound of body weight by intramuscular injection...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1850 - Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan. 522.1850 Section 522.1850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... canine synovial joints. (ii) Amount. 2 mg per pound of body weight by intramuscular injection...

  19. Dermal absorption of mucopolysaccharide polysulfate (heparinoid) in human and minipig.

    PubMed

    Kumokawa, Tadao; Hirata, Kazumasa; Sato, Keiichi; Kano, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Dermal absorption of mucopolysaccharide polysulfate (MPS, the active ingredient of Hirudoid") in human and minipig was investigated by using 14C-labeled MPS. Three types of human and minipig skin samples were used: intact, dried and tape-stripped. At 24 h after application of 14C-MPS to intact human skin on a Franz cell in vitro, the radioactivity was detected in 0.98, 1.34, and 0.08% of the applied dose in stratum corneum, epidermal-dermal skin, and receptor fluid, respectively. In dried human skin, the amount of radioactivity detected was similar to that in intact human skin. By contrast, in tape-stripped human skin, higher radioactivity was detected in epidermal-dermal skin and receptor fluid (2.85 and 0.33% of the applied dose, respectively) than in intact or dried skin. Minipig skin showed 1.5 to 4.5 times greater dermal absorption of 14C-MPS, as compared with human skin. In an in vivo study with minipig, radioactivity was detected at the dosing skin site after dermal administration of 14C-MPS. The stability of 14C-MPS in human skin after dermal application was evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis and ion-exchange chromatography. It was suggested that 14C-MPS absorbed into human skin would be stable because the chromatogram behaviors of the radioactivity on the two types of method were not shifted. Microautoradiography of human and minipig skins after 14C-MPS dosing showed that radioactivity was widely distributed in the epidermis in the area near hair follicles. The present results clearly demonstrate that MPS is stable and that a small fraction of it is percutaneously absorbed by human and minipig skin.

  20. Inhibitory effect of polysulfated heparin endostatin on alkali burn induced corneal neovascularization in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao-Na; Yuan, Zhong-Fang; Mu, Guo-Ying; Hu, Ming; Cao, Li-Jun; Zhang, Ya-Li; Liu, Lei; Ge, Ming-Xu

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate anti-angiogenic effects of polysulfated heparin endostatin (PSH-ES) on alkali burn induced corneal neovascularization (NV) in rabbits. METHODS An alkali burn was made on rabbit corneas to induce corneal NV in the right eye of 24 rabbits. One day after burn creation, a 0.2 mL subconjunctival injection of 50 µg/mL PSH-ES, 50 µg/mL recombinant endostatin (ES), or normal saline was administered every other day for a total of 14d (7 injections). Histology and immunohistochemisty were used to examine corneas. Corneal NV growth was evaluated as microvessel quantity and corneal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression was measured by immunohistochemical assay. RESULTS Subconjunctival injection of ES and PSH-ES resulted in significant corneal NV suppression, but PSH-ES had a more powerful anti-angiogenic effect than ES. Mean VEGF concentration in PSH-ES treated corneas was significantly lower than in ES treated and saline treated corneas. Histological examination showed that corneas treated with either PSH-ES or ES had significantly fewer microvessels than eyes treated with saline. Additionally corneas treated with PSH-ES had significantly fewer microvessels than corneas treated with ES. CONCLUSION Both PSH-ES and recombinant ES effectively inhibit corneal NV induced by alkali burn. However, PSH-ES is a more powerful anti-angiogenic agent than ES. This research has the potential to provide a new treatment option for preventing and treating corneal NV. PMID:25938033

  1. Energy utilization and growth performance of chickens fed novel wheat inbred lines selected for different pentosan levels with and without xylanase supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Pirgozliev, V.; Rose, S. P.; Pellny, T.; Amerah, A. M.; Wickramasinghe, M.; Ulker, M.; Rakszegi, M.; Bedo, Z.; Shewry, P. R.; Lovegrove, A.

    2015-01-01

    Different F5 recombinant inbred lines from the cross Yumai 34 × Ukrainka were grown in replicated trials on a single site in one harvest year at Rothamsted Research. A total of 10 samples from those lines were harvested and used in a broiler experiment. Twenty nutritionally complete meal-form diets that had 630 g/kg of wheat with different amounts of pentosan, with and without exogenous xylanase supplementation, were used to compare broiler growth performance and determine apparent metabolizable energy corrected for N retention (AMEn). We examined the relationship between the nutritive value of the wheat samples and their chemical compositions and results of quality tests. The amounts of total and water soluble pentosans in wheat samples ranged from 36.7 to 48.0 g/kg DM, and 6.7 to 11.6 g/kg DM, respectively. The mean crude oil and protein contents of the wheat samples were 10.5 and 143.9 g/kg DM, respectively. The average determined value for the kinematic viscosity was 0.0018 mPa.s, and 2.1 mPa.s for the dynamic viscosity. The AMEn of the wheat-based diets had a maximum range of 0.47 MJ/kg DM within the ten wheat samples that were tested. Xylanase supplementation improved (P < 0.05) dietary AMEn, dry matter, and fat digestibility coefficients. There was a positive (P < 0.05) relationship between in vitro kinematic viscosity of the wheat samples and the total pentosan content. There was a negative relationship between the total pentosan content in the wheat and broiler growth performance. An increase by 10 g of pentosan per kg of wheat reduced (P < 0.001) daily feed intake and weight gain by 2.9 g and 3.5 g, respectively. The study shows that the feeding quality of wheat samples can be predicted by their total pentosan content. Supplementary xylanase improved energy and nutrient availability of all wheat samples that was independent of differences in pentosan content. PMID:25595480

  2. Energy utilization and growth performance of chickens fed novel wheat inbred lines selected for different pentosan levels with and without xylanase supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pirgozliev, V; Rose, S P; Pellny, T; Amerah, A M; Wickramasinghe, M; Ulker, M; Rakszegi, M; Bedo, Z; Shewry, P R; Lovegrove, A

    2015-02-01

    Different F5 recombinant inbred lines from the cross Yumai 34×Ukrainka were grown in replicated trials on a single site in one harvest year at Rothamsted Research. A total of 10 samples from those lines were harvested and used in a broiler experiment. Twenty nutritionally complete meal-form diets that had 630 g/kg of wheat with different amounts of pentosan, with and without exogenous xylanase supplementation, were used to compare broiler growth performance and determine apparent metabolizable energy corrected for N retention (AMEn). We examined the relationship between the nutritive value of the wheat samples and their chemical compositions and results of quality tests. The amounts of total and water soluble pentosans in wheat samples ranged from 36.7 to 48.0 g/kg DM, and 6.7 to 11.6 g/kg DM, respectively. The mean crude oil and protein contents of the wheat samples were 10.5 and 143.9 g/kg DM, respectively. The average determined value for the kinematic viscosity was 0.0018 mPa.s, and 2.1 mPa.s for the dynamic viscosity. The AMEn of the wheat-based diets had a maximum range of 0.47 MJ/kg DM within the ten wheat samples that were tested. Xylanase supplementation improved (P<0.05) dietary AMEn, dry matter, and fat digestibility coefficients. There was a positive (P<0.05) relationship between in vitro kinematic viscosity of the wheat samples and the total pentosan content. There was a negative relationship between the total pentosan content in the wheat and broiler growth performance. An increase by 10 g of pentosan per kg of wheat reduced (P<0.001) daily feed intake and weight gain by 2.9 g and 3.5 g, respectively. The study shows that the feeding quality of wheat samples can be predicted by their total pentosan content. Supplementary xylanase improved energy and nutrient availability of all wheat samples that was independent of differences in pentosan content.

  3. Polysulfated Trehalose as a Novel Anticoagulant Agent with Dual Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Qudsia; Abid, Mohammad; Gupta, Neha; Tyagi, Tarun; Ashraf, Mohammad Z.; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman

    2015-01-01

    Physiological hemostatic balance is a coordinated outcome of counteracting coagulation and fibrinolytic systems. An imbalance of procoagulant and anticoagulant factors may result in life threatening thromboembolism. Presently, anticoagulant administration is the first line of therapy for the treatment of these conditions and several anticoagulants have been approved, including various forms of heparin. However, the polyanionic nature and multispecificity of heparin pose several complications. Generally, the polysulfated compounds with antithrombotic potential are thought to have feasible synthetic procedures with much less bleeding, thus having favourable safety profiles. Here we report the synthesis of a novel compound, trehalose octasulfate and the assessment of its anticoagulation potential. Molecular docking of trehalose and trehalose octasulfate with antithrombin showed a specificity switch in binding affinity on sulfation, where trehalose octasulfate interacts with critical residues of AT that are either directly involved in heparin binding or in the conformational rearrangement of AT on heparin binding. An in vitro analysis of trehalose octasulfate demonstrated prolonged clotting time. Lead compound when intravenously injected in occlusion induced thrombotic rats showed remarkable reduction in the size and weight of the clot at a low dose. Delay in coagulation time was observed by analysing blood plasma isolated from rats preinjected with trehalose octasulfate. A decrease in Adenosine 5′-Diphosphate (ADP) induced platelet aggregation indicated a probable dual anticoagulant and antiplatelet mechanism of action. To summarize, this study presents trehalose octasulfate as a novel, effective, dual acting antithrombotic agent. PMID:25866798

  4. Production of furfural from pentosan-rich biomass: analysis of process parameters during simultaneous furfural stripping.

    PubMed

    Agirrezabal-Telleria, I; Gandarias, I; Arias, P L

    2013-09-01

    Among the furan-based compounds, furfural (FUR) shows interesting properties as building-block or industrial solvent. It is produced from pentosan-rich biomass via xylose cyclodehydration. The current FUR production makes use of homogeneous catalysts and excessive amounts of steam. The development of greener furfural production and separation techniques implies the use of heterogeneous catalysts and innovative separation processes. This work deals with the conversion of corncobs as xylose source to be dehydrated to furfural. The results reveal differences between the use of direct corncob hydrolysis and dehydration to furfural and the prehydrolysis and dehydration procedures. Moreover, this work focuses on an economical analysis of the main process parameters during N2-stripping and its economical comparison to the current steam-stripping process. The results show a considerable reduction of the annual utility costs due to use of recyclable nitrogen and the reduction of the furfural purification stages. PMID:23810948

  5. Production of furfural from pentosan-rich biomass: analysis of process parameters during simultaneous furfural stripping.

    PubMed

    Agirrezabal-Telleria, I; Gandarias, I; Arias, P L

    2013-09-01

    Among the furan-based compounds, furfural (FUR) shows interesting properties as building-block or industrial solvent. It is produced from pentosan-rich biomass via xylose cyclodehydration. The current FUR production makes use of homogeneous catalysts and excessive amounts of steam. The development of greener furfural production and separation techniques implies the use of heterogeneous catalysts and innovative separation processes. This work deals with the conversion of corncobs as xylose source to be dehydrated to furfural. The results reveal differences between the use of direct corncob hydrolysis and dehydration to furfural and the prehydrolysis and dehydration procedures. Moreover, this work focuses on an economical analysis of the main process parameters during N2-stripping and its economical comparison to the current steam-stripping process. The results show a considerable reduction of the annual utility costs due to use of recyclable nitrogen and the reduction of the furfural purification stages.

  6. Effect of pentosans addition on pasting properties of flours of eight hard white spring wheat cultivars.

    PubMed

    Arif, Saqib; Ali, Tahira Mohsin; Ul Afzal, Qurat; Ahmed, Mubarik; Siddiqui, Asim Jamal; Hasnain, Abid

    2014-06-01

    The effects of water extractable pentosans (WEP) and water unextractable pentosans (WUP) on pasting properties in flours of eight different hard white spring wheat (HWSW) cultivars was studied. WEP and WUP isolated from a hard wheat flour were added to each of the cultivars at 1% and 2% level. The results indicated that WEP exhibited a pronounced effect on pasting properties as compared to WUP and variety. Univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate sources of variation. The variety significantly (P < 0.001) influenced all the pasting parameters. WUP caused significant (P < 0.001) variation in paste viscosities (except breakdown). WEP influenced more pronouncedly the hot paste, cold paste, breakdown and setback viscosities with F values-221.802, 214.286, 98.073 and 120.159, respectively. Variety-by-WEP interaction exhibited significant (P < 0.01) influence on pasting time, peak, hot paste and cold paste viscosities. Whereas, variety-by-WUP interaction only significantly (P < 0.001) influenced the pasting- time and -temperature. Duncan's test was used to analyze the significant difference (P < 0.05) within the variety. The results revealed that WUP did not induce significant (P < 0.05) influence on all the pasting parameters, whereas, WEP influenced significantly (P < 0.05) the paste viscosities of some of the varieties. It was also found that the addition of WEP remarkably reduced the setback, hot paste, cold paste viscosities and increased the breakdown viscosity in all cultivar flours. The effect of WEP was greater at higher level of supplementation on paste viscosities. PMID:24876638

  7. Unsuccessful intraventricular pentosan polysulphate treatment of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Whittle, I R; Knight, R S G; Will, R G

    2006-06-01

    Pentosan polysulphate, delivered by chronic intraventricular infusion, has been proposed as a potential therapy for human prion disease. The first treated patient is still alive several years after treatment started. Here we describe in detail a case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in which this treatment was started at a relatively early stage but had no definite clinical benefit. The patient died from disease progression 16 months after diagnosis and 5 months after pentosan polysulphate treatment was commenced.

  8. Effects of pentoxifylline and pentosan polysulphate combination therapy on diabetic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Laczy, Boglárka; Cseh, Judit; Mohás, Márton; Markó, Lajos; Tamaskó, Mónika; Koszegi, Tamás; Molnár, Gergo A; Wagner, Zoltán; Wagner, László; Wittmann, István

    2009-06-01

    Vascular dysfunction, including impaired perfusion has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of microvascular complications in diabetes mellitus. Both pentoxifylline (PF) and pentosan polysulphate (PPS) are known to improve microcirculation. Antioxidant and antiproteinuric effects of PF are also known. In a placebo-controlled study, we determined the possible efficacy of PF-PPS combination therapy on diabetic neuropathy and nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. Patients in Verum group (n = 77) received PF-PPS infusions (100-100 mg/day) for 5 days. Control diabetics (Placebo group; n = 12) were given only saline infusions. Specialized cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests, vibration threshold values and urinary albumin excretion were assessed before and after therapy. In Verum group, autonomic score, indicating the severity of cardiac autonomic dysfunction, decreased after therapy (p < or = 0.001). Of the reflexes, deep breath and handgrip tests also improved after therapy (p < or = 0.001). Vibration threshold values, an indicator of the loss of sensory nerve function, were increased after therapy (p < or = 0.001). Results of cardiac autonomic tests and vibration threshold values remained unaltered in Placebo group. Majority of patients had normalbuminuria, which was not affected by PF-PPS. In conclusion, short-term PF-PPS therapy was effective on cardiovascular autonomic function and vibration perception, whereas it failed to reduce albuminuria within normal range in type 2 diabetic patients.

  9. Neuroprotective effect of pentosan polysulphate on ischemia-related neuronal death of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sakurai-Yamashita, Yasuko; Kinugawa, Hidekazu; Niwa, Masami

    2006-11-27

    Pentosan polysulphate (PPS) negatively charged sulphated glycosaminoglycan was studied in ischemia-related hippocampal neuronal death and compared with a low molecular weight of heparin, named dalteparin in rats. Transient global ischemia was produced by four vessel-occlusion, the occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries following the electrocautherization of the vertebral arteries. 3mg/kg of PPS or 300IU/kg of dalteparin was administered i.v. immediately after 7min-occlusion/reperfusion. Seven days after the operation, the animals were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde, and paraffinized coronal brain sections measuring 6microm in thickness were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Neuronal damage was then estimated as a ratio of the number of degenerated neurons to that of both the surviving and degenerated neurons in three distinct area of the CA1 subfield. The ratio of neuronal death increased with the length of the occlusion-time, at 5, 7 and 10min. Both PPS and dalteparin significantly inhibited the neuronal damage induced by 7min-occlusion. These results demonstrated that both PPS and dalteparin could thus protect brain neurons against ischemia/reperfusion-induced damage thus suggesting that they may be potentially useful therapeutic agents for acute ischemic stroke.

  10. Plasma and synovial fluid concentrations of calcium pentosan polysulphate achieved in the horse following intramuscular injection.

    PubMed

    Fuller, C J; Ghosh, P; Barr, A R S

    2002-01-01

    Results from in vitro studies have indicated that calcium pentosan polysulphate (CaPPS) may be of therapeutic value in osteoarthritis (OA) in the horse. However, no controlled clinical trials using this drug in equine OA have yet been reported. If CaPPS is to be developed for such use, the relationship between the proposed i.m. dose of CaPPS to be used and the concentrations of drug attained in plasma and synovial fluid of the target joint should first be established. An investigation was undertaken to determine these concentrations after a single 2 mg/kg i.m. injection of CaPPS. Blood and synovial fluid samples were taken from 6 healthy, sound horses following i.m. CaPPS administration. Concentrations of CaPPS measured in the synovial fluid were, on the basis of published studies, sufficient to elicit a potential therapeutic effect on synoviocyte metabolism, and possibly also to stimulate proteoglycan synthesis and reduce matrix metalloproteinase activities in articular cartilage. It would therefore seem justified to investigate further the therapeutic effect of CaPPS in OA in the horse.

  11. An injectable hydrogel incorporating mesenchymal precursor cells and pentosan polysulphate for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Frith, Jessica E; Cameron, Andrew R; Menzies, Donna J; Ghosh, Peter; Whitehead, Darryl L; Gronthos, Stan; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Cooper-White, Justin J

    2013-12-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the leading causes of lower back pain and a major health problem worldwide. Current surgical treatments include excision or immobilisation, with neither approach resulting in the repair of the degenerative disc. As such, a tissue engineering-based approach in which stem cells, coupled with an advanced delivery system, could overcome this deficiency and lead to a therapy that encourages functional fibrocartilage generation in the IVD. In this study, we have developed an injectable hydrogel system based on enzymatically-crosslinked polyethylene glycol and hyaluronic acid. We examined the effects of adding pentosan polysulphate (PPS), a synthetic glycosaminoglycan-like factor that has previously been shown (in vitro and in vivo) to this gel system in order to induce chondrogenesis in mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs) when added as a soluble factor, even in the absence of additional growth factors such as TGF-β. We show that both the gelation rate and mechanical strength of the resulting hydrogels can be tuned in order to optimise the conditions required to produce gels with the desired combination of properties for an IVD scaffold. Human immunoselected STRO-1+ MPCs were then incorporated into the hydrogels. They were shown to retain good viability after both the initial formation of the gel and for longer-term culture periods in vitro. Furthermore, MPC/hydrogel composites formed cartilage-like tissue which was significantly enhanced by the incorporation of PPS into the hydrogels, particularly with respect to the deposition of type-II-collagen. Finally, using a wild-type rat subcutaneous implantation model, we examined the extent of any immune reaction and confirmed that this matrix is well tolerated by the host. Together these data provide evidence that such a system has significant potential as both a delivery vehicle for MPCs and as a matrix for fibrocartilage tissue engineering applications.

  12. Augmented anti-angiogenesis activity of polysulfated heparin-endostatin and polyethylene glycol-endostatin in alkali burn-induced corneal ulcers in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHAO-NA; YUAN, ZHONG-FANG; MU, GUO-YING; HU, MING; CAO, LI-JUN; ZHANG, YA-LI; GE, MING-XU

    2015-01-01

    Endostatin (ES) is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor that has the ability to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. However, its clinical application is limited by a number of disadvantages, such as poor stability, short half-life and the requirement of high doses to maintain its efficacy. The chemical modification on ES may offer a solution to these disadvantages. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of ES, polysulfated heparin-endostatin (PSH-ES) and polyethylene glycol-endostatin (PEG-ES) on the endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis associated with corneal neovascularization (CNV) and to determine their mechanisms of action. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) was used to study the effects of ES and its derivatives on endothelial cell proliferation in vitro, and rabbits were used to evaluate the effects of ES and its derivatives on CNV in vivo. In the evaluation of CNV, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the cornea was measured via immunohistochemistry and microvessels were counted. ES and its derivatives significantly inhibited endothelial cell proliferation in vitro (P<0.05) and suppressed CNV in vivo. Among the compounds examined, ES most effectively inhibited endothelial cell proliferation in vitro (P<0.05); however, PSH-ES and PEG-ES most effectively inhibited CNV in vivo (P<0.05). These results indicate that PSH-ES and PEG-ES are candidate anti-angiogenesis drugs. PMID:26622410

  13. The interaction of boar sperm proacrosin with its natural substrate, the zona pellucida, and with polysulfated polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Urch, U A; Patel, H

    1991-04-01

    Boar sperm acrosin is an acrosomal protease with trypsin-like specificity, and it functions in fertilization by assisting sperm passage through the zona pellucida by limited hydrolysis of this extracellular matrix. In addition to a proteolytic active site domain, acrosin binds the zona pellucida at a separate binding domain that is lost during proacrosin autolysis. In this study, we quantitate the binding of proacrosin to the physiological substrate for acrosin, the zona pellucida, and to a non-substrate, the polysulfated polysaccharide fucoidan. Binding was analogous to sea urchin sperm bindin that binds egg jelly fucan and the vitelline envelope of sea urchin eggs. Proacrosin was found to bind to fucoidan and to the zona pellucida with binding affinities similar to bindin interaction with egg jelly fucan. These interactions were competitively inhibited by similar relative molecular mass polysulfated polymers. Since bindin and proacrosin have distinctly different amino acid sequences, their interaction with acidic sulfate esters demonstrates an example of convergent evolution wherein different macromolecules localized in analogous sperm compartments have the same biological function. From cDNA sequence analysis of proacrosin, this binding may be mediated through a consensus sequence for binding sulfated glycoconjugates. Proacrosin binding to the zona pellucida may serve as both a recognition or primary sperm receptor, as well as maintaining the sperm on the zona pellucida once the acrosome reaction has occurred.

  14. [Effect of pentosan polysulphate (SP-54) on the level of prion physiological form in rat tissues].

    PubMed

    Vlizlo, V V; Stadnyk, V V; Maĭor, Kh Ia; Kinakh, M V; Verbytskyĭ, P I; Kozak, M M

    2008-01-01

    It is established that except for already known influence of pentosan polysulphate (SP-54) on the expression of pathological prion, this preparation has an inhibiting effect in respect of physiological prion. Moreover, the reduction of concentration of physiologycal prion is registered in the central and peripheral organs of the prion-replicating system. It was also shown that inhibition of the studied protein leads to the growth in copper and zinc concentration in the proper organs and tissues, but at the same time activity of Cu/Zn-dependent superoxide dismutase does not change.

  15. Protection of the blood-brain barrier by pentosan against amyloid-β-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Deli, Mária A; Veszelka, Szilvia; Csiszár, Boglárka; Tóth, Andrea; Kittel, Agnes; Csete, Mária; Sipos, Aron; Szalai, Anikó; Fülöp, Lívia; Penke, Botond; Abrahám, Csongor S; Niwa, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells of brain capillaries forming the blood-brain barrier play an important role in the pathogenesis and therapy of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are key pathological elements in the development of the disease. A blood-brain barrier model, based on primary rat brain endothelial cells was used in which the barrier properties were induced by glial cells. The effects of amyloid peptides have been tested on cell viability and barrier functions. Aβ showed toxic effects on primary rat brain endothelial cells measured by MTT dye conversion and the lactate dehydrogenase release. Morphologically cytoplasmic vacuolization, disruption of the structure of cytoplasmic organelles and tight junctions could be observed in brain endothelial cells. Treatment with Aβ1-42 decreased the electrical resistance, and increased the permeability of brain endothelial cell monolayers for both fluorescein and albumin. Serum amyloid P component which stabilizes Aβ fibrils in cortical amyloid plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits significantly potentiated the barrier-weakening effect of Aβ1-42. Sulfated polysaccharide pentosan could decrease the toxic effects of Aβ peptides in brain endothelial cells. It could also significantly protect the barrier integrity of monolayers from damaging actions of peptides. Pentosan modified the size, and significantly decreased the number of amyloid aggregates demonstrated by atomic force microscopy. The present data further support the toxic effects of amyloid peptides on brain endothelial cells, and can contribute to the development of molecules protecting the blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Differential effects of polysulfated polysaccharide on experimental encephalomyelitis, proliferation of autoimmune T cells, and inhibition of heparanase activity.

    PubMed

    Hershkoviz, R; Mor, F; Miao, H Q; Vlodavsky, I; Lider, O

    1995-10-01

    The extravasation of activated T lymphocytes through blood vessel walls and their migration to inflammatory loci are associated with secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes, such as heparanase, which degrades heparan sulfate (HS) moieties of the ECM. The HS-degrading activity of heparanase was found to be inhibited by HS and heparin. Since induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) requires extravasation and migration of autoimmune T cells, degradation of ECM by heparanase is expected to be involved in induction of the disease. Herein, we examined whether laminarin sulfate, a polysulfated polysaccharide (PSS) isolated from the cell walls of seaweeds and subjected to chemical sulfation, could inhibit ECM degradation by mammalian heparanase, and could prevent EAE. PSS was a more potent inhibitor of heparanase-mediated degradation of ECM than heparin. In-vivo, PSS, injected once a week, inhibited the severity of actively-induced EAE in rats. However, inhibition of EAE was not due to an overall suppression of autoimmune T cells, since PSS enhanced the proliferation of myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific, encephalitogenic T cells. PSS-activated autoimmune T cells, but not MBP-activated cells, failed to induce EAE in recipient rats. Moreover, rats injected with PSS-activated T cells were resistant to induction of EAE by anti-MBP CD4+ T cells. Thus, PSS may have potential clinical applications in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:8579728

  17. Effects of bound versus soluble pentosan polysulphate in PEG/HA-based hydrogels tailored for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Frith, Jessica E; Menzies, Donna J; Cameron, Andrew R; Ghosh, P; Whitehead, Darryl L; Gronthos, S; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Cooper-White, Justin J

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports in the literature investigating chondrogenesis in mesenchymal progenitor cell (MPC) cultures have confirmed the chondro-inductive potential of pentosan polysulphate (PPS), a highly sulphated semi-synthetic polysaccharide, when added as a soluble component to culture media under standard aggregate-assay conditions or to poly(ethylene glycol)/hyaluronic acid (PEG/HA)-based hydrogels, even in the absence of inductive factors (e.g. TGFβ). In this present study, we aimed to assess whether a 'bound' PPS would have greater activity and availability over a soluble PPS, as a media additive or when incorporated into PEG/HA-based hydrogels. We achieved this by covalently pre-binding the PPS to the HA component of the gel (forming a new molecule, HA-PPS). We firstly investigated the activity of HA-PPS compared to free PPS, when added as a soluble factor to culture media. Cell proliferation, as determined by CCK8 and EdU assay, was decreased in the presence of either bound or free PPS whilst chondrogenic differentiation, as determined by DMMB assay and histology, was enhanced. In all cases, the effect of the bound PPS (HA-PPS) was more potent than that of the unbound form. These results alone suggest wider applications for this new molecule, either as a culture supplement or as a coating for scaffolds targeted at chondrogenic differentiation or maturation. We then investigated the incorporation of HA-PPS into a PEG/HA-based hydrogel system, by simply substituting some of the HA for HA-PPS. Rheological testing confirmed that incorporation of either HA-PPS or PPS did not significantly affect gelation kinetics, final hydrogel modulus or degradation rate but had a small, but significant, effect on swelling. When encapsulated in the hydrogels, MPCs retained good viability and rapidly adopted a rounded morphology. Histological analysis of both GAG and collagen deposition after 21 days showed that the incorporation of the bound-PPS into the hydrogel resulted in

  18. A novel, biodegradable and reversible polyelectrolyte platform for topical-colonic delivery of pentosan polysulphate.

    PubMed

    Shah, Hardik K; Conkie, Jim A; Tait, Robert C; Johnson, James R; Wilson, Clive G

    2011-02-14

    The goal of the present work was to develop a swellable hydrogel colonic delivery system, which would maximise the availability of the therapeutic agent at a site of inflammation, especially where the water is scarce. A novel method was developed to manufacture a biodegradable and reversible polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) containing chitosan and poly acrylic-acid (PAA). The PEC was analysed using FTIR and DSC, which confirmed the formation of non-permanent swollen gel-network at an alkaline pH. Pentosan polysulphate (PPS) was incorporated in a PEC and an activated partial thromboplastin time assay was developed to measure the release of PPS from PEC. In vitro studies suggested that the release of PPS was dependent on the initial drug loading and the composition of the PEC. The gel strength of the swollen network, determined using a texture analyser, was dependent on polymer composition and the amount of PPS incorporated. Bacterial enzymes were collected from the rat caecum and colon for the digestion studies and characterised for glucosidase activity, glucuronidase activity and protein content. The digestion of the reversible polyelectrolyte complexes was measured using a dinitro salicylic acid assay and an increased release of drug was also confirmed in the presence of bacterial enzymes. PMID:21093555

  19. A novel, biodegradable and reversible polyelectrolyte platform for topical-colonic delivery of pentosan polysulphate.

    PubMed

    Shah, Hardik K; Conkie, Jim A; Tait, Robert C; Johnson, James R; Wilson, Clive G

    2011-02-14

    The goal of the present work was to develop a swellable hydrogel colonic delivery system, which would maximise the availability of the therapeutic agent at a site of inflammation, especially where the water is scarce. A novel method was developed to manufacture a biodegradable and reversible polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) containing chitosan and poly acrylic-acid (PAA). The PEC was analysed using FTIR and DSC, which confirmed the formation of non-permanent swollen gel-network at an alkaline pH. Pentosan polysulphate (PPS) was incorporated in a PEC and an activated partial thromboplastin time assay was developed to measure the release of PPS from PEC. In vitro studies suggested that the release of PPS was dependent on the initial drug loading and the composition of the PEC. The gel strength of the swollen network, determined using a texture analyser, was dependent on polymer composition and the amount of PPS incorporated. Bacterial enzymes were collected from the rat caecum and colon for the digestion studies and characterised for glucosidase activity, glucuronidase activity and protein content. The digestion of the reversible polyelectrolyte complexes was measured using a dinitro salicylic acid assay and an increased release of drug was also confirmed in the presence of bacterial enzymes.

  20. Cerebroventricular infusion of pentosan polysulphate in human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Todd, N V; Morrow, J; Doh-ura, K; Dealler, S; O'Hare, S; Farling, P; Duddy, M; Rainov, N G

    2005-06-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy believed to be caused by the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent, an abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP(sc)). At present there is no specific or effective treatment available for any form of CJD. Pentosan polysulphate (PPS), a large polyglycoside molecule with weak heparin-like activity, has been shown to prolong the incubation period of the intracerebral infection when administered to the cerebral ventricles in a rodent scrapie model. PPS also prevents the production of further PrP(sc) in cell culture models. These properties of PPS prompted its cerebroventricular administration in a young man with vCJD. Long-term continuous infusion of PPS at a dose of 11 microg/kg/day for 18 months did not cause drug-related side effects. Follow-up CT scans demonstrated progressive brain atrophy during PPS administration. Further basic and clinical research is needed in order to address the issue of efficacy of PPS in vCJD and in other prion diseases.

  1. Less protease-resistant PrP in a patient with sporadic CJD treated with intraventricular pentosan polysulphate.

    PubMed

    Terada, T; Tsuboi, Y; Obi, T; Doh-ura, K; Murayama, S; Kitamoto, T; Yamada, T; Mizoguchi, K

    2010-02-01

    Treatment with intraventricular pentosan polysulphate (PPS) might be beneficial in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We report a 68-year-old woman with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease who received continuous intraventricular PPS infusion (1-120 microg/kg/day) for 17 months starting 10 months after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment with PPS was well tolerated but was associated with a minor, transient intraventricular hemorrhage and a non-progressive collection of subdural fluid. The patient's overall survival time was well above the mean time expected for the illness but still within the normal range. Post-mortem examination revealed that the level of abnormal protease-resistant prion protein in the brain was markedly decreased compared with levels in brains without PPS treatment. These findings suggest that intraventricular PPS infusion might modify the accumulation of abnormal prion proteins in the brains of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

  2. Long term survival in a patient with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease treated with intraventricular pentosan polysulphate.

    PubMed

    Parry, A; Baker, I; Stacey, R; Wimalaratna, S

    2007-07-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a neurodegenerative disease that principally affects young people and has a median duration of illness of 13 (range 6-39) months. vCJD is incurable and there are currently no treatments that conclusively slow the rate of disease progression. However, recent animal studies and isolated case reports have suggested that treatment with intraventricular pentosan polysulphate (PPS) may be beneficial in the treatment of patients with vCJD. We report a case of a 22-year-old male with vCJD treated 19 months after the onset of clinical symptoms with continuous intraventricular PPS (32 microg/kg/day) over a period of 31 months. Treatment with PPS appeared to be safe and well tolerated and was associated with prolonged survival (51 months) when compared to natural history studies. However, PPS treatment did not appear to arrest the progression of the disease.

  3. Pentosan-derived water-soluble carbon nano dots with substantial fluorescence: Properties and application as a photosensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Li, Wei; Wu, Yanjiao; Huang, Zhanhua; Liu, Shouxin

    2014-10-01

    The hydrothermal carbonization of monosaccharides and polysaccharides is widely used in the production of carbonaceous material with a desired structure. However, the liquid products are regarded as waste and discarded. Here, we report a facile approach for the synthesis of water-soluble carbon nano dots (CNDs) with substantial fluorescence from the liquid by-products of the hydrothermal carbonization of pentosan, thus the by-products of pulp refining. The synthesized CNDs are monodispersed spheres with abundant oxygen-containing groups and they have an average size of 30 nm. Quantum yield measurements revealed CNDs with substantial green photoluminescence (PL) without passivation. Additionally, excitation was independent, pH-sensitive and stable. The use of CNDs as a photosensitizer in the CNDs/TiO2 system for methylene blue (MB) degradation under visible light irradiation is attractive. The spectral response range of the CNDs/TiO2 system can be widened from the UV region to a part of the visible light region (400-550 nm).

  4. Arabinose fermentation by Lactobacillus plantarum in sourdough with added pentosans and alphaalpha-L-arabinofuranosidase: a tool to increase the production of acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, M; Lavermicocca, P; Minervini, F; de Angelis, M; Corsetti, A

    2000-02-01

    Sixty-five strains of obligately and facultatively heterofermentative sourdough lactic acid bacteria were screened for their capacity to grow optimally in the presence of arabinose, ribose and xylose as carbon sources. Lactobacillus alimentarius 15F, Lact. brevis 10A, Lact. fermentum 1F and Lact. plantarum 20B showed higher growth rate, cell yield, acidification rate and production of acetic acid when some pentoses instead of maltose were added to the SDB medium. Lactobacillus plantarum 20B used arabinose also in a synthetic medium where complex growth factors such as yeast extract were omitted. Other Lact. plantarum strains did not show the same property. Pentosan extract was treated with alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Aspergillus niger or endo-xylanase from Bacillus subtilis to produce hydrolysates containing mainly arabinose and xylose, respectively. In particular, the hydrolysate containing arabinose substantiated the growth and the production of lactic acid and, especially, of acetic acid by Lact. plantarum 20B. Sourdough fermentation by Lact. plantarum 20B with addition of pentosan extract and alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase increased the acidification rate, titratable acidity and acetic acid content compared with traditional sourdough. A facultatively heterofermentative strain, Lact. plantarum 20B, also produced a sourdough with an optimal fermentation quotient.

  5. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  6. In vitro hemorheological effects of parenteral agents used in peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biro, Katalin; Sandor, Barbara; Toth, Andras; Koltai, Katalin; Papp, Judit; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Kalman; Kesmarky, Gabor

    2014-05-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis. In PAD hemorheological parameters were defined as risk factors in a number of studies and several therapeutic agents were tried in these conditions. Our study aims to investigate and compare the in vitro hemorheological effects of various drugs generally used in the parenteral treatment of intermittent claudication and critical limb ischemia. Blood samples of healthy male volunteers were incubated with iloprost, alprostadil, pentoxifylline, sulodexide or pentosan polysulfate at calculated therapeutic serum concentration. Hematocrit (Hct) was determined by microhematocrit centrifuge. Plasma and apparent whole blood viscosities (WBV) were evaluated by capillary viscometer. Red blood cell aggregation was measured by LORCA (laserassisted optical rotational cell analyzer) aggregometer, and LORCA ektacytometer was used for measuring erythrocyte deformability at 37°C. Iloprost, alprostadil, and pentoxifylline incubation did not have any significant effect on plasma and apparent WBV. Elongation index increased in samples incubated with alprostadil at low shear stresses 0.95 and 0.53 Pa (p < 0.05). Sulodexide significantly improved WBV and Hct/WBV ratio (p < 0.05). Incubation with pentosan polysulfate resulted in higher WBV, lower Hct/WBV ratio and deterioration in the aggregation parameters (p < 0.05). Sulodexide may have beneficial effect on a macrorheological parameter; alprostadil may improve a microrheological parameter. Hemorheological alterations could be important in PAD patients with hampered vasodilator capacity.

  7. Assessment of prospective preventive therapies for chronic wasting disease in mule deer.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Lisa L; Kocisko, David A; Caughey, Byron; Miller, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    We compared prion infection rates among mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) receiving pentosan polysulfate, tannic acid, tetracycline HCl, or no treatment 14 days before to 14 days after (dpi) oral inoculation with tonsil tissue homogenate. All deer were infected, but the rapid disease course (230-603 dpi) suggested our challenge was overwhelming.

  8. Use of pentosan polysulphate in cats with idiopathic, non-obstructive lower urinary tract disease: a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wallius, Barbro M; Tidholm, Anna E

    2009-06-01

    Idiopathic feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD) is a common clinical entity where different treatments, for example glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as pentosan polysulphate (PPS), are advocated. However, few treatments have been investigated by well-controlled clinical trials. This paper compares the use of PPS in FLUTD compared to placebo. Of the 18 cats in the experiment, nine were treated with PPS and nine were treated with placebo with subcutaneous injections of 3mg/kg PPS or placebo day 1, 2, 5 and 10. The study was double-blind, randomised and placebo-controlled. Revaluation was performed after 5 and 10 days, 2 weeks, 2, 6 and 12 months. There were no statistically significant differences concerning clinical signs between groups during treatment or at re-evaluation, except for pretreatment stressful events where PPS-treated cats had experienced significantly more stressful events compared to cats treated with placebo before entering the study. Six cats (33%) showed recurrence of clinical signs during the entire study period, and only one of these cats had more than one recurrent episode. One cat (placebo) was euthanased 7 days after initial treatment because of recurrence of clinical signs. Another cat (placebo) was euthanased due to other reasons after 6 months. At 2 weeks two cats (placebo and PPS) showed clinical signs. At 2 months re-evaluation one cat showed mild clinical signs. At 6 and 12 months all remaining 16 cats were healthy. Idiopathic, non-obstructive FLUTD is a self-limiting disease with good short-term and excellent long-term prognosis without treatment. Whether or not PPS may be beneficial in a subpopulation of cats with continuous or frequently recurring clinical signs may be elucidated in forthcoming double-blind, randomised and placebo-controlled trials including only this subpopulation of cats.

  9. Interactions between heparinoids and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Paulíková, H; Valusová, E; Antalík, M

    1997-07-01

    The interaction between polysulfated polysaecharides (low-molecular-weight heparin LMWH, dextran sulfate DS and pentosan sulfate PS) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) was investigated. The fluorescence and UV spectra of YADH after adding the tested polysaccharides have confirmed the interaction between the enzyme and these compounds. Kinetic studies have shown that LMWH, DS and PS are inhibitors of YADH (mixed type with respect to NAD). The most potent inhibitor is PS (ID50=37.5 ng/ml, Ki=0.6 muM). The inhibition effect depends on the ionic strength (the inhibition decreased by about 50% in the presence of 100 mM Na2SO4) and pH value (the inhibition decreased at pH>7). The results indicate that the inhibition effect of these polyanions is caused by their electrostatic interactions with the NAD-binding region of YADH.

  10. Meloxicam and surgical denervation of the coxofemoral joint for the treatment of degenerative osteoarthritis in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Douglas P; Remedios, Audrey M; Black, Sandra R; Finn-Bodner, Susan T

    2006-09-01

    An adult male white Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) with pronounced atrophy of the pelvic musculature was diagnosed with degenerative osteoarthritis of the coxofemoral joints. Initial management with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug meloxicam and a semisynthetic sodium pentosan polysulfate resulted in clinical improvement and radiographic stabilization of the arthritic condition over several months. However, because pain was still evident, bilateral denervation of the coxofemoral joints was performed, successfully ameliorating the signs of osteoarthritic pain in the tiger. Meloxicam has shown good clinical efficacy for the treatment of osteoarthritis and other painful conditions in large felids. Coxofemoral joint denervation offers many advantages for the treatment of osteoarthritis in exotic carnivore species, and should be considered a viable treatment modality.

