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Sample records for pentoxide induces pulmonary

  1. Vanadium pentoxide induces activation and death of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Dávalos, Angélica; Gonzalez-Villava, Adriana; Rodriguez-Lara, Vianey; Montaño, Luis Felipe; Fortoul, Teresa I; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    Vanadium is a transition metal released into the atmosphere, as air-suspended particles, as a result of the combustion of fossil fuels and some metallurgic industry activities. Air-suspended particle pollution causes inflammation-related processes such as thrombosis and other cardiovascular events. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) on endothelial cells since they are key participants in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. Cell adhesion, the expression of adhesion molecules and oxidative stress, as well as proliferation, morphology and cell death of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to V2O5, were evaluated. Vanadium pentoxide at a 3.12 µg cm(-2) concentration induced an enhanced adhesion of the U937 macrophage cell line to HUVECs, owing to an increased expression of late adhesion molecules. HUVECs exposed to V2O5 showed an increase in ROS and nitric oxide production, and a diminished proliferation. These changes in vanadium-treated HUVECs were accompanied by severe morphological changes and apoptotic cell death. Vanadium pentoxide induced serious endothelial cell damage, probably related to the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality observed in individuals living in highly air-polluted areas. PMID:21721017

  2. Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) induced mucin production by airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongfang; Walters, Dianne M.; Zhu, Lingxiang; Lee, Pak-Kei

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutants has been linked to various airway diseases and disease exacerbations. Almost all chronic airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma are caused by complicated interactions between gene and environment. One of the major hallmarks of those diseases is airway mucus overproduction (MO). Excessive mucus causes airway obstruction and significantly increases morbidity and mortality. Metals are major components of environmental particulate matters (PM). Among them, vanadium has been suggested to play an important role in PM-induced mucin production. Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) is the most common commercial source of vanadium, and it has been associated with occupational chronic bronchitis and asthma, both of which are MO diseases. However, the underlying mechanism is not entirely clear. In this study, we used both in vitro and in vivo models to demonstrate the robust inductions of mucin production by V2O5. Furthermore, the follow-up mechanistic study revealed a novel v-raf-1 murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1-IKK-NF-κB pathway that mediated V2O5-induced mucin production. Most interestingly, the reactive oxygen species and the classical mucin-inducing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-MAPK pathway appeared not to be involved in this process. Thus the V2O5-induced mucin production may represent a novel EGFR-MAPK-independent and environmental toxicant-associated MO model. Complete elucidation of the signaling pathway in this model will not only facilitate the development of the treatment for V2O5-associated occupational diseases but also advance our understanding on the EGFR-independent mucin production in other chronic airway diseases. PMID:21531775

  3. Vanadium pentoxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vanadium pentoxide ; CASRN 1314 - 62 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  4. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  5. Drugs induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Savale, Laurent; Günther, Sven; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature, resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification, PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly appetite suppressant drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used but are also considered as possible risk factors for PAH. Dasatinib, a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, in part reversible after its withdrawal. Recently several studies raised the potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. Other possible risk factors for PAH include: nasal decongestants, like phenylpropanolamine, dietary supplement - L-Tryptophan, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, pergolide and other drugs that could act on 5HT2B receptors. Interestingly, PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drugs induced PAH. PMID:23972547

  6. Vanadium pentoxide effects on stress responses in wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UE-ME3.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Tânia; Conim, Ana; Alves-Pereira, Isabel; Ferreira, Rui

    2009-11-01

    Vanadium pentoxide mainly used as catalyst in sulphuric acid, maleic anhydride and ceramics industry, is a pollutant watering redistributed around the environment. Research on biological influence of vanadium pentoxide has gained major importance because it exerts toxic effects on a wide variety of biological systems. In this work we intent to evaluate the effects of vanadium pentoxide ranging from 0 to 2 mM in culture media on a wine wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae from Alentejo region of Portugal. Our results show that 2.0 mM vanadium pentoxide in culture medium induced a significant increase of malonaldehyde level and Glutathione peroxidase activity, a slightly increase of Catalase A activity as well as a decrease of wet weight and mitochondrial NADH cit c reductase of S. cerevisiae UE-ME(3). Also our results show that cycloheximide prevent cell death when cells grows 30 min in presence of 1.5 mM of vanadium pentoxide.

  7. Pulmonary Artery Denervation Reduces Pulmonary Artery Pressure and Induces Histological Changes in an Acute Porcine Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nadine D.; Chang, William; Watson, Oliver; Swift, Andrew J.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A.; Kiely, David G.; Suvarna, S. Kim; Gunn, Julian; Lawrie, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background— Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality and limited treatment options. Recent studies have shown that pulmonary artery denervation improves pulmonary hemodynamics in an experimental model and in an early clinical trial. We aimed to evaluate the nerve distribution around the pulmonary artery, to determine the effect of radiofrequency pulmonary artery denervation on acute pulmonary hypertension induced by vasoconstriction, and to demonstrate denervation of the pulmonary artery at a histological level. Methods and Results— Histological evaluation identified a circumferential distribution of nerves around the proximal pulmonary arteries. Nerves were smaller in diameter, greater in number, and located in closer proximity to the luminal aspect of the pulmonary arterial wall beyond the pulmonary artery bifurcation. To determine the effect of pulmonary arterial denervation acute pulmonary hypertension was induced in 8 pigs by intravenous infusion of thromboxane A2 analogue. Animals were assigned to either pulmonary artery denervation, using a prototype radiofrequency catheter and generator, or a sham procedure. Pulmonary artery denervation resulted in reduced mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output. Ablation lesions on the luminal surface of the pulmonary artery were accompanied by histological and biochemical alteration in adventitial nerves and correlated with improved hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions— Pulmonary artery denervation offers the possibility of a new treatment option for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Further work is required to determine the long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26553697

  8. Cocaine-induced pulmonary changes: HRCT findings *

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Renata Rocha; Zanetti, Gláucia; Souza, Arthur Soares; de Souza, Luciana Soares; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate HRCT scans of the chest in 22 patients with cocaine-induced pulmonary disease. Methods: We included patients between 19 and 52 years of age. The HRCT scans were evaluated by two radiologists independently, discordant results being resolved by consensus. The inclusion criterion was an HRCT scan showing abnormalities that were temporally related to cocaine use, with no other apparent causal factors. Results: In 8 patients (36.4%), the clinical and tomographic findings were consistent with "crack lung", those cases being studied separately. The major HRCT findings in that subgroup of patients included ground-glass opacities, in 100% of the cases; consolidations, in 50%; and the halo sign, in 25%. In 12.5% of the cases, smooth septal thickening, paraseptal emphysema, centrilobular nodules, and the tree-in-bud pattern were identified. Among the remaining 14 patients (63.6%), barotrauma was identified in 3 cases, presenting as pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and hemopneumothorax, respectively. Talcosis, characterized as perihilar conglomerate masses, architectural distortion, and emphysema, was diagnosed in 3 patients. Other patterns were found less frequently: organizing pneumonia and bullous emphysema, in 2 patients each; and pulmonary infarction, septic embolism, eosinophilic pneumonia, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema, in 1 patient each. Conclusions: Pulmonary changes induced by cocaine use are varied and nonspecific. The diagnostic suspicion of cocaine-induced pulmonary disease depends, in most of the cases, on a careful drawing of correlations between clinical and radiological findings. PMID:26398752

  9. Naloxone-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J A; Koenigsberg, M D

    1987-11-01

    We present the case of a 68-year-old woman with acute pulmonary edema secondary to the administration of naloxone to reverse an inadvertent narcotic overdose. The patient presented following a 12-hour history of increasingly bizarre behavior and confusion. A total IV dose of 1.6 mg naloxone was administered in an attempt to reverse the suspected overconsumption of a codeine-containing cough suppressant. She immediately became agitated, tachycardic, and diaphoretic; a clinical diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema was made. Following treatment with furosemide, nitroglycerin, and morphine sulfate, the patient recovered completely without further incident. Although naloxone is thought to be a safe drug with few complications, it should not be used indiscriminantly, and the smallest doses necessary to elicit the desired response should be used. PMID:3662194

  10. Triptolide Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Chen, Chun; Cao, Yongbin; Tian, Yeping; Guo, Yangsong; Zhang, Bingrong; Wang, Xiaohui; Yin, Liangjie; Zhang, Zhenhuan; O'Dell, Walter; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2015-11-01

    Triptolide (TPL) may mitigate radiation-induced late pulmonary side effects through its inhibition of global pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we evaluated the effect of TPL in C57BL/6 mice, the animals were exposed to radiation with vehicle (15 Gy), radiation with TPL (0.25 mg/kg i.v., twice weekly for 1, 2 and 3 months), radiation and celecoxib (CLX) (30 mg/kg) and sham irradiation. Cultured supernatant of irradiated RAW 264.7 and MLE-15 cells and lung lysate in different groups were enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays at 33 h. Respiratory rate, pulmonary compliance and pulmonary density were measured at 5 months in all groups. The groups exposed to radiation with vehicle and radiation with TPL exhibited significant differences in respiratory rate and pulmonary compliance (480 ± 75/min vs. 378 ± 76/min; 0.6 ± 0.1 ml/cm H2O/p kg vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 ml/cm H2O/p kg). Seventeen cytokines were significantly reduced in the lung lysate of the radiation exposure with TPL group at 5 months compared to that of the radiation with vehicle group, including profibrotic cytokines implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, such as IL-1β, TGF- β1 and IL-13. The radiation exposure with TPL mice exhibited a 41% reduction of pulmonary density and a 25% reduction of hydroxyproline in the lung, compared to that of radiation with vehicle mice. The trichrome-stained area of fibrotic foci and pathological scaling in sections of the mice treated with radiation and TPL mice were significantly less than those of the radiation with vehicle-treated group. In addition, the radiation with TPL-treated mice exhibited a trend of improved survival rate compared to that of the radiation with vehicle-treated mice at 5 months (83% vs. 53%). Three radiation-induced profibrotic cytokines in the radiation with vehicle-treated group were significantly reduced by TPL treatment, and this partly contributed to the trend of improved survival rate and pulmonary density and function and the decreased severity of

  11. Tracheoesophageal fistula induced by invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuetian; Zhu, Cheng; Qian, Xiaozhe

    2016-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is commonly seen in immunocompromised patients, and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) induced by IPA is rare and seldom reported. Management of these critically ill patients is challenging and often requires a multidisciplinary approach. The authors reported an adult suffering from aplastic anemia who developed TEF caused by IPA. The diagnosis was confirmed following bronchoscopy and histopathological examination. Antifungal and bronchoscopic intervention provided a cure without any recurrence as yet.

  12. Agmatine attenuates silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    El-Agamy, D S; Sharawy, M H; Ammar, E M

    2014-06-01

    There is a large body of evidence that nitric oxide (NO) formation is implicated in mediating silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. As a reactive free radical, NO may not only contribute to lung parenchymal tissue injury but also has the ability to combine with superoxide and form a highly reactive toxic species peroxynitrite that can induce extensive cellular toxicity in the lung tissues. This study aimed to explore the effect of agmatine, a known NO synthase inhibitor, on silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with agmatine for 60 days following a single intranasal instillation of silica suspension (50 mg in 0.1 ml saline/rat). The results revealed that agmatine attenuated silica-induced lung inflammation as it decreased the lung wet/dry weight ratio, protein concentration, and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Agmatine showed antifibrotic activity as it decreased total hydroxyproline content of the lung and reduced silica-mediated lung inflammation and fibrosis in lung histopathological specimen. In addition, agmatine significantly increased superoxide dismutase (p < 0.001) and reduced glutathione (p < 0.05) activities with significant decrease in the lung malondialdehyde (p < 0.001) content as compared to the silica group. Agmatine also reduced silica-induced overproduction of pulmonary nitrite/nitrate as well as tumor necrosis factor α. Collectively, these results demonstrate the protective effects of agmatine against the silica-induced lung fibrosis that may be attributed to its ability to counteract the NO production, lipid peroxidation, and regulate cytokine effects.

  13. Scuba diving-induced pulmonary edema in a swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Gnadinger, C A; Colwell, C B; Knaut, A L

    2001-11-01

    SCUBA diving-induced pulmonary edema is a rare syndrome that has been previously reported to occur in cold water. We present a case of SCUBA diving-induced pulmonary edema in a 52-year-old man diving in a warm swimming pool. The pathophysiology of this syndrome is unclear, but it is unrelated to either barotrauma or decompression illness. This patient developed frank pulmonary edema while submerged, which resolved after surfacing. As with other patients who have had this syndrome, he did not have any cardiorespiratory disease. The presentation and pathophysiology of SCUBA diving-induced pulmonary edema are discussed.

  14. Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis: pulmonary fibrosis in mice induced by treatment with butylated hydroxytoluene and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Haschek, W.M.; Brody, A.R.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.; Witschi, H.

    1981-12-01

    It is proposed that the pulmonary fibrosis induced in mice by treatment with BHT and oxygen is a good experimental model for human pulmonary fibrosis. The mechanism of synergistic and additive effects of various agents on pulmonary injury and the epithelial mesenchymal interactions occurring during the early and late phases of lung repair could be studied. This model could be used for study of the effects of various concentrations of oxygen on diffusely damaged lung and assessment of the efficacy of drugs in preventing or resolving excessive collagen accumulation in lung. In addition, the relationship between pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema could be studied.

  15. The Curious Question of Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa L.; Farrell, Emily T.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.

    2011-01-01

    The question of whether pulmonary edema develops during exercise on land is controversial. Yet, the development of pulmonary edema during swimming and diving is well established. This paper addresses the current controversies that exist in the field of exercise-induced pulmonary edema on land and with water immersion. It also discusses the mechanisms by which pulmonary edema can develop during land exercise, swimming, and diving and the current gaps in knowledge that exist. Finally, this paper discusses how these fields can continue to advance and the areas where clinical knowledge is lacking. PMID:21660232

  16. Septic pulmonary embolism induced by dental infection.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Yutaro; Taniguchi, Akihiko; Yuzurio, Syota; Horita, Naokatsu; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Watanabe, Yoichi; Tohmori, Hidetoshi; Ono, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Dental infection can be an important source for septic pulmonary embolism (SPE), but only a few cases of SPE accompanying dental infection have been reported. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features of SPE induced by dental infection. Patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria described in the text were recruited in a retrospective fashion. All 9 patients were men, with a median age of 59 years (range:47 to 74 years). Eight patients had chest pain (88.9%), 5 had a preceding toothache (55.6%) and 3 had preceding gingival swelling (33.3%). Blood cultures obtained from 7 patients were negative. Periodontitis was found in all of the cases, periapical periodontitis in 5 cases, and gingival abscess in 3 cases. The median duration of hospitalization was 15 days, and symptoms were mild in some cases. In addition to antimicrobial therapy, tooth extraction was performed in 3 cases, tooth scaling in 6. SPE induced by dental infection has prominent clinical characteristics such as male preponderance, chest pain, preceding toothache, and mild clinical course.

  17. Glycyrrhizic acid alleviates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lili; Tang, Haiying; He, Huanyu; Liu, Jia; Mao, Jingwei; Ji, Hong; Lin, Hongli; Wu, Taihua

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and lethal form of interstitial lung disease that lacks effective therapies at present. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a natural compound extracted from a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Glycyrrhiza glabra, was recently reported to benefit lung injury and liver fibrosis in animal models, yet whether GA has a therapeutic effect on pulmonary fibrosis is unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential therapeutic effect of GA on pulmonary fibrosis in a rat model with bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The results indicated that GA treatment remarkably ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis and attenuated BLM-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and activation of transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway in the lungs. Further, we demonstrated that GA treatment inhibited proliferation of 3T6 fibroblast cells, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted apoptosis in vitro, implying that GA-mediated suppression of fibroproliferation may contribute to the anti-fibrotic effect against BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In summary, our study suggests a therapeutic potential of GA in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26483688

  18. The effects of oxygen induced pulmonary vasoconstriction on bedside measurement of pulmonary gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Ulla M; Thomsen, Lars P; Rees, Stephen E; Rasmussen, Bodil S

    2016-04-01

    In patients with respiratory failure measurements of pulmonary gas exchange are of importance. The bedside automatic lung parameter estimator (ALPE) of pulmonary gas exchange is based on changes in inspired oxygen (FiO2) assuming that these changes do not affect pulmonary circulation. This assumption is investigated in this study. Forty-two out of 65 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had measurements of mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP), cardiac output and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure thus enabling the calculation of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at each FiO2 level. The research version of ALPE was used and FiO2 was step-wise reduced a median of 0.20 and ultimately returned towards baseline values, allowing 6-8 min' steady state period at each of 4-6 levels before recording the oxygen saturation (SpO2). FiO2 reduction led to median decrease in SpO2 from 99 to 92 %, an increase in MPAP of 4 mmHg and an increase in PVR of 36 dyn s cm(-5). Changes were immediately reversed on returning FiO2 towards baseline. In this study changes in MPAP and PVR are small and immediately reversible consistent with small changes in pulmonary gas exchange. This indicates that mild deoxygenation induced pulmonary vasoconstriction does not have significant influences on the ALPE parameters in patients after CABG.

  19. Pulmonary mass and multiple lung nodules mimicking a lung neoplasm as amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-García, J L.; García-Nieto, J C.; Ballesta, F; Prieto, E; Villanueva, M A.; Gallardo, J

    2001-07-01

    Amiodarone is an effective anti-arrhythmic agent. However, during long-term therapy, patients can develop severe adverse pulmonary reactions that are potentially life-threatening. A case of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity is presented in a 78-year-old woman. She developed dyspnea and a pulmonary mass with associated multiple lung nodules mimicking a lung cancer following 5 years of treatment with amiodarone for atrial fibrillation. After drug withdrawal, and without any additional treatment, clinical and radiological improvement was observed, and radiological findings resolved completely within 6 months.

  20. Upregulated Copper Transporters in Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zimnicka, Adriana M.; Tang, Haiyang; Guo, Qiang; Kuhr, Frank K.; Oh, Myung-Jin; Wan, Jun; Chen, Jiwang; Smith, Kimberly A.; Fraidenburg, Dustin R.; Choudhury, Moumita S. R.; Levitan, Irena; Machado, Roberto F.; Kaplan, Jack H.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodeling and increased arterial wall stiffness are two major causes for the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure in patients and animals with pulmonary hypertension. Cellular copper (Cu) plays an important role in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling; increased Cu in vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated to be associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal experiments. In this study, we show that the Cu-uptake transporter 1, CTR1, and the Cu-efflux pump, ATP7A, were both upregulated in the lung tissues and pulmonary arteries of mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Hypoxia also significantly increased expression and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX), a Cu-dependent enzyme that causes crosslinks of collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix. In vitro experiments show that exposure to hypoxia or treatment with cobalt (CoCl2) also increased protein expression of CTR1, ATP7A, and LOX in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). In PASMC exposed to hypoxia or treated with CoCl2, we also confirmed that the Cu transport is increased using 64Cu uptake assays. Furthermore, hypoxia increased both cell migration and proliferation in a Cu-dependent manner. Downregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) with siRNA significantly attenuated hypoxia-mediated upregulation of CTR1 mRNA. In summary, the data from this study indicate that increased Cu transportation due to upregulated CTR1 and ATP7A in pulmonary arteries and PASMC contributes to the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The increased Cu uptake and elevated ATP7A also facilitate the increase in LOX activity and thus the increase in crosslink of extracellular matrix, and eventually leading to the increase in pulmonary arterial stiffness. PMID:24614111

  1. Lung sounds in asbestos induced pulmonary disorders.

    PubMed

    Piirilä, P; Lehtola, H; Zitting, A; Kivisaari, L; Koskinen, H; Luukkonen, R; Salo, S P; Vehmas, T; Nordman, H; Sovijärvi, A R

    2000-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the lung sounds in patients with asbestos related pulmonary disorders with findings in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), and with lung function variables, in order to find out associations of acoustic changes with radiological fibrosis, emphysema or with pulmonary gas transfer functions. Sixty-four patients with asbestos-related pleural disease, with or without pulmonary disease, were studied. Lung sound recording and analysis was carried out with a computerized lung sound analyser, and HRCT of the chest, as well as forced spirometry and diffusing capacity measurement were performed. The fibrosis score correlated positively with the quartile frequencies of the power spectrum of lung sounds in inspiration (f50) and expiration (f50) and crackle count in inspiration, as well as negatively with diffusing capacity. When the patients with crackling sounds and significant fibrosis were excluded (n=18), emphysema correlated negatively with expiratory quartile frequencies of the power spectrum, with f25 and f50. Furthermore, diffusing capacity correlated with inspiratory f25 and forced expiratory volume in one second with inspiratory f50 when crackles and fibrosis were excluded. Changes in lung sounds were significantly associated with radiologically verified abnormalities and gas transfer of pulmonary tissue. High sound frequencies were associated with fibrotic changes of the lung while low sound frequencies with pulmonary emphysema. Acoustic analysis gives complementary clinical information for evaluation of asbestos-related pulmonary disorders. PMID:11153590

  2. Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema in a Triathlon.

    PubMed

    Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Koyamatsu, Jun; Nobuyoshi, Masaharu; Murase, Kunihiko; Maeda, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Family physicians have more opportunities to attend athletic competitions as medical staff at first-aid centers because of the increasing popularity of endurance sports. Case. A 38-year-old man who participated in a triathlon race experienced difficulty in breathing after swimming and was moved to a first-aid center. His initial oxygen saturation was 82% and a thoracic computed tomography scan showed bilateral ground glass opacity in the peripheral lungs. His diagnosis was noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with exercise or swimming: exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE) or swimming-induced pulmonary edema (SIPE). Treatment with furosemide and corticosteroid relieved his symptoms of pulmonary edema. Discussion. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with endurance sports is not common, but knowledge about EIPE/SIPE or neurogenic pulmonary edema associated with hyponatremia, which is called Ayus-Arieff syndrome, is crucial. Knowledge and caution for possible risk factors, such as exposure to cold water or overhydration, are essential for both medical staff and endurance athletes. Conclusion. To determine the presence of pulmonary edema associated with strenuous exercise, oxygen saturation should be used as a screening tool at a first-aid center. To avoid risks for EIPE/SIPE, knowledge about these diseases is essential for medical staff and for athletes who perform extreme exercise.

  3. Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema in a Triathlon

    PubMed Central

    Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Koyamatsu, Jun; Nobuyoshi, Masaharu; Murase, Kunihiko; Maeda, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Family physicians have more opportunities to attend athletic competitions as medical staff at first-aid centers because of the increasing popularity of endurance sports. Case. A 38-year-old man who participated in a triathlon race experienced difficulty in breathing after swimming and was moved to a first-aid center. His initial oxygen saturation was 82% and a thoracic computed tomography scan showed bilateral ground glass opacity in the peripheral lungs. His diagnosis was noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with exercise or swimming: exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE) or swimming-induced pulmonary edema (SIPE). Treatment with furosemide and corticosteroid relieved his symptoms of pulmonary edema. Discussion. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with endurance sports is not common, but knowledge about EIPE/SIPE or neurogenic pulmonary edema associated with hyponatremia, which is called Ayus-Arieff syndrome, is crucial. Knowledge and caution for possible risk factors, such as exposure to cold water or overhydration, are essential for both medical staff and endurance athletes. Conclusion. To determine the presence of pulmonary edema associated with strenuous exercise, oxygen saturation should be used as a screening tool at a first-aid center. To avoid risks for EIPE/SIPE, knowledge about these diseases is essential for medical staff and for athletes who perform extreme exercise. PMID:26229538

  4. Dasatinib induces lung vascular toxicity and predisposes to pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guignabert, Christophe; Phan, Carole; Seferian, Andrei; Huertas, Alice; Tu, Ly; Thuillet, Raphaël; Sattler, Caroline; Le Hiress, Morane; Tamura, Yuichi; Jutant, Etienne-Marie; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Bouchet, Stéphane; Manéglier, Benjamin; Molimard, Mathieu; Rousselot, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease that can be induced by dasatinib, a dual Src and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Today, key questions remain regarding the mechanisms involved in the long-term development of dasatinib-induced PAH. Here, we demonstrated that chronic dasatinib therapy causes pulmonary endothelial damage in humans and rodents. We found that dasatinib treatment attenuated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction responses and increased susceptibility to experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) in rats, but these effects were absent in rats treated with imatinib, another BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment induced pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, while imatinib did not. Dasatinib treatment mediated endothelial cell dysfunction via increased production of ROS that was independent of Src family kinases. Consistent with these findings, we observed elevations in markers of endothelial dysfunction and vascular damage in the serum of CML patients who were treated with dasatinib, compared with CML patients treated with imatinib. Taken together, our findings indicate that dasatinib causes pulmonary vascular damage, induction of ER stress, and mitochondrial ROS production, which leads to increased susceptibility to PH development. PMID:27482885

  5. Development of a tantalum pentoxide Luneberg lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, D. A.; Chubb, C. R.; Powers, J. K.; Reed, W. R.; Dalke, E. A.; Tomaschke, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    A process has been developed for the fabrication of a tantalum pentoxide waveguide Luneburg lens as the input collimator for an optical signal processing circuit on a silicon substrate, such as an integrated wavelength demultiplexer. The development of such a lens involved improvement of the deposition mask profile, reduction of surface scattering by underlaying the lens, reduction of edge scattering by using shims under the mask, and prediction and measurement of the TE-TM polarization aberration. It is shown that polarization aberration significantly affects the design of a demultiplexer system.

  6. Chemotherapy-induced pulmonary hypertension: role of alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Günther, Sven; Quarck, Rozenn; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Dorfmüller, Peter; Antigny, Fabrice; Dumas, Sébastien J; Raymond, Nicolas; Lau, Edmund; Savale, Laurent; Jaïs, Xavier; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Stenmark, Kurt; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Perros, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is an uncommon form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by progressive obstruction of small pulmonary veins and a dismal prognosis. Limited case series have reported a possible association between different chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. We evaluated the relationship between chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. Cases of chemotherapy-induced PVOD from the French PH network and literature were reviewed. Consequences of chemotherapy exposure on the pulmonary vasculature and hemodynamics were investigated in three different animal models (mouse, rat, and rabbit). Thirty-seven cases of chemotherapy-associated PVOD were identified in the French PH network and systematic literature analysis. Exposure to alkylating agents was observed in 83.8% of cases, mostly represented by cyclophosphamide (43.2%). In three different animal models, cyclophosphamide was able to induce PH on the basis of hemodynamic, morphological, and biological parameters. In these models, histopathological assessment confirmed significant pulmonary venous involvement highly suggestive of PVOD. Together, clinical data and animal models demonstrated a plausible cause-effect relationship between alkylating agents and PVOD. Clinicians should be aware of this uncommon, but severe, pulmonary vascular complication of alkylating agents. PMID:25497573

  7. Pulmonary and generalized lysosomal storage induced by amphiphilic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Z

    1984-01-01

    Administration of amphiphilic drugs to experimental animals causes formation of myelinoid bodies in many cell types, accumulation of foamy macrophages in pulmonary alveoli and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. These changes are the result of an interaction between the drugs and phospholipids which leads to an alteration in physicochemical properties of the phospholipids. Impairment of the digestion of altered pulmonary secretions in phagosomes of macrophages results in accumulation of foam cells in pulmonary alveoli. Impairment of the metabolism of altered phospholipids removed by autophagy induces an accumulation of myelinoid bodies. The administration of amphiphilic compounds thus causes pulmonary intra-alveolar histiocytosis which is a part of a drug-induced lysosomal storage or generalized lipidosis. The accumulation of drug-lipid complexes in myelinoid bodies and in pulmonary foam cells may lead to alteration of cellular functioning and to clinical disease. Currently over 50 amphiphilic drugs are known. Unique pharmacological properties necessitate clinical use of some of these drugs. The occurrence and severity of potential clinical side effects depend on the nature of each drug, dosage and duration of treatment, simultaneous administration of other drugs and foods, individual metabolic pattern of the patient and other factors. Further studies on factors preventing and potentiating adverse effects of amphiphilic drugs are indicated. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:6376111

  8. The significance of nanoparticles in particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James D; Baugh, John A

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to airborne nanoparticles contributes to many chronic pulmonary diseases. Nanoparticles, classified as anthropogenic and natural particles, and fibers of diameters less than 100 nm, have unrestricted access to most areas of the lung due to their size. Size relates to the deposition efficiency of the particle, with particles in the nano-range having the highest efficiencies. The deposition of nanoparticles in the lung can lead to chronic inflammation, epithelial injury, and further to pulmonary fibrosis. Cases of particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis, namely pneumoconiosis, are mostly occupationally influenced, and continue to be documented around the world. The tremendous growth of nanotechnology, however, has spurred fears of increased rates of pulmonary diseases, especially fibrosis. The severity of toxicological consequences warrants further examination of the effects of nanoparticles in humans, possible treatments and increased regulatory measures. PMID:18523535

  9. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced pulmonary vascular endothelial injury.

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, S E; Hennig, B; Jay, M; Yoneda, K; McClain, C J

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mediates components of the acute-phase response, stimulates granulocyte metabolism, and induces endothelial cell surface changes. We studied whether human recombinant TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha) could increase pulmonary edema formation and pulmonary vascular permeability. Rabbits preinfused with 125I-albumin were administered rTNF-alpha or saline. Animals were sacrificed, and lung wet/dry weight ratios as well as bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma 125I activities were determined. rTNF-alpha increased lung wet/dry weight ratios by 151% (P less than 0.02) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid/plasma 125I activity ratios by 376% (P less than 0.01) compared with values for saline controls. Electron microscopy of lung sections demonstrated endothelial injury, perivascular edema, and extravasation of an ultrastructural permeability tracer. To demonstrate that rTNF-alpha could directly increase pulmonary vascular endothelial permeability in vitro, we studied albumin transfer across cultured porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers. rTNF-alpha induced time-dependent dose-response increments in transendothelial albumin flux in the absence of granulocyte effector cells. These observations suggest that rTNF-alpha can provoke acute pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in vivo as well as in vitro. Images PMID:2925247

  11. EXERCISE-INDUCED PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE AFTER RUNNING A MARATHON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on a healthy 26-year-old male who had an exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) within 24 hours of running a marathon. There were no symptoms, abnormalities on exam, or radiographic infiltrates. He routinely participated in bronchoscopy research and the EIPH was e...

  12. Obstruction-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ming-Jay; Zou, Yu; He, Huamei; McGowan, Francis X; Zurakowski, David; Zhang, Yanhang

    2011-11-01

    Pulmonary obstruction occurs in many common forms of congenital heart disease. In this study, pulmonary artery (PA) banding is used as a model for pulmonary stenosis. Significant remodeling of the vascular bed occurs as a result of a prolonged narrowing of the PAs, and here we quantify the biophysical and molecular changes proximal and distal to the obstruction. Main and branch PAs are harvested from banded and sham rabbits and their mechanical properties are assessed using a biaxial tensile tester. Measurements defined as initial and stiff slopes are taken, assuming a linear region at the start and end of the J-shaped stress-strain curves, along with a transitional knee point. Collagen, elastin assays, Movat's pentachrome staining, and Doppler protocols are used to quantify biochemical, structural, and physiological differences. The banded main PAs have significantly greater initial slopes while banded branch PAs have lower initial slopes; however, this change in mechanical behavior cannot be explained by the assay results as the elastin content in both main and branch PAs is not significantly different. The stiff slopes of the banded main PAs are higher, which is attributed to the significantly greater amounts of insoluble collagen. Shifting of the knee points reveals a decreased toe region in the main PAs but an opposite trend in the branch PAs. The histology results show a loss of integrity of the media, increase in ground substance, and dispersion of collagen in the banded tissue samples. This indicates other structural changes could have led to the mechanical differences in banded and normal tissue. PMID:22168741

  13. Selective endothelin-A receptor blockade attenuates endotoxin-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endothelin-1 is a potent mediator of sepsis-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH). The pulmonary vascular effects of selective blockade of endothelin receptor subtype A (ETAR) during endotoxemia remain unknown. We hypothesized that selective ETAR antagonism attenuates endotoxin-induced PH and improves pulmonary artery (PA) vasoreactivity. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–450 g) received lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Salmonella typhimurium; 20 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle 6 hours before hemodynamic assessment and tissue harvest. The selective ETAR antagonist sitaxsentan (10 or 20 mg/kg) or vehicle was injected intravenously 3 hours after receipt of LPS. Right ventricular systolic pressure, mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), oxygenation (P/F ratio), and serum bicarbonate were measured. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell differential and lung wet-to-dry ratios were obtained. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasorelaxations were determined in isolated PA rings. PA interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) messenger RNA (mRNA) were measured. LPS caused PH, decreased MAP, CO, and serum bicarbonate, and increased PA IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and iNOS mRNA. Sitaxsentan attenuated sepsis-induced PH and increased MAP. The P/F ratio, CO, serum bicarbonate, and BAL neutrophilia were not affected by sitaxsentan. In isolated PA rings, while not affecting phenylephrine-induced vasocontraction or endothelium-dependent relaxation, sitaxsentan dose-dependently attenuated LPS-induced alterations in endothelium-independent relaxation. PA cytokine mRNA levels were not significantly attenuated by ETAR blockade. We conclude that ETAR blockade attenuates endotoxin-induced alterations in systemic and PA pressures without negatively affecting oxygenation. This protective effect appears to be mediated not by attenuation of sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction, acidosis, or alveolar

  14. Serotonin induces pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Day, Regina M.; Agyeman, Abena S.; Segel, Michael J.; Chévere, Rubén D.; Angelosanto, Jill M.; Suzuki, Yuichiro J.; Fanburg, Barry L.

    2007-01-01

    The chronic phase of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is associated with vascular remodeling, especially thickening of the smooth muscle layer of large pulmonary arteries and muscularization of small pulmonary vessels, which normally have no associated smooth muscle. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been shown to induce proliferation and hypertrophy of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC), and may be important for in vivo pulmonary vascular remodeling. Here, we show that 5-HT stimulates migration of pulmonary artery PASMC. Treatment with 5-HT for 16 h increased migration of PASMC up to four-fold as monitored in a modified Boyden chamber assay. Increased migratory responses were associated with cellular morphological changes and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. 5-HT-induced alterations in morphology were previously shown in our laboratory to require cAMP [Lee SL, Fanburg BL. Serotonin produces a configurational change of cultured smooth muscle cells that is associated with elevation of intracellular cAMP. J Cell Phys 1992;150(2):396–405], and the 5-HT4 receptor was pharmacologically determined to be the primary activator of cAMP in bovine PASMC [Becker BN, Gettys TW, Middleton JP, Olsen CL, Albers FJ, Lee SL, et al. 8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin-responsive 5-hydroxytryptamine4-like receptor expressed in bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Mol Pharmacol 1992;42(5):817–25]. We examined the role of the 5-HT4 receptor and cAMP in 5-HT-induced bovine PASMC migration. PASMC express 5-HT4 receptor mRNA, and a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist and a cAMP antagonist completely blocked 5-HT-induced cellular migration. Consistent with our previous report that a cAMP-dependent Cl− channel is required for 5-HT-induced morphological changes in PASMC, phenylanthranilic acid, a Cl− channel blocker, inhibited actin cytoskeletal reorganization and migration produced by 5-HT. We conclude that 5-HT stimulates PASMC migration and

  15. Extracellular Matrix Powder Protects Against Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Manni, Michelle L.; Czajka, Caitlin A.; Oury, Tim D.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis refers to a group of lung diseases characterized by inflammation, fibroblast proliferation, and excessive collagen deposition. Although the mechanisms underlying pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood, current evidence suggests that epithelial injury contributes to the development of fibrosis. Regenerative medicine approaches using extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds have been shown to promote site-specific tissue remodeling. This led to the hypothesis that particulate ECM would promote normal tissue repair and attenuate bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. C57BL/6 mice were treated intratracheally with bleomycin or saline with or without a particulate form of ECM scaffold from porcine urinary bladder matrix (UBM-ECM) or enzymatically digested UBM-ECM. Mice were sacrificed 5 and 14 days after exposure. Compared to control mice, bleomycin-exposed mice had similar increases in inflammation in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid regardless of UBM-ECM treatment. However, 14 days after exposure, lung histology and collagen levels revealed that mice treated with bleomycin and the particulate or digested UBM-ECM had negligible fibrosis, whereas mice given only bleomycin had marked fibrosis. Administration of the particulate UBM-ECM 24 h after bleomycin exposure also significantly protected against pulmonary injury. In vitro epithelial cell migration and wound healing assays revealed that particulate UBM-ECM promoted epithelial cell chemotaxis and migration. This suggests that promotion of epithelial wound repair may be one mechanism in which UBM-ECM limits pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:21797754

  16. Vitamin C prevents cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice and provides pulmonary restoration.

    PubMed

    Koike, Kengo; Ishigami, Akihito; Sato, Yasunori; Hirai, Toyohiro; Yuan, Yiming; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Tobino, Kazunori; Sato, Tadashi; Sekiya, Mitsuaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Fukuchi, Yoshinosuke; Maruyama, Naoki; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2014-02-01

    Vitamin C (VC) is a potent antioxidant and is essential for collagen synthesis. We investigated whether VC treatment prevents and cures smoke-induced emphysema in senescence marker protein-30 knockout (SMP30-KO) mice, which cannot synthesize VC. Two smoke-exposure experiments using SMP30-KO mice were conducted. In the first one (a preventive study), 4-month-old mice received minimal VC (0.0375 g/l) [VC(L)] or physiologically sufficient VC (1.5 g/l) [VC(S)] and exposed to cigarette smoke or smoke-free air for 2 months. Pulmonary evaluations followed when the mice were 6 months of age. The second study began after the establishment of smoke-induced emphysema (a treatment study). These mice no longer underwent smoke exposure but received VC(S) or VC(L) treatment for 2 months. Morphometric analysis was performed, and measurements of oxidative stress, collagen synthesis, and vascular endothelial growth factor in the lungs were evaluated. Chronic smoke exposure caused emphysema (29.6% increases of mean linear intercepts [MLI] and 106.5% increases of destructive index compared with the air-only group) in 6-month-old SMP30-KO mice, and this emphysema closely resembled human chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Smoke-induced emphysema persisted in the VC(L) group after smoking cessation, whereas VC treatment provided pulmonary restoration (18.5% decrease of MLI and 41.3% decrease of destructive index compared with VC(L) group). VC treatment diminished oxidative stress, increased collagen synthesis, and improved vascular endothelial growth factor levels in the lungs. Our results suggest that VC not only prevents smoke-induced emphysema in SMP30-KO mice but also restores emphysematous lungs. Therefore, VC may provide a new therapeutic strategy for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in humans.

  17. Drug-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension: a recent outbreak.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Seferian, Andrei; Savale, Laurent; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterised by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly to appetite suppressant intake drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used, but are considered possible risk factors, for PAH. Dasatinib, dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, potentially in part reversible after dasatinib withdrawal. Recently, several studies have raised the issue of potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and a few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility, and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drug-induced PAH. PMID:23997051

  18. Contribution of calcium-activated chloride channel to elevated pulmonary artery pressure in pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by high pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Chuansi; Ma, Jianfa; Lao, Jinquan; Pang, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high pulmonary blood flow remains uncertain. In this study, we investigated the possible role and effects of CaCC in this disease. Sixty rats were randomly assigned to normal, sham, and shunt groups. Rats in the shunt group underwent abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava shunt surgery. The pulmonary artery pressure was measured by catheterization. Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index (RVHI), arterial wall area/vessel area (W/V), and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter (T/D) were analyzed by optical microscopy. Electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were investigated using patch clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH and pulmonary vascular structural remodeling (PVSR) developed, accompanied by increased pulmonary pressure and pathological interstitial pulmonary changes. Compared with normal and sham groups, pulmonary artery pressure, RVHI, W/V, and T/D of the shunt group rats increased significantly. Electrophysiological results showed primary CaCC characteristics. Compared with normal and sham groups, membrane capacitance and current density of PASMCs in the shunt group increased significantly, which were subsequently attenuated following chloride channel blocker niflumic acid (NFA) treatment. To conclude, CaCC contributed to PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow and may represent a potential target for treatment of PAH. PMID:25755701

  19. Contribution of calcium-activated chloride channel to elevated pulmonary artery pressure in pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by high pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Chuansi; Ma, Jianfa; Lao, Jinquan; Pang, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high pulmonary blood flow remains uncertain. In this study, we investigated the possible role and effects of CaCC in this disease. Sixty rats were randomly assigned to normal, sham, and shunt groups. Rats in the shunt group underwent abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava shunt surgery. The pulmonary artery pressure was measured by catheterization. Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index (RVHI), arterial wall area/vessel area (W/V), and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter (T/D) were analyzed by optical microscopy. Electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were investigated using patch clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH and pulmonary vascular structural remodeling (PVSR) developed, accompanied by increased pulmonary pressure and pathological interstitial pulmonary changes. Compared with normal and sham groups, pulmonary artery pressure, RVHI, W/V, and T/D of the shunt group rats increased significantly. Electrophysiological results showed primary CaCC characteristics. Compared with normal and sham groups, membrane capacitance and current density of PASMCs in the shunt group increased significantly, which were subsequently attenuated following chloride channel blocker niflumic acid (NFA) treatment. To conclude, CaCC contributed to PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow and may represent a potential target for treatment of PAH.

  20. Inflammatory mechanisms of pulmonary injury induced by mustards.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Vayas, Kinal N; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-02-26

    Exposure of humans and animals to vesicants, including sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), causes severe and debilitating damage to the respiratory tract. Both acute and long term pathological consequences are observed in the lung following a single exposure to these vesicants. Evidence from our laboratories and others suggest that macrophages and the inflammatory mediators they release play an important role in mustard-induced lung injury. In this paper, the pathogenic effects of SM and NM on the lung are reviewed, along with the potential role of inflammatory macrophages and mediators they release in mustard-induced pulmonary toxicity. PMID:26478570

  1. Reaction of dinitrogen pentoxide with fluoranthene

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinska, B.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Ramdahl, T.; Winer, A.M.; Pitts, J.N. Jr.

    1986-07-09

    The products and mechanisms of the reactions of dinitrogen pentoxide (N/sub 2/O/sub 5/) with fluoranthene (FL) in aprotic solvents have been investigated. The influence of solvent polarity and temperature and the effects of addition of HNO3 on the resulting nitrofluoranthene (NFL) isomer distributions have been studied. These data are compared with the NFL isomer distributions resulting from the reactions of FL with N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and other nitrating agents in the gas and adsorbed phases. In the gas phase and in CCl4 solution at ambient temperature, 2-NFL is the only mononitro isomer formed from the reaction of FL with N/sub 2/O/sub 5/. However, in more polar solvents (CH/sub 3/CN and CH/sub 3/NO/sub 2/) and in CCl/sub 4/ at subambient temperature (-15/sup 0/C), as well as with FL in the adsorbed state, reaction with N/sub 2/O/sub 5/ produces only the 3-,8-,7-, and 1-NFL isomers. A homolytic mechanism for the formation of the 2-NFL isomer is postulated

  2. Losartan attenuates paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, F; Sun, Y B; Su, L; Li, S; Liu, Z F; Li, J; Hu, X T; Li, J

    2015-05-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is one of the most widely used herbicides in the world and can cause pulmonary fibrosis in the cases with intoxication. Losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, has beneficial effects on the treatment of fibrosis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of losartan on pulmonary fibrosis in PQ-intoxicated rats. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 32, 180-220 g) were randomly assigned to four groups: (i) control group; (ii) PQ group; (iii) PQ + losartan 7d group; and (iv) PQ + losartan 14d group. Losartan treatment (intragastrically (i.g.), 10 mg/kg) was performed for 7 and 14 days after a single i.g. dose of 40 mg/kg PQ. All rats were killed on the 16th day, and hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome staining were used to examine lung injury and fibrosis. The levels of hydroxyproline and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Mmp9), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and relative expression levels of collagen type I and III were also detected. PQ caused a significant increase in hydroxyproline content, mRNA expression of TGF-β1, Mmp9, and TIMP-1, and relative expression levels of collagen type I and III ( p < 0.05), while losartan significantly decreased the amount of hydroxyproline and downregulated TGF-β1, Mmp9, and TIMP-1 mRNA and collagen type I and III expressions ( p < 0.05). Histological examination of PQ-treated rats showed lung injury and widespread inflammatory cell infiltration in the alveolar space and pulmonary fibrosis, while losartan could markedly reduce such damage and prevent pulmonary fibrosis. The results of this study indicated that losartan could reduce lung damage and prevent pulmonary fibrosis induced by PQ.

  3. Propranolol-induced elevation of pulmonary collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenschmidt, R.C.; Witschi, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Current concepts of collagen metabolism suggest that fibroblasts tightly control collagen production. One of the possible mechanisms of control is via the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP). Beta adrenergic agonists, by elevating intracellular cAMP levels, have been shown in vitro to suppress fibroblast collagen production; whereas beta adrenergic antagonists were effective in removing this suppression by blocking the rise in cAMP. In the present study with mice, the authors showed that administration of the beta adrenergic antagonists, propranolol, at a dose demonstrated to decrease the ratio of cAMP to cGMP, resulted in an elevation in total lung collagen in vivo. The increase in collagen was evident only when propranolol was administered before and during acute lung damage induced by either butylated hydroxytoluene, bleomycin or high concentrations of oxygen. There was no increase in lung collagen when propranolol administration was delayed after injury or when given to an undamaged lung. The authors propose that via beta adrenergic blockage by propranolol, fibroblasts involved in the normal reparative process may have lost a mechanism for regulatory control, resulting in excessive deposition of collagen. 38 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Marathon-induced pulmonary edema of a patient with transient dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Ryo; Morita, Yuka; Okajima, Yuka; Matsusako, Masaki; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a 31-year-old healthy man with marathon-induced pulmonary edema. Chest radiograph revealed pulmonary edema without cardiomegaly. Contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) revealed transient pulmonary edema without filling-defect in pulmonary arteries. As marathon running increases in popularity, radiologists and emergency physicians should be familiar with diagnosis of this entity on chest radiograph, avoiding unnecessary CT examination without additional clinical information.

  5. Marathon-induced pulmonary edema of a patient with transient dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Ryo; Morita, Yuka; Okajima, Yuka; Matsusako, Masaki; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a 31-year-old healthy man with marathon-induced pulmonary edema. Chest radiograph revealed pulmonary edema without cardiomegaly. Contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) revealed transient pulmonary edema without filling-defect in pulmonary arteries. As marathon running increases in popularity, radiologists and emergency physicians should be familiar with diagnosis of this entity on chest radiograph, avoiding unnecessary CT examination without additional clinical information. PMID:26324381

  6. Asiatic acid inhibits pulmonary inflammation induced by cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Won; Park, Hyun Ah; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Jang, Yin-Gi; Kim, Ju Yeong; Choi, Bo Kyung; Lee, Hee Jae; Lee, Sangwoo; Paik, Jin-Hyub; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Ahn, Kyung-Seop; Lee, Hyun-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Asiatic acid (AA) is one of the major components of Titrated extract of Centella asiatica (TECA), which has been reported to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of AA on pulmonary inflammation induced by cigarette smoke (CS). AA significantly attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of CS exposure mice. AA also decreased ROS production and NE activity, and inhibited the release of proinflammatory cytokines in BALF. AA reduced the recruitment of inflammatory cells and MCP-1 expression in lung tissue of CS exposure mice. AA also attenuated mucus overproduction, and decreased the activation of MAPKs and NF-kB in lung tissue. Furthermore, AA increased HO-1 expression and inhibited the reduced expression of SOD3 in lung tissue. These findings indicate that AA effectively inhibits pulmonary inflammatory response, which is an important process in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) via suppression of inflammatory mediators and induction of HO-1. Therefore, we suggest that AA has the potential to treat inflammatory disease such as COPD.

  7. IRIS Toxicological Review of Vanadium Pentoxide (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This vanadium pentoxide reassessment consists of an oral reference dose (RfD), an inhalation reference concentration (RfC), an inhalation unit risk (IUR) and a cancer weight of evidence descriptor. This is the first assessment developing an RfC or IUR for this compound. This as...

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Vanadium Pentoxide (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On September 30, 2011, the draft Toxicological Review of Vanadium Pentoxide and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and W...

  9. Upregulation of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Channels Contributes to Endotoxin-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gui-Lan; Jiang, Hongni; Zou, Fangdong

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock is a pathologic condition caused by endotoxin-producing bacteria, and often associated with severe pulmonary hypertension. Inflammation is a major systemic response to endotoxin; however, it is unknown whether endotoxin has a direct impact on pulmonary arteries that contributes to pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Material/Methods Rat pulmonary arteries and primary pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were cultured in vitro and treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and blockers of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. Neointimal growth and arterial stenosis were observed on cryosections of cultured pulmonary arteries. Proliferation of PASMCs was examined by a WST-1 (water-soluble tetrazolium salt) assay. Expression of TRPC genes in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs were detected and quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Results LPS significantly induced neointimal growth and stenosis of pulmonary arteries and promoted proliferation of PASMCs. TRPC channel blockers 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and SKF-96365 inhibited LPS-induced remodeling of pulmonary arteries and PASMC proliferation. Expression of TRPC1/3/4/6 was detected in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs. LPS treatment dramatically increased the expression of TRPC3 and TRPC4 at both messenger RNA and protein levels. Conclusions LPS stimulates stenosis of pulmonary arteries through enhancement of TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry into PASMCs, which is caused by upregulation of TRPC3 and TRPC4 channels. PMID:27471122

  10. Eugenol attenuates pulmonary damage induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Zin, Walter A; Silva, Ana G L S; Magalhães, Clarissa B; Carvalho, Giovanna M C; Riva, Douglas R; Lima, Crystianne C; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Takiya, Christina M; Valença, Samuel S; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Faffe, Débora S

    2012-03-01

    Environmentally relevant doses of inhaled diesel particles elicit pulmonary inflammation and impair lung mechanics. Eugenol, a methoxyphenol component of clove oil, presents in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Our aim was to examine a possible protective role of eugenol against lung injuries induced by diesel particles. Male BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. Mice received saline (10 μl in; CTRL group) or 15 μg of diesel particles DEP (15 μg in; DIE and DEUG groups). After 1 h, mice received saline (10 μl; CTRL and DIE groups) or eugenol (164 mg/kg; EUG and DEUG group) by gavage. Twenty-four hours after gavage, pulmonary resistive (ΔP1), viscoelastic (ΔP2) and total (ΔPtot) pressures, static elastance (Est), and viscoelastic component of elastance (ΔE) were measured. We also determined the fraction areas of normal and collapsed alveoli, amounts of polymorpho- (PMN) and mononuclear cells in lung parenchyma, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Est, ΔP2, ΔPtot, and ΔE were significantly higher in the DIE than in the other groups. DIE also showed significantly more PMN, airspace collapse, and apoptosis than the other groups. However, no beneficial effect on lipid peroxidation was observed in DEUG group. In conclusion, eugenol avoided changes in lung mechanics, pulmonary inflammation, and alveolar collapse elicited by diesel particles. It attenuated the activation signal of caspase-3 by DEP, but apoptosis evaluated by TUNEL was avoided. Finally, it could not avoid oxidative stress as indicated by malondialdehyde.

  11. Eugenol attenuates pulmonary damage induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Zin, Walter A; Silva, Ana G L S; Magalhães, Clarissa B; Carvalho, Giovanna M C; Riva, Douglas R; Lima, Crystianne C; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Takiya, Christina M; Valença, Samuel S; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Faffe, Débora S

    2012-03-01

    Environmentally relevant doses of inhaled diesel particles elicit pulmonary inflammation and impair lung mechanics. Eugenol, a methoxyphenol component of clove oil, presents in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Our aim was to examine a possible protective role of eugenol against lung injuries induced by diesel particles. Male BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. Mice received saline (10 μl in; CTRL group) or 15 μg of diesel particles DEP (15 μg in; DIE and DEUG groups). After 1 h, mice received saline (10 μl; CTRL and DIE groups) or eugenol (164 mg/kg; EUG and DEUG group) by gavage. Twenty-four hours after gavage, pulmonary resistive (ΔP1), viscoelastic (ΔP2) and total (ΔPtot) pressures, static elastance (Est), and viscoelastic component of elastance (ΔE) were measured. We also determined the fraction areas of normal and collapsed alveoli, amounts of polymorpho- (PMN) and mononuclear cells in lung parenchyma, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Est, ΔP2, ΔPtot, and ΔE were significantly higher in the DIE than in the other groups. DIE also showed significantly more PMN, airspace collapse, and apoptosis than the other groups. However, no beneficial effect on lipid peroxidation was observed in DEUG group. In conclusion, eugenol avoided changes in lung mechanics, pulmonary inflammation, and alveolar collapse elicited by diesel particles. It attenuated the activation signal of caspase-3 by DEP, but apoptosis evaluated by TUNEL was avoided. Finally, it could not avoid oxidative stress as indicated by malondialdehyde. PMID:22194320

  12. The role of adrenergic receptor blockade in serotonin-induced changes in the pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, E; Rolston, W A; Stern, S

    1977-01-01

    1. In dogs i.v. injection of serotonin caused a rise in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary arteriocapillary resistance that persisted even after alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blockade; pulmonary venous resistance also increased, but this was abolished by pretreatment with either propranolol or phenoxybenzamine. 2. The injection of serotonin into the ascending aorta produced an immediate rise in systemic, pulmonary arterial and pulmonary venous pressures and pulmonary venous resistance. After phenoxybenzmine, the rise in systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures remained unchanged, but previously observed increases in pulmonary venous pressure and resistance were blocked. In contrast, propranolol failed to abolish the rise in pulmonary venous resistance after serotonin injection into the ascending aorta. 3. These results confirm the observation that the vasoconstrictor effect attributed to intravenously injected serotonin on the arterial side of the pulmonary circulation is independent of the known sympathetic pathways. The data suggest that the pulmonary venoconstriction induced by intravenous serotonin is of reflex origin, abolished by alpha and beta receptor blockade, whereas the efferent arm of the reflex pulmonary venoconstriction following injection of serotonin into the ascending aorta is mediated via alpha-adrenergic receptors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:599427

  13. Nebivolol has a beneficial effect in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pankey, Edward A; Edward, Justin A; Swan, Kevin W; Bourgeois, Camille R T; Bartow, Matthew J; Yoo, Daniel; Peak, Taylor A; Song, Bryant M; Chan, Ryan A; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Prieto, Minolfa C; Giles, Thomas D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a rare disorder that, without treatment, is progressive and fatal within 3-4 years. Current treatment involves a diverse group of drugs that target the pulmonary vascular bed. In addition, strategies that increase nitric oxide (NO) formation have a beneficial effect in rodents and patients. Nebivolol, a selective β1 adrenergic receptor-blocking agent reported to increase NO production and stimulate β3 receptors, has vasodilator properties suggesting that it may be beneficial in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. The present study was undertaken to determine whether nebivolol has a beneficial effect in monocrotaline-induced (60 mg/kg) pulmonary hypertension in the rat. These results show that nebivolol treatment (10 mg/kg, once or twice daily) attenuates pulmonary hypertension, reduces right ventricular hypertrophy, and improves pulmonary artery remodeling in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. This study demonstrates the presence of β3 adrenergic receptor immunoreactivity in pulmonary arteries and airways and that nebivolol has pulmonary vasodilator activity. Studies with β3 receptor agonists (mirabegron, BRL 37344) and antagonists suggest that β3 receptor-mediated decreases in systemic arterial pressure occur independent of NO release. Our results suggest that nebivolol, a selective vasodilating β1 receptor antagonist that stimulates β3 adrenergic receptors and induces vasodilation by increasing NO production, may be beneficial in treating pulmonary hypertensive disorders. PMID:27172427

  14. Boilermakers' bronchitis. Respiratory tract irritation associated with vanadium pentoxide exposure during oil-to-coal conversion of a power plant.

    PubMed

    Levy, B S; Hoffman, L; Gottsegen, S

    1984-08-01

    Severe respiratory tract irritation occurred in at least 74 of 100 boilermakers who were exposed to high levels of vanadium pentoxide fume during oil-to-coal conversion of a utility company power plant in a rural area of western Massachusetts. Many were welders working in confined areas with inadequate ventilation. Most frequent symptoms were productive cough, sore throat, dyspnea on exertion, and chest pain or discomfort. The illness was severe enough to cause 70 workers to consult physicians and most of them to lose time from work (median, five days). Wheezing (in 39%) was the most frequent finding on physical examination. Mild hypoxemia was noted in several workers; most (72%) had normal chest x-ray films. Expiratory flow rate over the middle 50% of the forced vital capacity was the pulmonary function test most remarkably affected (median, 57% of predicted for 24 workers tested). The Occupational Safety and Health Administration documented levels of vanadium pentoxide fume at or above the permissible exposure limit in all eight air samples taken from inside the boiler; it cited the company for inadequate mechanical ventilation and an inadequate respiratory protection program for workers. The report of this outbreak may help prevent future problems by drawing attention of physicians, workers, and managers to the potential pulmonary hazards in power plant conversion.

  15. Role of oxidative stress in thuringiensin-induced pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.-F. . E-mail: sftsai@tactri.gov.tw; Yang Chi; Liu, B.-L.; Hwang, J.-S.; Ho, S.-P. . E-mail: spho@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2006-10-15

    To understand the effect of thuringiensin on the lungs tissues, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administrated with thuringiensin by intratracheal instillation at doses 0.8, 1.6 and 3.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively. The rats were sacrificed 4 h after treatment, and lungs were isolated and examined. Subsequently, an effective dose of 1.6 mg/kg was selected for the time course study (4, 8, 12, and 24 h). Intratracheal instillation of thuringiensin resulted in lung damage, as evidenced by increase in lung weight and decrease in alkaline phosphatase (10-54%), an enzyme localized primarily in pulmonary alveolar type II epithelial cells. Furthermore, the administration of thuringiensin caused increases in lipid peroxidation (21-105%), the indices of lung injury. In addition, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) activities of lung tissue extracts were measured to evaluate the effect of thuringiensin on antioxidant defense system. The SOD activity and GSH content in lung showed significant decreases in a dose-related manner with 11-21% and 15-37%, respectively. Those were further supported by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, as indicated by increases in IL-1{beta} (229-1017%) and TNF-{alpha} (234%) levels. Therefore, the results demonstrated that changes in the pulmonary oxidative-antioxidative status might play an important role in the thuringiensin-induced lung injury.

  16. Pulmonary metastasis after bleomycin-induced endothelial injury and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, I.Y.R.; Young, L.; Orr, F.W.

    1986-03-01

    Injury to the endothelial barrier is thought to enhance the localization and metastasis of circulating tumor cells. This hypothesis was tested by inducing pulmonary endothelial injury in C57bl/6 mice by injecting a single IV dose of bleomycine (120 mg/kg). After 5 days, severe endothelial injury was demonstrated by morphology and by increased levels of protein in lung lavage fluid. When /sup 131/I-iododeoxyuridine labeled syngeneic fibrosarcoma cells were injected IV at this time, a 9 fold increase in their localization was detected 24 hrs later in bleomycin-treated lungs compared to saline controls. By EM, tumor cells were observed at sites of denuded vascular basement membrane. There was also a significant increase in subsequent gross metastases and percentage of lung occupied by tumor in the bleomycin group. Animals examined 10 days after bleomycin showed less endothelial damage and a smaller increase in tumor cell localization and metastases. At 21 days, when endothelial structure and alveolar protein levels had returned to normal, and at 6 weeks, when there was focal fibrosis, no increase in tumor cell localization or metastases was found. It is concluded that damage to the pulmonary endothelium is a key factor in enhancing the trapping of circulating tumor cells and increasing metastatic tumor growth.

  17. Metformin Reduces Bleomycin-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Mi; Jang, An Hee; Kim, Hyojin; Lee, Kyu Hwa; Kim, Young Whan

    2016-09-01

    Metformin has anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. We investigated whether metformin has an inhibitory effect on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. A total of 62 mice were divided into 5 groups: control, metformin (100 mg/kg), BLM, and BLM with metformin (50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg). Metformin was administered to the mice orally once a day from day 1. We sacrificed half of the mice on day 10 and collected the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from their left lungs. The remaining mice were sacrificed and analyzed on day 21. The right lungs were harvested for histological analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers were determined via analysis of the harvested lungs on day 21. The mice treated with BLM and metformin (50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg) showed significantly lower levels of inflammatory cells in the BALF compared with the BLM-only mice on days 10 and 21. The histological examination revealed that the metformin treatment led to a greater reduction in inflammation than the treatment with BLM alone. The mRNA levels of collagen, collagen-1, procollagen, fibronectin, and transforming growth factor-β in the metformin-treated mice were lower than those in the BLM-only mice on day 21, although statistical significance was observed only in the case of procollagen due to the small number of live mice in the BLM-only group. Additionally, treatment with metformin reduced fibrosis to a greater extent than treatment with BLM alone. Metformin suppresses the inflammatory and fibrotic processes of BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. PMID:27510385

  18. Antenatal Saireito (TJ-114) Can Improve Pulmonary Hypoplasia and Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Nitrofen-Induced Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia.

    PubMed

    Hirako, Shima; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Kotani, Tomomi; Sumigama, Seiji; Mano, Yukio; Nakano, Tomoko; Imai, Kenji; Li, Hua; Toyokuni, Shinya; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2016-09-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) can induce lung hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension and is associated with high mortality. The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy and safety of antenatal Saireito (TJ-114), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, in a rat CDH model. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to an herbicide (nitrofen, 100 mg) on embryonic day 9 (E9) to induce CDH, and antenatal Saireito (2000 mg/kg/day) was orally administered from E10 to E20. On E21, fetuses were delivered. Antenatal Saireito significantly decreased the incidence of CDH (p < 0.01), increased lung volume (p < 0.01), improved alveolarization and pulmonary artery remodeling using histological analysis, and improved respiratory function using gasometric analysis (pH; p < 0.05, and PCO2 ; p < 0.01). In addition, antenatal Saireito significantly decreased endothelin-1 and endothelin receptor A expression in the pulmonary arteries. Taken together, our results demonstrated that antenatal Saireito can improve fetal pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary vascular remodeling and, as a result, can improve respiratory function in a rat CDH model. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27221220

  19. Prevention of pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary vascular remodeling by antenatal simvastatin treatment in nitrofen-induced congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Makanga, Martine; Maruyama, Hidekazu; Dewachter, Celine; Da Costa, Agnès Mendes; Hupkens, Emeline; de Medina, Geoffrey; Naeije, Robert; Dewachter, Laurence

    2015-04-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) has a high mortality rate mainly due to lung hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Simvastatin has been shown to prevent the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in experimental models of PH. We, therefore, hypothesized that antenatal simvastatin would attenuate PPHN in nitrofen-induced CDH in rats. The efficacy of antenatal simvastatin was compared with antenatal sildenafil, which has already been shown to improve pathological features of PPHN in nitrofen-induced CDH. On embryonic day (E) 9.5, nitrofen or vehicle was administered to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats. On E11, nitrofen-treated rats were randomly assigned to antenatal simvastatin (20 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) orally), antenatal sildenafil (100 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) orally), or placebo administration from E11 to E21. On E21, fetuses were delivered by cesarean section, killed, and checked for left-sided CDH. Lung tissue was then harvested for further pathobiological evaluation. In nitrofen-induced CDH, simvastatin failed to reduce the incidence of nitrofen-induced CDH in the offspring and to increase the body weight, but improved the lung-to-body weight ratio and lung parenchyma structure. Antenatal simvastatin restored the pulmonary vessel density and external diameter, and reduced the pulmonary arteriolar remodeling compared with nitrofen-induced CDH. This was associated with decreased lung expression of endothelin precursor, endothelin type A and B receptors, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase, together with restored lung activation of apoptotic processes mainly in the epithelium. Antenatal simvastatin presented similar effects as antenatal therapy with sildenafil on nitrofen-induced CDH. Antenatal simvastatin improves pathological features of lung hypoplasia and PPHN in experimental nitrofen-induced CDH. PMID:25617377

  20. Prevention of pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary vascular remodeling by antenatal simvastatin treatment in nitrofen-induced congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Makanga, Martine; Maruyama, Hidekazu; Dewachter, Celine; Da Costa, Agnès Mendes; Hupkens, Emeline; de Medina, Geoffrey; Naeije, Robert; Dewachter, Laurence

    2015-04-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) has a high mortality rate mainly due to lung hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Simvastatin has been shown to prevent the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in experimental models of PH. We, therefore, hypothesized that antenatal simvastatin would attenuate PPHN in nitrofen-induced CDH in rats. The efficacy of antenatal simvastatin was compared with antenatal sildenafil, which has already been shown to improve pathological features of PPHN in nitrofen-induced CDH. On embryonic day (E) 9.5, nitrofen or vehicle was administered to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats. On E11, nitrofen-treated rats were randomly assigned to antenatal simvastatin (20 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) orally), antenatal sildenafil (100 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) orally), or placebo administration from E11 to E21. On E21, fetuses were delivered by cesarean section, killed, and checked for left-sided CDH. Lung tissue was then harvested for further pathobiological evaluation. In nitrofen-induced CDH, simvastatin failed to reduce the incidence of nitrofen-induced CDH in the offspring and to increase the body weight, but improved the lung-to-body weight ratio and lung parenchyma structure. Antenatal simvastatin restored the pulmonary vessel density and external diameter, and reduced the pulmonary arteriolar remodeling compared with nitrofen-induced CDH. This was associated with decreased lung expression of endothelin precursor, endothelin type A and B receptors, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase, together with restored lung activation of apoptotic processes mainly in the epithelium. Antenatal simvastatin presented similar effects as antenatal therapy with sildenafil on nitrofen-induced CDH. Antenatal simvastatin improves pathological features of lung hypoplasia and PPHN in experimental nitrofen-induced CDH.

  1. Calcitriol inhibits bleomycin-induced early pulmonary inflammatory response and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhu-Xia; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xu, Shen; Qin, Hou-Ying; Zhang, Cheng; Zhao, Hui; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Early pulmonary inflammation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) play important roles during lung fibrosis. Increasing evidence demonstrates that calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D3, has anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of calcitriol on bleomycin (BLM)-induced early pulmonary inflammation and subsequent EMT. Mice were intratracheally injected with BLM (3.0mg/kg). In three calcitriol+BLM groups, mice were intraperitoneal (i.p.) injected with different doses of calcitriol (0.2, 1.0 or 5.0 μg/kg) daily, beginning at 48 h before BLM injection. Twenty-four hours, seven and fourteen days after BLM injection, pulmonary inflammation and EMT were evaluated. As expected, BLM-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs was attenuated by calcitriol. BLM-induced pulmonary inflammatory cytokines were repressed by calcitriol. Moreover, BLM-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was blocked by calcitriol. In addition, BLM-induced phosphorylation of pulmonary p38 MAPK and protein kinase B (Akt) was inhibited by calcitriol. Further analysis showed that BLM-induced α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker for EMT in the lungs, was significantly attenuated by calcitriol. BLM-induced transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) up-regulation and Smad phosphorylation were attenuated by calcitriol. In conclusion, calcitriol inhibits BLM-induced early pulmonary inflammation and subsequent EMT. PMID:26520185

  2. IGF-1 signaling in neonatal hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension: Role of epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Sun, Miranda; Ramchandran, Ramaswamy; Raj, J Usha

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a fatal disease characterized by a progressive increase in pulmonary artery pressure accompanied by pulmonary vascular remodeling and increased vasomotor tone. Although some biological pathways have been identified in neonatal hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH), little is known regarding the role of growth factors in the pathogenesis of PH in neonates. In this study, using a model of hypoxia-induced PH in neonatal mice, we demonstrate that the growth factor insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), a potent activator of the AKT signaling pathway, is involved in neonatal PH. After exposure to hypoxia, IGF-1 signaling is activated in pulmonary endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vitro, and the IGF-1 downstream signal pAKT(S473) is upregulated in lungs of neonatal mice. We found that IGF-1 regulates ET-1 expression in pulmonary endothelial cells and that IGF-1 expression is regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs). In addition, there is a differential cytosine methylation site in the IGF-1 promoter region in response to neonatal hypoxia. Moreover, inhibition of HDACs with apicidin decreases neonatal hypoxia-induced global DNA methylation levels in lungs and specific cytosine methylation levels around the pulmonary IGF-1 promoter region. Finally, HDAC inhibition with apicidin reduces chronic hypoxia-induced activation of IGF-1/pAKT signaling in lungs and attenuates right ventricular hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Taken together, we conclude that IGF-1, which is epigenetically regulated, is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension in neonatal mice. This study implicates a novel HDAC/IGF-1 epigenetic pathway in the regulation of hypoxia-induced PH and warrants further study of the role of IGF-1 in neonatal pulmonary hypertensive disease. PMID:25921925

  3. Sodium hydrosulfide prevents hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Zhang, B K; Liu, D; Nie, W; Yuan, J M; Wang, Z; Guo, Y M

    2012-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to determine if H(2)S is involved in the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in broilers, a condition frequently observed in a variety of cardiac and pulmonary diseases. 2. Two-week-old broilers were reared under normoxic conditions or exposed to normobaric hypoxia (6 h/day) with tissue levels of H(2)S adjusted by administering sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, 10 µmol/kg body weight/day). Mean pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular mass, plasma and tissue H(2)S levels, the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CSE) and vascular remodeling were determined at 35 d of age. 3. Exposure to hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension was characterized by elevated pulmonary pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy and vascular remodeling. This was accompanied by decreased expression of CSE and decreased concentrations of plasma and tissue H(2)S. 4. Hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension was significantly reduced by administration of NaHS but this protective effect was largely abolished by D, L-propargylglycerine, an inhibitor of CSE. 5. The results indicate that H(2)S is involved in the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Supplementing NaHS or H(2)S could be a strategy for reducing hypoxia-induced hypertension in broilers.

  4. The Chinese Herbal Medicine Formula mKG Suppresses Pulmonary Fibrosis of Mice Induced by Bleomycin

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Yao, Li-Fu; Zhao, Yang; Wei, Li-Man; Guo, Peng; Yu, Meng; Cao, Bo; Li, Tan; Chen, Hong; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is a serious progressive lung disease and it originates from inflammation-induced parenchymal injury with excessive extracellular matrix deposition to result in the destruction of the normal lung architecture. Modified Kushen Gancao Formula (mKG), derived from traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has a prominent anti-inflammatory effect. The present study is to explore the inhibitory effects of mKG on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. mKG significantly decreased pulmonary alveolitis, fibrosis scores, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-17 (IL-17), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and hydroxyproline (HYP) levels in lung tissue of mice compared with BLM treatment. It markedly alleviated the increase of HYP content in the lung tissues and pathologic changes of pulmonary fibrosis caused by BLM instillation. In conclusion, mKG has an anti-fibrotic effect and might be employed as a therapeutic candidate agent for attenuating pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26891294

  5. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  6. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  7. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  8. Protective role of interleukin-10 in Ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The mechanisms underlying ozone (03)-induced pulmonary inflammation remain unclear. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that is known to inhibit inflammatory mediators. Objectives: We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying interleuken-10...

  9. Nitric oxide mediates bleomycin-induced angiogenesis and pulmonary fibrosis via regulation of VEGF.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Anand Krishnan V; Ramesh, Vani; Castro, Carlos A; Kaushik, Vivek; Kulkarni, Yogesh M; Wright, Clayton A; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease hallmarked by increased fibroblast proliferation, amplified levels of extracellular matrix deposition and increased angiogenesis. Although dysregulation of angiogenic mediators has been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, the specific rate-limiting angiogenic markers involved and their role in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear. We demonstrate that bleomycin treatment induces angiogenesis, and inhibition of the central angiogenic mediator VEGF using anti-VEGF antibody CBO-P11 significantly attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Bleomycin-induced nitric oxide (NO) was observed to be the key upstream regulator of VEGF via the PI3k/Akt pathway. VEGF regulated other important angiogenic proteins including PAI-1 and IL-8 in response to bleomycin exposure. Inhibition of NO and VEGF activity significantly mitigated bleomycin-induced angiogenic and fibrogenic responses. NO and VEGF are key mediators of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and could serve as important targets against this debilitating disease. Overall, our data suggests an important role for angiogenic mediators in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  10. Capillary remodeling in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Schraufnagel, D. E.; Mehta, D.; Harshbarger, R.; Treviranus, K.; Wang, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    Lung fibrosis is a process in which collagen is laid down and the delicate capillary-alveolar relationship is disturbed. The architectural changes which occur in the capillaries, a main element of the oxygen transferring unit, are difficult to illustrate without a three-dimensional tool, such as scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, a scanning electron microscopic study was undertaken to show the capillary changes of lung fibrosis. Fibrosis was induced in rats by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. After 30 days the rats were sacrificed, and the vascular tree of the lung was cast with methacrylate. The fibrosis was patchy. The intercapillary space became wider; and some capillaries had large, irregular dilatations. Occasionally giant capillaries (up to 19 mu in diameter) were noted. The pleural and alveolar capillary diameters increased (P less than 0.01), and the branching frequency decreased (P = 0.02). The center of the capillary rings, which has been suggested to be the site of contractile interstitial cells, increased in size (P = 0.03). The appearance of irregularly shaped capillaries and an increase in diameter without a change in density of alveolar capillaries, resulting in a loss of surface area and a decrease in branching, are the main scanning electron microscopic findings of the remodeling which occurs in pulmonary capillaries in lung fibrosis. These changes may partially explain the functional derangement of this disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:2430459

  11. An orally active TRPV4 channel blocker prevents and resolves pulmonary edema induced by heart failure.

    PubMed

    Thorneloe, Kevin S; Cheung, Mui; Bao, Weike; Alsaid, Hasan; Lenhard, Stephen; Jian, Ming-Yuan; Costell, Melissa; Maniscalco-Hauk, Kristeen; Krawiec, John A; Olzinski, Alan; Gordon, Earl; Lozinskaya, Irina; Elefante, Lou; Qin, Pu; Matasic, Daniel S; James, Chris; Tunstead, James; Donovan, Brian; Kallal, Lorena; Waszkiewicz, Anna; Vaidya, Kalindi; Davenport, Elizabeth A; Larkin, Jonathan; Burgert, Mark; Casillas, Linda N; Marquis, Robert W; Ye, Guosen; Eidam, Hilary S; Goodman, Krista B; Toomey, John R; Roethke, Theresa J; Jucker, Beat M; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Townsley, Mary I; Lepore, John J; Willette, Robert N

    2012-11-01

    Pulmonary edema resulting from high pulmonary venous pressure (PVP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in heart failure (HF) patients, but current treatment options demonstrate substantial limitations. Recent evidence from rodent lungs suggests that PVP-induced edema is driven by activation of pulmonary capillary endothelial transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels. To examine the therapeutic potential of this mechanism, we evaluated TRPV4 expression in human congestive HF lungs and developed small-molecule TRPV4 channel blockers for testing in animal models of HF. TRPV4 immunolabeling of human lung sections demonstrated expression of TRPV4 in the pulmonary vasculature that was enhanced in sections from HF patients compared to controls. GSK2193874 was identified as a selective, orally active TRPV4 blocker that inhibits Ca(2+) influx through recombinant TRPV4 channels and native endothelial TRPV4 currents. In isolated rodent and canine lungs, TRPV4 blockade prevented the increased vascular permeability and resultant pulmonary edema associated with elevated PVP. Furthermore, in both acute and chronic HF models, GSK2193874 pretreatment inhibited the formation of pulmonary edema and enhanced arterial oxygenation. Finally, GSK2193874 treatment resolved pulmonary edema already established by myocardial infarction in mice. These findings identify a crucial role for TRPV4 in the formation of HF-induced pulmonary edema and suggest that TRPV4 blockade is a potential therapeutic strategy for HF patients.

  12. Adenosine triphosphate treatment for meconium aspiration-induced pulmonary hypertension in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kääpä, P; Jahnukainen, T; Grönlund, J; Rautanen, M; Halkola, L; Välimäki, I

    1997-07-01

    To investigate the pulmonary haemodynamic effects of meconium aspiration and subsequent adenosine triphosphate (ATP) treatment, 12 anaesthetized and ventilated pigs (wt 24-28 kg) received either ATP or an equal volume of saline into the right heart in doses of 0.02 to 0.80 mumol kg-1 min-1 after intratracheal administration of 2 mL kg-1 of human meconium. Meconium instillation induced significant increases in pulmonary vascular pressures and total and postarterial resistances calculated from pulmonary artery occlusion studies, but did not affect the systemic haemodynamics, except for a fall in heart rate and increase in central venous pressure. Infusion of ATP at the lowest doses (0.02 and 0.08 mumol kg-1 min-1) selectively decreased the pulmonary arterial pressure and vascular resistance and at 0.32 and 0.80 mumol kg-1 min-1 reduced both the pulmonary and systemic resistances. In the lung circulation the increasing doses of ATP reduced preferably the arterial but also the postarterial resistance. Withdrawal of ATP infusion led to a significant rebound effect especially in the postarterial segment of the lung circulation. Meconium aspiration thus induces an acute, predominantly postarterial obstruction in the lung circulation and infusion of ATP at low doses selectively dilates the pulmonary vascular bed and may help to preclude elevation of capillary pressures in meconium aspiration-induced pulmonary hypertension. PMID:9246392

  13. Pulmonary arterial responses to reactive oxygen species are altered in newborn piglets with chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fike, Candice D.; Aschner, Judy L.; Slaughter, James C.; Kaplowitz, Mark R.; Zhang, Yongmei; Pfister, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. ROS might mediate vascular responses, at least in part, by stimulating prostanoid production. Our goals were to determine if the effect of ROS on vascular tone is altered in resistance pulmonary arteries (PRA) of newborn piglets with chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and the role, if any, of prostanoids in ROS-mediated responses. In cannulated, pressurized PRA, ROS generated by xanthine (X) plus xanthine oxidase (XO) had minimal effect on vascular tone in control piglets but caused significant vasoconstriction in hypoxic piglets. Both cyclooxygenase inhibition with indomethacin and thromboxane synthase inhibition with dazoxiben significantly blunted constriction to X+XO in hypoxic PRA. X+XO increased prostacyclin production (70±8%) by a greater degree than thromboxane production (50±6%) in control PRA; this was not the case in hypoxic PRA where the increases in prostacyclin and thromboxane production were not statistically different (78±13% versus 216±93%, respectively). Thromboxane synthase expression was increased in PRA from hypoxic piglets while prostacyclin synthase expression was similar in PRA from hypoxic and control piglets. Under conditions of chronic hypoxia, altered vascular responses to ROS may contribute to pulmonary hypertension by a mechanism that involves the prostanoid vasoconstrictor, thromboxane. PMID:21516056

  14. Pulmonary effects of intravenous atropine induce ventilation perfusion mismatch.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Paydarfar, David

    2014-05-01

    Atropine is used for a number of medical conditions, predominantly for its cardiovascular effects. Cholinergic nerves that innervate pulmonary smooth muscle, glands, and vasculature may be affected by anticholinergic medications. We hypothesized that atropine causes alterations in pulmonary gas exchange. We conducted a prospective interventional study with detailed physiologic recordings in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats (n = 8). Animals breathing a normoxic gas mixture titrated to a partial arterial pressure of oxygen of 110-120 were exposed to an escalating dose of intravenous atropine (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 5.0, and 20.0 mg/kg body mass). Arterial blood gas measurements were recorded every 2 min (×5) at baseline, and following each of the 5 doses of atropine. In addition, the animals regional pulmonary blood flow was measured using neutron-activated microspheres. Oxygenation decreased immediately following intravenous administration of atropine, despite a small increase in the volume of inspired air with no change in respiratory rate. Arterial blood gas analysis showed an increase in pulmonary dysfunction, characterized by a widening of the alveolar-arteriole gradient (p < 0.003 all groups except for the lowest dose of atropine). The microsphere data demonstrates an abrupt and marked heterogeneity of pulmonary blood flow following atropine treatment. In conclusion, atropine was found to decrease pulmonary gas exchange in a dose-dependent fashion in this rat model.

  15. Sol-gel derived PZT films doped with vanadium pentoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Hongfang; Guo Qing; Zhao Zhiman; Cao Guozhong

    2009-11-15

    The present research investigated the sol-gel preparation, dielectric and ferroelectric properties of PZT films doped with 5 mol% vanadium oxide. Stable PZTV sols can be readily formed, and homogeneous, micrometer thick and pinhole-free PZTV films were obtained by using spin coating followed with rapid annealing. The X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that no parasitic or secondary phases were formed in the sol-gel PZT films with the addition of vanadium oxide. The material doped with vanadium pentoxide showed enhanced dielectric constant and remanent polarization with reduced loss tangent and coercive field.

  16. Glycosaminoglycan synthesis in amiodarone-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Farinas, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) have previously been demonstrated to be synthesized in greater than normal amounts following a single intratracheal insufflation of bleomycin in hamsters. This suggests that GAG may play a role in the propagation of pulmonary fibrotic reactions. To further test this hypothesis, GAG synthesis was studied in a new hamster model of interstitial lung injury, induced by the cardiac drug, aminodarone. Animals received a single intratracheal instillation of 1.25 mg aminodarone. At 4, 9, and 21 days post-insufflation, the animals were sacrificed, their lungs removed, and 1 mm fragments placed in explant culture for 6 hours at 37/sup 0/C in the presence of /sup 35/S-sulfate. The labeled GAG were isolated and measured for /sup 35/S incorporation. The author then isolated the hexosamine portions of the respective GAGs, Heparan Sulfate (HEP S), Chondroitin-6-Sulfate (Ch-6-S) and Chondroitin-4-Sulfate and Dermatan Sulfate (CH-4-S and DS) using the enzyme ABC and paper chromatography. They also studied the GAG content and distribution in hamster lung fibroblasts incorporated with /sup 35/S for 48 hours and subjected to either 0, 0.01 mg, 0.1 mg, or 1 mg of aminodarone. GAG synthesis is increased at an early stage following the induction of lung injury by aminodarone and remains elevated for a 3 week period. The change in GAG distribution boards elevated CH-4-S and DS may be characteristic of interstitial diseases in general. The GAGs that are synthesized by fibroblasts may be responsible for the increased CH-4-S and DS synthesis.

  17. Aerobic exercise attenuates pulmonary inflammation induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Olivo, Clarice R; Miyaji, Eliane N; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Almeida, Francine M; Lourenço, Juliana D; Abreu, Rodrigo M; Arantes, Petra M M; Lopes, Fernanda Dtqs; Martins, Milton A

    2014-11-01

    Aerobic exercise has been recognized as a stimulator of the immune system, but its effect on bacterial infection has not been extensively evaluated. We studied whether moderate aerobic exercise training prior to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection influences pulmonary inflammatory responses. BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: Sedentary Untreated (sedentary without infection); Sedentary Infected (sedentary with infection); Trained Untreated (aerobic training without infection); and Trained Infected (aerobic training with infection). Animals underwent aerobic training for 4 wk, and 72 h after last exercise training, animals received a challenge with S. pneumoniae and were evaluated either 12 h or 10 days after instillation. In acute phase, Sedentary Infected group had an increase in respiratory system resistance and elastance; number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL); polymorphonuclear cells in lung parenchyma; and levels of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin (IL)-1β (IL-1β) in lung homogenates. Exercise training significantly attenuated the increase in all of these parameters and induced an increase in expression of antioxidant enzymes (CuZnSOD and MnSOD) in lungs. Trained Infected mice had a significant decrease in the number of colony-forming units of pneumococci in the lungs compared with Sedentary Infected animals. Ten days after infection, Trained Infected group exhibited lower numbers of macrophages in BAL, polymorphonuclear cells in lung parenchyma and IL-6 in lung homogenates compared with Sedentary Infected group. Our results suggest a protective effect of moderate exercise training against respiratory infection with S. pneumoniae. This effect is most likely secondary to an effect of exercise on oxidant-antioxidant balance.

  18. Carvacrol induces the apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianlong; Fan, Kai; Wang, Peng; Yu, Juan; Liu, Ruxia; Qi, Hanping; Sun, Hongli; Cao, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    The abnormal apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is an important pathophysiological process in pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Carvacrol, an essential oil compound from oregano and thyme, has displayed antimicrobial, antitumor, and antioxidant properties. Although carvacrol has pro-apoptosis properties in tumor cells, the underlying mechanisms of carvacrol in PASMC apoptosis remain unclear. Thus, in this study, we aim to investigate the role of carvacrol in pulmonary vascular remodeling and PASMC apoptosis in hypoxia. Right Ventricular Hypertrophy Measurements and pulmonary pathomorphology data show that the ratio of the heart weight/tibia length (HW/TL), the right ventricle/left ventricle plus septum (RV/LV+S) and the medial width of the pulmonary artery increased in chronic hypoxia and were reversed by carvacrol treatment under hypoxia. Additionally, carvacrol inhibited PASMC viability, attenuated oxidative stress, induced mitochondria membrane depolarization, increased the percentage of apoptotic cells, suppressed Bcl-2 expression, decreased procaspase-3 expression, promoted caspase-3 activation, and inhibited the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that carvacrol attenuates the pulmonary vascular remodeling and promotes PASMC apoptosis by acting on, at least in part, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. This process might provide us new insight into the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26607464

  19. Resolution of pulmonary hypertension complication during venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia application.

    PubMed

    Ballard-Croft, Cherry; Wang, Dongfang; Jones, Cameron; Wang, Jingkun; Pollock, Robert; Jubak, Bob; Topaz, Stephen; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia (vv-PISH) system for advanced cancer treatment. The vv-PISH system consistently delivered hyperthermia to adult healthy swine, but significant pulmonary hypertension developed during the heating phase. The goal of this study was to develop a method to prevent pulmonary hypertension. We hypothesized that pulmonary hypertension results from decreased priming solution air solubility, which causes pulmonary gas embolism. Healthy adult sheep (n = 3) were used to establish a standard vv-PISH sheep model without priming solution preheating. In subsequent sheep (n = 7), the priming solution was preheated (42-46°C) and the hyperthermia circuit flushed with CO2. All sheep survived the experiment and achieved 2 hours of 42°C hyperthermia. In the group lacking priming solution preheating, significant pulmonary hypertension (35-44 mm Hg) developed. In the sheep with priming solution preheating, pulmonary artery pressure was very stable without pulmonary hypertension. Blood electrolytes were in physiologic range, and complete blood counts were unaffected by hyperthermia. Blood chemistries revealed no significant liver or kidney damage. Our simple strategy of priming solution preheating completely resolved the problem of pulmonary hypertension as a milestone toward developing a safe and easy-to-use vv-PISH system for cancer treatment.

  20. Resolution of pulmonary hypertension complication during venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia application.

    PubMed

    Ballard-Croft, Cherry; Wang, Dongfang; Jones, Cameron; Wang, Jingkun; Pollock, Robert; Jubak, Bob; Topaz, Stephen; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia (vv-PISH) system for advanced cancer treatment. The vv-PISH system consistently delivered hyperthermia to adult healthy swine, but significant pulmonary hypertension developed during the heating phase. The goal of this study was to develop a method to prevent pulmonary hypertension. We hypothesized that pulmonary hypertension results from decreased priming solution air solubility, which causes pulmonary gas embolism. Healthy adult sheep (n = 3) were used to establish a standard vv-PISH sheep model without priming solution preheating. In subsequent sheep (n = 7), the priming solution was preheated (42-46°C) and the hyperthermia circuit flushed with CO2. All sheep survived the experiment and achieved 2 hours of 42°C hyperthermia. In the group lacking priming solution preheating, significant pulmonary hypertension (35-44 mm Hg) developed. In the sheep with priming solution preheating, pulmonary artery pressure was very stable without pulmonary hypertension. Blood electrolytes were in physiologic range, and complete blood counts were unaffected by hyperthermia. Blood chemistries revealed no significant liver or kidney damage. Our simple strategy of priming solution preheating completely resolved the problem of pulmonary hypertension as a milestone toward developing a safe and easy-to-use vv-PISH system for cancer treatment. PMID:23820278

  1. Effect of aerosolized milrinone during drug-induced pulmonary hypertension in lambs.

    PubMed

    Gelvez, Javier; Fakioglu, Harun; Olarte, Jose L; Soliz, Amed; Totapally, Balagangadhar R; Torbati, Dan

    2004-07-01

    We tested whether aerosolized milrinone in lambs selectively reduces drug-induced acute pulmonary hypertension without reducing the mean systemic blood pressure (MSBP). Seven, 2-3-week-old lambs were anesthetized (50 mg/kg ketamine), paralyzed (0.1 mg/kg vecuronium bromide) and mechanically ventilated. A femoral artery, pulmonary artery, and jugular vein were catheterized for continuous monitoring of MSBP, mean pulmonary artery pressure, periodic gas-exchange analyses, and determination of cardiac output by thermodilution technique. An Airlife Misty nebulizer was used in a dry state to establish a stable baseline of an inspired fraction of oxygen (FiO(2)) at 0.21. Acute pulmonary hypertension with hypoxemia was then induced by increasing the mean pulmonary artery pressure up to 30-35% of the MSBP using 2-6 microg/kg/min of Thromboxane A(2) mimetic (U-46619), intravenously. The lambs were then subjected to 15 min of saline nebulization without milrinone followed by 30 min saline nebulization with a relatively high concentration of milrinone (10 mg/ml, total dose of 40 mg). Aerosolized milrinone had no effect on systemic or pulmonary artery pressure during combined acute pulmonary hypertension and hypoxemia. We speculate that our nebulization procedures failed to deliver sufficient amount of milrinone for producing a detectable hemodynamic effect. PMID:15082033

  2. Drug-induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome Accompanied by Pulmonary Lesions Exhibiting Centrilobular Nodular Shadows.

    PubMed

    Sawata, Tetsuro; Bando, Masashi; Kogawara, Haruna; Nakayama, Masayuki; Mato, Naoko; Yamasawa, Hideaki; Takemura, Tamiko; Sugiyama, Yukihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 51-year-old woman diagnosed with Crohn's disease developed drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) 12 and six weeks after starting the oral intake of mesalazine and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, respectively. Chest CT showed centrilobular nodular shadows and a transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) revealed infiltration of inflammatory cells predominantly in the small pulmonary artery walls and bronchiolar walls. Regarding pulmonary lesions of DIHS, infiltrative shadows have sometimes been reported, whereas nodular shadows have rarely been documented. This is a valuable case report for considering the mechanism underlying the development of pulmonary lesions in case of DIHS. PMID:27150872

  3. Cold-induced pulmonary oedema in scuba divers and swimmers and subsequent development of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, P T; Nuri, M; Crowther, A; Webb-Peploe, M M

    1989-01-14

    The effect of cold and/or a raised partial pressure of oxygen was examined in eleven people with no demonstrable cardiac abnormality but who had pulmonary oedema when scuba diving or surface swimming, and in ten normal divers. These stimuli induced pathological vasoconstriction in the pulmonary oedema group, nine of whom also showed signs of cardiac decompensation when so stimulated. The pulmonary oedema patients have been followed-up for an average of 8 years. Seven have become hypertensive. Except for the onset of lone atrial fibrillation in one normotensive female diver and development of Raynaud's phenomenon in a normotensive man, there have been no cardiovascular events and no deaths.

  4. Key Role of ROS in the Process of 15-Lipoxygenase/15-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoiccid-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Hypoxia Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Mao, Min; Qiu, Yanli; Liu, Gaofeng; Sheng, Tingting; Yu, Xiufeng; Wang, Shuang; Zhu, Daling

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO) and its metabolite 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) were up-regulated in pulmonary arterial cells from both pulmonary artery hypertension patients and hypoxic rats and that these factors mediated the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) by affecting the proliferation and apoptosis of pulmonary arterial (PA) cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of the remodeling induced by 15-HETE have remained unclear. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 15-LO are both induced by hypoxia, it is possible that ROS are involved in the events of hypoxia-induced 15-LO expression that lead to PH. We employed immunohistochemistry, tube formation assays, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assays, and cell cycle analyses to explore the role of ROS in the process of 15-HETE-mediated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH). We found that exogenous 15-HETE facilitated the generation of ROS and that this effect was mainly localized to mitochondria. In particular, the mitochondrial electron transport chain and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 4 (Nox4) were responsible for the significant 15-HETE-stimulated increase in ROS production. Moreover, ROS induced by 15-HETE stimulated endothelial cell (EC) migration and promoted pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation under hypoxia via the p38 MAPK pathway. These results indicated that 15-HETE-regulated ROS mediated hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling (PVR) via the p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:26871724

  5. Therapeutic Benefits of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Chun; Ke, Meng-Wei; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Wann, Shue-Ren; Shu, Chih-Wen; Chiou, Kuan-Rau; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn; Pan, Hung-Wei; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Liu, Chun-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by progressive increases in vascular resistance and the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. The accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lung and elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines in the bloodstream suggest that inflammation may play a role in PAH. In this study, the benefits of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and iPSC-conditioned medium (iPSC CM) were explored in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH rats. We demonstrated that both iPSCs and iPSC CM significantly reduced the right ventricular systolic pressure and ameliorated the hypertrophy of the right ventricle in MCT-induced PAH rats in models of both disease prevention and disease reversal. In the prevention of MCT-induced PAH, iPSC-based therapy led to the decreased accumulation of inflammatory cells and down-regulated the expression of the IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12α, IL-12β, IL-23 and IFNγ genes in lung specimens, which implied that iPSC-based therapy may be involved in the regulation of inflammation. NF-κB signaling is essential to the inflammatory cascade, which is activated via the phosphorylation of the NF-κB molecule. Using the chemical inhibitor specifically blocked the phosphorylation of NF-κB, and in vitro assays of cultured human M1 macrophages implied that the anti-inflammation effect of iPSC-based therapy may contribute to the disturbance of NF-κB activation. Here, we showed that iPSC-based therapy could restore the hemodynamic function of right ventricle with benefits for preventing the ongoing inflammation in the lungs of MCT-induced PAH rats by regulating NF-κB phosphorylation. PMID:26840075

  6. Vanadium pentoxide nanoparticles mimic vanadium haloperoxidases and thwart biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalio, Filipe; André, Rute; Hartog, Aloysius F.; Stoll, Brigitte; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Wever, Ron; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2012-08-01

    Marine biofouling--the colonization of small marine microorganisms on surfaces that are directly exposed to seawater, such as ships' hulls--is an expensive problem that is currently without an environmentally compatible solution. Biofouling leads to increased hydrodynamic drag, which, in turn, causes increased fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Tributyltin-free antifouling coatings and paints based on metal complexes or biocides have been shown to efficiently prevent marine biofouling. However, these materials can damage the environment through metal leaching (for example, of copper and zinc) and bacteria resistance. Here, we show that vanadium pentoxide nanowires act like naturally occurring vanadium haloperoxidases to prevent marine biofouling. In the presence of bromide ions and hydrogen peroxide, the nanowires catalyse the oxidation of bromide ions to hypobromous acid (HOBr). Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2) is formed and this exerts strong antibacterial activity, which prevents marine biofouling without being toxic to marine biota. Vanadium pentoxide nanowires have the potential to be an alternative approach to conventional anti-biofouling agents.

  7. Nanometer sized tantalum pentoxide fibers prepared by electrospinning

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmaraj, N.; Kim, H.Y.

    2006-03-09

    Novel, porous tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) nanofibers with 150-250 nm diameter were obtained by high temperature calcination of the as-electrospun tantalum pentoxide/poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) composite fibers prepared by sol-gel processing and electrospinning technique. Surface analysis, structure and elemental composition of these as-electrospun and as-calcinated Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanofibers have been studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and FT-IR. High-resolution FE-SEM images showed the porous nature of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanofibers. EDX analysis revealed the perfect stoichiometry of the nanofibers as Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. A linear correlation was noted between the calcination temperature and orthorhombic crystalline phase evolution of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}.

  8. The Effects of Aquaporin-1 in Pulmonary Edema Induced by Fat Embolism Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiwei; Tian, Kun; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Shang, Jiawei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of aquaporin1 (AQP1) in the pathologic process of pulmonary edema induced by fat embolism syndrome (FES) and the effects of a free fatty acid (FFA) mixture on AQP1 expression in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). In vivo, edema was more serious in FES mice compared with the control group. The expression of AQP1 and the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) in the FES group were significantly increased compared with the control group. At the same time, inhibition of AQP1 decreased the pathological damage resulting from pulmonary edema. Then we performed a study in vitro to investigate whether AQP1 was induced by FFA release in FES. The mRNA and protein level of AQP1 were increased by FFAs in a dose- and time-dependent manner in PMVECs. In addition, the up-regulation of AQP1 was blocked by the inhibitor of p38 kinase, implicating the p38 MAPK pathway as involved in the FFA-induced AQP1 up-regulation in PMVECs. Our results demonstrate that AQP1 may play important roles in pulmonary edema induced by FES and can be regarded as a new therapy target for treatment of pulmonary edema induced by FES. PMID:27455237

  9. Heme biosynthesis modulation via δ-aminolevulinic acid administration attenuates chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Alhawaj, Raed; Patel, Dhara; Kelly, Melissa R.; Sun, Dong

    2015-01-01

    This study examines how heme biosynthesis modulation with δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) potentially functions to prevent 21-day hypoxia (10% oxygen)-induced pulmonary hypertension in mice and the effects of 24-h organoid culture with bovine pulmonary arteries (BPA) with the hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension mediator endothelin-1 (ET-1), with a focus on changes in superoxide and regulation of micro-RNA 204 (miR204) expression by src kinase phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3). The treatment of mice with ALA attenuated pulmonary hypertension (assessed through echo Doppler flow of the pulmonary valve, and direct measurements of right ventricular systolic pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy), increases in pulmonary arterial superoxide (detected by lucigenin), and decreases in lung miR204 and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2) expression. ALA treatment of BPA attenuated ET-1-induced increases in mitochondrial superoxide (detected by MitoSox), STAT3 phosphorylation, and decreases in miR204 and SOD2 expression. Because ALA increases BPA protoporphyrin IX (a stimulator of guanylate cyclase) and cGMP-mediated protein kinase G (PKG) activity, the effects of the PKG activator 8-bromo-cGMP were examined and found to also attenuate the ET-1-induced increase in superoxide. ET-1 increased superoxide production and the detection of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence, suggesting oxidant conditions might impair heme biosynthesis by ferrochelatase. However, chronic hypoxia actually increased ferrochelatase activity in mouse pulmonary arteries. Thus, a reversal of factors increasing mitochondrial superoxide and oxidant effects that potentially influence remodeling signaling related to miR204 expression and perhaps iron availability needed for the biosynthesis of heme by the ferrochelatase reaction could be factors in the beneficial actions of ALA in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25659899

  10. Changes in pulmonary arterial wall mechanical properties and lumenal architecture with induced vascular remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthen, Robert C.; Heinrich, Amy E.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2004-04-01

    To explore and quantify pulmonary arterial remodeling we used various methods including micro-CT, high-resolution 3-dimensional x-ray imaging, to examine the structure and function of intact pulmonary vessels in isolated rat lungs. The rat is commonly used as an animal model for studies of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and the accompanying vascular remodeling, where vascular remodeling has been defined primarily by changes in the vessel wall composition in response to hypertension inducing stimuli such as chronic hypoxic exposure (CHE) or monocrotaline (MCT) injection. Little information has been provided as to how such changes affect the vessel wall mechanical properties or the lumenal architecture of the pulmonary arterial system that actually account for the hemodynamic consequences of the remodeling. In addition, although the link between primary forms of pulmonary hypertension and inherited genetics is well established, the role that genetic coding plays in hemodynamics and vascular remodeling is not. Therefore, we are utilizing Fawn-Hooded (FH), Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Brown Norway (BN)rat strains along with unique imaging methods to parameterize both vessel distensibility and lumenal morphometry using a principal pulmonary arterial pathway analysis based on self-consistency. We have found for the hypoxia model, in addition to decreased body weight, increased hematocrit, increased right ventricular hypertrophy, the distensibility of the pulmonary arteries is shown to decrease significantly in the presence of remodeling.

  11. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. Immunoallergologic tests and bronchoalveolar lavage phospholipid content.

    PubMed

    Nicolet-Chatelain, G; Prevost, M C; Escamilla, R; Migueres, J

    1991-02-01

    Amiodarone (A) is a widely-used antiarrhythmic drug. Pulmonary toxicity is the most serious adverse effect with an estimated mortality of 1 to 33 percent. In order to determine an element helpful for diagnosis, we examined four patients with amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity, three patients treated with A, without evidence of pulmonary toxicity but with a main underlying pulmonary disease, and four healthy volunteers. Daily and cumulative doses or duration of treatment were similar in the first two groups. Pulmonary function tests (spirometry, CO-diffusing capacity, arterial blood gases), roentgenographic examinations, pulmonary biopsies or immunoallergologic tests (skin reaction, lymphoblastic transformation test and human basophile degranulation test) did not provide any discriminatory element. In APT+, we observed an increased cellularity of the bronchoalveolar lavage. Neither the differential cell count nor the presence of foamy macrophages were distinguishable between APT+ and APT-. The phospholipid composition of BAL fluid showed a decreased total phospholipid and phospholipid/protein ratio in all patients compared to normal subjects. These changes reflect more the severity of pulmonary disease than the specificity of the causative agent. However, we observed that the unique PL which decreases in APT- and remains normal in APT+ is phosphatidyl-serine + phosphatidylinositol (PS + PI). This has to be confirmed and should be evaluated at different stages of the disease to determine an eventual specific element. We conclude that there are no data currently available to establish the diagnosis of APT except perhaps for the analysis of BAL PL content.

  12. Diving-induced venous gas emboli do not increase pulmonary artery pressure.

    PubMed

    Valic, Z; Duplancić, D; Baković, D; Ivancev, V; Eterović, D; Wisløff, U; Brubakk, A O; Dujić, Z

    2005-10-01

    Venous gas emboli are frequently observed in divers even if proper decompression procedures are followed. This study was initiated to determine if pulmonary artery pressure increases in asymptomatic divers, which could increase the risk of arterial embolization due to passage of venous gas emboli from the right to the left side of the heart. Recordings of venous gas emboli and estimation of pulmonary artery pressure by non-invasive transthoracic echocardiography were applied in 10 recreational scuba diving volunteers before and 20, 40, 60, and 80 min after simulated dives to 18 m (80 min bottom time) in a hyperbaric chamber. The ratio between pulmonary artery acceleration time and right ventricular ejection time was used as an estimate of pulmonary artery pressure. None of investigated divers had signs of decompression sickness. Despite the post-dive presence of the venous gas emboli, measured in the region of the pulmonary valve annulus (mean=1.71 bubbles.cm-2, 40 min after dive), the ratio between pulmonary artery acceleration time and right ventricular ejection time did not decrease, but actually increased (from 0.43+/-0.06 to 0.49+/-0.06, 40 min after dive; p<0.05), suggesting a decrease in pulmonary artery pressure after the dive. We conclude that diving-induced venous gas bubbles do not cause significant changes in the central circulation which could increase the risk of arterial embolization.

  13. Swimming-induced immersion pulmonary edema while snorkeling can be rapidly life-threatening: case reports.

    PubMed

    Cochard, G; Henckes, A; Deslandes, S; Noël-Savina, E; Bedossa, M; Gladu, G; Ozier, Y

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that immersion pulmonary edema can be life-threatening for divers using a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba). Swimming-induced pulmonary edema in otherwise healthy individuals is not an object of dispute but its real severity is not well known and is probably underestimated. We report two cases of life-threatening acute respiratory distress while swimming and snorkeling, one of which is well documented for swimming-induced pulmonary edema. The interest of these case reports lies in the suddenness of these life-threatening events. Such accidents can mimic a loss of consciousness due to cardiac dysrhythmia and lead to drowning. In the case of swimming-induced pulmonary edema, the prognosis is far better than for a cardiac disorder, but it is also dependent on the efficiency of the supervision. Swimmers, divers, race organizers and supervising physicians should be given knowledge of this pathology and its potentially acute occurrence. Adequate organizational dispositions are mandatory to prevent swimming-induced pulmonary edema-related deaths. PMID:24224285

  14. Swimming-induced immersion pulmonary edema while snorkeling can be rapidly life-threatening: case reports.

    PubMed

    Cochard, G; Henckes, A; Deslandes, S; Noël-Savina, E; Bedossa, M; Gladu, G; Ozier, Y

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that immersion pulmonary edema can be life-threatening for divers using a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba). Swimming-induced pulmonary edema in otherwise healthy individuals is not an object of dispute but its real severity is not well known and is probably underestimated. We report two cases of life-threatening acute respiratory distress while swimming and snorkeling, one of which is well documented for swimming-induced pulmonary edema. The interest of these case reports lies in the suddenness of these life-threatening events. Such accidents can mimic a loss of consciousness due to cardiac dysrhythmia and lead to drowning. In the case of swimming-induced pulmonary edema, the prognosis is far better than for a cardiac disorder, but it is also dependent on the efficiency of the supervision. Swimmers, divers, race organizers and supervising physicians should be given knowledge of this pathology and its potentially acute occurrence. Adequate organizational dispositions are mandatory to prevent swimming-induced pulmonary edema-related deaths.

  15. Inhibition of pulmonary surfactants synthesis during N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Li, Lian; She, Hua; Yue, Shaojie; Li, Chen; Luo, Ziqiang

    2010-09-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ionotropic glutamate receptors widely distributed in the central nervous system, and have been extensively investigated for their roles in embryonic development, synaptic plasticity and neuroexcitoxicity. Their functions in the peripheral nervous system and non-neural tissues have caught much attention recently. Over-activation of NMDA receptors induces excitotoxic lung injury. But the endogenous cell types in the lungs that express NMDA receptors remains elusive and the molecular mechanism underlies NMDA-induced lung injury has not been fully characterized. In this work, we reported that functional NMDA receptors were expressed in alveolar type II cells in the lungs. Over-activation of these receptors led to down-regulation of pulmonary surfactants synthesis. We further demonstrated that decreased cellular choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase alpha expression induced by NMDA treatment accounted for the decreased pulmonary surfactants synthesis. Our results provided important clues for treatment of glutamate lung injury by modulating pulmonary surfactants system.