  11. Meloxicam and surgical denervation of the coxofemoral joint for the treatment of degenerative osteoarthritis in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Douglas P; Remedios, Audrey M; Black, Sandra R; Finn-Bodner, Susan T

    2006-09-01

    An adult male white Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) with pronounced atrophy of the pelvic musculature was diagnosed with degenerative osteoarthritis of the coxofemoral joints. Initial management with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug meloxicam and a semisynthetic sodium pentosan polysulfate resulted in clinical improvement and radiographic stabilization of the arthritic condition over several months. However, because pain was still evident, bilateral denervation of the coxofemoral joints was performed, successfully ameliorating the signs of osteoarthritic pain in the tiger. Meloxicam has shown good clinical efficacy for the treatment of osteoarthritis and other painful conditions in large felids. Coxofemoral joint denervation offers many advantages for the treatment of osteoarthritis in exotic carnivore species, and should be considered a viable treatment modality. PMID:17319147

  12. 21 CFR 522.1850 - Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... associated lameness of the carpal and hock joints in horses. (ii) Amount—(A) Intra-articular use (carpal): 250 mg once a week for 5 weeks. (B) Intramuscular use (carpal and hock): 500 mg every 4 days for...

  13. Treatment effect of cyclosporine A in patients with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZHIKUI; ZHANG, LEI

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CyA) is emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy for painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC), which is currently an incurable disease. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the treatment effects of CyA in PBS/IC. Electronic and manual retrieval procedures were carried out to identify eligible references for the systematic review. The entire contents of the included articles were assessed, from study design to reported results. Eight studies, comprising three randomized controlled trials (RCTs), four prospective studies and one retrospective cohort study, were included, involving a total of 298 subjects. Meta-analysis was not implemented due to heterogeneity of the manner of reporting the outcome parameters. All studies reported an improvement in symptoms following treatment with CyA. The results of the three RCTs implied that the treatment effects of CyA were better than those of pentosan polysulfate sodium. Some adverse events, for example, elevation of serum creatinine levels and an increase in blood pressure, were noted in five studies. In conclusion, the evidence from the studies implied that treatment of CyA can result in a long-term benefit in patients of PBS/IC; however, further evidence is required to verify this. PMID:27347076

  14. Specific interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid with the human immunodeficiency virus/CD4 cell receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Schols, D.; Baba, M.; Pauwels, R.; Desmyter, J.; De Clercq, E. )

    1989-05-01

    The triphenylmethane derivative aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA), but not aurin, selectively prevented the binding of OKT4A/Leu-3a monoclonal antibody (mAb) and, to a lesser extent, OKT4 mAb to the CD4 cell receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The effect was seen within 1 min at an ATA concentration of 10 {mu}M in various T4{sup +} cells (MT-4, U-937, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and monocytes). It was dose-dependent and reversible. ATA prevented the attachment of radiolabeled HIV-1 particles to MT-4 cells, which could be expected as the result of its specific binding to the HIV/CD4 receptor. Other HIV inhibitors such as suramin, fuchsin acid, azidothymidine, dextran sulfate, heparin, and pentosan polysulfate did not affect OKT4A/Leu-3a mAb binding to the CD4 receptor, although the sulfated polysaccharides suppressed HIV-1 adsorption to the cells at concentrations required for complete protection against HIV-1 cytopathogenicity. Thus, ATA is a selective marker molecule for the CD4 receptor. ATA also interfered with the staining of membrane-associated HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 by a mAb against it. These unusual properties of a small molecule of nonimmunological origin may have important implications for the study of CD4/HIV/AIDS pathogenesis and possibly treatment.

  15. [The complexity of chronic pelvic pain exemplified by the condition currently called interstitial cystitis. Part 1: Background and basic principles].

    PubMed

    Binder, I; van Ophoven, A

    2008-05-01

    The so-called interstitial cystitis is a chronic pain syndrome rather than a purely end organ disease of the urinary bladder. New suggestions for definition and nomenclature take this into consideration. Since aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown a causal treatment is still not at hand. There are neither evidence-based treatment algorithms nor a so-called standard therapy. Numerous therapeutic approaches have been tried up to now. These attempts can be divided into oral, intravesical, surgical and physical procedures. There are also meaningful supplementary therapy procedures beyond the boundaries of classical school medicine. The WHO guidelines provide the basis for every pain therapy. For the oral therapeutic procedures in current use the following medications with differing levels of evidence have been recommended: amitriptylin, hydroxyzin, pentosan polysulfate. Many other orally administered drugs have also been used although in many cases evidence of efficacy is lacking, these included anticonvulsants, L-arginine and various immunomodulators and immunosuppressants. Among the intravesical therapeutic procedures botulinum toxin A, dimethyl sulfoxide, heparin and glycosaminoglycan substitutes have been used. For the physical procedures, besides bladder distension, hyperbaric oxygen therapy shows efficacy. When conventional therapeutic methods fail, surgical (partial) removal of the urinary bladder or urinary diversion procedures represent the therapeutic ultimo ratio. There are hardly any controlled studies on alternative curative procedures although rather good results have been obtained in chronic pelvic pain syndrome with acupuncture as an additional therapeutic modality.

  16. [The complexity of chronic pelvic pain exemplified by the condition currently called interstitial cystitis. Part 2: Treatment].

    PubMed

    Binder, I; Rossbach, G; van Ophoven, A

    2008-07-01

    The so-called interstitial cystitis is a chronic pain syndrome rather than a purely end organ disease of the urinary bladder. New suggestions for definitions and nomenclature take this into consideration. Since aetiology and pathogenesis are still unknown a treatment of the cause is still not possible. There are neither evidence-based treatment algorithms nor a so-called standard therapy. Numerous therapeutic approaches have been tried up to now. These attempts can be divided into oral, intravesical, surgical and physical procedures. There are also meaningful supplementary therapy procedures beyond the boundaries of classical school medicine. The WHO staging scheme provides the basis for every pain therapy. For the oral therapeutic procedures in current use the following medications with differing levels of evidence have been recommended: amitriptylin, hydroxyzin, pentosan polysulfate. Many other orally administered drugs have also been used although in many cases evidence of efficacy is lacking, these included anticonvulsants, L-arginine and various immunomodulators and immunosuppressants. Among the intravesical therapeutic procedures botulinum toxin A, dimethyl sulfoxide, heparin and glycosaminoglycan substitutes have been used. For the physical procedures, besides bladder distension, hyperbaric oxygen therapy shows efficacy. When the conventional therapeutic methods fail, surgical (partial) removal of the urinary bladder or urinary diversion procedures represent the therapeutic ultimo ratio. There are hardly any controlled studies on alternative curative procedures although rather good results have been obtained in chronic pelvic pain syndrome with acupuncture as an additional therapeutic modality.

  17. Research Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    Research on Global Carbon Emission and Sequestration NSFC Funded Project Made Significant Progress in Quantum Dynamics Functional Human Blood Protein Obtained from Rice How Giant Pandas Thrive on a Bamboo Diet New Evidence of Interpersonal Violence from 129,000 Years Ago Found in China Aptamer-Mediated Efficient Capture and Release of T Lymphocytes on Nanostructured Surfaces BGI Study Results on Resequencing 50 Accessions of Rice Cast New Light on Molecular Breeding BGI Reports Study Results on Frequent Mutation of Genes Encoding UMPP Components in Kidney Cancer Research on Habitat Shift Promoting Species Diversification

  18. Prion diseases: immunotargets and therapy.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Jennifer T; Panegyres, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephathalopathies or prion diseases are a group of neurological disorders characterized by neuronal loss, spongiform degeneration, and activation of astrocytes or microglia. These diseases affect humans and animals with an extremely high prevalence in some species such as deer and elk in North America. Although rare in humans, they result in a devastatingly swift neurological progression with dementia and ataxia. Patients usually die within a year of diagnosis. Prion diseases are familial, sporadic, iatrogenic, or transmissible. Human prion diseases include Kuru, sporadic, iatrogenic, and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease, and fatal familial insomnia. The causative agent is a misfolded version of the physiological prion protein called PrP(Sc) in the brain. There are a number of therapeutic options currently under investigation. A number of small molecules have had some success in delaying disease progression in animal models and mixed results in clinical trials, including pentosan polysulfate, quinacrine, and amphotericin B. More promisingly, immunotherapy has reported success in vitro and in vivo in animal studies and clinical trials. The three main branches of immunotherapy research are focus on antibody vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, and adoptive transfer of physiological prion protein-specific CD4(+) T-lymphocytes. Vaccines utilizing antibodies generally target disease-specific epitopes that are only exposed in the misfolded PrP(Sc) conformation. Vaccines utilizing antigen-loaded dendritic cell have the ability to bypass immune tolerance and prime CD4(+) cells to initiate an immune response. Adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T-cells is another promising target as this cell type can orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Although more research into mechanisms and safety is required, these immunotherapies offer novel therapeutic targets for prion

  19. Prion diseases: immunotargets and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Burchell, Jennifer T; Panegyres, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephathalopathies or prion diseases are a group of neurological disorders characterized by neuronal loss, spongiform degeneration, and activation of astrocytes or microglia. These diseases affect humans and animals with an extremely high prevalence in some species such as deer and elk in North America. Although rare in humans, they result in a devastatingly swift neurological progression with dementia and ataxia. Patients usually die within a year of diagnosis. Prion diseases are familial, sporadic, iatrogenic, or transmissible. Human prion diseases include Kuru, sporadic, iatrogenic, and familial forms of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease, Gerstmann–Sträussler–Scheinker disease, and fatal familial insomnia. The causative agent is a misfolded version of the physiological prion protein called PrPSc in the brain. There are a number of therapeutic options currently under investigation. A number of small molecules have had some success in delaying disease progression in animal models and mixed results in clinical trials, including pentosan polysulfate, quinacrine, and amphotericin B. More promisingly, immunotherapy has reported success in vitro and in vivo in animal studies and clinical trials. The three main branches of immunotherapy research are focus on antibody vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, and adoptive transfer of physiological prion protein-specific CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Vaccines utilizing antibodies generally target disease-specific epitopes that are only exposed in the misfolded PrPSc conformation. Vaccines utilizing antigen-loaded dendritic cell have the ability to bypass immune tolerance and prime CD4+ cells to initiate an immune response. Adoptive transfer of CD4+ T-cells is another promising target as this cell type can orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Although more research into mechanisms and safety is required, these immunotherapies offer novel therapeutic targets for prion

  20. A potent oral P-selectin blocking agent improves microcirculatory blood flow and a marker of endothelial cell injury in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kutlar, Abdullah; Ataga, Kenneth I; McMahon, Lillian; Howard, Joanna; Galacteros, Frederic; Hagar, Ward; Vichinsky, Elliott; Cheung, Anthony T W; Matsui, Neil; Embury, Stephen H

    2012-05-01

    Abnormal blood flow accounts for most of the clinical morbidity of sickle cell disease (SCD) [1,2]. Most notably, occlusion of flow in the microvasculature causes the acute pain crises [3] that are the commonest cause for patients with SCD to seek medical attention [4] and major determinants of their quality of life [5]. Based on evidence that endothelial P-selectin is central to the abnormal blood flow in SCD we provide results from four of our studies that are germane to microvascular blood flow in SCD. A proof-of-principle study established that doses of heparin lower than what are used for anticoagulation but sufficient to block P-selectin improved microvascular blood flow inpatients with SCD. An in vitro study showed that Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium (PPS) had greater P-selectin blocking activity than heparin. A Phase I clinical study demonstrated that a single oral dose of PPS increased microvascular blood flow in patients with SCD. A Phase II clinical study that was not completed documented that daily oral doses of PPS administered for 8 weeks lowered plasma levels of sVCAM-1 and tended to improve microvascular blood flow in patients with SCD. These data support the concept that P-selectin on the microvascular endothelium is critical to both acute vascular occlusion and chronically impaired microvascular blood flow in SCD. They also demonstrate that oral PPS is beneficial to microvascular sickle cell blood flow and has potential as an efficacious agent for long-term prophylactic therapy of SCD.

  1. AB053. Role of inflammation in the mucopolysaccharidoses & review of recent therapies

    PubMed Central

    Schuchman, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) comprise a group of 11 related lysosomal storage disorders due to inherited deficiencies of enzymes involved in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) degradation. Each disorder is characterized by the accumulation of specific GAGs and GAG fragments, mostly in connective tissue cells and tissues, resulting in an array of clinical findings that include abnormal bone growth, joint and skull deformities, tracheal abnormalities and other connective tissue disease. Involvement of the central nervous system occurs in some patients, as does involvement of liver, spleen, lung and other organ systems. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is available for four MPS types (I, II, IV and VI) and under development for several others. Bone marrow transplantation also may be undertaken in patients for whom ERT is not available, and gene therapies are being considered for several of the disorders. While each of these therapies may provide substantial clinical benefit, there are limited effects on the bones, cartilage and brain, indicating a need for new research and treatment options. The common clinical presentation of the different MPS disorders suggests that common underlying disease mechanisms are likely to be responsible, and that new drugs targeting these pathways may be of benefit to multiple MPS types. One such drug is pentosan polysulfate (PPS), which is being “re-purposed” to reduce inflammation and GAG storage in MPS. Two small proof-of-concept clinical trials of PPS in MPS patients have recently been completed. This lecture will review the pathophysiology and genetics of the MPS disorders, the current state of MPS treatment, and prospects for future treatments.

  2. Inflammatory Kinetics and Efficacy of Anti-inflammatory Treatments on Human Nucleus Pulposus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Benjamin A; Purmessur, Devina; Likhitpanichkul, Morakot; Weinberg, Alan; Cho, Samuel K.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Hecht, Andrew C.; Iatridis, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Human nucleus pulposus (NP) cell culture study investigating response to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), effectiveness of clinically available anti-inflammatory drugs, and interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines. Objective To characterize the kinetic response of pro-inflammatory cytokines released by human NP cells to TNFα stimulation and the effectiveness of multiple anti-inflammatories with 3 sub-studies: Timecourse, Same-time blocking, Delayed blocking. Summary of Background Data Chronic inflammation is a key component of painful intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. Improved efficacy of anti-inflammatories requires better understanding of how quickly NP cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and which pro-inflammatory mediators are most therapeutically advantageous to target. Methods Degenerated human NP cells (n=10) were cultured in alginate with or without TNFα (10ng/mL). Cells were incubated with one of four anti-inflammatories (anti-IL-6 receptor/atlizumab, IL-1 receptor anatagonist, anti-TNFα/infliximab and sodium pentosan polysulfate/PPS) in two blocking-studies designed to determine how intervention timing influences drug efficacy. Cell viability, protein and gene expression for IL-1β, IL-6 & IL-8 were assessed. Results Timecourse: TNFα substantially increased the amount of IL-6, IL-8 & IL-1β, with IL-1β and IL-8 reaching equilibrium within ~72 hours (IL-1β: 111±40pg/mL, IL-8: 8478±957pg/mL), and IL-6 not reaching steady state after 144 hours (1570±435 pg/mL). Anti-TNFα treatment was most effective at reducing the expression of all cytokines measured when added at the same time as TNFα stimulation. Similar trends were observed when drugs were added 72 hours after TNFα stimulation, however, no anti-inflammatories significantly reduced cytokine levels compared to TNF control. Conclusion IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were expressed at different rates and magnitudes suggesting different roles for these cytokines in disease

  3. Autonomous Soaring Flight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on autonomous soaring flight results for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)'s is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Thermal Soaring Flight Results; 3) Autonomous Dolphin Soaring; and 4) Future Plans.

  4. Recent results from TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    1997-01-01

    TRISTAN results on {gamma}{gamma} physics from 1994 to 1995 are reviewed in this report. We have systematically investigated jet production, the {gamma}-structure function, and charm pair production in {gamma}{gamma} processes. The results are discussed, and future prospects are presented.

  5. Your Kidney Test Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... Important Tests Blood Pressure Serum Albumin Bicarbonate Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) Potassium Calcium Phosphorus Results Goal: Your ... level in your blood. BUN checks how much urea, a waste product, is in your blood. Potassium ...

  6. Electroweak results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Waters

    2004-06-02

    Inclusive W and Z production cross-sections have been measured by CDF and certain electroweak parameters extracted with high precision from these measurements. New results on diboson production at the Tevatron are also presented.

  7. Results from MAC

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, G.B.

    1983-05-01

    The MAC detector has been exposed at PEP to 40 pb/sup -1/ luminosity of e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions. The detector is described and recent results of a continuing analysis of hadronic cross section, lepton pair charge asymmetry, Bhabha process, two photon final state and radiative ..mu.. pairs are given. New results on flavor tagging of hadronic events with an inclusive ..mu.., and some searches for new particles are presented.

  8. Unfavorable results in replantation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Abraham G.

    2013-01-01

    Reattachment of amputated parts of the body (Replantation) has become a reality since the first arm replant was carried out six decades ago. Failures were not uncommon in the beginning, leading on to the analysis of the problem and refinements in technique. Improvements in sutures, instrumentation and better microscopes further helped the surgeons to do replantation with better finesse and functional results. Evaluation of results and particularly failure and long term results help the younger surgeons to learn from the difficulties faced earlier to do better in the future. An attempt is made to list various aspects of replantation experienced by the author during the past 30 years, particularly in reference to unfavorable results, which had been occasionally total failure, or a partial failure, with poor function and cosmesis due to infection. An insensate limb with poor function is the result of inadequate or improper nerve coaptation or infection destroying the whole repair. It is apt to mention that infection is mostly the result of poor vascularity due to devitalized tissue. Difficulties arise often in identifying the viable tissue, particularly while debriding in the distal amputated part since there is no bleeding. Experience counts in this, specifically to identify the viable muscle. The factors that may lead to complications are listed with remarks to avoid them. PMID:24501462

  9. Recent results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Takikawa, K.; CDF

    1998-02-15

    We first present recent CDF results on the top quark, covering the measurement of the t{anti t} production cross section and the top quark mass, the observation of hadronic W decays in top events, the measurement of V{sub tb}, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, and kinematical properties of t{anti t} production. Then we present one topic from CDF exotic physics results, i.e., the search for first-generation leptoquarks, and one topic from CDF B physics results, i.e., the measurement of time-dependent B{sup 0}-{anti B}{sup 0} mixing. Finally we conclude by briefly mentioning the prospects for Run II.

  10. Copyright Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botterbusch, Hope R.

    1992-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of copyright concerns that was conducted by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology. Areas addressed include video and television; copyright legislation; printed materials; music; audiovisual materials; and computer software. A checklist of proper copyright procedures is included. (six references)…

  11. QCD results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, R.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    Results are presented for hadronic jet and direct photon production at {radical}{bar s} = 1800 GeV. The data are compared with next-to-leading QCD calculations. A new limit on the scale of possible composite structure of the quarks is also reported. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  12. BABAR B Decay Results

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, David B

    2002-03-14

    Data from the first run of the BABAR detector at the PEP II accelerator are presented. Measurements of many rare B decay modes are now possible using the large data sets currently being collected by BABAR. An overview of analysis techniques and results on data collected in 2000 are described.

  13. Recent results from MAC

    SciTech Connect

    MAC Collaboration

    1982-05-01

    Some preliminary results from the MAC detector at PEP are presented. These include measurements of the angular distribution of ..gamma gamma.., ..mu mu.. and tau tau final states, a determination of the tau lifetime, a measurement of R, and a presentation of the inclusive muon p/sub perpendicular/ distribution for hadronic events.

  14. Reporting Research Results Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessment research is at its best when it packages research results and data so that they can be digested by multiple audiences. Too many assessment researchers spend all their efforts planning and executing the research project with little attention to closing the loop at the end. If assessment findings are not communicated effectively, the…

  15. New Results from Hermes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tytgat, M.

    2004-06-01

    An overview is given of selected recent HERMES results obtained from measurements performed during the first running period of HERA. These topics include inclusive g1(x)-measurements with a NLO QCD analysis, polarized quark distribution extraction, b1(x)-measurement, double spin asymmetries in vector meson production, ρ0-nuclear transparency and finally quark fragmentation in nuclei.

  16. [The applicability of results].

    PubMed

    Marín-León, I

    2015-11-01

    The ultimate aim of the critical reading of medical literature is to use the scientific advances in clinical practice or for innovation. This requires an evaluation of the applicability of the results of the studies that have been published, which begins with a clear understanding of these results. When the studies do not provide sufficient guarantees of rigor in design and analysis, the conditions necessary for the applicability of the results are not met; however, the fact that the results are reliable is not enough to make it worth trying to use their conclusions. This article explains how carrying out studies in experimental or artificial conditions often moves them away from the real conditions in which they claim to apply their conclusions. To evaluate this applicability, the article proposes evaluating a set of items that will enable the reader to determine the likelihood that the benefits and risks reported in the studies will yield the least uncertainty in the clinical arena where they aim to be applied.

  17. Management Values Survey Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Barbara; Payne, Ron

    1988-01-01

    Describes results of a survey conducted to compare values of members of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) with managers in business and industry. Issues discussed include job satisfaction, opportunities for advancement, attitudes toward management, and salary; a summary of each value system is provided. (LRW)

  18. Sharing Research Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    There are many ways to share a collection of data and students' thinking about that data. Explaining the results of science inquiry is important--working scientists and amateurs both contribute information to the body of scientific knowledge. Students can collect data about an activity that is already happening in a classroom (e.g., the qualities…

  19. Implementation Challenges and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Kirk; Sorensen, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the online and f2f summer algebra courses that were delivered in summers 2011 and 2012. These data will be used to frame the impact results presented in an earlier paper. In particular, the paper will provide a detailed picture of how the online course was structured and the types of supports provided to…

  20. Results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, J.S.

    1994-10-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first nine runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 66{sub -13}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result of 73{sub -16}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup 5} (sys) SNU, the capture rate is 69{sub -11}{sup +11} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. This represents only 52%--56% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models.

  1. Dosimetric results on EURECA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitz, G.

    1995-01-01

    Detector packages were exposed on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) as part of the Biostack experiment inside the Exobiology and Radiation Assembly (ERA) and at several locations around EURECA. The packages consist of different plastic nuclear track detectors, nuclear emulsions and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's). Evaluation of these detectors yields data on absorbed dose and particle and LET spectra. Preliminary results of absorbed dose measurements in the EURECA dosimeter packages are reported and compared to results of the LDEF experiments. The highest dose rate measured on EURECA is 63.3 plus or minus 0.4 mGy d(exp -1) behind a shielding thickness of 0.09 g cm(exp -2) in front of the detector package.

  2. Latest results from Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauber, Jan; sSubmitted Planck Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This talk will present an overview of the most recent Planck data and results, with emphasis on polarization.The use of CMB polarization data from Planck confirms the best-fit Lambda-CDM model obtained with Planck temperature-only data, and improves the accuracy with which cosmological parameters are determined. The most recent results based on polarized E-mode and B-mode CMB power spectra at large angular scales will be presented, and their implications for the epoch of reionization and primordial gravitational waves.In this talk I will also present the latest analysis of polarized diffuse galactic foreground emissions based on Planck data. Both the synchrotron and dust emission maps obtained from Planck reveal new facets of the galactic interstellar medium. In particular dust emission holds the promise of providing a model of the large-scale 3D shape of the Galactic magnetic field, as well as its small scale behavior.

  3. Dosimetric results on EURECA

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, G.

    1995-02-01

    Detector packages were exposed on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) as part of the Biostack experiment inside the Exobiology and Radiation Assembly (ERA) and at several locations around EURECA. The packages consist of different plastic nuclear track detectors, nuclear emulsions and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD`s). Evaluation of these detectors yields data on absorbed dose and particle and LET spectra. Preliminary results of absorbed dose measurements in the EURECA dosimeter packages are reported and compared to results of the LDEF experiments. The highest dose rate measured on EURECA is 63.3 plus or minus 0.4 mGy d(exp -1) behind a shielding thickness of 0.09 g cm(exp -2) in front of the detector package.

  4. Titan - Some new results

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, T.; Gautier, D.

    1989-01-01

    New analyses of Voyager spectra of Titan have led to improvements in the determination of abundances of minor constituents as a function of latitude and altitude. Ground-based microwave observations have extended the Voyager results for HCN, and have demonstrated that CO is mysteriously deficient in the stratosphere. The origin of the CH4, CO, and N2 in Titan's atmosphere is still unresolved. Both primordial and evolutionary sources are compatible with the available evidence. 21 refs.

  5. Recent VERITAS results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszak, D.

    2014-04-01

    VERITAS is an array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes near Tucson, Arizona and is one of the world's most sensitive detectors of very high energy (VHE: > 100 GeV) gamma rays. The scientific reach of VERITAS covers the study of both extragalactic and Galactic objects as well as the search for astrophysical dark matter. In these proceedings we will discuss the status of VERITAS operations and upgrades and present a selection of recent results.

  6. PDX experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.; Arunasalam, V.; Barnes, C.

    1981-01-01

    The main objectives of the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) are to: (1) determine the effectiveness of poloidal divertors in controlling impurities in high temperature plasmas, (2) use the poloidal divertor to provide clean plasmas for confinement and high beta studies, and (3) investigate the effect of cross-section shaping on plasma confinement and MHD properties. In this paper, we report the results obtained during initial divertor operation of the PDX.

  7. Space Shuttle radargrammetry results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leberl, F.; Domik, G.; Raggam, J.; Cimino, J.; Kobrick, M.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary results on the radargrammetric processing of SIR-A and SIR-B data are presented. Radargrammetric processing was applied to images of the Trinity National Forest in Northern California, the islands of Cephalonia, Ithaka, and Sardegna, Mt. Shasta, and Cordon La Grasa, Argentina. The preliminary processing of the SIR-A and SIR-B data has produced digital elevation models, stereo models, and a contour map.

  8. GIRAFFE test results summary

    SciTech Connect

    Yokobori, S.; Arai, K.; Oikawa, H.

    1996-03-01

    A passive system can provide engineered safety features enhancing safety system reliability and plant simplicity. Toshiba has conducted the test Program to demonstrate the feasibility of the SBWR passive safety system using a full-height, integral system test facility GIRAFFE. The test facility GIRAFFE models the SBWR in full height to correctly present the gravity driving head forces with a 1/400 volume scale. The GIRAFFE test Program includes the certification tests of the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) to remove the post-accident decay heat and the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) to replenish the reactor coolant inventory during a LOCA. The test results have confirmed the PCCS and GDCS design and in addition, have demonstrated the operation of the pCCS with the presence of a lighter-than-steam noncondensable as well as with the presence of a heavier-than-steam, noncondensable. The GIRAFFE test Program has also provided the database to qualify a best estimate thermal-hydraulic computer code TRAC. The post test analysis results have shown that TRAC can accurately predict the PCCS heat removal Performance and the containment pressure response to a LOCA. This paper summarizes the GIRAFFE test results to investigate post-LOCA PCCS heat removal performance and post-test analysis using TRAC.

  9. Certification of computational results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gregory F.; Wilson, Dwight S.; Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A conceptually novel and powerful technique to achieve fault detection and fault tolerance in hardware and software systems is described. When used for software fault detection, this new technique uses time and software redundancy and can be outlined as follows. In the initial phase, a program is run to solve a problem and store the result. In addition, this program leaves behind a trail of data called a certification trail. In the second phase, another program is run which solves the original problem again. This program, however, has access to the certification trail left by the first program. Because of the availability of the certification trail, the second phase can be performed by a less complex program and can execute more quickly. In the final phase, the two results are compared and if they agree the results are accepted as correct; otherwise an error is indicated. An essential aspect of this approach is that the second program must always generate either an error indication or a correct output even when the certification trail it receives from the first program is incorrect. The certification trail approach to fault tolerance is formalized and realizations of it are illustrated by considering algorithms for the following problems: convex hull, sorting, and shortest path. Cases in which the second phase can be run concurrently with the first and act as a monitor are discussed. The certification trail approach are compared to other approaches to fault tolerance.

  10. The Viking biology results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Harold P.

    1989-01-01

    A brief review of the purposes and the results from the Viking Biology experiments is presented, in the expectation that the lessons learned from this mission will be useful in planning future approaches to the biological exploration of Mars. Since so little was then known about potential micro-environments on Mars, three different experiments were included in the Viking mission, each one based on different assumptions about what Martian organisms might be like. In addition to the Viking Biology Instrument (VBI), important corollary information was obtained from the Viking lander imaging system and from the molecular analysis experiments that were conducted using the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GCMS) instrument. No biological objects were noted by the lander imaging instrument. The GCMS did not detect any organic compounds. A description of the tests conducted by the Gas Exchange Experiment, the Labeled Release experiment, and the Pyrolytic Release experiment is given. Results are discussed. Taken as a whole, the Viking data yielded no unequivocal evidence for a Martian biota at either landing site. The results also revealed the presence of one or more reactive oxidants in the surface material and these need to be further characterized, as does the range of micro-environments, before embarking upon future searches for extant life on Mars.

  11. Explaining embodied cognition results.

    PubMed

    Lakoff, George

    2012-10-01

    From the late 1950s until 1975, cognition was understood mainly as disembodied symbol manipulation in cognitive psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and the nascent field of Cognitive Science. The idea of embodied cognition entered the field of Cognitive Linguistics at its beginning in 1975. Since then, cognitive linguists, working with neuroscientists, computer scientists, and experimental psychologists, have been developing a neural theory of thought and language (NTTL). Central to NTTL are the following ideas: (a) we think with our brains, that is, thought is physical and is carried out by functional neural circuitry; (b) what makes thought meaningful are the ways those neural circuits are connected to the body and characterize embodied experience; (c) so-called abstract ideas are embodied in this way as well, as is language. Experimental results in embodied cognition are seen not only as confirming NTTL but also explained via NTTL, mostly via the neural theory of conceptual metaphor. Left behind more than three decades ago is the old idea that cognition uses the abstract manipulation of disembodied symbols that are meaningless in themselves but that somehow constitute internal "representations of external reality" without serious mediation by the body and brain. This article uniquely explains the connections between embodied cognition results since that time and results from cognitive linguistics, experimental psychology, computational modeling, and neuroscience.

  12. Pressure locking test results

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  13. Pressure locking test results

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-06-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; we will publish the results of our thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  14. SPEAR results, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Scharre, D.L.

    1981-09-01

    New results from SPEAR on the inclusive photon spectrum at the psi' and on J/psi radiative transitions are presented. Evidence for an eta/sub c/' candidate is observed in the psi' inclusive photon spectrum at a mass M = 3592 +- 5 MeV. A new resonance, the theta(1640) which is observed to decay into eta eta, has been seen in radiative transitions from the J/psi. The spin-parity of the l(1440), previously observed in J/psi radiative transitions and originally identified as the E(1420), has been determined to be 0/sup -/.

  15. Recent result from RENO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyunkwan; RENO Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation (RENO) started data-taking from August, 2011 and has measured the smallest neutrino mixing angle θ13 by observing the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos. Antineutrinos from the six reactors at Hanbit Nuclear Power Plant in Korea are detected and compared by the two identical detectors located in the near and far distances from the reactor array center. We present new results on precisely measured sin 22θ13 value and |Δm2 ee| based on spectral analysis using the 800 days of data sample, which are taken from August, 2011 to Dec., 2013.

  16. Lithium cell test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Three lithium SO2 cells, two lithium CF cells, and a vinyl chloride cell, all with crimped seals, and all strictly experimental, were independently discharged on resistors. Three temperatures were used and several different storage temperatures. Discharge rate generally on the nominal discharges were 0.1 amp, 0.5 amp, and 1 amp. Tests results show that the crimp seals are inadequate, especially for the SO2 cells. Normal discharges present no hazards. All cells discharge to zero. The problem of lithium cell explosions, such as occurred during off-limits testing, is discussed.

  17. Recent BABAR Results

    SciTech Connect

    Eigen, Gerald

    2015-04-29

    We present herein the most recent BABAR results on direct CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xsγ, on partial branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xs+-, on a search for B → π/ηℓ+- decays, on a search for lepton number violation in B+ → X-+ℓ'+ modes and a study of B0 →ωω and B0 → ωφ decays.

  18. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  19. Spacelab Science Results Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Lundquist, C. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Horwitz, J. L.; Germany, G. A.; Cruise, J. F.; Lewis, M. L.; Murphy, K. L.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with OSTA-1 in November 1981 and ending with Neurolab in March 1998, a total of 36 Shuttle missions carried various Spacelab components such as the Spacelab module, pallet, instrument pointing system, or mission peculiar experiment support structure. The experiments carried out during these flights included astrophysics, solar physics, plasma physics, atmospheric science, Earth observations, and a wide range of microgravity experiments in life sciences, biotechnology, materials science, and fluid physics which includes combustion and critical point phenomena. In all, some 764 experiments were conducted by investigators from the U.S., Europe, and Japan. The purpose of this Spacelab Science Results Study is to document the contributions made in each of the major research areas by giving a brief synopsis of the more significant experiments and an extensive list of the publications that were produced. We have also endeavored to show how these results impacted the existing body of knowledge, where they have spawned new fields, and if appropriate, where the knowledge they produced has been applied.

  20. Latest Double Chooz results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasserre, Thierry; Double Chooz Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    I report the latest results from the Double Chooz experiment on the θ13 neutrino mixing angle. Two detectors are located at distances of 400 m and 1050 m from the reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power station (France) to measure the disappearance of electron antineutrinos. The far detector has been taking data since 2011, accumulating a live time of 467.90 days (66.5 GW-ton-year). In this article we focus on the latest measurement using neutrino-induced neutron capture on hydrogen. A new analysis improved the signal efficiency and reduced the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties, leading to sin2 2θ 13 = 0.095+0.039 -0.038. When combined with the Gadolinium-based analysis this leads to sin2 2θ13 = 0.088+0.33 -0.033. The distortion from the prediction above a visible energy of 4 MeV is confirmed. The near detector started data taking in 2014 and first results shall be reported in 2016.

  1. Unfavourable results in pollicisation

    PubMed Central

    Thatte, Mukund R.; Nehete, Sushil; Garude, Kirti; Mehta, Rujuta

    2013-01-01

    Pollicisation of the index finger is perhaps one of the most complex and most rewarding operations in hand and plastic surgery. It however has a steep learning curve and demands very high skill levels and experience. There are multiple pitfalls and each can result in an unfavourable result. In essence we need to: Shorten the Index, recreate the carpo metacarpal joint from the metacarpo phalangeal (MP) joint, rotate the digit by about 120° for pulp to pulp pinch, palmarly abduct by 40-50° to get a new first web gap, Shorten and readjust the tension of the extensors, re attach the intrinsics to form a thenar eminence capable of positioning the new thumb in various functional positions and finally close the flaps forming a new skin envelope. The author has performed over 75 pollicisations personally and has personal experience of some of the issues raised there. The steps mentioned therefore are an algorithm for helping the uninitiated into these choppy waters. PMID:24501467

  2. Early physics results.

    PubMed

    Jenni, Peter

    2012-02-28

    For the past year, experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have started exploring physics at the high-energy frontier. Thanks to the superb turn-on of the LHC, a rich harvest of initial physics results have already been obtained by the two general-purpose experiments A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS) and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), which are the subject of this report. The initial data have allowed a test, at the highest collision energies ever reached in a laboratory, of the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particles, and to make early searches Beyond the Standard Model (BSM). Significant results have already been obtained in the search for the Higgs boson, which would establish the postulated electro-weak symmetry breaking mechanism in the SM, as well as for BSM physics such as Supersymmetry (SUSY), heavy new particles, quark compositeness and others. The important, and successful, SM physics measurements are giving confidence that the experiments are in good shape for their journey into the uncharted territory of new physics anticipated at the LHC. PMID:22253245

  3. First results from CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Guy

    2011-10-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS superconducting linac facility aims at providing low energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics, astrophysics and application issues. These beams are obtained from fission fragments of a 1 Ci 252Cf source, thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge breed to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. The method described is fast and universal and short-lived isotope yield scale essentially with Californium fission yields. The facility is now commissioned and operating with a 100 mCi source which has yielded extracted low-energy mass separated radioactive beams at intensities in excess of 100000 ions per second. Radioactive beams have been charge bred with an efficiency of up to 12% and reaccelerated to 6 MeV/u. Commissioning results, together with the results from first astrophysics experiments at CARIBU using the beams from the 100 mCi source will be presented. The final 1 Ci source is currently under fabrication and is expected to be installed by the end of the year. This work was supported by the US DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  4. Recent results from LHCf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menjo, H.; Adriani, O.; Berti, E.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G.; D'Alessandro, R.; Del Prete, M.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Kawade, K.; Makino, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubayashi, E.; Mitsuka, G.; Muraki, Y.; Papini, P.; Perrot, A.-L.; Pfeiffer, D.; Ricciarini, S.; Sako, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Sugiura, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tamura, T.; Tiberio, A.; Torii, S.; Tricomi, A.; Turner, W. C.; Zhou, Q.

    2015-08-01

    The LHCf experiment is one of the LHC forward experiments. The aim of LHCf is to provide critical calibration data of hadronic intraction models used in air shower simulations. The LHCf has completed the operations for p-p collisions with a collision energy of √s = 0.9 and 7 TeV p-p in 2010 and for p-Pb collisions with a collision energy per nucleon of √sNN = 5.02. The recent LHCf result of forward neutron energy spectra at 7 TeV p-p collision and forward π0 spectra at p-Pb collisions are presented in this paper.

  5. Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gail Heath

    2012-07-01

    Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

  6. Top physics: CDF results

    SciTech Connect

    K. Bloom

    2004-06-23

    The top quark plays an important role in the grand scheme of particle physics, and is also interesting on its own merits. We present recent results from CDF on top-quark physics based on 100-200 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. We have measured the t{bar t} cross section in different decay modes using several different techniques, and are beginning our studies of top-quark properties. New analyses for this conference include a measurement of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} in the lepton-plus-jets channel using a neural net to distinguish signal and background events, and measurements of top-quark branching fractions.

  7. Spacelab Science Results Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, Robert J.

    1999-08-01

    Some of the 36 Spacelab missions were more or less dedicated to specific scientific disciplines, while other carried a eclectic mixture of experiments ranging from astrophysics to life sciences. However, the experiments can be logically classified into two general categories; those that make use of the Shuttle as an observing platform for external phenomena (including those which use the Shuttle in an interactive mode) and those which use the Shuttle as a microgravity laboratory. This first volume of this Spacelab Science Results study will be devoted to experiments of the first category. The disciplines included are Astrophysics, Solar Physics, Space Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, and Earth Sciences. Because of the large number of microgravity investigations, Volume 2 will be devoted to Microgravity Sciences, which includes Fluid Physics, Combustion Science, Materials Science, and Biotechnology, and Volume 3 will be devoted to Space Life Sciences, which studies the response and adaptability of living organisms to the microgravity environment.

  8. EIGER characterization results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinapoli, Roberto; Bergamaschi, Anna; Greiffenberg, Dominic; Henrich, Beat; Horisberger, Roland; Johnson, Ian; Mozzanica, Aldo; Radicci, Valeria; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian; Tinti, Gemma

    2013-12-01

    Characterization and performance measurements have been done on several EIGER detector systems, produced with chips coming from two different lots, both with a lab X-ray source and at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). Results on the detector calibration, electronic noise, threshold dispersion, minimum achievable energy threshold, maximum detectable incoming photon flux and maximum frame rate are presented. An EIGER module is constructed from a ∼4×8 cm2 monolithic silicon sensor bump-bonded to 2 ×4 readout chips and contains 0.5 Mpixel. The first EIGER 500 K systems have been produced and images taken with these detectors are shown. Modules can be tiled together to form large area detectors; both a 9 Mpixel and a 16 Mpixel systems are at present under development for the coherent small angle X-ray scattering and protein crystallography beamlines of the SLS.

  9. Undulator Transportation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Horton, Nick; Kharakh, David; Levashov, Yurii; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Poling, Ben; Reese, Ed; /SLAC

    2010-11-17

    A test was performed to determine whether transporting and handling the undulators makes any changes to their properties. This note documents the test. No significant changes to the test undulator were observed. After the LCLS undulators are tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF), they must be transported to storage buildings and transported to the tunnel. It has been established that the undulators are sensitive to temperature. We wish to know whether the undulators are also sensitive to the vibrations and shocks of transportation. To study this issue, we performed a test in which an undulator was measured in the MMF, transported to the tunnel, brought back to the MMF, and re-measured. This note documents the test and the results.

  10. Fish community results

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Scott, E.M. Jr.; Brown, A.M.

    1991-05-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) operates 9 reservoirs on the Tennessee River and 37 reservoirs on its tributaries. TVA is committed to maintaining the health of aquatic resources created when the reservoir system was built. To that end, TVA in cooperation with Valley states, operates a water resource monitoring program that includes physical, chemical, and biological data collection components. Biological monitoring will target the following selected elements within three zones of the reservoir (inflow, transition, and forebay): Sediment/Water-column Acute Toxicity Screening, Benthic macroinvertebrates, and Fish. Reservoir fisheries monitoring is divided into the following activities: Fish Biomass, Fish Tissue Contamination, Fish Community Monitoring, and Fish Health Assessment. This report presents the results of fish community monitoring and fish health assessments.

  11. Recent Results from Phobos

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Edmundo; Betts, R. R.; Garcia, E.; Halliwell, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Sagerer, J.; Smith, C. E.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; George, N.; Hauer, M.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.

    2007-02-12

    The PHOBOS detector is one of four heavy ion experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper we will review some of the results of PHOBOS from the data collected in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies up to 200 GeV. Evidence is found of the formation of a very high energy density and highly interactive system, which can not be described in terms of hadrons, and has a relatively low baryon density. There is evidence that the system formed is thermalized to a certain degree. Scaling with the number of participants and extended longitudinal scaling behavior are also observed in distributions of produced charged particles.

  12. FIRE Science Results 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, David S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) is a U.S. cloud-radiation research program formed in 1984 to increase the basic understanding of cirrus and marine stratocumulus cloud systems, to develop realistic parameterizations for these systems, and to validate and improve ISCCP cloud product retrievals. Presentations of results culminating the first 5 years of FIRE research activities were highlighted. The 1986 Cirrus Intensive Field Observations (IFO), the 1987 Marine Stratocumulus IFO, the Extended Time Observations (ETO), and modeling activities are described. Collaborative efforts involving the comparison of multiple data sets, incorporation of data measurements into modeling activities, validation of ISCCP cloud parameters, and development of parameterization schemes for General Circulation Models (GCMs) are described.

  13. Results from SNO

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Yuen-dat

    2001-10-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is an underground heavy water Cherenkov detector for studying solar neutrinos. SNO is capable of performing both flavor sensitive and flavor blind measurements of the solar neutrino flux. The first charged current (CC) measurement is found to be: {psi}{sub SNO}{sup CC}({nu}{sub e}) = 1.75 {+-} 0.07(stat.){sub -0.11}{sup +0.12}(sys.) {+-} 0.05 (theor.) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and the elastic scattering fluxes (ES) is: {psi}{sub SNO}{sup ES}({nu}{sub x}) = 2.39 {+-} 0.34(stat.){sub -0.14}{sup +0.16} (sys.) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The {psi}{sub SNO}{sup CC}({nu}{sub e}) result, when combined with the high statistics elastic scattering (ES) measurement from Super-Kamiokande, provide a strong evidence for solar neutrino flavor transformation (3.3{sigma}). The deduced total solar neutrino flux is in good agreement with standard solar model predictions. No significant distortion in the energy spectrum is observed.

  14. Hyperthermia quality assurance results.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, P N; Saylor, T K; Matloubieh, A Y; Paliwal, B R

    1988-01-01

    The Hyperthermia Physics Center (HPC), under contract with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), has conducted review-type quality assurance (QA) measurements at the five Hyperthermia Equipment Evaluation Centers involved in evaluating the clinical efficacy of a variety of devices for delivering heat treatments to deep-seated human tumours. A summary of the QA protocol, results, testing procedures, standards, criteria, conclusions and recommendations are presented in this paper. The QA review measurements indicate (a) that 81.5 per cent of temperatures surveyed were within the 0.2 degrees C HPC criterion (91 per cent were within 0.4 degrees C), (b) that only 66 per cent of power indications were within the 10 per cent criterion, (c) that the heat patterns in a phantom produced by the BSD Annular Phased Array (AA) had significant variability, (d) that each treatment facility had at least a few potentially occupiable locations where the maximum permissible American National Standards Institute standards of electromagnetic leakage were exceeded, and (e) that these levels of accuracy and safety were achieved only after stringent inhouse QA efforts. From the combined data, it is concluded that the temperature accuracy in this cooperative trial was sufficient to justify a common analysis of clinical data as presented in this series. Also, stringent quality control of every parameter must continue to be stressed in all future hyperthermia trials.

  15. ALICE TPC commissioning results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, D. T.; Alice Tpc Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy-ion experiment at CERN LHC aiming to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. A lead-lead collision might produce several 10 00 new particles. Detailed study of the event requires precise measurements of the particle tracks. A 90 m3 Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with more than 500 000 read-out pads was built as the main central barrel tracker. Collisions can be recorded at a rate of up to about 1 kHz. The front-end electronics, designed from FPGAs and custom ASICs, performs shaping, amplification, digitisation and digital filtering of the signals. The data are forwarded to DAQ via 216 1.25 Gb/s fibre-optical links. Configuration, control and monitoring is done by an embedded Linux system on the front-end electronics. Before production runs with beam, extensive commissioning using tracks from cosmics and from the laser system as well as clusters from radioactive krypton gas is needed. Extensive results have been obtained with respect to the performance of the TPC including its sub-systems.

  16. ESR teleradiology survey: results.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    With recent developments of teleradiology technology and services, it has become necessary to better evaluate its extent and use among different countries in Europe. With this goal in mind, the ESR launched two specific surveys intended to gather the current state of adoption and implementation of teleradiology in clinical practice. A special focus on differentiating between insourcing teleradiology services among partners of the same organisation and outsourcing to external services was an essential part of the design of these surveys. The first survey was addressed to 44 national societies of different countries in Europe, while the second survey was intended for all practicing radiologist ESR members. While the results of these surveys reported here may provide a wealth of information to better understand the trends in adoption of teleradiology in Europe, they only represent a snapshot at a certain point in time. The rapid development of telecommunication tools as well as a fundamental change in practice and healthcare economics will certainly influence these observations in the upcoming years. These data, however, will provide objective and relevant parameters for supporting the efforts of experts and policy makers in promoting appropriate criteria and guidelines for adequate use of teleradiology in clinical practice. Main Messages • Understand concepts and challenges of teleradiology • Provide insight into current trends and solutions for teleradiology • Compare differences in teleradiolgy strategies between countries in Europe • Establish a reference on statistical data of usage of teleradiology in Europe. PMID:27188379

  17. Results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pondrom, L.G. )

    1990-12-14

    The present status of hadron collider physics is reviewed. The total cross section for {bar p} + p has been measured at 1.8 TeV: {sigma}{sub tot} = 72.1 {plus minus} 3.3 mb. New data confirm the UA2 observation of W/Z {yields} {bar q}q. Precision measurements of M{sub W} by UA2 and CDF give an average value M{sub W} = 80.13 {plus minus} 0.30 GeV/c{sup 2}. When combined with measurements of M{sub Z} from LEP and SLC this number gives sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 0.227 {plus minus} 0.006, or m{sub top} = 130{sub {minus}60}{sup +40} GeV/c{sup 2} from the EWK radiative correction term {Delta}r. Evidence for hadron colliders as practical sources of b quarks has been strengthened, while searches for t quarks have pushed the mass above M{sub W}: m{sub top} > 89 GeV/c{sup 2} 95% cl (CDF Preliminary). Searches beyond the standard model based on the missing E{sub T} signature have not yet produced any positive results. Future prospects for the discovery of the top quark in the range m{sub top} < 200 GeV/c{sup 2} look promising. 80 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. New results from Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, M.

    2003-04-01

    We have measured the CP violation parameters in B° decays to the following CP eigenstates: (c overlinec)K s, J/ψK L, J/ψK -0, π +π -, θK s, η/K sand K +K -K s, using data collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e +e - collider. One of the angles of the CKM unitality triangle, θ1, has been determined using 78 fb -1 as sin 2 θ1 = 0.719 ± 0.074 ± 0.035. The large Aππ is an indication of direct CP violation in B meson decay. The SθK, Sη' K are SKKK are all consistent with sin 2 θ1 within 3σ. We also present the first measurement o the inclusive branching fraction for the electroweak penguin decay B → Xsℓ +ℓ -. The results on the branching fraction, dilepton and recoil mass spectra are in agreement with the Standard Model expectations.

  19. Simpler images, better results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton

    1999-03-01

    The very rapid development of optical technology has followed a pattern similar to that of nuclear magnetic resonance: first, spectroscopy and then imaging. The accomplishments in spectroscopy have been significant--among them, early detection of hematomas and quantitative oximetry (assuming that time and frequency domain instruments are used). Imaging has progressed somewhat later. The first images were obtained in Japan and USA a few years ago, particularly of parietal stimulation of the human brain. Since then, rapid applications to breast and limb, together with higher resolution of the brain now make NIR imaging of functional activation and tumor detection readily available, reliable and affordable devices. The lecture has to do with the applications of imaging to these three areas, particularly to prefrontal imaging of cognitive function, of breast tumor detection, and of localized muscle activation in exercise. The imaging resolution achievable in functional activation appears to be FWHM of 4 mm. The time required for an image is a few seconds or even much less. Breast image detection at 50 microsecond(s) ec/pixel results in images obtainable in a few seconds or shorter times (bandwidths of the kHz are available). Finally, imaging of the body organs is under study in this laboratory, particularly in the in utero fetus. It appears that the photon migration theory now leads to the development of a wide number of images for human subject tissue spectroscopy and imaging.

  20. CTF Challenge: Result Summary

    PubMed Central

    Marabini, Roberto; Carragher, Bridget; Chen, Shaoxia; Chen, James; Cheng, Anchi; Downing, Kenneth H.; Frank, Joachim; Grassucci, Robert A.; Heymann, J. Bernard; Jiang, Wen; Jonic, Slavica; Liao, Hstau Y.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Patwari, Shail; Piotrowski, Angela L.; Quintana, Adrian; Sorzano, Carlos O.S.; Stahlberg, Henning; Vargas, Javier; Voss, Neil R.; Chiu, Wah; Carazo, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Image formation in bright field electron microscopy can be described with the help of the contrast transfer function (CTF). In this work the authors describe the “CTF Estimation Challenge”, called by the Madrid Instruct Image Processing Center (I2PC) in collaboration with the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) at Houston. Correcting for the effects of the CTF requires accurate knowledge of the CTF parameters, but these have often been difficult to determine. In this challenge, researchers have had the opportunity to test their ability in estimating some of the key parameters of the electron microscope CTF on a large micrograph data set produced by well-known laboratories on a wide set of experimental conditions. This work presents the first analysis of the results of the CTF Estimation Challenge, including an assessment of the performance of the different software packages under different conditions, so as to identify those areas of research where further developments would be desirable in order to achieve high-resolution structural information. PMID:25913484

  1. Databases for LDEF results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail

    1992-01-01

    One of the objectives of the team supporting the LDEF Systems and Materials Special Investigative Groups is to develop databases of experimental findings. These databases identify the hardware flown, summarize results and conclusions, and provide a system for acknowledging investigators, tracing sources of data, and future design suggestions. To date, databases covering the optical experiments, and thermal control materials (chromic acid anodized aluminum, silverized Teflon blankets, and paints) have been developed at Boeing. We used the Filemaker Pro software, the database manager for the Macintosh computer produced by the Claris Corporation. It is a flat, text-retrievable database that provides access to the data via an intuitive user interface, without tedious programming. Though this software is available only for the Macintosh computer at this time, copies of the databases can be saved to a format that is readable on a personal computer as well. Further, the data can be exported to more powerful relational databases, capabilities, and use of the LDEF databases and describe how to get copies of the database for your own research.

  2. Results of hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Favetti, Fabio; Casella, Filippo; Papalia, Matteo; Panegrossi, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background The renewed popularity of resurfacing hip arthroplasty in the last 10 years has generated a remarkable quantity of scientific contributions based on mid- and short-term follow-up. More than one paper has reported a consistent early revision rate as a consequence of biological or biomechanical failure. Two major complications are commonly described with resurfacing implants: avascular necrosis and femoral-neck fracture. A close relationship between these two events has been suggested, but not firmly demonstrated, whereas cementing technique seems to be better understood as potential cause of failure. Methods We performed an in vitro study in which four different resurfacing implants were evaluated with a simulated femoral head, two types of cement, (low and high viscosity) and two cementing techniques: direct (cement apposition directly on the femoral head) and indirect (cement poured into the femoral component). Results High-viscosity cement showed homogeneous distribution over the entire femoral head. Low-viscosity cement showed a massive polar concentration with insufficient, if not absent, distribution in the equatorial zone. Conclusion Polar cement concentration could be a risk factor for early implant failure due to two effects on the femoral head: biological (excessive local exothermic reaction could cause osteocyte necrosis) and biomechanical (which could lead to uneven load distribution on the femoral head). PMID:21234563

  3. Overview of MAST results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bigelow, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Carr, M.; Caughman, J.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Diallo, A.; Dickinson, D.; Diem, S.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fox, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K.; Graves, J.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawke, J.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Holgate, J.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Leggate, H.; Lilley, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; Ono, Y.; Oliver, H.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Podesta, M.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Roach, C.; Robinson, J.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Storrs, J.; Takase, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Walkden, N.; Wilson, H.; Wyk, L. V.; Yamada, T.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST; MAST Upgrade Teams

    2015-10-01

    The Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) programme is strongly focused on addressing key physics issues in preparation for operation of ITER as well as providing solutions for DEMO design choices. In this regard, MAST has provided key results in understanding and optimizing H-mode confinement, operating with smaller edge localized modes (ELMs), predicting and handling plasma exhaust and tailoring auxiliary current drive. In all cases, the high-resolution diagnostic capability on MAST is complemented by sophisticated numerical modelling to facilitate a deeper understanding. Mitigation of ELMs with resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode number nRMP = 2, 3, 4, 6 has been demonstrated: at high and low collisionality; for the first ELM following the transition to high confinement operation; during the current ramp-up; and with rotating nRMP = 3 RMPs. nRMP = 4, 6 fields cause less rotation braking whilst the power to access H-mode is less with nRMP = 4 than nRMP = 3, 6. Refuelling with gas or pellets gives plasmas with mitigated ELMs and reduced peak heat flux at the same time as achieving good confinement. A synergy exists between pellet fuelling and RMPs, since mitigated ELMs remove fewer particles. Inter-ELM instabilities observed with Doppler backscattering are consistent with gyrokinetic simulations of micro-tearing modes in the pedestal. Meanwhile, ELM precursors have been strikingly observed with beam emission spectroscopy (BES) measurements. A scan in beta at the L-H transition shows that pedestal height scales strongly with core pressure. Gyro-Bohm normalized turbulent ion heat flux (as estimated from the BES data) is observed to decrease with increasing tilt of the turbulent eddies. Fast ion redistribution by energetic particle modes depends on density, and access to a quiescent domain with ‘classical’ fast ion transport is found above a critical density. Highly efficient electron Bernstein wave current drive (1 A W-1) has been achieved

  4. Overview of MAST results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counsell, G. F.; Akers, R. J.; Appel, L. C.; Applegate, D.; Axon, K. B.; Baranov, Y.; Brickley, C.; Bunting, C.; Buttery, R. J.; Carolan, P. G.; Challis, C.; Ciric, D.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Cunningham, G.; Darke, A.; Dnestrovskij, A.; Dowling, J.; Dudson, B.; Dunstan, M. R.; Delchambre, E.; Field, A. R.; Foster, A.; Gee, S.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Helander, P.; Hender, T. C.; Hole, M.; Howell, D. H.; Joiner, N.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Lehane, I. P.; Lisgo, S.; Lloyd, B.; Lott, F.; Maddison, G. P.; Manhood, S. J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McClements, K. G.; Meyer, H.; Morris, A. W.; Nelson, M.; O'Brien, M. R.; Patel, A.; Pinfold, T.; Preinhaelter, J.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Sharapov, S.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stammers, K.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tabasso, A.; Tallents, S.; Taylor, D.; Tournianski, M. R.; Turner, A.; Turri, G.; Valovic, M.; Volpe, F.; Voss, G.; Walsh, M. J.; Watkins, J. R.; Wilson, H. R.; Wisse, M.; MAST, the; NBI; ECRH Teams

    2005-10-01

    . Early edge localized mode activity on MAST is associated with the formation of narrow filamentary structures following field lines in the edge. These filaments rotate toroidally with the edge plasma and, away from the X-points, accelerate radially outwards from the edge up to 20 cm. Studies of disruptions on MAST demonstrate a complex evolution of core energy loss and resultant divertor power loads, including phases where the target heat flux width is broadened by a factor of 8. Observations of energetic particle modes driven by super-Alfvénic beam ions provide support for a model for the non-linear evolution of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) forming Bernstein-Green-Krushal waves. The AE activity reduces to low levels with increasing β. Plasma start-up without a central solenoid and in a manner compatible with future large spherical tokamak (ST) devices has been demonstrated using breakdown at a quadrupole magnetic null. Closed flux surface plasmas with peak plasma currents up to 370 kA have been generated and sustained for 0.3 s. New error field correction coils have extended the operational space for low density plasmas and enabled scaling studies of error field induced locked mode formation in the ST.

  5. Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory Action of a Polysulfated Fraction from Gracilaria cornea in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Rodrigues, José Ariévilo Gurgel; Vanderlei, Edfranck de Sousa Oliveira; de Araújo, Ianna Wivianne Fernandes; Ribeiro, Natássia Albuquerque; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Ribeiro, Kátia Alves; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; da Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the sulfated polysaccharidic fraction obtained from red marine alga Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI) were investigated using a paw edema model induced in rats by different inflammatory agents (carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, bradykinin, compound 48/80 or L-arginine). Gc-FI at the doses of 3, 9 or 27 mg/kg, subcutaneously - s.c., significantly inhibited rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, as confirmed by myeloperoxidase and Evans’ blue assessments, respectively. Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited rat paw edema induced by histamine, compound 48/80 and L-arginine. Additionally, Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited Cg-induced edema in animals with intact mast cells but did not inhibit that with degranulated mast cells by compound 48/80, revealing a protective role on mast cell membranes. Gc-FI down-regulated the IL-1β, TNF-α and COX-2 mRNA and protein levels compared with those of the carrageenan group, based on qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses. After inhibition with ZnPP IX, a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI was not observed in Cg-induced paw edema, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI is, in part, dependent on the integrity of the HO-1 pathway. Gc-FI can target a combination of multiple points involved in inflammatory phenomena. PMID:25807556

  6. Mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory action of a polysulfated fraction from Gracilaria cornea in rats.

    PubMed

    Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Rodrigues, José Ariévilo Gurgel; Vanderlei, Edfranck de Sousa Oliveira; de Araújo, Ianna Wivianne Fernandes; Ribeiro, Natássia Albuquerque; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Ribeiro, Kátia Alves; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; da Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the sulfated polysaccharidic fraction obtained from red marine alga Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI) were investigated using a paw edema model induced in rats by different inflammatory agents (carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, bradykinin, compound 48/80 or L-arginine). Gc-FI at the doses of 3, 9 or 27 mg/kg, subcutaneously--s.c., significantly inhibited rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, as confirmed by myeloperoxidase and Evans' blue assessments, respectively. Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited rat paw edema induced by histamine, compound 48/80 and L-arginine. Additionally, Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited Cg-induced edema in animals with intact mast cells but did not inhibit that with degranulated mast cells by compound 48/80, revealing a protective role on mast cell membranes. Gc-FI down-regulated the IL-1β, TNF-α and COX-2 mRNA and protein levels compared with those of the carrageenan group, based on qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses. After inhibition with ZnPP IX, a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI was not observed in Cg-induced paw edema, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI is, in part, dependent on the integrity of the HO-1 pathway. Gc-FI can target a combination of multiple points involved in inflammatory phenomena.

  7. Characteristics of Mitochondrial Transformation into Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kesner, E E; Saada-Reich, A; Lorberboum-Galski, H

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria can be incorporated into mammalian cells by simple co-incubation of isolated mitochondria with cells, without the need of transfection reagents or any other type of intervention. This phenomenon was termed mitochondrial transformation, and although it was discovered in 1982, currently little is known regarding its mechanism(s). Here we demonstrate that mitochondria can be transformed into recipient cells very quickly, and co-localize with endogenous mitochondria. The isolated mitochondria interact directly with cells, which engulf the mitochondria with cellular extensions in a way, which may suggest the involvement of macropinocytosis or macropinocytosis-like mechanisms in mitochondrial transformation. Indeed, macropinocytosis inhibitors but not clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibition-treatments, blocks mitochondria transformation. The integrity of the mitochondrial outer membrane and its proteins is essential for the transformation of the mitochondria into cells; cells can distinguish mitochondria from similar particles and transform only intact mitochondria. Mitochondrial transformation is blocked in the presence of the heparan sulfate molecules pentosan polysulfate and heparin, which indicate crucial involvement of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the mitochondrial transformation process.

  8. Derivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from canine induced pluripotent stem cells by inhibition of the TGFβ/activin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Frith, Jessica E; Frith, Thomas J R; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Cooper-White, Justin J; Wolvetang, Ernst J

    2014-12-15

    In this study we have generated canine mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), also known as mesenchymal stem cells, from canine induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) by small-molecule inhibition of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/activin signaling pathway. These ciPSC-derived MSCs (ciPSC-MSCs) express the MSC markers CD73, CD90, CD105, STRO1, cPDGFRβ and cKDR, in addition to the pluripotency factors OCT4, NANOG and REX1. ciPSC-MSCs lack immunostaining for H3K27me3, suggesting that they possess two active X chromosomes. ciPSC-MSCs are highly proliferative and undergo robust differentiation along the osteo-, chondro- and adipogenic pathways, but do not form teratoma-like tissues in vitro. Of further significance for the translational potential of ciPSC-MSCs, we show that these cells can be encapsulated and maintained within injectable hydrogel matrices that, when functionalized with bound pentosan polysulfate, dramatically enhance chondrogenesis and inhibit osteogenesis. The ability to efficiently derive large numbers of highly proliferative canine MSCs from ciPSCs that can be incorporated into injectable, functionalized hydrogels that enhance their differentiation along a desired lineage constitutes an important milestone towards developing an effective MSC-based therapy for osteoarthritis in dogs, but equally provides a model system for assessing the efficacy and safety of analogous approaches for treating human degenerative joint diseases. PMID:25055193

  9. Potent Antiscrapie Activities of Degenerate Phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Kocisko, David A.; Vaillant, Andrew; Lee, Kil Sun; Arnold, Kevin M.; Bertholet, Nadine; Race, Richard E.; Olsen, Emily A.; Juteau, Jean-Marc; Caughey, Byron

    2006-01-01

    Although transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are incurable, a key therapeutic approach is prevention of conversion of the normal, protease-sensitive form of prion protein (PrP-sen) to the disease-specific protease-resistant form of prion protein (PrP-res). Here degenerate phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (PS-ONs) are introduced as low-nM PrP-res conversion inhibitors with strong antiscrapie activities in vivo. Comparisons of various PS-ON analogs indicated that hydrophobicity and size were important, while base composition was only minimally influential. PS-ONs bound avidly to PrP-sen but could be displaced by sulfated glycan PrP-res inhibitors, indicating the presence of overlapping binding sites. Labeled PS-ONs also bound to PrP-sen on live cells and were internalized. This binding likely accounts for the antiscrapie activity. Prophylactic PS-ON treatments more than tripled scrapie survival periods in mice. Survival times also increased when PS-ONs were mixed with scrapie brain inoculum. With these antiscrapie activities and their much lower anticoagulant activities than that of pentosan polysulfate, degenerate PS-ONs are attractive new compounds for the treatment of TSEs. PMID:16495266

  10. Characteristics of Mitochondrial Transformation into Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kesner, E. E.; Saada-Reich, A.; Lorberboum-Galski, H.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria can be incorporated into mammalian cells by simple co-incubation of isolated mitochondria with cells, without the need of transfection reagents or any other type of intervention. This phenomenon was termed mitochondrial transformation, and although it was discovered in 1982, currently little is known regarding its mechanism(s). Here we demonstrate that mitochondria can be transformed into recipient cells very quickly, and co-localize with endogenous mitochondria. The isolated mitochondria interact directly with cells, which engulf the mitochondria with cellular extensions in a way, which may suggest the involvement of macropinocytosis or macropinocytosis-like mechanisms in mitochondrial transformation. Indeed, macropinocytosis inhibitors but not clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibition-treatments, blocks mitochondria transformation. The integrity of the mitochondrial outer membrane and its proteins is essential for the transformation of the mitochondria into cells; cells can distinguish mitochondria from similar particles and transform only intact mitochondria. Mitochondrial transformation is blocked in the presence of the heparan sulfate molecules pentosan polysulfate and heparin, which indicate crucial involvement of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the mitochondrial transformation process. PMID:27184109

  11. Noncovalent PEGylation by polyanion complexation as a means to stabilize keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2).

    PubMed

    Khondee, Supang; Olsen, Christopher M; Zeng, Yuhong; Middaugh, C Russell; Berkland, Cory

    2011-11-14

    Repifermin, a truncated form of fibroblast growth factor-10 (FGF-10) also known as keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2), is a heparin-binding protein with potent regenerative properties. The protein unfolds and aggregates at relatively low temperature (~37 °C). Electrostatic interactions between polyanions and several FGFs have been reported to enhance the thermal stability of these proteins. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was grafted to the polyanions pentosan polysulfate (PPS) and dextran sulfate (DS) as an alternative means to stabilize and noncovalently PEGylate KGF-2. Physical characteristics of KGF-2:polyanion-PEG complexes were examined using a variety of methods including circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic light scattering. When compared to KGF-2 alone, subtle changes in CD spectra and fluorescence emission maxima were found when KGF-2 was formulated with the synthetic PEG-polyanions. Highly PEGylated polyanions (DS-PEG5) did not bind KGF-2 as well as conjugates with fewer PEG chains. The molecular weight of PEG did not have a noticeable effect on KGF-2 binding to the various PEG-polyanion conjugates. At optimal molar ratios, PPS-PEG and DS-PEG conjugates were able to stabilize KGF-2 by increasing the melting temperature by approximately 9-17 °C. Thus, polyanion-PEG conjugates improved the stability of KGF-2 and also offered a new electrostatic PEGylation scheme that may be extrapolated to other heparin-binding proteins.

  12. Derivation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Canine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Inhibition of the TGFβ/Activin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Frith, Jessica E.; Frith, Thomas J.R.; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Wolvetang, Ernst J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have generated canine mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), also known as mesenchymal stem cells, from canine induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) by small-molecule inhibition of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/activin signaling pathway. These ciPSC-derived MSCs (ciPSC-MSCs) express the MSC markers CD73, CD90, CD105, STRO1, cPDGFRβ and cKDR, in addition to the pluripotency factors OCT4, NANOG and REX1. ciPSC-MSCs lack immunostaining for H3K27me3, suggesting that they possess two active X chromosomes. ciPSC-MSCs are highly proliferative and undergo robust differentiation along the osteo-, chondro- and adipogenic pathways, but do not form teratoma-like tissues in vitro. Of further significance for the translational potential of ciPSC-MSCs, we show that these cells can be encapsulated and maintained within injectable hydrogel matrices that, when functionalized with bound pentosan polysulfate, dramatically enhance chondrogenesis and inhibit osteogenesis. The ability to efficiently derive large numbers of highly proliferative canine MSCs from ciPSCs that can be incorporated into injectable, functionalized hydrogels that enhance their differentiation along a desired lineage constitutes an important milestone towards developing an effective MSC-based therapy for osteoarthritis in dogs, but equally provides a model system for assessing the efficacy and safety of analogous approaches for treating human degenerative joint diseases. PMID:25055193

  13. Heparinase I-specific disaccharide unit of heparin is a key structure but insufficient for exerting anti-prion activity in prion-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Wakao, Masahiro; Sato, Masaki; Hamanaka, Taichi; Nishizawa, Keiko; Funayama, Yukino; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Suda, Yasuo; Doh-ura, Katsumi

    2015-05-15

    Glycosaminoglycans reportedly play important roles in prion formation, but because of their structural complexity, the chemical structures affecting prion formation have not been fully evaluated. Here, we compared two types of low molecular weight heparins and found that heparinase I-sensitive structures influenced anti-prion activity in prion-infected cells. Surface plasmon resonance analyses showed significant binding of a representative heparinase I substrate disaccharide unit, GlcNS6S-IdoA2S, to recombinant prion protein (PrP) fragments, such as full-length PrP23-231 and N-terminal domain PrP23-89, but not to PrP89-230. This binding was competitively inhibited by heparin or pentosan polysulfate, but not by Cu(2+). These PrP binding profiles of the disaccharide unit are consistent with those previously reported for heparin. However, synthetic compounds comprising disaccharide unit alone or its multimers exhibited no anti-prion activity in prion-infected cells. Consequently, the findings suggest that the heparin disaccharide unit that binds to the N-terminal region of PrP is a key structure, but it is insufficient for exerting anti-prion activity.

  14. Intra-articular therapy in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Uthman, I; Raynauld, J; Haraoui, B

    2003-01-01

    The medical literature was reviewed from 1968–2002 using Medline and the key words "intra-articular" and "osteoarthritis" to determine the various intra-articular therapies used in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are the most frequently used intra-articular therapies in osteoarthritis. Other intra-articular substances such as orgotein, radiation synovectomy, dextrose prolotherapy, silicone, saline lavage, saline injection without lavage, analgesic agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucosamine, somatostatin, sodium pentosan polysulfate, chloroquine, mucopolysaccharide polysulfuric acid ester, lactic acid solution, and thiotepa cytostatica have been investigated as potentially therapeutic in the treatment of arthritic joints. Despite the lack of strong, convincing, and reproducible evidence that any of the intra-articular therapies significantly alters the progression of osteoarthritis, corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are widely used in patients who have failed other therapeutic modalities for lack of efficacy or toxicity. As a practical approach for a knee with effusion, steroid injections should be considered while the presence of symptomatic "dry" knees may favour the hyaluronic acid approach. The virtual absence of serious side effects, coupled with the perceived benefits, make these approaches attractive. PMID:12954956

  15. RESULTATIVE VERBS AND OTHER PROBLEMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HASHIMOTO, ANNE YUE

    THE SO-CALLED RESULTATIVE VERBS IN MANDARIN CHINESE ARE STUDIED WITHIN THE GENERAL FRAMEWORK OF A TRANSFORMATIONAL GRAMMAR. THE RESULTATIVE VERBS ARE GENERALLY CONSIDERED AS CONSISTING OF TWO COMPONENTS--A VERBAL COMPONENT FOLLOWED BY A RESULTATIVE OR DIRECTIONAL COMPLEMENT. OTHER PROBLEMS RELATED TO COMPLEMENTS ARE ALSO TOUCHED UPON, FOR EXAMPLE,…

  16. Aesthetic rhinoplasty: Avoiding unfavourable results.

    PubMed

    Bhangoo, Kulwant S

    2013-05-01

    Rhinoplasty is one of the most challenging surgical procedures in plastic surgery. It is not surprising that a significant number of patients end up with unfavourable outcomes. Many of these unfavourable outcomes could be the result of poor judgment and wrong decision making. Most frequently, the unfavourable outcome is the result of errors in surgical technique. In this paper, unfavourable outcomes resulting from errors in surgical technique are discussed under the heading of each operative step. Poor placement of intra-nasal incision can result in internal valve obstruction. Bad columellar scars can result from errors during open rhinoplasty. Unfavourable results associated with skeletonisation are mentioned. Tip plasty, being the most difficult part of rhinoplasty, can result in lack of tip projection, asymmetry and deformities associated with placement of tip grafts. Over-resection of the lower lateral cartilages during tip plasty can also result in pinched nose, alar collapse causing external valve obstruction and other alar rim deformities. Humpectomy can result in open roof deformity, inverted V deformity and over-resection resulting in saddle nose. The so-called poly beak deformity is also a preventable unfavourable outcome when dealing with a large dorsal hump. Complications resulting from osteotomies include narrowing of nasal airway, open roof deformity, inverted V deformity and asymmetry of the bony wall resulting from incomplete or green stick fractures. Judicious use of grafts can be very rewarding. By the same token, grafts also carry with them the risk of complications. Allografts can result in recurrent infection, atrophy of the overlying skin and extrusion resulting in crippling deformities. Autografts are recommended by the author. Unfavourable results from autografts include displacement of graft, visibility of the graft edges, asymmetry, warping, and resorption.

  17. Exploring Web Search Results Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Bramer, Max

    As the number of documents on the web has proliferated, the low precision of conventional web search engines and the flat ranked search results presentation make it difficult for users to locate specific information of interest. Grouping web search results into a hierarchy of topics provides an alternative to the flat ranked list and facilitates searching and browsing. In this paper, we present a brief survey of previous work on web search results clustering and existing commercial search engines using this technique, discuss two key issues of web search results clustering: cluster summarisation and evaluation and propose some directions for future research.

  18. ISOCAM experiment cryogenic test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sa, L.; Collaudin, B.

    The thermal requirements for ISOCAM, an IR camera to be mounted aboard the ISO satellite, are reviewed, and model predictions are matched with test results. The degree of model validation suggested by analytical prediction vs test results is described. Predictions of thermal conduction through mounting screws, from ball bearings, and of the heat distribution in the rotor and stator of a cryogenic stepper motor correlate well with actual test results. It is shown that ISOCAM meets the thermal requirements necessary for successful on-orbit operation. The model predicted such phenomena as 'chopped' motor function and the twofold increase in temperature resulting from continuous motor operation.

  19. Top physics results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-05-01

    The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

  20. Latest Electroweak Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The latest results in electroweak physics from proton anti-proton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron recorded by the CDF detector are presented. The results provide constraints on parton distribution functions, the mass of the Higgs boson and beyond the Standard Model physics.

  1. Project "Freestyle": National Sites Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Frederick

    Project "Freestyle" involved the development of prototypical television and print materials intended to combat sex-role stereotyping in career-related attitudes of nine to twelve-year-old children. This paper summarizes the results of the field evaluation of three pilot programs. With the aid of graphs, it reports the results in the following…

  2. Contradictory results in interferon research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Several reports on immunologically related interferon research, both in the areas of basic science and clinical research, are briefly reviewed, and it is noted that in many cases the results obtained are contradictory. It is argued, however, that the contradictory results are not surprising since interferon is a biological response modifier and has been known to produce opposite results even when the same interferon prepartion is used. It is emphasized that dosage, timing, route, and other experimental conditions are essential factors in planning immunological studies with interferon. Careful planning of future experiments with interferon should be required to prevent the possible generation of effects that are opposite to those expected.

  3. Pentaquarks: the latest experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    M. Battaglieri; R. De Vita; Valery Kubarovsky

    2006-01-01

    After the claim of the possible discovery of a pentaquark state, many experiments reported positive and negative results opening a discussion about the pentaquark existence. New experiments with high resolution and high statistics are needed in the reaction channels and for the kinematics of the positive results to solve the controversy. Jefferson Lab started a comprehensive program to search for pentaquark in photoproduction at threshold on proton and deuteron targets, collecting more than 10 times the existing statistics. The first experiment on the proton (g11) just finished to analyze the data, and the first results of the pentaquark search are reported here.

  4. Some recent results from ICARUS

    SciTech Connect

    Farnese, Christian

    2015-07-15

    ICARUS T600 is the largest Liquid Argon (LAr) Time Projection Chamber (TPC) ever built. Thanks to the excellent spatial and calorimetric resolutions and the three-dimensional visualization capabilities ICARUS T600 represents a major milestone towards the realization of future LAr detectors for neutrino physics and for the search of rare events. Three new important results from the analysis of the events collected by this detector will be here shortly presented: in particular the new improved results on the electron neutrino search, the results on the determination of the muon momentum using the Multiple Scattering and the new LAr purification methods and improvements of the electron lifetime.

  5. Interpreting Results from Multiscore Batteries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasi, Anne

    1985-01-01

    Describes the role of information on score reliabilities, significance of score differences, intercorrelations of scores, and differential validity of score patterns on the interpretation of results from multiscore batteries. (Author)

  6. Results of Neptunium Disposal Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    2003-10-07

    Researchers investigated the neutralization of neptunium solution from H-Canyon Tank 16.4 and the properties of the resulting slurry. This work investigated slurry properties from a single neutralization protocol and limited storage times.

  7. Results on hard diffractive production

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.

    1995-07-01

    The results of experiments at hadron colliders probing the structure of the pomeron through hard diffraction are reviewed. Some results on deep inelastic diffractive scattering obtained a HERA are also discussed and placed in perspective. By using a properly normalized pomeron flux factor in single diffraction dissociation, as dictated by unitarity, the pomeron emerges as a combination of valence quark and gluon color singlets in a ratio suggested by asymptopia.

  8. Selection of LHCb Physics Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Burkhard

    2013-05-01

    LHCb is a dedicated flavour physics experiment at the LHC searching for physics beyond the Standard Model through precision measurements of CP-violating observables and the study of very rare decays of beauty- and charm-flavoured hadrons. In this article a selection of recent LHCb results is presented. Unless otherwise stated, the results are based on an integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1 accumulated during the year 2011 at √s = 7 TeV.

  9. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  10. Results from Neutrino Oscillations Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis

    2010-09-10

    The interpretation of the results of early solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments in terms of neutrino oscillations has been verified by several recent experiments using both, natural and man-made sources. The observations provide compelling evidence in favor of the existence of neutrino masses and mixings. These proceedings give a general description of the results from neutrino oscillation experiments, the current status of the field, and some possible future developments.

  11. New CDF results on diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mesropian, Christina; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-12-01

    We report new diffraction results obtained by the CDF collaboration in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s=1.96 TeV. The first experimental evidence of exclusive dijet and diphoton production is presented. The exclusive results are discussed in context of the exclusive Higgs production at LHC. We also present the measurement of the Q{sup 2} and t dependence of the diffractive structure function.

  12. [Extreme results in electrolyte determination].

    PubMed

    Vogt, W; Oesterle, B

    1992-01-01

    Besides statistical quality control, quality control based on patient specimens is an important tool for quality enhancement and thus for an increased diagnostic certainty in laboratory medicine. One of three possibilities of plausibility judgement is the control of extreme results, that is alert and absurd value check. The aim of our study was to look for extremely high or low findings of the most frequently examined clinical-chemical parameters, to scrutinize their validity according to clearly defined criteria and to find out the underlying actual clinical situations and diseases. In this publication only the results for the electrolytes are discussed. Retrospectively the most extreme values of all results for serum sodium, potassium and chloride concentrations of a 21-month interval were extracted in a large university hospital. The clinical situation was then evaluated by reading the medical reports of these patients. The validity of the findings was judged by previously defined criteria and rated as confirmed, questionable and not confirmed. In all cases the survival time was determined. The most extreme confirmed results were for sodium 191 and 100 mmol/l, for potassium 9.0 and 1.3 mmol/l and for chloride 138 and 65 mmol/l. All these findings were compatible with life, at least for several hours. Even if it is probably impossible to give generally valid extreme ranges. Nevertheless our results should certainly have practical importance in absurd and alert value check. PMID:1502820

  13. Planck 2015 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Alves, M. I. R.; Argüeso, F.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chluba, J.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Farhang, M.; Feeney, S.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Florido, E.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Giusarma, E.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jin, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; Liu, H.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamaie, M.; Oppermann, N.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Said, N.; Salvatelli, V.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Sanghera, H. S.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Shiraishi, M.; Smith, K.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tramonte, D.; Tristram, M.; Troja, A.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vassallo, T.; Vibert, L.; Vidal, M.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Walter, B.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, which is dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched on 14 May 2009. It scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12 August 2009 and 23 October 2013. In February 2015, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based ondata from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data and the data products in the release, as well as the associated cosmological and astrophysical science results and papers. The data products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, diffuse foregrounds in temperature and polarization, catalogues of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic cold clumps), and extensive simulations of signals and noise used in assessing uncertainties and the performance of the analysis methods. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data is described, along with a CMB lensing likelihood. Scientific results include cosmological parameters derived from CMB power spectra, gravitational lensing, and cluster counts, as well as constraints on inflation, non-Gaussianity, primordial magnetic fields, dark energy, and modified gravity, and new results on low-frequency Galactic foregrounds.

  14. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bourdin, H.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carr, R.; Carvalho, P.; Casale, M.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Falgarone, E.; Falvella, M. C.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Frommert, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Galli, S.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jasche, J.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matsumura, T.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A.; Räth, C.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Riazuelo, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.