  16. Preventive effects of vitamin D treatment on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongmei; Yu, Xiaoting; Fang, Xia; Liang, Aibin; Yu, Zhang; Gu, Pan; Zeng, Yu; He, Jian; Zhu, Hailong; Li, Shuai; Fan, Desheng; Han, Fei; Zhang, Lanjing; Yi, Xianghua

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary fibrosis often have low vitamin D levels, the effects of which are largely unknown. We here report that early vitamin D supplementation significantly reduced the severity of pulmonary fibrosis and inflammatory cell accumulationin in the bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis mouse model on supplementary days 14, 21 and 28 (P < 0.001). Vitamin D supplementation also prevented some ultrastructural changes in response to bleomycin administration, including basement membrane thickening, interstitial fibrin deposition and microvilli flattening or disappearance on days 14, 21 and 28, and lamellar body swelling or vacuolation on days 21 and 28. The bleomycin group had rising hydroxyproline level on days 14, 21 and 28, whereas the vitamin D treatment group showed consistently lower hydroxyproline level but still higher than that of the control group (P < 0.001). Our immunohistochemistry and densitometry analyses showed less staining for α-smooth muscle actin, a myofibroblast marker, in the vitamin D group compared to the bleomycin group (P < 0.001). Thus, vitamin D treatment could prevent bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by delaying or suppressing ultrastructural changes, as well as attenuating hydroxyproline accumulation and inhibiting myofibroblastic proliferation. These data further our understanding of the roles of vitamin D in pulmonary fibrogenesis and in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26627341

  17. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Induces Protection against Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Long, Mei; Wang, Jie; Liu, Fen; Gai, Min-Tao; Aierken, Alidan; Li, Ming-Yuan; Li, Qian; Wu, Lei-Qi; Ma, Yi-Tong; Hujiaaihemaiti, Minawaer

    2016-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of various pulmonary diseases via the activation of the unfolded protein response. However, the role of ER stress in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains unclear. The well-known chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) inhibits ER stress signaling. We hypothesized that known chemical chaperones, including 4-PBA, would inhibit the activation of ER stress and prevent and/or reverse PAH. Methods and Results Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: a normal control group (NORMAL group), a PAH group, and two PAH model plus 4-PBA treatment groups. The latter two groups included rats receiving 4-PBA by gavage each day as a preventive measure (the PRE group, with PBA starting on the day of PAH induction and continuing for 4 weeks) or as a reversal measure (the REV group, with PBA starting on the third week of PAH induction and continuing for 2 weeks). The PAH model was induced by intraperitoneally administering monocrotaline. The mean pulmonary artery pressure and mean right ventricular pressure were lower in the REV and PRE groups than in the NORMAL group. Furthermore, 4-PBA improved pulmonary arterial remodeling and suppressed the expression of ER stress indicators. Conclusion Our findings indicate that PAH induces ER stress and provokes pulmonary arterial and right ventricular remodeling. Additionally, we show that attenuation of ER stress has the potential to be an effective therapeutic strategy for protecting pulmonary arteries. PMID:27304885

  18. Fractal Dimension in Quantifying Experimental-Pulmonary-Hypertension-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Sabela, Ana Karênina Dias de Almeida; Mariano, Thaoan Bruno; Ozaki, Guilherme Akio Tamura; Castoldi, Robson Chacon; do Carmo, Edna Maria; Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Tomasi, Loreta Casquel; Okoshi, Katashi; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2016-01-01

    Background Right-sided heart failure has high morbidity and mortality, and may be caused by pulmonary arterial hypertension. Fractal dimension is a differentiated and innovative method used in histological evaluations that allows the characterization of irregular and complex structures and the quantification of structural tissue changes. Objective To assess the use of fractal dimension in cardiomyocytes of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension, in addition to providing histological and functional analysis. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: control (C; n = 8) and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (M; n = 8). Five weeks after pulmonary arterial hypertension induction with monocrotaline, echocardiography was performed and the animals were euthanized. The heart was dissected, the ventricles weighed to assess anatomical parameters, and histological slides were prepared and stained with hematoxylin/eosin for fractal dimension analysis, performed using box-counting method. Data normality was tested (Shapiro-Wilk test), and the groups were compared with non-paired Student t test or Mann Whitney test (p < 0.05). Results Higher fractal dimension values were observed in group M as compared to group C (1.39 ± 0.05 vs. 1.37 ± 0.04; p < 0.05). Echocardiography showed lower pulmonary artery flow velocity, pulmonary acceleration time and ejection time values in group M, suggesting function worsening in those animals. Conclusion The changes observed confirm pulmonary-arterial-hypertension-induced cardiac dysfunction, and point to fractal dimension as an effective method to evaluate cardiac morphological changes induced by ventricular dysfunction. PMID:27223643

  19. Rescue Treatment with L-Citrulline Inhibits Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension in Newborn Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Dikalova, Anna; Kaplowitz, Mark R.; Cunningham, Gary; Summar, Marshall; Aschner, Judy L.

    2015-01-01

    Infants with cardiopulmonary disorders associated with hypoxia develop pulmonary hypertension. We previously showed that initiation of oral L-citrulline before and continued throughout hypoxic exposure improves nitric oxide (NO) production and ameliorates pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets. Rescue treatments, initiated after the onset of pulmonary hypertension, better approximate clinical strategies. Mechanisms by which L-citrulline improves NO production merit elucidation. The objective of this study was to determine whether starting L-citrulline after the onset of pulmonary hypertension inhibits disease progression and improves NO production by recoupling endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Hypoxic and normoxic (control) piglets were studied. Some hypoxic piglets received oral L-citrulline starting on Day 3 of hypoxia and continuing throughout the remaining 7 days of hypoxic exposure. Catheters were placed for hemodynamic measurements, and pulmonary arteries were dissected to assess NO production and eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios (a measure of eNOS coupling). Pulmonary vascular resistance was lower in L-citrulline–treated hypoxic piglets than in untreated hypoxic piglets but was higher than in normoxic controls. NO production and eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratios were greater in pulmonary arteries from L-citrulline–treated than from untreated hypoxic animals but were lower than in normoxic controls. When started after disease onset, oral L-citrulline treatment improves NO production by recoupling eNOS and inhibits the further development of chronic hypoxia–induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets. Oral L-citrulline may be a novel strategy to halt or reverse pulmonary hypertension in infants suffering from cardiopulmonary conditions associated with hypoxia. PMID:25536367

  20. Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity – A Frequently Missed Complication

    PubMed Central

    Sweidan, Alexander J.; Singh, Navneet K.; Dang, Natasha; Lam, Vinh; Datta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Amiodarone is often used in the suppression of tachyarrhythmias. One of the more serious adverse effects includes amiodarone pulmonary toxicity (APT). Several pulmonary diseases can manifest including interstitial pneumonitis, organizing pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, pulmonary nodules or masses, and pleural effusion. Incidence of APT varies from 5–15% and is correlated to dosage, age of the patient, and preexisting lung disease. DESCRIPTION A 56-year-old male with a past medical history of coronary artery disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was admitted for a coronary artery bypass graft. Post-operatively, the patient was admitted to the ICU for ventilator management and continued to receive his home dose of amiodarone 400 mg orally twice daily, which he had been taking for the past 3 months. The patient was found to be hypoxemic with a PaO2 52 mmHg and bilateral infiltrates on chest x-ray. Patient also complained of new onset dyspnea. Physical exam found bilateral rhonchi with bibasilar crackles and subcutaneous emphysema along the left anterior chest wall. Daily chest x-rays showed worsening of bilateral interstitial infiltrates and pleural effusions. A chest high-resolution computed tomography on post-operative day 3 showed extensive and severe bilateral ground glass opacities. APT was suspected and amiodarone was discontinued. A course of oral prednisone without antibiotics was initiated, and after one week of treatment the chest film cleared, the PaO2 value normalized and dyspnea resolved. DISCUSSION APT occurs via cytotoxic T cells and indirectly by immunological reaction. Typically the lungs manifest a diffuse interstitial pneumonitis with varying degrees of fibrosis. Infiltrates with a ‘ground-glass’ appearance appreciated on HRCT are more definitive than chest x-ray. Pulmonary nodules can be seen, frequently in the upper lobes. These are postulated to be accumulations of

  1. Aloe vera affects changes induced in pulmonary tissue of mice caused by cigarette smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Koul, Ashwani; Bala, Shashi; Yasmeen; Arora, Neha

    2015-09-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the influence of Aloe vera (AV) on changes induced in pulmonary tissue of cigarette smoke (CS) inhaling mice. CS inhalation for 4 weeks caused pulmonary damage as evident by histoarchitectural alterations and enhanced serum and tissue lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities. CS inhalation also led to increased mucin production as revealed by mucicarmine and Alcian Blue-Periodic Acid Schiff (AB-PAS) staining. Studies on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (balf) of CS exposed animals revealed structural changes in phospholipids and increase in surface tension when compared with control counterparts. These changes were accompanied by enhanced nitric oxide (NO) levels, citrulline levels, peroxidative damage, and differential modulation of antioxidant defense system. AV administration (seven weeks, 500 mg/kg b.w. daily) to CS inhaling mice led to modulation of CS induced pulmonary changes as revealed by lesser degree of histoarchitectural alterations, lesser mucin production, decreased NO levels, citrulline levels, peroxidative damage, and serum LDH activity. AV treatment to CS inhaling mice was associated with varying response to antioxidant defense system, however balf of CS + AV treated animals did not exhibit appreciable changes when compared with that of CS exposed animals. These observations suggest that AV has the potential to modulate CS induced changes in the pulmonary tissue which could have implications in management of CS associated pulmonary diseases, however, further investigations are required to explore its complete mechanism of action.

  2. miR-29 inhibits bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jun; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Huang, Xiao R; Chung, Arthur Ck; Feng, Yu-Lin; Hui, David Sc; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Sung, Joseph Jy; Lan, Hui Y

    2012-06-01

    Loss of microRNA-29 (miR-29) is known to be a mechanism of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-mediated pulmonary fibrosis, but the therapeutic implication of miR-29 for pulmonary fibrosis remains unexplored. The present study investigated whether miR-29 had therapeutic potential for lung disease induced by bleomycin in mice. In addition, the signaling mechanisms that regulated miR-29 expression were investigated in vivo and in vitro. We found that miR-29 was a downstream target gene of Smad3 and negatively regulated by TGF-β/Smad signaling in fibrosis. This was evidenced by the findings that mice or pulmonary fibroblasts null for Smad3 were protected against bleomycin or TGF-β1-induced loss of miR-29 along with fibrosis in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, overexpression of miR-29 could in turn negatively regulated TGF-β and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression and Smad3 signaling. Therefore, Sleeping Beauty (SB)-mediated miR-29 gene transfer into normal and diseased lung tissues was capable of preventing and treating pulmonary fibrosis including inflammatory macrophage infiltration induced by bleomycin in mice. In conclusion, miR-29 is negatively regulated by TGF-β/Smad3 and has a therapeutic potential for pulmonary fibrosis. SB-mediated miR-29 gene therapy is a non-invasive therapeutic strategy for lung disease associated with fibrosis. PMID:22395530

  3. Molecular insights into the progression of crystalline silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Umbright, Christina; Roberts, Jenny R.; Cumpston, Amy; McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David; Li, Shengqiao; Kashon, Michael; Joseph, Pius

    2015-01-01

    Identification of molecular target(s) and mechanism(s) of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity is important for the intervention and/or prevention of diseases associated with exposure to silica. Rats were exposed to crystalline silica by inhalation (15 mg m−3, 6 h per day, 5 days) and global gene expression profile was determined in the lungs by microarray analysis at 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks following termination of silica exposure. The number of significantly differentially expressed genes (>1.5-fold change and <0.01 false discovery rate P-value) detected in the lungs during the post-exposure time intervals analyzed exhibited a steady increase in parallel with the progression of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity noticed in the rats. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of a representative set of 10 genes confirmed the microarray findings. The number of biological functions, canonical pathways and molecular networks significantly affected by silica exposure, as identified by the bioinformatics analysis of the significantly differentially expressed genes detected during the post-exposure time intervals, also exhibited a steady increase similar to the silica-induced pulmonary toxicity. Genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, respiratory diseases, cancer, and tissue remodeling and fibrosis were significantly differentially expressed in the rat lungs; however, unresolved inflammation was the single most significant biological response to pulmonary exposure to silica. Excessive mucus production, as implicated by significant overexpression of the pendrin coding gene, SLC26A4, was identified as a potential novel mechanism for silica-induced pulmonary toxicity. Collectively, the findings of our study provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of crystalline silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in the rat. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:22431001

  4. Aripiprazole induced non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Mustafa; Celik, Mustafa; Cakıcı, Musa; Polat, Mustafa; Suner, Arif

    2014-01-01

    Aripiprazole is a second-generation antipsychotic drug with partial dopamine agonistic activity. Although the adverse cardiovascular effects of both typical and atypical antipsychotics are well known, similar data on aripiprazole, which was recently introduced, are scarce. Herein we report a 35-year-old female that presented to our emergency department with non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Chest X-ray and thoracic CT showed pulmonary edema and bilateral pleural effusion. Anamnesis showed that she had been taking sertraline 200 mg d-1 for obsessive-compulsive disorder for a long time and that aripiprazole10 mg d-1 was added for augmentation 2 months prior to presentation. We think that the CYP 2D6 inhibitor sertraline might have played a role in increasing the plasma concentration and toxicity of aripiprazole in the presented patient. PMID:25487626

  5. /sup 67/Ga scanning in talc-induced pulmonary granulomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.G.; Aguirre, A.; Weaver, A.

    1980-04-01

    We describe a case of pulmonary granulomatosis in a user who habitually injected methylphenidate (Ritalin) intravenously; symptomatic and objective improvement occurred with corticosteroid therapy. A scan of the lungs using raioactive /sup 67/Ga showed an increased concentration of /sup 67/Ga throughout both lungs. There was a reduction in abnormal accumulation of /sup 67/Ga, improvement in the arterial oxygen pressure and the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, and a reduction in the infiltrate on the chest x-ray film two months after the institution of therapy. Before treatment the patient's symptoms and arterial deoxygenation increased despite the cessation of her drug abuse, thus raising the question of a self-perpetuating inflammatory process in a case of pulmonary deposition of talc.

  6. Role of posterior hypothalamus in hypobaric hypoxia induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Choudhary, R C; Reddy, M K; Ray, A; Ravi, K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of posterior hypothalamus and central neurotransmitters in the pulmonary edema due to hypobaric hypoxia, rats were placed in a high altitude simulation chamber (barometric pressure-294.4 mmHg) for 24 h. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increases in mean arterial blood pressure, renal sympathetic nerve activity, right ventricular systolic pressure, lung wet to dry weight ratio and Evans blue dye leakage. There was a significant attenuation in these responses to hypobaric hypoxia (a) after lesioning posterior hypothalamus and (b) after chronic infusion of GABAA receptor agonist muscimol into posterior hypothalamus. No such attenuation was evident with the chronic infusion of the nitric oxide donor SNAP into the posterior hypothalamus. It is concluded that in hypobaric hypoxia, there is over-activity of posterior hypothalamic neurons probably due to a local decrease in GABA-ergic inhibition which increases the sympathetic drive causing pulmonary hypertension and edema. PMID:25448396

  7. Characterization on RF magnetron sputtered niobium pentoxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Usha, N.; Sivakumar, R.; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2014-10-15

    Niobium pentoxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) thin films with amorphous nature were deposited on microscopic glass substrates at 100°C by rf magnetron sputtering technique. The effect of rf power on the structural, morphological, optical, and vibrational properties of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films have been investigated. Optical study shows the maximum average transmittance of about 87% and the optical energy band gap (indirect allowed) changes between 3.70 eV and 3.47 eV. AFM result indicates the smooth surface nature of the samples. Photoluminescence measurement showed the better optical quality of the deposited films. Raman spectra show the LO-TO splitting of Nb-O stretching of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films.

  8. Towards thiol functionalization of vanadium pentoxide nanotubes using gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lavayen, V.; O'Dwyer, C. . E-mail: codwyer@tyndall.ie; Cardenas, G.; Gonzalez, G.; Sotomayor Torres, C.M.

    2007-04-12

    Template-directed synthesis is a promising route to realize vanadate-based 1-D nanostructures, an example of which is the formation of vanadium pentoxide nanotubes and associated nanostructures. In this work, we report the interchange of long-chained alkyl amines with alkyl thiols. This reaction was followed using gold nanoparticles prepared by the Chemical Liquid Deposition (CLD) method with an average diameter of {approx}0.9nm and a stability of {approx}85 days. V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanotubes (VOx-NTs) with lengths of {approx}2{mu}m and internal hollow diameters of 20-100nm were synthesized and functionalized in a Au-acetone colloid with a nominal concentration of {approx}4x10{sup -3}mol dm{sup -3}. The interchange reaction with dodecylamine is found only to occur in polar solvents and incorporation of the gold nanoparticles is not observed in the presence of n-decane.

  9. Ulinastatin attenuates pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx damage and inhibits endothelial heparanase activity in LPS-induced ARDS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lipeng; Huang, Xiao; Kong, Guiqing; Xu, Haixiao; Li, Jiankui; Hao, Dong; Wang, Tao; Han, Shasha; Han, Chunlei; Sun, Yeying; Liu, Xiangyong; Wang, Xiaozhi

    2016-09-16

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome of acute respiratory failure characterized by major pathologic mechanisms of increased microvascular permeability and inflammation. The glycocalyx lines on the endothelial surface, which determines the vascular permeability, and heparanase play pivotal roles in the degradation of heparan sulfate (HS). HS is the major component of the glycocalyx. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of Ulinastatin (UTI) on vascular permeability and pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In our study, C57BL/6 mice and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with LPS to induce injury models. After 6 h of LPS stimulation, pulmonary pathological changes, pulmonary edema, and vascular permeability were notably attenuated by UTI. UTI inhibited LPS-induced endothelial glycocalyx destruction and significantly decreased the production of HS as determined by ELISA and immunofluorescence. UTI also reduced the active form of heparanase (50 kDa) expression and heparanase activity. Moreover, lysosome pH was investigated because heparanase (65 kDa) can be reduced easily in its active form at 50 kDa in a low pH environment within lysosome. Results showed that UTI could inhibit LPS-induced pH elevation in lysosome. In conclusion, UTI protects pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx integrity and inhibits heparanase activity during LPS-induced ARDS.

  10. Brain natriuretic peptide levels in six basic underwater demolitions/SEAL recruits presenting with swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE).

    PubMed

    Shearer, Damon; Mahon, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE) is associated with both SCUBA diving and strenuous surface swimming; however, the majority of reported cases and clinically observed cases tend to occur during or after aggressive surface swimming. Capillary stress failure appears to be central to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Regional pulmonary capillaries are exposed to relatively high pressures secondary to increased vascular volume, elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance, and regional differences in perfusion secondary to forces of gravity and high cardiac output. Acute pulmonary edema can be classified as either cardiogenic or noncardiogenic or both. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when the pulmonary capillary hydrostatic pressure exceeds plasma oncotic pressure. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when pulmonary capillary permeability is increased. Given the pathophysiology noted above, SIPE can be described as a cardiogenic pulmonary edema, at least in part, since an increased transalveolar pressure gradient has been implicated in the pathogenesis of SIPE. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is used in the clinical setting to differentiate cardiac from pulmonary sources of dyspnea, specifically to diagnose cardiogenic pulmonary edema. During clinical management, BNP levels were drawn on six BUD/S recruits simultaneously presenting with pulmonary complaints consistent with SIPE, after an extended surface bay swim. This paper analyzes that data after de-identification and reviews the pathophysiology and clinical management of SIPE.

  11. Amp Synthesis in Aqueous Solution of Adenosine and Phosphorus Pentoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, Y.; Kojima, H.; Ejiri, K.; Inomata, K.

    1982-12-01

    Possible formation of a P4O10 molecule in magma, the stability of the molecule in hydrous volcanic gas at high temperatures and a possible prebiotic phosphate cycle were discussed in relation to chemical evolution. To demonstrate the utility of phosphorus pentoxide as a phosphorylating agent, aqueous solutions of adenosine (0.02M) and phosphorus pentoxide (0.2M) were incubated at 37°C for 5 months. The pH of the solutions was adjusted every day or every few days to each fixed value (9.0, 10.5, 11.5, 12.5) with 10 N NaOH. The HPLC analysis showed the formation of 2'-AMP, 3'-AMP, 5'-AMP, cyclic (2' 3')-AMP and cyclic (3' 5')-AMP. The main components of the products were 2'- and 3'-AMP, though cyclic (2' 3')-AMP was the main component in the early period of the incubation at pH 9.0. The yields (conversion rate of adenosine to AMPs) were increased almost linearly with the incubation time for 5 months in the case of pH 9.0. The final yields were about 3% (pH 9.0), 6% (pH 9.0, 1 M NaCl), 5% (pH 9.0, 0.01 M CaCl2, 0.01 M MgCl2), 7% (pH 9.0, 0.5 M NaCl, 0.01 M CaCl2, 0.01 M MgCl2), 9% (pH 9.0, 1 M NaCl, 0.01 M CaCl2, 0.01 M MgCl2), 32% (pH 10.5), 43% (pH 11.5), 35% (pH 12.5).

  12. The Beneficial Effect of Suramin on Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Izikki, Mohamed; Mercier, Olaf; Lecerf, Florence; Lubert Guin, Lauriane; Hoang, Eric; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Dartevelle, Philippe; Fadel, Elie; Eddahibi, Saadia

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disorder characterized by an increase in pulmonary artery pressure and structural changes in the pulmonary vasculature. Several observations indicate that growth factors play a key role in PH by modulating pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PA-SMC) function. In rats, established monocrotaline-induced PH (MCT-PH) can be reversed by blocking platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGF-R), epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-R), or fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGF-R). All these receptors belong to the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family. Methods and Results We evaluated whether RTK blockade by the nonspecific growth factor inhibitor, suramin, reversed advanced MCT-PH in rats via its effects on growth-factor signaling pathways. We found that suramin inhibited RTK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in cultured human PA-SMCs. Suramin inhibited PA-SMC proliferation induced by serum, PDGF, FGF2, or EGF in vitro and ex vivo. Treatment with suramin from day 1 to day 21 after monocrotaline injection attenuated PH development, as shown by lower values for pulmonary artery pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and distal vessel muscularization on day 21 compared to control rats. Treatment with suramin from day 21 to day 42 after monocrotaline injection reversed established PH, thereby normalizing the pulmonary artery pressure values and vessel structure. Suramin treatment suppressed PA-SMC proliferation and attenuated both the inflammatory response and the deposition of collagen. Conclusions RTK blockade by suramin can prevent MCT-PH and reverse established MCT-PH in rats. This study suggests that an anti-RTK strategy that targets multiple RTKs could be useful in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24143201

  13. Differential effects of pirfenidone on acute pulmonary injury and ensuing fibrosis in the hamster model of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Card, Jeffrey W; Racz, William J; Brien, James F; Margolin, Solomon B; Massey, Thomas E

    2003-09-01

    Pulmonary toxicity, including fibrosis, is a serious adverse effect associated with the antidysrhythmic drug amiodarone (AM). We tested the potential usefulness of pirfenidone against AM-induced pulmonary toxicity in the hamster model. Intratracheal AM administration resulted in pulmonary fibrosis 21 days posttreatment, as evidenced by an increased hydroxyproline content and histological damage. Dietary pirfenidone administration (0.5% w/w in chow), for 3 days prior to and continuously after AM, prevented fibrosis and suppressed elevation of pulmonary transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 mRNA content at 7 and 21 days post-AM. Protection against AM-induced lung damage was not observed when supplementation with pirfenidone was delayed until 7 days following AM administration, suggesting that alteration of early events in AM lung toxicity is necessary for the protective effect of pirfenidone. Both AM and bleomycin, another pulmonary fibrogen, caused inflammation 24 h after intratracheal dosing, measured as increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, protein content, and cellular alterations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, with the response to AM markedly greater than that to bleomycin. Administration of AM, but not bleomycin, also caused whole lung mitochondrial dysfunction, alveolar macrophage death, and an influx of eosinophils into the lung, of which pirfenidone was able to decrease only the latter. We conclude that: (1) AM induces alveolar macrophage death and severe, acute pulmonary inflammation with associated eosinophilia following intratracheal administration; (2) mitochondrial dysfunction may play an early role in AM pulmonary injury; and (3) pirfenidone decreases AM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in the hamster, probably through suppression of TGF-beta1 gene expression.

  14. Variability in Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation in Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure depe...

  15. METAL-INDUCED LATE PULMONARY INJURY IS REDUCED BY OZONE (O3) COEXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    METAL-INDUCED LATE PULMONARY INJURY IS REDUCED BY OZONE (O3) COEXPOSURE. UP Kodavanti, MCJ Schladweiler, WP Watkinson, JP Nolan, PA Evansky, ER Lappi, G Ross, JH Richards, and DL Costa. NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.
    Ambient ...

  16. URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRUCTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRICTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION.Jacqueline D. Carter, Zhuowei Li, Lisa A. Dailey, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina, and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

    Exposure to particulate matter...

  17. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Induce Pulmonary and Vascular Response Following Intratracheal Instillation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon-based nanotubes have been shown to induce varying degrees of pulmonary response in rodents influenced by the dose, the extent of agglomeration, the chemistry of the suspension solution, and the functional properties. We hypothesized that low concentrations of non-modified ...

  18. DIESEL AND CARBON PARTICLES ENHANCE HOUSE DUST MITE-INDUCED PULMONARY HYPERSENSITIVITY IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel and Carbon Particles Enhance House Dust Mite-Induced Pulmonary Hypersensitivity in Brown Norway Rats. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels2, D. Winsett2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, M. Madden2 and M.I. Gilmour2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC and 2 USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Ep...

  19. ARE MACROPHAGES ACTIVATED AND INDUCE PULMONARY INJURY BY INTRACELLULARLY BIOAVAILABLE IRON?

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARE MACROPHAGES ACTIVATED AND INDUCE PULMONARY INJURY BY INTRACELLULARLY BIOAVAILABLE IRON? UP Kodavanti1, MCJ Schladweiler1, S Becker2, DL Costa1, P Mayer3, A Ziesenis3, WG Kreyling3, 1ETD, 2HSDivision, NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, and 3GSF, Inhalation Biology...

  20. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates endothelin-1-induced proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells by upregulating TRPC channels.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong-Ni; Zeng, Bo; Chen, Gui-Lan; Lai, Bin; Lu, Shao-Hua; Qu, Jie-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) are critical pathogenic factors in sepsis-induced pulmonary hypertension; however it is unknown whether they have a coordinated action in the pathogenesis of this disease. Here we found that although LPS did not change the contractility of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in response to ET-1, it significantly promoted ET-1-induced PASMC proliferation. Measurement of ET-1-evoked Ca(2+) transients in PASMCs showed that LPS dramatically enhanced Ca(2+) influx mediated by transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. LPS did not directly activate TRPC channels, instead it selectively upregulated the expression of TRPC3 and TRPC4 in pulmonary arteries. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) and chemical blockers against TRPC channels abolished LPS-induced PASMC proliferation. LPS-induced cell proliferation and TRPC expression was mediated by the Ca(2+)-dependent calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway. We suggest that blocking TRPC channels could be an effective strategy in controlling pulmonary arterial remodeling after endotoxin exposure. PMID:27470334

  1. Modulation of Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Leakage in Rats by Seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.)

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Jayamurthy; Suryakumar, Geetha; Shukla, Dhananjay; Jayamurthy, Himani; Kasiganesan, Harinath; Kumar, Rajesh; Sawhney, Ramesh Chand

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral and pulmonary syndromes may develop in unacclimatized individuals shortly after ascent to high altitude resulting in high altitude illness, which may occur due to extravasation of fluid from intra to extravascular space in the brain, lungs and peripheral tissues. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential of seabuckthorn (SBT) (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) leaf extract (LE) in curtailing hypoxia-induced transvascular permeability in the lungs by measuring lung water content, leakage of fluorescein dye into the lungs and further confirmation by quantitation of albumin and protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Exposure of rats to hypoxia caused a significant increase in the transvascular leakage in the lungs. The SBT LE treated animals showed a significant decrease in hypoxia-induced vascular permeability evidenced by decreased water content and fluorescein leakage in the lungs and decreased albumin and protein content in the BALF. The SBT extract was also able to significantly attenuate hypoxia-induced increase in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and decrease hypoxia-induced oxidative stress by stabilizing the levels of reduced glutathione and antioxidant enzymes. Pretreatment of the extract also resulted in a significant decrease in the circulatory catecholamines and significant increase in the vasorelaxation of the pulmonary arterial rings as compared with the controls. Further, the extract significantly attenuated hypoxia-induced increase in the VEGF levels in the plasma, BALF (ELISA) and lungs (immunohistochemistry). These observations suggest that SBT LE is able to provide significant protection against hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular leakage. PMID:19996155

  2. Loss of Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Attenuates Murine Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Flechsig, Paul; Hartenstein, Bettina; Teurich, Sybille; Dadrich, Monika; Hauser, Kai; Abdollahi, Amir; Groene, Hermann-Josef; Angel, Peter; Huber, Peter E.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary fibrosis is a disorder of the lungs with limited treatment options. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a family of proteases that degrade extracellular matrix with roles in fibrosis. Here we studied the role of MMP13 in a radiation-induced lung fibrosis model using a MMP13 knockout mouse. Methods and Materials: We investigated the role of MMP13 in lung fibrosis by investigating the effects of MMP13 deficiency in C57Bl/6 mice after 20-Gy thoracic irradiation (6-MV Linac). The morphologic results in histology were correlated with qualitative and quantitative results of volume computed tomography (VCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical outcome. Results: We found that MMP13 deficient mice developed less pulmonary fibrosis than their wildtype counterparts, showed attenuated acute pulmonary inflammation (days after irradiation), and a reduction of inflammation during the later fibrogenic phase (5-6 months after irradiation). The reduced fibrosis in MMP13 deficient mice was evident in histology with reduced thickening of alveolar septi and reduced remodeling of the lung architecture in good correlation with reduced features of lung fibrosis in qualitative and quantitative VCT and MRI studies. The partial resistance of MMP13-deficient mice to fibrosis was associated with a tendency towards a prolonged mouse survival. Conclusions: Our data indicate that MMP13 has a role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Further, our findings suggest that MMP13 constitutes a potential drug target to attenuate radiation-induced lung fibrosis.

  3. Tetomilast attenuates elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema through inhibition of oxidative stress in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Baila, Bulin; Ohno, Yasushi; Nagamoto, Hisashi; Kotosai, Kounori; Yabuuchi, Youichi; Funaguchi, Norihiko; Ito, Fumitaka; Endo, Junki; Mori, Hidenori; Takemura, Genzou; Fujiwara, Takako; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2012-01-01

    Tetomilast was originally identified as a potent inhibitor of superoxide production in human neutrophils, and is of interest because it may relieve oxidative stress related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our objective was to determine whether tetomilast effectively protects against the development of porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE)-induced emphysema in rabbits. Rabbits were divided into three groups (sham n=19, PPE n=19, PPE/Tetomilast n=18). The rabbits were once daily orally administered vehicle solution or tetomilast 5 d/week for 4 weeks before the PPE instillation. We compared pulmonary function, inflammatory cell infiltration, oxidative stress, and the incidences of apoptosis among the three groups. Tetomilast suppressed PPE-induced increases in the incidence of apoptosis and the production of 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in lung tissues. PPE-instilled rabbits treated with tetomilast showed significantly less mean linear intercept and significantly better pulmonary function than rabbits administered PPE alone. Tetomilast may inhibit the development of emphysema by attenuating pulmonary inflammation and apoptosis caused by PPE-induced oxidative stress.

  4. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F; Hoyle, Gary W

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury.

  5. Early Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Uzung; Marinelli, Laura; Ali, Sayed; Huberfeld, Seymour; Barrera, Rafael; Chang, John B

    2016-09-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug that has been commonly used to treat supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. This drug is an iodine-containing compound that tends to accumulate in several organs, including the lungs. Especially, its main metabolically active metabolite desethylamiodarone can adversely affect many organs. A very well-known severe complication of amiodarone therapy is the amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. This article presents the case study of an 82-year-old male patient with acute amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. The patient underwent endovascular aneurysm repair for rapidly increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm. During the postoperative period the patient developed rapid atrial fibrillation and amiodarone therapy was initiated. Subsequently, the patient went into acute respiratory failure and was requiring high supplemental oxygen support and a chest X-ray revealed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. During the hospital course the patient required mechanical ventilator support. With discontinuation of amiodarone, supportive therapy and steroid treatment patient symptoms significantly improved. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity must be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients on the medication with progressive or acute respiratory symptoms. Early discontinuation of amiodarone and aggressive corticosteroid therapy should be considered as a viable treatment strategy. PMID:27574388

  6. Association analysis reveals genetic variation altering bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Paun, Alexandra; Lemay, Anne-Marie; Tomko, Tomasz G; Haston, Christina K

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a disease of significant morbidity, with an incompletely defined genetic basis. Here, we combine linkage and association studies to identify genetic variations associated with pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Mice were treated with bleomycin by osmotic minipump, and pulmonary fibrosis was histologically assessed 6 weeks later. Fibrosis was mapped in C57BL6/J (fibrosis-susceptible) × A/J (fibrosis-resistant) F2 mice, and the major identified linkage intervals were evaluated in consomic mice. Genome-wide and linkage-interval genes were assessed for their association with fibrosis, using phenotypic data from 23 inbred strains and the murine single-nucleotide polymorphism map. Susceptibility to pulmonary fibrosis mapped to a locus on chromosome 17, which was verified with consomic mice, and to three additional suggestive loci that may interact with alleles on chromosome 17 to affect the trait in F2 mice. Two of the loci, including the region on chromosome 17, are homologous to previously mapped loci of human idiopathic fibrosis. Of the 23 phenotyped murine strains, four developed significant fibrosis, and the majority presented minimal disease. Genome-wide and linkage region-specific association studies revealed 11 pulmonary expressed genes (including the autophagy gene Cep55, and Masp2, which is a complement component) to contain polymorphisms significantly associated with bleomycin-induced fibrotic lung disease. In conclusion, genomic approaches were used to identify linkage intervals and specific genetic variations associated with pulmonary fibrosis in mice. The common loci and similarities in phenotype suggest these findings to be of relevance to clinical pulmonary fibrosis.

  7. Acetaminophen Use: An Unusual Cause of Drug-Induced Pulmonary Eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Saint-Pierre, Mathieu D; Moran-Mendoza, Onofre

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary eosinophilia (PE) can be found in very diverse pathological processes. Several medications have also been associated with this entity. Acetaminophen is a medication commonly used in multiple different drug formulations, many of which are available without a prescription. It has however been associated with pulmonary eosinophilia (eosinophilic pneumonia) in a few cases in Japan. We describe the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian female who presented with new persistent dry cough and dyspnea on exertion after she started using up to 4 grams of acetaminophen on a daily basis. Chest imaging revealed peripheral lower lung zone ground glass and reticular opacities, and increased eosinophils were present on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). The patient's symptoms markedly improved upon acetaminophen cessation, and significantly decreased eosinophils were seen on repeat BAL. To our knowledge, this is the first case of likely acetaminophen-induced pulmonary eosinophilia reported outside Japan. PMID:27445539

  8. Elevated Transglutaminase 2 Activity is Associated with Hypoxia-Induced Experimental Pulmonary Hypertension in Mice

    PubMed Central

    DiRaimondo, Thomas R.; Klock, Cornelius; Warburton, Rod; Herrera, Zachary; Penumatsa, Krishna; Toksoz, Deniz; Hill, Nicholas; Khosla, Chaitan; Fanburg, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in human patients and animal models have suggested that transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is upregulated in pulmonary hypertension (PH), a phenomenon that appears to be associated with the effects of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) in this disease. Using chemical tools to interrogate and inhibit TG2 activity in vivo, we have shown that pulmonary TG2 undergoes marked post-translational activation in a mouse model of hypoxia-induced PH. We have also identified irreversible fluorinated TG2 inhibitors that may find use as non-invasive positron emission tomography probes for diagnosis and management of this debilitating, lifelong disorder. Pharmacological inhibition of TG2 attenuated the elevated right ventricular pressure but had no effect on hypertrophy of the right ventricle of the heart. A longitudinal study of pulmonary TG2 activity in PH patients is warranted. PMID:24152195

  9. Acetaminophen Use: An Unusual Cause of Drug-Induced Pulmonary Eosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Pierre, Mathieu D.; Moran-Mendoza, Onofre

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary eosinophilia (PE) can be found in very diverse pathological processes. Several medications have also been associated with this entity. Acetaminophen is a medication commonly used in multiple different drug formulations, many of which are available without a prescription. It has however been associated with pulmonary eosinophilia (eosinophilic pneumonia) in a few cases in Japan. We describe the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian female who presented with new persistent dry cough and dyspnea on exertion after she started using up to 4 grams of acetaminophen on a daily basis. Chest imaging revealed peripheral lower lung zone ground glass and reticular opacities, and increased eosinophils were present on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). The patient's symptoms markedly improved upon acetaminophen cessation, and significantly decreased eosinophils were seen on repeat BAL. To our knowledge, this is the first case of likely acetaminophen-induced pulmonary eosinophilia reported outside Japan. PMID:27445539

  10. Attenuation of the extract from Moringa oleifera on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang-Hu; Chen, Yi-Jui; Yang, Chao-Hsun; Liu, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Junn-Liang; Pan, Shwu-Fen; Lin, Tzer-Bin; Chen, Mei-Jung

    2012-02-29

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an extract from Moringa oleifera (MO) on the development of monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) in Wistar rats. An ethanol extraction was performed on dried MO leaves, and HPLC analysis identified niaziridin and niazirin in the extract. PH was induced with a single subcutaneous injection of MCT (60 mg/kg) which resulted in increases in pulmonary arterial blood pressure (Ppa) and in thickening of the pulmonary arterial medial layer in the rats. Three weeks after induction, acute administration of the MO extract to the rats decreased Ppa in a dose-dependent manner that reached statistical significance at a dose of 4.5 mg of freeze-dried extract per kg body weight. The reduction in Ppa suggested that the extract directly relaxed the pulmonary arteries. To assay the effects of chronic administration of the MO extract on PH, control, MCT and MCT+MO groups were designated. Rats in the control group received a saline injection; the MCT and MCT+MO groups received MCT to induce PH. During the third week after MCT treatment, the MCT+MO group received daily i.p. injections of the MO extract (4.5 mg of freeze-dried extract/kg of body weight). Compared to the control group, the MCT group had higher Ppa and thicker medial layers in the pulmonary arteries. Chronic treatments with the MO extract reversed the MCT-induced changes. Additionally, the MCT group had a significant elevation in superoxide dismutase activity when normalized by the MO extract treatments. In conclusion, the MO extract successfully attenuated the development of PH via direct vasodilatation and a potential increase in antioxidant activity. PMID:22242951

  11. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F.; Hoyle, Gary W.

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1 h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6 h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury. - Highlights: • Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. • Corticosteroids may inhibit lung injury through their anti-inflammatory actions. • Corticosteroids inhibited chlorine-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary edema. • Mometasone and budesonide are potential rescue treatments for chlorine lung injury.

  12. Biomarker expression in lung of rabbit with pulmonary fibrosis induced by ammonium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng-hong; Guo, Hui-xia; Lin, Ming-fang; Chen, Zhi-ze; Zhou, Xuan; Peng, Kai-liang

    2011-04-01

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP), an oxidizer, has been used in solid propellants. Although AP exposure has been suspected as a risk factor for the development of pulmonary fibrosis, data are still inconclusive. To evaluate the pulmonary toxicity and the potential pulmonary fibrosis caused by occupational exposure to this compound, 25 male rabbits were randomly allocated into five groups to receive AP or bleomycin or saline by intratracheal injection. All rabbits were sacrificed and total RNA from the lungs was extracted. Expressions of types I and III collagens, transforming growth factor-β(1) (TGF-β(1)) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) messenger RNA (mRNA) were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expressions of type I and III collagen mRNA in low, moderate and high dose AP groups were significantly higher (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05) than that in the saline group. There was also a significant increased level of TGF-β(1) and TNF-α mRNA in the three AP groups compared with saline control group (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05). These results reveal that AP can increase gene expressions of types I, III collagens, TGF-β(1) and TNF-α in lung of rabbits exposed to AP. The overexpression of these biomarkers were considered as effective indicator linking to the development of pulmonary fibrosis and finally demonstrated that AP has potential to induce pulmonary fibrosis.

  13. Role of the TGF-β/Alk5 Signaling Pathway in Monocrotaline-induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zaiman, Ari L.; Podowski, Megan; Medicherla, Satya; Gordy, Kimberley; Xu, Fang; Zhen, Lijie; Shimoda, Larissa A.; Neptune, Enid; Higgins, Linda; Murphy, Alison; Chakravarty, Sarvajit; Protter, Andrew; Sehgal, Pravin B.; Champion, Hunter C.; Tuder, Rubin M.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disease characterized by an elevation in the mean pulmonary artery pressure leading to right heart failure and a significant risk of death. Alterations in two transforming growth factor (TGF) signaling pathways, bone morphogenetic protein receptor II and the TGF-β receptor I, Alk1, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, the role of TGF-β family signaling in PH and pulmonary vascular remodeling remains unclear. Objectives: To determine whether inhibition of TGF-β signaling will attenuate and reverse monocrotaline-induced PH (MCT-PH). Methods: We have used an orally active small-molecule TGF-β receptor I inhibitor, SD-208, to determine the functional role of this pathway in MCT-PH. Measurements and Main Results: The development of MCT-PH was associated with increased vascular cell apoptosis, which paralleled TGF-β signaling as documented by psmad2 expression. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling with SD-208 significantly attenuated the development of the PH and reduced pulmonary vascular remodeling. These effects were associated with decreased early vascular cell apoptosis, adventitial cell proliferation, and matrix metalloproteinase expression. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling with SD-208 in established MCT-PH resulted in a small but significant improvement in hemodynamic parameters and medial remodeling. Conclusions: These findings provide evidence that increased TGF-β signaling participates in the pathogenesis of experimental severe PH. PMID:18202349

  14. Wnt5a attenuates hypoxia-induced pulmonary arteriolar remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yuling; Wang, Wang; Chai, Sanbao; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH), which is characterized by pulmonary arteriolar remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy, is still a life-threatening disease with the current treatment strategies. The underlying molecular mechanisms of HPH remain unclear. Our previously published study showed that Wnt5a, one of the ligands in the Wnt family, was critically involved in the inhibition of hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation by downregulation of β-catenin/cyclin D1 in vitro. In this study, we investigated the possible functions and mechanisms of Wnt5a in HPH in vivo. Recombinant mouse Wnt5a (rmWnt5a) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was administered to male C57/BL6 mice weekly from the first day to the end of the two or four weeks after exposed to hypoxia (10% O2). Hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension was associated with a marked increase in β-catenin/cyclin D1 expression in lungs. Right ventricular systolic pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy index were reduced in animals treated with rmWnt5a compared with PBS. Histology showed less pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in the group treated with rmWnt5a than with PBS. Treatment with rmWnt5a resulted in a concomitant reduction in β-catenin/cyclin D1 levels in lungs. These data demonstrate that Wnt5a exerts its beneficial effects on HPH by regulating pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in a manner that is associated with reduction in β-catenin/cyclin D1 signaling. A therapy targeting the β-catenin/cyclin D1 signaling pathway might be a potential strategy for HPH treatment. PMID:25956683

  15. 17(R)-resolvin D1 ameliorates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yatomi, Masakiyo; Hisada, Takeshi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Koga, Yasuhiko; Ono, Akihiro; Kamide, Yosuke; Seki, Kaori; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Sunaga, Noriaki; Kaira, Kyoichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a destructive inflammatory disease with limited therapeutic options. Inflammation plays an integral role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Unresolved inflammatory responses can lead to substantial tissue injury, chronic inflammation, and fibrosis. The resolvins are a family of endogenous ω-3 fatty acid derived-lipid mediators of inflammation resolution. Resolvin D1 (RvD1) displays potent anti-inflammatory, pro-resolving activity, without causing immunosuppression. Its epimer, 17(R)-resolvin D1 (17(R)-RvD1), exhibits equivalent functionality to RvD1. In addition, 17(R)-RvD1 is resistant to rapid inactivation by eicosanoid oxidoreductases. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that 17(R)-RvD1 can provide a therapeutic benefit in IPF by reducing inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis, while leaving the normal immune response intact. Mice were exposed to bleomycin (BLM) via micro-osmotic pump to induce pulmonary fibrosis, and were then treated with 17(R)-RvD1 or vehicle by intraperitoneal injection. Administration of 17(R)-RvD1 from the start of BLM treatment attenuated neutrophil alveolar infiltration, lung collagen content, and Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and type I collagen mRNA expression, along with subsequent reduction in histologically detectable fibrosis. The 17(R)-RvD1-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells was inhibited by an antagonist of lipoxin A4 receptor/formyl peptide receptor 2 (ALX/FPR2). The administration of 17(R)-RvD1 at the later fibrotic stage also improved the lung failure. These results suggest that 17(R)-RvD1 attenuates pulmonary fibrosis by promoting the resolution of neutrophilic inflammation and also provides pulmonary restoration. These data highlight the therapeutic potential of 17(R)-RvD1 in the management of this intractable disease. PMID:26660549

  16. Wnt5a attenuates hypoxia-induced pulmonary arteriolar remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuling; Wang, Wang; Chai, Sanbao; Liu, Jie; Yang, Ting; Wang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH), which is characterized by pulmonary arteriolar remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy, is still a life-threatening disease with the current treatment strategies. The underlying molecular mechanisms of HPH remain unclear. Our previously published study showed that Wnt5a, one of the ligands in the Wnt family, was critically involved in the inhibition of hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation by downregulation of β-catenin/cyclin D1 in vitro. In this study, we investigated the possible functions and mechanisms of Wnt5a in HPH in vivo. Recombinant mouse Wnt5a (rmWnt5a) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was administered to male C57/BL6 mice weekly from the first day to the end of the two or four weeks after exposed to hypoxia (10% O2). Hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension was associated with a marked increase in β-catenin/cyclin D1 expression in lungs. Right ventricular systolic pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy index were reduced in animals treated with rmWnt5a compared with PBS. Histology showed less pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in the group treated with rmWnt5a than with PBS. Treatment with rmWnt5a resulted in a concomitant reduction in β-catenin/cyclin D1 levels in lungs. These data demonstrate that Wnt5a exerts its beneficial effects on HPH by regulating pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in a manner that is associated with reduction in β-catenin/cyclin D1 signaling. A therapy targeting the β-catenin/cyclin D1 signaling pathway might be a potential strategy for HPH treatment.

  17. Curcumin attenuates elastase- and cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaru; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Ito, Yoko; Nagai, Katsura; Odajima, Nao; Moriyama, Chinatsu; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2009-04-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment obtained from turmeric (Curcumina longa), is a dietary polyphenol that has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The effect of curcumin against the development of pulmonary emphysema in animal models is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether curcumin is able to attenuate the development of pulmonary emphysema in mice. Nine-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were treated with intratracheal porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) or exposed to mainstream cigarette smoke (CS) (60 min/day for 10 consecutive days or 5 days/wk for 12 wk) to induce pulmonary inflammation and emphysema. Curcumin (100 mg/kg) or vehicle was administrated daily by oral gavage 1 h and 24 h before intratracheal PPE treatment and daily thereafter throughout a 21-day period in PPE-exposed mice and 1 h before each CS exposure in CS-exposed mice. As a result, curcumin treatment significantly inhibited PPE-induced increase of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at 6 h and on day 1 after PPE administration, with an increase in antioxidant gene expression at 6 h and significantly attenuated PPE-induced air space enlargement on day 21. It was also found that curcumin treatment significantly inhibited CS-induced increase of neutrophils and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after 10 consecutive days of CS exposure and significantly attenuated CS-induced air space enlargement after 12 wk of CS exposure. In conclusion, oral curcumin administration attenuated PPE- and CS-induced pulmonary inflammation and emphysema in mice.

  18. Curcumin attenuates elastase- and cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaru; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Ito, Yoko; Nagai, Katsura; Odajima, Nao; Moriyama, Chinatsu; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2009-04-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment obtained from turmeric (Curcumina longa), is a dietary polyphenol that has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The effect of curcumin against the development of pulmonary emphysema in animal models is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether curcumin is able to attenuate the development of pulmonary emphysema in mice. Nine-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were treated with intratracheal porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) or exposed to mainstream cigarette smoke (CS) (60 min/day for 10 consecutive days or 5 days/wk for 12 wk) to induce pulmonary inflammation and emphysema. Curcumin (100 mg/kg) or vehicle was administrated daily by oral gavage 1 h and 24 h before intratracheal PPE treatment and daily thereafter throughout a 21-day period in PPE-exposed mice and 1 h before each CS exposure in CS-exposed mice. As a result, curcumin treatment significantly inhibited PPE-induced increase of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at 6 h and on day 1 after PPE administration, with an increase in antioxidant gene expression at 6 h and significantly attenuated PPE-induced air space enlargement on day 21. It was also found that curcumin treatment significantly inhibited CS-induced increase of neutrophils and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after 10 consecutive days of CS exposure and significantly attenuated CS-induced air space enlargement after 12 wk of CS exposure. In conclusion, oral curcumin administration attenuated PPE- and CS-induced pulmonary inflammation and emphysema in mice. PMID:19168576

  19. [Progress on pathogenesis and treatment of paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Shao, Xue; Chen, Jiang-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is a highly effective herbicide with contact toxicity. PQ mainly accumulates in the lungs after absorption into the blood circulation. The respiratory function failure caused by PQ-induced lung injury, especially the irreversible pulmonary fibrosis in late phase, is the leading cause of death in patients with PQ poisoning. The mechanism of PQ poisoning is still unclear. Now it is speculated that oxidative stress and inflammation injury are the main pathogenic mechanisms, and abnormal gene expression, mitochondrial damage, loss of pulmonary surfactant, cytokine network and unbalanced matrix metalloproteinases/tissue inhibitors may be also involved in the pathogenesis. In addition to reducing poison absorption and increasing its removal, the current clinical treatment is mainly composed of antioxidant and anti-immune response, but has poor therapeutic effects. Although many novel methods of treatment have been proposed, most of them are still in the experimental stage. It is a hot spot to clarify the mechanism of PQ poisoning and to seek safe and effective treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. This article reviews the research progress on pathogenesis and treatment of PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25644573

  20. Activation of AMPK Prevents Monocrotaline-Induced Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaojun; Han, Dong; Zhang, Yonghong; Xie, Xinming; Ke, Rui; Zhu, Yanting; Liu, Lu; Song, Yang; Yang, Lan; Li, Manxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background The current study was performed to investigate the effect of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) – activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation on the extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling of pulmonary arteries in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and to address its potential mechanisms. Material/Methods PAH was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline (MCT) into Sprague-Dawley rats. Metformin (MET) was administered to activate AMPK. Immunoblotting was used to determine the phosphorylation and expression of AMPK and expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). Gelatin zymography was performed to determine the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. Results Activation of AMPK by MET significantly reduced the right ventricle systolic pressure and the right ventricular hypertrophy in MCT-induced rat PAH model, and partially inhibited the ECM remodeling of pulmonary arteries. These effects were coupled with the decrease of MMP-2/9 activity and TIMP-1 expression. Conclusions This study suggests that activation of AMPK benefits PAH by inhibiting ECM remodeling of pulmonary arteries. Enhancing AMPK activity might have potential value in clinical treatment of PAH. PMID:26978596

  1. “A small leak will sink a great ship”: hypoxia-inducible factor and group III pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Andrew J.; Scott, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension complicating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, also known as secondary pulmonary hypertension, represents a major source of morbidity and mortality in affected patients. While the study of primary pulmonary arterial hypertension has yielded several therapies, the same is not true for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. Recent studies have indicated an important role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) – a regulatory protein that is vital in adaptation to hypoxic conditions – in the development of secondary pulmonary hypertension. HIF influences development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension through alteration in voltage-gated potassium channels and homeostatic calcium regulation, resulting in disruption of endothelial cell-cell communication, and eventual vascular remodeling. This article summarizes salient literature related to HIF and secondary pulmonary hypertension, in addition to proposing a final common pathway in known mechanistic pathways that result in endothelial barrier integrity loss – vascular “leak” – primarily through a shared endothelial-epithelial signaling protein family, CCN. PMID:27446973

  2. Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations of porous tantalum pentoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, K. R.; Vogler, T. J.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2014-05-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) based molecular dynamics has been established as a method capable of yielding high fidelity results for many materials at a wide range of pressures and temperatures and has recently been applied to complex polymers such as polyethylene, compounds such as ethane or CO2, and oxides such as MgO. We use this method to obtain a Grïneisen Γ and thereby build a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state (EOS) and a Rice-Walsh EOS for tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5 or tantala) and compare to experimental data. The experimental data have initial densities (ρ00) of approximately 1.13, 3, and 7.4 g/cm3 reduced from a crystalline of 8.36 g/cm3. We found that r becomes constant at higher temperatures and pressure, but is a function of both density and temperature at lower densities and temperatures. Finally, the Mie-Gruneisen EOS is adequate for modeling the slightly distended Hugoniot with an initial density of 7.4 g/cm3 however it is inadequate for the more porous Hugoniot, while the Rice-Walsh EOS combined with a P - λ crush model approximates the experimental data quite well.

  3. Effects of NOX1 on fibroblastic changes of endothelial cells in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, SEO-HYUN; KIM, MISEON; LEE, HAE-JUNE; KIM, EUN-HO; KIM, CHUN-HO; LEE, YOON-JIN

    2016-01-01

    Lung fibrosis is a major complication in radiation-induced lung damage following thoracic radiotherapy, while the underlying mechanism has remained to be elucidated. The present study performed immunofluorescence and immunoblot assays on irradiated human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) with or without pre-treatment with VAS2870, a novel NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, or small hairpin (sh)RNA against NOX1, -2 or -4. VAS2870 reduced the cellular reactive oxygen species content induced by 5 Gy radiation in HPAECs and inhibited phenotypic changes in fibrotic cells, including increased alpha smooth muscle actin and vimentin, and decreased CD31 and vascular endothelial cadherin expression. These fibrotic changes were significantly inhibited by treatment with NOX1 shRNA, but not by NOX2 or NOX4 shRNA. Next, the role of NOX1 in pulmonary fibrosis development was assessed in the lung tissues of C57BL/6J mice following thoracic irradiation using trichrome staining. Administration of an NOX1-specific inhibitor suppressed radiation-induced collagen deposition and fibroblastic changes in the endothelial cells (ECs) of these mice. The results suggested that radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis may be efficiently reduced by specific inhibition of NOX1, an effect mediated by reduction of fibrotic changes of ECs. PMID:27053172

  4. Hydralazine-induced ANCA vasculitis with pulmonary renal syndrome: a rare clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Marina, Vamsee Priya; Malhotra, Deepak; Kaw, Dinkar

    2012-12-01

    Hydralazine is a commonly used drug for treatment of hypertension and is known to cause drug-induced lupus erythematosus. It has rarely been reported to cause anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positive vasculitis, a life-threatening complication. Presentation could be extremely variable delaying diagnosis. Although drug-induced vasculitis has been infrequently associated with rapidly progressing glomerulonephritis, pulmonary involvement presenting as pulmonary renal syndrome is extremely rare. We report a case of hydralazine-induced vasculitis presenting as pulmonary renal syndrome with fatal outcome even after aggressive treatment. Numerous antibodies are associated with hydralazine including anti myeloperoxidase antibody, anti-nuclear antibody, anti-histone antibody, and anti-elastase antibody. Additionally, we also report the presence of anti-phospholipid antibodies specific to anti-cardiolipin, anti-beta2 glycoprotein, and anti-phosphatid that have not been previously reported. We conclude that early diagnosis and prompt discontinuation of the drug is necessary for the treatment of hydralazine-induced anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody vasculitis.