    2014-11-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14 May 2009 and has been scanning the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously since 12 August 2009. In March 2013, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the initial cosmology products based on the first 15.5 months of Planck data, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the mission and its performance, the processing, analysis, and characteristics of the data, the scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and diffuse extragalactic foregrounds, a catalogue of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources, and a list of sources detected through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data and a lensing likelihood are described. Scientific results include robust support for the standard six-parameter ΛCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements of its parameters, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large-scale anomalies in the temperature distribution of the CMB, first detected by WMAP, are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at greater than 25σ. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussianity in the CMB. Planck's results agree well with results from the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. Planck finds a lower Hubble constant than found in some more local measures. Some tension is also present between the amplitude of matter fluctuations (σ8) derived from

  15. Data Mining Citizen Science Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    Scientific discovery from big data is enabled through multiple channels, including data mining (through the application of machine learning algorithms) and human computation (commonly implemented through citizen science tasks). We will describe the results of new data mining experiments on the results from citizen science activities. Discovering patterns, trends, and anomalies in data are among the powerful contributions of citizen science. Establishing scientific algorithms that can subsequently re-discover the same types of patterns, trends, and anomalies in automatic data processing pipelines will ultimately result from the transformation of those human algorithms into computer algorithms, which can then be applied to much larger data collections. Scientific discovery from big data is thus greatly amplified through the marriage of data mining with citizen science.

  16. ACTS: Technology Description and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, Richard T.; Schertler, Ronald; Gargione, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The ACTS Project was originated at NASA Glenn Research Center in the early 1980's to sponsor the development and application of technology that was intended to be used by the private sector. The program was formulated with the underlying philosophy of maintaining US leadership in satellite communications while focusing technology development for efficient use of the frequency spectrum. This report chronicles the execution and results of the program from the perspective of its technology managers, from inception through hardware and system development to on-orbit experiments and demonstrations of the technology. The first eight sections of the report discuss programmatic background, the specific satellite and ground terminal technology and the results generated by the program including industry relevance. A federally funded program of this type attracted strong advocates and adversaries and the resulting impact on the project schedule is also discussed. The last two sections are a list of useful acronyms and extensive references.

  17. KC-135 winglet flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    Three KC-135 winglet configurations were flight tested for cant/incidence angles of 15 deg/-4 deg, 15 deg/-2 deg, and 0 deg/-4 deg, as well as the basic wing. The flight results for the 15 deg/-4 deg and basic wing configurations confirm the wind tunnel predicted 7% incremental decrease in total drag at cruise conditions. The 15 deg/-4 configuration flight measured wing and winglet pressure distributions, loads, stability and control, flutter, and buffet also correlate well with predicted values. The only unexpected flight results as compared with analytical predictions is a flutter speed decrease for the 0 deg/-4 deg configuration. The 15 deg/-2 deg configuration results show essentially the same incremental drag reduction as the 15 deg/-4 deg configuration; however, the flight loads are approximately 30% higher for the 15 deg/-2 deg configuration. The drag data for the 0 deg/-4 deg configuration show only a flight drag reduction.

  18. [Submitting studies without significant results].

    PubMed

    Texier, Gaëtan; Meynard, Jean-Baptiste; Michel, Rémy; Migliani, René; Boutin, Jean-Paul

    2007-03-01

    When a study finds that no exposure factor or therapy is significantly related to a given effect, researchers legitimately wonder if the results should be submitted for publication and to what journal. Clinical trials that report significant associations have a higher probability of publication, a phenomenon known as selective publication. The principal reasons of this selective publication include author self-censorship, peer-reviewing, trials not intended for publication, interpretation of the p value, cost of journal subscriptions, and policies. Subsequent reviews and meta-analyses are biased by the unavailability of nonsignificant results. Suggestions for preventing this risk include university training, trial registries, an international standard randomised controlled trial number (ISRCTN), Cochrane collaboration, and the gray literature. Journals (including electronic journals) interested in studies with nonsignificant results are listed. New technologies are changing the relations between publishers, libraries, authors and readers. PMID:17287106

  19. CDF results on electroweak physics

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    The second major run of the {bar p}p Fermilab Tevatron collider has just ended on June 1. The CDF detector has accumulated almost five times the data sample of its previous 1988--1989 run. We present new results on the ratio of W to Z boson production cross-sections and on the charge asymmetry in W decay. We give a progress report on the measurement of the W mass. New results from the 1988--1989 data on Drell-Yan production and on W {gamma} production are also presented.

  20. Communicating Performance Assessments Results - 13609

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The F-Area Tank Farms (FTF) and H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR), Liquid Waste Operations contractor at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). The FTF and HTF are active radioactive waste storage and treatment facilities consisting of 51 carbon steel waste tanks and ancillary equipment such as transfer lines, evaporators and pump tanks. Performance Assessments (PAs) for each Tank Farm have been prepared to support the eventual closure of the underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. PAs provide the technical bases and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements for final closure of the Tank Farms. The Tank Farms are subject to a number of regulatory requirements. The State regulates Tank Farm operations through an industrial waste water permit and through a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Closure documentation will include State-approved Tank Farm Closure Plans and tank-specific closure modules utilizing information from the PAs. For this reason, the State of South Carolina and the EPA must be involved in the performance assessment review process. The residual material remaining after tank cleaning is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005. PAs are performance-based, risk-informed analyses of the fate and transport of FTF and HTF residual wastes following final closure of the Tank Farms. Since the PAs serve as the primary risk assessment tools in evaluating readiness for closure, it is vital that PA conclusions be communicated effectively. In the course of developing the FTF and HTF PAs, several lessons learned have emerged regarding communicating PA results. When communicating PA results it is

  1. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  2. Recent results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J. )

    1990-12-10

    This is a summary of some of the many recent results from the CERN and Fermilab colliders, presented for an audience of nuclear, medium-energy, and elementary particle physicists. The topics are jets and QCD at very high energies, precision measurements of electroweak parameters, the remarkably heavy top quark, and new results on the detection of the large flux of B mesons produced at these machines. A summary and some comments on the bright prospects for the future of hadron colliders conclude the talk. 39 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. CDF experimental results on diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental results on diffraction from the Fermilab Tevatron collider obtained by the CDF experiment are reviewed and compared. We report on the diffractive structure function obtained from dijet production in the range 0 < Q{sup 2} < 10,000 GeV{sup 2}, and on the |t| distribution in the region 0 < |t| < 1 GeV{sup 2} for both soft and hard diffractive events up to Q{sup 2} {approx} 4,500 GeV{sup 2}. Results on single diffractive W/Z production, forward jets, and central exclusive production of both dijets and diphotons are also presented.

  4. Supersymmetry results at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Manca, Giulia; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    The Run II physics programme of the Tevatron is proceeding with more than 300 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data, collected at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Searches for supersymmetric particles are starting to set new limits, improving over the LEP and Run I results and exploring new regions of parameter space. They present recent results in Supersymmetry with the upgraded CDF and D0 detectors and give some prospects for the future of these searches.

  5. Tau physics results from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, M.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-08-10

    Results on {tau} physics at SLD are presented. They are based on 4,316 {tau}-pair events selected from a 150 k Z{sup 0} data sample collected at the SLC. These results include measurements of the {tau} lifetime ({tau}{sub r} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1 {+-} 3.3 fs), the {tau} Michel parameters ({rho} = 0.71 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04, {zeta} = 1.03 {+-} 0.36 {+-} 0.05, and {zeta}{delta} = 0.84 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.05), and the {tau} neutrino helicity (h{sub {nu}} = {minus}0.81 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.03).

  6. Recent Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demorden, L.

    1998-06-01

    We review recent results from fixed-target and collider experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron. Among the topics discussed are jet production rates, {alpha}{sub S} measurements, the {anti d}/{anti u} ratio in the proton sea, diffraction, heavy quark physics and leptoquark searches.

  7. Cuesta College School Performance Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuesta Coll., San Luis Obispo, CA.

    This Cuesta College (California) document identifies key institutional effectiveness indicators that are used to assess institutional performance on specified educational processes. The key process of instruction/learning is measured through student performance results such as: (1) transfer rate (University of California/California State…

  8. Results from the HARP experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radicioni, E.

    2008-07-01

    Hadron production is a key ingredient for precise prediction of atmospheric ν fluxes, characterization of accelerator ν beams, and quantification of π production and capture for ν-factory designs. HARP at the CERN PS was the first hadron production experiment designed on purpose to match all these requirements. We briefly describe here its most recent results.

  9. State Test Results Are Predictable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Out-of-school, community demographic and family-level variables have an important influence on student achievement as measured by large-scale standardized tests. Studies described here demonstrated that about half of the test score is accounted for by variables outside the control of teachers and school administrators. The results from these…

  10. 51-A V1103 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counts, B.

    1984-01-01

    The following are test results from the performance sections of the 51-A V1103.03 conducted on October 31,1984. During this checkout, an astronaut commented that the O2 actuator on SEMU 1052 (PLSS 1007) seemed stiffer to operate than the other two units.

  11. Recent results from DORIS II

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a brief review of recent results from the ARGUS and Crystal Ball experiments at DORIS II, concentrating on UPSILON(1S) and UPSILON(2S) spectroscopy with a short foray into ..gamma gamma.. physics. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  12. The Latest Results from DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) successfully launched on Dec.17, 2015 is the first Chinese astronomical satellite that can measure 2 GeV-10 TeV electrons and gamma-rays with unprecedented energy resolution. In this talk I will introduce the design, the beam-test, the on-orbit calibration and some preliminary results of DAMPE.

  13. The Planck Mission: Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Bersanelli

    2012-03-07

    The ESA Planck space mission, launched on May 14, 2009, is dedicated to high precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the first light of the universe, both in temperature and polarization. The satellite observes the full sky from a far-Earth orbit with two cryogenic instruments in the 30-850 GHz range at the focal plane of a 1.5-meter telescope. The primary objective of Planck is to measure with unprecedented precision the key cosmological parameters and to provide accurate tests of physics in the early universe. Planck has recently completed the fifth full-sky survey. The data analysis is underway. The first cosmology results are expected in early 2013 while a number of astrophysical results have been recently delivered to the community, including galactic and extragalactic astrophysics and a rich catalogue of radio and infrared sources. These results demonstrate the excellent in-orbit performance of the instruments and give excellent prospects for the forthcoming cosmological results.

  14. Recent diffractive results from HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkárová, Alice

    2016-07-01

    The diffractive dijet cross sections for photoproduction and deep inelastic scattering were studied and compared with theoretical NLO QCD predictions. The results of exclusive dijet production were compared to predictions from models which are based on different assumptions about the nature of diffractive exchange. Isolated prompt photons in diffractive photoproduction produced inclusively or together with a jet were studied for the first time.

  15. Optical Telescope Design Study Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, J.; Sankar, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the results of a study conducted from Nov 2012-Apr 2013 to develop a telescope design for a space-based gravitational wave detector. The telescope is needed for efficient power delivery but since it is directly in the beam path, the design is driven by the requirements for the overall displacement sensitivity of the gravitational wave observatory. Two requirements in particular, optical pathlength stability and scattered light performance, are beyond the usual specifications for good image quality encountered in traditional telescopic systems. An important element of the study was to tap industrial expertise to develop an optimized design that can be reliably manufactured. Key engineering and design trade-offs and the sometimes surprising results will be presented.

  16. CMS results on multijet correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Safronov, Grigory

    2015-04-10

    We present recent CMS measurements on multijet correlations using forward and low-p{sub T} jets, focusing on searches for BFKL and saturation phenomena. In pp collisions at √(s)=7 TeV, azimuthal correlations in dijets separated in rapidity by up to 9.4 units were measured. The results are compared to BFKL- and DGLAP-based predictions. In pp collisions at √(s)=8 TeV, cross sections for jets with p{sub T} > 21 GeV and |y| < 4.7, and for track-jets with p{sub T} > 1 GeV (minijets) are presented. The minijet results are sensitive to the bound imposed by the total inelastic cross section, and are compared to various models for taming the growth of the 2 → 2 cross section at low p{sub T}.

  17. Airborne laser topographic mapping results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Collins, J. G.; Link, L. E.; Swift, R. N.; Butler, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of terrain mapping experiments utilizing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) over forested areas are presented. The flight tests were conducted as part of a joint NASA/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (CE) investigation aimed at evaluating the potential of an airborne laser ranging system to provide cross-sectional topographic data on flood plains that are difficult and expensive to survey using conventional techniques. The data described in this paper were obtained in the Wolf River Basin located near Memphis, TN. Results from surveys conducted under winter 'leaves off' and summer 'leaves on' conditions, aspects of day and night operation, and data obtained from decidous and coniferous tree types are compared. Data processing techniques are reviewed. Conclusions relative to accuracy and present limitations of the AOL, and airborne lidar systems in general, to terrain mapping over forested areas are discussed.

  18. First results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Aburashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.; Gusev, A.O.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Knodel, T.V.; Knyshenko, I.I.; Kornoukhov, V.N.; Mirmov, I.N.; Pshukov, A.M.; Shalagin, A.M.; Shikhin, A.A.; Timofeyev, P.V.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Vermul, V.M.; Zatsepin, G.T.; Bowles, T.J.; Nico, J.S.; Teasdale, W.A.; Wark, D.L.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Cleveland, B.T.; Daily, T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.; Wildenhain, P.W.; Elliott, S.R.; Cherry, M.L.

    1995-07-10

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76{sup +21}{sub {minus}18}(stat){sup +5}{sub {minus}7}(sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74{sup +13}{sub {minus}12}(stat){sup +5}{sub {minus}7}(sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  19. Seeds in space experiment results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Jim A.

    1991-01-01

    Two million seeds of 120 different varieties representing 106 species, 97 genera, and 55 plant families were flown aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The seeds were housed on the space exposed experiment developed for students (SEEDS) tray in sealed canister number six and in two small vented canisters. The tray was in the F-2 position. The seeds were germinated and the germination rates and development of the resulting plants compared to the control seed that stayed in Park Seed's seed storage facility. The initial results are presented. There was a better survival rate in the sealed canister in space than in the storage facility at Park Seed. At least some of the seeds in each of the vented canisters survived the exposure to vacuum for almost six years. The number of observed apparent mutations was very low.

  20. Top physics results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2005-05-01

    The top quark is by far the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model. They present recent top physics results from CDF based on 160-320 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The t{bar t} cross section and the top mass have been measured in different decay channels and using different methods. they have searched for evidence of single top production, setting upper limits on its production rate. Other results shown in this conference include studies of the polarization of W bosons from top decays, a search for charged Higgs decaying from top, and a search for additional heavy t' quarks.

  1. Surveyor 3 Preliminary Science Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Surveyor III soft-landed on the Moon at 00:04 GMT on April 20, 1967. Data obtained have significantly increased our knowledge of the Moon. The Surveyor III spacecraft was similar to Surveyor I; the only major change in scientific instrumentation was the addition of a soil mechanics surface sampler. Surveyor III results at this preliminary evaluation of data give valuable information about the relation between the surface skin of under-dense material responsible for the photometric properties and the deeper layers of material whose properties resemble those of ordinary terrestrial soils. In addition, they provide new insight into the relation between the general lunar surface as seen by Surveyor I and the interior of a large subdued crater. The new results have also contributed to our understanding of the mechanism of downhill transport. Many critical questions cannot, however, be answered until final reduction of experimental data.

  2. Forget about data, deliver results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Roland

    2015-12-01

    High-energy astrophysics space missions have pioneered and demonstrated the power of legacy data sets for generating new discoveries, especially when analysed in ways original researchers could not have anticipated. The only way to ensure that the data of present observatories can be effectively used in the future is to allow users to perform on-the-fly data analysis to produce straightforwardly scientific results for any sky position, time and energy intervals without requiring mission specific software or detailed instrumental knowledge. Providing a straightforward interface to complex data and data analysis makes the data and the process of generating science results available to the public and higher education and promotes the visibility of the investment in science to the society. This is a fundamental step to transmit the values of science and to evolve towards a knowledge society.

  3. CMS results on multijet correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronov, Grigory

    2015-04-01

    We present recent CMS measurements on multijet correlations using forward and low-pT jets, focusing on searches for BFKL and saturation phenomena. In pp collisions at √{s }=7 TeV, azimuthal correlations in dijets separated in rapidity by up to 9.4 units were measured. The results are compared to BFKL- and DGLAP-based predictions. In pp collisions at √{s }=8 TeV, cross sections for jets with pT > 21 GeV and |y| < 4.7, and for track-jets with pT > 1 GeV (minijets) are presented. The minijet results are sensitive to the bound imposed by the total inelastic cross section, and are compared to various models for taming the growth of the 2 → 2 cross section at low pT.

  4. Recent DIII-D results

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, P.I.

    1994-07-01

    This paper summarizes the recent DIII-D experimental results and the development of the relevant hardware systems. The DIII-D program focuses on divertor solutions for next generation tokamaks such as International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), and on developing configurations with enhanced confinement and stability properties that will lead to a more compact and economical fusion reactor. The DIII-D program carries out this research in an integrated fashion.

  5. A-3 scientific results - extragalactic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    The results of the HEAO A-3 experiment are summarized. Specific contributions of the experiment to extragalactic astronomy are emphasized. The discovery of relatively condensed X-ray emission in the cores of those clusters of galaxies which are dominated by a giant elliptical or cD galaxy, the discovery of extended X-ray emitting plasma in groups of galaxies, and the demonstration that BL Lac objects are a class of X-ray sources are among the topics discussed.

  6. SPQR -- Spectroscopy: Prospects, Questions & Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-06-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in mapping out the spectrum of hadrons over the past decade with plans to make further advances in the decade ahead. Baryons and mesons, both expected and unexpected, have been found, the results of precision experiments often with polarized beams, polarized targets and sometimes polarization of the final states. All these hadrons generate poles in the complex energy plane that are consequences of strong coupling QCD. They reveal how this works.

  7. Recent QCD results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Huston, J. |; CDF Collaboration

    1994-01-01

    CDF has recently concluded a very successful 1992--93 data run in which an integrated luminosity of 21.3 pb {sup {minus}1} was written to tape. The large data sample allows for a greater discovery potential for new phenomena and for better statistical and systematic precision in analysis of conventional physics. This paper summarizes some of the new results from QCD analyses for this run.

  8. Physics results from polarized DIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, G. P.

    1998-03-23

    We have extracted polarized nucleon distributions from recent data at CERN, SLAC and DESY. The flavor-dependent valence and sea quark spin distributions are determined for each experiment. We take into account possible differences in the up and down sea distributions, and assume that the strange sea contribution is suppressed by mass effects. Physics results determined from different experiments are compared, including higher order corrections.

  9. Measuring the results of faith.

    PubMed

    Hudson, T

    1996-09-20

    Guiding patients to health takes more than technological wizardry, wonder drugs, and pleasantly decorated surroundings. In fact, to an increasing number of institutions, faith is the missing ingredient. Faith in a higher power. Faith in oneself. Faith in the possibilities for recovery. Welcome, then, to the new high-tech, high-touch world, where pastoral care meets managed care. The results may startle you. PMID:8924945

  10. Results from the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, A.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2009-01-08

    These proceedings are based on lectures given at the Helmholtz International Summer School Heavy Quark Physics at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna, Russia, during August 2008. I review the current status of CP violation in B meson decays from the B factories. These results can be used, along with measurements of the sides of the Unitarity Triangle, to test the CKM mechanism. In addition I discuss experimental studies of B decays to final states with 'spin-one' particles.

  11. Open cherry picker simulation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The simulation program associated with a key piece of support equipment to be used to service satellites directly from the Shuttle is assessed. The Open Cherry Picker (OCP) is a manned platform mounted at the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) and is used to enhance extra vehicular activities (EVA). The results of simulations performed on the Grumman Large Amplitude Space Simulator (LASS) and at the JSC Water Immersion Facility are summarized.

  12. Top quark results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    We present the latest results on the top quark obtained by the CDF experiment using a data sample of about 110 {ital pb}{sup -1} collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We briefly describe the candidate events selection and then discuss the production cross section determination and the mass measurement. The study of two new decay channels (all hadronic and ``tau dilepton``) is also reported.

  13. Electroweak results from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.; D0 Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Preliminary results from D0 are presented on properties of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} electroweak gauge bosons, using final states containing electrons and muons. In particular, preliminary measurements of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections with decay into final states containing electrons are shown and a status report on the determination of M{sub w}/M{sub z} is given.

  14. Cassini Imaging Results at Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEwen, A.; Turtle, E.; Perry J.; Fussner, S.; Porco, C.; West, R.; Johnson, T.; Collins, G.; DelGenio, T.; Barbara, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images show striking albedo markings on the surface of Titan. In equatorial regions the albedo patterns have high contrast and exhibit prominent lineaments and linear/angular boundaries suggestive of tectonic influences or fracturing of brittle surficial materials. There are intriguing dark curving lines near the south pole. Here we present several working hypotheses to explain these patterns. We also briefly summarize atmospheric science results.

  15. Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Borissov, G.; /Lancaster U.

    2012-06-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy b- and c-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in B{sub s} {yields} J{psi}{phi} decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

  16. Some Recent Results with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Maurik Holtrop

    2010-10-01

    The CLAS is a multipurpose, large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, instrumented with detector systems sensitive to charged and neutral particles. The experimental program at CLAS is aimed at furthering our understanding of hadronic and nuclear physics, through electron and photon scattering experiments, which cover a large range of topics, including meson and baryon spectroscopy, nucleon structure through elastic and deep inelastic scattering, nuclear transparency, nuclear correlations and nuclear structure. This talk will briefly describe the detector and the collaboration that uses it and will highlight some recent results.

  17. Electroweak results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1995-10-01

    Results from the CDF and D{O} experiments are presented on properties of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities. In particular, measurements of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections, the W-charge asymmetry and the CDF measurement of the W-mass are summarized. Gauge boson self interactions axe measured by studying di-gauge boson production and limits on anomalous gauge boson couplings axe discussed.

  18. The first results from MAXIMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoot, George F.

    2001-02-01

    This talk reviews the first results from MAXIMA and the scientific implications of the combined MAXIMA and BOOMERANG data sets. The key piece of science is that both experiments independently observe the first acoustic peak in CMB angular power spectrum at a value ~200 and with a width which are compatible with a flat universe and inflation. Both experiments also observe a positive signal which is lower than that previously expected for the second acoustic peak region. A natural economical explanation is that the density of baryons is slightly but noticeably higher than that determined through Big Bang Nucleosynthesis theory. .

  19. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  20. Lightcurve Results for Eleven Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartrelle, Gordon M.

    2012-04-01

    Differential photometry techniques were used to develop lightcurves, rotation periods and amplitudes for eleven main-belt asteroids: 833 Monica, 962 Aslog, 1020 Arcadia, 1082 Pirola, 1097 Vicia, 1122 Lugduna, 1145 Robelmonte, 1253 Frisia, 1256 Normannia, 1525 Savolinna, and 2324 Janice. Ground-based observations from Badlands Observatory (BLO) in Quinn, SD, as well as the University of North Dakota Observatory (UND) in Grand Forks, ND, provided the data for the project. A search of the asteroid lightcurve database (LCDB) did not reveal any previously reported results for seven of the eleven targets in this study.

  1. Results from the HARP Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanesi, M. G.

    2008-02-01

    Hadron production is a key ingredient in many aspects of ν physics. Precise prediction of atmospheric ν fluxes, characterization of accelerator ν beams, quantification of π production and capture for ν-factory designs, all of these would profit from hadron production measurements. HARP at the CERN PS was the first hadron production experiment designed on purpose to match all these requirements. It combines a large, full phase space acceptance with low systematic errors and high statistics. HARP was operated in the range from 3 GeV to 15 GeV. We briefly describe here the most recent results.

  2. Results from the HARP experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanesi, M. G.

    2007-06-01

    Hadron production is a key ingredient in many aspects of ν physics. Precise prediction of atmospheric ν fluxes, characterization of accelerator ν beams, quantification of π production and capture for ν-factory designs, all of these would profit from hadron production measurements. HARP at the CERN PS was the first hadron production experiment designed on purpose to match all these requirements. It combines a large, full phase space acceptance with low systematic errors and high statistics. HARP was operated in the range from 3 GeV to 15 GeV. We briefly describe here the most recent results.

  3. Data bases for LDEF results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried 57 experiments and 10,000 specimens for some 200 LDEF experiment investigators. The external surface of LDEF had a large variety of materials exposed to the space environment which were tested preflight, during flight, and post flight. Thermal blankets, optical materials, thermal control paints, aluminum, and composites are among the materials flown. The investigations have produced an abundance of analysis results. One of the responsibilities of the Boeing Support Contract, Materials and Systems Special Investigation Group, is to collate and compile that information into an organized fashion. The databases developed at Boeing to accomplish this task is described.

  4. Implicit Media Knowledge Experiments & Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Muy-Chu; Germaneau, Alexis

    2011-08-01

    Implicit Media Knowledge aims to provide relevant information related to visual media without effort. It is based on the analysis of media usage from several users (e.g. a community). Algorithms based on clustering methods that extract relevant information (e.g. tags, taxonomy trees) related to a media from its usage are detailed. To validate our new approach, we propose to apply our concept and algorithms on a specific media use such as the analysis of how multiple users organize their media files. Significant results of two experiments will be highlighted. Perspectives of our work will be finally presented.

  5. Preliminary neural response telemetry results.

    PubMed

    Cullington, H

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes the neural response telemetry (NRT) results obtained from the first 30 patients tested at this centre. One hundred per cent of patients tested intra-operatively had NRT responses on at least one electrode; this compared to 82.4% of patients tested post-operatively. Reasonable correlations existed between post-operative NRT thresholds and psychophysical threshold and comfort levels, although there was too much variability for the data to be used to set these parameters directly. Post-operative NRT thresholds were always at levels audible to patients.

  6. Results from IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYoung, Tyce

    2016-04-01

    Data from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory have revealed the existence of a flux of high energy neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin, which is observed in a number of analyses spanning different energy ranges, fields of view, and neutrino flavors. The current data are consistent with an isotropic, equal-flavor flux described by a simple power law spectrum, but deviations from this simple model cannot yet be constrained with high precision. The existing observations in this area are reviewed, along with recent results on dark matter searches and observations of cosmic rays.

  7. Results from the HARP Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Catanesi, M. G.

    2008-02-21

    Hadron production is a key ingredient in many aspects of {nu} physics. Precise prediction of atmospheric {nu} fluxes, characterization of accelerator {nu} beams, quantification of {pi} production and capture for {nu}-factory designs, all of these would profit from hadron production measurements. HARP at the CERN PS was the first hadron production experiment designed on purpose to match all these requirements. It combines a large, full phase space acceptance with low systematic errors and high statistics. HARP was operated in the range from 3 GeV to 15 GeV. We briefly describe here the most recent results.

  8. Steam-explosion pretreatment of wood: effect of chip size, acid, moisture content and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, H.H.; Yu, E.K.C.; Saddler, J.N.

    1986-06-01

    Material balances for pentosan, lignin, and hexosan, during steam-explosion pretreatment of aspenwood, showed almost quantitative recovery of cellulose in the water-insoluble fraction. Dilute acid impregnation resulted in more selective hydrolysis of pentosan relative to undesirable pyrolysis, and gave a more accessible substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis. Thermocouple probes, located inside simulated aspenwood chips heated in 240 degrees C-saturated steam, showed rapid heating of air-dry wood, whereas green or impregnated wood heated slowly. Small chips, 3.2 mm in the fiber direction, whether green or air dry gave approximately equal rates of pentosan destruction and solubilization, and similar yields of glucose and of total reducing sugars on enzmatic hydrolysis with Trichoderma harzianum. Partial pyrolysis, destroying one-third of the pentosan of aspenwood at atmospheric pressure by dry steam at 276 degrees C, gave little increase in yield of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment with saturated steam at 240 degrees C gave essentially the same yields of butanediol and ethanol on fermentation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, whether or not 80% of the steam was bled off before explosion and even if the chips remained intact, showing that explosion was unnecessary. 17 references.

  9. Double Chooz and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meregaglia, A.; Double Chooz Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The reactor bar{{ν}}e^{} disappearance experiment Double Chooz, located in France near the power plant of Chooz, has as main goal the measurement of the θ_{{13}}^{} mixing angle. For the first time, in 2011, the experimental results gave an indication for a non-zero value of such an oscillation parameter. The mixing angle was successively measured using only the far detector finding the best fit value of sin2(2 θ_{{13}}^{}) = 0.090+0.033-0.029 . The near detector started data taking in December 2014 and it will allow to reduce the systematic errors so far dominated by the reactor flux uncertainty. In this paper a review of the experiment is presented focusing on the so-called Gadolinium-III results (DOUBLE CHOOZ COLLABORATION (ABE Y. et al.), JHEP, 10 (2014) 086; 02 (2015) 074). Furthermore additional physics measurements are presented such as the capability of Double Chooz to identify the ortho-positronium state on event by event basis.

  10. REMS Wind Sensor Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Torre Juarez, M.; Gomez-Elvira, J.; Navarro, S.; Marin, M.; Torres, J.; Rafkin, S. C.; Newman, C. E.; Pla-García, J.

    2015-12-01

    The REMS instrument is part of the Mars Science Laboratory payload. It is a sensor suite distributed over several parts of the rover. The wind sensor, which is composed of two booms equipped with a set of hot plate anemometers, is installed on the Rover Sensing Mast (RSM). During landing most of the hot plates of one boom were damaged, most likely by the pebbles lifted by the Sky Crane thruster. The loss of one wind boom necessitated a full review of the data processing strategy. Different algorithms have been tested on the readings of the first Mars year, and these results are now archived in the Planetary Data System (PDS), The presentation will include a description of the data processing methods and of the resulting products, including the typical evolution of wind speed and direction session-by-session, hour-by-hour and other kinds of statistics . A review of the wind readings over the first Mars year will also be presented.

  11. Space expectations: Latest survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitt, David; Swan, Cathy; Swan, Peter; Woods, Arthur

    2010-11-01

    At the 59th IAC in Glasgow, a paper was presented describing two studies being carried out by Commission VI of the International Academy of Astronautics on the impact of space activities upon society. One of these studies sought to discover the hopes, aspirations and expectations of those outside the space field - the person in the street - regarding space activities. The paper reviewed the thought processes and decisions leading up to the commencement of the survey, documented the reasoning behind the questions which the public were; described the efforts to translate the questionnaire into the six Unesco languages to achieve wider participation, and provided an overview of results to date. This present paper provides an update on this Space Expectations survey as the study comes to a close. The paper briefly discusses the addition of new languages for the questionnaire and the drive to make the survey better known and encourage participation worldwide, before going on to provide a detailed analysis of the latest results of opinions. Insights include respondent's thoughts regarding the visions and costs of space activities, how much people feel part of them and whether and how they would like to be more involved.

  12. Heel pain--operative results.

    PubMed

    Baxter, D E; Thigpen, C M

    1984-01-01

    In 6 years through 1982, the authors performed 34 operative cases in 26 patients with recalcitrant heel pain. The operative procedure involves an isolated neurolysis of the mixed nerve supplying the abductor digiti quinti muscle as it passes beneath the abductor hallucis muscle and beneath the medial ridge of the calcaneus. The deep fascia of the abductor hallucis muscle is released routinely, and an impinging heel spur or tight plantar fascia is partially removed or released if it is causing entrapment of the nerve. The biomechanical pathogenesis of heel pain in relation to pes planus and pes cavus predisposing to an entrapment neuropathy is described, and the anatomy of the heel in relation to the nerve distribution is clarified and well illustrated. Of the 34 operated heels, 32 had good results and two had poor results. Heel pain can cause total disability in the working population and may jeopardize one's employment or professional athletic career. The authors believe operative treatment has a place in the care of recalcitrant heel pain and that an entrapment neuropathy is an etiological factor in heel pain.

  13. Wake Vortex Algorithm Scoring Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, R. E.; Delisi, D. P.; Hinton, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report compares the performance of two models of trailing vortex evolution for which interaction with the ground is not a significant factor. One model uses eddy dissipation rate (EDR) and the other uses the kinetic energy of turbulence fluctuations (TKE) to represent the effect of turbulence. In other respects, the models are nearly identical. The models are evaluated by comparing their predictions of circulation decay, vertical descent, and lateral transport to observations for over four hundred cases from Memphis and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airports. These observations were obtained during deployments in support of NASA's Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The results of the comparisons show that the EDR model usually performs slightly better than the TKE model.

  14. Research Results and Information Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Research Results Monsoon behavior balanced by glaciers Research Discovers Frequent Mutations of Chromatin Significant Progress in Water Photochemistry Research Structural signature in amorphous alloy formation and plastic deformation The neural basis of Drosophila larval light/darkness preference Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding Integrin activation and internalization on soft ECM as a mechanism of induction of stem cell differentiation by ECM elasticity Determination of electron pairing symmetry of iron-based superconductor FeSe Long-Range Topological Order in Metallic Glass Information Update List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and CNRS in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and ESRC in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and RS in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and RSE in 2011 Funding of Major Program Projects in 2010 Funding of Key Program Projects in 2010

  15. Data Assimilation Results from PLASMON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Lichtenberger, J.; Duffy, J.; Friedel, R. H.; Clilverd, M.; Heilig, B.; Vellante, M.; Manninen, J. K.; Raita, T.; Rodger, C. J.; Collier, A.; Reda, J.; Holzworth, R. H.; Ober, D. M.; Boudouridis, A.; Zesta, E.; Chi, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    VLF and magnetometer observations can be used to remotely sense the plasmasphere. VLF whistler waves can be used to measure the electron density and magnetic Field Line Resonance (FLR) measurements can be used to measure the mass density. In principle it is then possible to remotely map the plasmasphere with a network of ground-based stations which are also less expensive and more permanent than satellites. The PLASMON project, funded by the EU FP-7 program, is in the process of doing just this. A large number of ground-based observations will be input into a data assimilative framework which models the plasmasphere structure and dynamics. The data assimilation framework combines the Ensemble Kalman Filter with the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model. In this presentation we will describe the plasmasphere model, the data assimilation approach that we have taken, PLASMON data and data assimilation results for specific events.

  16. Results from Antarctic optical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Eather, R.H.

    1988-08-01

    This paper summarizes the results of investigations carried out in the past decade on the upper atmosphere and the magnetosphere of Antarctica, using ground-based optical techniques, such as all-sky cameras, spectral imaging, photometry, and interferometry. Special attention is given to studies conducted by the United States, United Kingdom, Australian, French, Japanese, New Zealand, South African, and Japanese teams in Antarctica, that contributed to the information in the areas of dayside aurora, auroral conjugacy, thermospheric dynamics, and wave-particle interactions. The advantages obtained by the use of monochromatic imaging devices are discussed; this technique, used in conjunction with various detectors and sophisticated image-processing methods is considered to be the instrumentation of choice for future optical studies of upper atmosphere. 75 references.

  17. Current MINOS Neutrino Oscillation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Habig, Alec; /Minnesota U., Duluth

    2009-07-01

    The MINOS experiment is now making precise measurements of the {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance oscillations seen in atmospheric neutrinos, tests possible disappearance to sterile {nu} by measuring the neutral current flux, and has extended our reach towards the so far unseen {theta}{sub 13} by looking for {nu}{sub e} appearance in the {nu}{sub {mu}} beam. It does so by using the intense, well-understood NuMI neutrino beam created at Fermilab and observing it 735km away at the Soudan Mine in Northeast Minnesota. High-statistics studies of the neutrino interactions themselves and the cosmic rays seen by the MINOS detectors have also been made. Results from MINOS first three years of operations will be presented.

  18. SPA Meteor Section Results: 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair

    2013-08-01

    Information extracted from analyses carried out by the SPA Meteor Section from 2007 is presented and discussed. Events covered include: the radio Quadrantid maximum on January 4; a bright fireball seen from parts of England and imaged from the Netherlands at 19h56m UT on February 6, for which an approximate trajectory was established; radio results from the Lyrids in late April; the Perseid near-peak activity from August and a note on some daylight Perseid observing from Britain using thermal imagers; the radio α-Aurigid maximum on September 1; the Orionid return, which again provided enhanced activity over several consecutive dates in October for visual and radio observers; the radio Leonids, although the probably main peak found visually on November 19 was not recorded thus due to its timing; the typically protracted Geminid maximum period around December 13-15 as observed visually and by radio; and the Ursid outburst, primarily as detected by radio on December 22.

  19. First results on fast baking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visentin, B.; Gasser, Y.; Charrier, J. P.

    2006-07-01

    High gradient performances of bulk niobium cavities go through a low-temperature baking during one or two days, the temperature parameter is adjusted in a narrow tuning range around 110 or 120 °C. With such treatment, the intrinsic quality factor Q0 is improved at high fields. Assuming the oxygen diffusion is involved in this phenomenon, we have developed the “fast baking” (145 °C/3 h) as an alternative method. Similar results have been achieved with this method compared to standard baking. Consequently, for the first time, a link between oxygen diffusion and high field Q-slope has been demonstrated. Furthermore, this method open the way to a simpler and better baking procedure for the large-scale cavity production due to: time reduction and possibility to combine baking and drying during cavity preparation.

  20. Monsoon '90 - Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Guerra, Abel G.

    1992-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  1. Monsoon 1990: Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Dubois, Pascale; Guerra, Abel

    1991-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  2. Airfreight forecasting methodology and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A series of econometric behavioral equations was developed to explain and forecast the evolution of airfreight traffic demand for the total U.S. domestic airfreight system, the total U.S. international airfreight system, and the total scheduled international cargo traffic carried by the top 44 foreign airlines. The basic explanatory variables used in these macromodels were the real gross national products of the countries involved and a measure of relative transportation costs. The results of the econometric analysis reveal that the models explain more than 99 percent of the historical evolution of freight traffic. The long term traffic forecasts generated with these models are based on scenarios of the likely economic outlook in the United States and 31 major foreign countries.

  3. Recent results from telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Masaki

    2015-08-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) is an experiment to observe Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). TA's recent results, the energy spectrum and anisotropy based on the 6-year surface array data, and the primary composition obtained from the shower maximum (XMAX) are reported. The spectrum demonstrates a clear dip and cutoff. The shape of the spectrum is well described by the energy loss of extra-galactic protons interacting with the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Above the cutoff, a medium-scale (20∘ radius) flux enhancement was observed near the Ursa-Major. A chance probability of creating this hotspot from the isotropic flux is 4.0 σ. The measured ⟨XMAX⟩ is consistent with the primary being proton or light nuclei for energies 1018.2 eV-1019.2 eV.

  4. TFTR D-T results

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.M.

    1995-03-01

    Temperatures, densities and confinement of deuterium plasmas confined in tokamaks have been achieved within the last decade that are approaching those required for a D-T reactor. As a result, the unique phenomena present in a D-T reactor plasma can now be studied in the laboratory. Recent experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been the first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas with reactor fuel concentrations of tritium. The injection of {approximately} 20 MW of tritium and 14 MW of deuterium neutral beams into the TFTR produced a plasma with a T/D density ratio of {approximately} 1 and yielded a maximum fusion power of {approximately} 9.2 MW. The fusion power density in the core of the plasma was {approximately} 1.8 MW m{sup {minus}3} approximating that expected in a D-T fusion reactor. A TFTR plasma with T/D density ratio of {approximately} 1 was found to have {approximately} 20% higher energy confinement time than a comparable D plasma, indicating a confinement scaling with average ion mass, A, of {tau}{sub E} {approximately} A{sup 0.6}. The core ion temperature increased from 30 keV to 37 keV due to a 35% improvement of ion thermal conductivity. Using the electron thermal conductivity from a comparable deuterium plasma, about 50% of the electron temperature increase from 9 keV to 10.6 keV can be attributed to electron heating by the alpha particles. The {approx} 5% loss of alpha particles was consistent with classical first orbit loss without anomalous effects. Initial measurements have been made of the confined energetic alphas and the resultant alpha ash density.

  5. Huygens GCMS Results from Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso B.; Demick, Jaime; Kasprzak, Wayne; Atreya, Sushil; Owen, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    The Huygens Probe executed a successful entry, descent and impact on the Saturnian moon of Titan on January 14, 2005. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) instrument conducted isotopic and compositional measurements throughout the two and one half hour descent from 146 km altitude, and on the surface for 69 minutes until loss of signal from the orbiting Cassini spacecraft. The GCMS incorporated a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system. The gas sampling system provided continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the surface after impact. Data products from the GCMS included altitude profiles of the major atmospheric constituents dinitrogen (N2) and methane (CH4), isotope ratios of 14N/15N, 12C/13C, and D/H, mole fractions of radiogenic argon (40Ar) and primordial argon (36Ar), and upper limits on the mole fractions of neon, krypton and xenon, which were found to be absent. Surface measurements confirmed the presence of ethane (C2H6) and cyanogen (C2N2). Later data products expanded atmospheric profiles to include the surface response of C2N2. C2H6, acetylene (C2H2), and carbon dioxide (CO2). More recent results include the profiles of benzene (C6H6) and molecular hydrogen (H2). The GCMS data are being further analyzed to obtain higher precision results and to identify other trace species ion the atmosphere and evaporating from the surface.

  6. Comparative Soot Diagnostics: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Griffin, DeVon W.; Gard, Melissa Y.

    1997-01-01

    detected and suppressed. Prior to CSD, no combustion-generated particulate samples had been collected near the flame zone for well-developed microgravity flames. All of the extant data either came from drop tower tests and therefore only corresponded to the early stages of a fire or were collected far from the flame zone. The fuel sources in the drop tower tests were restricted to laminar gas-jet diffusion flames and very rapidly overheated wire insulation. The gas-jet tests indicated, through thermophoretic sampling, (2) that soot primaries and aggregates (groups of primary particles) in low-gravity may be significantly larger than those in normal gravity (1-g). This raises new scientific questions about soot processes as well as practical issues for particulate size sensitivity and detection alarm threshold levels used in on-orbit smoke detectors. Preliminary tests in the 2.2 second drop tower suggest that particulate generated by overheated wire insulation may be larger in low-g than in 1-g. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) grids downstream of the fire region in the Wire Insulation Flammability experiment as well as visual observation of long string-like aggregates, further confirm this suggestion. The combined impact of these limited results and theoretical predictions is that, as opposed to extrapolation from l-g data, direct knowledge of low-g combustion particulate is needed for more confident design of smoke detectors for spacecraft. This paper describes the operation and preliminary results of the CSD, a project conceived and developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The CSD flight experiment was conducted in the Middeck Glovebox Facility (MGBX) on USMP-3. The project is support by NASA Headquarters Microgravity Science and Applications Division and Code Q. The results presented here are from the microgravity portion of the experiment, including the temporal response of the detectors and average sizes of the primary and aggregate particles captured on the

  7. Geophysical Model Research and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Walter, W; Tkalcic, H; Franz, G; Flanagan, M

    2004-07-07

    Geophysical models constitute an important component of calibration for nuclear explosion monitoring. We will focus on four major topics: (1) a priori geophysical models, (2) surface wave models, (3) receiver function derived profiles, and (4) stochastic geophysical models. The first, a priori models, can be used to predict a host of geophysical measurements, such as body wave travel times, and can be derived from direct regional studies or even by geophysical analogy. Use of these models is particularly important in aseismic regions or regions without seismic stations, where data of direct measurements might not exist. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed the Western Eurasia and North Africa (WENA) model which has been evaluated using a number of data sets, including travel times, surface waves, receiver functions, and waveform analysis (Pasyanos et al., 2004). We have joined this model with our Yellow Sea - Korean Peninsula (YSKP) model and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) East Asia model to construct a model for all of Eurasia and North Africa. Secondly, we continue to improve upon our surface wave model by adding more paths. This has allowed us to expand the region to all of Eurasia and into Africa, increase the resolution of our model, and extend results to even shorter periods (7 sec). High-resolution models exist for the Middle East and the YSKP region. The surface wave results can be inverted either alone, or in conjunction with other data, to derive models of the crust and upper mantle structure. We are also using receiver functions, in joint inversions with the surface waves, to produce profiles directly under seismic stations throughout the region. In a collaborative project with Ammon, et al., they have been focusing on stations throughout western Eurasia and North Africa, while we have been focusing on LLNL deployments in the Middle East, including Kuwait, Jordan, and the United Arab Emirates. Finally, we have been

  8. RESULTS OF SUPPLEMENTAL MST STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T; David Hobbs, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-07-24

    The current design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) includes an auxiliary facility, the Actinide Finishing Facility, which provides a second contact of monosodium titanate (MST) to remove soluble actinides and strontium from waste if needed. This treatment will occur after cesium removal by Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). Although the process changes and safety basis implications have not yet been analyzed, provisions also exist to recover the MST from this operation and return to the initial actinide removal step in the SWPF for an additional (third) contact with fresh waste. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) request identified the need to study the following issues involving this application of MST: Determine the effect of organics from the solvent extraction (CSSX) process on radionuclide sorption by MST; Determine the efficiency of re-using MST for multiple contacts; and Examine fissile loading on MST under conditions using a waste containing significantly elevated concentrations of plutonium, uranium, neptunium, and strontium. This report describes the results of three experimental studies conducted to address these needs: (1) Addition of high concentrations of entrained CSSX solvent had no noticeable effect, over a two week period, on the sorption of the actinides and strontium by MST in a direct comparison experiment. (2) Test results show that MST still retains appreciable capacity after being used once. For instance, reused MST--in the presence of entrained solvent--continued to sorb actinides and strontium. (3) A single batch of MST was used to sequentially contact five volumes of a simulant solution containing elevated concentrations of the radionuclides of interest. After the five contacts, we measured the following solution actinide loadings on the MST: plutonium: 0.884 {+-} 0.00539 wt % or (1.02 {+-} 0.0112) E+04 {micro}g/g MST, uranium: 12.1 {+-} 0.786 wt % or (1.40 {+-} 0.104) E+05 {micro}g/g MST, and neptunium: 0.426 {+-} 0

  9. FlareLab: early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, H.; Kempkes, P.; Mackel, F.; Stein, H.; Tenfelde, J.; Arnold, L.; Dreher, J.; Grauer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The FlareLab experiment at Bochum University has been constructed to generate and investigate plasma-filled magnetic flux tubes similar to arch-shaped solar prominences, which often result in coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In its first version, the device has been used to reproduce and extend previous studies of Bellan et al (1998 Phys. Plasmas 5 1991). Here the plasma source consists of two electrodes, which can be connected to a 1.0 kJ capacitor bank, and of a horseshoe magnet, which provides an arch-shaped guiding field. The discharge is ignited in a cloud of hydrogen gas that has been puffed into the space above the electrodes. In the first few microseconds the plasma current rises at a rate of several kA µs-1, causing the plasma column to pinch along the guiding B-field and to form an expanding loop structure. The observed dynamics of the magnetic flux tubes is analysed by means of three-dimensional MHD simulations in order to determine the influence of parameters like the initial magnetic field geometry on magnetic stability. At present, FlareLab is redesigned to mimic a model that was proposed by Titov and Démoulin (1999 Astron. Astrophys. 351 707) to investigate twisted magnetic configurations in solar flares.

  10. ALOHA Cabled Observatory: Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, B. M.; Lukas, R.; Duennebier, F. K.

    2011-12-01

    The ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO) was installed 6 June 2011, extending power, network communications and timing to a seafloor node and instruments at 4726 m water depth 100 km north of Oahu. The system was installed using ROV Jason operated from the R/V Kilo Moana. Station ALOHA is the field site of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program that has investigated temporal dynamics in biology, physics, and chemistry since 1988. HOT conducts near monthly ship-based sampling and makes continuous observations from moored instruments to document and study climate and ecosystem variability over semi-diurnal to decadal time scales. The cabled observatory system will provide the infrastructure for continuous, interactive ocean sampling enabling new measurements as well as a new mode of ocean observing that integrates ship and cabled observations. The ACO is a prototypical example of a deep observatory system that uses a retired first-generation fiber-optic telecommunications cable. Sensors provide live video, sound from local and distant sources, and measure currents, pressure, temperature, and salinity. Preliminary results will be presented and discussed.

  11. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2010-12-17

    Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

  12. Drillhole results to be discussed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Vattenfall, the Swedish State Power Board, is searching for a predicted reservoir of abiogenic methane beneath the floor of a meteorite crater in central Sweden. Some of the early scientific results from the drilling project at the Siljan Ring impact structure will be presented on Thursday, May 21, at the 1987 AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore, Md.Thomas Gold of Cornell University (Ithaca, N.Y.) has predicted that large amounts of methane from deep within the earth may move closer to the surface beneath sites where large meteorites have hit the earth, such as the Siljan Ring structure (Eos, July 9, 1985, p. 537). The site is known for its gas seeps, according to Paul Westcott of the Gas Research Institute (GRI, in Chicago, Ill.). The institute is putting up 15% of the costs of the drillhole in return for access to samples and data. Seismic surveys at the site revealed horizontal structures in the granite, which may suggest the presence of gas-liquid interfaces, Westcott said.

  13. Unfavourable results in craniofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ramesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Craniofacial surgery is one of the newer subspecialties of plastic surgery and owes its birth to the pioneering work of Paul Tessier in the late sixties. Since then this challenging specialty work has been taken up by many centres around the word including India. Initial reports in late eighties and early nineties showed morbidity and mortality ranging from 1.6% to 4.3%. However over past few decades, with improved instrumentations, safer anaesthesia and cumulative experience of surgeons the morbidity and mortality has been brought down to as low as 0.1% in many centres in USA. In our centre at Post-graduate Institute, Chandigarh, the mortality rate is about 0.8% (4 out of 480 cases). The learning curve in this surgery is rather steep but with experience and a well-coordinated team work, results in this complex subspecialty can be improved. The infection is a major cause for worry but can be easily prevented by sound surgical principles and placing a vascularised tissue barrier between the extradural space and the nasopharynx/sinus mucosa. PMID:24501456

  14. EUPORIAS: plans and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buontempo, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in our understanding and ability to forecast climate variability have meant that skilful predictions are beginning to be routinely made on seasonal to decadal (s2d) timescales. Such forecasts have the potential to be of great value to a wide range of decision-making, where outcomes are strongly influenced by variations in the climate. In 2012 the European Commission funded EUPORIAS, a four year long project to develop prototype end-to-end climate impact prediction services operating on a seasonal to decadal timescale, and assess their value in informing decision-making. EUPORIAS commenced on 1 November 2012, coordinated by the UK Met Office leading a consortium of 24 organisations representing world-class European climate research and climate service centres, expertise in impacts assessments and seasonal predictions, two United Nations agencies, specialists in new media, and commercial companies in climate-vulnerable sectors such as energy, water and tourism. The poster describes the setup of the project, its main outcome and some of the very preliminary results.

  15. Collaborative Behavioral Teratology Study: results.

    PubMed

    Buelke-Sam, J; Kimmel, C A; Adams, J; Nelson, C J; Vorhees, C V; Wright, D C; St Omer, V; Korol, B A; Butcher, R E; Geyer, M A

    1985-01-01

    Behavioral measures used in the Collaborative Behavioral Teratology Study (CBTS) were negative geotaxis (PNDs 7-10), olfactory discrimination (PNDs 9-11), auditory startle habituation (PNDs 18-19 and 57-58), 1-hr activity (PNDs 21, 60, 100 and 120), 23-hr activity (PND 100), activity following a pharmacological challenge (PND 120), and an operant, discrete trial visual discrimination task. Maternal and offspring body weights and the appearance of certain physical landmarks of development were also monitored. The design of the CBTS allowed evaluation of the reproducibility and detection sensitivity of these behavioral test methods, as well as the impact of early testing experience on later behavioral assessment, offspring sex differences in response levels and variability, and the contribution of litter-to-litter and animal-to-animal variation to behavioral measures in a standardized test protocol. The results obtained in this test system are discussed in relation to each of these factors and to the degree of overt toxicity obtained using prenatal treatment with 0, 0.5 or 2.0 mg/kg d-amphetamine sulfate, SC, on gestation days 12-15 (Study 1) or methylmercuric chloride, 0, 2.0 or 6.0 mg/kg by gavage, on gestation days 6-9 (Study 2).

  16. SPA Meteor Section Results: 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair

    2010-12-01

    A summary of the main analyzed results and other information provided to the SPA Meteor Section from 2006 is presented and discussed. Events covered include: the radio Quadrantid maximum on January 3/4; an impressive fireball seen from parts of England, Belgium and the Netherlands at 22h53m51s UT on July 18, which was imaged from three EFN stations as well; the Southern delta-Aquarid and alpha-Capricornid activity from late July and early August; the radio Perseid maxima on August 12/13; confirmation that the October 5/6 video-meteor outburst was not observed by radio; visual and radio findings from the strong, bright-meteor, Orionid return in October; another impressive UK-observed fireball on November 1/2, with an oil painting of the event as seen from London; the Leonids, which produced a strong visual maximum around 04h-05h UT on November 18/19 that was recorded much less clearly by radio; radio and visual reports from the Geminids, with a note regarding NASA-observed Geminid lunar impact flashes; and the Ursid outburst recorded by various techniques on December 22.

  17. Preliminary results of ANAIS-25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaré, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cuesta, C.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2014-04-01

    The ANAIS (Annual Modulation with NaI(Tl) Scintillators) experiment aims at the confirmation of the DAMA/LIBRA signal using the same target and technique at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. 250 kg of ultrapure NaI(Tl) crystals will be used as a target, divided into 20 modules, each coupled to two photomultipliers. Two NaI(Tl) crystals of 12.5 kg each, grown by Alpha Spectra from a powder having a potassium level under the limit of our analytical techniques, form the ANAIS-25 set-up. The background contributions are being carefully studied and preliminary results are presented: their natural potassium content in the bulk has been quantified, as well as the uranium and thorium radioactive chains presence in the bulk through the discrimination of the corresponding alpha events by PSA, and due to the fast commissioning, the contribution from cosmogenic activated isotopes is clearly identified and their decay observed along the first months of data taking. Following the procedures established with ANAIS-0 and previous prototypes, bulk NaI(Tl) scintillation events selection and light collection efficiency have been also studied in ANAIS-25.

  18. Cosmic radioactivity and INTEGRAL results

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, Roland

    2014-05-02

    Gamma-ray lines from radioactive decay of unstable isotopes co-produced by nucleosynthesis in massive stars and supernova have been measured since more than thirty years. Over the past ten years, INTEGRAL complemented the first sky survey made by COMPTEL. The {sup 26}A1 isotope with 1 My decay time had been first direct proof of currently-ongoing nucleosynthesis in our Galaxy. This has now become a tool to study the ∼My history of specific source regions, such as massive-star groups and associations in nearby regions which can be discriminated from the galactic-plane background, and the inner Galaxy, where Doppler shifted lines add to the astronomical information about bar and spiral structure. Recent findings suggest that superbubbles show a remarkable asymmetry, on average, in the spiral arms of our galaxy. {sup 60}Fe is co-produced by the sources of {sup 26}A1, and the isotopic ratio from their nucleosynthesis encodes stellar-structure information. Annihilation gamma-rays from positrons in interstellar space show a puzzling bright and extended source region central to our Galaxy, but also may be partly related to nucleosynthesis. {sup 56}Ni and {sup 44}Ti isotope gamma-rays have been used to constrain supernova explosion mechanisms. Here we report latest results using the accumulated multi-year database of INTEGRAL observations, and discuss their astrophysical interpretations, connecting to other traces of cosmic radioactivity and to other cosmic messengers.

  19. Results from the NEXT Protogypes

    DOE PAGES

    Oliveira, C A.B.

    2013-10-04

    NEXT-100 is an electroluminescent high pressure Time Projection Chamber currently under construction. It will search for the neutrino-less double beta decay in 136Xe at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. NEXT-100 aims to achieve nearly intrinsic energy resolution and to highly suppress background events by taking advantage of the unique properties of xenon in the gaseous phase as the detection medium. In order to prove the principle of operation and to study which are the best operational conditions, two prototypes were constructed: NEXT-DEMO and NEXT-DBDM. In this study we present the latest results from both prototypes. We report the improvement in termsmore » of light collection (~ 3x) achieved by coating the walls of NEXT-DEMO with tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB), the outstanding energy resolution of 1% (Full Width Half Maximum) from NEXT-DBDM as well as the tracking capabilities of this prototype (2.1 mm RMS error for point-like depositions) achieved by using a square array of 8 x 8 SiPMs.« less

  20. Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Woodruff, Robert; Vasudevan, Gopal; Rizzo, Maxime; Thompson, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept study and a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC would provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 5-year mission lifetime. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables starlight suppression in broadband light from 480-960 nm. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness we have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed.

  1. Results from Long Baseline Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messier, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of neutrino mass in 1998 spawned a world-wide effort to better understand neutrino properties using neutrinos from the Sun, the atmosphere, reactors, and from accelerators. Neutrino experiments based at the world's accelerators have been an important component of this program as the proton accelerators provide a nearly pure beam of muon neutrinos at selected energies with which to study neutrino oscillations of muon flavor to other flavors. The underlying structure of the neutrino masses and mixings are revealed through the study of the frequency and amplitude of the flavor oscillations. The smallness of the neutrino mass splittings (~= 0 . 05 eV) means that phase differences between the mass eigenstates accumulate very slowly requiring these experiments to be conducted over great distances ranging from 250 km to 810 km separation between source and detector. Currently there are three long-baseline experiments underway, T2K at the J-PARC facility in Japan, and MINOS+ and NOvA underway at Fermilab in the United States. In this talk, I will review the fundamental physics probed by these experiments, how the experimental setups probe this physics, and summarize the recent results with a particular emphasis on the newest experiment, NOvA.

  2. [Mortality results in SENTIERI Project].

    PubMed

    Pirastu, R; Zona, A; Ancona, C; Bruno, C; Fano, V; Fazzo, L; Iavarone, I; Minichilli, F; Mitis, F; Pasetto, R; Comba, P

    2011-01-01

    SENTIERI Project (Mortality study of residents in Italian polluted sites) studies mortality of residents in 44 sites of national interest for environmental remediation (Italian polluted sites, IPS). The epidemiological evidence of the causal association between causes of death and exposures was a priori classified into one of these three categories: Sufficient (S), Limited (L) and Inadequate (I). In these sites various environmental exposures are present. Asbestos (or asbestiform fibres as in Biancavilla) has been the motivation for defining six sites as IPSs (Balangero, Emarese, Casale Monferrato, Broni, Bari-Fibronit, Biancavilla). In five of these, increases in malignant neoplasm or pleura mortality are detected; in four of them, results are consistent in both genders. In six other sites (Pitelli, Massa Carrara, Aree del Litorale Vesuviano, Tito, "Aree industriali della Val Basento", Priolo), where other sources of environmental pollution in addition to asbestos are reported, mortality from malignant neoplasm of pleura is increased in both genders in Pitelli, Massa Carrara, Priolo, "Litorale vesuviano". In the time span 1995-2002, a total of 416 extra cases of malignant neoplasm of pleura are detected in the twelve asbestos-polluted sites. Asbestos and pleural neoplasm represent an unique case. Unlike mesothelioma, most causes of death analyzed in SENTIERI have multifactorial etiology; furthermore, in most IPSs multiple sources of different pollutants are present, sometimes concurrently with air pollution from urban areas: in these cases, drawing conclusions on the association between environmental exposures and specific health outcomes might be complicated. Notwithstanding these difficulties, in a number of cases an etiological role could be attributed to some environmental exposures. The attribution could be possible on the basis of increases observed in both genders and in different age classes, and the exclusion of a major role of occupational exposures was

  3. An overview of FTU results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, P.; Alessi, E.; Amicucci, L.; Angelini, B.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Artaserse, G.; Barbato, E.; Belli, F.; Bertocchi, A.; Bin, W.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Briguglio, S.; Bruschi, A.; Calabrò, G.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Centioli, C.; Cesario, R.; Cianfarani, C.; Cirant, S.; Crisanti, F.; D'Arcangelo, O.; De Angeli, M.; De Angelis, R.; Di Matteo, L.; Di Troia, C.; Esposito, B.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Fogaccia, G.; Frigione, D.; Fusco, V.; Gabellieri, L.; Galperti, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Giovannozzi, E.; Granucci, G.; Grossetti, G.; Grosso, G.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Iannone, F.; Krivska, A.; Kroegler, H.; Lazzaro, E.; Lontano, M.; Maddaluno, G.; Marchetto, C.; Marinucci, M.; Marocco, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Mazzotta, C.; Milovanov, A.; Minelli, D.; Mirizzi, F. C.; Moro, G. A.; Napoli, F.; Nowak, S.; Orsitto, F. P.; Pacella, D.; Panaccione, L.; Panella, M.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Podda, S.; Pizzuto, A.; Pucella, G.; Ramogida, G.; Ravera, G.; Romano, A.; Sozzi, C.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.; Viola, B.; Vitale, V.; Vlad, G.; Zanza, V.; Zerbini, M.; Zonca, F.; Aquilini, M.; Cefali, P.; Di Ferdinando, E.; Di Giovenale, S.; Giacomi, G.; Gravanti, F.; Grosso, A.; Mellera, V.; Mezzacappa, M.; Pensa, A.; Petrolini, P.; Piergotti, V.; Raspante, B.; Rocchi, G.; Sibio, A.; Tilia, B.; Torelli, C.; Tulli, R.; Vellucci, M.; Zannetti, D.

    2013-10-01

    Since the 2010 IAEA-FEC Conference, FTU has exploited improvements in cleaning procedures and in the density control system to complete a systematic exploration of access to high-density conditions in a wide range of plasma currents and magnetic fields. The line-averaged densities at the disruptive limit increased more than linearly with the toroidal field, while no dependence on plasma current was found; in fact, the maximum density of 4.3 × 1020 m-3 was reached at B = 8 T even at the minimum current of 0.5 MA, corresponding to twice the Greenwald limit. The lack of plasma current dependence was due to the increase in density peaking with the safety factor. Experiments with the 140 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system were focused on the sawtooth (ST) period control and on the commissioning of a new launcher with real-time steering capability that will act as the front-end actuator of a real-time system for ST period control and tearing mode stabilization. Various ECRH and electron cyclotron current-drive modulation schemes were used; with the fastest one, the ST period synchronized with an 8 ms modulation period. The observed period variations were simulated using the JETTO code with a critical shear model for the crash trigger. The new launcher was of the plug-in type, allowing quick insertion and connection to the transmission line. Both beam characteristics and steering speed were in line with design expectation. Experimental results on the connection between improved coupling of lower hybrid waves in high-density plasmas and reduced wave spectral broadening were interpreted by fully kinetic, non-linear model calculations. A dual-frequency, time-of-flight diagnostic for the measurement of density profiles was developed and successfully tested. Fishbone-like instabilities driven by energetic electrons were simulated by the hybrid MHD-gyrokinetic XHMGC code.

  4. Transconjunctival dacryocystorhinostomy: Long term results

    PubMed Central

    Kaynak, Pelin; Ozturker, Can; Karabulut, Gamze; Çelik, Burcu; Yilmaz, Omer Faruk; Demirok, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes of transconjunctival dacryocystorhinostomy (TRC-DCR) surgery in patients with epiphora due to primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (PANDO) at second year follow-up. Methods In this retrospective, interventional study, 33 eyes of 29 patients, with epiphora due to PANDO, are included. Lower eyelid conjunctiva is incised at vestibulum inferomedially to access the lacrimal sac and nasal mucosa. Bone is perforated with burr and rongeurs and saccal and nasal flaps are anastomosed. Conjunctival wound edges are apposed and left unsutured. Intraoperative difficulties, surgical time and complications are noted. Average follow-up time was 2 years. Anatomical success was defined as patent lacrimal passages upon irrigation and functional success was defined as relief of epiphora. Results In nineteen (57.6%) eyes the surgeries were completed with the anterior and the posterior flaps sutured. In eight eyes (24.2%) only anterior flaps could be sutured. In 6 eyes (18.2%), the surgical procedure was converted to external dacryocystorhinostomy since the nasal mucosa could not be exposed adequately via transconjunctival route. The mean surgical time was 65.1 min. One patient had a millimeter long lower eyelid margin laceration in one eye (3.7%) intraoperatively due to traction for visualization of the operative site. Epiphora resolved in 25 of 27 eyes (92.5%) in whom TRC-DCR could be completed. Epiphora and failure to irrigation were noted in two eyes (7.4%) at the postoperative 4th and 8th months, respectively and required reoperation. No complications occurred, except granuloma formation at the conjunctival incision site in three eyes (11.1%). Epiphora resolved in all the six eyes of patients who underwent an external DCR (100%). Conclusion Transconjunctival dacryocystorhinostomy is a scarless dacryocystorhinostomy technique which is performed without endoscope and/or laser assistance, with 92.5% success rate comparable to external DCR at

  5. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohm, H.; Angioni, C.; Arslanbekov, R.; Atanasiu, C.; Becker, G.; Becker, W.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Bolshukhin, D.; Bolzonella, T.; Borrass, K.; Brambilla, M.; Braun, F.; Buhler, A.; Carlson, A.; Conway, G. D.; Coster, D. P.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Egorov, S.; Eich, T.; Engelhardt, K.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Faugel, H.; Finken, K. H.; Foley, M.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Gafert, J.; Fournier, K. B.; Gantenbein, G.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Gernhardt, J.; Goodman, T.; Gruber, O.; Gude, A.; Günter, S.; Haas, G.; Hartmann, D.; Heger, B.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hobirk, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohenöcker, H.; Horton, L. D.; Igochine, V.; Jacchia, A.; Jakobi, M.; Jenko, F.; Kallenbach, A.; Kardaun, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Keller, A.; Kendl, A.; Kim, J.-W.; Kirov, K.; Kochergov, R.; Kollotzek, H.; Kraus, W.; Krieger, K.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Kurzan, B.; Lang, P. T.; Lasnier, C.; Lauber, P.; Laux, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Leuterer, F.; Lohs, A.; Lorenz, A.; Lorenzini, R.; Maggi, C.; Maier, H.; Mank, K.; Manso, M.-E.; Mantica, P.; Maraschek, M.; Martines, E.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Meo, F.; Merkel, P.; Merkel, R.; Merkl, D.; Mertens, V.; Monaco, F.; Mück, A.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Na, Y.-S.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Neuhauser, J.; Nguyen, F.; Nishijima, D.; Nishimura, Y.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Nunes, I.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S. D.; Poli, E.; Proschek, M.; Pugno, R.; Quigley, E.; Raupp, G.; Reich, M.; Ribeiro, T.; Riedl, R.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Ryter, F.; Saarelma, S.; Sandmann, W.; Savtchkov, A.; Sauter, O.; Schade, S.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schwarz, E.; Schweinzer, J.; Schweizer, S.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sesnic, S.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Sips, A. C. C.; Speth, E.; Stäbler, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Tabasso, A.; Tanga, A.; Tardini, G.; Tichmann, C.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Urano, H.; Varela, P.; Vollmer, O.; Wagner, D.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Westerhof, E.; Wolf, R.; Wolfrum, E.; Würsching, E.; Yoon, S.-W.; Yu, Q.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.

    2003-12-01

    Recent results from the ASDEX Upgrade experimental campaigns 2001 and 2002 are presented. An improved understanding of energy and particle transport emerges in terms of a 'critical gradient' model for the temperature gradients. Coupling this to particle diffusion explains most of the observed behaviour of the density profiles, in particular, the finding that strong central heating reduces the tendency for density profile peaking. Internal transport barriers (ITBs) with electron and ion temperatures in excess of 20 keV (but not simultaneously) have been achieved. By shaping the plasma, a regime with small type II edge localized modes (ELMs) has been established. Here, the maximum power deposited on the target plates was greatly reduced at constant average power. Also, an increase of the ELM frequency by injection of shallow pellets was demonstrated. ELM free operation is possible in the quiescent H-mode regime previously found in DIII-D which has also been established on ASDEX Upgrade. Regarding stability, a regime with benign neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) was found. During electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization of NTMs, bgrN could be increased well above the usual onset level without a reappearance of the NTM. Electron cyclotron resonance heating and ECCD have also been used to control the sawtooth repetition frequency at a moderate fraction of the total heating power. The inner wall of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel has increasingly been covered with tungsten without causing detrimental effects on the plasma performance. Regarding scenario integration, a scenario with a large fraction of noninductively driven current (geq50%), but without ITB has been established. It combines improved confinement (tgrE/tgrITER98 ap 1.2) and stability (bgrN les 3.5) at high Greenwald fraction (ne/nGW ap 0.85) in steady state and with type II ELMy edge and would offer the possibility for long pulses with high fusion power at reduced current in ITER.

  6. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  7. Corral Monitoring System assessment results

    SciTech Connect

    Filby, E.E.; Haskel, K.J.

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the results of a functional and operational assessment of the Corral Monitoring Systems (CMS), which was designed to detect and document accountable items entering or leaving a monitored site. Its development was motivated by the possibility that multiple sites in the nuclear weapons states of the former Soviet Union might be opened to such monitoring under the provisions of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The assessment was performed at three levels. One level evaluated how well the planned approach addressed the target application, and which involved tracking sensitive items moving into and around a site being monitored as part of an international treaty or other agreement. The second level examined the overall design and development approach, while the third focused on individual subsystems within the total package. Unfortunately, the system was delivered as disassembled parts and pieces, with very poor documentation. Thus, the assessment was based on fragmentary operating data coupled with an analysis of what documents were provided with the system. The system design seemed to be a reasonable match to the requirements of the target application; however, important questions about site manning and top level administrative control were left unanswered. Four weaknesses in the overall design and development approach were detected: (1) poor configuration control and management, (2) inadequate adherence to a well defined architectural standard, (3) no apparent provision for improving top level error tolerance, and (4) weaknesses in the object oriented programming approach. The individual subsystems were found to offer few features or capabilities that were new or unique, even at the conceptual level. The CMS might possibly have offered a unique combination of features, but this level of integration was never realized, and it had no unique capabilities that could be readily extracted for use in another system.

  8. Pluto System Surface Composition Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Binzel, R. P.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Earle, A. M.; Ennico, K.; Jennings, D. E.; Howett, C. J. A.; Linscott, I. R.; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. Wm; Protopapa, S.; Reuter, D. C.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present an overview of surface composition discoveries from New Horizons' exploration of the Pluto system. The emphasis will be on results that could only have been obtained thanks to the uniquely high spatial resolution provided by a spacecraft visit. The Ralph instrument is New Horizons' primary tool for investigating surface compositions in the Pluto system. Ralph consists of a near-infrared spectral imager sharing a 75 mm aperture telescope assembly with a color CCD camera system. The Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) component of Ralph provides spectral coverage from 1.25 - 2.5 µm, at a resolving power (λ/Δλ) of 240. Ices such as CH4, N2, CO, CO2, C2H6, NH3, and H2O have uniquely diagnostic absorption bands in this wavelength region. The Multi-spectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) has 7 CCD arrays of which 4 have interference filters affixed directly on the focal plane. The filters pass wavelengths ranging from 400 through 975 nm, sensitive to coloration by tholin-type materials as well as a weak CH4 ice absorption band at 890 nm. Both Ralph components are usually operated in a scanning mode, rotating the spacecraft about its Z axis to sweep Ralph's field of view across the scene such that each point in the scene is eventually imaged at each wavelength. The width of the scanned region is 0.9 degrees divided into 256 spatial pixels for LEISA and 5.7 degrees spanned by 5000 pixels for MVIC. Over the course of the summer 2015 flyby, numerous Ralph observations targeted the various bodies in the Pluto system. As of late 2015, transmission of the data to Earth continues, but already a number of spectacular data sets are available for analysis, including LEISA scans of Pluto at 6 to 7 km/pixel and of Charon at 3 km/pixel, as well as MVIC scans of Pluto at 700 m/pixel and of Charon at 5 km/pixel. This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons Project.

  9. [Results for SHEBA/FIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Atmospheric Research Laboratory's Radiation Measurement System (RAMS) was on the NCAR C-130 aircraft in May and July 1998, collecting radiometric data on the science flights conducted in the vicinity of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ship. These measurements were part of the FIRE Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE ACE). Analysis of some of the data focused on the absorption, reflection, and transmittance of Arctic clouds, especially compared to model results. In order to assess the absorption of solar radiation by the clear and cloudy atmosphere in the Arctic the measurements from the radiometers were combined in pairs of above-cloud segments and below-cloud segments. To get these pairs, the data for all sixteen of the flights (8 in May and 8 in July) were examined for occurrences of low-altitude segments in proximity to high-altitude segments. The low-altitude data are then treated as measurements of the bottom of a layer and the high-altitude data are taken as measurements of the top of the layer. With measurements of the upwelling and downwelling irradiances above and below a layer one can determine the reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance of the layer. Attachment: Doelling, D.R., P. Minnis, D.A. Spangenberg, V. Chakrapani, A. Mahesh, S.K. Pope, and F.P.J. Valero, Cloud radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere during FIRE ACE derived from AVHRR data, J. Geophys. Res. 106, 15,279-15,296,2001. Minnis, P., D.R. Doelling, D.A. Spangenberg, A. Mahesh, S.K. Pope, and F.P.J. Valero, AVHRR-derived cloud radiative forcing over the ARM NSA and SHEBA site during FIRE ACE, abstract submitted to the ARM Science Team Meeting, San Antonio, TX, M a . 13-17,2000. Pope, S.K., and F.P.J. Valero, Measured and modeled radiometric fluxes in the Arctic during FIRE-ACE, presented as a poster at the American Geophysical Union meeting, San Francisco, CA, Dec. 13-17, 1999. Pope, S.K., and F.P.J. Valero, Measured and modeled radiometric fluxes in the Arctic

  10. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, O.; Bosch, H.-S.; Günter, S.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Kaufmann, M.; Krieger, K.; Lackner, K.; Mertens, V.; Neu, R.; Ryter, F.; Schweinzer, J.; Stäbler, A.; Suttrop, W.; Wolf, R.; Asmussen, K.; Bard, A.; Becker, G.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Borrass, K.; Braams, B.; Brambilla, M.; Brandenburg, R.; Braun, F.; Brinkschulte, H.; Brückner, R.; Brüsehaber, B.; Büchl, K.; Buhler, A.; Callaghan, H. P.; Carlson, A.; Coster, D. P.; Cupido, L.; de Peña Hempel, S.; Dorn, C.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Egorov, S.; Engelhardt, W.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Feist, H.-U.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Fussmann, G.; Gafert, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Gernhardt, J.; Gubanka, E.; Gude, A.; Haas, G.; Hallatschek, K.; Hartmann, D.; Heinemann, B.; Herppich, G.; Herrmann, W.; Hofmeister, F.; Holzhauer, E.; Jacobi, D.; Kakoulidis, M.; Karakatsanis, N.; Kardaun, O.; Khutoretski, A.; Kollotzek, H.; Kötterl, S.; Kraus, W.; Kurzan, B.; Kyriakakis, G.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L. L.; Leuterer, F.; Lorenz, A.; Maier, H.; Manso, M.; Maraschek, M.; Markoulaki, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P. J.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Merkel, R.; Meskat, J. P.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Napiontek, B.; Neu, G.; Neuhauser, J.; Niethammer, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S.; Raupp, G.; Reinmüller, K.; Riedl, R.; Rohde, V.; Röhr, H.; Roth, J.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlögl, D.; Schmidtmann, K.; Schneider, H.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweizer, S.; Schwörer, R. R.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sesnic, S.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Speth, E.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Thoma, A.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ullrich, W.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Verbeek, H.; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Weinlich, M.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wunderlich, R.; Xantopoulos, N.; Yu, Q.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.; Zohm, H.; Zouhar, M.

    1999-09-01

    The closed ASDEX Upgrade Divertor II, `LYRA', is capable of handling heating powers of up to 20 MW or P/R of 12 MW/m, owing to a reduction of the maximum heat flux to the target plates by more than a factor of 2 compared with the open Divertor I. This reduction is caused by high radiative losses from carbon and hydrogen inside the divertor region and is in agreement with B2-EIRENE modelling predictions. At medium densities in the H mode, the type I ELM behaviour shows no dependence on the heating method (NBI, ICRH). ASDEX Upgrade-JET dimensionless identity experiments showed compatibility of the L-H transition with core physics constraints, while in the H mode confinement, inconsistencies with the invariance principle were established. At high densities close to the Greenwald density, the MHD limited edge pressures, the influence of divertor detachment on separatrix parameters and increasing edge transport lead to limited edge densities and finally to temperatures below the critical edge temperatures for H mode. This results in a drastic increase of the H mode threshold power and an upper H mode density limit with gas puff refuelling. The H mode confinement degradation approaching this density limit is caused by the ballooning mode limited edge pressures and `stiff' temperature profiles relating core and edge temperatures. Repetitive high field side pellet injection allows for H mode operation well above the Greenwald density; moreover, higher confinement than with gas fuelling is found up to the highest densities. Neoclassical tearing modes limit the achievable β depending on the collisionality at the resonant surface. In agreement with the polarization current model, the onset β is found to be proportional to the ion gyroradius in the collisionless regime, while higher collisionalities are stabilizing. The fractional energy loss connected with saturated modes at high pressures is about 25%. A reduction of neoclassical mode amplitude and an increase of β have

  11. An overview of KSTAR results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jong-Gu; Oh, Y. K.; Yang, H. L.; Park, K. R.; Kim, Y. S.; Kim, W. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, S. G.; Na, H. K.; Kwon, M.; Lee, G. S.; Ahn, H. S.; Ahn, J.-W.; Bae, Y. S.; Bak, J. G.; Bang, E. N.; Chang, C. S.; Chang, D. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Cho, K. W.; Cho, M. H.; Choi, M.; Choe, W.; Choi, J. H.; Chu, Y.; Chung, K. S.; Diamond, P.; Delpech, L.; Do, H. J.; Eidietis, N.; England, A. C.; Ellis, R.; Evans, T.; Choe, G.; Grisham, L.; Gorelov, Y.; Hahn, H. S.; Hahn, S. H.; Han, W. S.; Hatae, T.; Hillis, D.; Hoang, T.; Hong, J. S.; Hong, S. H.; Hong, S. R.; Hosea, J.; Humphreys, D.; Hwang, Y. S.; Hyatt, A.; Ida, K.; In, Y. K.; Ide, S.; Jang, Y. B.; Jeon, Y. M.; Jeong, J. I.; Jeong, N. Y.; Jeong, S. H.; Jin, J. K.; Joung, M.; Ju, J.; Kawahata, K.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, Hee-Su; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. K.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J.; Kim, J. C.; Kim, Jong-Su; Kim, Jung-Su; Kim, J. H.; Kim, Kyung-Min; Kim, K. J.; Kim, K. P.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, S. T.; Kim, S. W.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. O.; Ko, J. S.; Ko, W. H.; Kogi, Y.; Kolemen, E.; Kong, J. D.; Kwak, S. W.; Kwon, J. M.; Kwon, O. J.; Lee, D. G.; Lee, D. R.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, K. D.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. I.; Lee, S. M.; Lee, T. G.; Lee, W.; Lee, W. L.; Lim, D. S.; Litaudon, X.; Lohr, J.; Mueller, D.; Moon, K. M.; Na, D. H.; Na, Y. S.; Nam, Y. U.; Namkung, W.; Narihara, K.; Oh, S. T.; Oh, D. G.; Ono, T.; Park, B. H.; Park, D. S.; Park, G. Y.; Park, H.; Park, H. T.; Park, J. K.; Park, J. S.; Park, M. K.; Park, S. H.; Park, S.; Park, Y. M.; Park, Y. S.; Parker, R.; Rhee, D. R.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sakamoto, K.; Shiraiwa, S.; Seo, D. C.; Seo, S. H.; Seol, J. C.; Shi, Y. J.; Son, S. H.; Song, N. H.; Suzuki, T.; Terzolo, L.; Walker, M.; Wallace, G.; Watanabe, K.; Wang, S. J.; Woo, H. J.; Woo, I. S.; Yagi, M.; Yu, Y. W.; Yamada, I.; Yonekawa, Y.; Yoo, C. M.; You, K. I.; Yoo, J. W.; Yun, G. S.; Yu, M. G.; Yoon, S. W.; Xiao, W.; Zoletnik, S.; the KSTAR Team

    2013-10-01

    Since the first H-mode discharges in 2010, the duration of the H-mode state has been extended and a significantly wider operational window of plasma parameters has been attained. Using a second neutral beam (NB) source and improved tuning of equilibrium configuration with real-time plasma control, a stored energy of Wtot ˜ 450 kJ has been achieved with a corresponding energy confinement time of τE ˜ 163 ms. Recent discharges, produced in the fall of 2012, have reached plasma βN up to 2.9 and surpassed the n = 1 ideal no-wall stability limit computed for H-mode pressure profiles, which is one of the key threshold parameters defining advanced tokamak operation. Typical H-mode discharges were operated with a plasma current of 600 kA at a toroidal magnetic field BT = 2 T. L-H transitions were obtained with 0.8-3.0 MW of NB injection power in both single- and double-null configurations, with H-mode durations up to ˜15 s at 600 kA of plasma current. The measured power threshold as a function of line-averaged density showed a roll-over with a minimum value of ˜0.8 MW at \\bar{n}_e\\sim 2\\times 10^{19}\\,m^{-3} . Several edge-localized mode (ELM) control techniques during H-mode were examined with successful results including resonant magnetic perturbation, supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), vertical jogging and electron cyclotron current drive injection into the pedestal region. We observed various ELM responses, i.e. suppression or mitigation, depending on the relative phase of in-vessel control coil currents. In particular, with the 90° phase of the n = 1 RMP as the most resonant configuration, a complete suppression of type-I ELMs was demonstrated. In addition, fast vertical jogging of the plasma column was also observed to be effective in ELM pace-making. SMBI-mitigated ELMs, a state of mitigated ELMs, were sustained for a few tens of ELM periods. A simple cellular automata (‘sand-pile’) model predicted that shallow deposition near the pedestal

  12. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, O.; Arslanbekov, R.; Atanasiu, C.; Bard, A.; Becker, G.; Becker, W.; Beckmann, M.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bilato, R.; Bolshukin, D.; Borrass, K.; Bosch, H.-S.; Braams, B.; Brambilla, M.; Brandenburg, R.; Braun, F.; Brinkschulte, H.; Brückner, R.; Brüsehaber, B.; Büchl, K.; Buhler, A.; Bürbaumer, H.; Carlson, A.; Ciric, M.; Conway, G.; Coster, D. P.; Dorn, C.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Egorov, S.; Engelhardt, W.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Faugel, H.; Foley, M.; Franzen, P.; Fu, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Gafert, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Gernhardt, J.; Gubanka, E.; Gude, A.; Günter, S.; Haas, G.; Hartmann, D.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hobirk, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohenöcker, H.; Horton, L.; Hu, L.; Jacobi, D.; Jakobi, M.; Jenko, F.; Kallenbach, A.; Kardaun, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Kendl, A.; Kim, J.-W.; Kirov, K.; Kochergov, R.; Kollotzek, H.; Kraus, W.; Krieger, K.; Kurzan, B.; Kyriakakis, G.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L.; Leuterer, F.; Lorenz, A.; Maier, H.; Mank, K.; Manso, M.-E.; Maraschek, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P. J.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Meo, F.; Merkel, R.; Mertens, V.; Meskat, J. P.; Monk, R.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Neuhauser, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Nunes, I.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S.; Poli, E.; Pugno, R.; Raupp, G.; Ribeiro, T.; Riedl, R.; Riondato, S.; Rohde, V.; Röhr, H.; Roth, J.; Ryter, F.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Sarelma, S.; Schade, S.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlögl, D.; Schmidtmann, K.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweinzer, J.; Schweizer, S.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sesnic, S.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Sips, A.; Speth, E.; Stäbler, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Tabasso, A.; Tanga, A.; Tardini, G.; Tichmann, C.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ullrich, W.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Vollmer, O.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wolf, R.; Wolfrum, E.; Wunderlich, R.; Xantopoulos, N.; Yu, Q.; Zarrabian, M.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.; Zeiler, A.; Zohm, H.