  5. Antagonism of Stem Cell Factor/c-kit Signaling Attenuates Neonatal Chronic Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Young, Karen C; Torres, Eneida; Hehre, Dorothy; Wu, Shu; Suguihara, Cleide; Hare, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that c-kit positive cells are present in the remodeled pulmonary vasculature bed of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Whether stem cell factor (SCF)/ c-kit regulated pathways potentiate pulmonary vascular remodeling is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that attenuated c-kit signaling would decrease chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling by decreasing pulmonary vascular cell mitogenesis. Methods Neonatal FVB/NJ mice treated with non-immune IgG (PL), or c-kit neutralizing antibody (ACK2) as well as c-kit mutant mice (WBB6F1- Kit W− v/ +) and their congenic controls, were exposed to normoxia (FiO2=0.21) or hypoxia (FiO2=0.12) for two weeks. Following this exposure, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling were evaluated. Results As compared to chronically hypoxic controls, c-kit mutant mice had decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular remodeling and proliferation. Consistent with these findings, administration of ACK2 to neonatal mice with chronic hypoxia-induced PH decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling. This attenuation in PH was accompanied by decreased extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Conclusion SCF/c-kit signaling may potentiate chronic hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling by modulating ERK activation. Inhibition of c-kit activity may be a potential strategy to alleviate PH. PMID:26705118

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 and inflammation in experimental right ventricular failure on prolonged overcirculation-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, Asmae; Dewachter, Laurence; Kerbaul, François; Brimioulle, Serge; Dewachter, Céline; Naeije, Robert; Rondelet, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is a stress response enzyme which presents with cardiovascular protective and anti-inflammatory properties. Six-month chronic overcirculation-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in piglets has been previously reported as a model of right ventricular (RV) failure related to the RV activation of apoptotic and inflammatory processes. We hypothesized that altered HO-1 signalling could be involved in both pulmonary vascular and RV changes. Fifteen growing piglets were assigned to a sham operation (n = 8) or to an anastomosis of the left innominate artery to the pulmonary arterial trunk (n = 7). Six months later, hemodynamics was evaluated after closure of the shunt. After euthanasia of the animals, pulmonary and myocardial tissue was sampled for pathobiological evaluation. Prolonged shunting was associated with a tendency to decreased pulmonary gene and protein expressions of HO-1, while pulmonary gene expressions of interleukin (IL)-33, IL-19, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and -2 were increased. Pulmonary expressions of constitutive HO-2 and pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α remained unchanged. Pulmonary vascular resistance (evaluated by pressure/flow plots) was inversely correlated to pulmonary HO-1 protein and IL-19 gene expressions, and correlated to pulmonary ICAM-1 gene expression. Pulmonary arteriolar medial thickness and PVR were inversely correlated to pulmonary IL-19 expression. RV expression of HO-1 was decreased, while RV gene expressions TNF-α and ICAM-2 were increased. There was a correlation between RV ratio of end-systolic to pulmonary arterial elastances and RV HO-1 expression. These results suggest that downregulation of HO-1 is associated to PAH and RV failure.

  7. Hydralazine-induced pulmonary-renal syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Ankur; Yokogawa, Naoto; Raja, Haroon; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Desai, Priyank; Zanotti-Cavazzoni, Sergio L; Rajaram, Sri-Sujanthy

    2012-07-01

    Drug-induced lupus erythematosus differs in its manifestation from drug-induced vasculitis. The former is associated with characteristic symptoms that improve following discontinuation, whereas the latter is predominantly an antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) positive small vessel vasculitis involving the kidneys, skin, and lungs. We present a case of advanced disease in an elderly Caucasian woman requiring corticosteroids, and immunosuppressive therapy, who was on hydralazine for >2 years.

  8. Enhanced Lithium-ion intercalation properties of coherent hydrous vanadium pentoxide-carbon cryogels nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Anqiang; Liu, Dawei; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Garcia, Betzaita Betalla; Liang, Shu-quan; Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong

    2010-06-01

    Coherent hydrous vanadium pentoxide (V2O5•nH2O) - carbon cryogels (CCs) nanocomposites were synthesized by electrodeposition of vanadium pentoxide onto the porous carbon scaffold which was derived from resorcinol (R) and formaldehyde (F) organic hydrogels. As-fabricated nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), along with EDAX and nitrogen sorption isotherms which suggested vanadium pentoxide incorporated in the pores of carbon cryogels. The nanocomposites showed much improved discharge capacity and better cyclic stability as compared to hydrous vanadium pentoxide films deposited on platinum foil. The discharge capacity of the nanocomposites reached 280 mAh/g based on the mass of the vandium pentoxide at a current density of 100mA/g and it possessed good cycle stability at different discharge rate. The results demonstrated that electrochemical performances, such as specific discharge capacitance and reversibility of the composite electrode, could be greatly enhanced by the introduction of carbon cryogels (CCs) scaffold with three-dimensionally interconnected porous structure in which V2O5•nH2O homogeneously dispersed.

  9. Lung transcriptional profiling: insights into the mechanisms of ozone-induced pulmonary injury in Wistar Kyoto rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized in rats; however, mechanistic understanding of the pathways involved is limited. We hypothesized that acute exposure of healthy rats to ozone will cause transcriptional alterations, and comprehensive ana...

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species-Reducing Strategies Improve Pulmonary Arterial Responses to Nitric Oxide in Piglets with Chronic Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dikalova, Anna; Slaughter, James C.; Kaplowitz, M.R.; Zhang, Y.; Aschner, Judy L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: There are no effective treatments for chronic pulmonary hypertension in infants with cardiopulmonary disorders associated with hypoxia, such as those with chronic lung disease. These patients often have poor or inconsistent pulmonary dilator responses to inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy for unknown reasons. One possible explanation for poor responsiveness to iNO is reduced NO bioavailability caused by interactions between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NO. Our major aim was to determine if strategies to reduce ROS improve dilator responses to the NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP), in resistance pulmonary arteries (PRAs) from a newborn piglet model of chronic pulmonary hypertension. Results: The dilation to SNAP was significantly impaired in PRAs from piglets with chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. ROS scavengers, including cell-permeable and impermeable agents to degrade hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), improved dilation to SNAP in PRAs from chronically hypoxic piglets. Treatment with agents to inhibit nitric oxide synthase and NADPH oxidase, potential enzymatic sources of ROS, also improved dilation to SNAP in PRAs from hypoxic piglets. Innovation: Our studies are the first to utilize a newborn model of chronic pulmonary hypertension to evaluate the impact of a number of potential therapeutic strategies for ROS removal on responses to exogenous NO in the vessels most relevant to the regulation of pulmonary vascular resistance (PRA). Conclusions: Strategies aimed at reducing ROS merit further evaluation and consideration as therapeutic approaches to improve responses to iNO in infants with chronic pulmonary hypertension. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1727–1738. PMID:23244497

  11. Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Fixed-Beam Pulsed Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-08-01

    The induction of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) by pulsed ultrasound was discovered 25 y ago, but early research used fixed-beam systems rather than actual diagnostic ultrasound machines. In this study, results of exposure of rats to fixed-beam focused ultrasound for 5 min at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz were compared with recent research on diagnostic ultrasound. One exposure condition at each frequency used 10-μs pulses delivered at 25-ms intervals. Three conditions involved Gaussian modulation of the pulse amplitudes at 25-ms intervals to simulate diagnostic scanning: 7.5 MHz with 0.3- and 1.5-μs pulses at 100- and 500-μs pulse repetition periods, respectively, and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses at 500-μs repetition periods. Four groups were tested for each condition to assess PCH areas at different exposure levels and to determine occurrence thresholds. The conditions with identical pulse timing resulted in smaller PCH areas for the smaller 7.5-MHz beam, but both had thresholds of 0.69-0.75 MPa in situ peak rarefactional pressure amplitude. The Gaussian modulation conditions for both 7.5 MHz with 0.3-μs pulses and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses had thresholds of 1.12-1.20 MPa peak rarefactional pressure amplitude, although the relatively long 1.5-μs pulses at 7.5 MHz yielded a threshold of 0.75 MPa. The fixed-beam pulsed ultrasound exposures produced lower thresholds than diagnostic ultrasound. There was no clear tendency for thresholds to increase with increasing ultrasonic frequency when pulse timing conditions were similar.

  12. Elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema: insights from experimental models.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Mariana A; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2011-12-01

    Several distinct stimuli can be used to reproduce histological and functional features of human emphysema, a leading cause of disability and death. Since cigarette smoke is the main cause of emphysema in humans, experimental researches have attempted to reproduce this situation. However, this is an expensive and cumbersome method of emphysema induction, and simpler, more efficacious alternatives have been sought. Among these approaches, elastolytic enzymes have been widely used to reproduce some characteristics of human cigarette smoke-induced disease, such as: augmentation of airspaces, inflammatory cell influx into the lungs, and systemic inflammation. Nevertheless, the use of elastase-induced emphysema models is still controversial, since the disease pathways involved in elastase induction may differ from those occurring in smoke-induced emphysema. This indicates that the choice of an emphysema model may impact the results of new therapies or drugs being tested. The aim of this review is to compare the mechanisms of disease induction in smoke and elastase emphysema models, to describe the differences among various elastase models, and to establish the advantages and disadvantages of elastase-induced emphysema models. More studies are required to shed light on the mechanisms of elastase-induced emphysema. PMID:22159348

  13. Elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema: insights from experimental models.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Mariana A; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2011-12-01

    Several distinct stimuli can be used to reproduce histological and functional features of human emphysema, a leading cause of disability and death. Since cigarette smoke is the main cause of emphysema in humans, experimental researches have attempted to reproduce this situation. However, this is an expensive and cumbersome method of emphysema induction, and simpler, more efficacious alternatives have been sought. Among these approaches, elastolytic enzymes have been widely used to reproduce some characteristics of human cigarette smoke-induced disease, such as: augmentation of airspaces, inflammatory cell influx into the lungs, and systemic inflammation. Nevertheless, the use of elastase-induced emphysema models is still controversial, since the disease pathways involved in elastase induction may differ from those occurring in smoke-induced emphysema. This indicates that the choice of an emphysema model may impact the results of new therapies or drugs being tested. The aim of this review is to compare the mechanisms of disease induction in smoke and elastase emphysema models, to describe the differences among various elastase models, and to establish the advantages and disadvantages of elastase-induced emphysema models. More studies are required to shed light on the mechanisms of elastase-induced emphysema.

  14. Targeted activation of endothelin-1 exacerbates hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Satwiko, Muhammad Gahan; Ikeda, Koji; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Yagi, Keiko; Hocher, Berthold; Hirata, Ken-ichi; Emoto, Noriaki

    2015-09-25

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal disease that eventually results in right heart failure and death. Current pharmacologic therapies for PAH are limited, and there are no drugs that could completely cure PAH. Enhanced activity of endothelin system has been implicated in PAH severity and endothelin receptor antagonists have been used clinically to treat PAH. However, there is limited experimental evidence on the direct role of enhanced endothelin system activity in PAH. Here, we investigated the correlation between endothelin-1 (ET-1) and PAH using ET-1 transgenic (ETTG) mice. Exposure to chronic hypoxia increased right ventricular pressure and pulmonary arterial wall thickness in ETTG mice compared to those in wild type mice. Of note, ETTG mice exhibited modest but significant increase in right ventricular pressure and vessel wall thickness relative to wild type mice even under normoxic conditions. To induce severe PAH, we administered SU5416, a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor, combined with exposure to chronic hypoxia. Treatment with SU5416 modestly aggravated hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and pulmonary arterial vessel wall thickening in ETTG mice in association with increased interleukin-6 expression in blood vessels. However, there was no sign of obliterative endothelial cell proliferation and plexiform lesion formation in the lungs. These results demonstrated that enhanced endothelin system activity could be a causative factor in the development of PAH and provided rationale for the inhibition of endothelin system to treat PAH. - Highlights: • Role of endothelin-1 in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was investigated. • The endothelin-1 transgenic (ETTG) and wild type (WT) mice were analyzed. • ETTG mice spontaneously developed PAH under normoxia conditions. • SU5416 further aggravated PAH in ETTG mice. • Enhanced endothelin system activity could be a causative factor in

  15. Gender differences in ozone-induced pulmonary and metabolic health effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    SOT 2015 abstractGender differences in ozone-induced pulmonary and metabolic health effectsU.P. Kodavanti1, V.L. Bass2, M.C. Schladweiler1, C.J. Gordon3, K.A. Jarema3, P. Phillips3, A.D. Ledbetter1, D.B. Miller4, S. Snow5, J.E. Richards1. 1 EPHD, NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triangle ...

  16. The ultrastructure of N-dibutylnitrosamine induced pulmonary tumours (adenocarcinomata) in European hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Reznik-Schüller, H.; Mohr, U.

    1975-01-01

    N-dibutyl-nitrosamine induced pulmonary adenocarcinoma in European hamsters were studied electron microscopically. The tumours were composed of light and dark cells, which, due to their lamellar bodies, resembled alveolar epithelial cells Type II. As cells containing lamellar bodies also occasionally occurred with the epithelial lining of tumour associated peripheral bronchi, a possible bronchiolar origin of the neoplasms is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:1212352

  17. Prostaglandins and estradiol-induced attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, J T; Gordon, J B; Malamet, R L; Wetzel, R C

    1985-10-01

    Pretreatment with estradiol (20 mg IM) attenuated vasoreactivity to decreases in inspired PIO2, lowered baseline resistance measured under conditions of maximal vasodilation (PIO2 = 0 mm Hg), and appeared to increase prostaglandin release in isolated, blood-perfused lungs of juvenile female sheep. Indomethacin (40 micrograms/ml) inhibited prostaglandin release and restored hypoxic vasoreactivity in estrogen-treated lungs, but did not alter the estrogen-induced decrease in baseline resistance. These results suggest that estradiol enhanced the production of prostaglandins which secondarily attenuated hypoxic vasoreactivity. The estradiol-induced decrease in baseline resistance, however, must have been mediated by some other mechanism.

  18. Comprehensive analysis of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice: effects of ambient existing particulate matters.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Koike, Eiko; Takano, Hirohisa

    2010-11-01

    Pulmonary exposure of rodents to porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) induces lesions that morphologically resemble human panacinar emphysema. However, there has been little work on the comprehensive analysis of this model. The present study was designed to extensively examine the biological effects of PPE on inflammation, cell damage, emphysematous change, and cholinergic reactivity in the lungs of mice. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the disease model. Intratracheal administration of PPE induced (1) proinflammatory response in the lungs that was characterized by significant infiltration of leukocytes such as macrophages, eosinophils, and lymphocytes and an increased level of interleukin-1β in lung homogenates, (2) lung cell damage, indicated by higher levels of total protein, lactate dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase in lung homogenates, (3) emphysema-related morphological changes including airspace enlargement and progressive destruction of alveolar wall structures, and (4) airway responsiveness to methacholine in the context of the compliance value of the respiratory system in a dose-dependent manner showing an overall trend. A single intratracheal administration of DEP did not significantly facilitate the hallmark of the disease. This is the first study to extensively analyze PPE-induced lung emphysema in mice with evaluation of the effects of DEP. Furthermore, this bioassay may be applied to future investigations that evaluate new therapeutic agents or risk factors for pulmonary emphysema.

  19. Increased hemoglobin-oxygen affinity ameliorates bleomycin-induced hypoxemia and pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xin; Dufu, Kobina; Hutchaleelaha, Athiwat; Xu, Qing; Li, Zhe; Li, Chien-Ming; Patel, Mira P; Vlahakis, Nicholas; Lehrer-Graiwer, Josh; Oksenberg, Donna

    2016-09-01

    Although exertional dyspnea and worsening hypoxia are hallmark clinical features of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), no drug currently available could treat them. GBT1118 is a novel orally bioavailable small molecule that binds to hemoglobin and produces a concentration-dependent left shift of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve with subsequent increase in hemoglobin-oxygen affinity and arterial oxygen loading. To assess whether pharmacological modification of hemoglobin-oxygen affinity could ameliorate hypoxemia associated with lung fibrosis, we evaluated GBT1118 in a bleomycin-induced mouse model of hypoxemia and fibrosis. After pulmonary fibrosis and hypoxemia were induced, GBT1118 was administered for eight consecutive days. Hypoxemia was determined by monitoring arterial oxygen saturation, while the severity of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed by histopathological evaluation and determination of collagen and leukocyte levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. We found that hemoglobin modification by GBT1118 had strong antihypoxemic therapeutic effects with improved arterial oxygen saturation to near normal level. Moreover, GBT1118 treatment significantly attenuated bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis, collagen accumulation, body weight loss, and leukocyte infiltration. This study is the first to suggest the beneficial effects of hemoglobin modification in fibrotic lungs and offers a promising and novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of hypoxemia associated with chronic fibrotic lung disorders in human, including IPF. PMID:27624688

  20. Adiponectin attenuates lung fibroblasts activation and pulmonary fibrosis induced by paraquat.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rong; Cao, Yu; He, Ya-rong; Lau, Wayne Bond; Zeng, Zhi; Liang, Zong-an

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is one of the most common complications of paraquat (PQ) poisoning, which demands for more effective therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests adiponectin (APN) may be a promising therapy against fibrotic diseases. In the current study, we determine whether the exogenous globular APN isoform protects against pulmonary fibrosis in PQ-treated mice and human lung fibroblasts, and dissect the responsible underlying mechanisms. BALB/C mice were divided into control group, PQ group, PQ + low-dose APN group, and PQ + high-dose APN group. Mice were sacrificed 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after PQ treatment. We compared pulmonary histopathological changes among different groups on the basis of fibrosis scores, TGF-β1, CTGF and α-SMA pulmonary content via Western blot and real-time quantitative fluorescence-PCR (RT-PCR). Blood levels of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 were determined by ELISA. Human lung fibroblasts WI-38 were divided into control group, PQ group, APN group, and APN receptor (AdipoR) 1 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) group. Fibroblasts were collected 24, 48, and 72 hours after PQ exposure for assay. Cell viability and apoptosis were determined via Kit-8 (CCK-8) and fluorescein Annexin V-FITC/PI double labeling. The protein and mRNA expression level of collagen type III, AdipoR1, and AdipoR2 were measured by Western blot and RT-PCR. APN treatment significantly decreased the lung fibrosis scores, protein and mRNA expression of pulmonary TGF-β1, CTGF and α-SMA content, and blood MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). Pretreatment with APN significantly attenuated the reduced cell viability and up-regulated collagen type III expression induced by PQ in lung fibroblasts, (p<0.05). APN pretreatment up-regulated AdipoR1, but not AdipoR2, expression in WI-38 fibroblasts. AdipoR1 siRNA abrogated APN-mediated protective effects in PQ-exposed fibroblasts. Taken together, our data suggests APN protects against PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a dose

  1. Adiponectin attenuates lung fibroblasts activation and pulmonary fibrosis induced by paraquat.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rong; Cao, Yu; He, Ya-rong; Lau, Wayne Bond; Zeng, Zhi; Liang, Zong-an

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is one of the most common complications of paraquat (PQ) poisoning, which demands for more effective therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests adiponectin (APN) may be a promising therapy against fibrotic diseases. In the current study, we determine whether the exogenous globular APN isoform protects against pulmonary fibrosis in PQ-treated mice and human lung fibroblasts, and dissect the responsible underlying mechanisms. BALB/C mice were divided into control group, PQ group, PQ + low-dose APN group, and PQ + high-dose APN group. Mice were sacrificed 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after PQ treatment. We compared pulmonary histopathological changes among different groups on the basis of fibrosis scores, TGF-β1, CTGF and α-SMA pulmonary content via Western blot and real-time quantitative fluorescence-PCR (RT-PCR). Blood levels of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 were determined by ELISA. Human lung fibroblasts WI-38 were divided into control group, PQ group, APN group, and APN receptor (AdipoR) 1 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) group. Fibroblasts were collected 24, 48, and 72 hours after PQ exposure for assay. Cell viability and apoptosis were determined via Kit-8 (CCK-8) and fluorescein Annexin V-FITC/PI double labeling. The protein and mRNA expression level of collagen type III, AdipoR1, and AdipoR2 were measured by Western blot and RT-PCR. APN treatment significantly decreased the lung fibrosis scores, protein and mRNA expression of pulmonary TGF-β1, CTGF and α-SMA content, and blood MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). Pretreatment with APN significantly attenuated the reduced cell viability and up-regulated collagen type III expression induced by PQ in lung fibroblasts, (p<0.05). APN pretreatment up-regulated AdipoR1, but not AdipoR2, expression in WI-38 fibroblasts. AdipoR1 siRNA abrogated APN-mediated protective effects in PQ-exposed fibroblasts. Taken together, our data suggests APN protects against PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a dose

  2. Adiponectin Attenuates Lung Fibroblasts Activation and Pulmonary Fibrosis Induced by Paraquat

    PubMed Central

    He, Ya-rong; Lau, Wayne Bond; Zeng, Zhi; Liang, Zong-an

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is one of the most common complications of paraquat (PQ) poisoning, which demands for more effective therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests adiponectin (APN) may be a promising therapy against fibrotic diseases. In the current study, we determine whether the exogenous globular APN isoform protects against pulmonary fibrosis in PQ-treated mice and human lung fibroblasts, and dissect the responsible underlying mechanisms. BALB/C mice were divided into control group, PQ group, PQ + low-dose APN group, and PQ + high-dose APN group. Mice were sacrificed 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after PQ treatment. We compared pulmonary histopathological changes among different groups on the basis of fibrosis scores, TGF-β1, CTGF and α-SMA pulmonary content via Western blot and real-time quantitative fluorescence-PCR (RT-PCR). Blood levels of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 were determined by ELISA. Human lung fibroblasts WI-38 were divided into control group, PQ group, APN group, and APN receptor (AdipoR) 1 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) group. Fibroblasts were collected 24, 48, and 72 hours after PQ exposure for assay. Cell viability and apoptosis were determined via Kit-8 (CCK-8) and fluorescein Annexin V-FITC/PI double labeling. The protein and mRNA expression level of collagen type III, AdipoR1, and AdipoR2 were measured by Western blot and RT-PCR. APN treatment significantly decreased the lung fibrosis scores, protein and mRNA expression of pulmonary TGF-β1, CTGF and α-SMA content, and blood MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). Pretreatment with APN significantly attenuated the reduced cell viability and up-regulated collagen type III expression induced by PQ in lung fibroblasts, (p<0.05). APN pretreatment up-regulated AdipoR1, but not AdipoR2, expression in WI-38 fibroblasts. AdipoR1 siRNA abrogated APN-mediated protective effects in PQ-exposed fibroblasts. Taken together, our data suggests APN protects against PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a dose

  3. Regulation of macroautophagy in amiodarone‐induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahavadi, Poornima; Knudsen, Lars; Venkatesan, Shalini; Henneke, Ingrid; Hegermann, Jan; Wrede, Christoph; Ochs, Matthias; Ahuja, Saket; Chillappagari, Shashi; Ruppert, Clemens; Seeger, Werner; Korfei, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Amiodarone (AD) is an iodinated benzofuran derivative, especially known for its antiarrhythmic properties. It exerts serious side‐effects even in patients receiving low doses. AD is well‐known to induce apoptosis of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECII), a mechanism that has been suggested to play an important role in AD‐induced lung fibrosis. The precise molecular mechanisms underlying this disease are, however, still unclear. Because of its amphiphilic nature, AD becomes enriched in the lysosomal compartments, affecting the general functions of these organelles. Hence, in this study, we aimed to assess the role of autophagy, a lysosome‐dependent homeostasis mechanism, in driving AECII apoptosis in response to AD. In vitro, AD‐treated MLE12 and primary AECII cells showed increased proSP‐C and LC3B positive vacuolar structures and underwent LC3B‐dependent apoptosis. In addition, AD‐induced autophagosome‐lysosome fusion and increased autophagy flux were observed. In vivo, in C57BL/6 mice, LC3B was localised at the limiting membrane of lamellar bodies, which were closely connected to the autophagosomal structures in AECIIs. Our data suggest that AD causes activation of macroautophagy in AECIIs and extensive autophagy‐dependent apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells. Targeting the autophagy pathway may therefore represent an attractive treatment modality in AD‐induced lung fibrosis. PMID:27499909

  4. Regulation of macroautophagy in amiodarone-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Poornima; Knudsen, Lars; Venkatesan, Shalini; Henneke, Ingrid; Hegermann, Jan; Wrede, Christoph; Ochs, Matthias; Ahuja, Saket; Chillappagari, Shashi; Ruppert, Clemens; Seeger, Werner; Korfei, Martina; Guenther, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Amiodarone (AD) is an iodinated benzofuran derivative, especially known for its antiarrhythmic properties. It exerts serious side-effects even in patients receiving low doses. AD is well-known to induce apoptosis of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECII), a mechanism that has been suggested to play an important role in AD-induced lung fibrosis. The precise molecular mechanisms underlying this disease are, however, still unclear. Because of its amphiphilic nature, AD becomes enriched in the lysosomal compartments, affecting the general functions of these organelles. Hence, in this study, we aimed to assess the role of autophagy, a lysosome-dependent homeostasis mechanism, in driving AECII apoptosis in response to AD. In vitro, AD-treated MLE12 and primary AECII cells showed increased proSP-C and LC3B positive vacuolar structures and underwent LC3B-dependent apoptosis. In addition, AD-induced autophagosome-lysosome fusion and increased autophagy flux were observed. In vivo, in C57BL/6 mice, LC3B was localised at the limiting membrane of lamellar bodies, which were closely connected to the autophagosomal structures in AECIIs. Our data suggest that AD causes activation of macroautophagy in AECIIs and extensive autophagy-dependent apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells. Targeting the autophagy pathway may therefore represent an attractive treatment modality in AD-induced lung fibrosis. PMID:27499909

  5. CD4(+)CD25(hi)Foxp3(+) Cells Exacerbate Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Birjandi, Shirin Z; Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav; Xue, Ying Ying; Nunez, Stefanie; Kern, Rita; Weigt, S Sam; Lynch, Joseph P; Chatila, Talal A; Belperio, John A

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a fatal lung disease with a median survival of 2 to 5 years. A decade of studies has downplayed inflammation contributing to its pathogenesis. However, these studies preceded the discovery of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and all of their functions. On the basis of human studies demonstrating Tregs can decrease graft-versus-host disease and vasculitides, there is consideration of their use to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that Treg therapy would attenuate the fibroplasia involved in a preclinical murine model of pulmonary fibrosis. IL-2 complex was used in vivo to expand CD4(+)CD25(hi)Foxp3(+) cells in the lung during intratracheal bleomycin challenge; however, this unexpectedly led to an increase in lung fibrosis. More important, this increase in fibrosis was a lymphocyte-dependent process. We corroborated these results using a CD4(+)CD25(hi)Foxp3(+) cellular-based therapy. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that CD4(+)CD25(hi)Foxp3(+) cells undergo alterations during bleomycin challenge and the IL-2 complex had no effect on profibrotic (eg, transforming growth factor-β) or type 17 immune response cytokines; however, there was a marked down-regulation of the type 1 and augmentation of the type 2 immune response cytokines from the lungs. Collectively, our animal studies show that a specific lung injury can induce Treg alterations, which can augment pulmonary fibrosis.

  6. Effects of buthionine sulfoximine on the development of ozone-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.D.; Pickrell, J.A.; Harkema, J.R.; McLaughlin, S.I.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F.

    1988-10-01

    The capacity of reduced glutathione (GSH) to protect lung tissue against ozone-induced pulmonary fibrosis was investigated. Male B6C3F1 mice were exposed to 0, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 ppm ozone for 23 hr/day for 14 days. During exposures and/or for a period of 90 days after exposures, subgroups of mice at each exposure level were given drinking water containing 30 mM L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO) to lower in vivo levels of GSH. These BSO treatments reduced blood glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCS) activity (regulatory enzyme for GSH biosynthesis) and lung nonprotein sulfhydryl (NPSH) levels in nonexposed animals by approximately half. In contrast, ozone exposures increased blood GCS activity and lung NPSH levels in a concentration-dependent manner, with smaller increases in the BSO-treated mice. Immediately after exposures, an ozone-related inflammatory response was seen in lungs, but no histopathological signs of developing fibrosis were evident. Ninety days later, mice exposed to 1 ppm ozone and not treated with BSO had modest evidence of pulmonary fibrosis. Mice exposed to 1 ppm ozone and treated with BSO during this post-exposure period (regardless of BSO treatment during exposures) showed histopathological evidence of exacerbated pulmonary fibrosis, compared to similarly exposed mice not treated with BSO postexposure. These results indicated that interference with the body's normal defense mechanisms against oxidant damage, including suppression of GSH biosynthesis, exacerbates the subsequent development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  7. Combined inhibition of TGFβ and PDGF signaling attenuates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dadrich, Monika; Nicolay, Nils H; Flechsig, Paul; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Hoeltgen, Line; Roeder, Falk; Hauser, Kai; Tietz, Alexandra; Jenne, Jürgen; Lopez, Ramon; Roehrich, Manuel; Wirkner, Ute; Lahn, Michael; Huber, Peter E

    2016-05-01

    Background : Radiotherapy (RT) is a mainstay for the treatment of lung cancer, but the effective dose is often limited by the development of radiation-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) play crucial roles in the development of these diseases, but the effects of dual growth factor inhibition on pulmonary fibrosis development remain unclear. Methods : C57BL/6 mice were treated with 20 Gy to the thorax to induce pulmonary fibrosis. PDGF receptor inhibitors SU9518 and SU14816 (imatinib) and TGFβ receptor inhibitor galunisertib were applied individually or in combinations after RT. Lung density and septal fibrosis were measured by high-resolution CT and MRI. Lung histology and gene expression analyses were performed and Osteopontin levels were studied. Results : Treatment with SU9518, SU14816 or galunisertib individually attenuated radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and decreased radiological and histological signs of lung damage. Combining PDGF and TGFβ inhibitors showed to be feasible and safe in a mouse model, and dual inhibition significantly attenuated radiation-induced lung damage and extended mouse survival compared to blockage of either pathway alone. Gene expression analysis of irradiated lung tissue showed upregulation of PDGF and TGFβ-dependent signaling components by thoracic irradiation, and upregulation patterns show crosstalk between downstream mediators of the PDGF and TGFβ pathways. Conclusion : Combined small-molecule inhibition of PDGF and TGFβ signaling is a safe and effective treatment for radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice and may offer a novel approach for treatment of fibrotic lung diseases in humans. Translational statement : RT is an effective treatment modality for cancer with limitations due to acute and chronic toxicities, where TGFβ and PDGF play a key role. Here, we show that a combined inhibition of

  8. Combined inhibition of TGFβ and PDGF signaling attenuates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dadrich, Monika; Nicolay, Nils H.; Flechsig, Paul; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Hoeltgen, Line; Roeder, Falk; Hauser, Kai; Tietz, Alexandra; Jenne, Jürgen; Lopez, Ramon; Roehrich, Manuel; Wirkner, Ute; Lahn, Michael; Huber, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Radiotherapy (RT) is a mainstay for the treatment of lung cancer, but the effective dose is often limited by the development of radiation-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) play crucial roles in the development of these diseases, but the effects of dual growth factor inhibition on pulmonary fibrosis development remain unclear. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were treated with 20 Gy to the thorax to induce pulmonary fibrosis. PDGF receptor inhibitors SU9518 and SU14816 (imatinib) and TGFβ receptor inhibitor galunisertib were applied individually or in combinations after RT. Lung density and septal fibrosis were measured by high-resolution CT and MRI. Lung histology and gene expression analyses were performed and Osteopontin levels were studied. Results: Treatment with SU9518, SU14816 or galunisertib individually attenuated radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and decreased radiological and histological signs of lung damage. Combining PDGF and TGFβ inhibitors showed to be feasible and safe in a mouse model, and dual inhibition significantly attenuated radiation-induced lung damage and extended mouse survival compared to blockage of either pathway alone. Gene expression analysis of irradiated lung tissue showed upregulation of PDGF and TGFβ-dependent signaling components by thoracic irradiation, and upregulation patterns show crosstalk between downstream mediators of the PDGF and TGFβ pathways. Conclusion: Combined small-molecule inhibition of PDGF and TGFβ signaling is a safe and effective treatment for radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice and may offer a novel approach for treatment of fibrotic lung diseases in humans. Translational statement: RT is an effective treatment modality for cancer with limitations due to acute and chronic toxicities, where TGFβ and PDGF play a key role. Here, we show that a combined

  9. Progesterone inhibits vascular remodeling and attenuates monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in estrogen-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Tofovic, P S; Zhang, X; Petrusevska, G

    2009-07-01

    (Full text is available at http://www.manu.edu.mk/prilozi). Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) is predominantly a disease of young females. Yet, little is known regarding the effects of female sex hormones in PH. Female rats develop less severe PH compared to male rats, and ovariectomy (OVX) exacerbates PH. Although OVX rats treated with estradiol develop less severe disease, the role of progesterone in OVX-induced exacerbation of disease has not been examined. Progesterone was shown to dilate pulmonary vessels and to inhibit proliferation of endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that progesterone may confer protective effects in experimental PH. A total of 30 female rats were ovariectomized and OVX rats were randomly administered either saline (OVX-Control group, n = 7), monocrotaline (60mg/kg i.p.; OVX-MCT group; n = 12), or MCT plus progesterone (30microg/kg/h via osmotic minipumps; OVX-MCT+P group; n = 11). After 32 days animals were instrumented for in situ (open chest) measurements of right ventricle (RV) peak systolic (RVSP) and end diastolic (RVEDP) pressures, and tissue samples were obtained for morphometric and histological analysis. Administration of MCT elevated RVSP (22.2 +/- 1.1 vs. 46.7 +/- 2.4 mmHg) and RVEDP (1.51 +/- 0.86 vs. 11.9+/-2.2 mmHg), increased RV/left ventricle + septum (RV/LV+S) ratio (0.256 +/- 0.010 vs. 0.582 +/- 0.033, OVX vs. OVX-MCT), and induced media hypertrophy of small size pulmonary arteries. In ovariectomized pulmonary hypertensive rats, treatment with progesterone attenuated the severity of disease (OVX-MCT+P group: RVSP = 36.6 +/- 2.3 mmHg; RV/LV+S = 0.468 +/- 0.025; RVEDP = 7.5 +/-1.5 mmHg), attenuated vascular remodeling (media % index: 28.2 +/- 1.1 vs. 34.2 +/- 1.3), and reduced mortality (9% vs. 25%; OVX-MCT+P vs. OVX-MCT). This study provides the first evidence that in estrogen-deficient rats, progesterone has protective effects in MCT-induced PH. Further evaluation of the role of

  10. Oxidant and enzymatic antioxidant status (gene expression and activity) in the brain of chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpour, Hossein; Khalaji-Pirbalouty, Valiallah; Nasiri, Leila; Mohebbi, Abdonnaser; Bahadoran, Shahab

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate oxidant and antioxidant status of the brain (hindbrain, midbrain, and forebrain) in chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension, the measurements of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, antioxidant capacity, enzymatic activity, and gene expression (for catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutases) were done. There were high lipid peroxidation/protein oxidation and low antioxidant capacity in the hindbrain of cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens compared to control ( P < 0.05). In the hypertensive chickens, superoxide dismutase activity was decreased (forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain), while catalase activity was increased (forebrain and midbrain) ( P < 0.05). Glutathione peroxidase activity did not change. Relative gene expression of catalase and superoxide dismutases (1 and 2) was downregulated, while glutathione peroxidase was upregulated in the brain of the cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens. Probably, these situations in the oxidant and antioxidant status of the brain especially hindbrain may change its function at cardiovascular center and sympathetic nervous system to exacerbate pulmonary hypertension.

  11. Metformin attenuates gefitinib-induced exacerbation of pulmonary fibrosis by inhibition of TGF-β signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Huang, Wenting; Li, Kunlin; Zhang, Kejun; Lin, Caiyu; Han, Rui; Lu, Conghua; Wang, Yubo; Chen, Hengyi; Sun, Fenfen; He, Yong

    2015-12-22

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a serious side-effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. Therefore, it is necessary to study underlying mechanisms for the development of pulmonary fibrosis induced by EGFR-TKI and potential approaches to attenuate it. Metformin is a well-established and widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic drug, and has gained attention for its potential anticancer effects. Recent reports have also demonstrated its role in inhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis. However, it is unknown whether metformin attenuates EGFR-TKI-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The effect of metformin on EGFR-TKI-induced exacerbation of pulmonary fibrosis was examined in vitro and in vivo using MTT, Ki67 incorporation assay, flow cytometry, immunostaining, Western blot analysis, and a bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis rat model. We found that in lung HFL-1 fibroblast cells, TGF-β or conditioned medium from TKI-treated lung cancer PC-9 cells or conditioned medium from TKI-resistant PC-9GR cells, induced significant fibrosis, as shown by increased expression of Collegen1a1 and α-actin, while metformin inhibited expression of fibrosis markers. Moreover, metformin decreased activation of TGF-β signaling as shown by decreased expression of pSMAD2 and pSMAD3. In vivo, oral administration of gefitinib exacerbated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, as demonstrated by HE staining and Masson staining. Significantly, oral co-administration of metformin suppressed exacerbation of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by gefitinib. We have shown that metformin attenuates gefitinib-induced exacerbation of TGF-β or bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. These observations indicate metformin may be combined with EGFR-TKI to treat NSCLC patients.

  12. Emodin ameliorates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats by suppressing epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibroblast activation

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ruijuan; Wang, Xia; Zhao, Xiaomei; Song, Nana; Zhu, Jimin; Wang, Jijiang; Wang, Jin; Xia, Chunmei; Chen, Yonghua; Zhu, Danian; Shen, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of TGF-β1 is frequently encountered and promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and fibroblast activation in pulmonary fibrosis. The present study investigated whether emodin mediates its effect via suppressing TGF-β1-induced EMT and fibroblast activation in bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Here, we found that emodin induced apoptosis and inhibited cellular proliferation, migration and differentiation in TGF-β1-stimulated human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELFs). Emodin suppressed TGF-β1-induced EMT in a dose- and time-dependent manner in alveolar epithelial A549 cells. Emodin also inhibited TGF-β1-induced Smad2, Smad3 and Erk1/2 activation, suggesting that Smad2/3 and Erk1/2 inactivation mediated the emodin-induced effects on TGF-β1-induced EMT. Additionally, we provided in vivo evidence suggesting that emodin apparently alleviated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis and improved pulmonary function by inhibiting TGF-β1 signaling and subsequently repressing EMT, fibroblast activation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Taken together, our data suggest that emodin mediates its effects mainly via inhibition of EMT and fibroblast activation and thus has a potential for the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27774992

  13. Chronic biliary obstruction induces pulmonary intravascular phagocytosis and endotoxin sensitivity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S W; Ohara, N

    1994-01-01

    Endotoxin sensitivity varies among animal species and appears to correlate with the presence of pulmonary intravascular macrophage (PIM). In rats, which lack PIM, we investigated the hypothesis that chronic cholestatic liver injury leads to induction of PIM and endotoxin sensitivity. Rats were randomized to either common bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham-surgery and studied at 1 wk (acute cholestasis), 2 wk (cholestasis, early cirrhosis), and 4 wk (cholestasis, established cirrhosis) after surgery. Intravascularly injected fluorescent latex microspheres (1 micron diameter) were taken up by large phagocytic cells in lung parenchyma of BDL rats (at 2 and 4 wk), while no uptake was observed in lungs from control rats. Electronmicroscopy revealed accumulation of large, mononuclear, macrophage-like cells containing ingested latex particles within the pulmonary capillaries. Pulmonary intravascular phagocytosis, as reflected in lung uptake of 99mTc microaggregated albumin (Microlite, mean particle diameter = 1 micron), averaged 0.7 +/- 0.1% (mean +/- SEM) of total injected dose in 13 control rats and progressively increased with time after BDL (1 wk, 1.7 +/- 0.2%; 2 wk, 10.0 +/- 3.0%; 4 wk 35.1 +/- 5.9%). Rats with biliary cirrhosis were markedly sensitive to the lethal effects of low dose endotoxin and demonstrated marked lung edema at the time of death. Furthermore, the lung uptake of intravascular 125I-lipopolysaccharide was increased five-fold in cirrhotic rats. We conclude that chronic biliary obstruction leads to the induction of pulmonary intravascular phagocytes and enhances endotoxin sensitivity in rats. Pulmonary intravascular phagocytosis in patients with advanced cirrhosis may account for their increased susceptibility to sepsis-induced adult respiratory distress syndrome. Images PMID:7962547

  14. Calcilytics enhance sildenafil-induced antiproliferation in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Aya; Yagi, Satomi; Ohara, Naoki; Tsukamoto, Kikuo

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a progressive and fatal disease of the pulmonary artery resulting from currently unidentified etiology. IPAH is pathologically characterized as sustained vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling of the pulmonary artery. Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors have been clinically used in the treatment of IPAH. Recently, we have shown that Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) antagonists, or calcilytics, inhibit excessive cell proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from IPAH patients. In this study, the additive or synergistic effect of calcilytics on antiproliferation following PDE5 inhibition was examined in IPAH-PASMCs by MTT assay. Treatment with sildenafil blocked the excessive cell proliferation of IPAH-PASMCs in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 16.9μM. However, sildenafil (0.03-100μM) did not affect the cell growth of PASMCs from normal subjects and patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Co-treatment with 0.3μM NPS2143, a calcilytic, additively enhanced the antiproliferative effect induced by sildenafil (3 or 30μM) in IPAH-PASMCs. Additionally, the inhibitory effect of calcilytics, NPS2143 or Calhex 231 (1 or 10μM), on excessive cell proliferation of IPAH-PASMCs was synergistic increased in the presence of 1μM sildenafil. Similar results were obtained by BrdU incorporation assay. These findings reveal that calcilytics additively/synergistically enhance the antiproliferative activity mediated by PDE5 inhibition, suggesting that a combination therapy of a PDE5 inhibitor with a calcilytic may be useful as a novel therapeutic approach for IPAH. PMID:27164419

  15. Inhibitory effects of amines from Citrus reticulata on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xian-Mei; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Xiao, Na; Shen, Qi; Li, Jian-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal lung disease for which, thus far, there are no effective treatments. The pericarp of Citrus reticulata, as a traditional herbal drug, has been used for the clinical treatment of lung-related diseases in China for many years. In the present study, the amines from the pericarp of Citrus reticulata were isolated, and their hydrochlorides were prepared. The results of screening using cultured human embryonic lung fibroblasts (hELFs) revealed that, of the amines, 4-methoxyphenethylamine hydrochloride (designated as amine hydrochloride 1) possessed the most potent inhibitory effect. Further in vivo experiments using a rat model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis demonstrated that the oral administration of amine hydrochloride 1 significantly lowered the hydroxyproline content in both serum and lung tissue, and alleviated pulmonary alveolitis and fibrosis. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that amine hydrochloride 1 exerted its inhibitory effect against IPF through the downregulation of lung transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 protein expression. Our results demonstrated that amine hydrochloride 1 prevented the development of bleomycin‑induced lung fibrosis in rats. Thus, our data suggest that the amines from the pericarp of Citrus reticulata have therapeutic potential for use in the treatment of IPF. PMID:26675886

  16. Inhibitory effects of amines from Citrus reticulata on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, XIAN-MEI; CAO, ZHEN-DONG; XIAO, NA; SHEN, QI; LI, JIAN-XIN

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal lung disease for which, thus far, there are no effective treatments. The pericarp of Citrus reticulata, as a traditional herbal drug, has been used for the clinical treatment of lung-related diseases in China for many years. In the present study, the amines from the pericarp of Citrus reticulata were isolated, and their hydrochlorides were prepared. The results of screening using cultured human embryonic lung fibroblasts (hELFs) revealed that, of the amines, 4-methoxyphenethylamine hydrochloride (designated as amine hydrochloride 1) possessed the most potent inhibitory effect. Further in vivo experiments using a rat model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis demonstrated that the oral administration of amine hydrochloride 1 significantly lowered the hydroxyproline content in both serum and lung tissue, and alleviated pulmonary alveolitis and fibrosis. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that amine hydrochloride 1 exerted its inhibitory effect against IPF through the downregulation of lung transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 protein expression. Our results demonstrated that amine hydrochloride 1 prevented the development of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Thus, our data suggest that the amines from the pericarp of Citrus reticulata have therapeutic potential for use in the treatment of IPF. PMID:26675886

  17. Anti-inflammatory effect of thalidomide in paraquat-induced pulmonary injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan

    2013-10-01

    Thalidomide has been used in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders due to its anti-inflammatory activity. Paraquat (PQ) poisoning causes severe lung injury. PQ-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis are due to its ability to induce oxidative stress, inflammatory and fibrotic reactions. This study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effect of thalidomide on PQ-induced lung damage in a mouse model. Mice were injected with a single dose of PQ (20mg/kg, i.p.), and treated with thalidomide (25 and 50mg/kg/day, i.p.) for six days. Lung tissues were dissected six days after PQ injection. The results showed that thalidomide ameliorated the biochemical and histological lung alterations induced by PQ. Thalidomide decreased production of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. In addition thalidomide reduced myeloperoxidase (MPO), nitric oxide (NO), and hydroxyproline content in lung tissue. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that thalidomide might be a valuable therapeutic drug in preventing the progression of PQ-induced pulmonary injury.

  18. Passion fruit peel extract attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Chilakapati, Shanmuga Reddy; Serasanambati, Mamatha; Manikonda, Pavan Kumar; Chilakapati, Damodar Reddy; Watson, Ronald Ross

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive fatal lung disease characterized by excessive collagen deposition, with no effective treatments. We investigated the efficacy of natural products with high anti-inflammatory activity, such as passion fruit peel extract (PFPE), in a mouse model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (PF). C57BL/6J mice were subjected to a single intratracheal instillation of bleomycin to induce PF. Daily PFPE treatment significantly reduced loss of body mass and mortality rate in mice compared with those treated with bleomycin. While bleomycin-induced PF resulted in elevated total numbers of inflammatory cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid on both days 7 and 21, PFPE administration significantly attenuated these phenomena compared with bleomycin group. On day 7, the decreased superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase activities observed in the bleomycin group were significantly restored with PFPE treatment. On day 21, enhanced hydroxyproline deposition in the bleomycin group was also suppressed by PFPE administration. PFPE treatment significantly attenuated extensive inflammatory cell infiltration and accumulation of collagen in lung tissue sections of bleomycin-induced mice on days 7 and 21, respectively. Our results indicate that administration of PFPE decreased bleomycin-induced PF because of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. PMID:24933624

  19. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  20. Intermedin/adrenomedullin-2 is a hypoxia-induced endothelial peptide that stabilizes pulmonary microvascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Muhammad; Paddenberg, Renate; Quanz, Karin; Chang, Chia L.; Park, Jae-Il; Gries, Barbara; Rafiq, Amir; Faulhammer, Petra; Goldenberg, Anna; Papadakis, Tamara; Noll, Thomas; Hsu, Sheau Y. T.; Weissmann, Norbert; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a pivotal role of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) signaling pathway in preventing damage of the lung by stabilizing pulmonary barrier function. Intermedin (IMD), also termed adrenomedullin-2, is the most recently identified peptide targeting this receptor. Here we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the expression of IMD in the murine lung and cultured murine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMEC) as well as the role of IMD in regulating vascular permeability. Monoclonal IMD antibodies were generated, and transcript levels were assayed by quantitative RT-PCR. The promoter region of IMD gene was analyzed, and the effect of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α on IMD expression was investigated in HEK293T cells. Isolated murine lungs and a human lung microvascular endothelial cell monolayer model were used to study the effect of IMD on vascular permeability. IMD was identified as a pulmonary endothelial peptide by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Hypoxia caused an upregulation of IMD mRNA in the murine lung and PMEC. As shown by these results, HIF-1α enhances IMD promoter activity. Our functional studies showed that IMD abolished the increase in pressure-induced endothelial permeability. Moreover, IMD decreased basal and thrombin-induced hyperpermeability of an endothelial cell monolayer in a receptor-dependent manner and activated PKA in these cells. In conclusion, IMD is a novel hypoxia-induced gene and a potential interventional agent for the improvement of endothelial barrier function in systemic inflammatory responses and hypoxia-induced vascular leakage. PMID:19684198

  1. A Comparative Study of Induced Sputum and Bronchial Washings in Diagnosing Sputum Smear Negative Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mandava, Venu; Namballa, Usha Rani; Makala, Sravani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis is one of the most important public health problem worldwide. Detecting patients with active pulmonary Koch’s disease is an important component of tuberculosis control programs. However, at times in patients even with a compatible clinical picture, sputum smears do not reveal acid-fast bacilli and smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis remains a common problem. Aim The present study is aimed to compare the results of induced sputum and bronchial washings smear in patients suspected to have sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis. Materials and Methods A prospective study conducted from August 2014 to July 2015, comprising 120 patients fulfilling study criteria. Patients with respiratory symptoms and chest roentgenogram suspicious of pulmonary tuberculosis with no previous history of anti-tuberculosis treatment and two spontaneous sputum smear samples negative for acid fast bacilli were included. Patients with active haemoptysis and sputum positive were excluded from the study. Sputum induction was done by using 5-10 ml of 3% hypertonic saline through ultrasonic nebulizer taking safety precautions. All the patient underwent fibreoptic bronchoscopy after six hours fasting on the same day. About 20 ml of normal saline instilled into the suspected pathology area and washings were taken with gentle suction. The sample processing and fluorescent staining for acid fast bacilli was done in a designated microscopy lab. Results Out of 120 sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients, induced sputum smear examination detected acid fast bacilli in 76 patients (63.3%) and acid fast bacilli detected from bronchial washings in 94 patients (78.3%). Smear positivity was higher in cavitary and infiltrative lesions as compared to consolidation and infrahilar pattern disease. Conclusion Even though both induced sputum and bronchial washings procedures were valuable for the diagnosis of sputum smear negative, sputum induction with hypertonic

  2. Chemical warfare agent and biological toxin-induced pulmonary toxicity: could stem cells provide potential therapies?

    PubMed

    Angelini, Daniel J; Dorsey, Russell M; Willis, Kristen L; Hong, Charles; Moyer, Robert A; Oyler, Jonathan; Jensen, Neil S; Salem, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWAs) as well as biological toxins present a significant inhalation injury risk to both deployed warfighters and civilian targets of terrorist attacks. Inhalation of many CWAs and biological toxins can induce severe pulmonary toxicity leading to the development of acute lung injury (ALI) as well as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The therapeutic options currently used to treat these conditions are very limited and mortality rates remain high. Recent evidence suggests that human stem cells may provide significant therapeutic options for ALI and ARDS in the near future. The threat posed by CWAs and biological toxins for both civilian populations and military personnel is growing, thus understanding the mechanisms of toxicity and potential therapies is critical. This review will outline the pulmonary toxic effects of some of the most common CWAs and biological toxins as well as the potential role of stem cells in treating these types of toxic lung injuries.

  3. Pioglitazone-induced congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema in a patient with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Jearath, Vaneet; Vashisht, Rajan; Rustagi, Vipul; Raina, Sujeet; Sharma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Pioglitazone-induced heart failure is known in patients with underlying heart disease, but is not well documented in patients with normal left ventricular function. Pioglitazone has been very popular as it is an insulin sensitizer and insulin resistance is prevalent among Indians. Fluid retention exacerbates pre-existing heart failure or precipitates heart failure in a patient with underlying left ventricular dysfunction. However, pathogenesis of heart failure in a patient with normal left ventricular function is not known. Probably it is due to dose-related effect on pulmonary endothelial permeability, rather than alterations in left ventricular mass or ejection fraction. We report a patient who developed congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema with normal left ventricular function within 1 year of starting pioglitazone therapy. We have to be careful in monitoring all possible side effects during followup when patients are on pioglitazone therapy.

  4. Pioglitazone-induced congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema in a patient with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Jearath, Vaneet; Vashisht, Rajan; Rustagi, Vipul; Raina, Sujeet; Sharma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Pioglitazone-induced heart failure is known in patients with underlying heart disease, but is not well documented in patients with normal left ventricular function. Pioglitazone has been very popular as it is an insulin sensitizer and insulin resistance is prevalent among Indians. Fluid retention exacerbates pre-existing heart failure or precipitates heart failure in a patient with underlying left ventricular dysfunction. However, pathogenesis of heart failure in a patient with normal left ventricular function is not known. Probably it is due to dose-related effect on pulmonary endothelial permeability, rather than alterations in left ventricular mass or ejection fraction. We report a patient who developed congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema with normal left ventricular function within 1 year of starting pioglitazone therapy. We have to be careful in monitoring all possible side effects during followup when patients are on pioglitazone therapy. PMID:27127397

  5. Immunotherapy for pulmonary TB: antimicrobial peptides and their inducers.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Cesar Enrique; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2013-10-01

    TB is an infectious disease that still has an enormous impact on public health worldwide. With the continuous increasing epidemic of multidrug-resistant TB, new drugs and vaccines are urgently needed. In the last decade there has been a broad advance in the knowledge of innate immunity in TB. Together with the growing research regarding immunomodulators, new promising insights have been developed that can contribute in the control of TB. This is the case of antimicrobial peptides, which can be potential therapeutic or adjuvant agents. The current high cost of antimicrobial peptide synthesis may be a current deterrent for treatment; antimicrobial peptide-inducers can be an alternative for low-cost treatment and/or adjuvants.

  6. Concentrated ambient air particles induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Joao R F; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Clarke, Robert W; Coull, Brent A; Stearns, Rebecca C; Lawrence, Joy; Murthy, G G Krishna; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether short-term exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) alter the morphology of small pulmonary arteries in normal rats and rats with chronic bronchitis (CB). Sprague-Dawley male rats were exposed to CAPs, using the Harvard Ambient Particle Concentrator, or to particle-free air (sham) under identical conditions during 3 consecutive days (5 hr/day) in six experimental sets. CB was induced by exposure to 276 +/- 9 ppm of sulfur dioxide (5 hr/day, 5 days/week, 6 weeks). Physicochemical characterization of CAPs included measurements of particle mass, size distribution, and composition. Rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last CAPs exposure. Histologic slides were prepared from random sections of lung lobes and coded for blinded analysis. The lumen/wall area (L/W) ratio was determined morphometrically on transverse sections of small pulmonary arteries. When all animal data (normal and CB) were analyzed together, the L/W ratios decreased as concentrations of fine particle mass, silicon, lead, sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon increased. In separate univariate analyses of animal data, the association for sulfate was significant only in normal rats, whereas silicon was significantly associated in both CB and normal rats. In multivariate analyses including all particle factors, the association with silicon remained significant. Our results indicate that short-term CAPs exposures (median, 182.75 micro g/m3; range, 73.50-733.00 micro g/m3) can induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in normal and CB rats. This effect was correlated with specific particle components and suggests that the pulmonary vasculature might be an important target for ambient air particle toxicity. PMID:12460797

  7. Dihydroartemisinin supresses inflammation and fibrosis in bleomycine-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongxia; Yuan, Wendan; Lv, Changjun; Li, Naie; Liu, Tongshen; Wang, Liang; Sun, Yufei; Qiu, Xueshan; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a respiratory disease with a high mortality rate and its pathogenesis involves multiple mechanisms including epithelial cell injury, fibroblast proliferation, inflammation, and collagen coagulation. The treatment regimens still fail to recover this disease. We have previously found that dihydroartemisinin inhibits the development of pulmonary fibrosis in rats. This study aimed to determine the mechanisms of dihydroartemisinin in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The experimental rats were divided into six groups as normal saline control group (NS group), bleomycin group (BLM group), dihydroartemisinin-1, -2, or -3 group (DHA-1, DHA-2 and DHA-3 group) and dexamethasone group (DXM group). In BLM group, rats were treated with intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. NS group received the same volume of saline instead of bleomycin. In DHA-1, DHA-2 and DHA-3 group, in addition to intratracheal instillation of bleomycin, respectively, dihydroartemisinin (25 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg daily) was administrated by intraperitoneal instillation. In DXM group, rats were treated with intraperitoneal instillation of dexamethasone as control. Immunocytochemical assay, reverse transcription PCR and western blot were used for detecting the expression of TGF-β1, TNF-α, α-SMA and NF-κB in lung tissues. What’s more, morphological change and collagen deposition were analyzed by hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson staining. Collagen synthesis was detected by hydroxyproline chromatometry. Results showed that dihydroartemisinin significantly decreased the amount of inflammatory cytokines and collagen synthesis, and inhibited fibroblast proliferation in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (P < 0.001). This study provides experimental evidence that dihydroartemisinin could decrease cytokines, alveolar inflammation and attenuates lung injury and fibrosis. PMID:25973011

  8. Regulatory T Cells Promote β-Catenin–Mediated Epithelium-to-Mesenchyme Transition During Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Shanshan; Pan, Xiujie; Xu, Long; Yang, Zhihua; Guo, Renfeng; Gu, Yongqing; Li, Ruoxi; Wang, Qianjun; Xiao, Fengjun; Du, Li; Zhou, Pingkun; Zhu, Maoxiang

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis results from thoracic radiation therapy and severely limits radiation therapy approaches. CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) cells are involved in pulmonary fibrosis induced by multiple factors. However, the mechanisms of Tregs and EMT cells in irradiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the influence of Tregs on EMT in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods and Materials: Mice thoraxes were irradiated (20 Gy), and Tregs were depleted by intraperitoneal injection of a monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody 2 hours after irradiation and every 7 days thereafter. Mice were treated on days 3, 7, and 14 and 1, 3, and 6 months post irradiation. The effectiveness of Treg depletion was assayed via flow cytometry. EMT and β-catenin in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Tregs isolated from murine spleens were cultured with mouse lung epithelial (MLE) 12 cells, and short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of β-catenin in MLE 12 cells was used to explore the effects of Tregs on EMT and β-catenin via flow cytometry and Western blotting. Results: Anti-CD25 antibody treatment depleted Tregs efficiently, attenuated the process of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, hindered EMT, and reduced β-catenin accumulation in lung epithelial cells in vivo. The coculture of Tregs with irradiated MLE 12 cells showed that Tregs could promote EMT in MLE 12 cells and that the effect of Tregs on EMT was partially abrogated by β-catenin knockdown in vitro. Conclusions: Tregs can promote EMT in accelerating radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. This process is partially mediated through β-catenin. Our study suggests a new mechanism for EMT, promoted by Tregs, that accelerates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  9. Leflunomide Induces Pulmonary and Hepatic CYP1A Enzymes via Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ananddeep; Zhang, Shaojie; Paramahamsa, Maturu; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy

    2015-12-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a crucial role in normal physiologic homeostasis. Additionally, aberrant AhR signaling leads to several pathologic states in the lung and liver. Activation of AhR transcriptionally induces phase I (CYP1A) detoxifying enzymes. Although the effects of the classic AhR ligands such as 3-methylcholanthrene and dioxins on phase 1 enzymes are well studied in rodent lung, liver, and other organs, the toxicity profiles limit their use as therapeutic agents in humans. Hence, there is a need to identify and investigate nontoxic AhR ligands not only to understand the AhR biology but also to develop the AhR as a clinically relevant therapeutic target. Leflunomide is a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug in humans that is known to have AhR agonist activity in vitro. Whether it activates AhR and induces phase 1 enzymes in vivo is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that leflunomide will induce pulmonary and hepatic CYP1A enzymes in C57BL/6J wild-type mice, but not in AhR-null mice. We performed real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses for CYP1A1/2 mRNA expression, western blot assays for CYP1A1/2 protein expression, and ethoxyresorufinO-deethylase assay for CYP1A1 catalytic activity. Leflunomide increased CYP1A1/A2 mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activities in wild-type mice. In contrast, leflunomide failed to increase pulmonary and hepatic CYP1A enzymes in AhR-null mice. In conclusion, we provide evidence that leflunomide induces pulmonary and hepatic CYP1A enzymes via the AhR.

  10. Immune Modulatory Effects of IL-22 on Allergen-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ping; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Yuqi; Kolls, Jay K.; Zheng, Tao; Zhu, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    IL-22 is a Th17/Th22 cytokine that is increased in asthma. However, recent animal studies showed controversial findings in the effects of IL-22 in allergic asthma. To determine the role of IL-22 in ovalbumin-induced allergic inflammation we generated inducible lung-specific IL-22 transgenic mice. Transgenic IL-22 expression and signaling activity in the lung were determined. Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced pulmonary inflammation, immune responses, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) were examined and compared between IL-22 transgenic mice and wild type controls. Following doxycycline (Dox) induction, IL-22 protein was readily detected in the large (CC10 promoter) and small (SPC promoter) airway epithelial cells. IL-22 signaling was evidenced by phosphorylated STAT3. After OVA sensitization and challenge, compared to wild type littermates, IL-22 transgenic mice showed decreased eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and in lung tissue, decreased mucus metaplasia in the airways, and reduced AHR. Among the cytokines and chemokines examined, IL-13 levels were reduced in the BAL fluid as well as in lymphocytes from local draining lymph nodes of IL-22 transgenic mice. No effect was seen on the levels of serum total or OVA-specific IgE or IgG. These findings indicate that IL-22 has immune modulatory effects on pulmonary inflammatory responses in allergen-induced asthma. PMID:25254361

  11. Genetic delivery of bevacizumab to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor-induced high-permeability pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaki; Boyer, Julie L; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-06-01

    High-permeability pulmonary edema causing acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with high mortality. Using a model of intratracheal adenovirus (Ad)-mediated overexpression of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A(165) in mouse lung to induce alveolar permeability and consequent pulmonary edema, we hypothesized that systemic administration of a second adenoviral vector expressing an anti-VEGF antibody (AdalphaVEGFAb) would protect the lung from pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was induced in mice by intratracheal administration of AdVEGFA165. To evaluate anti-VEGF antibody therapy, the mice were treated intravenously with AdalphaVEGFAb, an adenoviral vector encoding the light and heavy chains of an anti-human VEGF antibody with the bevacizumab (Avastin) antigen-binding site. Lung VEGF-A(165) and phosphorylated VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 levels, histology, lung wet-to-dry weight ratios, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) levels of total protein were assessed. Administration of AdalphaVEGFAb to mice decreased AdVEGFA165-induced levels of human VEGF-A(165) and phosphorylated VEGFR-2 in the lung. Histological analysis of AdalphaVEGFAb-treated mice demonstrated a reduction of edema fluid in the lung tissue that correlated with a reduction of lung wet-to-dry ratios and BALF total protein levels. Importantly, administration of AdalphaVEGFAb 48 hr after induction of pulmonary edema with AdVEGFA165 was effective in suppressing pulmonary edema. Administration of an adenoviral vector encoding an anti-VEGF antibody that is the equivalent of bevacizumab effectively suppresses VEGF-A(165)-induced high-permeability pulmonary edema, suggesting that anti-VEGF antibody therapy may represent a novel therapy for high-permeability pulmonary edema.

  12. 77 FR 5797 - Draft Toxicological Review of Vanadium Pentoxide: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... vanadium pentoxide assessment in Federal Register Notices published September 30, 2011, (76 FR 60827) and November 9, 2011 (76 FR 69736). DATES: The peer review panel meeting on the draft assessment for Vanadium... Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20460; telephone: (703) 347-8561; facsimile: (703) 347- 8691). If...

  13. 76 FR 69736 - Draft Toxicological Review of Vanadium Pentoxide: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of... on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)'' (EPA/635R-11/004A). EPA is extending the public... December 29, 2011. The Listening Session on the draft IRIS assessment for vanadium pentoxide will be...

  14. Antifibrotic effects of CXCR4 antagonist in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Hideki; Aono, Yoshinori; Azuma, Momoyo; Kishi, Masami; Yokota, Yuki; Kinoshita, Katsuhiro; Takezaki, Akio; Kishi, Jun; Kawano, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Izumi, Keisuke; Sone, Saburo; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Circulating fibrocytes had been reported to migrate into the injured lungs, and contribute to fibrogenesis via chemokine-chemokine receptor systems including CXCL12-CXCR4 axis. Here we hypothesized that blockade of CXCR4 might inhibit the migration of fibrocytes to the injured lungs and the subsequent pulmonary fibrosis. To explore the antifibrotic effects of blockade of CXCR4, we used a specific antagonist for CXCR4, AMD3100, in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis model in mice. Administration of AMD3100 significantly improved the loss of body weight of mice treated with bleomycin, and inhibited the fibrotic lesion in subpleural areas of the lungs. The quantitative analysis demonstrated that treatment with AMD3100 reduced the collagen content and fibrotic score (Aschcroft score) in the lungs. Although AMD3100 did not affect cell classification in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid on day 7, the percentage of lymphocytes was reduced by AMD3100 on day 14. AMD3100 directly inhibited the migration of human fibrocytes in response to CXCL12 in vitro, and reduced the trafficking of fibrocytes into the lungs treated with bleocmycin in vivo. These results suggest that the blockade of CXCR4 might be useful strategy for therapy of patients with pulmonary fibrosis via inhibiting the migration of circulating fibrocytes. PMID:23614921

  15. The role of platelet aggregation and release in fragment D-induced pulmonary dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Manwaring, D; Curreri, P W

    1980-01-01

    The plasma concentration of fibrinogen degradation product D (fragmentt D) is markedly incrased following major burn or traumatic injury. Purified human fragment D infused into awake, restrained, nontraumatized rabbits (100 micrograms/ml blood) causes progressive thrombocytopenia, pulmonary dysfunction, vascular leak, and interstitial neutrophilia. Rabbits treated with the antihistamine diphenhydramine (Benadryl) prior to fragment D infusion fail to develop these symptoms. This study examined platelet aggregation, platelet ATP secretion, and platelet malondialdehyde release in rabbits which received fragmen D alone or fragment D following diphenhydramine pretreatment. Platelet-rich plasma was prepared from citrated blood drawn from femoral arterial catheters at 0, 2 1/2, and 4 hours postinfusion. Platelet aggregation was stimulated with either collagen or ADP. Malondialdehyde, a byproduct of thromboxane synthesis, was measured by colorimetry. Platelet aggregation and function (stimulated with collagen) were enhanced in fragment D platelet-rich plasma, since all response times decreased. Total ATP and MDA release incresed. Diphenhydramine pretreatment inhibited fragment D-enhanced aggregation, ATP release and prostaglandin (thromboxane) synthesis. No animal pretreated with diphenhydramine exhibited thrombocytopenia or respiratory dysfunction. Stimulation of platelet aggregation and release may represent one mechanism by which fragment D induces pulmonary dysfunction. Diphenhydramine inhibits these responses and may prove therapeutic in posttraumtic pulmonary complications. PMID:7406554

  16. Calorie Restriction Attenuates Monocrotaline-induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingge; Lei, Jingyi; Qu, Yinxian; Zhang, Huan; Xin, Weichuan; Ma, Feng; Liu, Shuwen; Li, Zhichao; Jin, Faguang; Fu, Enqing

    2015-06-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective nonpharmacological interventions protecting against cardiovascular disease, such as hypertension in the systemic circulation. However, whether CR could attenuate pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is largely unknown. The PAH model was developed by subjecting the rats to a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline. CR lowered mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and reduced vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in PAH rats. Meanwhile, CR attenuated endothelial dysfunction as evidenced by increased relaxation in response to acetylcholine. The beneficial effects of CR were associated with restored sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) expression and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation and reduced eNOS acetylation in pulmonary arteries of PAH rats. To further clarify the role of SIRT1 in the protective effects of CR, adenoviral vectors for overexpression of SIRT1 were administered intratracheally at 1 day before monocrotaline injection. Overexpression of SIRT1 exhibited similar beneficial effects on mPAP and endothelial function, and increased eNOS phosphorylation and reduced eNOS acetylation in the absence of CR. Moreover, SIRT1 overexpression attenuated the increase in mPAP in hypoxia-induced PAH animals. Overall, the present data demonstrate that CR may serve as an effective treatment of PAH, and targeting the SIRT1/eNOS pathway may improve treatment of PAH. PMID:25636073

  17. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Patti C; Millecchia, Lyndell M; Castranova, Vincent

    2004-02-15

    Exposure of mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increases nitric oxide (NO) production, which is proposed to play a role in the resulting pulmonary damage and inflammation. To determine the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-induced NO in this lung reaction, the responses of inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout (iNOS KO) versus C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice to aspirated LPS + IFN-gamma were compared. Male mice (8-10 weeks) were exposed to LPS (1.2 mg/kg) + IFN-gamma (5000 U/mouse) or saline. At 24 or 72 h postexposure, lungs were lavaged with saline and the acellular fluid from the first bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, albumin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The cellular fraction of the total BAL was used to determine alveolar macrophage (AM) and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) counts, and AM zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence (AM-CL). Pulmonary responses 24 h postexposure to LPS + IFN-gamma were characterized by significantly decreased TAC, increased BAL AMs and PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and enhanced AM-CL to the same extent in both WT and iNOS KO mice. Responses 72 h postexposure were similar; however, significant differences were found between WT and iNOS KO mice. iNOS KO mice demonstrated a greater decline in total antioxidant capacity, greater BAL PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and an enhanced AM-CL compared to the WT. These data suggest that the role of iNOS-derived NO in the pulmonary response to LPS + IFN-gamma is anti-inflammatory, and this becomes evident over time. PMID:14962504

  18. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Human Pulmonary Micro-Vascular Endothelial Apoptosis via the YAP Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lei; Huang, Xiaoqin; Guo, Feng; Zhou, Zengding; Chang, Mengling; Tang, Jiajun; Huan, Jingning

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a pathologic increase in lung vascular leakage under septic conditions. LPS-induced human pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cell (HPMEC) apoptosis launches and aggravates micro-vascular hyper-permeability and acute lung injury (ALI). Previous studies show that the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway is vital for LPS-induced EC apoptosis. Yes-associated protein (YAP) has been reported to positively regulate intrinsic apoptotic pathway in tumor cells apoptosis. However, the potential role of YAP protein in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis has not been determined. In this study, we found that LPS-induced activation and nuclear accumulation of YAP accelerated HPMECs apoptosis. LPS-induced YAP translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus by the increased phosphorylation on Y357 resulted in the interaction between YAP and transcription factor P73. Furthermore, inhibition of YAP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) not only suppressed the LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis but also regulated P73-mediated up-regulation of BAX and down-regulation of BCL-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of the YAP/P73/(BAX and BCL-2)/caspase-3 signaling pathway played a critical role in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis. Inhibition of the YAP might be a potential therapeutic strategy for lung injury under sepsis. PMID:27807512

  19. Role of Cardiovascular Disease-associated iron overload in Libby amphibole-induced acute pulmonary injury and inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by asbestos is thought to be mediated through redox-cycling of fiber-bound and bioavailable iron (Fe). We hypothesized that Libby amphibole (LA)-induced cute lung injury will be exacerbated in rat models of cardiovascular disease (CVD)-associated Fe-ove...

  20. Human mesenchymal stem cells attenuate pulmonary hypertension induced by prenatal lipopolysaccharide treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Lin, Willie; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-10-01

    Intra-amniotic injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces pulmonary hypertension in newborn rats. This study was designed to test whether human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reduce pulmonary hypertension and alleviate cardiac hypertrophy in prenatal LPS-treated rats. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitoneally with LPS (0.5 mg/kg per day) or untreated on gestational days 20 and 21. Human MSCs (3×10(5) cells and 1×10(6) cells) in 0.03 mL of normal saline (NS) were transplanted intratracheally on postnatal day 5. Four study groups were considered: normal, LPS+NS, LPS+MSCs (3×10(5) cells), and LPS+MSCs (1×10(6) cells). On postnatal day 14, lung and heart tissues were collected for measuring the arterial medial wall thickness (MWT) and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) level as markers of pulmonary hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy, respectively. The LPS+NS group exhibited a significantly higher right ventricle (RV)/[left ventricle (LV)+ interventricular septum (IVS)] thickness ratio and MWT, a greater cardiomyocyte width, a greater number of cardiomyocyte nuclei per squared millimeter, and higher β-MHC expression than those observed in the normal group. Human MSC transplantation (3×10(5) cells and 1×10(6) cells) in LPS-treated rats reduced MWT and the RV/(LV+IVS) thickness ratio to normal levels. This improvement in right ventricular hypertrophy was accompanied by a decrease in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), nuclear factor-κB, and tumor necrosis factor-α expression in the heart. Intratracheal human MSCs transplantation can attenuate pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy in prenatal LPS-treated rats; this attenuation may be associated with suppression of TLR4 expression via paracrine pathways. PMID:27273502

  1. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Overexpression Can Reverse the Course of Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mohamed N; Zhang, Yinzhong; Codipilly, Champa; Zaghloul, Nahla; Patel, Dhara; Wolin, Michael; Miller, Edmund J

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia leads to free radical production, which has a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH). We hypothesized that treatment with extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) could ameliorate the development of PH induced by hypoxia. In vitro studies using pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells showed that cells transfected with EC-SOD had significantly less accumulation of xanthine oxidase and reactive oxygen species than nontransfected cells after hypoxia exposure for 24 h. To study the prophylactic role of EC-SOD, adult male wild-type (WT) and transgenic (TG) mice, with lung-specific overexpression of human EC-SOD (hEC-SOD), were exposed to fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) 10% for 10 d. After exposure, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular mass (RV/S + LV), pulmonary vascular wall thickness (PVWT) and pulmonary artery contraction/relaxation were assessed. TG mice were protected against PH compared with WT mice with significantly lower RVSP (23.9 ± 1.24 versus 47.2 ± 3.4), RV/S + LV (0.287 ± 0.015 versus 0.335 ± 0.022) and vascular remodeling, indicated by PVWT (14.324 ± 1.107 versus 18.885 ± 1.529). Functional studies using pulmonary arteries isolated from mice indicated that EC-SOD prevents hypoxia-mediated attenuation of nitric oxide–induced relaxation. Therapeutic potential was assessed by exposing WT mice to FiO2 10% for 10 d. Half of the group was transfected with plasmid containing cDNA encoding human EC-SOD. The remaining animals were transfected with empty vector. Both groups were exposed to FiO2 10% for a further 10 d. Transfected mice had significantly reduced RVSP (18.97 ± 1.12 versus 41.3 ± 1.5), RV/S + LV (0.293 ± 0.012 versus 0.372 ± 0.014) and PVWT (12.51 ± 0.72 versus 18.98 ± 1.24). On the basis of these findings, we concluded that overexpression of EC-SOD prevents the development of PH and ameliorates established PH. PMID:22045221

  2. Primary breast cancer induces pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability and promotes metastasis via the VEGF-PKC pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Man; Qin, Chengyong; Han, Mingyong

    2016-06-01

    The lung is one of the most frequent target organs for breast cancer metastasis. When breast cancer cells from a primary tumor do not colonize the lung, which we named the premetastatic phase, the microenvironment of the lung has already been influenced by the primary tumor. However, little is known about the exact premetastatic alteration and regulatory mechanisms of the lung. Here, we used 4T1 cells (a mouse breast cancer cell line which can specifically metastasize to the lung) to build a mouse breast cancer model. We found that primary breast tumor induced increased pulmonary vascular permeability in the premetastatic phase, which facilitated the leakage of rhodamine-dextran and the extravasation of intravenous therapy injected cancer cells. Furthermore, tight junctions (TJs) were disrupted, and the expression of zonula occludens-1(ZO-1), one of the most important components of tight junctions, was decreased in the premetastatic lung. In addition, elevated serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was involved in the destabilization of tight junctions and the VEGF antagonist bevacizumab reversed the primary tumor-induced vascular hyperpermeability. Moreover, activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway disrupted the integrity of TJs and accordingly, the disruption could be alleviated by blocking VEGF. Taken together, these data demonstrate that primary breast cancer may induce tight junction disruptions in the premetastatic lung via the VEGF-PKC pathway and promote pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability before metastasis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26152457

  3. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Attenuates Bleomycin-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ming; Wu, Yan; Wang, Lin; Zang, Baoxia; Tan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is an active component of Carthamus tinctorius L., and we want to investigate whether HSYA attenuates pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin (BLM) in mice. The mice received a BLM via oropharyngeal aspiration, and HSYA was intraperitoneally injected. Arterial blood gas analysis was performed. Morphological changes and hydroxyproline content were measured. mRNA expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and collagen I was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. α-SMA-positive cells in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemical staining. A549 cell was cultured, and morphological changes were observed after TGF-β1 and HSYA treatment. mRNA expression was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Phosphorylation of Smad3 was evaluated by western blotting. HSYA decreased the lung consolidation area and collagen deposition in mice with pulmonary fibrosis. The blood gas changes due to BLM were attenuated by HSYA. HSYA also alleviated the BLM-induced increase of TGF-β1, connective tissue growth factor, α-SMA, and collagen I mRNA levels. HSYA treatment inhibited the increase of α-SMA expression, Smad3 phosphorylation, the morphological changes in lung tissue. HSYA inhibits Smad3 phosphorylation and elevated expression of collagen I mRNA in epithelial-mesenchymal transition induced by TGF-β1. PMID:26777519

  4. Diesel exhaust induced pulmonary and cardiovascular impairment: The role of hypertension intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Thomas, Ronald F.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Bass, Virginia; Krantz, Q. Todd; King, Charly; Nyska, Abraham; Richards, Judy E.; Andrews, Debora; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2013-04-15

    Exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) and associated gases is linked to cardiovascular impairments; however, the susceptibility of hypertensive individuals is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine cardiopulmonary effects of gas-phase versus whole-DE and (2) to examine the contribution of systemic hypertension in pulmonary and cardiovascular effects. Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with hydralazine to reduce blood pressure (BP) or L-NAME to increase BP. Spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats were treated with hydralazine to reduce BP. Control and drug-pretreated rats were exposed to air, particle-filtered exhaust (gas), or whole DE (1500 μg/m{sup 3}), 4 h/day for 2 days or 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Acute and 4-week gas and DE exposures increased neutrophils and γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) activity in lavage fluid of WKY and SH rats. DE (4 weeks) caused pulmonary albumin leakage and inflammation in SH rats. Two-day DE increased serum fatty acid binding protein-3 (FABP-3) in WKY. Marked increases occurred in aortic mRNA after 4-week DE in SH (eNOS, TF, tPA, TNF-α, MMP-2, RAGE, and HMGB-1). Hydralazine decreased BP in SH while L-NAME tended to increase BP in WKY; however, neither changed inflammation nor BALF γ-GT. DE-induced and baseline BALF albumin leakage was reduced by hydralazine in SH rats and increased by L-NAME in WKY rats. Hydralazine pretreatment reversed DE-induced TF, tPA, TNF-α, and MMP-2 expression but not eNOS, RAGE, and HMGB-1. ET-1 was decreased by HYD. In conclusion, antihypertensive drug treatment reduces gas and DE-induced pulmonary protein leakage and expression of vascular atherogenic markers. - Highlights: ► Acute diesel exhaust exposure induces pulmonary inflammation in healthy rats. ► In hypertensive rats diesel exhaust effects are seen only after long term exposure. ► Normalizing blood pressure reverses lung protein leakage caused by diesel exhaust. ► Normalizing blood pressure reverses

  5. Successful pregnancy after pulmonary embolism and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia--case report.

    PubMed

    Plesinac, S; Babović, I; Karapandzić, V Plesinac

    2013-01-01

    The authors present the case of a nulliparous 34-year-old patient. At the tenth week of gestation, she developed phlebothrombosis of veins of the right leg and massive pulmonary embolism. After thrombolytic and heparin therapy she developed rethrombosis and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II. Lepirudin was introduced in therapy and in the 12th week of gestation acenocumarol was added. After the 34th week, she received danaparoid sodium. After a week, by cesarean section, a healthy and mature female was delivered. PMID:23971268

  6. Secreted Phosphoprotein 1 and Sex-Specific Differences in Silica-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Latoche, Joseph D.; Ufelle, Alexander Chukwuma; Fazzi, Fabrizio; Ganguly, Koustav; Leikauf, George D.; Fattman, Cheryl L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fibrotic lung diseases occur predominantly in males, and reports describe better survival in affected females. Male mice are more sensitive to silica-induced lung fibrosis than silica-treated female mice. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1, also known as osteopontin) increases in pulmonary fibrosis, and Spp1 transcription may be regulated by estrogen or estrogen receptor–related receptors. Objective: We determined whether differences in silica-induced SPP1 levels contribute to sex differences in lung fibrosis. Methods: Male and female mice were treated with 0.2 g/kg intratracheal silica, and lung injury was assessed 1, 3, or 14 days post-exposure. Gene-targeted (Spp1–/–) mice, control Spp1+/+ (C57BL/6J) mice, ovariectomized (OVX) female mice, and estrogen-treated male mice were treated with silica, and lung injury was assessed. Results: Silica-induced SPP1 in lung tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage, and serum increased more in male than in female mice. Following silica treatment, bronchoalveolar lavage cell infiltrates decreased in female Spp1–/– mice compared with female Spp1+/+ mice, and lung hydroxyproline decreased in male Spp1–/– mice compared with male Spp1+/+ mice. OVX female mice had increased lung SPP1 expression in response to silica compared with silica-treated sham female mice. Silica-induced lung collagen and hydroxyproline (markers of fibrosis), and SPP1 levels decreased in estrogen-treated males compared with untreated males. Conclusion: These findings suggest that sex-specific differences in SPP1 levels contribute to the differential sensitivity of male and female mice to the development of silica-induced fibrosis. Citation: Latoche JD, Ufelle AC, Fazzi F, Ganguly K, Leikauf GD, Fattman CL. 2016. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 and sex-specific differences in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Environ Health Perspect 124:1199–1207; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510335 PMID:26955063

  7. First Steps Towards an Understanding of a Mode ofCarcinogenic Action for Vanadium Pentoxide

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, Detlef; Chevalier, Hans-Jörg; Merker, Mandy; Morgenthal, Katja; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Sagelsdorff, Peter; Walter, Marc; Weber, Klaus; Mcgregor, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation of vanadium pentoxide clearly increases the incidence of alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms in male and female B6C3F1 mice at all concentrations tested (1, 2 or 4 mg/m3), whereas responses in F344/N rats was, at most, ambiguous. While vanadium pentoxide is mutagenic in vitro and possibly in vivo in mice, this does not explain the species or site specificity of the neoplastic response. A nose-only inhalation study was conducted in female B6C3F1 mice (0, 0.25, 1 and 4 mg/m3, 6 h/day for 16 days) to explore histopathological, biochemical (α-tocopherol, glutathione and F2-isoprostane) and genetic (comet assays and 9 specific DNA-oxo-adducts) changes in the lungs. No treatment related histopathology was observed at 0.25 mg/m3. At 1 and 4 mg/m3, exposure-dependent increases were observed in lung weight, alveolar histiocytosis, sub-acute alveolitis and/or granulocytic infiltration and a generally time-dependent increased cell proliferation rate of histiocytes. Glutathione was slightly increased, whereas there were no consistent changes in α-tocopherol or 8-isoprostane F2α. There was no evidence for DNA strand breakage in lung or BAL cells, but there was an increase in 8-oxodGuo DNA lesions that could have been due to vanadium pentoxide induction of the lesions or inhibition of repair of spontaneous lesions. Thus, earlier reports of histopathological changes in the lungs after inhalation of vanadium pentoxide were confirmed, but no evidence has yet emerged for a genotoxic mode of action. Evidence is weak for oxidative stress playing any role in lung carcinogenesis at the lowest effective concentrations of vanadium pentoxide. PMID:22272055

  8. Impact of a CXCL12/CXCR4 Antagonist in Bleomycin (BLM) Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis and Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Induced Hepatic Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chow, Leola N; Schreiner, Petra; Ng, Betina Y Y; Lo, Bernard; Hughes, Michael R; Scott, R Wilder; Gusti, Vionarica; Lecour, Samantha; Simonson, Eric; Manisali, Irina; Barta, Ingrid; McNagny, Kelly M; Crawford, Jason; Webb, Murray; Underhill, T Michael

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 has been implicated in attenuation of bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic injury. In pulmonary fibrosis, published reports suggest that collagen production in the injured lung is derived from fibrocytes recruited from the circulation in response to release of pulmonary CXCL12. Conversely, in hepatic fibrosis, resident hepatic stellate cells (HSC), the key cell type in progression of fibrosis, upregulate CXCR4 expression in response to activation. Further, CXCL12 induces HSC proliferation and subsequent production of collagen I. In the current study, we evaluated AMD070, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of CXCL12/CXCR4 in alleviating BLM-induced pulmonary and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice. Similar to other CXCR4 antagonists, treatment with AMD070 significantly increased leukocyte mobilization. However, in these two models of fibrosis, AMD070 had a negligible impact on extracellular matrix deposition. Interestingly, our results indicated that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling has a role in improving mortality associated with BLM induced pulmonary injury, likely through dampening an early inflammatory response and/or vascular leakage. Together, these findings indicate that the CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling axis is not an effective target for reducing fibrosis. PMID:26998906

  9. Arginase inhibition prevents bleomycin-induced pulmonary hypertension, vascular remodeling, and collagen deposition in neonatal rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Ivanovska, Julijana; Kantores, Crystal; McNamara, Patrick J; Scott, Jeremy A; Belik, Jaques; Jankov, Robert P

    2015-03-15

    Arginase is an enzyme that limits substrate L-arginine bioavailability for the production of nitric oxide by the nitric oxide synthases and produces L-ornithine, which is a precursor for collagen formation and tissue remodeling. We studied the pulmonary vascular effects of arginase inhibition in an established model of repeated systemic bleomycin sulfate administration in neonatal rats that results in pulmonary hypertension and lung injury mimicking the characteristics typical of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. We report that arginase expression is increased in the lungs of bleomycin-exposed neonatal rats and that treatment with the arginase inhibitor amino-2-borono-6-hexanoic acid prevented the bleomycin-induced development of pulmonary hypertension and deposition of collagen. Arginase inhibition resulted in increased L-arginine and L-arginine bioavailability and increased pulmonary nitric oxide production. Arginase inhibition also normalized the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and reduced bleomycin-induced nitrative stress while having no effect on bleomycin-induced inflammation. Our data suggest that arginase is a promising target for therapeutic interventions in neonates aimed at preventing lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension.

  10. TLR4 deficiency promotes autophagy during cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    An, Chang Hyeok; Wang, Xiao Mei; Lam, Hilaire C; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Washko, George R; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2012-11-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) exert important nonimmune functions in lung homeostasis. TLR4 deficiency promotes pulmonary emphysema. We examined the role of TLR4 in regulating cigarette smoke (CS)-induced autophagy, apoptosis, and emphysema. Lung tissue was obtained from chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) patients. C3H/HeJ (Tlr4-mutated) mice and C57BL/10ScNJ (Tlr4-deficient) mice and their respective control strains were exposed to chronic CS or air. Human or mouse epithelial cells (wild-type, Tlr4-knockdown, and Tlr4-deficient) were exposed to CS-extract (CSE). Samples were analyzed for TLR4 expression, and for autophagic or apoptotic proteins by Western blot analysis or confocal imaging. Chronic obstructive lung disease lung tissues and human pulmonary epithelial cells exposed to CSE displayed increased TLR4 expression, and increased autophagic [microtubule-associated protein-1 light-chain-3B (LC3B)] and apoptotic (cleaved caspase-3) markers. Beas-2B cells transfected with TLR4 siRNA displayed increased expression of LC3B relative to control cells, basally and after exposure to CSE. The basal and CSE-inducible expression of LC3B and cleaved caspase-3 were elevated in pulmonary alveolar type II cells from Tlr4-deficient mice. Wild-type mice subjected to chronic CS-exposure displayed airspace enlargement;, however, the Tlr4-mutated or Tlr4-deficient mice exhibited a marked increase in airspace relative to wild-type mice after CS-exposure. The Tlr4-mutated or Tlr4-deficient mice showed higher levels of LC3B under basal conditions and after CS exposure. The expression of cleaved caspase-3 was markedly increased in Tlr4-deficient mice exposed to CS. We describe a protective regulatory function of TLR4 against emphysematous changes of the lung in response to CS.

  11. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Samantha J.; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B.; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Thomas, Ronald F.; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P.; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P.; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E.; Elmore, Susan A.; Morrison, James P.; Johnson, Crystal L.; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2014-01-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe. PMID:25239632

  12. Inhaled diesel emissions generated with cerium oxide nanoparticle fuel additive induce adverse pulmonary and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Snow, Samantha J; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C; Thomas, Ronald F; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E; Elmore, Susan A; Morrison, James P; Johnson, Crystal L; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2014-12-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe.

  13. Protective effect of dexpanthenol on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ermis, Hilal; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Gulbas, Gazi; Vardi, Nigar; Polat, Alaadin; Cetin, Asli; Kilic, Talat; Aytemur, Zeynep Ayfer

    2013-12-01

    Despite extensive studies, there is no effective treatment currently available other than pirfenidone for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A protective effect of pantothenic acid and its derivatives on cell damage produced by oxygen radicals has been reported, but it has not been tested in bleomycin (BLM)--induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the preventive effect of dexpanthenol (Dxp) on pulmonary fibrosis. Thirty-two rats were assigned to four groups as follows: (1) control group, (2) dexpanthenol (Dxp) group; 500 mg/kg Dxp continued intraperitoneally for 14 days, (3) bleomycin (BLM) group; a single intratracheal injection of BLM (2.5 mg/kg body weight in 0.25-ml phosphate buffered saline), and (4) BLM + Dxp-treated group; 500 mg/kg Dxp was administered 1 h before the intratracheal BLM injection and continued for 14 days i.p. The histopathological grades of lung inflammation and collagen deposition, tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured. BLM provoked inflammation and collagen deposition (p < 0.0001), with a marked increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity resembling increased inflammatory activity (p < 0.0001), which was prevented by Dxp (p < 0.0001, p = 0.02). BLM reduced tissue activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.009). MDA was increased with BLM (p = 0.003). SOD (p = 0.001) and MDA (p = 0.016) levels were improved in group 4. The CAT levels in the BLM + Dxp group were close to those in the control group (p > 0.05). We showed that Dxp significantly prevents BLM-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Further studies are required to evaluate the role of Dxp in the treatment of lung fibrosis. PMID:23995256

  14. Pathogenesis pathways of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in bleomycin-induced lung injury model in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Keyun; Jiang, Jianzhong; Ma, Tieliang; Xie, Jing; Duan, Lirong; Chen, Ruhua; Song, Ping; Yu, Zhixin; Liu, Chao; Zhu, Qin; Zheng, Jinxu

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the pathogenesis pathways of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Bleomycin (BLM) induced animal models of experimental lung fibrosis were used. CHIP assay was executed to find the link between Smad3 and IL-31, and the expressions of TGF-β1, Smad3, IL-31 and STAT1 were detected to find whether they were similar with each other. We found that in the early injury or inflammation of the animal model, BLM promoted the development of inflammation, leading to severe pulmonary fibrosis. Then the expression of TGF-β1 and Smad3 increased. Activated Smad3 bound to the IL-31 promoter region, followed by the activation of JAK-STAT pathways. The inhibitor of TGF-β1 receptor decreased the IL-31 expression and knocking-down of IL-31 also decreased the STAT1 expression. We conclude that there is a pathway of pathogenesis in BLM-induced mouse model that involves the TGF-β, IL-31 and JAKs/STATs pathway.

  15. Acute secondhand smoke-induced pulmonary inflammation is diminished in RAGE knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wood, Tyler T; Winden, Duane R; Marlor, Derek R; Wright, Alex J; Jones, Cameron M; Chavarria, Michael; Rogers, Geraldine D; Reynolds, Paul R

    2014-11-15

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) has increasingly been demonstrated to be an important modulator of inflammation in cases of pulmonary disease. Published reports involving tobacco smoke exposure have demonstrated increased expression of RAGE, its participation in proinflammatory signaling, and its role in irreversible pulmonary remodeling. The current research evaluated the in vivo effects of short-term secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in RAGE knockout and control mice compared with identical animals exposed to room air only. Quantitative PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry revealed elevated RAGE expression in controls after 4 wk of SHS exposure and an anticipated absence of RAGE expression in RAGE knockout mice regardless of smoke exposure. Ras activation, NF-κB activity, and cytokine elaboration were assessed to characterize the molecular basis of SHS-induced inflammation in the mouse lung. Furthermore, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was procured from RAGE knockout and control animals for the assessment of inflammatory cells and molecules. As a general theme, inflammation coincident with leukocyte recruitment was induced by SHS exposure and significantly influenced by the availability of RAGE. These data reveal captivating information suggesting a role for RAGE signaling in lungs exposed to SHS. However, ongoing research is still warranted to fully explain roles for RAGE and other receptors in cells coping with involuntary smoke exposure for prolonged periods of time.

  16. Cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells in elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Longhini-Dos-Santos, Nathalia; Barbosa-de-Oliveira, Valter Abraão; Kozma, Rodrigo Heras; Faria, Carolina Arruda de; Stessuk, Talita; Frei, Fernando; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2013-04-01

    Emphysema is characterized by destruction of alveolar walls with loss of gas exchange surface and consequent progressive dyspnea. This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) in an animal model of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema. Emphysema was induced in C57Bl/J6 female mice by intranasal instillation of elastase. After 21 days, the mice received bone marrow mononuclear cells from EGFP male mice with C57Bl/J6 background. The groups were assessed by comparison and statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed among the groups treated with BMMC and evaluated after 7, 14 and 21 days. Analysis of the mean linear intercept (Lm) values for the different groups allowed to observe that the group treated with BMMC and evaluated after 21 days showed the most significant result. The group that received no treatment showed a statistically significant difference when compared to other groups, except the group treated and evaluated after 21 days, evidencing the efficacy of cell therapy with BMMC in pulmonary emphysema.

  17. Activated Wnt signaling induces myofibroblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, contributing to pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaorui; Wang, Cong; Shi, Chaowen; Sun, Fangfang; Xu, Xiaomeng; Qian, Weiping; Nie, Shinan; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-05-01

    Acute lung injury may lead to fibrogenesis. However, no treatment is currently available. This study was conducted to determine the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a model of HCl-induced acute lung injury in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1 and its receptor CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)4 have been shown to participate in mobilizing MSCs. Adenovirus carrying the CXCR4 gene was used to transfect MSCs in order to increase the engraftment numbers of MSCs at injured sites. Histological examination data demonstrated that the engraftment of MSCs did not attenuate lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis. The results showed that engraftment of MSCs almost differentiated into myofibroblasts, but rarely differentiated into lung epithelial cells. Additionally, it was demonstrated that activated canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in injured lung tissue regulated the myofibroblast differentiation of MSCs in vivo. The in vitro study results demonstrated that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling stimulated MSCs to express myofibroblast markers; however, this process was attenuated by Wnt antagonist DKK1. Therefore, the results demonstrated that the aberrant activation of Wnt signaling induces the myofibroblast differentiation of engrafted MSCs, thus contributing to pulmonary fibrosis following lung injury. PMID:24573542

  18. Pulmonary surfactant phosphatidylglycerol inhibits respiratory syncytial virus–induced inflammation and infection

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Mari; Chu, Hong Wei; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of hospitalization for respiratory tract infection in young children. It is also a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly individuals and in persons with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Currently, no reliable vaccine or simple RSV antiviral therapy is available. Recently, we determined that the minor pulmonary surfactant phospholipid, palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), could markedly attenuate inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide through direct interactions with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) interacting proteins CD14 and MD-2. CD14 and TLR4 have been implicated in the host response to RSV. Treatment of bronchial epithelial cells with POPG significantly inhibited interleukin-6 and -8 production, as well as the cytopathic effects induced by RSV. The phospholipid bound RSV with high affinity and inhibited viral attachment to HEp2 cells. POPG blocked viral plaque formation in vitro by 4 log units, and markedly suppressed the expansion of plaques from cells preinfected with the virus. Administration of POPG to mice, concomitant with viral infection, almost completely eliminated the recovery of virus from the lungs at 3 and 5 days after infection, and abrogated IFN-γ (IFN-γ) production and the enhanced expression of surfactant protein D (SP-D). These findings demonstrate an important approach to prevention and treatment of RSV infections using exogenous administration of a specific surfactant phospholipid. PMID:20080799

  19. Pulmonary clearance of three aerosolized solutes in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Huchon, G.J.; Montgomery, A.B.; Lipavsky, A.; Hoeffel, J.M.; Murray, J.F.

    1988-03-01

    We studied the effects of oleic acid (OA) on pulmonary clearance of three aerosolized radioactive solutes: /sup 99m/Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA), /sup 67/Ga-desferoxamine (/sup 67/Ga-DFOM), and /sup 111/In-transferrin (/sup 111/In-TF). Either 0.09 ml/kg OA or an equivalent volume of 0.9% NaCl (controls) was administered intravenously to 48 anesthetized, paralyzed dogs. Each animal received one aerosolized solute either 60 min after (protocol A) or 30 min before (protocol B) the infusion of OA or NaCl. In protocol A clearances of all three solutes were similar in OA and control animals. In contrast, in protocol B clearances of all three solutes increased significantly during OA infusion; during the next 60 min clearances of /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA and /sup 67/Ga-DFOM returned to control values but 111In-TF remained increased. We conclude that 1) in OA-induced permeability edema pulmonary clearance of aerosolized solutes is increased when the aerosol is delivered 30 min before but not 60 min after injury, and 2) increased clearance persists only for large molecules, presumably because smaller molecules cross injured epithelium quickly and completely. These phenomena are best explained by a nonhomogeneous distribution of OA-induced injury.

  20. Common and distinct mechanisms of induced pulmonary fibrosis by particulate and soluble chemical fibrogenic agents

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Yu, Xiaoqing; Porter, Dale W.; Battelli, Lori A.; Kashon, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis results from the excessive deposition of collagen fibers and scarring in the lungs with or without an identifiable cause. The mechanism(s) underlying lung fibrosis development is poorly understood, and effective treatment is lacking. Here we compared mouse lung fibrosis induced by pulmonary exposure to prototypical particulate (crystalline silica) or soluble chemical (bleomycin or paraquat) fibrogenic agents to identify the underlying mechanisms. Young male C57BL/6J mice were given silica (2 mg), bleomycin (0.07 mg), or paraquat (0.02 mg) by pharyngeal aspiration. All treatments induced significant inflammatory infiltration and collagen deposition, manifesting fibrotic foci in silica-exposed lungs or diffuse fibrosis in bleomycin or paraquat-exposed lungs on day 7 post-exposure, at which time the lesions reached their peaks and represented a junction of transition from an acute response to chronic fibrosis. Lung genomewide gene expression was analyzed, and differential gene expression was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblotting for representative genes to demonstrate their induced expression and localization in fibrotic lungs. Canonical signaling pathways, gene ontology, and upstream transcription networks modified by each agent were identified. In particular, these inducers elicited marked proliferative responses; at the same time, silica preferentially activated innate immune functions and the defense against foreign bodies, whereas bleomycin and paraquat boosted responses related to cell adhesion, platelet activation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and wound healing. This study identified, for the first time, the shared and unique genes, signaling pathways, and biological functions regulated by particulate and soluble chemical fibrogenic agents during lung fibrosis, providing insights into the mechanisms underlying human lung fibrotic diseases. PMID:26345256

  1. Phospholipase D signaling in serotonin-induced mitogenesis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Fanburg, B L

    2008-09-01

    We have previously reported the participation of mitogen-activated protein, Rho, and phosphoinositide-3 (PI3) kinases in separate pathways in serotonin (5-HT)-induced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated the possible participation of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this growth process. 5-HT stimulated a time-dependent increase in [(3)H]phosphatidylbutanol and PA generation. Exposure of SMCs to 1-butanol or overexpression of an inactive mutant of human PLD1R898R blocked 5-HT-induced proliferation. Furthermore, 1-butanol inhibited 5-HT activation of S6K1 and S6 protein, downstream effectors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), by 80 and 72%, respectively, and partially blocked activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by 30% but had no effect on other associated signaling pathways. Exogenous PA caused cellular proliferation and revitalized cyclin D1 expression by 5-HT of the 1-butanol-treated cells. PA also reproduced activations by 5-HT of mTOR, S6K1, and ERK. Transfection with inactive human PLD1 reduced 5-HT-induced activation of S6K1 by approximately 50%. Inhibition of 5-HT receptor 2A (R 2A) with ketaserin blocked PLD activation by 5-HT. Inhibition with PI3-kinase inhibitor failed to block either activation of PLD by 5-HT or PA-dependent S6K1 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that ligation of the 5-HTR 2A by 5-HT initiates PLD activation in SMCs, and that its product, PA, is an early signaling molecule in 5-HT-induced pulmonary artery SMC proliferation. Signaling by PA produces its downstream effects primarily through the mTOR/S6K1 pathway and to a lesser extent through the ERK pathway. Hydrolysis of cell membrane lipid may be important in vascular effects of 5-HT. PMID:18621911

  2. Interactive effects of cerium oxide and diesel exhaust nanoparticles on inducing pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane Y.C.; Young, Shih-Houng; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a fuel-borne catalyst to lower the generation of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), but are emitted as cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2) along with DEP in the diesel exhaust. The present study investigates the effects of the combined exposure to DEP and CeO2 on the pulmonary system in a rat model. Specific pathogen-free male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 and/or DEP via a single intratracheal instillation and were sacrificed at various time points post-exposure. This investigation demonstrated that CeO2 induces a sustained inflammatory response, whereas DEP elicits a switch of the pulmonary immune response from Th1 to Th2. Both CeO2 and DEP activated AM and lymphocyte secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ respectively. However, only DEP enhanced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production in response to ex vivo LPS or Concanavalin A challenge that was not affected by the presence of CeO2, suggesting that DEP suppresses host defense capability by inducing the Th2 immunity. The micrographs of lymph nodes show that the particle clumps in DEP + CeO2 were significantly larger than CeO2 or DEP, exhibiting dense clumps continuous throughout the lymph nodes. Morphometric analysis demonstrates that the localization of collagen in the lung tissue after DEP + CeO2 reflects the combination of DEP-exposure plus CeO2-exposure. At 4 weeks post-exposure, the histological features demonstrated that CeO2 induced lung phospholipidosis and fibrosis. DEP induced lung granulomas that were not significantly affected by the presence of CeO2 in the combined exposure. Using CeO2 as diesel fuel catalyst may cause health concerns. PMID:24793434

  3. Phospholipase D signaling in serotonin-induced mitogenesis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Fanburg, B L

    2008-09-01

    We have previously reported the participation of mitogen-activated protein, Rho, and phosphoinositide-3 (PI3) kinases in separate pathways in serotonin (5-HT)-induced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated the possible participation of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this growth process. 5-HT stimulated a time-dependent increase in [(3)H]phosphatidylbutanol and PA generation. Exposure of SMCs to 1-butanol or overexpression of an inactive mutant of human PLD1R898R blocked 5-HT-induced proliferation. Furthermore, 1-butanol inhibited 5-HT activation of S6K1 and S6 protein, downstream effectors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), by 80 and 72%, respectively, and partially blocked activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by 30% but had no effect on other associated signaling pathways. Exogenous PA caused cellular proliferation and revitalized cyclin D1 expression by 5-HT of the 1-butanol-treated cells. PA also reproduced activations by 5-HT of mTOR, S6K1, and ERK. Transfection with inactive human PLD1 reduced 5-HT-induced activation of S6K1 by approximately 50%. Inhibition of 5-HT receptor 2A (R 2A) with ketaserin blocked PLD activation by 5-HT. Inhibition with PI3-kinase inhibitor failed to block either activation of PLD by 5-HT or PA-dependent S6K1 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that ligation of the 5-HTR 2A by 5-HT initiates PLD activation in SMCs, and that its product, PA, is an early signaling molecule in 5-HT-induced pulmonary artery SMC proliferation. Signaling by PA produces its downstream effects primarily through the mTOR/S6K1 pathway and to a lesser extent through the ERK pathway. Hydrolysis of cell membrane lipid may be important in vascular effects of 5-HT.

  4. Interactive effects of cerium oxide and diesel exhaust nanoparticles on inducing pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jane Y C; Young, Shih-Houng; Mercer, Robert R; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Ma, Joseph K; Castranova, Vincent

    2014-07-15

    Cerium compounds have been used as a fuel-borne catalyst to lower the generation of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), but are emitted as cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2) along with DEP in the diesel exhaust. The present study investigates the effects of the combined exposure to DEP and CeO2 on the pulmonary system in a rat model. Specific pathogen-free male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 and/or DEP via a single intratracheal instillation and were sacrificed at various time points post-exposure. This investigation demonstrated that CeO2 induces a sustained inflammatory response, whereas DEP elicits a switch of the pulmonary immune response from Th1 to Th2. Both CeO2 and DEP activated AM and lymphocyte secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ, respectively. However, only DEP enhanced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production in response to ex vivo LPS or Concanavalin A challenge that was not affected by the presence of CeO2, suggesting that DEP suppresses host defense capability by inducing the Th2 immunity. The micrographs of lymph nodes show that the particle clumps in DEP+CeO2 were significantly larger than CeO2 or DEP, exhibiting dense clumps continuous throughout the lymph nodes. Morphometric analysis demonstrates that the localization of collagen in the lung tissue after DEP+CeO2 reflects the combination of DEP-exposure plus CeO2-exposure. At 4 weeks post-exposure, the histological features demonstrated that CeO2 induced lung phospholipidosis and fibrosis. DEP induced lung granulomas that were not significantly affected by the presence of CeO2 in the combined exposure. Using CeO2 as diesel fuel catalyst may cause health concerns.