    2001-10-01

    Ion and electron temperature profiles in conventional L and H mode on ASDEX Upgrade are generally stiff and limited by a critical temperature gradient length ∇T/T as given by ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence. ECRH experiments indicate that electron temperature (Te) profiles are also stiff, as predicted by electron temperature gradient turbulence with streamers. Accordingly, the core and edge temperatures are proportional to each other and the plasma energy is proportional to the pedestal pressure for fixed density profiles. Density profiles are not stiff, and confinement improves with density peaking. Medium triangularity shapes (δ<0.45) show strongly improved confinement up to the Greenwald density nGW and therefore higher βvalues, owing to increasing pedestal pressure, and H mode density operation extends above nGW. Density profile peaking at nGW was achieved with controlled gas puffing rates, and first results from a new high field side pellet launcher allowing higher pellet velocities are promising. At these high densities, small type II ELMs provide good confinement with low divertor power loading. In advanced scenarios the highest performance was achieved in the improved H mode with HL-89PβN approx 7.2 at δ = 0.3 for five confinement times, limited by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) at low central magnetic shear (qmin approx 1). The T profiles are still governed by ITG and trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence, and confinement is improved by density peaking connected with low magnetic shear. Ion internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges - mostly with reversed shear (qmin>1) and L mode edge - achieved HL-89P <= 2.1 and are limited to βN <= 1.7 by internal and external ideal MHD modes. Turbulence driven transport is suppressed, in agreement with the E × B shear flow paradigm, and core transport coefficients are at the neoclassical ion transport level, where the latter was established by Monte Carlo simulations. Reactor relevant ion

  13. Recent Opportunity Microscopic Imager Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Yingst, R.; Team, A.

    2013-12-01

    Opportunity. The extremely soft bedrock exposed at a Whitewater Lake outcrop target dubbed 'Azilda' is mostly fine-grained, with dispersed 2-5 mm-diameter spherules and resistant veins. This target was easily abraded by the RAT, exposing a sandstone-like texture, but the sorting of grains is difficult to determine at MI resolution. Darker, erosion-resistant veneers, similar to desert varnishes on Earth, appear to record aqueous alteration that post-dates the formation of the Ca sulfate veins; they likely contain the nontronite that is observed by CRISM in this area. The inferred neutral pH and relatively low temperature of the fluids involved in these phases of alteration would have provided a habitable environment for life if it existed on Mars at that time. Because Opportunity can no longer directly sense phyllosilicate mineralogy with the MiniTES or Mössbauer spectrometers, it is focusing on characterizing the chemistry with the APXS and texture with the MI of potential phyllosilicate host rocks. The Athena MI continues to return useful images of Mars that are being used to study the textures of rocks and soils at Endeavour crater. Exploration by Opportunity continues, with the rover approaching 'Solander Point' and more exposures of phyllosilicates detected from orbit; the latest MI results will be presented at the conference.

  14. SMOS first results over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Yann; Waldteufel, Philippe; Cabot, François; Richaume, Philippe; Jacquette, Elsa; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Mamhoodi, Ali; Delwart, Steven; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2010-05-01

    retrieve soil moisture over fairly large and thus inhomogeneous areas. The retrieval is carried out at nodes of a fixed Earth surface grid. To achieve this purpose, after checking input data quality and ingesting auxiliary data, the retrieval process per se can be initiated. This cannot be done blindly as the direct model will be dependent upon surface characteristics. It is thus necessary to first assess what is the dominant land use of a node. For this, an average weighing function (MEAN_WEF) which takes into account the "antenna"pattern is run over the high resolution land use map to assess the dominant cover type. This is used to drive the decision tree which, step by step, selects the type of model to be used as per surface conditions. All this being said and done the retrieval procedure starts if all the conditions are satisfied, ideally to retrieve 3 parameters over the dominant class (the so-called rich retrieval). If the algorithm does not converge satisfactorily, a new trial is made with less floating parameters ("poorer retrieval") until either results are satisfactory or the algorithm is considered to fail. The retrieval algorithm also delivers whenever possible a dielectric constant parameter (using the-so called cardioid approach). Finally, once the retrieval converged, it is possible to compute the brightness temperature at a given fixed angle (42.5°) using the selected forward models applied to the set of parameters obtained at the end of the retrieval process. So the output product of the level 2 soil moisture algorithm should be node position, soil moisture, dielectric constants, computed brightness temperature at 42.5°, flags and quality indices. During the presentation we will describe in more details the algorithm and accompanying work in particular decision tree principle and characteristics, the auxiliary data used and the special and "exotic"cases. We will also be more explicit on the algorithm validation and verification through the data

  15. Inhibition of Protease-Resistant Prion Protein Formation in a Transformed Deer Cell Line Infected with Chronic Wasting Disease‡

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Gregory J.; Olsen, Emily A.; Lee, Kil Sun; Raymond, Lynne D.; Bryant, P. Kruger; Baron, Gerald S.; Caughey, Winslow S.; Kocisko, David A.; McHolland, Linda E.; Favara, Cynthia; Langeveld, Jan P. M.; van Zijderveld, Fred G.; Mayer, Richard T.; Miller, Michael W.; Williams, Elizabeth S.; Caughey, Byron

    2006-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (prion disease) of North American cervids, i.e., mule deer, white-tailed deer, and elk (wapiti). To facilitate in vitro studies of CWD, we have developed a transformed deer cell line that is persistently infected with CWD. Primary cultures derived from uninfected mule deer brain tissue were transformed by transfection with a plasmid containing the simian virus 40 genome. A transformed cell line (MDB) was exposed to microsomes prepared from the brainstem of a CWD-affected mule deer. CWD-associated, protease-resistant prion protein (PrPCWD) was used as an indicator of CWD infection. Although no PrPCWD was detected in any of these cultures after two passes, dilution cloning of cells yielded one PrPCWD-positive clone out of 51. This clone, designated MDBCWD, has maintained stable PrPCWD production through 32 serial passes thus far. A second round of dilution cloning yielded 20 PrPCWD-positive subclones out of 30, one of which was designated MDBCWD2. The MDBCWD2 cell line was positive for fibronectin and negative for microtubule-associated protein 2 (a neuronal marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (an activated astrocyte marker), consistent with derivation from brain fibroblasts (e.g., meningeal fibroblasts). Two inhibitors of rodent scrapie protease-resistant PrP accumulation, pentosan polysulfate and a porphyrin compound, indium (III) meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphine chloride, potently blocked PrPCWD accumulation in MDBCWD cells. This demonstrates the utility of these cells in a rapid in vitro screening assay for PrPCWD inhibitors and suggests that these compounds have potential to be active against CWD in vivo. PMID:16378962

  16. Angiopoietin-1 prevents severe bleeding complications induced by heparin-like drugs and fibroblast growth factor-2 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Das, Jharna R.; Tang, Pingtao; Wong, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Critically ill children can develop bleeding complications when treated with heparin-like drugs. These events are usually attributed to the anticoagulant activity of these drugs. However, previous studies showed that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a heparin-binding growth factor released in the circulation of these patients, could precipitate intestinal hemorrhages in mice treated with the heparin-like drug pentosan polysulfate (PPS). Yet very little is known about how FGF-2 induces bleeding complications in combination with heparin-like drugs. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which circulating FGF-2 induces intestinal hemorrhages in mice treated with PPS. We used a well-characterized mouse model of intestinal hemorrhages induced by FGF-2 plus PPS. Adult FVB/N mice were infected with adenovirus carrying Lac-Z or a secreted form of recombinant human FGF-2, and injected with PPS, at doses that do not induce bleeding complications per se. Mice treated with FGF-2 in combination with PPS developed an intestinal inflammatory reaction that increased the permeability and disrupted the integrity of submucosal intestinal vessels. These changes, together with the anticoagulant activity of PPS, induced lethal hemorrhages. Moreover, a genetically modified form of the endothelial ligand angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1*), which has powerful antipermeability and anti-inflammatory activity, prevented the lethal bleeding complications without correcting the anticoagulant status of these mice. These findings define new mechanisms through which FGF-2 and Ang-1* modulate the outcome of intestinal bleeding complications induced by PPS in mice and may have wider clinical implications for critically ill children treated with heparin-like drugs. PMID:26276817

  17. Anionic polysaccharides. A class of substances with hepatoprotective and antiadhesive properties in rat liver preservation.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Chifumi; Kollmar, Otto; Schäfer, Thilo; Tian, Ying-Hua; Schilling, Martin K

    2002-01-01

    In liver preservation, the substitution of the anion Cl(-) by lactobionic acid (LB) prevents reperfusion edema and extends the preservation time for human livers. We studied the effect of compounds that are structurally related to lactobionic acid: anionic polycarbohydrates (sulfated anionic polysaccharide, SAP, and pentosan polysulfate, PPS) on liver function and leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction in isolated perfusion and liver transplant models. Rat livers, cold-stored (24 h) in a Cl(-) -containing control solution, became edematous during 1 h of reperfusion. Substitution of Cl(-) by either LB, SAP, or PPS decreased reperfusion edema in a Cl(-) concentration-dependent fashion. Reperfusion edema was abolished completely after preservation in 100 mM SAP solution or PPS solution. Also hepatic lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) release was lowest after preservation in those solutions. After preservation in LB or anionic polycarbohydrate solutions, portal venous resistance was significantly higher than after preservation in Cl(-)-containing control solution. Capillary blood flow was 391 +/- 83 pl/s and 398 +/- 174 pl/s after preservation in SAP solution (SAPs) and PPSs, and 803 +/- 117 pl/s and 641 +/- 219 pl/s after preservation in LB or Cl(-)-containing control solution. The number of leukocytes sticking to the vascular wall was lower ( P < 0.05) after preservation in SAPs or PPSs (109 +/- 31 cells/mm(2) and 108 +/- 60 cells/mm(2), respectively), when compared with preservation in Cl(-)-containing control or LB solutions (429 +/- 63 cells/mm(2) and 277 +/- 59 cells/mm(2)). In rat liver preservation, anionic polysaccharides are antiedematous compounds, with a higher potency than LB and additional antiadhesive properties. PMID:11875608

  18. Reversible Detection of Heparin and Other Polyanions by Pulsed Chronopotentiometric Polymer Membrane Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    The first fully reversible polymeric membrane-based sensor for the anticoagulant heparin and other polyanions using a pulsed chronopotentiometry (pulstrode) measurement mode is reported. Polymeric membranes containing a lipophilic inert salt of the form R+R− (where R+ and R− are tridodecylmethylammonium (TDMA+) and dinonylnaphthalene sulfonate (DNNS−), respectively) are used to suppress unwanted spontaneous ion extractions under zero-current equilibrium conditions. An anodic galvanostatic current pulse applied across the membrane perturbs the equilibrium lipophilic ion distribution within the membrane phase in such a way that concomitantly, anions/polyanions are extracted into the membrane from the sample. The membrane is then subjected to an open-circuit zero current state for a short period and finally a 0 V vs. reference electrode potentiostatic pulse is applied to restore the membrane to its initial full equilibrium condition. Potentials are sampled as average values during the last 10% of the 0.5-s open circuit phase of the measurement cycle. Fully reversible and reproducible EMF responses are observed for heparin, pentosan polysulfate (PPS), chondroitin sulfate (CS) and oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS), with the magnitude of the potentiometric response proportional to charge density of the polyanions. The sensor provides EMF response related to heparin concentrations in the range of 1-20 U/mL. The responses to variations in heparin levels and toward other polyanions of the pulstrode configuration are analogous to the already established single-use, non-reversible potentiometric polyion sensors based on membranes doped only with the lipophilic anion exchanger TDMA+. PMID:20121058

  19. Extraction of hemicellulose from ryegrass straw for the production of glucose isomerase and use of the resulting straw residue for animal feed

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.P.; Anderson, A.W.

    1980-03-01

    The hemicellulose fraction of ryegrass straw was extracted with NaOH and used for the production of glucose isomerase by Streptomyces flavogriseus. The level of hemicellulose extracted increased proportionately with increasing NaOH concentration up to about 4%, then the rate of increase slowed down. Hemicellulose extraction was facilitated by the combined application of heat and NaOH. Approximately 15% hemicellulose (12% as pentosan) could be obtained by treating straw with 4% NaOH for either 3 hours at 90/sup 0/C or 24 hour at room temperature. The highest level (3.04 units/ml culture) of intracellular glucose isomerase was obtained when the organism was grown at 30 degrees Centigrade for two days on 2% straw hemicellulose. The organism also produced a high yield of glucose isomerase on xylose or xylan. The NaOH treated straw residue, after removal of hemicellulose, had approximately 75% higher digestibility and 20% higher feed efficiency for weanling meadow voles than untreated straw, but almost the equivalent to that obtained by NaOH treatment without removal of the hemicellulose. Thus, the residue could be used as animal feed. A process for the production of glucose isomerase and animal feed from ryegrass straw was also proposed.

  20. Symposium on Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at a symposium titled Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics are set forth. The abstracts emphasize photometric, spectroscopic, polarization, and theoretical results on a broad range of current topics in infrared astrophysics.

  1. Ideas for Effective Communication of Statistical Results

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-03-01

    Effective presentation of statistical results to those with less statistical training, including managers and decision-makers requires planning, anticipation and thoughtful delivery. Here are several recommendations for effectively presenting statistical results.

  2. Earth Radiation Budget Experiment - Preliminary seasonal results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Harrison, Edwin F.; Lee, Robert B., III

    1990-01-01

    Data from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and from the operational NOAA-9 satellite being placed in the archive of the earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are discussed. The results of the ERBE data validation effort are reviewed along with ERBE solar constant observations and earth-viewing results. The latter include monthly average results for July 1985, annual average clear-sky fluxes, and annual average, zonal, and global results.

  3. Latest Results from the COMPASS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, M.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper the latest results from the COMPASS experiment are presented. We show results from longitudinally and transversely polarised targets off which high energy muons are scattered. In addition the future plans of COMPASS as well as results of the beam test runs are also presented.

  4. The Results Act: a challenging management framework.

    PubMed

    Caudle, S L

    2001-01-01

    This article provides the reader with a basic understanding of the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993. The Act requires federal agencies to institute a planning and reporting management framework to achieve results. It also identifies challenges federal agencies face in implementing a stronger results management approach and promising practices agencies can use in crafting their management approach. PMID:14680035

  5. How Are My Newborn's Screening Results Used?

    MedlinePlus

    ... might say, the results were "negative" or "in-range." Parents with concerns should feel free to contact their physician and ask about the results. Most states notify parents only when the results are out of range for a particular condition. 1 Out of Range ...

  6. Basic research 1996 results (Gas Research Institute)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Recent results of the Gas Research Institute (GRI) Basic Research program are documented in this report with the purpose to account for the success of the past project. GRI Basic Research program is described as being mission directed because it focuses exclusively on improving gas technology and results oriented because all elements of the research program have defined goals and the performance of the research is judged in terms of these goals. Results are defined as technology transfers, that is, knowledge or procedures that are used outside the basic research arena, either in applied research and development (R&D) or in commercial practice. Beginning from 1981, 176 results have been documented. They are listed in Appendix A to this report. In 1996, GRI`s Basic research documented 16 results: five results were used in GRI`s applied R&D program, six in other applied R&D, and five in commercial practice. They support all three sectors of the gas industry: gas producers (nine results), pipelines (one result), and distributors (four results). Two results support all three sectors. This report describes the known direct uses of the Basic Research program results.

  7. Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    The Innovation Impact brochure captures key breakthrough results across NREL's primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: solar, wind, bioenergy, transportation, buildings, analysis, and manufacturing technologies.

  8. Interpreting Borderline BeLPT Results

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, D.C.; Mayer, A.S.; Lewin, M.D.; Mroz, M.M.; Maier, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) identifies persons sensitized to beryllium (BeS) and thus at risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD). BeLPT test results are abnormal (AB), borderline (BL), or normal (NL). This manuscript addresses the predictive value and interpretation of BL BeLPT results. Methods The various three-result combinations that meet or exceed a nominal referral criteria of 1 AB + 1 BL are assessed with probability modeling and compared. Results At 2% prevalence, the three-result combinations that meet or exceed this referral criteria and associated probabilities of BeS are: (a) 1 AB + 1 BL + 1 NL (72%); (b) 3 BL (91%); (c) 2 AB + 1 NL (95%); (d) 1 AB + 2 BL (99%); (e) 2 AB + 1 BL (100%); and (f) 3 AB (100%). Conclusion These results suggest that BL results are meaningful and that three BL results predict BeS across a broad range of population prevalences. An analysis of longitudinal BeLPT results and clinical findings from an actual surveillance program is warranted to confirm the model’s predictions. PMID:20957676

  9. Tablet PCs, Academic Results and Educational Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer, Ferran; Belvis, Esther; Pamies, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    This article is the result of a study carried out in 2008 and 2009 by a team from the Autonomous University of Barcelona in order to evaluate the implementation of the Digital Whiteboard Program in public schools in the region of Aragon (Spain). The following pages present some of the results obtained during the study. More specifically, this…

  10. Zero Result Searches. . . How to Minimize Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Steve

    1986-01-01

    Based on manual observation of 187 zero result online searches at a university library, this article addresses three types of problems that can produce such search results: multiple database searching, topic negotiation, and database availability. A summary of conceptual and practical recommendations for searchers are provided. (6 references) (EJS)

  11. 7 CFR 1205.29 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reporting results. 1205.29 Section 1205.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Procedures § 1205.29 Reporting results. (a) Each county FSA...

  12. 7 CFR 1205.29 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting results. 1205.29 Section 1205.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Procedures § 1205.29 Reporting results. (a) Each county FSA...

  13. 7 CFR 1205.29 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting results. 1205.29 Section 1205.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Procedures § 1205.29 Reporting results. (a) Each county FSA...

  14. The Joint Languages Model and GCSE Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenning, Marie-Madeleine

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes results obtained at GCSE by students involved in a joint languages diversification scheme in which they studied two languages in parallel for three years. Comparisons are made across languages, with other subjects, and with results achieved by the previous year group, which entered before diversification. Findings reveal various issues…

  15. Zbrowse: An interactive GWAS results browser

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growing number of genotyped populations, the advent of high-throughput phenotyping techniques and the development of GWAS analysis software has rapidly accelerated the number of GWAS experimental results. Candidate gene discovery from these results files is often tedious, involving many manual s...

  16. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED... results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test rules in subpart B of this part, a positive...

  17. CMS supersymmetry and exotic Higgs results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohay, R.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    A selection of results covering searches for supersymmetric particles and exotic decays of the Higgs boson are presented. These results are based on 8 TeV proton-proton collision data collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

  18. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12...) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12 Test results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test rules in subpart B of this part, a positive...

  19. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12...) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12 Test results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test rules in subpart B of this part, a positive...

  20. Pluto results on jets and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Pluto collaboration

    1981-02-01

    Results obtained with the PLUTO detector at PETRA are presented. Multihadron final states have been analysed with respect to clustering, energy-energy correlations and transverse momenta in jets. QCD predictions for hard gluon emission and soft gluon-quark cascades are discussed. Results on ..cap alpha../sub s/ and the gluon spin are given.

  1. MiniBooNE Oscillation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Djurcic, Zelimir; /Columbia U.

    2009-07-01

    These proceedings summarize the MiniBooNE {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} results, describe the first {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} result, and current analysis effort with the NuMI neutrinos detected in the miniBooNE detector.

  2. Students' Homework and TIMSS 2003 Mathematics Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikk, Jaan

    2006-01-01

    An aspect of the complex relationship between students homework and academic achievement (Cooper, Robinson, and Patall, 2006) was examined by correlating TIMSS 2003 mathematics results with the data about homework in 46 countries of the TIMSS study. The TIMSS results had no statistically significant correlation with the teachers' emphasis on…

  3. Tau Lepton Flavor Violation Results from BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, A.

    2009-12-01

    We report the recent results obtained by BABAR collaboration in lepton flavor violation (LFV) searches in the tau lepton sector, presenting 16 new results from τLLL (L = e, μ), τ→LV0 (V0 = ρ0, K*0, K*-0, Φ and τ→LKS.

  4. Supporting Public Access to Research Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapinski, P. Scott; Osterbur, David; Parker, Joshua; McCray, Alexa T.

    2014-01-01

    We posed the question of what services an academic library can best provide to support the NIH Public Access Policy. We approached the answer to this question through education, collaboration, and tool-building. As a result, over the last four years we have engaged over 1,500 participants in discussions of public access to research results, forged…

  5. Stakeholder views on returning research results.

    PubMed

    Haga, Susanne B; Zhao, Jennifer Q

    2013-01-01

    While the disclosure of research findings is relevant to all types of biomedical research, it has garnered particular attention with respect to genetics and genomics research due to some of the unique aspects of the data and the high public profile of the field. In this chapter, we review the attitudes of stakeholders (research participants, policymakers, and researchers) to define areas of consensus regarding the issue of returning research results across and within groups. In addition to stakeholder attitudes about obligations and interest in research results, other major related issues related to returning research results, such as informed consent, communication of research results, and cost, are discussed. Given the consensus between stakeholders to return summary reports of a study's outcomes and individual research results of clinical significance, we conclude that the time has come to encourage, if not require, researchers to consider these issues in the developmental planning stages of a project and to plan and budget accordingly. PMID:24262096

  6. Croatian survey on critical results reporting

    PubMed Central

    Trifunović, Jasenka; Pavosevic, Tihana; Nikolac, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Poor harmonization of critical results management is present in various laboratories and countries, including Croatia. We aimed to investigate procedures used in critical results reporting in Croatian medical biochemistry laboratories (MBLs). Materials and methods An anonymous questionnaire, consisting of 24 questions/statements, related to critical results reporting procedures, was send to managers of MBLs in Croatia. Participants were asked to declare the frequency of performing procedures and degree of agreement with statements about critical values reporting using a Likert scale. Total score and mean scores for corresponding separate statements divided according to health care setting were calculated and compared. Results Responses from 111 Croatian laboratories (48%) were analyzed. General practice laboratories (GPLs) more often re-analyzed the sample before reporting the critical result in comparison with the hospital laboratories (HLs) (score: 4.86 (4.75-4.96) vs. 4.49 (4.25-4.72); P = 0.001) and more often reported the critical value exclusively to the responsible physician compared to HLs (4.46 (4.29-4.64) vs. 3.76 (3.48-4.03), P < 0.001). High total score (4.69 (4.56-4.82)) was observed for selection of the critical results list issued by the Croatian Chamber of Medical Biochemistry (CCMB) indicating a high harmonization level for this aspect of critical result management. Low total scores were observed for the statements regarding data recording and documentation of critical result notification. Conclusions Differences in practices about critical results reporting between HLs and GPLs were found. The homogeneity of least favorable responses detected for data recording and documentation of critical results notification reflects the lack of specific national recommendations. PMID:26110031

  7. Scheduling periodic jobs using imprecise results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jen-Yao; Liu, Jane W. S.; Lin, Kwei-Jay

    1987-01-01

    One approach to avoid timing faults in hard, real-time systems is to make available intermediate, imprecise results produced by real-time processes. When a result of the desired quality cannot be produced in time, an imprecise result of acceptable quality produced before the deadline can be used. The problem of scheduling periodic jobs to meet deadlines on a system that provides the necessary programming language primitives and run-time support for processes to return imprecise results is discussed. Since the scheduler may choose to terminate a task before it is completed, causing it to produce an acceptable but imprecise result, the amount of processor time assigned to any task in a valid schedule can be less than the amount of time required to complete the task. A meaningful formulation of the scheduling problem must take into account the overall quality of the results. Depending on the different types of undesirable effects caused by errors, jobs are classified as type N or type C. For type N jobs, the effects of errors in results produced in different periods are not cumulative. A reasonable performance measure is the average error over all jobs. Three heuristic algorithms that lead to feasible schedules with small average errors are described. For type C jobs, the undesirable effects of errors produced in different periods are cumulative. Schedulability criteria of type C jobs are discussed.

  8. Experimental rotordynamic coefficient results for honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.; Childs, Dara W.

    1988-01-01

    Test results (leakage and rotordynamic coefficients) are presented for seven honeycomb-stator smooth-rotor seals. Tests were carried out with air at rotor speeds up to 16,000 cpm and supply pressures up to 8.2 bars. Test results for the seven seals are compared, and the most stable configuration is identified based on the whirl frequency ratio. Results from tests of a smooth-rotor/smooth-stator seal, a teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal, and the most stable honeycomb seal are compared.

  9. New results on the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1987-11-01

    This is a review of new results on the tau lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/2..pi../sup 0/nu/sub tau/ with much improved precision, and limits on decay modes containing eta mesons, including the second-class-current decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/eta nu/sub tau/. The implications of these new results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 52 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Semantic Clustering of Search Engine Results.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Sara Saad; El-Sayed, Maged F; Hassan, Yasser F

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for search engine results clustering that relies on the semantics of the retrieved documents rather than the terms in those documents. The proposed approach takes into consideration both lexical and semantics similarities among documents and applies activation spreading technique in order to generate semantically meaningful clusters. This approach allows documents that are semantically similar to be clustered together rather than clustering documents based on similar terms. A prototype is implemented and several experiments are conducted to test the prospered solution. The result of the experiment confirmed that the proposed solution achieves remarkable results in terms of precision.

  11. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurin, D.; Bernardi, G.; Gerber, C.; Junk, T.; Juste, A.; Kotwal, A.; Lewis, J.; Mesropian, C.; Schellman, H.; Sekaric, J.; Toback, D.; Van Kooten, R.; Vellidis, C.; Zivkovic, L.

    2015-02-27

    We present a comprehensive review of the physics results obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations up to summer 2014, with emphasis on those achieved in the Run II of the Tevatron collider which delivered a total integrated luminosity of ~10 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96~{\\rm TeV}$. The results are presented in six main physics topics: QCD, Heavy Flavor, Electroweak, Top quark, Higgs boson and searches for New Particles and Interactions. The characteristics of the accelerator, detectors, and the techniques used to achieve these results are also briefly summarized.

  12. MERIS 1st Year: early calibration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delwart, Steven; Bourg, Ludovic; Huot, Jean-Paul

    2004-02-01

    Envisat is ESA's environmental research satellite launched on 1 March 2002. It carries a suit of sensors offering opportunities for a broad range of scientific research and applications. The calibration results from the first year of operation of the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) will be presented, including in-flight verification and radiometric, spectral and geometric characterization of the instrument. Radiometric calibration using the on-board diffuser will be discussed and comparison with vicarious calibration results over desert sites or well-characterized marine sites will be presented. The image quality will be assessed, and improvements resulting from the in-flight characterization will be presented.

  13. Livermore Big Trees Park: 1998 Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Queen, D; Gallegos, G; Surano, K

    2002-04-18

    This report is an in-depth study of results from environmental sampling conducted in 1998 by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Big Trees Park in the city of Livermore. The purpose of the sampling was to determine the extent and origin of plutonium found in soil at concentrations above fallout-background levels in the park. This report describes the sampling that was conducted, the chemical and radio-chemical analyses of the samples, the quality control assessments and statistical analyses of the analytical results, and LLNL's interpretations of the results. It includes a number of data analyses not presented in LLNL's previous reports on Big Trees Park.

  14. Semantic Clustering of Search Engine Results

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Sara Saad; El-Sayed, Maged F.; Hassan, Yasser F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for search engine results clustering that relies on the semantics of the retrieved documents rather than the terms in those documents. The proposed approach takes into consideration both lexical and semantics similarities among documents and applies activation spreading technique in order to generate semantically meaningful clusters. This approach allows documents that are semantically similar to be clustered together rather than clustering documents based on similar terms. A prototype is implemented and several experiments are conducted to test the prospered solution. The result of the experiment confirmed that the proposed solution achieves remarkable results in terms of precision. PMID:26933673

  15. Heavy quark results at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Fein, D.K.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    Recent results in heavy quark physics from the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider are reported. Topics included are top quark production and mass determination, bottom production and correlations, and charmonium production. 20 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Recent QCD results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Pickarz, Henryk; CDF and DO collaboration

    1997-02-01

    Recent QCD results from the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider are presented. An outlook for future QCD tests at the Tevatron collider is also breifly discussed. 27 refs., 11 figs.

  17. MedlinePlus Survey Results 2015

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/survey/index.html MedlinePlus Survey Results 2015 To use the sharing features on this page, ... to our online customer satisfaction site surveys in 2015, administered by the ForeSee by Answers Corporation. Learn ...

  18. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  19. Recent Radiation Test Results for Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Topper, Alyson D.; Casey, Megan C.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Phan, Anthony M.; Kim, Hak S.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Single-event effect (SEE) and total ionizing dose (TID) test results are presented for various hardened and commercial power metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), including vertical planar, trench, superjunction, and lateral process designs.

  20. Summary of TMX results: executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.

    1981-02-26

    This report summarizes results from the successful experimental operation of the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) over the period October 1978 through September 1980. The experimental program, summarized by the DOE milestones given in Table 1, had three basic phases: (1) an 8-month checkout period, October 1978 through May 1979; (2) a 6-month initial period of operation, June through November 1979, during which the basic principles of the tandem configuration were demonstrated (i.e., plasma confinement was improved over that of a single-cell mirror); and (3) a 10-month period, December 1979 through September 1980, during which the initial TMX results were corroborated by additional diagnostic measurements and many detailed physics investigations were carried out. This report summarizes the early results, presents results of recent data analysis, and outlines areas of ongoing research.

  1. New diffraction results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Terashi, Koji; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-05-01

    We present new results from studies on diffractive dijet production and exclusive production of dijet and diphoton obtained by the CDF Collaboration in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron.

  2. Highlights of Recent Results with Clas

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Burkert

    2005-04-01

    Recent results on the study of the electromagnetic structure of nucleon resonances, the spin structure of proton and neutrons at small and intermediate photon virtualities, and the search for exotic pentaquark baryons are presented.

  3. New Quality Metrics for Web Search Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Panagiotis Takis; Ivanova, Lilia; Mustafaraj, Eni

    Web search results enjoy an increasing importance in our daily lives. But what can be said about their quality, especially when querying a controversial issue? The traditional information retrieval metrics of precision and recall do not provide much insight in the case of web information retrieval. In this paper we examine new ways of evaluating quality in search results: coverage and independence. We give examples on how these new metrics can be calculated and what their values reveal regarding the two major search engines, Google and Yahoo. We have found evidence of low coverage for commercial and medical controversial queries, and high coverage for a political query that is highly contested. Given the fact that search engines are unwilling to tune their search results manually, except in a few cases that have become the source of bad publicity, low coverage and independence reveal the efforts of dedicated groups to manipulate the search results.

  4. Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-07-01

    U.S. DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluated Norcal Waste Systems liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks. Trucks had prototype Cummins Westport ISXG engines. Report gives final evaluation results.

  5. Focus on Communication: NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Fall 2008 ... grew new hair cells. Read More "Focus on Communication" Articles Living with Hearing Loss / Anatomy of the ...

  6. CTEPP NC DATA QA/QC RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains the method performance results. This includes field blanks, method blanks, duplicate samples, analytical duplicates, matrix spikes, and surrogate recovery standards.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (...

  7. Results of coronal hole research: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of the last 10 years of coronal hole research, in particular since 1970, is presented. The findings of the early investigations and the more recent results obtained with Skylab/Apollo Telescope Mount instrumentation are discussed.

  8. A generalized Dolinar receiver with inconclusive results

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahira, K.; Usuda, T. S.

    2014-12-04

    We investigate the implementation of a measurement for binary optical coherent states that minimizes the error probability with a fixed rate of an inconclusive result. We find that the optimal measurement for binary optical coherent states with any probability of an inconclusive result can be implemented using only a beam splitter, a local coherent light source, a photon detector, and a feedback circuit, even though the measurement is generally not projective.

  9. Abdominal apoplexy resulting in small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Le, Don; Guileyardo, Joseph; Casanova, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal apoplexy is a rare hemorrhagic condition involving the small arteries or veins within the abdominal cavity. A high degree of clinical suspicion, followed by appropriate diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention, is critical, as nonoperative mortality approaches 100%. Contrary to most previously reported cases, which were associated with hemoperitoneum, we present a patient in which gastroduodenal artery dissection resulted in an organized retroperitoneal hematoma with local compression of the duodenum and subsequent bowel obstruction, resulting in vomiting, aspiration, and death. PMID:27695177

  10. NASA JSC neural network survey results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Dan

    1987-01-01

    A survey of Artificial Neural Systems in support of NASA's (Johnson Space Center) Automatic Perception for Mission Planning and Flight Control Research Program was conducted. Several of the world's leading researchers contributed papers containing their most recent results on artificial neural systems. These papers were broken into categories and descriptive accounts of the results make up a large part of this report. Also included is material on sources of information on artificial neural systems such as books, technical reports, software tools, etc.

  11. Quality circles: Organizational adaptations, improvements and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tortorich, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effective application in industry and government of quality circles work was demonstrated. The results achieved in quality and productivity improvements and cost savings are impressive. The circle process should be institutionalized within industry and government. The stages of circle program growth, innovations that help achieve circle process institutionalization, and the result achieved at Martin Marietta's Michoud Division and within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are addressed.

  12. Reproducibility of liquid oxygen impact test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayle, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Results for 12,000 impacts on a wide range of materials were studied to determine the reproducibility of the liquid oxygen impact test method. Standard deviations representing the overall variability of results were in close agreement with the expected values for a binomial process. This indicates that the major source of variability is due to the go - no go nature of the test method and that variations due to sampling and testing operations were not significant.

  13. Random walk through recent CDF QCD results

    SciTech Connect

    C. Mesropian

    2003-04-09

    We present recent results on jet fragmentation, jet evolution in jet and minimum bias events, and underlying event studies. The results presented in this talk address significant questions relevant to QCD and, in particular, to jet studies. One topic discussed is jet fragmentation and the possibility of describing it down to very small momentum scales in terms of pQCD. Another topic is the studies of underlying event energy originating from fragmentation of partons not associated with the hard scattering.

  14. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    Manos, Daria; Hamer, Okka; Müller, Nestor L

    2007-11-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage is a relatively common complication of blunt chest trauma. Occasionally, it may result from pulmonary barotrauma after scuba diving or from sports activities not associated with barotrauma such as long breath-hold diving. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from a bungee jump in a previously healthy man. Bungee jumping is an increasingly popular sport with relatively few reported injuries. To our knowledge pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described.

  15. Recent results from COMPASS muon scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Capozza, Luigi [Irfu Collaboration: COMPASS Collaboration

    2012-10-23

    A sample of recent results in muon scattering measurements from the COMPASS experiment at CERN will be reviewed. These include high energy processes with longitudinally polarised proton and deuteron targets. High energy polarised measurements provide important constraints for studying the nucleon spin structure and thus permit to test the applicability of the theoretical framework of factorisation theorems and perturbative QCD. Specifically, latest results on longitudinal quark polarisation, quark helicity densities and gluon polarisation will be reviewed.

  16. Pancreatic carcinoma: results with fast neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, R.; Cohen, L.; Hendrickson, F.; Awschalom, M.; Hrejsa, A.F.; Rosenberg, I.

    1981-02-01

    Results of therapy in 31 of 50 patients who were treated for advanced pancreatic carcinoma at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are presented here. To date, six patients are alive and four are free of disease. Since the main reason for failure was lack of control of primary tumor, the tumor dose has been increased by 15%. Based on our results, a nationwide study has been launched to assess the effectiveness of neutrons vs photons in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  17. Abdominal apoplexy resulting in small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Le, Don; Guileyardo, Joseph; Casanova, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal apoplexy is a rare hemorrhagic condition involving the small arteries or veins within the abdominal cavity. A high degree of clinical suspicion, followed by appropriate diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention, is critical, as nonoperative mortality approaches 100%. Contrary to most previously reported cases, which were associated with hemoperitoneum, we present a patient in which gastroduodenal artery dissection resulted in an organized retroperitoneal hematoma with local compression of the duodenum and subsequent bowel obstruction, resulting in vomiting, aspiration, and death.

  18. Results on CP violation from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    S. Giagu

    2003-12-11

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider is collecting a large sample of fully hadronic decays of Bottom and Charm mesons. First CP Violation measurements have been performed using the initial data, achieving results which clearly state the CDF ability in extracting significant CKM information from p{bar p} collisions. The first results on direct CP asymmetries on Charm and Bottom decays and future plans from the CDF experiment are discussed in this paper.

  19. Rampant software errors may undermine scientific results

    PubMed Central

    Soergel, David A. W.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunities for both subtle and profound errors in software and data management are boundless, yet they remain surprisingly underappreciated. Here I estimate that any reported scientific result could very well be wrong if data have passed through a computer, and that these errors may remain largely undetected.  It is therefore necessary to greatly expand our efforts to validate scientific software and computed results. PMID:26539290

  20. Tooth avulsions resulting from basketball net entanglement.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, D P; Winters, J; Novickas, D; Mesa, K

    1997-09-01

    The authors conducted a survey of dentists reporting tooth avulsions from basketball net accidents. Although the number of people injured was small, the dental injuries were serious. In many cases, multiple teeth were avulsed as a result of the maxillary anterior teeth becoming entangled in the basketball net while the patients were attempting to slamdunk a basketball either on a lowered backboard or from a raised take-off area. The authors present recommendations for preventing tooth avulsions resulting from basketball net entanglement.

  1. Implications of the Qweak Commissioning Result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Greg; Qweak Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The commissioning results of the Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab, which constituted approximately 4% of the total results obtained in that experiment, were recently published. After a brief review of the experiment, new, unpublished results derived from that publication will be presented. The sensitivity of the fit used to extract the proton's weak charge to the choice of electromagnetic form factors, to the proton radius puzzle, and to the dipole mass used for the Q2 evolution will be examined. The running of sin2 (θw) and the experiment's mass reach will be discussed. The status of the ongoing effort to complete the analysis of the full experiment will also be shown. The commissioning results of the Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab, which constituted approximately 4% of the total results obtained in that experiment, were recently published. After a brief review of the experiment, new, unpublished results derived from that publication will be presented. The sensitivity of the fit used to extract the proton's weak charge to the choice of electromagnetic form factors, to the proton radius puzzle, and to the dipole mass used for the Q2 evolution will be examined. The running of sin2 (θw) and the experiment's mass reach will be discussed. The status of the ongoing effort to complete the analysis of the full experiment will also be shown. This work was supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177, under which Jefferson Science Associates, LLC operates Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  2. Test result management in global health settings.