  5. Increase in caveolae and caveolin-1 expression modulates agonist-induced contraction and store- and receptor-operated Ca(2+) entry in pulmonary arteries of pulmonary hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Hai-Xia; Mu, Yun-Ping; Gui, Long-Xin; Yan, Fu-Rong; Lin, Da-Cen; Sham, James S K; Lin, Mo-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a major component protein associated with caveolae in the plasma membrane and has been identified as a regulator of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and receptor-operated Ca(2+) entry (ROCE). However, the contributions of caveolae/Cav-1 of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) to the altered Ca(2+) signaling pathways in pulmonary arteries (PAs) during pulmonary hypertension (PH) have not been fully characterized. The present study quantified caveolae number and Cav-1 expression, and determined the effects of caveolae disruption on ET-1, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and 1-Oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol (OAG)-induced contraction in PAs and Ca(2+) influx in PASMCs of chronic hypoxia (CH)- and monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH rats. We found that the number of caveolae, and the Cav-1 mRNA and protein levels were increased significantly in PASMCs in both PH models. Disruption of caveolae by cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) significantly inhibited the contractile response to ET-1, CPA and OAG in PAs of control rats. ET-1, SOCE and ROCE-mediated contractile responses were enhanced, and their susceptibility to MβCD suppression was potentiated in the two PH models. MβCD-induced inhibition was reversed by cholesterol repletion. Introduction of Cav-1 scaffolding domain peptide to mimic Cav-1 upregulation caused significant increase in CPA- and OAG-induced Ca(2+) entry in PASMCs of control, CH and MCT-treated groups. Our results suggest that the increase in caveolae and Cav-1 expression in PH contributes to the enhanced agonist-induced contraction of PA via modulation of SOCE and ROCE; and targeting caveolae/Cav-1 in PASMCs may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PH. PMID:27311393

  6. Connective tissue growth factor stimulates the proliferation, migration and differentiation of lung fibroblasts during paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhizhou; Sun, Zhaorui; Liu, Hongmei; Ren, Yi; Shao, Danbing; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Jinfeng; Wolfram, Joy; Wang, Feng; Nie, Shinan

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that paraquat (PQ) poisoning can cause severe lung injury during the early stages of exposure, finally leading to irreversible pulmonary fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is an essential growth factor that is involved in tissue repair and pulmonary fibrogenesis. In the present study, the role of CTGF was examined in a rat model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by PQ poisoning. Histological examination revealed interstitial edema and extensive cellular thickening of interalveolar septa at the early stages of poisoning. At 2 weeks after PQ administration, lung tissue sections exhibited a marked thickening of the alveolar walls with an accumulation of interstitial cells with a fibroblastic appearance. Masson's trichrome staining revealed a patchy distribution of collagen deposition, indicating pulmonary fibrogenesis. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining of tissue samples demonstrated that CTGF expression was significantly upregulated in the PQ-treated group. Similarly, PQ treatment of MRC-5 human lung fibroblast cells caused an increase in CTGF in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the addition of CTGF to MRC-5 cells triggered cellular proliferation and migration. In addition, CTGF induced the differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, as was evident from increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen. These findings demonstrate that PQ causes increased CTGF expression, which triggers proliferation, migration and differentiation of lung fibroblasts. Therefore, CTGF may be important in PQ-induced pulmonary fibrogenesis, rendering this growth factor a potential pharmacological target for reducing lung injury.

  7. Interactive effects of cerium oxide and diesel exhaust nanoparticles on inducing pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jane Y.C.; Young, Shih-Houng; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2014-07-15

    Cerium compounds have been used as a fuel-borne catalyst to lower the generation of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), but are emitted as cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO{sub 2}) along with DEP in the diesel exhaust. The present study investigates the effects of the combined exposure to DEP and CeO{sub 2} on the pulmonary system in a rat model. Specific pathogen-free male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO{sub 2} and/or DEP via a single intratracheal instillation and were sacrificed at various time points post-exposure. This investigation demonstrated that CeO{sub 2} induces a sustained inflammatory response, whereas DEP elicits a switch of the pulmonary immune response from Th1 to Th2. Both CeO{sub 2} and DEP activated AM and lymphocyte secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ, respectively. However, only DEP enhanced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production in response to ex vivo LPS or Concanavalin A challenge that was not affected by the presence of CeO{sub 2}, suggesting that DEP suppresses host defense capability by inducing the Th2 immunity. The micrographs of lymph nodes show that the particle clumps in DEP + CeO{sub 2} were significantly larger than CeO{sub 2} or DEP, exhibiting dense clumps continuous throughout the lymph nodes. Morphometric analysis demonstrates that the localization of collagen in the lung tissue after DEP + CeO{sub 2} reflects the combination of DEP-exposure plus CeO{sub 2}-exposure. At 4 weeks post-exposure, the histological features demonstrated that CeO{sub 2} induced lung phospholipidosis and fibrosis. DEP induced lung granulomas that were not significantly affected by the presence of CeO{sub 2} in the combined exposure. Using CeO{sub 2} as diesel fuel catalyst may cause health concerns. - Highlights: • DEP induced acute lung inflammation and switched immune response from Th1 to Th2. • DEP induced lung granulomas were not affected by the presence of CeO{sub 2}. • CeO{sub 2} induced sustained lung

  8. Mononuclear Phagocyte-Derived Microparticulate Caspase-1 Induces Pulmonary Vascular Endothelial Cell Injury.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Srabani; Wewers, Mark D; Sarkar, Anasuya

    2015-01-01

    Lung endothelial cell apoptosis and injury occurs throughout all stages of acute lung injury (ALI/ARDS) and impacts disease progression. Lung endothelial injury has traditionally been focused on the role of neutrophil trafficking to lung vascular integrin receptors induced by proinflammatory cytokine expression. Although much is known about the pathogenesis of cell injury and death in ALI/ARDS, gaps remain in our knowledge; as a result of which there is currently no effective pharmacologic therapy. Enzymes known as caspases are essential for completion of the apoptotic program and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that caspase-1 may serve as a key regulator of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) apoptosis in ALI/ARDS. Our recent experiments confirm that microparticles released from stimulated monocytic cells (THP1) induce lung endothelial cell apoptosis. Microparticles pretreated with the caspase-1 inhibitor, YVAD, or pan-caspase inhibitor, ZVAD, were unable to induce cell death of HPMVEC, suggesting the role of caspase-1 or its substrate in the induction of HPMVEC cell death. Neither un-induced microparticles (control) nor direct treatment with LPS induced apoptosis of HPMVEC. Further experiments showed that caspase-1 uptake into HPMVEC and the induction of HPMVEC apoptosis was facilitated by caspase-1 interactions with microparticulate vesicles. Altering vesicle integrity completely abrogated apoptosis of HPMVEC suggesting an encapsulation requirement for target cell uptake of active caspase-1. Taken together, we confirm that microparticle centered caspase-1 can play a regulator role in endothelial cell injury. PMID:26710067

  9. Baicalin Attenuates Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension to Improve Hypoxic Cor Pulmonale by Reducing the Activity of the p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway and MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuangquan; Wang, Yiran; Liu, Panpan; Chen, Ali; Chen, Mayun; Yao, Dan; Xu, Xiaomei; Wang, Liangxing; Huang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Baicalin has a protective effect on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats, but the mechanism of this effect remains unclear. Thus, investigating the potential mechanism of this effect was the aim of the present study. Model rats that display hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale under control conditions were successfully generated. We measured a series of indicators to observe the levels of pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary arteriole remodeling, and right ventricular remodeling. We assessed the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the pulmonary arteriole walls and pulmonary tissue homogenates using immunohistochemistry and western blot analyses, respectively. The matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 9 protein and mRNA levels in the pulmonary arteriole walls were measured using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our results demonstrated that baicalin not only reduced p38 MAPK activation in both the pulmonary arteriole walls and tissue homogenates but also downregulated the protein and mRNA expression levels of MMP-9 in the pulmonary arteriole walls. This downregulation was accompanied by the attenuation of pulmonary hypertension, arteriole remodeling, and right ventricular remodeling. These results suggest that baicalin may attenuate pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale, which are induced by chronic hypoxia, by downregulating the p38 MAPK/MMP-9 pathway. PMID:27688788

  10. Baicalin Attenuates Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension to Improve Hypoxic Cor Pulmonale by Reducing the Activity of the p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway and MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiran; Chen, Ali; Chen, Mayun; Yao, Dan; Xu, Xiaomei; Wang, Liangxing

    2016-01-01

    Baicalin has a protective effect on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats, but the mechanism of this effect remains unclear. Thus, investigating the potential mechanism of this effect was the aim of the present study. Model rats that display hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale under control conditions were successfully generated. We measured a series of indicators to observe the levels of pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary arteriole remodeling, and right ventricular remodeling. We assessed the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the pulmonary arteriole walls and pulmonary tissue homogenates using immunohistochemistry and western blot analyses, respectively. The matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 9 protein and mRNA levels in the pulmonary arteriole walls were measured using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our results demonstrated that baicalin not only reduced p38 MAPK activation in both the pulmonary arteriole walls and tissue homogenates but also downregulated the protein and mRNA expression levels of MMP-9 in the pulmonary arteriole walls. This downregulation was accompanied by the attenuation of pulmonary hypertension, arteriole remodeling, and right ventricular remodeling. These results suggest that baicalin may attenuate pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale, which are induced by chronic hypoxia, by downregulating the p38 MAPK/MMP-9 pathway. PMID:27688788

  11. Baicalin Attenuates Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension to Improve Hypoxic Cor Pulmonale by Reducing the Activity of the p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway and MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiran; Chen, Ali; Chen, Mayun; Yao, Dan; Xu, Xiaomei; Wang, Liangxing

    2016-01-01

    Baicalin has a protective effect on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats, but the mechanism of this effect remains unclear. Thus, investigating the potential mechanism of this effect was the aim of the present study. Model rats that display hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale under control conditions were successfully generated. We measured a series of indicators to observe the levels of pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary arteriole remodeling, and right ventricular remodeling. We assessed the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the pulmonary arteriole walls and pulmonary tissue homogenates using immunohistochemistry and western blot analyses, respectively. The matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 9 protein and mRNA levels in the pulmonary arteriole walls were measured using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our results demonstrated that baicalin not only reduced p38 MAPK activation in both the pulmonary arteriole walls and tissue homogenates but also downregulated the protein and mRNA expression levels of MMP-9 in the pulmonary arteriole walls. This downregulation was accompanied by the attenuation of pulmonary hypertension, arteriole remodeling, and right ventricular remodeling. These results suggest that baicalin may attenuate pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale, which are induced by chronic hypoxia, by downregulating the p38 MAPK/MMP-9 pathway.

  12. Asymmetric dimethyl arginine induces pulmonary vascular dysfunction via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha.

    PubMed

    Pekarova, Michaela; Koudelka, Adolf; Kolarova, Hana; Ambrozova, Gabriela; Klinke, Anna; Cerna, Anna; Kadlec, Jaroslav; Trundova, Maria; Sindlerova Svihalkova, Lenka; Kuchta, Radek; Kuchtova, Zdenka; Lojek, Antonin; Kubala, Lukas

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), associated with imbalance in vasoactive mediators and massive remodeling of pulmonary vasculature, represents a serious health complication. Despite the progress in treatment, PH patients typically have poor prognoses with severely affected quality of life. Asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA), endogenous inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), also represents one of the critical regulators of pulmonary vascular functions. The present study describes a novel mechanism of ADMA-induced dysfunction in human pulmonary endothelial and smooth muscle cells. The effect of ADMA was compared with well-established model of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular dysfunction. It was discovered for the first time that ADMA induced the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) in both types of cells, associated with drastic alternations in normal cellular functions (e.g., nitric oxide production, cell proliferation/Ca(2+) concentration, production of pro-inflammatory mediators, and expression of eNOS, DDAH1, and ICAM-1). Additionally, ADMA significantly enhanced the hypoxia-mediated increase in the signaling cascades. In summary, increased ADMA may lead to manifestation of PH phenotype in human endothelial and smooth muscle cells via the STAT3/HIF-1α cascade. Therefore this signaling pathway represents the potential pathway for future clinical interventions in PH. PMID:26091577

  13. Lung-specific loss of α3 laminin worsens bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morales-Nebreda, Luisa I; Rogel, Micah R; Eisenberg, Jessica L; Hamill, Kevin J; Soberanes, Saul; Nigdelioglu, Recep; Chi, Monica; Cho, Takugo; Radigan, Kathryn A; Ridge, Karen M; Misharin, Alexander V; Woychek, Alex; Hopkinson, Susan; Perlman, Harris; Mutlu, Gokhan M; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Jones, Jonathan C R; Budinger, G R Scott

    2015-04-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric proteins that are secreted by the alveolar epithelium into the basement membrane, and their expression is altered in extracellular matrices from patients with pulmonary fibrosis. In a small number of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, we found that the normal basement membrane distribution of the α3 laminin subunit was lost in fibrotic regions of the lung. To determine if these changes play a causal role in the development of fibrosis, we generated mice lacking the α3 laminin subunit specifically in the lung epithelium by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by the surfactant protein C promoter (SPC-Cre) with mice expressing floxed alleles encoding the α3 laminin gene (Lama3(fl/fl)). These mice exhibited no developmental abnormalities in the lungs up to 6 months of age, but, compared with control mice, had worsened mortality, increased inflammation, and increased fibrosis after the intratracheal administration of bleomycin. Similarly, the severity of fibrosis induced by an adenovirus encoding an active form of transforming growth factor-β was worse in mice deficient in α3 laminin in the lung. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of α3 laminin in the lung epithelium does not affect lung development, but plays a causal role in the development of fibrosis in response to bleomycin or adenovirally delivered transforming growth factor-β. Thus, we speculate that the loss of the normal basement membrane organization of α3 laminin that we observe in fibrotic regions from the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis contributes to their disease progression.

  14. Lung-specific loss of α3 laminin worsens bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morales-Nebreda, Luisa I; Rogel, Micah R; Eisenberg, Jessica L; Hamill, Kevin J; Soberanes, Saul; Nigdelioglu, Recep; Chi, Monica; Cho, Takugo; Radigan, Kathryn A; Ridge, Karen M; Misharin, Alexander V; Woychek, Alex; Hopkinson, Susan; Perlman, Harris; Mutlu, Gokhan M; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Jones, Jonathan C R; Budinger, G R Scott

    2015-04-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric proteins that are secreted by the alveolar epithelium into the basement membrane, and their expression is altered in extracellular matrices from patients with pulmonary fibrosis. In a small number of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, we found that the normal basement membrane distribution of the α3 laminin subunit was lost in fibrotic regions of the lung. To determine if these changes play a causal role in the development of fibrosis, we generated mice lacking the α3 laminin subunit specifically in the lung epithelium by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by the surfactant protein C promoter (SPC-Cre) with mice expressing floxed alleles encoding the α3 laminin gene (Lama3(fl/fl)). These mice exhibited no developmental abnormalities in the lungs up to 6 months of age, but, compared with control mice, had worsened mortality, increased inflammation, and increased fibrosis after the intratracheal administration of bleomycin. Similarly, the severity of fibrosis induced by an adenovirus encoding an active form of transforming growth factor-β was worse in mice deficient in α3 laminin in the lung. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of α3 laminin in the lung epithelium does not affect lung development, but plays a causal role in the development of fibrosis in response to bleomycin or adenovirally delivered transforming growth factor-β. Thus, we speculate that the loss of the normal basement membrane organization of α3 laminin that we observe in fibrotic regions from the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis contributes to their disease progression. PMID:25188360

  15. Lung-Specific Loss of α3 Laminin Worsens Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Nebreda, Luisa I.; Rogel, Micah R.; Eisenberg, Jessica L.; Hamill, Kevin J.; Soberanes, Saul; Nigdelioglu, Recep; Chi, Monica; Cho, Takugo; Radigan, Kathryn A.; Ridge, Karen M.; Misharin, Alexander V.; Woychek, Alex; Hopkinson, Susan; Perlman, Harris; Mutlu, Gokhan M.; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Jones, Jonathan C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric proteins that are secreted by the alveolar epithelium into the basement membrane, and their expression is altered in extracellular matrices from patients with pulmonary fibrosis. In a small number of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, we found that the normal basement membrane distribution of the α3 laminin subunit was lost in fibrotic regions of the lung. To determine if these changes play a causal role in the development of fibrosis, we generated mice lacking the α3 laminin subunit specifically in the lung epithelium by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by the surfactant protein C promoter (SPC-Cre) with mice expressing floxed alleles encoding the α3 laminin gene (Lama3fl/fl). These mice exhibited no developmental abnormalities in the lungs up to 6 months of age, but, compared with control mice, had worsened mortality, increased inflammation, and increased fibrosis after the intratracheal administration of bleomycin. Similarly, the severity of fibrosis induced by an adenovirus encoding an active form of transforming growth factor-β was worse in mice deficient in α3 laminin in the lung. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of α3 laminin in the lung epithelium does not affect lung development, but plays a causal role in the development of fibrosis in response to bleomycin or adenovirally delivered transforming growth factor-β. Thus, we speculate that the loss of the normal basement membrane organization of α3 laminin that we observe in fibrotic regions from the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis contributes to their disease progression. PMID:25188360

  16. Diet-induced alterations in gut microflora contribute to lethal pulmonary damage in TLR2/TLR4 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yewei; Sun, Shengyi; Goodrich, Julia K.; Kim, Hana; Poole, Angela C.; Duhamel, Gerald E.; Ley, Ruth E.; Qi, Ling

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic intake of Western diet has driven an epidemic of obesity and metabolic syndrome, but how it induces mortality remains unclear. Here we show that chronic intake of a high-fat diet (HFD), not a low-fat diet (LFD), leads to severe pulmonary damage and mortality in mice deficient in Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4 (DKO hereafter). Diet-induced pulmonary lesions are blocked by antibiotics treatment and transmissible to wildtype mice upon either cohousing or fecal transplantation, pointing to the existence of bacterial pathogens. Indeed, diet and innate deficiency exert significant impact on gut microbiota composition. Thus, chronic intake of HFD promotes severe pulmonary damage and mortality in DKO mice in part via gut dysbiosis, a finding that may be important for immunodeficient patients, particularly those on chemotherapy or radiotherapy, where gut microbiota-caused conditions are often life-threatening. PMID:24953658

  17. Diet-induced alterations in gut microflora contribute to lethal pulmonary damage in TLR2/TLR4-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yewei; Sun, Shengyi; Goodrich, Julia K; Kim, Hana; Poole, Angela C; Duhamel, Gerald E; Ley, Ruth E; Qi, Ling

    2014-07-10

    Chronic intake of Western diet has driven an epidemic of obesity and metabolic syndrome, but how it induces mortality remains unclear. Here, we show that chronic intake of a high-fat diet (HFD), not a low-fat diet, leads to severe pulmonary damage and mortality in mice deficient in Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (DKO). Diet-induced pulmonary lesions are blocked by antibiotic treatment and are transmissible to wild-type mice upon either cohousing or fecal transplantation, pointing to the existence of bacterial pathogens. Indeed, diet and innate deficiency exert significant impact on gut microbiota composition. Thus, chronic intake of HFD promotes severe pulmonary damage and mortality in DKO mice in part via gut dysbiosis, a finding that may be important for immunodeficient patients, particularly those on chemotherapy or radiotherapy, where gut-microbiota-caused conditions are often life threatening.

  18. Decreased proteasomal function accelerates cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yosuke; Tomaru, Utano; Ishizu, Akihiro; Ito, Tomoki; Kiuchi, Takayuki; Ono, Ayako; Miyajima, Syota; Nagai, Katsura; Higashi, Tsunehito; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Miwa, Soichi; Kasahara, Masanori

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disease common in elderly people, characterized by progressive destruction of lung parenchyma and chronic inflammation of the airways. The pathogenesis of COPD remains unclear, but recent studies suggest that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in alveolar cells contributes to emphysematous lung destruction. The proteasome is a multicatalytic enzyme complex that plays a critical role in proteostasis by rapidly destroying misfolded and modified proteins generated by oxidative and other stresses. Proteasome activity decreases with aging in many organs including lungs, and an age-related decline in proteasomal function has been implicated in various age-related pathologies. However, the role of the proteasome system in the pathogenesis of COPD has not been investigated. Recently, we have established a transgenic (Tg) mouse model with decreased proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, showing age-related phenotypes. Using this model, we demonstrate here that decreased proteasomal function accelerates cigarette smoke (CS)-induced pulmonary emphysema. CS-exposed Tg mice showed remarkable airspace enlargement and increased foci of inflammation compared with wild-type controls. Importantly, apoptotic cells were found in the alveolar walls of the affected lungs. Impaired proteasomal activity also enhanced apoptosis in cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-exposed fibroblastic cells derived from mice and humans in vitro. Notably, aggresome formation and prominent nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor were observed in CSE-exposed fibroblastic cells isolated from Tg mice. Collective evidence suggests that CS exposure and impaired proteasomal activity coordinately enhance apoptotic cell death in the alveolar walls that may be involved in the development and progression of emphysema in susceptible individuals such as the elderly.

  19. Neotuberostemonine attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by suppressing the recruitment and activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Juan; Cheng, Si; Feng, Tianlong; Wu, Yan; Xie, Weina; Zhang, Mian; Xu, Xianghong; Zhang, Chaofeng

    2016-07-01

    Neotuberostemonine (NTS) is one of the main antitussive alkaloids in the root of Stemona tuberosa Lour. This study aimed to investigate the effects of NTS on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice and the underlying mechanism. After BLM administration, NTS were orally administered to mice at 20 and 40mg/kg per day from days 8 to 21, with nintedanib as a positive control. The effect of NTS on BLM-induced mice was assessed via histopathological examination by HE and Masson's trichrome staining, TGF-β1 level and macrophage recruitment by immunohistochemical staining, expression of profibrotic media and M1/M2 polarization by western blot. RAW 264.7 cells were used to evaluate whether NTS (1, 10, 100μM) directly affected macrophages. The results revealed that NTS treatment significantly ameliorated lung histopathological changes and decreased inflammatory cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The over-expression of collagen, α-SMA and TGF-β1 was reduced by NTS. Furthermore, NTS markedly lowered the expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 while raised the expression of MMP-9. A further analysis showed that NTS was able to decrease the recruitment of macrophages and to inhibit the M2 polarization in mice lung tissues. The experiment in vitro showed that NTS significantly reduced the arginase-1 (marker for M2) expression in a dose-dependent manner but down-regulated the iNOS (marker for M1) expression only at 100μM. In conclusion, our study demonstrated for the first time that NTS has a significant protective effect on BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis through suppressing the recruitment and M2 polarization of macrophages. PMID:27144994

  20. Neotuberostemonine attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by suppressing the recruitment and activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Juan; Cheng, Si; Feng, Tianlong; Wu, Yan; Xie, Weina; Zhang, Mian; Xu, Xianghong; Zhang, Chaofeng

    2016-07-01

    Neotuberostemonine (NTS) is one of the main antitussive alkaloids in the root of Stemona tuberosa Lour. This study aimed to investigate the effects of NTS on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice and the underlying mechanism. After BLM administration, NTS were orally administered to mice at 20 and 40mg/kg per day from days 8 to 21, with nintedanib as a positive control. The effect of NTS on BLM-induced mice was assessed via histopathological examination by HE and Masson's trichrome staining, TGF-β1 level and macrophage recruitment by immunohistochemical staining, expression of profibrotic media and M1/M2 polarization by western blot. RAW 264.7 cells were used to evaluate whether NTS (1, 10, 100μM) directly affected macrophages. The results revealed that NTS treatment significantly ameliorated lung histopathological changes and decreased inflammatory cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The over-expression of collagen, α-SMA and TGF-β1 was reduced by NTS. Furthermore, NTS markedly lowered the expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 while raised the expression of MMP-9. A further analysis showed that NTS was able to decrease the recruitment of macrophages and to inhibit the M2 polarization in mice lung tissues. The experiment in vitro showed that NTS significantly reduced the arginase-1 (marker for M2) expression in a dose-dependent manner but down-regulated the iNOS (marker for M1) expression only at 100μM. In conclusion, our study demonstrated for the first time that NTS has a significant protective effect on BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis through suppressing the recruitment and M2 polarization of macrophages.

  1. Right ventricular cyclic nucleotide signaling is decreased in hyperoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Heilman, Rachel P; Lagoski, Megan B; Lee, Keng Jin; Taylor, Joann M; Kim, Gina A; Berkelhamer, Sara K; Steinhorn, Robin H; Farrow, Kathryn N

    2015-06-15

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) and right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) affect 25-35% of premature infants with significant bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), increasing morbidity and mortality. We sought to determine the role of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) in the right ventricle (RV) and left ventricle (LV) in a hyperoxia-induced neonatal mouse model of PH and RVH. After birth, C57BL/6 mice were placed in room air (RA) or 75% O2 (CH) for 14 days to induce PH and RVH. Mice were euthanized at 14 days or recovered in RA for 14 days or 42 days prior to euthanasia at 28 or 56 days of age. Some pups received sildenafil or vehicle (3 mg·kg(-1)·dose(-1) sc) every other day from P0. RVH was assessed by Fulton's index [RV wt/(LV + septum) wt]. PDE5 protein expression was analyzed via Western blot, PDE5 activity was measured by commercially available assay, and cGMP was measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. Hyperoxia induced RVH in mice after 14 days, and RVH did not resolve until 56 days of age. Hyperoxia increased PDE5 expression and activity in RV, but not LV + S, after 14 days. PDE5 expression normalized by 28 days of age, but PDE5 activity did not normalize until 56 days of age. Sildenafil given during hyperoxia prevented RVH, decreased RV PDE5 activity, and increased RV cGMP levels. Mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of PDE5 had increased RVH in RA. These findings suggest normal RV PDE5 function is disrupted by hyperoxia, and elevated PDE5 contributes to RVH and remodeling. Therefore, in addition to impacting the pulmonary vasculature, sildenafil also targets PDE5 in the neonatal mouse RV and decreases RVH.

  2. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  3. Myeloid derived hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha is required for protection against pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus infection.

    PubMed

    Shepardson, Kelly M; Jhingran, Anupam; Caffrey, Alayna; Obar, Joshua J; Suratt, Benjamin T; Berwin, Brent L; Hohl, Tobias M; Cramer, Robert A

    2014-09-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) is the mammalian transcriptional factor that controls metabolism, survival, and innate immunity in response to inflammation and low oxygen. Previous work established that generation of hypoxic microenvironments occurs within the lung during infection with the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Here we demonstrate that A. fumigatus stabilizes HIF1α protein early after pulmonary challenge that is inhibited by treatment of mice with the steroid triamcinolone. Utilizing myeloid deficient HIF1α mice, we observed that HIF1α is required for survival and fungal clearance early following pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus. Unlike previously reported research with bacterial pathogens, HIF1α deficient neutrophils and macrophages were surprisingly not defective in fungal conidial killing. The increase in susceptibility of the myeloid deficient HIF1α mice to A. fumigatus was in part due to decreased early production of the chemokine CXCL1 (KC) and increased neutrophil apoptosis at the site of infection, resulting in decreased neutrophil numbers in the lung. Addition of recombinant CXCL1 restored neutrophil survival and numbers, murine survival, and fungal clearance. These results suggest that there are unique HIF1α mediated mechanisms employed by the host for protection and defense against fungal pathogen growth and invasion in the lung. Additionally, this work supports the strategy of exploring HIF1α as a therapeutic target in specific immunosuppressed populations with fungal infections.

  4. Chinese skullcap in move free arthritis supplement causes drug induced liver injury and pulmonary infiltrates.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Renumathy; Owens, Victoria; Sanchez, William

    2013-01-01

    Herbal medications are being increasingly used by the American population especially for common conditions like arthritis. They have been reported to cause adverse effects, including significant hepatotoxicity, but reporting remains sporadic. We report here a patient who developed drug induced liver injury following the intake of Move Free, which is an over-the-counter arthritis supplement. We propose that Chinese skullcap, which is one of the herbal ingredients of the medication, is responsible for the adverse event. There was a strong temporal association between the intake of supplement and onset of symptoms, and also there have been a few recent case reports implicating the same component. A unique observation in our case is the occurrence of pulmonary infiltrates simultaneously with the hepatotoxicity, and this side effect has not been well documented before. Both the hepatic and pulmonary complications completely resolved over few weeks after the patient stopped taking the medication. Since these supplements are readily available over the counter, we feel that it is important to document possible adverse outcomes to raise awareness in the medical community and also among patients. PMID:25431706

  5. Chinese Skullcap in Move Free Arthritis Supplement Causes Drug Induced Liver Injury and Pulmonary Infiltrates

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekaran, Renumathy

    2013-01-01

    Herbal medications are being increasingly used by the American population especially for common conditions like arthritis. They have been reported to cause adverse effects, including significant hepatotoxicity, but reporting remains sporadic. We report here a patient who developed drug induced liver injury following the intake of Move Free, which is an over-the-counter arthritis supplement. We propose that Chinese skullcap, which is one of the herbal ingredients of the medication, is responsible for the adverse event. There was a strong temporal association between the intake of supplement and onset of symptoms, and also there have been a few recent case reports implicating the same component. A unique observation in our case is the occurrence of pulmonary infiltrates simultaneously with the hepatotoxicity, and this side effect has not been well documented before. Both the hepatic and pulmonary complications completely resolved over few weeks after the patient stopped taking the medication. Since these supplements are readily available over the counter, we feel that it is important to document possible adverse outcomes to raise awareness in the medical community and also among patients. PMID:25431706

  6. Indomethacin pretreatment reduces ozone-induced pulmonary function decrements in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Adams, W.C.; Siefkin, A.D.

    1987-12-01

    We studied whether O/sub 3/-induced pulmonary function decrements could be inhibited by the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, indomethacin, in healthy human subjects. Fourteen college-age males completed six 1-h exposure protocols consisting of no drug, placebo, and indomethacin (Indocin SR 75 mg every 12 h for 5 days) pretreatments, with filtered air and O/sub 3/ (0.35 ppm) exposures within each pretreatment. Pretreatments were delivered weekly in random order in a double-blind fashion. Ozone and filtered air exposures, separated by 72 h, were delivered in random order in a single-blind fashion. Exposures consisted of 1-h exercise on a bicycle ergometer with work loads set to elicit a mean minute ventilation of 60 L/min. Statistical analysis revealed significant (p less than 0.05) across pretreatment effects for FVC and FEV1, with no drug versus indomethacin and placebo versus indomethacin comparisons being significant. These findings suggest that cyclooxygenase products of arachidonic acid, which are sensitive to indomethacin inhibition, play a prominent role in the development of pulmonary function decrements consequent to acute O/sub 3/ exposure.

  7. Mechanisms of hydralazine induced vasodilation in rabbit aorta and pulmonary artery

    PubMed Central

    Ellershaw, D C; Gurney, A M

    2001-01-01

    The directly acting vasodilator hydralazine has been proposed to act at an intracellular site in vascular smooth muscle to inhibit Ca2+ release. This study investigated the mechanism of action of hydralazine on rabbit aorta and pulmonary artery by comparing its effects on the tension generated by intact and β-escin permeabilized vessels and on the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, membrane potential and K+ currents of isolated vascular smooth muscle cells. Hydralazine relaxed pulmonary artery and aorta with similar potency. It was equally effective at inhibiting phasic and tonic contractions evoked by phenylephrine in intact vessels and contractions evoked by inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (IP3) in permeabilized vessels. Hydralazine inhibited the contraction of permeabilized vessels and the increase in smooth muscle cell Ca2+ concentration evoked by caffeine with similar concentration dependence, but with lower potency than its effect on IP3 contractions. Hydralazine had no effect on the relationship between Ca2+ concentration and force generation in permeabilized vessels, but it slowed the rate at which maximal force was developed before, but not after, destroying sarcoplasmic reticulum function with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Hydralazine had no effect on membrane potential or the amplitudes of K+ currents recorded from isolated smooth muscle cells over the concentration range causing relaxation of intact vessels. The results suggest that the main action of hydralazine is to inhibit the IP3-induced release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:11588117

  8. Loss of adipose triglyceride lipase is associated with human cancer and induces mouse pulmonary neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Pichler, Martin; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Haybaeck, Johannes; Jahn, Stephan W; Lackner, Carolin; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette; Popper, Helmut; Schauer, Silvia; Nusshold, Elisa; Kindt, Alida S D; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Speicher, Michael R; Haemmerle, Guenther; Zimmermann, Robert; Zechner, Rudolf; Vesely, Paul W; Hoefler, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Understanding cancer metabolism is instrumental to devise innovative therapeutic approaches. Anabolic metabolism, including the induction of lipogenic enzymes, is a key feature of proliferating cells. Here, we report a novel tumor suppressive function for adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the rate limiting enzyme in the triglyceride hydrolysis cascade.In immunohistochemical analysis, non-small cell lung cancers, pancreatic adenocarcinoma as well as leiomyosarcoma showed significantly reduced levels of ATGL protein compared to corresponding normal tissues. The ATGL gene was frequently deleted in various forms of cancers. Low levels of ATGL mRNA correlated with significantly reduced survival in patients with ovarian, breast, gastric and non-small cell lung cancers. Remarkably, pulmonary neoplasia including invasive adenocarcinoma developed spontaneously in mice lacking ATGL pointing to an important role for this lipase in controlling tumor development.Loss of ATGL, as detected in several forms of human cancer, induces spontaneous development of pulmonary neoplasia in a mouse model. Our results, therefore, suggest a novel tumor suppressor function for ATGL and contribute to the understanding of cancer metabolism. We propose to evaluate loss of ATGL protein expression for the diagnosis of malignant tumors. Finally, modulation of the lipolytic pathway may represent a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of human cancer.

  9. Myeloid Derived Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1-alpha Is Required for Protection against Pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shepardson, Kelly M.; Jhingran, Anupam; Caffrey, Alayna; Obar, Joshua J.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Berwin, Brent L.; Hohl, Tobias M.; Cramer, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) is the mammalian transcriptional factor that controls metabolism, survival, and innate immunity in response to inflammation and low oxygen. Previous work established that generation of hypoxic microenvironments occurs within the lung during infection with the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Here we demonstrate that A. fumigatus stabilizes HIF1α protein early after pulmonary challenge that is inhibited by treatment of mice with the steroid triamcinolone. Utilizing myeloid deficient HIF1α mice, we observed that HIF1α is required for survival and fungal clearance early following pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus. Unlike previously reported research with bacterial pathogens, HIF1α deficient neutrophils and macrophages were surprisingly not defective in fungal conidial killing. The increase in susceptibility of the myeloid deficient HIF1α mice to A. fumigatus was in part due to decreased early production of the chemokine CXCL1 (KC) and increased neutrophil apoptosis at the site of infection, resulting in decreased neutrophil numbers in the lung. Addition of recombinant CXCL1 restored neutrophil survival and numbers, murine survival, and fungal clearance. These results suggest that there are unique HIF1α mediated mechanisms employed by the host for protection and defense against fungal pathogen growth and invasion in the lung. Additionally, this work supports the strategy of exploring HIF1α as a therapeutic target in specific immunosuppressed populations with fungal infections. PMID:25255025

  10. Contribution of elastin and collagen to the pathogenesis of monocrotaline induced pulmonary hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Todorovich, L.; Johnson, D.; Ranger, P.; Keeley, F.; Rabinovitch, M.

    1986-03-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were selected randomly for subcutaneous injections, 24 with monocrotaline (M) (60mg/kg) and 24 with an equivolume of saline, and studied 8, 16 or 28 days later. The right (RV) and left ventricle with septum (LV + S) were separated and weighed. The pulmonary artery (PA) was assessed by light and electron microscopy. Synthesis of elastin collagen and non-collagenous proteins was determined by measuring incorporations of /sup 3/H-valine, /sup 14/C-OH-proline and /sup 14/C-proline respectively. Total content of elastin was determined by weight of residue after CNBr digestion, and of collagen by total OH-proline content in SDS and CNBr extracts. At 16 days, the M injected rats developed a 6-fold increase in PA elastin synthesis and a 2-fold increase in medial wall thickness. Ultrastructural changes included increased microtubules and golgi apparatus in endothelium, decreased proportion of mature elastin in subendothelium and increased ground substance in media. By 28 days, M rats showed a progressive increase in PA elastin and collagen synthesis, greater than 20-fold, and in medial wall thickness, 3-fold. This was associated with a 2-fold increase in total elastin in proportion to the increase in PA weight and the development of RV hypertrophy (RV/LV + S increased more than 2-fold). Progressive irreversible pulmonary hypertension induced by M may be related to continuing stimulation of PA elastin and collagen synthesis.

  11. Loss of adipose triglyceride lipase is associated with human cancer and induces mouse pulmonary neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Pichler, Martin; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Haybaeck, Johannes; Jahn, Stephan W.; Lackner, Carolin; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette; Popper, Helmut; Schauer, Silvia; Nusshold, Elisa; Kindt, Alida S. D.; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Speicher, Michael R.; Haemmerle, Guenther; Zimmermann, Robert; Zechner, Rudolf; Vesely, Paul W.; Hoefler, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Understanding cancer metabolism is instrumental to devise innovative therapeutic approaches. Anabolic metabolism, including the induction of lipogenic enzymes, is a key feature of proliferating cells. Here, we report a novel tumor suppressive function for adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the rate limiting enzyme in the triglyceride hydrolysis cascade. In immunohistochemical analysis, non-small cell lung cancers, pancreatic adenocarcinoma as well as leiomyosarcoma showed significantly reduced levels of ATGL protein compared to corresponding normal tissues. The ATGL gene was frequently deleted in various forms of cancers. Low levels of ATGL mRNA correlated with significantly reduced survival in patients with ovarian, breast, gastric and non-small cell lung cancers. Remarkably, pulmonary neoplasia including invasive adenocarcinoma developed spontaneously in mice lacking ATGL pointing to an important role for this lipase in controlling tumor development. Loss of ATGL, as detected in several forms of human cancer, induces spontaneous development of pulmonary neoplasia in a mouse model. Our results, therefore, suggest a novel tumor suppressor function for ATGL and contribute to the understanding of cancer metabolism. We propose to evaluate loss of ATGL protein expression for the diagnosis of malignant tumors. Finally, modulation of the lipolytic pathway may represent a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of human cancer. PMID:27213586

  12. Massive Pulmonary Embolism in a Patient with Heparin Induced Thrombocytopenia: Successful Treatment with Dabigatran

    PubMed Central

    Bircan, Haci Ahmet; Alanoglu, Emine Guchan

    2016-01-01

    Heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare, potentially fatal, immune-mediated complication of heparin therapy, associated with thrombosis and thrombocytopenia. In this study, a successful dabigatran administration in a case with massive pulmonary thromboembolism (mPTE) and HIT is presented. 57 years-old female, who was receiving low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (0.4 mL once a daily, S.C. for 11 days) due to total knee replacement, was referred to our clinic with the hypotension and syncope attacks. Her echocardiography and pulmonary CT angiography findings were consistent with mPTE. We detected a serious decrease in her platelet count highly suggestive for HIT (plt: 54×103/µL). LMWH was discontinued and dabigatran was started (150 mg twice daily). After platelet count increased over 150×103/μL, dabigatran was switched to warfarin. Since heparin is widely used in medicine, all physicians need to be aware of this life threatening complication of heparin. Replacing heparin with an alternative anticoagulant such as dabigatran may become a life-saving strategy especially in case of HIT complicated with mPTE. PMID:27026768

  13. The Protective Effect of Naringin against Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Turgut, Nergiz H.; Kara, Haki; Elagoz, Sahende; Deveci, Koksal; Gungor, Huseyin; Arslanbas, Emre

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the protective effect of naringin on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Twenty-four Wistar rats randomly divided into four groups (control, bleomycin alone, bleomycin + naringin 40, and bleomycin + naringin 80) were used. Rats were administered a single dose of bleomycin (5 mg/kg; via the tracheal cannula) alone or followed by either naringin 40 mg/kg (orally) or naringin 80 mg/kg (orally) or water (1 mL, orally) for 14 days. Rats and lung tissue were weighed to determine the lung index. TNF-α and IL-1β levels, hydroxyproline content, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were assayed. Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Masson's trichrome, and 0.1% toluidine blue. TNF-α, IL-1β, and MDA levels and hydroxyproline content significantly increased (p < 0.01) and GPx and SOD activities significantly decreased in bleomycin group (p < 0.01). Naringin at a dose of 80 mg/kg body weight significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-1β activity, hydroxyproline content, and MDA level (p < 0.01) and increased GPx and SOD activities (p < 0.05). Histological evidence supported the results. These results show that naringin has the potential of reducing the toxic effects of bleomycin and may provide supportive therapy for conventional treatment methods for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26977316

  14. Synthesis of niobium pentoxide nanoparticles in single-flow supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchigami, Teruaki; Kakimoto, Ken-ichi

    2016-10-01

    The development of a new synthesis method is still required for very fine oxide nanoparticles. In this study, a single-flow supercritical fluid system has been developed for the synthesis of highly crystalline nanosized oxide particles. Niobium oxide particles were synthesized by single-flow supercritical water treatment, batch-type supercritical water treatment and subcritical water treatment. Niobium pentoxide nanoparticles synthesized by single-flow supercritical water treatment at 673 K, 24.5 MPa, and 15 ml min-1 flow rate had a pseudohexagonal structure. The morphology of the nanoparticle was a rod, and it has a smaller particle size and larger crystallite size than those of the oxide particles synthesized by the other methods, because the particle growth and the decomposition of surfactant were rapidly suppressed in the single-flow supercritical water treatment. The nanosized niobium pentoxide is useful as a catalyst in harsh environments and as a precursor powder of lead-free piezoelectric materials.

  15. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Halappanavar, Sabina; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction of the acute phase response is intimately linked to risk of cardiovascular disease as shown in both epidemiological and animal studies. Indeed, blood levels of acute phase proteins, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, are independent predictors of risk of cardiovascular disease in prospective epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased levels of acute phase mRNA and proteins in lung tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma clearly indicate pulmonary acute phase response following pulmonary deposition of different kinds of particles including diesel exhaust particles, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes. The pulmonary acute phase response is dose-dependent and long lasting. Conversely, the hepatic acute phase response is reduced relative to lung or entirely absent. We also provide evidence that pulmonary inflammation, as measured by neutrophil influx, is a predictor of the acute phase response and that the total surface area of deposited particles correlates with the pulmonary acute phase response. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to occupational exposure to nanoparticles. How to cite this article: WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2014, 6:517–531. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1279 PMID:24920450

  16. Rosuvastatin intensifies the beneficial effects of rho-kinase inhibitor in reversal of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Owczarek, Jacek; Sołtysiak, Urszula; Orszulak-Michalak, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It remains controversial whether statins have a beneficial effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). This study is intended to evaluate whether statin, co-administered with Rho-kinase inhibitor, could enhance its efficacy. Although Rho-kinase inhibitors, including fasudil, have been reported to improve pulmonary hypertension in experimental and clinical studies, the combination of these agents has not been tested in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Material and methods The effects of such a regimen on hemodynamics, right ventricle hypertrophy, and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) activity in experimental monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension were examined. Fourteen days after monocrotaline injection (60 mg/kg), male rats were treated orally for another 14 days with fasudil (15 mg/kg per day), or with a combination of fasudil + rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg per day). Results The drug combination reversed the MCT-induced increase in right ventricle pressure (RVP) and reduced right ventricular hypertrophy (RV/LV + S ratio) more than Rho kinase inhibitor alone. The simultaneous administration of fasudil and rosuvastatin caused a further decrease of RhoA kinase activity in isolated lung tissues as compared to fasudil alone. Conclusions The results indicate that rosuvastatin intensifies the beneficial effects of Rho-kinase inhibitor on the Rho/Rho-kinase pathway and such a combination may represent an option for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27478473

  17. Heterozygous deficiency of hypoxia-inducible factor–2α protects mice against pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular dysfunction during prolonged hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Brusselmans, Koen; Compernolle, Veerle; Tjwa, Marc; Wiesener, Michael S.; Maxwell, Patrick H.; Collen, Désiré; Carmeliet, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia induces pulmonary vascular remodeling, leading to pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and heart failure. Heterozygous deficiency of hypoxia-inducible factor–1α (HIF-1α), which mediates the cellular response to hypoxia by increasing expression of genes involved in erythropoiesis and angiogenesis, has been previously shown to delay hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. HIF-2α is a homologue of HIF-1α and is abundantly expressed in the lung, but its role in pulmonary hypertension remains unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the pulmonary response of WT and viable heterozygous HIF-2α–deficient (Hif2α+/–) mice after exposure to 10% O2 for 4 weeks. In contrast to WT mice, Hif2α+/– mice were fully protected against pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy, unveiling a critical role of HIF-2α in hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. Pulmonary expression levels of endothelin-1 and plasma catecholamine levels were increased threefold and 12-fold respectively in WT but not in Hif2α+/– mice after hypoxia, suggesting that HIF-2α–mediated upregulation of these vasoconstrictors contributes to the development of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling. PMID:12750401

  18. Phase transition kinetics in DIET of vanadium pentoxide. I. Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, R.; Fan, H.-J.; Marks, L. D.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results of the kinetics of phase transformation in vanadium pentoxide during surface loss of oxygen from electron irradiation are described. Phase transformations under three different regimes were examined: (a) low flux; (b) intermediate flux and (c) high flux. Different phase transformation routes were observed under different fluxes. In a companion paper, numerical calculations are presented demonstrating that these results are due to a mixed interface/diffusion controlled phase transition pumped by surface oxygen loss.

  19. Role of Cigarette Smoke-Induced Aggresome Formation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease-Emphysema Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ian; Ji, Changhoon; Ni, Inzer; Min, Taehong; Tang, Danni; Vij, Neeraj

    2015-08-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure is known to induce proteostasis imbalance that can initiate accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. Therefore, the primary goal of this study was to determine if first- and secondhand CS induces localization of ubiquitinated proteins in perinuclear spaces as aggresome bodies. Furthermore, we sought to determine the mechanism by which smoke-induced aggresome formation contributes to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-emphysema pathogenesis. Hence, Beas2b cells were treated with CS extract (CSE) for in vitro experimental analysis of CS-induced aggresome formation by immunoblotting, microscopy, and reporter assays, whereas chronic CS-exposed murine model and human COPD-emphysema lung tissues were used for validation. In preliminary analysis, we observed a significant (P < 0.01) increase in ubiquitinated protein aggregation in the insoluble protein fraction of CSE-treated Beas2b cells. We verified that CS-induced ubiquitin aggregrates are localized in the perinuclear spaces as aggresome bodies. These CS-induced aggresomes (P < 0.001) colocalize with autophagy protein microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3B(+) autophagy bodies, whereas U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved autophagy-inducing drug (carbamazepine) significantly (P < 0.01) decreases their colocalization and expression, suggesting CS-impaired autophagy. Moreover, CSE treatment significantly increases valosin-containing protein-p62 protein-protein interaction (P < 0.0005) and p62 expression (aberrant autophagy marker; P < 0.0001), verifying CS-impaired autophagy as an aggresome formation mechanism. We also found that inhibiting protein synthesis by cycloheximide does not deplete CS-induced ubiquitinated protein aggregates, suggesting the role of CS-induced protein synthesis in aggresome formation. Next, we used an emphysema murine model to verify that chronic CS significantly (P < 0.0005) induces aggresome formation. Moreover, we

  20. Picosecond laser structuring of thin film platinum layers covered with tantalum pentoxide isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Heise, Gerhard; Huber, Heinz; Trappendreher, Daniel; Ilchmann, Florian; Weiss, Robin S.; Wolf, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    A thin film layer system consisting of platinum (Pt) as conductive layer on a glass substrate and tantalum pentoxide as isolating layer on top of the platinum is attractive for designing biocompatible conductor paths and contact pads for bio sensor chips. For the flexible and rapid patterning of the conductive and the isolating layers, both, the complete removal and the selective ablation of the individual thin films were investigated using ultra-short laser pulses with about 10 ps pulse duration and 1064 nm wavelength at low laser fluences. A platinum film covered with tantalum pentoxide shows a significantly lower ablation threshold than a single Pt film on glass alone when illuminated from the front side. Furthermore, we explored that the tantalum pentoxide film can be removed by glass side illumination from the Pt film, without affecting the Pt film and leaving the Pt film on the glass substrate intact. Those ablation phenomena occur at laser fluences of about 0.2 J/cm{sup 2}, far below the evaporation limit of platinum. We present a detailed ablation threshold value examination for the structuring of these layer systems by front side and glass side irradiation for different film thicknesses. Furthermore, we discuss the possible underlying physical mechanisms of these ablation phenomena.

  1. Ozone-induced changes in the pulmonary clearance of (99m)Tc-DTPA in man

    SciTech Connect

    Kehrl, H.R.; Vincent, L.M.; Kowalsky, R.J.; Horstman, D.H.; O'Neil, J.J.

    1988-05-01

    Ozone is a respiratory irritant that has been shown in animals to increase the premeability of the respiratory epithelium. In the study the authors have recently reported that respiratory epithelial permeability was similarly affected in eight healthy non-smoking young men exposed to ozone (ARRD, 135 (1987) 1124-8). Permeability was evaluated by determining the pulmonary clearance of inhaled aerosolized 99mTc-DTPA with sequential posterior lung imaging by a computer-assisted gamma camera. In a randomized crossover design, 16 young men were exposed for 2 h to purified air and 0.4 ppm ozone while performing intermittent high intensity treadmill exercise; forced vital capacity (FVC) was measured before and at the end of exposures. The results demonstrate that ozone exposure increased respiratory epithelial permeability. Such an increase may be a manifestation of direct ozone-induced epithelial-cell injury, lung inflammation, or both.

  2. Glycogen accumulation in alveolar type II cells in 3-methylindole--induced pulmonary edema in goats.

    PubMed Central

    Atwal, O. S.; Bray, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    The present study shows that intravenous infusion of 3-methylindole (3MI) induced acute pulmonary edema in goats. Edematous changes were seen in the alveoli and the interalveolar interstitium. At 72 hours after treatment, an accumulation of glycogen that had a pathognomonic appearance of alpha particles was observed in the alveolar Type II cells. A rich accumulation of glycogen particles and defective lamellar bodies containing triglycerides were the significant morphologic changes in the alveolar Type II cells. These findings suggest that massive glycogen deposition in the alveolar Type II cells is a defect that might interfere with surfactant production, further complicating the disease process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6274198

  3. Particle-Induced Pulmonary Acute Phase Response Correlates with Neutrophil Influx Linking Inhaled Particles and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Lamson, Jacob Stuart; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Nyendi, Allen Njimeri; Wahlberg, Pia; Madsen, Anne Mette; Jackson, Petra; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    Background Particulate air pollution is associated with cardiovascular disease. Acute phase response is causally linked to cardiovascular disease. Here, we propose that particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response provides an underlying mechanism for particle-induced cardiovascular risk. Methods We analysed the mRNA expression of Serum Amyloid A (Saa3) in lung tissue from female C57BL/6J mice exposed to different particles including nanomaterials (carbon black and titanium dioxide nanoparticles, multi- and single walled carbon nanotubes), diesel exhaust particles and airborne dust collected at a biofuel plant. Mice were exposed to single or multiple doses of particles by inhalation or intratracheal instillation and pulmonary mRNA expression of Saa3 was determined at different time points of up to 4 weeks after exposure. Also hepatic mRNA expression of Saa3, SAA3 protein levels in broncheoalveolar lavage fluid and in plasma and high density lipoprotein levels in plasma were determined in mice exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Results Pulmonary exposure to particles strongly increased Saa3 mRNA levels in lung tissue and elevated SAA3 protein levels in broncheoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma, whereas hepatic Saa3 levels were much less affected. Pulmonary Saa3 expression correlated with the number of neutrophils in BAL across different dosing regimens, doses and time points. Conclusions Pulmonary acute phase response may constitute a direct link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. We propose that the particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may predict risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23894396

  4. Cardiac arrhythmia mechanisms in rats with heart failure induced by pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, David; Stones, Rachel; Drinkhill, Mark J.; Benson, Alan P.; Yang, Zhaokang; Cassan, Cecile; Gilbert, Stephen H.; Saint, David A.; Cazorla, Olivier; Steele, Derek S.; Bernus, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension provokes right heart failure and arrhythmias. Better understanding of the mechanisms underlying these arrhythmias is needed to facilitate new therapeutic approaches for the hypertensive, failing right ventricle (RV). The aim of our study was to identify the mechanisms generating arrhythmias in a model of RV failure induced by pulmonary hypertension. Rats were injected with monocrotaline to induce either RV hypertrophy or failure or with saline (control). ECGs were measured in conscious, unrestrained animals by telemetry. In isolated hearts, electrical activity was measured by optical mapping and myofiber orientation by diffusion tensor-MRI. Sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ handling was studied in single myocytes. Compared with control animals, the T-wave of the ECG was prolonged and in three of seven heart failure animals, prominent T-wave alternans occurred. Discordant action potential (AP) alternans occurred in isolated failing hearts and Ca2+ transient alternans in failing myocytes. In failing hearts, AP duration and dispersion were increased; conduction velocity and AP restitution were steeper. The latter was intrinsic to failing single myocytes. Failing hearts had greater fiber angle disarray; this correlated with AP duration. Failing myocytes had reduced sarco(endo)plasmic reticular Ca2+-ATPase activity, increased sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+-release fraction, and increased Ca2+ spark leak. In hypertrophied hearts and myocytes, dysfunctional adaptation had begun, but alternans did not develop. We conclude that increased electrical and structural heterogeneity and dysfunctional sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ handling increased the probability of alternans, a proarrhythmic predictor of sudden cardiac death. These mechanisms are potential therapeutic targets for the correction of arrhythmias in hypertensive, failing RVs. PMID:22427523

  5. Cellular localization of transforming growth factor-beta expression in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K.; Flanders, K. C.; Phan, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is associated with increased lung transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) gene expression, but cellular localization of the source of this expression has not been unequivocally established. In this study, lung fibrosis was induced in rats by endotracheal bleomycin injection on day 0 and, on selected days afterwards, lungs were harvested for in situ hybridization, immunohistochemical and histochemical analyses for TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein expression, and cell identification. The results show that control lungs express essentially no detectable TGF-beta 1 mRNA or protein in the parenchyma. Before day 3 after bleomycin treatment, scattered bronchiolar epithelial cells, mononuclear cells, and eosinophils expressed elevated levels of TGF-beta 1. Between days 3 and 14, there was a major increase in the number of eosinophils, myofibroblasts, and fibroblasts strongly expressing TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein. TGF-beta 1-producing cells were predominantly localized within areas of injury and active fibrosis. After day 14, the intensity and number of TGF-beta 1-expressing cells significantly declined and were predominantly found in fibroblasts in fibrotic areas. The expression of TGF-beta 1 protein was generally coincident with that for mRNA with the exception of bronchiolar epithelial cells in which strong protein expression was unaccompanied by a commensurate increase in mRNA. The study demonstrates that myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, and eosinophils represent the major sources of increased lung TGF-beta 1 expression in this model of pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7543734

  6. High-density lipoproteins potentiate α1-antitrypsin therapy in elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Juan-Antonio; Ortega-Gomez, Almudena; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Louedec, Liliane; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoit; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Nicoletti, Antonino; Levoye, Angelique; Plantier, Laurent; Meilhac, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Several studies report that high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) can carry α1-antitrypsin (AAT; an elastase inhibitor). We aimed to determine whether injection of exogenous HDL, enriched or not in AAT, may have protective effects against pulmonary emphysema. After tracheal instillation of saline or elastase, mice were randomly treated intravenously with saline, human plasma HDL (75 mg apolipoprotein A1/kg), HDL-AAT (75 mg apolipoprotein A1-3.75 mg AAT/kg), or AAT alone (3.75 mg/kg) at 2, 24, 48, and 72 hours. We have shown that HDL-AAT reached the lung and prevented the development of pulmonary emphysema by 59.3% at 3 weeks (alveoli mean chord length, 22.9 ± 2.8 μm versus 30.7 ± 4.5 μm; P < 0.001), whereas injection of HDL or AAT alone only showed a moderate, nonsignificant protective effect (28.2 ± 4.2 μm versus 30.7 ± 5 μm [P = 0.23] and 27.3 ± 5.66 μm versus 30.71 ± 4.96 μm [P = 0.18], respectively). Indeed, protection by HDL-AAT was significantly higher than that observed with HDL or AAT (P = 0.006 and P = 0.048, respectively). This protective effect was associated (at 6, 24, and 72 h) with: (1) a reduction in neutrophil and macrophage number in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid; (2) decreased concentrations of IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and TNF-α in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma; (3) a reduction in matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activities; and (4) a reduction in the degradation of fibronectin, a marker of tissue damage. In addition, HDL-AAT reduced acute cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory response. Intravenous HDL-AAT treatment afforded a better protection against elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema than AAT alone, and may represent a significant development for the management of emphysema associated with AAT deficiency.

  7. Role of LTB₄ in the pathogenesis of elastase-induced murine pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Shim, Y Michael; Paige, Mikell; Hanna, Halim; Kim, Su H; Burdick, Marie D; Strieter, Robert M

    2010-12-01

    Exaggerated levels of the leukotriene B₄ (LTB₄) frequently coexist at sites of inflammation and tissue remodeling. Therefore, we hypothesize that the LTB₄ pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neutrophilic inflammation that contributes to pulmonary emphysema. In this study, significant levels of LTB₄ were detected in human lung tissues with emphysema compared with lungs without emphysema (9,497 ± 2,839 vs. 4,142 ± 1,173 pg/ml, n = 9 vs. 10, P = 0.04). To further determine the biological role of LTB₄ in the pathogenesis of emphysema, we compared the lungs of wild-type (WT) and LTA₄ hydrolase-/- mice (LTB₄ deficient, LTA₄H-/-) exposed to intranasal elastase or vehicle control. We found that intranasal elastase induced accumulation of LTB₄ in the lungs and caused progressively worsening emphysema between 14 and 28 days after elastase exposure in WT mice but not in LTA₄H-/- mice. Premortem physiology documented increased lung compliance in elastase-exposed WT mice compared with elastase-exposed LTA₄H-/- mice as measured by Flexivent (0.058 ± 0.005 vs. 0.041 ± 0.002 ml/cmH₂O pressure). Postmortem morphometry documented increased total lung volume and alveolar sizes in elastase-exposed WT mice compared with elastase-exposed LTA₄H-/- mice as measured by volume displacement and alveolar chord length assessment. Furthermore, elastase-exposed LTA₄H-/- mice were found to have significantly delayed influx of the CD45(high)CD11b(high)Ly6G(high) leukocytes compatible with neutrophils compared with elastase-exposed WT mice. Mechanistic insights to these phenotypes were provided by demonstrating protection from elastase-induced murine emphysema with neutrophil depletion in the elastase-exposed WT mice and by demonstrating time-dependent modulation of cysteinyl leukotriene biosynthesis in the elastase-exposed LTA₄H-/- mice compared with elastase-exposed WT mice. Together, these findings demonstrated that LTB₄ played an important

  8. Iron-induced remodeling in cultured rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, Nikolai V; Atkins, James L; Gurusamy, Narasimman; Pitt, Bruce R

    2012-02-01

    Although iron is known to be a component of the pathogenesis and/or maintenance of acute lung injury (ALI) in experimental animals and human subjects, the majority of these studies have focused on disturbances in iron homeostasis in the airways resulting from exposure to noxious gases and particles. Considerably less is known about the effect of increased plasma levels of redox-reactive non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) and its impact on pulmonary endothelium. Plasma levels of NTBI can increase under various pathophysiological conditions, including those associated with ALI, and multiple mechanisms are in place to affect the [Fe(2+)]/[Fe(3+)] redox steady state. It is well accepted, however, that intracellular transport of NTBI occurs after reduction of [Fe(3+)] to [Fe(2+)] (and is mediated by divalent metal transporters). Accordingly, as an experimental model to investigate mechanisms mediating vascular effects of redox reactive iron, rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells (RPAECs) were subjected to pulse treatment (10 min) with [Fe(2+)] nitriloacetate (30 μM) in the presence of pyrithione, an iron ionophore, to acutely increase intracellular labile pool of iron. Cellular iron influx and cell shape profile were monitored with time-lapse imaging techniques. Exposure of RPAECs to [Fe(2+)] resulted in: (i) an increase in intracellular iron as detected by the iron sensitive fluorophore, PhenGreen; (ii) depletion of cell glutathione; and (iii) nuclear translocation of stress-response transcriptional factors Nrf2 and NFkB (p65). The resulting iron-induced cell alterations were characterized by cell polarization and formation of membrane cuplike and microvilli-like projections abundant with ICAM-1, caveolin-1, and F-actin. The iron-induced re-arrangements in cytoskeleton, alterations in focal cell-cell interactions, and cell buckling were accompanied by decrease in electrical resistance of RPAEC monolayer. These effects were partially eliminated in the presence of N

  9. Amplification of TGFβ Induced ITGB6 Gene Transcription May Promote Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tatler, Amanda L; Goodwin, Amanda T; Gbolahan, Olumide; Saini, Gauri; Porte, Joanne; John, Alison E; Clifford, Rachel L; Violette, Shelia M; Weinreb, Paul H; Parfrey, Helen; Wolters, Paul J; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating, progressive disease with poor survival rates and limited treatment options. Upregulation of αvβ6 integrins within the alveolar epithelial cells is a characteristic feature of IPF and correlates with poor patient survival. The pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ1 can upregulate αvβ6 integrin expression but the molecular mechanisms driving this effect have not previously been elucidated. We confirm that stimulation with exogenous TGFβ1 increases expression of the integrin β6 subunit gene (ITGB6) and αvβ6 integrin cell surface expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via transcriptional activation of the ITGB6 gene, but does not result from effects on ITGB6 mRNA stability. Basal expression of ITGB6 in, and αvβ6 integrins on, lung epithelial cells occurs via homeostatic αvβ6-mediated TGFβ1 activation in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and can be amplified by TGFβ1 activation. Fundamentally, we show for the first time that TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via canonical Smad signalling since dominant negative constructs directed against Smad3 and 4 inhibit ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, disruption of a Smad binding site at -798 in the ITGB6 promoter abolishes TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that TGFβ1 stimulation of lung epithelial cells results in direct binding of Smad3, and Smad4, to the ITGB6 gene promoter within this region. Finally, using an adenoviral TGFβ1 over-expression model of pulmonary fibrosis we demonstrate that Smad3 is crucial for TGFβ1-induced αvβ6 integrin expression within the alveolar epithelium in vivo. Together, these data confirm that a homeostatic, autocrine loop of αvβ6 integrin activated TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 gene expression regulates epithelial basal αvβ6 integrin expression, and demonstrates that this occurs via Smad

  10. Amplification of TGFβ Induced ITGB6 Gene Transcription May Promote Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tatler, Amanda L.; Goodwin, Amanda T.; Gbolahan, Olumide; Saini, Gauri; Porte, Joanne; John, Alison E.; Clifford, Rachel L.; Violette, Shelia M.; Weinreb, Paul H.; Parfrey, Helen; Wolters, Paul J.; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating, progressive disease with poor survival rates and limited treatment options. Upregulation of αvβ6 integrins within the alveolar epithelial cells is a characteristic feature of IPF and correlates with poor patient survival. The pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ1 can upregulate αvβ6 integrin expression but the molecular mechanisms driving this effect have not previously been elucidated. We confirm that stimulation with exogenous TGFβ1 increases expression of the integrin β6 subunit gene (ITGB6) and αvβ6 integrin cell surface expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via transcriptional activation of the ITGB6 gene, but does not result from effects on ITGB6 mRNA stability. Basal expression of ITGB6 in, and αvβ6 integrins on, lung epithelial cells occurs via homeostatic αvβ6-mediated TGFβ1 activation in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and can be amplified by TGFβ1 activation. Fundamentally, we show for the first time that TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 expression occurs via canonical Smad signalling since dominant negative constructs directed against Smad3 and 4 inhibit ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, disruption of a Smad binding site at -798 in the ITGB6 promoter abolishes TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 transcriptional activity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that TGFβ1 stimulation of lung epithelial cells results in direct binding of Smad3, and Smad4, to the ITGB6 gene promoter within this region. Finally, using an adenoviral TGFβ1 over-expression model of pulmonary fibrosis we demonstrate that Smad3 is crucial for TGFβ1-induced αvβ6 integrin expression within the alveolar epithelium in vivo. Together, these data confirm that a homeostatic, autocrine loop of αvβ6 integrin activated TGFβ1-induced ITGB6 gene expression regulates epithelial basal αvβ6 integrin expression, and demonstrates that this occurs via Smad

  11. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy associated with ipratropium bromide therapy in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Melão, Filipa; Nunes, José P L; Vasconcelos, Mariana; Dias, Paula; Almeida, Pedro B; Rodrigues, Rui; Pinho, Teresa; Madureira, António; Maciel, Maria J

    2014-03-01

    Stress-induced cardiomyopathy, also known as 'broken heart syndrome' or Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by transient systolic dysfunction of the apical and/or mid segments of the left ventricle, in the absence of significant coronary artery disease. We report the case of a 56-year-old male patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), with stress-induced cardiomyopathy associated with the use of ipratropium bromide, administered in the context of an acute exacerbation of COPD. PMID:24680554

  12. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid attenuates paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis by preventing Smad7 from deacetylation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Xiang-Yan; Shi, Ming-Jun; Xiao, Ying; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Chang-Zhi; Shao, Song-Jun; Liu, Xin-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), has anti-fibrotic effect. However, the exact mechanism of its anti-fibrotic potential remains is unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of SAHA in attenuating pulmonary fibrosis by regulating stability of Smad7 in paraquat (PQ)-induced lung fibrosis animal model and cultured pulmonary fibroblasts. Methods Rats with paraquat-induced lung fibrosis were fed with a SAHA solution (15 mg/kg) by gastric gavage. Human pulmonary fibroblasts (HFL1) pre-treated with TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL) were treated with SAHA (5 µM). Results SAHA (histone deacetylase inhibitor, HDACi) suppressed PQ-induced lung fibrosis in rats by stabilizing Smad7 level, thus attenuating Smad3 activity, resulting in the inhibition of fibroblast differentiation and collagen expression. In vitro study showed that SAHA suppressed TGF-β1-induced fibroblast differentiation into myofibroblasts. SAHA exerted its antifibrotic effect through preventing Smad7 from deacetylation most maybe by inhibiting TGF-β1-induced HDAC1 activity. Conclusions SAHA repressed PQ-induced lung fibrosis via preventing Smad7 from deacetylation. PMID:27747000

  13. A clinically authentic mouse model of enterovirus 71 (EV-A71)-induced neurogenic pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chua, Beng Hooi; Alonso, Sylvie; Chow, Vincent T K; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) is a neurotropic virus that sporadically causes fatal neurologic illness among infected children. Animal models of EV-A71 infection exist, but they do not recapitulate in animals the spectrum of disease and pathology observed in fatal human cases. Specifically, neurogenic pulmonary oedema (NPE)-the main cause of EV-A71 infection-related mortality-is not observed in any of these models. This limits their utility in understanding viral pathogenesis of neurologic infections. We report the development of a mouse model of EV-A71 infection displaying NPE in severely affected animals. We inoculated one-week-old BALB/c mice with an adapted EV-A71 strain and identified clinical signs consistent with observations in human cases and other animal models. We also observed respiratory distress in some mice. At necropsy, we found their lungs to be heavier and incompletely collapsed compared to other mice. Serum levels of catecholamines and histopathology of lung and brain tissues of these mice strongly indicated onset of NPE. The localization of virally-induced brain lesions also suggested a potential pathogenic mechanism for EV-A71-induced NPE. This novel mouse model of virally-induced NPE represents a valuable resource for studying viral mechanisms of neuro-pathogenesis and pre-clinical testing of potential therapeutics and prophylactics against EV-A71-related neurologic complications. PMID:27357918

  14. Pulmonary fibrosis in a mouse model of sarcoid granulomatosis induced by booster challenge with Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dingyuan; Huang, Xiaoxi; Geng, Jing; Dong, Run; Li, Shuhong; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Chen; Dai, Huaping

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) associated with chronic sarcoidosis remains poorly understood, and no experimental model is currently available for this condition. Previous studies have shown that Propionibacterium acnes (PA) was associated with sarcoidosis and induced granuloma formation in mice. Here, we investigated whether repeated challenge with PA induces persistent inflammation leading to sarcoidosis followed by PF in mice. Specifically, C57BL/6 mice were inoculated intraperitoneally and subjected to intratracheal challenge with PA, and then were booster-challenged with either PA or phosphate-buffered saline on day 28. Inflammation, granulomata, and features of fibrosis were evaluated every 7 days until day 70. Complete remission of lung granulomata was apparent on day 42 in the sarcoid-remission group. However, granulomata was present from days 21 to 70 in mice that received PA boosting. Inflammatory cell counts and Th1 cytokine levels in lung lavage fluids were elevated up to day 70. Furthermore, fibrotic changes in the lungs were observed around granulomatous and peribronchovascular regions after PA boosting. Taken together, these findings suggest that development of PF following sarcoidosis may result from continuous PA infection and inflammation. Repeated boosting with PA to induce PF might be a useful model for future studies of sarcoidosis-associated PF. PMID:27203210

  15. A clinically authentic mouse model of enterovirus 71 (EV-A71)-induced neurogenic pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Victorio, Carla Bianca Luena; Xu, Yishi; Ng, Qimei; Chua, Beng Hooi; Alonso, Sylvie; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chua, Kaw Bing

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) is a neurotropic virus that sporadically causes fatal neurologic illness among infected children. Animal models of EV-A71 infection exist, but they do not recapitulate in animals the spectrum of disease and pathology observed in fatal human cases. Specifically, neurogenic pulmonary oedema (NPE)—the main cause of EV-A71 infection-related mortality—is not observed in any of these models. This limits their utility in understanding viral pathogenesis of neurologic infections. We report the development of a mouse model of EV-A71 infection displaying NPE in severely affected animals. We inoculated one-week-old BALB/c mice with an adapted EV-A71 strain and identified clinical signs consistent with observations in human cases and other animal models. We also observed respiratory distress in some mice. At necropsy, we found their lungs to be heavier and incompletely collapsed compared to other mice. Serum levels of catecholamines and histopathology of lung and brain tissues of these mice strongly indicated onset of NPE. The localization of virally-induced brain lesions also suggested a potential pathogenic mechanism for EV-A71-induced NPE. This novel mouse model of virally-induced NPE represents a valuable resource for studying viral mechanisms of neuro-pathogenesis and pre-clinical testing of potential therapeutics and prophylactics against EV-A71-related neurologic complications. PMID:27357918

  16. The role of collagen in extralobar pulmonary artery stiffening in response to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chen Yen; Wang, Zhijie; Tabima, Diana M; Eickhoff, Jens C; Chesler, Naomi C

    2010-12-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) causes extralobar pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening, which potentially impairs right ventricular systolic function. Changes in the extracellular matrix proteins collagen and elastin have been suggested to contribute to this arterial stiffening. We hypothesized that vascular collagen accumulation is a major cause of extralobar PA stiffening in HPH and tested our hypothesis with transgenic mice that synthesize collagen type I resistant to collagenase degradation (Col1a1(R/R)). These mice and littermate controls that have normal collagen degradation (Col1a1(+/+)) were exposed to hypoxia for 10 days; some were allowed to recover for 32 days. In vivo PA pressure and isolated PA mechanical properties and collagen and elastin content were measured for all groups. Vasoactive studies were also performed with U-46619, Y-27632, or calcium- and magnesium-free medium. Pulmonary hypertension occurred in both mouse strains due to chronic hypoxia and resolved with recovery. HPH caused significant PA mechanical changes in both mouse strains: circumferential stretch decreased, and mid-to-high-strain circumferential elastic modulus increased (P < 0.05 for both). Impaired collagen type I degradation prevented a return to baseline mechanical properties with recovery and, in fact, led to an increase in the low and mid-to-high-strain moduli compared with hypoxia (P < 0.05 for both). Significant changes in collagen content were found, which tended to follow changes in mid-to-high-strain elastic modulus. No significant changes in elastin content or vasoactivity were observed. Our results demonstrate that collagen content is important to extralobar PA stiffening caused by chronic hypoxia. PMID:20852040

  17. The role of collagen in extralobar pulmonary artery stiffening in response to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chen Yen; Wang, Zhijie; Tabima, Diana M.; Eickhoff, Jens C.

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) causes extralobar pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening, which potentially impairs right ventricular systolic function. Changes in the extracellular matrix proteins collagen and elastin have been suggested to contribute to this arterial stiffening. We hypothesized that vascular collagen accumulation is a major cause of extralobar PA stiffening in HPH and tested our hypothesis with transgenic mice that synthesize collagen type I resistant to collagenase degradation (Col1a1R/R). These mice and littermate controls that have normal collagen degradation (Col1a1+/+) were exposed to hypoxia for 10 days; some were allowed to recover for 32 days. In vivo PA pressure and isolated PA mechanical properties and collagen and elastin content were measured for all groups. Vasoactive studies were also performed with U-46619, Y-27632, or calcium- and magnesium-free medium. Pulmonary hypertension occurred in both mouse strains due to chronic hypoxia and resolved with recovery. HPH caused significant PA mechanical changes in both mouse strains: circumferential stretch decreased, and mid-to-high-strain circumferential elastic modulus increased (P < 0.05 for both). Impaired collagen type I degradation prevented a return to baseline mechanical properties with recovery and, in fact, led to an increase in the low and mid-to-high-strain moduli compared with hypoxia (P < 0.05 for both). Significant changes in collagen content were found, which tended to follow changes in mid-to-high-strain elastic modulus. No significant changes in elastin content or vasoactivity were observed. Our results demonstrate that collagen content is important to extralobar PA stiffening caused by chronic hypoxia. PMID:20852040

  18. Comparison of Thresholds for Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Pulsed-wave and B-mode Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed ultrasound was found to induce pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) in mice about 25 years ago but remains a poorly understood risk factor for pulmonary diagnostic ultrasound. In early research using laboratory fixed beam ultrasound, thresholds for PCH had frequency variation from 1–4 MHz similar to the Mechanical Index. In recent research, thresholds for B mode diagnostic ultrasound from 1.5–12 MHz had little dependence on frequency. To compare the diagnostic ultrasound method to laboratory pulsed exposure, thresholds for fixed beam ultrasound were determined using comparable methods at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz. PCH thresholds were lower for simple fixed-beam pulse modes than for B mode and in approximate agreement with early research. However, for comparable timing parameters, PCH thresholds had little dependence on ultrasonic frequency. These findings suggest that the MI may not be directly useful as a dosimetric parameter for safety guidance in pulmonary ultrasound. PMID:26819648

  19. Platelet-activating factor induces ovine fetal pulmonary venous smooth muscle cell proliferation: role of epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weilin; Ibe, Basil O; Raj, J Usha

    2007-06-01

    We have previously reported that platelet-activating factor (PAF) is present in very high levels in the ovine fetal lung and circulation and that PAF serves as an important physiological vasoconstrictor of the pulmonary circulation in utero. However, it is not known whether PAF stimulates pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation. In this study, we used ovine fetal pulmonary venous SMCs as our model system to study the effects and mechanisms of action of PAF on SMC proliferation. We found that PAF induced SMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. PAF also stimulated activation of both ERK and p38 but not c-Jun NH(2) terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways. PAF (10 nM) induced phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Specific inhibition of EGFR by AG-1478 and by the expression of a dominant-negative EGFR mutant in SMCs attenuated PAF-stimulated cell proliferation. Inhibition of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) release by CRM-197 and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) by GM-6001 abolished PAF-induced MAP kinase activation and cell proliferation. Increased alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity after PAF treatment in AP-HB-EGF fusion construct-transfected SMCs indicated that PAF induced the release of HB-EGF within 1 min. Gelatin zymography data showed that PAF stimulated MMP-2 activity and MMP-9 activity within 1 min. These results suggest that PAF promotes pulmonary vascular SMC proliferation via transactivation of EGFR through MMP activation and HB-EGF, resulting in p38 and ERK activation and that EGFR transactivation is essential for the mitogenic effect of PAF in pulmonary venous SMC. PMID:17322418

  20. Resistin deficiency in mice has no effect on pulmonary responses induced by acute ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Razvi, Shehla S; Richards, Jeremy B; Malik, Farhan; Cromar, Kevin R; Price, Roger E; Bell, Cynthia S; Weng, Tingting; Atkins, Constance L; Spencer, Chantal Y; Cockerill, Katherine J; Alexander, Amy L; Blackburn, Michael R; Alcorn, Joseph L; Haque, Ikram U; Johnston, Richard A

    2015-11-15

    Acute exposure to ozone (O3), an air pollutant, causes pulmonary inflammation, airway epithelial desquamation, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Pro-inflammatory cytokines-including IL-6 and ligands of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 [keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2], TNF receptor 1 and 2 (TNF), and type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1α and IL-1β)-promote these sequelae. Human resistin, a pleiotropic hormone and cytokine, induces expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 (the human ortholog of murine KC and MIP-2), and TNF. Functional differences exist between human and murine resistin; yet given the aforementioned observations, we hypothesized that murine resistin promotes O3-induced lung pathology by inducing expression of the same inflammatory cytokines as human resistin. Consequently, we examined indexes of O3-induced lung pathology in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice following acute exposure to either filtered room air or O3. In wild-type mice, O3 increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) resistin. Furthermore, O3 increased lung tissue or BALF IL-1α, IL-6, KC, TNF, macrophages, neutrophils, and epithelial cells in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice. With the exception of KC, which was significantly greater in resistin-deficient compared with wild-type mice, no genotype-related differences in the other indexes existed following O3 exposure. O3 caused AHR to acetyl-β-methylcholine chloride (methacholine) in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice. However, genotype-related differences in airway responsiveness to methacholine were nonexistent subsequent to O3 exposure. Taken together, these data demonstrate that murine resistin is increased in the lungs of wild-type mice following acute O3 exposure but does not promote O3-induced lung pathology. PMID:26386120

  1. Obesity-induced adipokine imbalance impairs mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial function and primes the lung for injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Duong, Michelle; Wang, Nadan; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Suratt, Benjamin T; Kallen, Caleb B; Sun, Jianxin; Zhu, Ying; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but mechanisms mediating this association are unknown. While obesity is known to impair systemic blood vessel function, and predisposes to systemic vascular diseases, its effects on the pulmonary circulation are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the chronic low grade inflammation of obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and primes the lung for acute injury. The lung endothelium from obese mice expressed higher levels of leukocyte adhesion markers and lower levels of cell-cell junctional proteins when compared to lean mice. We tested whether systemic factors are responsible for these alterations in the pulmonary endothelium; treatment of primary lung endothelial cells with obese serum enhanced the expression of adhesion proteins and reduced the expression of endothelial junctional proteins when compared to lean serum. Alterations in pulmonary endothelial cells observed in obese mice were associated with enhanced susceptibility to LPS-induced lung injury. Restoring serum adiponectin levels reversed the effects of obesity on the lung endothelium and attenuated susceptibility to acute injury. Our work indicates that obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and enhances susceptibility to acute injury and provides mechanistic insight into the increased prevalence of ARDS in obese humans. PMID:26068229

  2. mTORC1 is involved in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension through the activation of Notch3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wang; Liu, Jie; Ma, Aiping; Miao, Ran; Jin, Yuling; Zhang, Hongbing; Xu, Kaifeng; Wang, Chen; Wang, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is a clinical syndrome associated with high morbidity and mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Both the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the Notch3 signaling pathways have been reported to be involved in HPH; however, it is unknown whether there is a connection between these two signaling pathways in HPH. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between mTOR and Notch3 in HPH. After treatment with 10% O2 for 4 weeks, male C57BL/6 mice developed HPH with gradually increased right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVHI), and pulmonary arteriolar remodeling accompanied by the activation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and Notch3 in the lung tissue and pulmonary arterioles. Pretreatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin not only alleviated pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary arteriolar remodeling but also suppressed hypoxia-induced mTORC1 and Notch3 activation. Prophylactic N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) administration, a Notch signaling inhibitor, protected against the effects of hypoxia. These in vivo data were confirmed by in vitro experiments on human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) exposed to 3% O2 . Furthermore, overexpression of Notch3 intracellular domain partially abrogated the inhibitory effects of rapamycin on human PASMC proliferation. These data indicate that both mTORC1 and Notch3 signaling are involved in HPH and the downstream effects of mTORC1 activation in HPH are partially dependent on the activation of Notch3 signaling. PMID:24825564

  3. Quantification of Kras mutant fraction in the lung DNA of mice exposed to aerosolized particulate vanadium pentoxide by inhalation.

    PubMed

    Banda, Malathi; McKim, Karen L; Haber, Lynne T; MacGregor, Judith A; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Parsons, Barbara L

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated whether Kras mutation is an early event in the development of lung tumors induced by inhalation of particulate vanadium pentoxide (VP) aerosols. A National Toxicology Program tumor bioassay of inhaled particulate VP aerosols established that VP-induced alveolar/bronchiolar carcinomas of the B6C3F1 mouse lung carried Kras mutations at a higher frequency than observed in spontaneous mouse lung tumors. Therefore, this study sought to: (1) characterize any Kras mutational response with respect to VP exposure concentration, and (2) investigate the possibility that amplification of preexisting Kras mutation is an early event in VP-induced mouse lung tumorigenesis. Male Big Blue B6C3F1 mice (6 mice/group) were exposed to aerosolized particulate VP by inhalation, 6h/day, 5 days/week for 4 or 8 weeks, using VP exposure concentrations of 0, 0.1, and 1 mg/m(3). The levels of two different Kras codon 12 mutations [GGT → GAT (G12D) and GGT → GTT (G12V)] were measured in lung DNAs by Allele-specific Competitive Blocker PCR (ACB-PCR). For both exposure concentrations (0.1 and 1.0mg/m(3)) and both time points (4 and 8 weeks), the mutant fractions observed in VP-exposed mice were not significantly different from the concurrent controls. Given that 8 weeks of inhalation of a tumorigenic concentration of particulate aerosols of VP did not result in a significant change in levels of lung Kras mutation, the data do not support either a direct genotoxic effect of VP on Kras or early amplification of preexisting mutation as being involved in the genesis of VP-induced mouse lung tumors under the exposure conditions used. Rather, the data suggest that accumulation of Kras mutation occurs later with chronic VP exposure and is likely not an early event in VP-induced mouse lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26232258

  4. Poor Baseline Pulmonary Function May Not Increase the Risk of Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingbo; Cao, Jianzhong; Yuan, Shuanghu; Arenberg, Douglas; Stanton, Paul; Tatro, Daniel; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Kong, Feng-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Poor pulmonary function (PF) is often considered a contraindication to definitive radiation therapy for lung cancer. This study investigated whether baseline PF was associated with radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients treated with CRT and tested for PF at baseline were eligible. Baseline predicted values of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusion capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were analyzed. Additional factors included age, gender, smoking status, Karnofsky performance status, coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tumor location, histology, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, and mean lung dose (MLD) were evaluated for RILT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT (SRILT), including grade ≥2 radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Results: There was a total of 260 patients, and SRILT occurred in 58 (22.3%) of them. Mean FEV1 values for SRILT and non-SRILT patients were 71.7% and 65.9% (P=.077). Under univariate analysis, risk of SRILT increased with MLD (P=.008), the absence of COPD (P=.047), and FEV1 (P=.077). Age (65 split) and MLD were significantly associated with SRILT in multivariate analysis. The addition of FEV1 and age with the MLD-based model slightly improved the predictability of SRILT (area under curve from 0.63-0.70, P=.088). Conclusions: Poor baseline PF does not increase the risk of SRILT, and combining FEV1, age, and MLD may improve the predictive ability.

  5. Environmental fiber-induced pleuro-pulmonary diseases in an Anatolian village: an epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Artvinli, M; Baris, Y I

    1982-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the prevalence of pleural mesothelioma and other malignancies in the Anatolian village of Tuzköy, where neither asbestos nor any environmental carcinogen has been detected. Another village (Kizilköy) located 12 km from Tuzköy was selected as a control. Three hundred twelve subjects from Tuzköy who were at least 25 yr of age and 95 subjects from Kizilköy were studied. Analysis of X-rays of the Tuzköy group revealed that subjects had calcified pleural plaques (17%), pleural thickening (10.5%), obscured costophrenic angles (15%), and diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (12.1%). Sixty-seven deaths were records in Tuzköy during the previous 3 yr, 41 of which resulted from malignant diseases. There were no X-ray abnormalities or deaths resulting from malignancies in the control group. Because of the high incidence of mesothelioma and lung cancer which usually results from asbestos exposure, the presence of asbestos in Tuzköy was investigated, but none was detected in spite to Tuzköy's volcanic location. Nevertheless, zeolite, an asbestiform mineral, was detected in the stones of buildings and in the village soil, as well as in the lung and pleura of the patients during biopsy. Thus, this mineral was considered to be responsible for the fiber-induced pleuro-pulmonary diseases in Tuzköy. No zeolite was found in the soil and stones of the control village.

  6. Effect of early treatment with transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (TEDS) on pulmonary inflammation induced by bleomycin

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Laisa A.; Silva, Carlos A.; Polacow, Maria L. O.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bleomycin (B) is an antineoplastic drug that has pulmonary fibrosis as a side effect. There are few experimental studies about the effects of physical therapy treatment in this case. Objective The objective was to study rat lungs treated with B and precocious intervention by transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (TEDS). Method Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n=5): a control group (C); a stimulated group (TEDS); a group treated with a single dose of B (intratracheally, 2.5 mg/kg) (B); and a group treated with B and electric stimulation (B + TEDS). After the B instillation, the electrical stimulation was applied for 7 days, for a duration of 20 minutes. Lung fragments were histologically processed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and 8-isoprostane-PGF2α (8-iso-PGF2α). The density of the alveolar area was determined by planimetry, the inflammatory profile was defined by the number of cells, and the level of oxidative stress in the pulmonary tissue was evaluated by 8-iso-PGF2α. For statistical analysis of the data, the Shapiro-Wilk test was used, followed by a one-way ANOVA with the post-hoc Bonferroni test (p≤0.05). Results The B group exhibited a significant reduction in the area density, and the acute treatment with B + TEDS prevented this reduction. There were increased numbers of fibroblasts, leukocytes, and macrophages in the B group, as well as increased lipid peroxidation, which was observed only in this group. Conclusion B promoted a reduction in the alveolar density area, thereby inducing the inflammatory process and increasing the production of free radicals. These effects were minimized by the application of TEDS at the initial treatment stage. PMID:24346295

  7. The Pesticide Metabolites Paraoxon and Malaoxon Induce Cellular Death by Different Mechanisms in Cultured Human Pulmonary Cells.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Daniel J; Moyer, Robert A; Cole, Stephanie; Willis, Kristen L; Oyler, Jonathan; Dorsey, Russell M; Salem, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are known to induce pulmonary toxicity in both humans and experimental animals. To elucidate the mechanism of OP-induced cytotoxicity, we examined the effects of parathion and malathion and their respective metabolites, paraoxon and malaoxon, on primary cultured human large and small airway cells. Exposure to paraoxon and malaoxon produced a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity following a 24-hour exposure, while treatment with parathion or malathion produced no effects at clinically relevant concentrations. Exposure to paraoxon-induced caspase activation, but malaoxon failed to induce this response. Since caspases have a major role in the regulation of apoptosis and cell death, we evaluated OP-induced cell death in the presence of a caspase inhibitor. Pharmacological caspase inhibition protected against paraoxon-induced cell death but not malaoxon-induced cell death. These data suggest that caspase activation is a key signaling element in paraoxon-induced cell death, but not malaoxon-induced cellular death in the pulmonary epithelium. PMID:26173615

  8. Tetrathiomolybdate therapy protects against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Brewer, George J; Ullenbruch, Matthew R; Dick, Robert; Olivarez, Leovigildo; Phan, Sem H

    2003-03-01

    Tetrathiomolybdate (TM), a drug developed for the treatment of Wilson's disease, produces an antiangiogenic effect by reducing systemic copper levels. Several angiogenic cytokines appear to depend on normal levels of copper for activity. In both animal tumor models and in cancer patients, TM therapy has proved effective in inhibiting the growth of tumors. We have hypothesized that the activities of fibrotic and inflammatory cytokines are also subject to modulation by the availability of copper in a manner similar to angiogenic cytokines. As a first step in evaluating whether TM plays a therapeutic role in diseases of inflammation and fibrosis, we studied the effects of TM on a murine model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Oral TM therapy resulted in dose-dependent reduction in serum ceruloplasmin, a surrogate marker of systemic copper levels. Significant decreases in systemic copper levels were associated with marked reduction in lung fibrosis as determined on the basis of histopathologic findings and a biochemical measure of fibrosis. The protection afforded by TM was also reflected in significantly reduced bleomycin-induced body-weight loss. In the next phase of this work, we will seek to determine the mechanisms by which TM brings about this therapeutic benefit.

  9. HYPOXIA-INDUCED CHANGES IN PULMONARY AND SYSTEMIC VASCULAR RESISTANCE: WHERE IS THE O2 SENSOR?

    PubMed Central

    Waypa, Gregory B.; Schumacker, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arteries (PA) constrict in response to alveolar hypoxia, whereas systemic arteries (SA) undergo dilation. These physiological responses reflect the need to improve gas exchange in the lung, and to enhance the delivery of blood to hypoxic systemic tissues. An important unresolved question relates to the underlying mechanism by which the vascular cells detect a decrease in oxygen tension and translate that into a signal that triggers the functional response. A growing body of work implicates the mitochondria, which appear to function as O2 sensors by initiating a redox-signaling pathway that leads to the activation of downstream effectors that regulate vascular tone. However, the direction of this redox signal has been the subject of controversy. Part of the problem has been the lack of appropriate tools to assess redox signaling in live cells. Recent advancements in the development of redox sensors have led to studies that help to clarify the nature of the hypoxia-induced redox signaling by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, these studies provide valuable insight regarding the basis for discrepancies in earlier studies of the hypoxia-induced mechanism of redox signaling. Based on recent work, it appears that the O2 sensing mechanism in both the PA and SA are identical, that mitochondria function as the site of O2 sensing, and that increased ROS release from these organelles leads to the activation of cell-specific, downstream vascular responses. PMID:20713189

  10. Physical exercise is effective in preventing cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary oxidative response in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nesi, Renata Tiscoski; de Souza, Priscila Soares; dos Santos, Giulia Pedroso; Thirupathi, Anand; Menegali, Bruno T; Silveira, Paulo Cesar Lock; da Silva, Luciano Acordi; Valença, Samuel Santos; Pinho, Ricardo Aurino

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in the pathogenesis of pulmonary injury induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure, and physical exercise (Ex) is useful in combating impaired oxidative process. We verified the preventive effects of Ex on lung oxidative markers induced by smoking. In this study, 36 mice (C57BL-6, 30–35 g) were split into four groups: control, CS, Ex, and CS plus Ex. Ex groups were given prior physical training in water (2×30 min/d, 5 days/wk, 8 weeks). After training, the CS groups were subjected to passive exposure to four cigarettes, 3 × per day, for 60 consecutive days. After 24 hours from the last exposure, CS animals were sacrificed, and lung samples were collected for further analysis. Left lung sample was prepared for histological analysis, and right lung was used for biochemical analysis (superoxide, hydroxyproline, lipid peroxidation [thiobarbituric acid reactive species], protein carbonylation [carbonyl groups formation], superoxide dismutase [SOD], catalase [CAT], and glutathione peroxidase [GPx] activities). Group comparisons were evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results were expressed as mean ± standard deviation, with P<0.05 considered significantly different. Preventive Ex impeded histological changes and increased the enzymatic defense system (SOD and GPx) by reducing oxidative damage in lipids and proteins. This preventive effect of prior physical Ex alleviates damage caused by CS exposure. PMID:27042047

  11. Physical exercise is effective in preventing cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary oxidative response in mice.

    PubMed

    Nesi, Renata Tiscoski; de Souza, Priscila Soares; Dos Santos, Giulia Pedroso; Thirupathi, Anand; Menegali, Bruno T; Silveira, Paulo Cesar Lock; da Silva, Luciano Acordi; Valença, Samuel Santos; Pinho, Ricardo Aurino

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in the pathogenesis of pulmonary injury induced by cigarette smoke (CS) exposure, and physical exercise (Ex) is useful in combating impaired oxidative process. We verified the preventive effects of Ex on lung oxidative markers induced by smoking. In this study, 36 mice (C57BL-6, 30-35 g) were split into four groups: control, CS, Ex, and CS plus Ex. Ex groups were given prior physical training in water (2×30 min/d, 5 days/wk, 8 weeks). After training, the CS groups were subjected to passive exposure to four cigarettes, 3 × per day, for 60 consecutive days. After 24 hours from the last exposure, CS animals were sacrificed, and lung samples were collected for further analysis. Left lung sample was prepared for histological analysis, and right lung was used for biochemical analysis (superoxide, hydroxyproline, lipid peroxidation [thiobarbituric acid reactive species], protein carbonylation [carbonyl groups formation], superoxide dismutase [SOD], catalase [CAT], and glutathione peroxidase [GPx] activities). Group comparisons were evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results were expressed as mean ± standard deviation, with P<0.05 considered significantly different. Preventive Ex impeded histological changes and increased the enzymatic defense system (SOD and GPx) by reducing oxidative damage in lipids and proteins. This preventive effect of prior physical Ex alleviates damage caused by CS exposure. PMID:27042047

  12. Hirsutella sinensis mycelium attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsung-Teng; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Ko, Yun-Fei; Ojcius, David M; Lan, Ying-Wei; Martel, Jan; Young, John D; Chong, Kowit-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hirsutella sinensis mycelium (HSM), the anamorph of Cordyceps sinensis, is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been shown to possess various pharmacological properties. We previously reported that this fungus suppresses interleukin-1β and IL-18 secretion by inhibiting both canonical and non-canonical inflammasomes in human macrophages. However, whether HSM may be used to prevent lung fibrosis and the mechanism underlying this activity remain unclear. Our results show that pretreatment with HSM inhibits TGF-β1-induced expression of fibronectin and α-SMA in lung fibroblasts. HSM also restores superoxide dismutase expression in TGF-β1-treated lung fibroblasts and inhibits reactive oxygen species production in lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, HSM pretreatment markedly reduces bleomycin-induced lung injury and fibrosis in mice. Accordingly, HSM reduces inflammatory cell accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and proinflammatory cytokines levels in lung tissues. The HSM extract also significantly reduces TGF-β1 in lung tissues, and this effect is accompanied by decreased collagen 3α1 and α-SMA levels. Moreover, HSM reduces expression of the NLRP3 inflammasome and P2X7R in lung tissues, whereas it enhances expression of superoxide dismutase. These findings suggest that HSM may be used for the treatment of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26497260

  13. Essential role for the ATG4B protease and autophagy in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Sandra; Maciel, Mariana; Herrera, Iliana; Nava, Teresa; Vergara, Fabián; Gaxiola, Miguel; López-Otín, Carlos; Selman, Moisés; Pardo, Annie

    2015-04-01

    Autophagy is a critical cellular homeostatic process that controls the turnover of damaged organelles and proteins. Impaired autophagic activity is involved in a number of diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis suggesting that altered autophagy may contribute to fibrogenesis. However, the specific role of autophagy in lung fibrosis is still undefined. In this study, we show for the first time, how autophagy disruption contributes to bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in vivo using an Atg4b-deficient mouse as a model. Atg4b-deficient mice displayed a significantly higher inflammatory response at 7 d after bleomycin treatment associated with increased neutrophilic infiltration and significant alterations in proinflammatory cytokines. Likewise, we found that Atg4b disruption resulted in augmented apoptosis affecting predominantly alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells. At 28 d post-bleomycin instillation Atg4b-deficient mice exhibited more extensive and severe fibrosis with increased collagen accumulation and deregulated extracellular matrix-related gene expression. Together, our findings indicate that the ATG4B protease and autophagy play a crucial role protecting epithelial cells against bleomycin-induced stress and apoptosis, and in the regulation of the inflammatory and fibrotic responses.

  14. Hirsutella sinensis mycelium attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tsung-Teng; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Ko, Yun-Fei; Ojcius, David M.; Lan, Ying-Wei; Martel, Jan; Young, John D.; Chong, Kowit-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hirsutella sinensis mycelium (HSM), the anamorph of Cordyceps sinensis, is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been shown to possess various pharmacological properties. We previously reported that this fungus suppresses interleukin-1β and IL-18 secretion by inhibiting both canonical and non-canonical inflammasomes in human macrophages. However, whether HSM may be used to prevent lung fibrosis and the mechanism underlying this activity remain unclear. Our results show that pretreatment with HSM inhibits TGF-β1–induced expression of fibronectin and α-SMA in lung fibroblasts. HSM also restores superoxide dismutase expression in TGF-β1–treated lung fibroblasts and inhibits reactive oxygen species production in lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, HSM pretreatment markedly reduces bleomycin–induced lung injury and fibrosis in mice. Accordingly, HSM reduces inflammatory cell accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and proinflammatory cytokines levels in lung tissues. The HSM extract also significantly reduces TGF-β1 in lung tissues, and this effect is accompanied by decreased collagen 3α1 and α-SMA levels. Moreover, HSM reduces expression of the NLRP3 inflammasome and P2X7R in lung tissues, whereas it enhances expression of superoxide dismutase. These findings suggest that HSM may be used for the treatment of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26497260

  15. Azelastine hydrochloride (Azeptin) inhibits peplomycin (PLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis by contradicting the up-regulation of signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, K; Yamamoto, T; Ueta, E; Osaki, T

    1997-10-01

    Inhibition of peplomycin (PLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis by azelastine hydrochloride (Azeptin) was examined using ICR mice, and the effects of both drugs on signal transduction were investigated. Microscopically, Azeptin (a total of 56 mg/kg for 28 days) suppressed pulmonary fibrosis in mice which received an i.p. injection of a total of 60 or 75 mg/kg PLM. In parallel with the microscopic findings, smaller amounts of collagen were synthesized in the lungs of Azeptin-injected mice. PLM enhanced the expression of interleukin-1 beta- and transforming growth factor-beta-mRNA in lungs. In contrast, Azeptin suppressed the expression. Compatible with these in vivo results, Azeptin and PLM contradictively regulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation and c-myc mRNA expression in human gingival and mouse pulmonary fibroblasts. In addition, NF-kappa B was activated by fibroblast treatment with 5 micrograms/ml PLM for 1 h, but intranuclear NF-kappa B was decreased by cell treatment with 10(-5) M Azeptin. From these results, it is concluded that Azeptin inhibits PLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis by antagonizing the up-regulation of signal transduction.

  16. Leflunomide-induced pulmonary hypertension in a young woman with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Paulino A; Saad, Ariel K; Flagel, Santiago; Mazzocchi, Octavio; Blanco, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-06-01

    Leflunomide, a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, has been shown to be effective in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Among other side effects, systemic hypertension has been described, and also a case of possible pulmonary hypertension (PH) has been reported. Symptomatic PH in RA is rare. We present a 28-year-old woman with a history of RA who consulted our hospital because of severe symptomatic pulmonary hypertension. Two years before admission, she was started on leflunomide. Due to previous evidence of the association of leflunomide with pulmonary hypertension, the drug was stopped. The patient became asymptomatic with normal pulmonary arterial pressure within a year. Given the poor prognosis of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, the recognition of potentially reversible causes is crucial. Until further evidence is available in a patient who develops pulmonary arterial hypertension, stopping leflunomide should be considered.

  17. PDGF induces SphK1 expression via Egr-1 to promote pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sysol, Justin R; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive, life-threatening disease for which there is currently no curative treatment available. Pathologic changes in this disease involve remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature, including marked proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Recently, the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its activating kinase, sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), have been shown to be upregulated in PAH and promote PASMC proliferation. The mechanisms regulating the transcriptional upregulation of SphK1 in PASMCs are unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a PAH-relevant stimuli associated with enhanced PASMC proliferation, on SphK1 expression regulation. In human PASMCs (hPASMCs), PDGF significantly increased SphK1 mRNA and protein expression and induced cell proliferation. Selective inhibition of SphK1 attenuated PDGF-induced hPASMC proliferation. In silico promoter analysis for SphK1 identified several binding sites for early growth response protein 1 (Egr-1), a PDGF-associated transcription factor. Luciferase assays demonstrated that PDGF activates the SphK1 promoter in hPASMCs, and truncation of the 5'-promoter reduced PDGF-induced SphK1 expression. Stimulation of hPASMCs with PDGF induced Egr-1 protein expression, and direct binding of Egr-1 to the SphK1 promoter was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. Inhibition of ERK signaling prevented induction of Egr-1 by PDGF. Silencing of Egr-1 attenuated PDGF-induced SphK1 expression and hPASMC proliferation. These studies demonstrate that SphK1 is regulated by PDGF in hPASMCs via the transcription factor Egr-1, promoting cell proliferation. This novel mechanism of SphK1 regulation may be a therapeutic target in pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH. PMID:27099350

  18. Inhibitory effect of Bailing capsule on hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohui; Peng, Kejun; Zhou, Yutian; Deng, Fengmei; Ma, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigated the effects of Bailing capsule on hypoxia-induced proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Methods: This prospective study was performed at the Central Laboratory, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu, China between April 2012 and November 2014. Ten healthy adult male Wistar rats were administrated with gastric perfusion of Bailing capsule to obtain serum containing the tested drugs. Proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells proliferation was measured using cell counting kit-8 assay. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat PASMCs was determined through a fluorometric assay, whereas production of endothelin-1 (ET-1) was detected by ELISA and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), c-fos, and c-jun in PASMCs was also determined using immunohistochemistry staining and qRT-PCR. Results: We observed that the medicated serum obviously inhibited hypoxia-induced cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the medicated serum significantly reduced hypoxia-induced production of ROS and ET-1, as well as expression of PCNA, c-fos, and c-jun, in PASMCs. Conclusion: Results demonstrated that Bailing capsule can inhibit hypoxia-induced PASMC proliferation possibly by suppressing ET-1 and ROS production and by inhibiting expression of PCNA, c-fos, and c-jun. These results suggest that Bailing possess antiproliferative property, which is probably one of the underlying mechanisms of Bailing capsule for the clinical treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:27146611

  19. Ruscogenin exerts beneficial effects on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension by inhibiting NF-κB expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rong; Bi, Liqing; Kong, Hui; Xie, Weiping; Hong, Yongqing; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of ruscogenin on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and to determine the mechanism underlying this effect. We isolated pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells (PVSMCs) from the pulmonary artery of the rats; the PVSMCs were cultured in vitro and then were treated with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), PDGF + ruscogenin, or PDGF + ruscogenin + parthenolide. We randomized Sprague-Dawley rats into five groups as follows: control group, PAH group, low-dose group, medium-dose group, and high-dose group; the rats in the low-, medium-, and high-dose groups received the vehicle and ruscogenin 0.1, 0.4, and 0.7 mg/kg, respectively, from day 1 to day 21 after injection of monocrotaline (MCT). We measured the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), and medial wall thickness of the pulmonary artery (PAWT). We examined the levels of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) protein by using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, and the mRNA levels of NF-κB in PVSMCs were evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The mPAP, RVSP, and PAWT and the protein and mRNA levels of NF-κB were significantly higher in the PAH model group than in the control group (P < 0.05). Ruscogenin induced a significant dose-dependent decrease in the mPAP, RVSP, and PAWT and in the NF-κB expression in the PAH group (P < 0.05), which suggests that ruscogenin will also exert dose-dependent effects on MCT-induced PAH through the inhibition of NF-κB. PMID:26722401

  20. Impact of diet on ozone-induced pulmonary and systemic effects in female Brown Norway (BN) rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impact of diet on ozone-induced pulmonary and systemic effects in female Brown Norway (BN) ratsV.L. Bass1, M.C. Schladweiler2, S. Snow5, C.J. Gordon4, K.A. Jarema4, P. Phillips4, A.D. Ledbetter2, D.B. Miller3, J.E. Richards2, U.P. Kodavanti2. 1. SPH, UNC, Chapel Hill2. EPHD, NHE...

  1. Usefulness of Intratracheal Instillation Studies for Estimating Nanoparticle-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Fujishima, Kei; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation studies are the gold standard for the estimation of the harmful effects of respirable chemical substances, while there is limited evidence of the harmful effects of chemical substances by intratracheal instillation. We reviewed the effectiveness of intratracheal instillation studies for estimating the hazards of nanoparticles, mainly using papers in which both inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies were performed using the same nanoparticles. Compared to inhalation studies, there is a tendency in intratracheal instillation studies that pulmonary inflammation lasted longer in the lungs. A difference in pulmonary inflammation between high and low toxicity nanoparticles was observed in the intratracheal instillation studies, as in the inhalation studies. Among the endpoints of pulmonary toxicity, the kinetics of neutrophil counts, percentage of neutrophils, and chemokines for neutrophils and macrophages, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), reflected pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that these markers may be considered the predictive markers of pulmonary toxicity in both types of study. When comparing pulmonary inflammation between intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies under the same initial lung burden, there is a tendency that the inflammatory response following the intratracheal instillation of nanoparticles is greater than or equal to that following the inhalation of nanoparticles. If the difference in clearance in both studies is not large, the estimations of pulmonary toxicity are close. We suggest that intratracheal instillation studies can be useful for ranking the hazard of nanoparticles through pulmonary inflammation. PMID:26828483

  2. Usefulness of Intratracheal Instillation Studies for Estimating Nanoparticle-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Fujishima, Kei; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-27

    Inhalation studies are the gold standard for the estimation of the harmful effects of respirable chemical substances, while there is limited evidence of the harmful effects of chemical substances by intratracheal instillation. We reviewed the effectiveness of intratracheal instillation studies for estimating the hazards of nanoparticles, mainly using papers in which both inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies were performed using the same nanoparticles. Compared to inhalation studies, there is a tendency in intratracheal instillation studies that pulmonary inflammation lasted longer in the lungs. A difference in pulmonary inflammation between high and low toxicity nanoparticles was observed in the intratracheal instillation studies, as in the inhalation studies. Among the endpoints of pulmonary toxicity, the kinetics of neutrophil counts, percentage of neutrophils, and chemokines for neutrophils and macrophages, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), reflected pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that these markers may be considered the predictive markers of pulmonary toxicity in both types of study. When comparing pulmonary inflammation between intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies under the same initial lung burden, there is a tendency that the inflammatory response following the intratracheal instillation of nanoparticles is greater than or equal to that following the inhalation of nanoparticles. If the difference in clearance in both studies is not large, the estimations of pulmonary toxicity are close. We suggest that intratracheal instillation studies can be useful for ranking the hazard of nanoparticles through pulmonary inflammation.

  3. Evanescent field Sensors Based on Tantalum Pentoxide Waveguides – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Katrin; Oehse, Kerstin; Sulz, Gerd; Hoffmann, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Evanescent field sensors based on waveguide surfaces play an important role where high sensitivity is required. Particularly tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) is a suitable material for thin-film waveguides due to its high refractive index and low attenuation. Many label-free biosensor systems such as grating couplers and interferometric sensors as well as fluorescence-based systems benefit from this waveguide material leading to extremely high sensitivity. Some biosensor systems based on Ta2O5 waveguides already took the step into commercialization. This report reviews the various detection systems in terms of limit of detection, the applications, and the suitable surface chemistry.