    PubMed

    Palazuelos, Daniel; Payne, Jonathan D; Dalal, Anuj K

    2012-09-01

    Across the globe, the ways in which patients' test results are managed are as varied as the many different types of healthcare systems that manage these data. The outcomes, however, are often not too dissimilar: too many clinically significant test results fall through the cracks. The consequences of not following up test results in a timely manner are serious and often devastating to patients: diagnoses are delayed, treatments are not initiated or altered in time, and diseases progress. In resource-poor settings, test results too commonly get filed away within the paper chart in ways that isolate them and prevent passage to future providers caring for a patient. To make matters worse, the onus to act upon these test results often rests on patients who need to return to the clinic within a specified timeframe in order to obtain their results but who may not have the means or are too ill to do so. Even in more developed healthcare settings that use electronic records, clinical data residing in the electronic medical record (EMR) are often stubbornly "static"-key pieces of clinical information are frequently not recognized, retrieved, or shared easily. In this way, EMRs are not unlike paper record systems, and therefore, EMRs alone will not solve this problem. To illustrate this problem, consider the case of a patient newly diagnosed with HIV in 3 different healthcare delivery settings.

  3. Review of recent irradiation-creep results

    SciTech Connect

    Coghlan, W.A.

    1982-05-01

    Materials deform faster under stress in the presence of irradiation by a process known as irradiation creep. This phenomenon is important to reactor design and has been the subject of a large number of experimental and theoretical investigations. The purpose of this work is to review the recent experimental results to obtain a summary of these results and to determine those research areas that require additional information. The investigations have been classified into four subgroups based on the different experimental methods used. These four are: (1) irradiation creep using stress relaxation methods, (2) creep measurements using pressurized tubes, (3) irradiation creep from constant applied load, and (4) irradiation creep experiments using accelerated particles. The similarity and the differences of the results from these methods are discussed and a summary of important results and suggested areas for research is presented. In brief, the important results relate to the dependence of creep on swelling, temperature, stress state and alloying additions. In each of these areas new results have been presented and new questions have arisen which require further research to answer. 65 references.

  4. Test Result Management in Global Health Settings

    PubMed Central

    Palazuelos, Daniel; Payne, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    OVERVIEW Across the globe, the ways in which patients' test results are managed are as varied as the many different types of healthcare systems that manage these data. The outcomes, however, are often not too dissimilar: too many clinically significant test results fall through the cracks. The consequences of not following up test results in a timely manner are serious and often devastating to patients: diagnoses are delayed, treatments are not initiated or altered in time, and diseases progress. In resource-poor settings, test results too commonly get filed away within the paper chart in ways that isolate them and prevent passage to future providers caring for a patient. To make matters worse, the onus to act upon these test results often rests on patients who need to return to the clinic within a specified timeframe in order to obtain their results but who may not have the means or are too ill to do so. Even in more developed healthcare settings that use electronic records, clinical data residing in the electronic medical record (EMR) are often stubbornly “static”—key pieces of clinical information are frequently not recognized, retrieved, or shared easily. In this way, EMRs are not unlike paper record systems, and therefore, EMRs alone will not solve this problem. To illustrate this problem, consider the case of a patient newly diagnosed with HIV in 3 different healthcare delivery settings. PMID:24278831

  5. Successful change programs begin with results.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, R H; Thomson, H A

    1992-01-01

    Most corporate improvement programs have a negligible impact on operational and financial performance because management focuses on the activities, not the results. By initiating activities-centered programs, such as seven-step problem solving, statistical process control, and total quality management training, managers falsely assume that one day results will materialize. But because there is no explicit connection between action and outcome, improvements seldom do materialize. The authors argue for an alternative approach: results-driven improvement programs that focus on achieving specific, measurable operational improvements within a few months. While both activity-centered and results-driven programs aim to strengthen fundamental corporate competitiveness, the approaches differ dramatically. Activity-centered programs rely on broad-based policies and are more concerned with time-consuming preparations than with measurable gains. Results-driven programs, on the other hand, rely on an incremental approach to change, building on what works and discarding what doesn't. As a result, successes come quickly, and managers build their skills and gain the support of their employees for future changes. Because results-driven improvements require minimal investment, there is no excuse for postponing action. Indeed, there is always an abundance of underexploited capability and dissipated resources within the organization that management can tap into to get the program off the ground. The authors give a few pointers for how to get started: translate the long-term vision into doable but ambitious short-term goals; periodically review strategy, learning from both successes and failures; and institutionalize the changes that work and get rid of the rest. PMID:10119715

  6. Predictive aging results in radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, Kenneth T.; Clough, Roger L.

    1993-06-01

    We have previously derived a time-temperature-dose rate superposition methodology, which, when applicable, can be used to predict polymer degradation versus dose rate, temperature and exposure time. This methodology results in predictive capabilities at the low dose rates and long time periods appropriate, for instance, to ambient nuclear power plant environments. The methodology was successfully applied to several polymeric cable materials and then verified for two of the materials by comparisons of the model predictions with 12 year, low-dose-rate aging data on these materials from a nuclear environment. In this paper, we provide a more detailed discussion of the methodology and apply it to data obtained on a number of additional nuclear power plant cable insulation (a hypalon, a silicone rubber and two ethylene-tetrafluoroethylenes) and jacket (a hypalon) materials. We then show that the predicted, low-dose-rate results for our materials are in excellent agreement with long-term (7-9 year) low-dose-rate results recently obtained for the same material types actually aged under bnuclear power plant conditions. Based on a combination of the modelling and long-term results, we find indications of reasonably similar degradation responses among several different commercial formulations for each of the following "generic" materials: hypalon, ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene, silicone rubber and PVC. If such "generic" behavior can be further substantiated through modelling and long-term results on additional formulations, predictions of cable life for other commercial materials of the same generic types would be greatly facilitated.

  7. SDO-AIA DEM: Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, Joan T.

    2011-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory has state-of-the-art spatial resolution and shows the most detailed images of coronal loops ever observed. The series of coronal filters peak at different temperatures, which span the range of active regions. These features represent a significant improvement over earlier coronal imagers and make AIA ideal for multi-thermal analysis. Here we targeted a 171-A coronal loop in AR 11092 observed by AIA on 2010 August 3. Isothermal analysis using the 171-to-193 ratio gave a temperature of Log T = 6.1, similar to the results of EIT and TRACE. Differential Emission Measure analysis, however, showed that the plasma was multithermal, not isothermal, with a distribution that peaked between Log T = 6.3 and 6.4. The result from the isothermal analysis, which is the average of the true plasma distribution weighted by the instrument response functions, appears to be deceptively low. These results have potentially serious implications: EIT and TRACE results, which use the same isothermal method, show substantially smaller temperature gradients than predicted by standard models for loops in hydrodynamic equilibrium and have been used as strong evidence in support of footpoint heating models. These implications may have to be re-examined in the wake of new results from AIA.

  8. Scheduling periodic jobs that allow imprecise results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jen-Yao; Liu, Jane W. S.; Lin, Kwei-Jay

    1990-01-01

    The problem of scheduling periodic jobs in hard real-time systems that support imprecise computations is discussed. Two workload models of imprecise computations are presented. These models differ from traditional models in that a task may be terminated any time after it has produced an acceptable result. Each task is logically decomposed into a mandatory part followed by an optional part. In a feasible schedule, the mandatory part of every task is completed before the deadline of the task. The optional part refines the result produced by the mandatory part to reduce the error in the result. Applications are classified as type N and type C, according to undesirable effects of errors. The two workload models characterize the two types of applications. The optional parts of the tasks in an N job need not ever be completed. The resulting quality of each type-N job is measured in terms of the average error in the results over several consecutive periods. A class of preemptive, priority-driven algorithms that leads to feasible schedules with small average error is described and evaluated.

  9. Some results concerning linear iterative (systolic) arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, O.H.; Palis, M.A.; Kim, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have shown some new interesting results concerning the properties, power, and limitations of various types of linear iterative (systolic) arrays. The method they employed consisted of finding sequential machine characterizations of these array models, and then using the characterizations to prove the results. Because of the absence of any concurrency and synchronization problems, the authors obtained simple proofs to results which when proved directly on the arrays would seem very difficult. The characterizations, therefore, provide a novel and promising method which can be used to analyze other systolic systems. In the future they hope to extend this methodology to the study of two-dimensional and multidimensional systolic arrays, and other systolic systems with different interconnection networks.

  10. Charge state breeders: On-line results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenander, Fredrik

    2008-10-01

    The transformation of radioactive ions from 1+ to n+ in the low-energy stage of a post-accelerator - also called charge breeding, has become a mature technique. Several machines using the method are in operation or under construction. This paper will present and evaluate on-line and off-line results from two different breeder types, the EBIS and the ECRIS-based systems. Notable on-line results, in terms of versatility, efficiency and beam purity among other things, have been achieved with the trap-EBIS charge breeding system for REX-ISOLDE, a post-accelerator operational since 2001. These will be compared with breeding results of stable and radioactive beams obtained with ECRIS at a number of facilities using or developing ECRIS breeders. Finally an outlook will be given of the predicted evolution of the charge breeders and how they can meet the requirements of future radioactive beam facilities.

  11. East Mountain Area 1995 air sampling results

    SciTech Connect

    Deola, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    Ambient air samples were taken at two locations in the East Mountain Area in conjunction with thermal testing at the Lurance Canyon Burn Site (LCBS). The samples were taken to provide measurements of particulate matter with a diameter less than or equal to 10 micrometers (PM{sub 10}) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report summarizes the results of the sampling performed in 1995. The results from small-scale testing performed to determine the potentially produced air pollutants in the thermal tests are included in this report. Analytical results indicate few samples produced measurable concentrations of pollutants believed to be produced by thermal testing. Recommendations for future air sampling in the East Mountain Area are also noted.

  12. CEBAF'S New RF Separator Structure Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Reza Kazimi; Jock Fugitt; A. Krycuk; Charles Sinclair; Larry Turlington

    1993-05-01

    Prototypes of the rf separator for CEBAF have been made and successfully beam tested. The structure is a new design which has a high transverse shunt impedance together with a small transverse dimension compared to more conventional rf deflecting structures. Five rf separators will be used at CEBAF to allow beam from any one of the five recirculation passes to be delivered to any of the three experimental halls. The authors have already described the basic design of the structure and theoretical calculations. They have also reported some results from rf measurements and beam tests. In this paper they present more beam test results, their final design parameters, and test results of coupling two 1/2 wavelength cavities together.

  13. MiniBooNE Oscillation Results 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2012-01-01

    The MiniBooNE neutrino oscillation search experiment at Fermilab has recently updated results from a search for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations, using a data sample corresponding to 8.58 x 10{sup 20} protons on target in anti-neutrino mode. This high statistics result represent an increase in statistics of 52% compared to result published in 2010. An excess of 57.7 {+-} 28.5 events is observed in the energy range 200 MeV < E{sub {nu}} < 3000 MeV. The data favor LSND-like {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations over a background only hypothesis at 91.1% confidence level in the energy range 475 < E{sub {nu}} < 3000 MeV.

  14. Preliminary results in surgery of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nasser, J A; Confort, C I; Ferraz, A; Bouza, A A

    1998-09-01

    The authors present the preliminary results of 20 patients selected to be operated on between January 1996 and April 1997. These patients presented one of the present indications for stereotactic posteroventral pallidotomy (PVP), such as: rigidity, akinesia/bradykinesia, gait dysfunction, drug induced dyskinesias and tremor. Every patient of this protocol was evaluated by: UPDRS score, Schwab and England scale, Hoehn and Yahr Staging Scale before and after surgery. The results in 3 months showed a remarkable improvement after PVP (P < 0.01) in all functional assessments, except for facial expression, speech and posture. The morbidity was 5%. 5 patients (25%) who were in Hoehn and Yahr 5 underwent a bilateral simultaneous PVP. In 5 patients (25%), who had tremor, during the PVP, VIM thalamotomy was added. These preliminary results, suggest that PVP is highly effective for PD symptoms.

  15. Recent results from COMPASS on exclusive muoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandacz, Andrzej

    2016-02-01

    The 160 GeV polarised muon beam available at CERN, with positive or negative charge, makes COMPASS a unique place for GPD studies. The first GPD related COMPASS results come from exclusive vector meson production on transversely polarised protons and deuterons. The data were taken in 2003-2010 with large solid-state polarised targets, although without detection of recoil particles. Results on various transverse target spin dependent azimuthal asymmetries are presented and their relations to GPDs are discussed. The dedicated COMPASS GPD program started in 2012 with commissioning of a new long liquid hydrogen target and new detectors such as the large recoil proton detector and the large-angle electromagnetic calorimeter. It was followed by a short pilot 'DVCS run'. The performance of the setup and first results on DVCS and exclusive π0 channels have been demonstrated. The full data taking for the GPD program approved within COMPASS-II proposal is planned for 2016 and 2017.

  16. Diffraction at the Tevatron: CDF results

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-11-01

    The diffractive program of the CDF Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider is reviewed with emphasis on recent results from Run II at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Updated results on the x{sub B{sub j}} and Q{sup 2} dependence of the diffractive structure function obtained from dijet production, and on the slope parameter of the t-distribution of diffractive events as a function of Q{sup 2} in the range 1 GeV{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, are presented and compared with theoretical expectations. Results on cross sections for exclusive dijet and diphoton production are also presented and used to calibrate theoretical estimates for exclusive Higgs production at the Large Hadron Collider.

  17. Nebraska wind resource assessment first year results

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, P.J.F.; Vilhauer, R.; Stooksbury, D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the preliminary results from a wind resource assessment program in Nebraska sponsored by the Nebraska Power Association. During the first year the measured annual wind speed at 40 meters ranged from 6.5 - 7.5 m/s (14.6 - 16.8 mph) at eight stations across the state. The site selection process is discussed as well as an overview of the site characteristics at the monitoring locations. Results from the first year monitoring period including data recovery rate, directionality, average wind speeds, wind shear, and turbulence intensity are presented. Results from the eight sites are qualitatively compared with other midwest and west coast locations. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Preliminary results in surgery of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nasser, J A; Confort, C I; Ferraz, A; Bouza, A A

    1998-09-01

    The authors present the preliminary results of 20 patients selected to be operated on between January 1996 and April 1997. These patients presented one of the present indications for stereotactic posteroventral pallidotomy (PVP), such as: rigidity, akinesia/bradykinesia, gait dysfunction, drug induced dyskinesias and tremor. Every patient of this protocol was evaluated by: UPDRS score, Schwab and England scale, Hoehn and Yahr Staging Scale before and after surgery. The results in 3 months showed a remarkable improvement after PVP (P < 0.01) in all functional assessments, except for facial expression, speech and posture. The morbidity was 5%. 5 patients (25%) who were in Hoehn and Yahr 5 underwent a bilateral simultaneous PVP. In 5 patients (25%), who had tremor, during the PVP, VIM thalamotomy was added. These preliminary results, suggest that PVP is highly effective for PD symptoms. PMID:9850746

  19. Testing alleged mediumship: methods and results.

    PubMed

    O'keeffe, Ciarán; Wiseman, Richard

    2005-05-01

    Mediums claim to be able to communicate with the deceased. Such claims attract a considerable amount of public interest and, if valid, have important implications for many areas of psychology. For over 100 years, researchers have tested alleged mediums. This work has obtained mixed results and provoked a considerable amount of methodological debate. This paper reviews the key issues in this debate, describes how the authors devised a method of testing that aimed to prevent the many problems that have hindered past research, and how they then used this method to test several professional mediums. The results of this work did not support the existence of genuine mediumistic ability. Competing interpretations of these results are discussed, along with ways in which the methodology presented in the paper could be used to assess conceptually similar, but non-paranormal, claims made in clinical, occupational and forensic contexts.

  20. Annotating images by mining image search results.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Jing; Zhang, Lei; Li, Xirong; Ma, Wei-Ying

    2008-11-01

    Although it has been studied for years by the computer vision and machine learning communities, image annotation is still far from practical. In this paper, we propose a novel attempt at model-free image annotation, which is a data-driven approach that annotates images by mining their search results. Some 2.4 million images with their surrounding text are collected from a few photo forums to support this approach. The entire process is formulated in a divide-and-conquer framework where a query keyword is provided along with the uncaptioned image to improve both the effectiveness and efficiency. This is helpful when the collected data set is not dense everywhere. In this sense, our approach contains three steps: 1) the search process to discover visually and semantically similar search results, 2) the mining process to identify salient terms from textual descriptions of the search results, and 3) the annotation rejection process to filter out noisy terms yielded by Step 2. To ensure real-time annotation, two key techniques are leveraged-one is to map the high-dimensional image visual features into hash codes, the other is to implement it as a distributed system, of which the search and mining processes are provided as Web services. As a typical result, the entire process finishes in less than 1 second. Since no training data set is required, our approach enables annotating with unlimited vocabulary and is highly scalable and robust to outliers. Experimental results on both real Web images and a benchmark image data set show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm. It is also worth noting that, although the entire approach is illustrated within the divide-and conquer framework, a query keyword is not crucial to our current implementation. We provide experimental results to prove this.

  1. Results from the BEAST experiment: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villela, T.; Beast Team

    We present the recent results of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurements obtained with the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST). BEAST is a 2.2 meter off-axis telescope, currently configured with an 8 element mixed Q (38-45 GHz) and Ka (25-35 GHz) focal plane and a modulating flat mirror. It was designed to operate both from high altitude balloons and from the ground. We present an overview of the recent BEAST results, including maps of CMB anisotropies, CMB power spectrum, and Galactic foreground contamination estimates.

  2. First results from the Fennoscandian GPS networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, J. M.; Jaldehag, R. T. K.

    1993-01-01

    Temporal correlations were measured of data obtained by the Swedish Permanent GPS Network for Positioning (SWEPOS). The model for correlations, r(Delta t) = exp(-(absolute value of (Delta t))/tau), can be used to predict precision of averaged values for different values of tau. Results indicate that tau is approximately equal to 1 day (r less than 1% after 5 days). The results show that the network can be used in geophysical applications such as the DOSE investigation on postglacial rebound.

  3. Recent results for the Raytheon RELI program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgas, David; Clatterbuck, Todd; Cashen, Matt; Daniele, Andrew; Hughes, Steve; Mordaunt, David

    2012-06-01

    We describe our approach and latest results for Raytheon's RELI (Robust Electric Laser Initiative) program. Our architecture leverages a slab-based, Master Oscillator / Power Amplifier (MOPA) architecture based on Raytheon's unique planar waveguide amplifier. Technical objectives for this effort are to demonstrate > 25 kW output with excellent beam quality and an electrical to optical efficiency > 30%. The planar waveguide architecture provides compact packaging and is inherently scalable to 100 kW or greater in a single beam line. We report on the latest progress and test results for the program.

  4. [Pulsar perimetry. A review and new results].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez de la Rosa, M; Gonzalez-Hernandez, M

    2013-02-01

    We present a review and update on Pulsar perimetry, which combines temporal frequency, contrast and spatial frequency stimuli. The effects of age, visual acuity, and learning on results are described. Data on threshold fluctuation, signal-to-noise ratio, and the possibility of reducing noise with filtering techniques are provided. We describe its dynamic range and the possibility of compensating for profound defects. Finally, we show the results obtained in normal patients and in those with ocular hypertension or initial glaucoma, as well as an analysis of glaucoma progression.

  5. [Pulsar perimetry. A review and new results].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez de la Rosa, M; Gonzalez-Hernandez, M

    2013-02-01

    We present a review and update on Pulsar perimetry, which combines temporal frequency, contrast and spatial frequency stimuli. The effects of age, visual acuity, and learning on results are described. Data on threshold fluctuation, signal-to-noise ratio, and the possibility of reducing noise with filtering techniques are provided. We describe its dynamic range and the possibility of compensating for profound defects. Finally, we show the results obtained in normal patients and in those with ocular hypertension or initial glaucoma, as well as an analysis of glaucoma progression. PMID:23392836

  6. Recent results on CVD diamond radiation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilhammer, P.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; v. d. Eijk, R.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fish, D.; Fried, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Knopfle, K. T.; Krammer, M.; Manfredi, P. F.; Meier, D.; LeNormand; Pan, L. S.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Plano, R.; Re, V.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Roff; Rudge, A.; Schieber, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G. B.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Turchetta, R.; RD 42 Collaboration

    1998-02-01

    CVD diamond radiation sensors are being developed for possible use in trackers in the LHC experiments. The diamond promises to be radiation hard well beyond particle fluences that can be tolerated by Si sensors. Recent results from the RD 42 collaboration on charge collection distance and on radiation hardness of CVD diamond samples will be reported. Measurements with diamond tracking devices, both strip detectors and pixel detectors, will be discussed. Results from beam tests using a diamond strip detector which was read out with fast, 25 ns shaping time, radiation-hard pipeline electronics will be presented.

  7. Spatially organized visualization of image query results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocca, Gianluigi; Cusano, Claudio; Santini, Simone; Schettini, Raimondo

    2011-02-01

    In this work we present a system which visualizes the results obtained from image search engines in such a way that users can conveniently browse the retrieved images. The way in which search results are presented allows the user to grasp the composition of the set of images "at a glance". To do so, images are grouped and positioned according to their distribution in a prosemantic feature space which encodes information about their content at an abstraction level that can be placed between visual and semantic information. The compactness of the feature space allows a fast analysis of the image distribution so that all the computation can be performed in real time.

  8. The Humanoid Robot LOLA—Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favot, V.; Schwienbacher, M.; Buschmann, T.; Lohmeier, S.; Ulbrich, H.

    2010-09-01

    With the experience gathered during the development and construnction of the robot JOHNNIE, a new humanoid robot LOLA was built. Goal of this project is to realize a fast, human-like walking. Different aspects of this complex mechatronic system and the first experiments results are presented. The lightweight construction and the custom build multi-sensory joint drives with high torque brushless motors are introduced. The new decentralized electronic control/sensing network is also discuss as well as the simulation environment, the trajectory planning algorithm and the stabilizing walking control. Finally the first experiments result are presented.

  9. The spin physics results from COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsov, O.

    2015-04-10

    COMPASS (COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy) is a fixed target experiment at CERN dedicated to studies of the spin structure of the nucleon and of the spectroscopy of hadrons. During the years 2002-2004, 2006-2007 and 2010-2011 the COMPASS collaboration has collected a large amount of data by scattering polarized 160(200) GeV/c muons on polarized {sup 6}LiD and NH{sub 3} targets. The COMPASS results on quark and gluon helicities are discussed, as well as results on transverse spin and transverse momentum effects in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering.

  10. Latest results from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhenry-Yvon, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory has been designed to investigate the origin and nature of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) with energies from 1017 to 1020 eV. In this paper we will review some of the most recent results obtained from data of the Pierre Auger Observatory, namely the spectrum of cosmic rays, the anisotropies in arrival directions and the studies related to mass composition and to the number of muons measured at the ground. We will also discuss the implication of these results for assembling a consistent description of the composition, origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

  11. [Preliminary results of treatment with aflibercept].

    PubMed

    Blăjan, Codruta; Nicula, D; Rusu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the first results concerning the Aflibercept (Eylea) treatment, the last antiVEGF approved for treatment of the age related macular degeneration (AMD), neovascular form and for macular edema due to the central retinal vein occlusion. The treatment was applied to patients presenting AMD, ME and other diseases: myopic and idiopatic choroidal neovascularisation, central serous choroidopathy (CSC) or diabetic macular edema (DME). The results were good: improvement of the visual acuity, resolution of the intraretinal fluids and macular edema. Although we did not notice major side-effects, resistance or tachyphylaxis, we noticed some recurrences.

  12. Delta II development and flight results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, S. K.

    An account is given of the design modifications of the Delta launch vehicle which have resulted in its Delta II variant, together with flight results obtained with the Delta II to date. Delta II launchers feature a stretched LX tank, a larger-diameter satellite-payload fairing, and an expansion of first-stage nozzle expansion ratio from 8:1 to 12:1. The thrust-augmenting solid rocket boosters use graphite/epoxy composite motor cases. Both two-stage and three-stage launches are discussed, with attention to flights for the Navstar satellites.

  13. Recent QCD Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Vellidis, Costas

    2015-10-10

    Four years after the shutdown of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the two Tevatron experiments, CDF and DZero, continue producing important results that test the theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The experiments exploit the advantages of the data sample acquired during the Tevatron Run II, stemming from the unique pp initial state, the clean environment at the relatively low Tevatron instantaneous luminosities, and the good understanding of the data sample after many years of calibrations and optimizations. A summary of results using the full integrated luminosity is presented, focusing on measurements of prompt photon production, weak boson production associated with jets, and non-perturbative QCD processes.

  14. Relativity concept inventory: Development, analysis, and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanides, J. S.; Savage, C. M.

    2013-06-01

    We report on a concept inventory for special relativity: the development process, data analysis methods, and results from an introductory relativity class. The Relativity Concept Inventory tests understanding of relativistic concepts. An unusual feature is confidence testing for each question. This can provide additional information; for example, high confidence correlated with incorrect answers suggests a misconception. A novel aspect of our data analysis is the use of Monte Carlo simulations to determine the significance of correlations. This approach is particularly useful for small sample sizes, such as ours. Our results show a gender bias that was not present in course assessment, similar to that reported for the Force Concept Inventory.

  15. Mechanisms resulting in accreted ice roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanin, Alan J.; Chua, Kiat

    1992-01-01

    Icing tests conducted on rotating cylinders in the BF Goodrich's Icing Research Facility indicate that a regular, deterministic, icing roughness pattern is typical. The roughness pattern is similar to kernels of corn on a cob for cylinders of diameter typical of a cob. An analysis is undertaken to determine the mechanisms which result in this roughness to ascertain surface scale and amplitude of roughness. Since roughness and the resulting augmentation of the convected heat transfer coefficient has been determined to most strongly control the accreted ice in ice prediction codes, the ability to predict a priori, location, amplitude and surface scale of roughness would greatly augment the capabilities of current ice accretion models.

  16. Recent Stirling engine loss-understanding results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Thieme, Lanny G.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1990-01-01

    For several years, NASA and other U.S. government agencies have been funding experimental and analytical efforts to improve the understanding of Stirling thermodynamic losses. NASA's objective is to improve Stirling engine design capability to support the development of new engines for space power. An overview of these efforts was last given at the 1988 IECEC. Recent results of this research are reviewed.

  17. Experimental results from the small isochronous ring

    SciTech Connect

    Eduard Pozdeyev

    2005-05-01

    The Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) is a compact, low-energy storage ring designed to investigate the beam dynamics of high-intensity isochronous cyclotrons and synchrotrons at the transition energy. The ring was developed at Michigan State University (MSU) and has been operational since December 2003. It stores 20 keV hydrogen beams with a peak current of 10-20 microamps for up to 200 turns. The transverse and longitudinal profiles of extracted bunches are measured with an accuracy of approximately 1 mm. The high accuracy of the measurements makes the experimental data attractive for validation of multi-particle space charge codes. The results obtained in the ring show a fast growth of the energy spread induced by the space charge forces. The energy spread growth is accompanied by a breakup of the beam bunches into separated clusters that are involved in the vortex motion specific to the isochronous regime. The experimental results presented in the paper show a remarkable agreement with simulations performed with the code CYCO. In this paper, we discuss specifics of space charge effects in the isochronous regime, present results of experiments in SIR, and conduct a detailed comparison of the experimental data with results of simulations.

  18. QCD results from D-Zero

    SciTech Connect

    Varelas, N.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-10-01

    We present recent results on jet production, dijet angular distributions, W+ Jets, and color coherence from p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider using the D0 detector. The data are compared to perturbative QCD calculations or to predictions of parton shower based Monte Carlo models.

  19. Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Test Results.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Clinical laboratory testing is now a global activity with laboratories no longer working in isolation but as regional and national networks, and often at international levels. We now have all of the electronic gadgetry via internet technology at our fingertips to rapidly and accurately measure and report on laboratory testing but are our test results harmonized? PMID:27683501

  20. Estimating Nitrogen Load Resulting from Biofuel Mandates.

    PubMed

    Alshawaf, Mohammad; Douglas, Ellen; Ricciardi, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 were enacted to reduce the U.S. dependency on foreign oil by increasing the use of biofuels. The increased demand for biofuels from corn and soybeans could result in an increase of nitrogen flux if not managed properly. The objectives of this study are to estimate nitrogen flux from energy crop production and to identify the catchment areas with high nitrogen flux. The results show that biofuel production can result in an increase of nitrogen flux to the northern Gulf of Mexico from 270 to 1742 thousand metric tons. Using all cellulosic (hay) ethanol or biodiesel to meet the 2022 mandate is expected to reduce nitrogen flux; however, it requires approximately 25% more land when compared to other scenarios. Producing ethanol from switchgrass rather than hay results in three-times more nitrogen flux, but requires 43% less land. Using corn ethanol for 2022 mandates is expected to have double the nitrogen flux when compared to the EISA-specified 2022 scenario; however, it will require less land area. Shifting the U.S. energy supply from foreign oil to the Midwest cannot occur without economic and environmental impacts, which could potentially lead to more eutrophication and hypoxia. PMID:27171101

  1. DQC 2009-10 Annual Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report presents survey results of the 10 State Actions including status of all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. These State Actions include: (1) Link P-20/workforce data systems; (2) Create stable, sustained support for robust state longitudinal data systems; (3) Develop governance structures to guide data collection,…

  2. Results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus . E-mail: ramnie@uniklinikum-saarland.de; Wenzlawowicz, Knut v.; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Wisser, Lothar; Derouet, Harry; Ruebe, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease. Patients and Methods: In the time interval 1983-2000, 154 patients in our clinic were irradiated for Peyronie's disease. Of those, 101 had at least one complete follow-up data set and are the subject of this study. In the majority of patients, penis deviation was between 30 and 50{sup o}, there were one or two indurated foci with a diameter between 5 and 15 mm. Pain was recorded in 48/92 patients. Seventy-two of the 101 patients received radiotherapy with a total dose of 30 Gy, and 25 received 36 Gy in daily fractions of 2.0 Gy. The remaining patients received the following dosage: 34 Gy (1 patient), 38-40 Gy (3 patients). Mean duration of follow-up was 5 years. Results: The best results ever at any time during follow-up were an improvement of deviation in 47%, reduction of number of foci in 32%, reduction of size of foci in 49%, and less induration in 52%. Approximately 50% reported pain relief after radiotherapy. There were 28 patients with mild acute dermatitis and only 4 patients with mild urethritis. There were no long-term side effects. Conclusion: Our results compare well with those of other studies in the literature. In our patient cohort, radiotherapy was an effective therapy option with only very rare and mild side effects.

  3. Buddy: fusing multiple search results together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, John J.; Boulware, Doug M.; Myers, John E.; Khattri, Vishal; Corzillus, Dave R.

    2003-03-01

    If you have ever used a popular search engine on the Internet to search for a specific topic you are interested in, you know that most of the results you get back are unrelated, or do not have the information for which you are searching. Usually you end up looking through many Web pages before you find information. Different search engines give you different ranked results, so how do you choose which one to use? Buddy solves these problems for you. With Buddy you can search multiple search engines with many different queries. Using topic trees to create in depth search queries, utilizing the power of many renowned search engines, with the ability to dynamically create and delete them on the fly, Buddy gives you the results you want on the information you are looking for. Using its unique ranking algorithm the results from multiple search engines are correlated and fused together, removing multiple document hits. This paper will discuss the motivation for and the capabilities of Buddy.

  4. SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.; Sleeman, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brau, J.; Ludgate, G.A.; Oram, C.J.; Cook, V.; Johnson, J.

    1985-10-01

    The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses.

  5. Irrigation customer survey procedures and results

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, B.J.; Johnston, J.W.; Dase, J.E.; Hattrup, M.P.; Reed, G.

    1987-03-01

    This report describes the statistical procedures, administrative procedures, and results of a telephone survey designed to collect primary data from individuals in the Pacific Northwest region who use electricity in irrigating agricultural crops. The project was intended to collect data useful for a variety of purposes, including conservation planning, load forecasting, and rate design.

  6. 7 CFR 1205.29 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Procedures § 1205.29 Reporting results. (a) Each county FSA office... that requested a continuance referendum, through the sign-up period, to the Deputy Administrator, Cotton Program, AMS, Stop 0224, 1400 Independence Ave., SW., Washington, DC 20250-0224....

  7. 7 CFR 1205.29 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Procedures § 1205.29 Reporting results. (a) Each county FSA office... that requested a continuance referendum, through the sign-up period, to the Deputy Administrator, Cotton Program, AMS, Stop 0224, 1400 Independence Ave., SW., Washington, DC 20250-0224....

  8. Recent results from proton-antiproton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S. . High Energy Physics Lab.)

    1990-03-01

    New results from the CERN and Fermilab proton-antiproton colliders are summarised. The areas covered are jet physics, direct photon production, W and Z production and decay, heavy flavor production, the search for the top quark, and the search for more exotic phenomena. 46 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Instructor Quality and EMT Certification Examination Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ-Eft, Darlene; Dickison, Phil; Levine, Roger

    2007-01-01

    The Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician Attributes and Demographics Study (LEADS) provides a representative sampling of EMTs throughout the United States. This study examines the relationship between instructor quality and National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians certification examination outcomes. Results show significant…

  10. Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Test Results

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    EDITORIAL Clinical laboratory testing is now a global activity with laboratories no longer working in isolation but as regional and national networks, and often at international levels. We now have all of the electronic gadgetry via internet technology at our fingertips to rapidly and accurately measure and report on laboratory testing but are our test results harmonized? PMID:27683501

  11. Estimating Nitrogen Load Resulting from Biofuel Mandates

    PubMed Central

    Alshawaf, Mohammad; Douglas, Ellen; Ricciardi, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 were enacted to reduce the U.S. dependency on foreign oil by increasing the use of biofuels. The increased demand for biofuels from corn and soybeans could result in an increase of nitrogen flux if not managed properly. The objectives of this study are to estimate nitrogen flux from energy crop production and to identify the catchment areas with high nitrogen flux. The results show that biofuel production can result in an increase of nitrogen flux to the northern Gulf of Mexico from 270 to 1742 thousand metric tons. Using all cellulosic (hay) ethanol or biodiesel to meet the 2022 mandate is expected to reduce nitrogen flux; however, it requires approximately 25% more land when compared to other scenarios. Producing ethanol from switchgrass rather than hay results in three-times more nitrogen flux, but requires 43% less land. Using corn ethanol for 2022 mandates is expected to have double the nitrogen flux when compared to the EISA-specified 2022 scenario; however, it will require less land area. Shifting the U.S. energy supply from foreign oil to the Midwest cannot occur without economic and environmental impacts, which could potentially lead to more eutrophication and hypoxia. PMID:27171101

  12. E-Learning: Managing for Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, James R.; Heacock, William B.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses advantages of electronic learning for business, including cost benefits, administrative benefits, and instructional benefits. Considers the increase in electronic learning to cut back on business travel since the September 11th attacks and offers guidelines to achieve business results with electronic learning, including linking learning…

  13. Milestone M4900: Simulant Mixing Analytical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2001-07-26

    This report addresses Milestone M4900, ''Simulant Mixing Sample Analysis Results,'' and contains the data generated during the ''Mixing of Process Heels, Process Solutions, and Recycle Streams: Small-Scale Simulant'' task. The Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for this task is BNF-003-98-0079A. A report with a narrative description and discussion of the data will be issued separately.

  14. Recent work and results on sparrow project

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Neal R

    2010-12-23

    This briefing describes recent work undertaken on the Sparrow Project and results of this work. It describes experiments comparing the use of Genie with 2 classes with 3 classes for the problem of ship delineation. It also describes some preliminary work in the area of the optimization of segmentation techniques.

  15. Relativity Concept Inventory: Development, Analysis, and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslanides, J. S.; Savage, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a concept inventory for special relativity: the development process, data analysis methods, and results from an introductory relativity class. The Relativity Concept Inventory tests understanding of relativistic concepts. An unusual feature is confidence testing for each question. This can provide additional information; for example,…

  16. Artemis: Results of the engineering feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form for the Engineering Feasibility Study of the Artemis Project, a plan to establish a permanent base on the Moon. Topics covered include the Common Lunar Lander (CLL), lunar lander engineering study results, lunar lander trajectory analysis, lunar lander conceptual design and mass properties, the lunar lander communication subsystem design, and product assurance.

  17. Selected results for LDEF thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    Several different thermal control coatings were analyzed as part of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Materials Special Investigation Group activity and as part of the Space Environment Effects on Spacecraft Materials Experiment M0003. A brief discussion of the results obtained for these materials is presented.

  18. Results-Oriented Supervision (for Teachers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Stanley S.

    Results-Oriented Supervision (R.O.S.) is a system for teacher supervision that focuses more on instructional improvement than on teacher evaluation. The supervisor and the teacher join together to formulate teaching objectives. After a period of implementation, a postconference is held to assess and restate or renew objectives. In the school…

  19. TIMSS 2011 International Results in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Ina V. S.; Martin, Michael O.; Foy, Pierre; Arora, Alka

    2012-01-01

    The "TIMSS 2011 International Results in Mathematics" summarizes fourth and eighth grade student achievement in each of the 63 countries and 14 benchmarking entities which participated in TIMSS 2011. The report includes trends in mathematics achievement over time for participants in the previous TIMSS 1995, 1999, 2003, and 2007…

  20. Validation Results for LEWICE 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Rutkowski, Adam

    1999-01-01

    A research project is underway at NASA Lewis to produce a computer code which can accurately predict ice growth under any meteorological conditions for any aircraft surface. This report will present results from version 2.0 of this code, which is called LEWICE. This version differs from previous releases due to its robustness and its ability to reproduce results accurately for different spacing and time step criteria across computing platform. It also differs in the extensive amount of effort undertaken to compare the results in a quantified manner against the database of ice shapes which have been generated in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The results of the shape comparisons are analyzed to determine the range of meteorological conditions under which LEWICE 2.0 is within the experimental repeatability. This comparison shows that the average variation of LEWICE 2.0 from the experimental data is 7.2% while the overall variability of the experimental data is 2.5%.

  1. Recent Results in Ring-Diagram Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    The ring-diagram technique was developed by Frank Hill 25 years ago and matured quickly during the late 1990s. It is nowadays one of the most commonly used techniques in local helioseismology. The method consists in the power spectral analysis of solar acoustic oscillations on small regions (2° to 30°) of the solar surface. The power spectrum resembles a set of trumpets nested inside each other and for a given frequency, it looks like a ring, hence the technique's name. It provides information on the horizontal flow field and thermodynamic structure in the layers immediately below the photosphere. With data regularly provided by MDI, GONG, and more recently HMI, many important results have been achieved. In recently years, these results include estimations of the meridional circulation and its evolution with solar cycle; flows associated with active regions, as well as, flow divergence and vorticity, and thermal structure beneath and around active regions. Much progress is expected with data now provided by HMI's high spatial resolution observations and high duty cycle. There are two data processing pipelines (GONG and HMI) providing free access to the data and the results of the ring-diagram analysis. Here we will discuss the most recent results and improvements in the technique, as well as, the many challenges that still remain.

  2. DO Results on Heavy Flavour Production

    SciTech Connect

    Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle

    2006-04-11

    This review is focused on DO results on hadron spectroscopy and on production cross sections: the contribution by DO to the understanding of the X(3872) object, the first observation of separated B** states, measurements of Bc meson properties, and eventually measurements of the inclusive {upsilon}(1S) differential cross section and of the tt-bar cross section.

  3. Test Results Untrustworthy. Point of View Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David C.; Nichols, Sharon L.

    2005-01-01

    America's public schools are making harmful, irreversible decisions based on test results that--in an increasing number of cases--can't be trusted, Arizona State University's Education Policy Research Laboratory has found. The pressure of high-stakes tests is forcing school districts and state Departments of Education to take inappropriate and at…

  4. Returned Solar Max hardware degradation study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triolo, Jack J.; Ousley, Gilbert W.

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Repair Mission returned with the replaced hardware that had been in low Earth orbit for over four years. The materials of this returned hardware gave the aerospace community an opportunity to study the realtime effects of atomic oxygen, solar radiation, impact particles, charged particle radiation, and molecular contamination. The results of these studies are summarized.

  5. Recent results on lattice QCD thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratti, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    I review recent results on QCD thermodynamics from lattice simulations. In particular, I will focus on the QCD equation of state at zero and finite chemical potential, the curvature of the phase diagram and fluctuations of conserved charges. The latter are compared to experimental data, to the purpose of extracting the chemical freeze-out temperature and chemical potential from first principles.

  6. Animation of finite element models and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    This is not intended as a complete review of computer hardware and software that can be used for animation of finite element models and results, but is instead a demonstration of the benefits of visualization using selected hardware and software. The role of raw computational power, graphics speed, and the use of videotape are discussed.

  7. Broadband Heterodyne SIS Spectrometer Prototype: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, F.; LeDuc, H.; Harris, A.; Hu, S.; Sumner, M.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2004-01-01

    The broadband heterodyne SIS receiver system described elsewhere (reference 1) has been assembled and tested both in the laboratory and during two observing runs on the Cassegrain focus of the 10 meter telescope at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Here we present a brief summary of the initial results.

  8. First parallax results from URAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Norbert; Finch, Charlie T.; Jao, Wei-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The first USNO Robotic Astrometric Telescope catalog (URAT1) was released in April 2015. The catalog contains 228 million objects covering most of the sky north of declination -15 degrees for observations made between 2012 April 24 until 2014 June 21. The URAT northern observations were completed in June 2015 and all individual epoch positions with typical 10 to 70 mas errors are available for this study. The average number of observation per star is about 25.We have created a URAT parallax pipeline utilizing code from the Research Consortium On Nearby Stars (RECONS) parallax pipeline. The URAT pipeline reads in all 'good' epoch data of a given object thencalculates a mean position, proper motion and relative parallax using the JPL DE405 emphemerides.We compare results of 696 objects found in both the Hipparcos and Yale Parallax Catalog (YPC) north of -10 degrees declination which also have a URAT relative parallax. URAT results are consistent with Hipparcosand YPC data, getting meaningful results, particularly for stars with a parallax of 40 mas or larger. Typical URAT parallax errors are between 5 and 15 mas, depending on observing history. The main goal of this project is to find new nearby stars using the URAT epoch data. First results are presented for stars which previously did not have a published parallax.

  9. Recent results from Fermilab E791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, A.; Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Aryal, M.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Costa, I.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Dubbs, T.; Fernandez, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gerson, S.; Gounder, K.; Granite, D.; Halling, M.; Herrera, G.; Hurwitz, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lundberg, B.; MayTal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; d'Oliveira, A. B.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A.; Sheaff, M.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Smith, J. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Stanton, N.; Sugano, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yi, D.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    1995-07-01

    Fermilab E791 is a high statistics charm experiment using a 500 GeV/c π- beam incident on a segmented target. We present results based on one third of the 1991-1992 data, with particular emphasis on a search for the flavor changing neutral current decay D+→π+μ+μ-.

  10. Event Structure and Grammatical Patterns: Resultative Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the nature of grammatical patterns through an in-depth study of resultative constructions in Mandarin and Thai. At the heart of the thesis lies the proposal that event structure templates--complex, meaning-based grammatical patterns--must be recognised as primary objects of linguistic analysis. As content-theoretic objects…

  11. [Ultrasonic welding of bones. Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Brug, E; Braunsteiner, E; von Gemmern, C

    1976-10-01

    Experiments with ultrasonic applied welding, a method first developed in the USSR are reported. In standardized isolated bone preparations stability values could be obtained of 10% [and in one case of 40% (!)] of the stability of the nonfractured bone. With these values the requirements of the method of osteosynthesis are met. Results of in vivo experiments are expected.

  12. RESULTS FROM THE AHS PESTICIDE EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study/Pesticide Exposure Study (AHS/PES) measured exposures resulting from agricultural use of 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos for a subset of applicators in the AHS cohort. Through on-farm measurements and observations, data collected in the exposure study will...

  13. National Lung Screening Trial Results: Fast Facts

    Cancer.gov

    On November 4, 2010, the NLST reported initial trial results, showing 20 percent fewer lung cancer deaths among trial participants screened with low-dose helical CT (also known as spiral CT) compared to those who got screened with chest X-rays.

  14. String theory: results, magic and doubts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovici, Eliezer

    2013-12-01

    This talk was given at a special place and on a special occasion for a special audience. It describes the results, magic and doubts that an attempt to construct a theory based on the idea that the basic constituents of matter can also be extended objects has led to. The emphasis is on the spirit behind the ideas.

  15. Experimental Results in DIS from Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Kuhn

    2009-10-01

    We are summarizing the experimental program of Jefferson Lab (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA) in deep inelastic electron scattering. We show recent results and discuss future plans for both the present 6 GeV era and the 12 GeV energy-upgraded facility.

  16. Results on longitudinal spin physics at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilfert, Malte

    2016-03-01

    The COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS has taken data on deep inelastic scattering of polarised muons on a polarised NH3 target in 2007 and 2011 and on a polarised LiD target in 2002-2004 and 2006. The new results on the longitudinal double spin asymmetry A1p and the spin-dependent structure function g1p obtained from the 2011 data set are presented. These results are used in a NLO QCD fit to the world data to obtain the polarised parton distributions. Also an update of the results on the Bjorken sum rule, connecting the integral of the non-singlet spin-dependent structure function with the ratio of the weak coupling constants, will be given. Direct access to the gluon polarisation is possible via the photon gluon fusion process in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. This process is studied using the pT dependence of charged hadron asymmetries. The latest results indicate a positive gluon polarisation in the kinematic region of COMPASS

  17. Recent results on semileptonic decays at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, J.; Babar Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Some recent BABAR results on semileptonic decays are presented. They focus on the determination of the CKM matrix elements |V| and |V| in inclusive and exclusive b→uℓν and b→cℓν decays, and on form factors measurement in exclusive c→sℓν decays.

  18. First Run II results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    S. Donati

    2002-06-04

    In this paper we report on the first run II results from the CDF experiment. A brief description of the Tevatron collider and CDF detector upgrades and performance achieved in the first part of run II is followed by the CDF expectations in the fields of beauty, top, electroweak and Higgs physics.

  19. Using Test Results to Improve Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassler, Otto C.; Caulkins, Thomas G.

    A model for summarizing test scores and using them to modify instructional programs is presented. The proposed model consists of two types of summaries of the data gathered through standardized tests. The first summary contains individual and single class results. Information in a "Class Item Response Record" chart provides individual student…

  20. CPT Results from KTeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan Nguyen

    2002-01-14

    I present several preliminary measurements from KTeV of the fundamental neutral K parameters, and their implications for CPT violation. A new limit is given on the sidereal time dependence of {phi}{sub +-}. The results are based on data collected in 1996-97.

  1. Common Lunar Lander (CLL) Engineering Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecklein, Jonette

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the Common Lunar Lander (CLL) engineering study results. The mission is to provide a delivery system to soft-land a 200 kg payload set at any given lunar latitude and longitude. Topics covered include the study schedule, mission goals and requirements, the CLL reference mission, costs, CLL options, and two stage performance analysis.

  2. Presentation of Institutional Results Reports, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

    "The Illinois Commitment: Partnerships, Opportunities, and Excellence" requires an annual submission of a Results Report from higher education institutions and agencies to provide evidence of progress toward the six statewide goals: economic growth, teaching and learning, affordability, access and diversity, high expectations and quality, and…

  3. Paradoxical Results in Multidimensional Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Giles; Finkelman, Matthew; Schwartzman, Armin

    2009-01-01

    In multidimensional item response theory (MIRT), it is possible for the estimate of a subject's ability in some dimension to decrease after they have answered a question correctly. This paper investigates how and when this type of paradoxical result can occur. We demonstrate that many response models and statistical estimates can produce…

  4. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Barry G.

    2014-06-01

    The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST). An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  5. Polarized electrons in ELSA (preliminary results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, S.; von Drachenfels, W.; Durek, D.; Frommberger, F.; Hoffmann, M.; Husmann, D.; Kiel, B.; Klein, F. J.; Menze, D.; Michel, T.; Nakanishi, T.; Naumann, J.; Reichelt, T.; Steier, C.; Toyama, T.; Voigt, S.; Westermann, M.

    1998-01-01

    Polarized electrons have been accelerated in the electron stretcher accelerator ELSA for the first time. Up to 2.1 GeV the polarization of the electron beam supplied by the 120 keV polarized electron source has been measured with a Mo/ller polarimeter. Preliminary results of polarization measurements at high energies and the performance of the source are presented.

  6. Results from recent NASA tire thermal studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The testing technique and some results from an experimental study to determine tire temperature profiles to aid in defining the strength and fatigue limitations of the tire carcass structure are described. This effort is part of a program to explore analytically and through experiment the temperature distribution in an aircraft tire during free roll and braked and yawed rolling conditions.

  7. New Results in Astrodynamics Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coverstone-Carroll, V.; Hartmann, J. W.; Williams, S. N.; Mason, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Generic algorithms have gained popularity as an effective procedure for obtaining solutions to traditionally difficult space mission optimization problems. In this paper, a brief survey of the use of genetic algorithms to solve astrodynamics problems is presented and is followed by new results obtained from applying a Pareto genetic algorithm to the optimization of low-thrust interplanetary spacecraft missions.

  8. Some Unexpected Results Using Computer Algebra Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Felix; Garcia, Alfonsa; Garcia, Francisco; Hoya, Sara; Rodriguez, Gerardo; de la Villa, Agustin

    2001-01-01

    Shows how teachers can often use unexpected outputs from Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) to reinforce concepts and to show students the importance of thinking about how they use the software and reflecting on their results. Presents different examples where DERIVE, MAPLE, or Mathematica does not work as expected and suggests how to use them as a…

  9. Statistical Literacy and Sample Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlevey, Lynn; Sullivan, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Sample surveys are widely used in the social sciences and business. The news media almost daily quote from them, yet they are widely misused. Using students with prior managerial experience embarking on an MBA course, we show that common sample survey results are misunderstood even by those managers who have previously done a statistics course. In…

  10. Exploring Alternative Approaches for Presenting Evaluation Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Hall, Jori; Greene, Jennifer C.; Ahn, Jeehae

    2013-01-01

    Evaluators have an obligation to present clearly the results of their evaluative efforts. Traditionally, such presentations showcase formal written and oral reports, with dispassionate language and graphs, tables, quotes, and vignettes. These traditional forms do not reach all audiences nor are they likely to include the most powerful presentation…

  11. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12...

  12. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12...

  13. Abstracts, Third Space Processing Symposium, Skylab results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Skylab experiments results are reported in abstracts of papers presented at the Third Space Processing Symposium. Specific areas of interest include: exothermic brazing, metals melting, crystals, reinforced composites, glasses, eutectics; physics of the low-g processes; electrophoresis, heat flow, and convection demonstrations flown on Apollo missions; and apparatus for containerless processing, heating, cooling, and containing materials.

  14. Crystal Ball results on tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.T.

    1987-10-01

    This report reviews measurements and upper limit determinations for a number of exclusive 1-prong tau decay modes using the Crystal Ball detector. These results are important input to the apparent discrepancy between the topological and sum-of-exclusive branching fractions in 1-prong tau decays.

  15. Recent results from the Crystal Ball experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.T.

    1986-12-01

    Several recent analyses from the Crystal Ball collaboration are reviewed. The major topics discussed are the search for new states in radiative UPSILON(1S) decays, the search for lepton number-violating and inclusive eta decay modes of the tau, and results from ..gamma gamma.. physics.

  16. Gamma Ray Bursts and recent Swift Results .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chincarini, G.

    Due to the large activity we had during these last months with the Swift satellite I started the writing of the presentation I gave at the SAIt Catania meeting only in the middle of September. The Swift satellite, however, never rested. Since then and in addition to the results I showed at the meeting in relation to the early and steep light curves observed with the XRT telescope in the 0.2 - 10 keV band, we had fundamental discoveries among which the detection and localization of short bursts and the detection of the largest redshift ever. It obviously would be improper to discuss here the most recent results but it would also be silly in such a fast evolving topics where the day by day observations show excellent results and the observer is far ahead of the theoretician, to write an article that, from the observational point of view, would be completely obsolete. The best approach here seems to be a brief description of what was presented during the meeting briefly mentioning also some of the most recent results. We remind the reader, however, that a copious literature written, and in preparation, exists so that we urge the reader to refer to the specialized articles. This brief article will touch on the basic characteristics of the Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the Introduction (section 1) and illustrate the basic characteristics of the Swift mission in section 2. Preliminary science results will be discussed in section 3 and finally we will mention one, among many, of the main goal we plan to achieve in Cosmology via the observations of very distant GRBs.

  17. The SUCOZOMA program: results and challenges.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, Anders

    2005-03-01

    The research program Sustainable Coastal Zone Management (SUCOZOMA), which was started in 1996 by the Swedish Foundation of Strategic Environmental Research, was motivated by the recognition of increasingly severe global, regional and national coastal problems. The program approached the complex issues of coastal eutrophication, fishing practices, and overexploited coastal resources, with a concerted effort involving multidisciplinarity, stakeholder cooperation, and a focus on the problems perceived as most serious by the public and decision-makers. As the program was concluded in 2004 it had resulted in the completion or near-completion of 22 doctoral dissertations and approximately one hundred publications. More than 40 scientists were involved in the program. Göteborg University was the host university, but important research teams have also been located at Stockholm University, the Beijer Institute, and the Kristineberg Marine Research Station of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and within the National Board of Fisheries. During the program, networks of stakeholders were established and SUCOZOMA had contributed to numerous political and administrative processes relevant for integrated coastal zone management (ICZM). SUCOZOMA program results can be grouped into different categories. Many of the projects in the two phases of the program produced results which can be defined as technical or practical and available for direct implementation in, e.g. mussel cultivation, restoration and safeguarding of spawning areas, seal-safe fishing gear or sustainable fishing of underexploited species. Other results can be characterized as policy oriented, and the impact of these can only be fairly evaluated as new policies are put into effect. SUCOZOMA resulted in important new knowledge regarding coastal science and management, but also concerning the organization required to conduct an end-user oriented multidisciplinary program effectively. PMID:15865301

  18. [Drug or plant substances which antagonize venoms or potentiate antivenins].

    PubMed

    Chippaux, J P; Rakotonirina, V S; Rakotonirina, A; Dzikouk, G

    1997-01-01

    Dendroaspis jamesoni (Elapidae) and Echis oceliatus (Viperidae) are responsible for most of severe evenomation in Cameroon. Toxicity of venoms of these two species has been measured using mice according to the method of Spearman & Kàrber. The effect on experimental envenomation of various drugs (atropine, promethazine, neostigmine, hydrocortisone, pentosane sulfuric polyester, heparin, tranexamic acid and aminocaproic acid) and plant extracts (Schumanniophyton magnificum, Bidens pilosa, Securidaca longepedunculata and Garcinia lucida) has been observed associated or not with the antivenom lpser Afrique (SAV). The venom of D. jamesoni contains neurotoxins agonizing and antagonising acetylcholine. The toxicity of the venom did not depend on the route of injection. Atropine, promethazine, neostigmine and hydrocortisone protected animals against a venom dose up to 2 LD50. Moreover, atropine and promethazine potentiated the SAV. Similar results have been obtained with extracts from S. magnificum and B. pilosa. The venom of E. ocellatus induces haemorrhage and necrosis. The toxicity increased by 3-fold when the venom was injected through intravenous or intraperitoneal route, compared to intramuscular route. Pentosane sulfuric polyester and tranexamic acid protected mice against doses up to 3 LD50. Pentosane sulfuric polyester, hydrocortisone, heparin and aminocaproic acid increased the SAV protective titre by 50%. However, tried plant extracts weakly antagonised the venom and did not potentiate the SAV.

  19. [Drug or plant substances which antagonize venoms or potentiate antivenins].

    PubMed

    Chippaux, J P; Rakotonirina, V S; Rakotonirina, A; Dzikouk, G

    1997-01-01

    Dendroaspis jamesoni (Elapidae) and Echis oceliatus (Viperidae) are responsible for most of severe evenomation in Cameroon. Toxicity of venoms of these two species has been measured using mice according to the method of Spearman & Kàrber. The effect on experimental envenomation of various drugs (atropine, promethazine, neostigmine, hydrocortisone, pentosane sulfuric polyester, heparin, tranexamic acid and aminocaproic acid) and plant extracts (Schumanniophyton magnificum, Bidens pilosa, Securidaca longepedunculata and Garcinia lucida) has been observed associated or not with the antivenom lpser Afrique (SAV). The venom of D. jamesoni contains neurotoxins agonizing and antagonising acetylcholine. The toxicity of the venom did not depend on the route of injection. Atropine, promethazine, neostigmine and hydrocortisone protected animals against a venom dose up to 2 LD50. Moreover, atropine and promethazine potentiated the SAV. Similar results have been obtained with extracts from S. magnificum and B. pilosa. The venom of E. ocellatus induces haemorrhage and necrosis. The toxicity increased by 3-fold when the venom was injected through intravenous or intraperitoneal route, compared to intramuscular route. Pentosane sulfuric polyester and tranexamic acid protected mice against doses up to 3 LD50. Pentosane sulfuric polyester, hydrocortisone, heparin and aminocaproic acid increased the SAV protective titre by 50%. However, tried plant extracts weakly antagonised the venom and did not potentiate the SAV. PMID:9479470

  20. [Congenital rubella resulting from maternal reinfection].

    PubMed

    Alem, A; Tamourt, O

    1998-01-01

    Almost all the rubeolic reinfections are not apparent and are without any risk for the fetus. The news born's case (2nd in children) which is described here, presents a bilateral cataract. We have found positive IgA, IgG and IgM and an antibodies avidity of 70%. Concerning the mother, there are no IgM. The IgM and IgA are positive. The avidity of the antibodies is upper than 90%. During her first pregancy, the mother was subjected to the search of the antibodies, the results are positive (title = 60 ul/ml) and during her second pregnancy, the mother had rubeollic contact with her eldest son. Our conclusion is that it is a congenital rubella resulting from a reinfection. PMID:11256312

  1. More results on oscillating edge-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Hegab, A.; Jackson, T. L.

    2000-06-01

    We examine a simple model of a side-anchored non-premixed edge-flame in order to gain insights into the oscillations that are sometimes observed in microgravity candle burning, flame-spread over liquids, etc. Previous results describe the role played by the Lewis number of the fuel, and the Damköhler number, and here we examine both the effects of an on-edge and off-edge convective flow, and the effects of a heat sink. The on-edge flow and the heat sink tend to destabilize and the off-edge flow tends to stabilize, results consistent with our hypothesis regarding the genesis of the oscillations.

  2. Exploratory visual analysis of pharmacogenomic results.

    PubMed

    Reif, David M; Dudek, Scott M; Shaffer, Christian M; Wang, Janey; Moore, Jason H

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of expansive pharmacogenomic datasets is a daunting challenge. A thorough exploration of experimental results requires both statistical and annotative information. Therefore, appropriate analysis tools must bring a readily-accessible, flexible combination of statistics and biological annotation to the user's desktop. We present the Exploratory Visual Analysis (EVA) software and database as such a tool and demonstrate its utility in replicating the findings of an earlier pharmacogenomic study as well as elucidating novel biologically plausible hypotheses. EVA brings all of the often disparate pieces of analysis together in an infinitely flexible visual display that is amenable to any type of statistical result and biological question. Here, we describe the motivations for developing EVA, detail the database and custom graphical user interface (GUI), provide an example of its application to a publicly available pharmacogenomic dataset, and discuss the broad utility of the EVA tool for the pharmacogenomics community. PMID:15759635

  3. First Results from CLEO-c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briere, Roy A.

    We present the first results from a recent pilot run of the CLEO-c experiment. This new program investigates the physics of charm mesons and charmonium resonances. We begin with results on two-body decays of the ψ(2S) first observations of some highly-suppressed "PV" modes are presented. Next, data taken at the ψ(3770) are used for a variety of studies of D meson decays in a very clean environment. We report the D bar {D} cross-section at the ψ(3770), extract fD from the first significant sample of D+→μ+νμ decays, and investigate both inclusive and exclusive semileptonic D decays.

  4. Rapid Spacecraft Development: Results and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, William A.

    2002-01-01

    The Rapid Spacecraft Development Office (RSDO) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the management and direction of a dynamic and versatile program for the definition, competition, and acquisition of multiple indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contracts - resulting in a catalog of spacecraft buses. Five spacecraft delivery orders have been placed by the RSDO and one spacecraft has been launched. Numerous concept and design studies have been performed, most with the intent of leading to a future spacecraft acquisition. A collection of results and lessons learned is recorded to highlight management techniques, methods and processes employed in the conduct of spacecraft acquisition. Topics include working relationships under fixed price delivery orders, price and value, risk management, contingency reserves, and information restrictions.

  5. Expert Meeting Report. Foundations Research Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ojczyk, C.; Huelman, P.; Carmody, J.

    2013-05-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an expert meeting on Foundations–Research Results on November 15, 2011, in Minneapolis, MN. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover needs and promote dialog among researchers and industry professionals. Key results were: greater understanding of the role of moisture transport through foundation and insulation materials and its potential impact on building durability; greater understanding of the role of foundation type in the process of selecting an insulation system for energy performance and building durability; need for research to quantify the risks associated with insulation processes to better enable users to weigh costs and benefits against the existing conditions of a home; need for improved performance modeling capabilities that address variations in foundation types and soil conditions.

  6. FIFE: Analysis and results - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, F. G.; Sellers, P. J.; Markham, B.; Wang, J.; Strebel, D. E.; Macpherson, I.; Kelly, R. D.; Verma, S.; Blad, B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the first results of the data analysis carried out for the First International Satellite Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) conducted over a 15 x 15 km grasslands study area in the central United States. Preliminary results show that the energy and mass flux data collected at several diurnal cycles during different parts of the growing season are of high quality. It was found that the canopy radiometric brightness temperature measured in the 10.4-12.3 microns is linearly related to seasonal variations in canopy aerodynamic temperature, and, thus, may provide a useful measure of sensible heat flux from the surface. Airborne monitoring of the mass and heat flux in the atmospheric boundary layer were found to be adequate for studies of the energy and mass budgets above the test site.

  7. FIFE, First ISLSCP Field Experiment - Results overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, F. G.; Markham, B. J.; Wang, J. R.; Huemmerich, F.; Sellers, P. J.; Strebel, D. E.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Kelly, Robert D.; Blad, Blaine L.

    1990-01-01

    Results of the analyses of the First International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) are described which relate to the mass and energy flux of a particular area. The extensive satellite and ground data are used to analyze the energy balance over the FIFE site, monitor the energy-budget components, study atmospheric effects on remote sensing, examine cloud cover, and investigate fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer. The results verify existing theories relating energy-balance components with surface biology and remote sensing, and satellites can be used to estimate surface-energy budgets. Some analyses provide data that contradict present theories regarding thermodynamic and biophysical methodologies for estimating surface-heat fluxes.

  8. CLSM bleed water reduction test results

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.; Rajendran, N.

    1997-04-21

    Previous testing by BSRI/SRTC/Raytheon indicated that the CLSM specified for the Tank 20 closure generates about 6 gallons (23 liters) of bleed water per cubic yard of material (0.76 m3).1 This amount to about 10 percent of the total mixing water. HLWE requested that the CLSM mix be optimized to reduce bleed water while maintaining flow. Elimination of bleed water from the CLSM mix specified for High-Level Waste Tank Closure will result in waste minimization, time savings and cost savings. Over thirty mixes were formulated and evaluated at the on-site Raytheon Test Laboratory. Improved low bleed water CLSM mixes were identified. Results are documented in this report.

  9. Environmental management system objectives & targets results summary :

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2014-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexicos (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System is the integrated approach for members of the workforce to identify and manage environmental risks. Each Fiscal Year (FY) SNL/NM performs an analysis to identify environmental aspects, and the environmental programs associated with them are charged with the task of routinely monitoring and measuring the objectives and targets that are established to mitigate potential impacts of SNL/NMs operations on the environment. An annual summary of the results achieved towards meeting established Sandia Corporation and SNL/NM Site-specific objectives and targets provides a connection to, and rational for, annually revised environmental aspects. The purpose of this document is to summarize the results achieved and documented in FY2013.

  10. The OPAL opacity code: New results

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    The OPAL code was developed to calculate the wide range of frequency-dependent and mean opacity data needed to model laboratory experiments and stellar interiors. We use parametric potentials to generate vastly more atomic data than used in earlier opacity work for all elements with atomic number less than 35. We have also developed an improved equation of state based on an activity expansion of the grand canonical partition function. We give herein a brief description of the OPAL code and present new results that include the effect of additional heavy elements compared to our earlier carbons. The importance of very heavy elements having atomic number greater than 30 is also discussed. We present some comparisons with recent results from the Opacity Project and some directions for future work.

  11. LDEF Materials Results for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F. (Compiler); Gregory, John (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    These proceedings describe the application of LDEF data to spacecraft and payload design, and emphasize where space environmental effects on materials research and development is needed as defined by LDEF data. The LDEF six years of exposure of materials has proven to be by far the most comprehensive source of information ever obtained on the long-term performance of materials in the space environment. The conference provided a forum for materials scientists and engineers to review and critically assess the LDEF results from the standpoint of their relevance, significance, and impact on spacecraft design practice. The impact of the LDEF findings on materials selection and qualification, and the needs and plans for further study, were addressed from several perspectives. Many timely and needed changes and modifications in external spacecraft materials selection have occurred as a result of LDEF investigations.

  12. Recent results of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández-Rey, Juan José

    2015-07-15

    The latest results from the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope are reported. Limits on a high energy neutrino diffuse flux have been set using for the first time both muon–track and showering events. The results for point sources obtained by ANTARES are also shown. These are the most stringent limits for the southern sky for neutrino energies below 100 TeV. Constraints on the nature of the cluster of neutrino events near the Galactic Centre observed by IceCube are also reported. In particular, ANTARES data excludes a single point–like neutrino source as the origin of this cluster. Looking for neutrinos coming from the Sun or the centre of the Galaxy, very competitive limits are set by the ANTARES data to the flux of neutrinos produced by self-annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles.

  13. Overview of recent results from CNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; Boozer, Allen H.; Brenner, Paul W.; Durand de Gevigney, Benoit; Sarasola, Xabier; Traverso, Peter

    2010-11-01

    This poster will give an overview of recent results from The Columbia Non-neutral Torus (CNT). CNT was recently reconfigured by repositioning the internal coils, creating magnetic surfaces substantially different from those previously used. Field line mapping, confinement, and stability results will be summarized; they are covered in more detail in adjacent posters. Numerical studies of drift orbits will be presented. Toroidal resonances and electrostatic perturbations can create complicated unconfined orbits in CNT, which can affect confinement negatively but also provides ways of injecting electrons, or positrons. The issue of Debye shielding in a non-neutral plasma is discussed. Debye screening is very different compared to the textbook calculation for a quasineutral plasma. The ability to affect drift orbits with external electrostatic perturbations may be used to inject electrons or positrons across the magnetic surfaces. An update on the plans for an electron-positron plasma experiment will also be given.

  14. Communicating the rigor behind science results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R.; Callery, S.

    2015-12-01

    Communicating the rigor behind science resultsNASA's Global Climate Change website and companion Facebook page have an exceptionally large reach. Moderating the vast quantity of questions, feedback and comments from these public platforms has provided a unique perspective on the way the public views science, the scientific method and how science is funded. Email feedback and social media interactions reveal widespread misperceptions about how science is carried out: There is considerable criticism and suspicion surrounding methods of funding, and the difficulty of obtaining grants is underestimated. There appears to be limited public awareness of the peer review process. This talk will highlight the need for better communication not only of science results, but the process of science--from proposal writing and getting funded to peer-review and fundamental science terminology. As a community of science communicators, we also need to highlight the inaccuracies sometimes introduced by media reports of peer-reviewed science papers.

  15. An Overview of Recent Results from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Hicks

    2011-12-01

    The unique capabilities of the CLAS detector to measure exclusive meson electroproduction off protons, with almost complete coverage of the final hadron phase space, has extended our knowledge of excited baryon structure. Consistent results from Np and Npp final states provide convincing evidence for reliable extraction of N* electrocouplings. Theoretical analyses of these results, using self-consistent dynamical calculations using an internal quark core and an external meson-baryon cloud suggest that meson-baryon dressing amplitudes need to be included. The meson-baryon dressing was already shown to be necessary to get agreement between calculations and data on the D resonance transition magnetic moment at low Q{sup 2}. Similarly, a new measurement of the transition magnetic moment for strange baryons also disagrees with quark models, suggesting the need for meson-baryon dressings. In the near future, the CLAS detector will be replaced with CLAS12, providing new high-precision data.

  16. SLS-1 flight experiments preliminary significant results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-01-01

    Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) is the first of a series of dedicated life sciences Spacelab missions designed to investigate the mechanisms involved in the physiological adaptation to weightlessness and the subsequent readaptation to 1 gravity (1 G). Hypotheses generated from the physiological effects observed during earlier missions led to the formulation of several integrated experiments to determine the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed phenomena. The 18 experiments selected for flight on SLS-1 investigated the cardiovascular, cardiopulmonary, regulatory physiology, musculoskeletal, and neuroscience disciplines in both human and rodent subjects. The SLS-1 preliminary results gave insight to the mechanisms involved in the adaptation to the microgravity environment and readaptation when returning to Earth. The experimental results will be used to promote health and safety for future long duration space flights and, as in the past, will be applied to many biomedical problems encountered here on Earth.

  17. FINAL NEUTRINO OSCILLATION RESULTS FROM LSND

    SciTech Connect

    W. LOUIS

    2000-10-01

    The LSND experiment provides evidence for neutrino oscillations from both the primary {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {r_arrow} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillation search and the secondary {nu}{sub {mu}} {r_arrow} {nu}{sub e} oscillation search. At present, this remains the only evidence for appearance neutrino oscillations and implies that at least one neutrino has a mass greater than 0.4 eV/c{sup 2} and that neutrinos comprise more than 1% of the mass of the universe. The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab, which is presently under construction, will provide a definitive test of the LSND results, and if the neutrino oscillation results are confirmed, will make a precision measurement of the oscillation parameters.

  18. Microwave radiometry for humanitarian demining: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Joel T.; Kim, Hyunjin; Wiggins, David R.; Cheon, Yonghun

    2002-08-01

    Previous modeling studies have indicated that a multi-frequency radiometer could prove advantageous for humanitarian demining due to the oscillatory patterns in brightness temperature versus frequency that would be observed in the presence of a sub-surface target. Initial experimental results are reported in this paper from a multi-frequency radiometer (MFRAD) system operating at 19 frequencies in the 2.1-6.5 GHz band. The basic design of MFRAD is reviewed, and the calibration and noise background removal procedures discussed. Experimental results with sub-surface metallic and styrofoam targets are then provided that demonstrate the predicted oscillatory behavior. An FFT-based detection algorithm is also described and applied to measured data. Further plans for experiments and tests with this system are also detailed.

  19. Modality-independent elastography: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Chad W.; Miga, Michael I.

    2004-05-01

    The correlation between the stiffness and health of tissue is an accepted form of organ disease assessment. As a result, there has been a significant amount of interest in developing methods to image elasticity parameters (i.e. elastography). This work presents a technique that frames the elastography imaging problem within a non-rigid iterative image registration approach. Through the use of finite element modeling and mutual information, material properties are varied in order to optimize the registration between a post-compressed image and a model-generated compressed image. The results shown here demonstrate the strong connection between image similarity and appropriate tissue parameters and the algorithm's ability to detect contrast in tissue stiffness. By casting elasticity image reconstruction within the context of image similarity, the method is generalized to all forms of medical imaging.

  20. Modelling rainfall erosion resulting from climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnell, Peter

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that soil erosion leads to agricultural productivity decline and contributes to water quality decline. The current widely used models for determining soil erosion for management purposes in agriculture focus on long term (~20 years) average annual soil loss and are not well suited to determining variations that occur over short timespans and as a result of climate change. Soil loss resulting from rainfall erosion is directly dependent on the product of runoff and sediment concentration both of which are likely to be influenced by climate change. This presentation demonstrates the capacity of models like the USLE, USLE-M and WEPP to predict variations in runoff and erosion associated with rainfall events eroding bare fallow plots in the USA with a view to modelling rainfall erosion in areas subject to climate change.

  1. Compliance to compulsory vaccination: strategies and results.

    PubMed

    Serafini, G; Caramello, S; Vaudetto, S

    1995-06-01

    This report is devoted to analyze the effect that compulsory vaccination has on the compliance of the population, compared with the results obtained by massive campaigns for optional vaccinations. The implementation of a specific software for the management of individual schedules helps to reach a substantial complete coverage of the individuals for the first ones, while improving but incomplete results regard the vaccines against pertussis and measles-mumps-rubella, optional in Italy. The optimization of data management at the local health unit level improves the quality and the satisfaction of the work performed by the personnel, but has a limited effect on the already nearly complete coverage for the compulsory immunizations. The mounting percentage of children immunized with optional vaccines can be explained both by the massive campaigns of information conducted in recent years and by the better tracking of individual immunization schedules.

  2. Field trials results of guided wave tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno Zon, Tim van; Leden, Edwin van der

    2015-03-31

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Guided wave travel time tomography is a method capable of providing an absolute wall thickness map. This method is currently making the transition from the laboratory to the field. For this purpose a dedicated data acquisition system and special purpose EMAT sensor rings have been developed. The system can be deployed for permanent monitoring and inspections. Field trials have been conducted on various pipes with different diameters, containing either liquid or gas. The main focus has been on pipe supports. The results demonstrate the successful operation of the technology in the field. Expected corrosion damage was clearly visible on the produced results enabling asset owner to make calculated decisions on the pipelines safety, maintenance and operations.

  3. Field trials results of guided wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; van Zon, Tim; van der Leden, Edwin

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Guided wave travel time tomography is a method capable of providing an absolute wall thickness map. This method is currently making the transition from the laboratory to the field. For this purpose a dedicated data acquisition system and special purpose EMAT sensor rings have been developed. The system can be deployed for permanent monitoring and inspections. Field trials have been conducted on various pipes with different diameters, containing either liquid or gas. The main focus has been on pipe supports. The results demonstrate the successful operation of the technology in the field. Expected corrosion damage was clearly visible on the produced results enabling asset owner to make calculated decisions on the pipelines safety, maintenance and operations.

  4. Results of laser ranging collocations during 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolenkiewicz, R.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of laser ranging collocations is to compare the ability of two satellite laser ranging systems, located in the vicinity of one another, to measure the distance to an artificial Earth satellite in orbit over the sites. The similar measurement of this distance is essential before a new or modified laser system is deployed to worldwide locations in order to gather the data necessary to meet the scientific goals of the Crustal Dynamics Project. In order to be certain the laser systems are operating properly, they are periodically compared with each other. These comparisons or collocations are performed by locating the lasers side by side when they track the same satellite during the same time or pass. The data is then compared to make sure the lasers are giving essentially the same range results. Results of the three collocations performed during 1983 are given.

  5. New results from the RD52 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigmans, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous detection of the Čerenkov light and scintillation light produced in hadron showers makes it possible to measure the electromagnetic shower fraction event by event and thus eliminate the detrimental effects of fluctuations in this fraction on the performance of calorimeters. In the RD52 (DREAM) project, the possibilities of this dual-readout calorimetry are investigated and optimized. In this talk, the latest results of this project will be presented. These results concern tests of a dual-readout fiber calorimeter with electrons at very small angles of incidence, detailed measurements of the time structure of hadron showers in this detector, as well as elaborate comparisons of various aspects of the calorimeter performance with GEANT4 simulations.

  6. New Quarkonium Results from the BABAR experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Collaboration, representing the BABAR

    2008-05-21

    New BABAR results on B mesons and quarkonia are presented: an analysis of B{sup +} {yields} X(3872)K{sup +} and B{sup 0} {yields} X(3872)K{sup 0} decays with X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, a precise measurement of the B mass difference {Delta}m{sub B} = m(B{sup 0}) -m(B{sup +}) and a study of hadronic transition between {Upsilon} mesons.

  7. Lattice results on nucleon/roper properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Huey-Wen

    2009-12-01

    In this proceeding, I review the attempts to calculate the Nucleon resonance (including Roper as first radially excited state of nucleon and other excited states) using lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The latest preliminary results from Hadron Spectrum Collaboration (HSC) with mπ thickapprox 380 MeV are reported. The Sachs electric form factor of the proton and neutron and their transition with the Roper at large Q2 are also updated in this work.

  8. Statistical literacy and sample survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlevey, Lynn; Sullivan, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Sample surveys are widely used in the social sciences and business. The news media almost daily quote from them, yet they are widely misused. Using students with prior managerial experience embarking on an MBA course, we show that common sample survey results are misunderstood even by those managers who have previously done a statistics course. In general, they fare no better than managers who have never studied statistics. There are implications for teaching, especially in business schools, as well as for consulting.

  9. Recent results from CERN-WA98

    SciTech Connect

    Stankus, P.; WA98 Collaboration

    1997-02-01

    The CERN experiment WA98 is a general-survey, open-spectrometer experiment designed to examine 160 A GeV/c Pb+A collisions at the CERN-SPS. The experiment has a broad physics agenda, as suggested by its many different subsystems. A diagram of the experiment as it stood in 1995 is shown in the report. Detectors whose results are presented here are described briefly.

  10. Experimental Results for Space-Wire-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Steve; Gibson, David; Ferrer, Albert

    2015-09-01

    SpaceWire-D is a deterministic extension to SpaceWire that uses time-division multiplexing to schedule traffic within time-slots. It allows a single SpaceWire network to be used for both time-critical avionics control applications and asynchronous payload data-handling simultaneously using existing SpaceWire technology. In this paper we describe the services of SpaceWire-D and present experimental results for each service.

  11. Electroweak results from the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Dorage, T., Padova University and I.N.F.N.

    1998-08-01

    We present the latest results on electroweak physics obtained from the analysis of p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s=1.8 TeV. The large data samples collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron collider allow measurements of the top quark mass to a 3% accuracy and of the W boson to a 0.1% accuracy. Many precision measurements that test the Standard Model and probe its possible extensions are also described.

  12. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.

    2011-10-12

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  13. [Ethnic entrepreneurship in Montreal: some preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Juteau, D; Daviau-guay, J; Moallem, M

    1992-01-01

    "This research note presents a first sketch of a study we are undertaking on ethnic entrepreneurship [in Montreal]. It details first of all our theoretical framework and then presents some preliminary results. For this research, we are studying various ethnic groups, those in the majority as well as the minority. For each of them, we will analyze the impact that immigration status, sex, the industrial sector and urban context play on entrepreneurial activity." (SUMMARY IN ENG AND SPA) PMID:12287383

  14. Recent Results from the MERIT Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, H. G.

    2010-03-01

    MERIT is a proof-of-principle experiment which demonstrates the key target concepts for the production of muons required for a muon collider or a neutrino factory. The experiment was run at CERN utilizing 14 and 24 GeV proton beams from the PS. The key elements of the experiment include the impact of the proton beam with a free flowing mercury jet within the confines of a 15-T solenoid field. Results from the experiment are reported.

  15. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from roller coaster.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming; Tian, Qing; Shen, Hong

    2011-03-01

    Roller coasters are probably one of the more popular rides at amusement parks around the world, and there are few reported injuries. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from roller coaster in a previously healthy woman. The clinical course, management, and etiology of her case are discussed; and the literature is reviewed. To our knowledge, pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described. PMID:20825914

  16. CO2 laser cold cathode research results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1973-01-01

    The construction and processing of four test lasers are discussed, and the test results are assessed. Tests show that the best performance was obtained from cathodes made from internally oxidized Ag-Cu alloys or pure Cu. Due to the cold cathode technology developments, sealed-off 1 w CO2 lasers with gas volumes of only 50 cu cm were duplicated, and have performed satisfactorily for more than 6000 hours.

  17. Recent Results from Fermilab E690

    SciTech Connect

    Berisso, M.C.; Christian, D.C.; Felix, J.; Gara, A.; Gottschalk, E.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartouni, E.P.; Knapp, B.C.; Kreisler, M.N.; Lee, S.; Markianos, K.; Moreno, G.; Reyes, M.A.; Sosa, M.; Wang, M.H.L.S.; Wehmann, A.; Wesson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Partial wave analysis results of centrally produced mesons in the reaction pp {yields} P{sub slow}(X)P{sub fast}, with 800 GeV/c protons incident on a liquid hydrogen target are presented. In the reactions considered in this paper the (X) system decays into: a) K{sup 0}{sub s}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}, b) K{sub s}K{sub s}, and c) {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}.

  18. Recent results from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Gascón, Alberto; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-07-23

    The Pierre Auger Observatory has been designed to investigate the origin and nature of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) using a hybrid detection technique. In this contribution we present some of the most recent results of the observatory, namely the upper-end of the spectrum of cosmic rays, state-of-the-art analyses on mass composition, the measurements of the proton-air cross-section, and the number of muons at ground.

  19. [Results, evolution of assisted reproduction techniques].

    PubMed

    Frydman, R

    1995-11-01

    During the last decade IVF and other assisted conception treatment (ACT) methods have become an internationally accepted form of treatment of infertile couple. The final definition of success following ACT is the couple who having received treatment have a live child. As IVF treatment gradually becomes more successful and as the number of babies born as a result of this treatment increases more attention is being focused on the outcome of ACT pregnancies. Recent and futur development of ACT are related.

  20. Recent Stirling engine loss - understanding results

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, R.C.; Thieme, L.G.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    For several years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and other US Government agencies have been funding experimental and analytical efforts to improve the understanding of Stirling thermodynamic losses. NASA`s objective is to improve Stirling engine design capability to support the development of new engines for space power. An overview of these efforts was last given at the 1988 IECEC. Recent results of this research are reviewed.