  4. Effects of amorphous silica coating on cerium oxide nanoparticles induced pulmonary responses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cohen, Joel M.; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Recently cerium compounds have been used in a variety of consumer products, including diesel fuel additives, to increase fuel combustion efficiency and decrease diesel soot emissions. However, cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been detected in the exhaust, which raises a health concern. Previous studies have shown that exposure of rats to nanoscale CeO2 by intratracheal instillation (IT) induces sustained pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 or CeO2 coated with a nano layer of amorphous SiO2 (aSiO2/CeO2) by a single IT and sacrificed at various times post-exposure to assess potential protective effects of the aSiO2 coating. The first acellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and BAL cells were collected and analyzed from all exposed animals. At the low dose (0.15 mg/kg), CeO2 but not aSiO2/CeO2 exposure induced inflammation. However, at the higher doses, both particles induced a dose-related inflammation, cytotoxicity, inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP at 1 day post-exposure. Morphological analysis of lung showed an increased inflammation, surfactant and collagen fibers after CeO2 (high dose at 3.5 mg/kg) treatment at 28 days post-exposure. aSiO2 coating significantly reduced CeO2-induced inflammatory responses in the airspace and appeared to attenuate phospholipidosis and fibrosis. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed Ce and phosphorous (P) in all particle-exposed lungs, whereas Si was only detected in aSiO2/CeO2-exposed lungs up to 3 days after exposure, suggesting that aSiO2 dissolved off the CeO2 core, and some of the CeO2 was transformed to CePO4 with time. These results demonstrate that aSiO2 coating reduce CeO2-induced inflammation, phospholipidosis and fibrosis. PMID:26210349

  5. Involvement of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and associated transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling in paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying-Ying; Shen, Peng; Chang, Wen-Xiu

    2015-12-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is a highly toxic herbicide which is able to induce pulmonary fibrosis in humans and animals. The epithelial‑to‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) was demonstrated to be an important factor in pulmonary fibrosis. However, it has remained elusive whether PQ induces pulmonary fibrosis via EMT, which was therefore investigated in the present study. In addition, the underlying mechanisms of PQ‑induced EMT were examined in vitro. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of rat lung tissues demonstrated that PQ induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Western blot analysis then revealed that the expression of epithelial cell marker E‑cadherin was significantly decreased, while the expression of mesenchymal markers α‑smooth‑muscle actin and vimentin was significantly increased in rat lung tissues and A549 cells following PQ treatment. Transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β/Smad signaling was also induced by PQ as evidenced by increased expression of TGF‑β1 and Smad2. However, PQ‑induced EMT in A549 cells was abolished by transfection with TGF‑β1‑specific small hairpin RNA. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that PQ induced EMT in vivo and in vitro, which may be an important process in the development of PQ‑induced pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, TGF-β/Smad signaling was involved in PQ-induced EMT. PMID:26499763

  6. Acrolein induced both pulmonary inflammation and the death of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Ito, Sachiko; Nishio, Naomi; Tanaka, Yuriko; Chen, Nana; Isobe, Ken-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    Acrolein, a compound found in cigarette smoke, is a major risk factor for respiratory diseases. Previous research determined that both acrolein and cigarette smoke produced reactive oxygen species (ROS). As many types of pulmonary injuries are associated with inflammation, this study sought to ascertain the extent to which exposure to acrolein advanced inflammatory state in the lungs. Our results showed that intranasal exposure of mice to acrolein increased CD11c(+)F4/80(high) macrophages in the lungs and increased ROS formation via induction of NF-κB signaling. Treatment with acrolein activated macrophages and led to their increased production of ROS and expression of several key pro-inflammatory cytokines. In in vitro studies, acrolein treatment of bone marrow-derived GM-CSF-dependent immature macrophages (GM-IMs), activated the cells and led to their increased production of ROS and expression of several key pro-inflammatory cytokines. Acrolein treatment of macrophages induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Inclusion of an inhibitor of ROS formation markedly decreased acrolein-mediated macrophage activation and reduced the extent of epithelial cell death. These results indicate that acrolein can cause lung damage, in great part by mediating the increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines/factors by macrophages.

  7. Nifuroxazide induces apoptosis and impairs pulmonary metastasis in breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Hu, M; Lei, Q; Xia, Y; Zhu, Y; Song, X; Li, Y; Jie, H; Liu, C; Xiong, Y; Zuo, Z; Zeng, A; Li, Y; Yu, L; Shen, G; Wang, D; Xie, Y; Ye, T; Wei, Y

    2015-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common female cancer with considerable metastatic potential. Signal transducers and activators of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway is constitutively activated in many cancers including breast cancer and has been validated as a novel potential anticancer target. Here, we reported our finding with nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as a potent inhibitor of Stat3. The potency of nifuroxazide on breast cancer was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we found that nifuroxazide decreased the viability of three breast cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that the occurrence of its apoptosis was associated with activation of cleaved caspases-3 and Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly blocked cancer cell migration and invasion, and the reduction of phosphorylated-Stat3(Tyr705), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression were also observed. Furthermore, in our animal experiments, intraperitoneal administration of 50 mg/kg/day nifuroxazide suppressed 4T1 tumor growth and blocked formation of pulmonary metastases without detectable toxicity. Meanwhile, histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a decrease in Ki-67-positive cells, MMP-9-positive cells and an increase in cleaved caspase-3-positive cells upon nifuroxazide. Notably, nifuroxazide reduced the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cell in the lung. Our data indicated that nifuroxazide may potentially be a therapeutic agent for growth and metastasis of breast cancer. PMID:25811798

  8. Nifuroxazide induces apoptosis and impairs pulmonary metastasis in breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, F; Hu, M; Lei, Q; Xia, Y; Zhu, Y; Song, X; Li, Y; Jie, H; Liu, C; Xiong, Y; Zuo, Z; Zeng, A; Li, Y; Yu, L; Shen, G; Wang, D; Xie, Y; Ye, T; Wei, Y

    2015-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the most common female cancer with considerable metastatic potential. Signal transducers and activators of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway is constitutively activated in many cancers including breast cancer and has been validated as a novel potential anticancer target. Here, we reported our finding with nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as a potent inhibitor of Stat3. The potency of nifuroxazide on breast cancer was assessed in vitro and in vivo. In this investigation, we found that nifuroxazide decreased the viability of three breast cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that the occurrence of its apoptosis was associated with activation of cleaved caspases-3 and Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly blocked cancer cell migration and invasion, and the reduction of phosphorylated-Stat3Tyr705, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression were also observed. Furthermore, in our animal experiments, intraperitoneal administration of 50 mg/kg/day nifuroxazide suppressed 4T1 tumor growth and blocked formation of pulmonary metastases without detectable toxicity. Meanwhile, histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a decrease in Ki-67-positive cells, MMP-9-positive cells and an increase in cleaved caspase-3-positive cells upon nifuroxazide. Notably, nifuroxazide reduced the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cell in the lung. Our data indicated that nifuroxazide may potentially be a therapeutic agent for growth and metastasis of breast cancer. PMID:25811798

  9. Comprehensive Antigen Screening Identifies Moraxella catarrhalis Proteins That Induce Protection in a Mouse Pulmonary Clearance Model

    PubMed Central

    Verhaegh, Suzanne J. C.; Niebisch, Axel; Hanner, Markus; Selak, Sanja; Schüler, Wolfgang; Morfeldt, Eva; Hellberg, Christel; Nagy, Eszter; Lundberg, Urban; Hays, John P.; Meinke, Andreas; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is one of the three most common causative bacterial pathogens of otitis media, however no effective vaccine against M. catarrhalis has been developed so far. To identify M. catarrhalis vaccine candidate antigens, we used carefully selected sera from children with otitis media and healthy individuals to screen small-fragment genomic libraries that are expressed to display frame-selected peptides on a bacterial cell surface. This ANTIGENome technology led to the identification of 214 antigens, 23 of which were selected by in vitro or in vivo studies for additional characterization. Eight of the 23 candidates were tested in a Moraxella mouse pulmonary clearance model, and 3 of these antigens induced significantly faster bacterial clearance compared to adjuvant or to the previously characterized antigen OmpCD. The most significant protection data were obtained with the antigen MCR_1416 (Msp22), which was further investigated for its biological function by in vitro studies suggesting that Msp22 is a heme binding protein. This study comprises one of the most exhaustive studies to identify potential vaccine candidate antigens against the bacterial pathogen M. catarrhalis. PMID:23671716

  10. Right ventricular angiogenesis is an early adaptive response to chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Todd M.; Peabody, Jacelyn; Baddoura, Philip; Fallica, Jon; Mock, Jason R.; Singer, Benjamin D.; D’Alessio, Franco R.; Damarla, Mahendra; Damico, Rachel L.; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Myocardial angiogenesis is presumed to play a role in right ventricular (RV) adaptation to pulmonary hypertension (PH), though definitive evidence and functional correlations are lacking. We aimed to use definitive methods to correlate RV angiogenesis, hypertrophy, and function in a murine PH model. Methods Mice were exposed to chronic hypoxia for 21 days to induce PH (CH-PH) and RV remodeling. We used unbiased stereology and flow cytometry to quantify angiogenesis and myocyte hypertrophy, and pressure-volume loops to measure RV function. Results Within 7 days, RV-specific increases in total capillary length (10576±2574 cm vs. 6822±1379 cm; P = 0.02), surface area (10±3.3 cm2 vs. 4.9±1.5 cm2; P = 0.01), and volume (0.0013±0.0005 cm3 vs. 0.0006±0.0001 cm3; P = 0.02) were observed, and RV endothelial cell proliferation increased nearly 10-fold. Continued exposure led to progressive RV hypertrophy without additional angiogenesis. RV function was preserved, but activation of hypoxia-dependent gene expression was observed in both ventricles after 21 days. Conclusions Early RV remodeling in CH-PH is associated with RV angiogenesis and preserved RV function. Continued CH-PH is associated with RV hypertrophy but not angiogenesis, leading to biventricular activation of hypoxia-dependent gene expression. PMID:26352923

  11. Enalapril Mitigates Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis and Pulmonary Fibrosis if Started 35 Days after Whole-Thorax Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Fish, Brian L.; Moulder, John E.; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Medhora, Meetha

    2014-01-01

    Victims of a radiological attack or nuclear accident may receive high-dose, heterogeneous exposures from radiation to the chest that lead to lung damage. Our goal is to develop countermeasures to mitigate such injuries. We used WAG/RijCmcr rats receiving 13 Gy to the whole thorax to induce pulmonary fibrosis within 210 days. The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril was evaluated as a mitigator of these injuries at two doses (18 and 36 mg/m2/day) and 8 schedules: starting at 7, 35, 70, 105 and 140 days and continuing to 210 days or starting at 7 days and stopping at 30, 60 or 90 days after whole-thorax irradiation. The earliest start date at 7 days after irradiation would provide an adequate window of time for triage and dosimetry. Survival after 35 days, as permitted by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) was also recorded as a primary end point of pneumonitis. Pulmonary fibrosis was evaluated using the Sircol biochemical assay to measure lung collagen. Our results indicated that a short course of either dose of enalapril from 7–90 days improved survival. However, pulmonary fibrosis was only mitigated by the higher dose of enalapril (36 mg/m2/day). The latest effective start date for the drug was 35 days after irradiation. These results indicate that ACE inhibitors can be started at least a month after irradiation for mitigation of pneumonitis and/or pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24131041

  12. Inhibition of PI3K by PX-866 prevents transforming growth factor-alpha-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Le Cras, Timothy D; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Davidson, Cynthia; Schmidt, Stephanie; Fenchel, Matthew; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Hardie, William D

    2010-02-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha) is a ligand for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR activation is associated with fibroproliferative processes in human lung disease and animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. EGFR signaling activates several intracellular signaling pathways including phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K). We previously showed that induction of lung-specific TGFalpha expression in transgenic mice caused progressive pulmonary fibrosis over a 4-week period. The increase in levels of phosphorylated Akt, detected after 1 day of doxycycline-induced TGFalpha expression, was blocked by treatment with the PI3K inhibitor, PX-866. Daily administration of PX-866 during TGFalpha induction prevented increases in lung collagen and airway resistance as well as decreases in lung compliance. Treatment of mice with oral PX-866 4 weeks after the induction of TGFalpha prevented additional weight loss and further increases in total collagen, and attenuated changes in pulmonary mechanics. These data show that PI3K is activated in TGFalpha/EGFR-mediated pulmonary fibrosis and support further studies to determine the role of PI3K activation in human lung fibrotic disease, which could be amenable to targeted therapy.

  13. Combined Tlr2 and Tlr4 Deficiency Increases Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Paun, Alexandra; Fox, Jessica; Balloy, Viviane; Chignard, Michel; Qureshi, Salman T.; Haston, Christina K.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether Toll-like receptor 2 or 4 genotype alters the lung response to irradiation in C57BL/6 mice using a model developing a phenotype that resembles radiotherapy-induced fibrosis in both histological characteristics and onset post-treatment. Methods and Materials: The pulmonary phenotype of C57BL/6 mice deficient in each or both of these genes was assessed after an 18-Gy single dose to the thoracic cavity by survival time postirradiation, bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential, histological evidence of alveolitis and fibrosis, and gene expression levels, and compared with that of wild-type mice. Results: The lung phenotype of Tlr4-deficient and Tlr2-deficient mice did not differ from that of wild-type mice in terms of survival time postirradiation, or by histological evidence of alveolitis or fibrosis. In contrast, mice deficient in both receptors developed respiratory distress at an earlier time than did wild-type mice and presented an enhanced fibrotic response (13.5% vs. 5.8% of the lung by image analysis of histological sections, p < 0.001). No differences in bronchoalveolar cell differential counts, nor in numbers of apoptotic cells in the lung as detected through active caspase-3 staining, were evident among the irradiated mice grouped by Tlr genotype. Gene expression analysis of lung tissue revealed that Tlr2,4-deficient mice have increased levels of hyaluronidase 2 compared with both wild-type mice and mice lacking either Tlr2 or Tlr4. Conclusion: We conclude that a combined deficiency in both Tlr2 and Tlr4, but not Tlr2 or Tlr4 alone, leads to enhanced radiation-induced fibrosis in the C57BL/6 mouse model.

  14. Pulmonary gallium uptake in rats with granulomatosis induced by complete Freund adjuvant

    SciTech Connect

    Stanislas-Leguern, G.; Masse, R.; Jaubert, F.; Chretien, J.; Huchon, G.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of gallium-67 uptake in lung granulomatosis, we studied 13 rats in which lung granulomatosis was induced by injection of complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) and 14 controls. Gallium uptake was assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lavaged lung. The cells responsible for gallium uptake were identified by latent image activation autoradiography. Gallium activity in both lavaged lungs and bronchoalveolar cells (BAC) was higher in CFA-treated animals than in controls (172,205 +/- 134,783 DPM versus 44,456 +/- 14,486 DPM +/- SD (p less than 0.05) and 40,083 +/- 16,350 DPM versus 9100 +/- 4114 DPM (p less than 0.05), respectively). In control rats, about two-thirds of total lung gallium was located in the interstitium, whereas in CFA-treated rats it was found in the mononuclear cells of lung granulomas. Gallium tracks were more numerous in the alveolar macrophages (AM) of CFA-treated rats than in control AM (28.4 +/- 10.0/field versus 8.4 +/- 3.8/field, p less than 0.001) but the number of tracks was proportional to the number of AM (52.4 +/- 18.7 versus 12.2 +/- 4.3, respectively; p less than 0.001). It is concluded that in rats with CFA-induced lung granulomatosis 1) pulmonary gallium uptake increases, 2) mononuclear cells are responsible for this uptake in both granulomas and AM, and 3) the increased uptake is due to the increased number of mononuclear cells.

  15. Preventive Effects of Rhodiola rosea L. on Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Si, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Jian; Han, Jian; Liang, Xu; Xu, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Yi-Ting; Li, Guo-Yu; Wang, Hang-Yu; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea L. (RRL) possesses a wide range of pharmacological properties, including lung-protective activity, and has been utilized in folk medicine for several 100 years. However, the lung-protective mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the possible lung-protective activity mechanism of RRL in a pulmonary fibrosis (PF) rat model. Lung fibrotic injury was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by single intratracheal instillation of saline containing bleomycin (BLM; 5 mg/kg). The rats were administered 125, 250, or 500 mg/kg of a 95% ethanol extract of RRL for 28 days. The animals were killed to detect changes in body weight, serum levels of glutathione (GSH) and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), as well as lung tissue hydroxyproline (HYP) content. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and immunohistochemical staining were performed to observe the histopathological changes in lung tissues. Additionally, target-related proteins were measured by Western blotting. RRL alleviated the loss of body weight induced by instilling BLM in PF rats, particularly at the 500 mg/kg per day dose. RRL reduced HYP (p < 0.01) and increased GSH and T-SOD contents. BALF levels of TNF-α, TGF-β1, and IL-6 decreased significantly in the RRL-treated groups. Expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and α-smooth muscle actin decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in response to RRL. Moreover, the levels of TGF-β1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in lung tissues also decreased in the RRL-treated groups. RRL alleviated BLM-induced PF in rats. Our results reveal that the protective effects of RRL against fibrotic lung injury in rats are correlated with its anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and anti-fibrotic properties. MMP-9 may play

  16. Preventive Effects of Rhodiola rosea L. on Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Si, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Jian; Han, Jian; Liang, Xu; Xu, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Yi-Ting; Li, Guo-Yu; Wang, Hang-Yu; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea L. (RRL) possesses a wide range of pharmacological properties, including lung-protective activity, and has been utilized in folk medicine for several 100 years. However, the lung-protective mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the possible lung-protective activity mechanism of RRL in a pulmonary fibrosis (PF) rat model. Lung fibrotic injury was induced in Sprague–Dawley rats by single intratracheal instillation of saline containing bleomycin (BLM; 5 mg/kg). The rats were administered 125, 250, or 500 mg/kg of a 95% ethanol extract of RRL for 28 days. The animals were killed to detect changes in body weight, serum levels of glutathione (GSH) and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), as well as lung tissue hydroxyproline (HYP) content. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hematoxylin and eosin, Masson’s trichrome, and immunohistochemical staining were performed to observe the histopathological changes in lung tissues. Additionally, target-related proteins were measured by Western blotting. RRL alleviated the loss of body weight induced by instilling BLM in PF rats, particularly at the 500 mg/kg per day dose. RRL reduced HYP (p < 0.01) and increased GSH and T-SOD contents. BALF levels of TNF-α, TGF-β1, and IL-6 decreased significantly in the RRL-treated groups. Expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and α-smooth muscle actin decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in response to RRL. Moreover, the levels of TGF-β1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in lung tissues also decreased in the RRL-treated groups. RRL alleviated BLM-induced PF in rats. Our results reveal that the protective effects of RRL against fibrotic lung injury in rats are correlated with its anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and anti-fibrotic properties. MMP-9 may play

  17. AVP-induced pulmonary vasodilation during specific V1 receptor block in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, D P; Clougherty, P W; Murray, P A

    1987-09-01

    Our objectives were 1) to determine whether exogenously administered arginine vasopressin (AVP) can exert a vasoactive influence on the pulmonary circulation of conscious dogs during specific vasopressinergic-1 (V1) receptor block, and 2) to assess the extent to which the pulmonary vascular response to AVP during V1 receptor block is mediated by either sympathetic beta-adrenergic or cholinergic receptor activation or by cyclooxygenase pathway activation. Multipoint pulmonary vascular pressure-cardiac index (P/Q) plots were constructed during normoxia in conscious dogs by stepwise constriction of the thoracic inferior vena cava to reduce Q. In dogs pretreated with a specific V1 receptor antagonist [d(CH2)5 AVP, 10 micrograms/kg iv], AVP infusion (7.6 ng.kg-1 X min-1 iv) increased (P less than 0.01) Q from 139 +/- 6 to 175 +/- 8 ml.min-1 X kg-1, and decreased (P less than 0.01) the pulmonary vascular pressure gradient (pulmonary arterial pressure-pulmonary capillary wedge pressure: PAP-PCWP) over the entire range of Q studied (140 to 80 ml.min-1 X kg-1). This pulmonary vasodilator response to AVP during V1 block was also observed following sympathetic beta-adrenergic block alone, following combined sympathetic beta-adrenergic and cholinergic block, and following cyclooxygenase pathway inhibition. Thus exogenous administration of AVP during specific V1 receptor block results in active, nonflow-dependent pulmonary vasodilation. This pulmonary vasodilator response is not mediated by reflex activation of sympathetic beta-adrenergic or cholinergic receptors or by metabolites of the cyclooxygenase pathway over a broad range of Q. PMID:2888317

  18. Electronic properties of tantalum pentoxide polymorphs from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Lu, W.; Kioupakis, E.

    2014-11-17

    Tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is extensively studied for its attractive properties in dielectric films, anti-reflection coatings, and resistive switching memory. Although various crystalline structures of tantalum pentoxide have been reported, its structural, electronic, and optical properties still remain a subject of research. We investigate the electronic and optical properties of crystalline and amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} structures using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and the GW method. The calculated band gaps of the crystalline structures are too small to explain the experimental measurements, but the amorphous structure exhibits a strong exciton binding energy and an optical band gap (∼4 eV) in agreement with experiment. We determine the atomic orbitals that constitute the conduction band for each polymorph and analyze the dependence of the band gap on the atomic geometry. Our results establish the connection between the underlying structure and the electronic and optical properties of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}.

  19. Synthesis and thermal evolution of structure in alkoxide-derived niobium pentoxide gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1993-01-01

    Niobium pentoxide gels in the form of transparent monoliths and powder have been synthesized from the controlled hydrolysis and polycondensation of niobium pentaethoxide under different experimental conditions using various mole ratios of Nb(OC2H5)5:H2O:C2H5OH:HCl. Alcohol acted as the mutual solvent and HCl as the deflocculating agent. In the absence of HCl, precipitation of colloidal particles was encountered on the addition of any water to the alkoxide. The gels were subjected to various thermal treatments and characterized by differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, x-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy. After drying at 400 C, the gels were amorphous to x-rays. The amorphous powder crystallized into the low-temperature orthorhombic form of Nb2O5 at approximately 500 C, which transformed irreversibly into the high-temperature monoclinic alpha-Nb2O5 between 900 to 1000 C. The kinetics of crystallization of the amorphous niobium pentoxide have been investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry. The crystallization activation energy was determined to be 399 kJ/mol.

  20. The influence of phosphorous pentoxide on the phase composition and formation of Portland clinker

    SciTech Connect

    Stanek, T.; Sulovsky, P.

    2009-07-15

    The influence of phosphorous pentoxide (P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) on the phase composition and formation of Portland clinker was studied in laboratory conditions. Phosphorous pentoxide in the form of calcium phosphate was added to common cement-making raw meal in graded quantities up to 5 wt.%. The raw meal properties were studied by thermal analysis. The development of clinker formation by burning for periods ranging from 20 s to 30 min in a special semi-automatic oven with a manipulator was followed using light optical microscopy. The phase composition of clinkers burnt to equilibrium was quantified by the optical point counting method. The entry of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} into clinker minerals was determined by electron microprobe analyses. The laboratory tests show that at 0.7 wt.% of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in the clinker the alite (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}) content decreases and belite (Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) content increases. At a P{sub 2}O{sub 5} content of 4.5 wt.% alite formation was totally blocked and the resulting clinker contained free lime in equilibrium with belite.

  1. 1H NMR-Based Analysis of Serum Metabolites in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Taijie; Gu, Jinping; Huang, Caihua; Zheng, Suli; Lin, Xu; Xie, Liangdi; Lin, Donghai

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To study the changes of the metabolic profile during the pathogenesis in monocrotaline (MCT) induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods. Forty male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 8, each). PAH rats were induced by a single dose intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg MCT, while 8 rats given intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml normal saline and scarified in the same day (W0) served as control. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) was measured through catherization. The degree of right ventricular hypertrophy and pulmonary hyperplasia were determined at the end of first to fourth weeks; nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of sera were then acquired for the analysis of metabolites. Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were used to discriminate different metabolic profiles. Results. The prominent changes of metabolic profiles were seen during these four weeks. Twenty specific metabolites were identified, which were mainly involved in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, energy metabolism, ketogenesis, and methionine metabolism. Profiles of correlation between these metabolites in each stage changed markedly, especially in the fourth week. Highly activated methionine and betaine metabolism pathways were selected by the pathway enrichment analysis. Conclusions. Metabolic dysfunction is involved in the development and progression of PAH. PMID:27057080

  2. Non-pulmonary vein foci induced before and after pulmonary vein isolation in patients undergoing ablation therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: incidence and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hui; Dai, Yin-yin; Jiang, Ru-hong; Liu, Qiang; Sun, Ya-xun; Lin, Jian-wei; Zhang, Zu-wen; Chen, Shi-quan; Zhu, Jun; Sheng, Xia; Jiang, Chen-yang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence and clinical outcome of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plus isoproterenol (ISP)-induced non-pulmonary vein (PV) foci before and after circumferential PV isolation (CPVI) during index ablation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). Methods: In 80 consecutive patients undergoing catheter ablation for drug-refractory, symptomatic PAF at our hospital from April 2010 to January 2011, atrial fibrillation (AF) was provoked with ATP (20 mg) and ISP (20 μg/min) administration before and after CPVI. The spontaneous initiation of AF was mapped and recorded. Results: Before ablation, AF mostly originating from PVs (PV vs. non-PV, 36/70 vs. 3/70; P<0.01) was induced in 39 patients with sinus rhythm. CPVI significantly suppressed AF inducibility; however, more non-PV foci were provoked (post-CPVI vs. pre-CPVI, 13/76 vs. 3/70; P=0.016). Patients with pre- and post-CPVI induced AF (n=49) were divided according to non-PV foci being induced (group N, n=17) or not (group P, n=32). After mean (19.2±8.2) months follow-up, 88.2% (15/17) and 65.6% (21/32) of patients in groups N and P, respectively, were free from AF recurrence (P=0.088). Conclusions: ATP+ISP administration effectively provokes non-PV foci, especially after CPVI in PAF patients. Although in this study difference did not achieve statistical significance, supplementary ablation targeting non-PV foci might benefit clinical outcome. PMID:25294381

  3. Pulmonary microRNA profiling in a mouse model of ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Vergadi, Eleni; Kaniaris, Evangelos; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Lagoudaki, Eleni; Georgopoulos, Dimitrios; Zapol, Warren M.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Iliopoulos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes induced by high tidal volume ventilation (HVTV) in pulmonary expression of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and identify potential target genes and corresponding miRNA-gene networks. Using a real-time RT-PCR-based array in RNA samples from lungs of mice subjected to HVTV for 1 or 4 h and control mice, we identified 65 miRNAs whose expression changed more than twofold upon HVTV. An inflammatory and a TGF-β-signaling miRNA-gene network were identified by in silico pathway analysis being at highest statistical significance (P = 10−43 and P = 10−28, respectively). In the inflammatory network, IL-6 and SOCS-1, regulated by miRNAs let-7 and miR-155, respectively, appeared as central nodes. In TGF-β-signaling network, SMAD-4, regulated by miR-146, appeared as a central node. The contribution of miRNAs to the development of lung injury was evaluated in mice subjected to HVTV treated with a precursor or antagonist of miR-21, a miRNA highly upregulated by HVTV. Lung compliance was preserved only in mice treated with anti-miR-21 but not in mice treated with pre-miR-21 or negative-control miRNA. Both alveolar-arterial oxygen difference and protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage were lower in mice treated with anti-miR-21 than in mice treated with pre-miR-21 or negative-control miRNA (DA-a: 66 ± 27 vs. 131 ± 22, 144 ± 10 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.001; protein concentration: 1.1 ± 0.2 vs. 2.3 ± 1, 2.1 ± 0.4 mg/ml, respectively, P < 0.01). Our results show that HVTV induces changes in miRNA expression in mouse lungs. Modulation of miRNA expression can affect the development of HVTV-induced lung injury. PMID:22659882

  4. Exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension in a patient with compensated cardiac disease: hemodynamic and functional response to sildenafil therapy.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Lazaros; Memon, Nabeel; O'Murchu, Brian

    2015-02-01

    We describe the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with exertional dyspnea and fatigue that had worsened over the preceding 2 years, despite a normally functioning bioprosthetic aortic valve and stable, mild left ventricular dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction, 0.45). His symptoms could not be explained by physical examination, an extensive biochemical profile, or multiple cardiac and pulmonary investigations. However, abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise test results and a right heart catheterization-combined with the use of a symptom-limited, bedside bicycle ergometer-revealed that the patient's exercise-induced pulmonary artery hypertension was out of proportion to his compensated left heart disease. A trial of sildenafil therapy resulted in objective improvements in hemodynamic values and functional class.

  5. Pneumomediastinum, subcutaneous emphysema, and pneumothorax after a pulmonary function testing in a patient with bleomycin-induced interstitial pneumonitis*

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Mariana Sponholz; Fernandes, Frederico Leon Arrabal; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is an uncommon event, the clinical picture of which includes retrosternal chest pain, subcutaneous emphysema, dyspnea, and dysphonia. The pathophysiological mechanism involved is the emergence of a pressure gradient between the alveoli and surrounding structures, causing alveolar rupture with subsequent dissection of the peribronchovascular sheath and infiltration of the mediastinum and subcutaneous tissue with air. Known triggers include acute exacerbations of asthma and situations that require the Valsalva maneuver. We described and documented with HRCT scans the occurrence of pneumomediastinum after a patient with bleomycin-induced interstitial lung disease underwent pulmonary function testing. Although uncommon, the association between pulmonary function testing and air leak syndromes has been increasingly reported in the literature, and lung diseases, such as interstitial lung diseases, include structural changes that facilitate the occurrence of this complication. PMID:24310635

  6. Protein complex formation with heat shock protein 90 in chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Sandra L.; Slaughter, James C.; Kaplowitz, Mark R.; Zhang, Yongmei; Zeng, Heng; Frye, Naila Rashida; Aschner, Judy L.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant interactions between heat shock protein (Hsp)90 and its client proteins could contribute to pulmonary hypertension. We tested the hypotheses that 1) the interaction between Hsp90 and its known client protein, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), is impaired in pulmonary resistance arteries (PRAs) from piglets with pulmonary hypertension caused by exposure to 3 or 10 days of hypoxia and 2) Hsp90 interacts with the prostanoid pathway proteins prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) and/or thromboxane synthase (TXAS). We also determined whether Hsp90 antagonism with geldanamycin alters the agonist-induced synthesis of prostacyclin and thromboxane or alters PRA responses to these prostaglandin metabolites. Compared with normoxic piglets, less eNOS coimmunoprecipitated with Hsp90 in PRAs from hypoxic piglets. Despite reduced Hsp90-eNOS interactions, dilation to ACh was enhanced in geldanamycin-treated PRAs from hypoxic, but not normoxic, piglets. In PRAs from all groups of piglets, PGIS and TXAS coimmunoprecipitated with Hsp90. Geldanamycin reduced the ACh-induced synthesis of prostacyclin and thromboxane and altered responses to the thromboxane mimetic U-46619 in PRAs from all groups. Although geldanamycin enhanced responses to prostacyclin in PRAs from both groups of hypoxic piglets, geldanamycin had no effect on prostacyclin responses in PRAs from either group of normoxic piglets. Our findings indicate that Hsp90 influences both prostanoid and eNOS signaling in the pulmonary circulation of newborn piglets and that the impact of pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 on these signaling pathways is altered during exposure to chronic hypoxia. PMID:20693398

  7. [A case of pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy induced by early gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Yasui, Hideki; Akamatsu, Taisuke; Nakamura, Yutarou; Inui, Naoki; Suda, Takafumi; Chida, Kingo; Meguro, Shiori; Baba, Satoshi

    2011-02-01

    A 56-year-old man with chief complaints of dry cough and dyspnea was admitted. He had severe hypoxemia, and his chest radiographs showed enhancement of pulmonary artery opacities with multiple defects on pulmonary blood flow scintigraphy. Enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed swelling of the mediastinum and hilar lymph nodes, but no apparent thrombi in the pulmonary arteries was seen. A biopsy specimen of a left neck lymph node showed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, including signet-ring cell carcinoma components, but the origin was unclear. Despite receiving chemotherapy, his respiratory condition worsened, and he died 3 days after admission. Routine autopsy failed to clarify the tumor origin, but a detailed dissection of specimens confirmed early gastric cancer. Additionally, pathology of the pulmonary arteries was compatible with pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM). PTTM is a rare condition characterized by the presence of diffuse thrombotic microthrombi and fibrocellular intimal proliferation in the pulmonary vasculature. Accompanied with early gastric cancer, this is an extremely rare but important case of PTTM. PMID:21400909

  8. Local delivery of biodegradable pirfenidone nanoparticles ameliorates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Ruchit; Redente, Elizabeth F.; Thakur, Ashish; Riches, David W. H.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2012-12-01

    Our purpose was to assess sustained delivery and enhanced efficacy of pirfenidone-loaded nanoparticles after intratracheal instillation. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles containing pirfenidone (NPs) were prepared and characterized. Biodistribution of NPs and solution was assessed using LC-MS after intratracheal administration in C57Bl/6 mice at 3 and 24 h and 1 week post-administration. Efficacy was tested in C57Bl/6 mice in a bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis model. Mice received 10 μg pirfenidone intratracheally in solution or NPs, once a week, for 3 weeks after bleomycin administration. Drug effects were monitored on day 28. Lung hydroxyproline content, total number of cells, and numbers of macrophages, lymphocytes, and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were assessed. Numbers of macrophages, lymphocytes, and neutrophils were assessed in the lung as well. NPs sustained significantly higher levels of pirfenidone in the lungs and BAL at 24 h and 1 week, compared to the solution group. Pirfenidone solution and NPs significantly reduced hydroxyproline levels by 57 and 81%, respectively, compared to bleomycin alone. At the end of 4 weeks, BAL cellularity was reduced by 25.4% and 56% with solution and NP treatment, respectively. The numbers of lymphocytes and neutrophils in the BAL were also reduced by 58.9 and 82.4% for solution and 74.5% and 89.7% for NPs, respectively. The number of inflammatory macrophages in the lung was reduced by 62.8% and the number of neutrophils was reduced by 59.1% in the NP group and by 37.7% and 44.5%, respectively, in the solution group, compared to bleomycin alone. In conclusion, nanoparticles sustain lung pirfenidone delivery and enhance its anti-fibrotic efficacy.

  9. Repeated cadmium nebulizations induce pulmonary MMP-2 and MMP-9 production and emphysema in rats.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, Nathalie; Vincke, Grégoire; Fiévez, Laurence; Onclinx, Cécile; Wirth, Delphine; Belleflamme, Michèle; Louis, Renaud; Cataldo, Didier; Peck, Michael J; Gustin, Pascal

    2005-07-01

    This study describes induction of pulmonary inflammation, production of matrix metalloprotease of type 2 (MMP-2) and type 9 (MMP-9), and emphysema in cadmium (Cd)-exposed rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly distributed into two groups: one placebo-exposed group undergoing saline (NaCl 0.9%) inhalation (n=30) and one Cd-exposed group undergoing cadmium (CdCl(2) 0.1%) inhalation (n=30). The animals of the placebo- and Cd-exposed groups were divided in five subgroups (n=6). Subgroups underwent either a single exposure of 1h or repeated exposures three times weekly for 1h during 3 weeks (3W), 5 weeks (5W), 5 weeks followed by 2 weeks without exposure (5W+2) or 5 weeks followed by 4 weeks without exposure (5W+4). Each animal underwent determination of enhanced pause (Penh) as index of airflow limitation prior to the first exposure as well as before sacrifice. The animals were sacrificed the day after their last exposure. The left lung was fixed for histomorphometric analysis (determination of median interwall distance (MIWD)), whilst bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected from the right lung. BALF was analyzed cytologically, and MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels were determined by gelatine zymography. Twelve rats previously instilled with pancreatic elastase were used as positive emphysema controls and underwent the same investigations. Cd-exposure induced a significant increase of BALF macrophages, neutrophils and MMP-9 up to 5W+4, whereas MMP-2 gelatinolytic activity returned to baseline levels within 5W. MIWD was significantly increased in all repeatedly Cd-exposed groups and elastase-treated rats. Penh was increased in Cd-exposed rats after a single exposure and after 3W. MMP gelatinolytic activity was significantly correlated with macrophages, neutrophils and Penh. In repeatedly exposed rats, MIWD was positively and significantly correlated with MMP gelatinolytic activity, suggesting that increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 production favours the development of emphysema.

  10. Cell- and isoform-specific increases in arginase expression in acute silica-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Poljakovic, Mirjana; Porter, Dale W; Millecchia, Lyndell; Kepka-Lenhart, Diane; Beighley, Christopher; Wolfarth, Michael G; Castranova, Vincent; Morris, Sidney M

    2007-01-15

    Arginase induction was reported in several inflammatory lung diseases, suggesting that this may be a common feature underlying the pathophysiology of such diseases. As little is known regarding arginase expression in silicosis, the induction and cellular localization of arginase were elucidated in lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats 24 h following exposure to varying doses of silica by intratracheal instillation. Arginase expression was evaluated by activity assay, quantification of arginase I and arginase II mRNA levels using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and immunohistochemistry. Analyses of cells and fluid obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) showed that markers of pulmonary inflammation, tissue damage, activation of alveolar macrophages (AM) and NO production were significantly increased by all silica doses. Arginase activity was increased also in AMs isolated from BAL fluid of silica-treated rats. Silica produced two- and three-fold increases in arginase activity of whole lung at doses of 1 and 5 mg/100 g body weight, respectively. Levels of arginase I mRNA, but not of arginase II mRNA, were similarly elevated. In control lungs, arginase I immunoreactivity was observed only in AMs sparsely dispersed throughout the lung; no inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) immunoreactivity was detected. In silica-treated lungs, arginase I and iNOS were co-expressed in most AMs that were abundantly clustered at inflammatory foci. The rapid induction of arginase I expression in inflammatory lung cells, similar to induction of arginase in other inflammatory lung diseases, implicates elevated arginase activity as a factor in the development of lung damage following exposure to silica. PMID:17365572

  11. Tiotropium Attenuates Virus-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Cigarette Smoke–Exposed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Hannes; Duechs, Matthias J.; Tilp, Cornelia; Jung, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections trigger exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and tiotropium, a M3 receptor antagonist, reduces exacerbations in patients by unknown mechanisms. In this report, we investigated whether tiotropium has anti-inflammatory effects in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) and infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and compared these effects with those of steroid fluticasone and PDE4-inhibitor roflumilast. Mice were exposed to CS; infected with H1N1 or RSV; and treated with tiotropium, fluticasone, or roflumilast. The amount of cells and cytokine levels in the airways, lung function, and viral load was determined. NCI-H292 cells were infected with H1N1 or RSV and treated with the drugs. In CS/H1N1-exposed mice, tiotropium reduced neutrophil and macrophage numbers and levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in the airways and improved lung function. In contrast, fluticasone increased the loss of body weight; failed to reduce neutrophil or macrophage numbers; increased IL-6, KC, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the lungs; and worsened lung function. Treatment with roflumilast reduced macrophage numbers, IL-6, and KC in the lungs but had no effect on neutrophil numbers or lung function. In CS/RSV-exposed mice, treatment with tiotropium, but not fluticasone or roflumilast, reduced neutrophil numbers and IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the lungs. Viral load of H1N1 and RSV was significantly elevated in CS/virus-exposed mice and NCI-H292 cells after fluticasone treatment, whereas tiotropium and roflumilast had no effect. In conclusion, tiotropium has anti-inflammatory effects on CS/virus-induced inflammation in mice that are superior to the effects of roflumilast and fluticasone. This finding might help to explain the observed reduction of exacerbation rates in COPD patients. PMID:27016458

  12. Lung transcriptional profiling: insights into the mechanisms of ozone-induced pulmonary injury in Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Ward, William O; Ledbetter, Allen D; Schladweiler, Mette C; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2015-01-01

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized in rats; however, mechanistic understanding of the pathways involved is limited. We hypothesized that acute exposure of healthy rats to ozone will cause transcriptional alterations, and comprehensive analysis of these changes will allow us to better understand the mechanism of pulmonary injury and inflammation. Male Wistar Kyoto rats (10-12 week) were exposed to air, or ozone (0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 ppm) for 4 h and pulmonary injury and inflammation were assessed at 0-h or 20-h (n = 8/group). Lung gene expression profiling was assessed at 0-h (air and 1.0 ppm ozone, n = 3-4/group). At 20-h bronchoalveolar lavage, fluid protein and neutrophils increased at 1 ppm ozone. Numerous genes involved in acute inflammatory response were up-regulated along with changes in genes involved in cell adhesion and migration, steroid metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle control and cell growth. A number of NRF2 target genes were also induced after ozone exposure. Based on expression changes, Rela, SP1 and TP3-mediated signaling were identified to be mediating downstream changes. Remarkable changes in the processes of endocytosis provide the insight that ozone-induced lung injury and inflammation are likely initiated by changes in cell membrane components and receptors likely from oxidatively modified lung lining lipids and proteins. In conclusion, ozone-induced injury and inflammation are preceded by changes in gene targets for cell adhesion/migration, apoptosis, cell cycle control and growth regulated by Rela, SP1 and TP53, likely mediated by the process of endocytosis and altered steroid receptor signaling.

  13. The effect of octreotide, an analog of somatostatin, on bleomycin-induced interstitial pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tug, Tuncer; Kara, Haki; Karaoglu, Aziz; Karatas, Fikret; Turgut, Nergiz Hacer; Ayan, Erhan; Boran, Cetin; Tug, Esra

    2013-04-01

    In this study, octreotide (OCT), a synthetic somatostatin analog, was tested for its beneficial effects in the prevention of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) induced by bleomycin (BLM) in rats by histological examination and by evaluating tissue OH-proline levels. Thirty male Wistar rats were divided randomly into three groups: group I: intratracheal (i.t.) BLM (7.5 mg/kg, single dose) + saline solution [0.9% NaCl, subcutaneously (s.c.), once-daily for 7 days]; group II: i.t. BLM (7.5 mg/kg, single dose) + OCT acetate (82.5 µg/kg, s.c., once-daily for 7 days); and the control group. At the end of the 7 days, lung tissues were excised and examined by histopathological methods. Levels of tissue hydroxyproline (OH-proline) were determined. BLM administration resulted in prominent histopathologic findings, such as diffuse alveolar damage and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, as well as a significant increase in OH-proline level, as compared to controls. OCT application explicitly attenuated the histopathologic changes to a significant extent. OCT decreased paranchymal fibrosis and structural deformities in BLM-induced lung fibrosis. These results suggest that OCT administration to rats with BLM-induced IPF has a protective effect. Further studies are necessary to reveal the molecular mechanism(s) of OCT-induced protective effect.

  14. Docetaxel (Taxotere®)-induced cavitary change of pulmonary metastatic lesions complicated by bilateral spontaneous pneumothoraces in a patient with primary adenocarcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hao-Lun; Lin, Wen-Chiung; Hsu, Hsian-He; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2013-06-01

    Pneumothorax is a complication that rarely occurs after chemotherapy for lung cancer. We report the chest computed tomography findings of a case of spontaneous pneumothorax complicating docetaxel (Taxotere®) treatment for pulmonary metastasis in a 70-year-old woman with pulmonary adenocarcinoma. The patient developed bilateral pneumothoraces, which was induced by changes in the cavitary pulmonary metastatic lesions, after systemic chemotherapy with docetaxel. The chest computed tomography findings and possible mechanisms of this unusual complication are discussed in this report. PMID:23820551

  15. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  16. Ginsenoside Rg1 attenuates hypoxia and hypercapnia-induced vasoconstriction in isolated rat pulmonary arterial rings by reducing the expression of p38

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mengxiao; Zhao, Meiping; Tang, Lanlan; Zhang, Congcong; Song, Longsheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal disease characterized by increased pulmonary arteriolar resistance. Pulmonary vasoconstriction has been proved to play a significant role in PAH. We previously reported that Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) might attenuate hypoxia and hypercapnia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction (HHPV). Methods In the present study, our specific objective was to investigate the role of ginsenoside Rg1, a major component of PNS, in this process and the possible underlying mechanism. The second order pulmonary rings isolated from the Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with different dosage of ginsenoside Rg1 at 8, 40, or 100 mg/L respectively, both before and during the conditions of hypoxia and hypercapnia. Contractile force changes of the rings were detected. Furthermore, SB203580, the selective inhibitor for p38 activation was applied to the rings. Pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were cultured under hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions, and ginsenoside Rg1 was administered to detect the changes induced by p38. Results Under the hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions, we observed a biphasic pulmonary artery contractile response to the second pulmonary artery rings. It is hypothesized that the observed attenuation of vasoconstriction and the production of vasodilation could have been induced by ginsenoside Rg1. This effect was significantly reinforced by SB203580 (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The expression of p38 in the PASMCs under hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions was significantly activated (P<0.05 or P<0.01) and the observed activation was attenuated by ginsenoside Rg1 (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusions Our findings strongly support the significant role of ginsenoside Rg1 in the inhibition of hypoxia and hypercapnia-induced vasoconstriction by the p38 pathway. PMID:27499938

  17. Beneficial effects of a novel agonist of the adenosine A2A receptor on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, Allan K N; Pereira, Sharlene L; Montagnoli, Tadeu L; Maia, Rodolfo C; Kümmerle, Arthur E; Landgraf, Sharon S; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Ferraz, Emanuelle B; Tesch, Roberta; Nascimento, José H M; de Sant'Anna, Carlos M R; Fraga, Carlos A M; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Sudo, Roberto T; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by enhanced pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy and increased right ventricular systolic pressure. Here, we investigated the effects of a N-acylhydrazone derivative, 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-N-methyl-benzoylhydrazide (LASSBio-1359), on monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Experimental Approach PAH was induced in male Wistar rats by a single i.p. injection of MCT (60 mg·kg−1) and 2 weeks later, oral LASSBio-1359 (50 mg·kg−1) or vehicle was given once daily for 14 days. Echocardiography was used to measure cardiac function and pulmonary artery dimensions, with histological assay of vascular collagen. Studies of binding to human recombinant adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A3) and of docking with A2A receptors were also performed. Key Results MCT administration induced changes in vascular and ventricular structure and function, characteristic of PAH. These changes were reversed by treatment with LASSBio-1359. MCT also induced endothelial dysfunction in pulmonary artery, as measured by diminished relaxation of pre-contracted arterial rings, and this dysfunction was reversed by LASSBio-1359. In pulmonary artery rings from normal Wistar rats, LASSBio-1359 induced relaxation, which was decreased by the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, ZM 241385. In adenosine receptor binding studies, LASSBio-1359 showed most affinity for the A2A receptor and in the docking analyses, binding modes of LASSBio-1359 and the A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, were very similar. Conclusion and Implications In rats with MCT-induced PAH, structural and functional changes in heart and pulmonary artery were reversed by treatment with oral LASSBio-1359, most probably through the activation of adenosine A2A receptors. PMID:23530610

  18. Involvement of IP3-receptor activation in endothelin-1-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat pulmonary small artery.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Okamura, K; Hatta, M; Morita, H; Kajioka, S; Naito, S; Yamazaki, J

    2013-11-15

    We examined the endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced increase in the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in fura-2-loaded rat pulmonary small arteries. ET-1 (30 nM) elicited a long-lasting increase in [Ca(2+)]i in physiological salt solution (PSS). In subsequent experiments, arteries were pretreated with BQ-788, an ETB-specific blocker, to allow us to focus on responses mediated via the ETA receptor, the existence of which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. In Ca(2+)-free PSS, ET-1 evoked a small transient increase in [Ca(2+)]i, indicating Ca(2+) release from the SR (sarcoplasmic reticulum). After a switch to PSS (containing 2mM CaCl2), ET-1 elicited a long-lasting increase in [Ca(2+)]i that was not inhibited by 1 μM nicardipine, an L-type Ca(2+)-channel inhibitor, suggesting involvement of a Ca(2+)-influx pathway independent of that channel. In arteries preincubated with 30 μM cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) or 2 μM thapsigargin (TG), the ET-1-induced Ca(2+)-release was greatly reduced, and the induced Ca(2+)-influx was attenuated. U-73122, a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, had inhibitory effects similar to those of CPA and TG on the ET-1-induced Ca(2+)-release and Ca(2+)-influx, whereas U-73343, an inactive analogue of U-73122, had no such effects. Two putative membrane-permeable IP3-receptor blockers, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2APB, 50 μM) and Xestospongin C (20 μM), (a) almost completely inhibited the ET-1-induced Ca(2+)-release and Ca(2+)-influx, and (b) reduced the ET-1-induced contraction. These results indicate that in rat pulmonary small arteries, ET-1 induces receptor-operated Ca(2+) influx via the ETA receptor, and that this influx interacts with InsP3-receptor activation. PMID:24157978

  19. N-acetylcysteine improves established monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The outcome of patients suffering from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are predominantly determined by the response of the right ventricle to the increase afterload secondary to high vascular pulmonary resistance. However, little is known about the effects of the current available or experimental PAH treatments on the heart. Recently, inflammation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of PAH. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a well-known safe anti-oxidant drug, has immuno-modulatory and cardioprotective properties. We therefore hypothesized that NAC could reduce the severity of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in rats exposed to monocrotaline (MCT), lowering inflammation and preserving pulmonary vascular system and right heart function. Methods Saline-treated control, MCT-exposed, MCT-exposed and NAC treated rats (day 14–28) were evaluated at day 28 following MCT for hemodynamic parameters (right ventricular systolic pressure, mean pulmonary arterial pressure and cardiac output), right ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary vascular morphometry, lung inflammatory cells immunohistochemistry (monocyte/macrophages and dendritic cells), IL-6 expression, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis. Results The treatment with NAC significantly decreased pulmonary vascular remodeling, lung inflammation, and improved total pulmonary resistance (from 0.71 ± 0.05 for MCT group to 0.50 ± 0.06 for MCT + NAC group, p < 0.05). Right ventricular function was also improved with NAC treatment associated with a significant decrease in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy (625 ± 69 vs. 439 ± 21 μm2 for MCT and MCT + NAC group respectively, p < 0.001) and heart fibrosis (14.1 ± 0.8 vs. 8.8 ± 0.1% for MCT and MCT + NAC group respectively, p < 0.001). Conclusions Through its immuno-modulatory and cardioprotective properties, NAC has beneficial effect on pulmonary vascular and right heart function in experimental PH. PMID:24929652

  20. Experimental extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary angiitis induced by intratracheal or intravenous challenge with Corynebacterium parvum in sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Yi, E S; Lee, H; Suh, Y K; Tang, W; Qi, M; Yin, S; Remick, D G; Ulich, T R

    1996-10-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary sarcoidosis are granulomatous diseases of the lung for which clinical presentation and anatomic site of granuloma formation differ. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis is caused by inhaled antigens, whereas the nature and source of the inciting antigen in sarcoidosis is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the route via which antigen is introduced to the lung contributes to the clinicopathological presentation of pulmonary granulomatous disease, rats immunized with intravenous (i.v.) Corynebacterium parvum were challenged after 2 weeks with either intratracheal (i.t.) or i.v. C. parvum. The granulomatous inflammation elicited by i.t. challenge predominantly involved alveolar spaces and histologically simulated extrinsic allergic alveolitis. In contrast, the inflammation induced by i.v. challenge was characterized by granulomatous angiitis and interstitial inflammation simulating sarcoidosis. Elevations of leukocyte counts and TNF levels in bronchoalveolar fluid, which reflect inflammation in the intra-alveolar compartment, were much more pronounced after i.t. than after i.v. challenge. Tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, CC chemokine, CXC chemokine, and adhesion molecule mRNA and protein expression occurred in each model. In conclusion, i.t. or i.v. challenge with C. parvum in sensitized rats caused pulmonary granulomatous inflammation that was histologically similar to human extrinsic allergic alveolitis and sarcoidosis, respectively. Although the soluble and cellular mediators of granulomatous inflammation were qualitatively similar in both disease models, the differing anatomic source of the same antigenic challenge was responsible for differing clinicopathological presentations. PMID:8863677

  1. Differential gene expression of three nitric oxide synthases is consistent with increased nitric oxide in the hindbrain of broilers with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, H; Nikoukar, Z; Nasiri, L; Bahadoran, S

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR and Griess reaction were conducted to evaluate gene expression of nitric oxide synthases (eNOS, nNOS and iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production in the hindbrain, midbrain, forebrain of chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension. The ratio of the right to total ventricular weight of heart as an indication of pulmonary hypertension was increased in the cold stress groups of chickens at 42 d of age. In the pulmonary hypertensive chickens, production of NO was increased in the hindbrain but was unchanged in the forebrain and midbrain. Relative gene expression of eNOS and nNOS was upregulated in the three segments of brain, whereas the iNOS transcript was downregulated in the forebrain and midbrain of the cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens. It is concluded that in the chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension, variations of nNOS, eNOS and iNOS gene expression would lead to overproduction of NO in the hindbrain, whereas the variations in the expression of these genes did not result in an elevation of NO in the forebrain and midbrain. It is suggested that high levels of NO in the hindbrain excites neural mechanisms involved in pulmonary hypertension.

  2. Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic, MnTE-2-PyP, Attenuates Chronic Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension, Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling, and Activation of the NALP3 Inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Leah R.; Kluck, Dylan; Field, Carlie; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E.; Woods, Crystal; Yeager, Michael E.; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Savani, Rashmin C.; Bowler, Russell P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by an oxidant/antioxidant imbalance that promotes abnormal vascular responses. Reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide (O2•−), contribute to the pathogenesis of PH and vascular responses, including vascular remodeling and inflammation. This study sought to investigate the protective role of a pharmacological catalytic antioxidant, a superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic (MnTE-2-PyP), in hypoxia-induced PH, vascular remodeling, and NALP3 (NACHT, LRR, and PYD domain-containing protein 3)–mediated inflammation. Results: Mice (C57/BL6) were exposed to hypobaric hypoxic conditions, while subcutaneous injections of MnTE-2-PyP (5 mg/kg) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were given 3× weekly for up to 35 days. SOD mimetic-treated groups demonstrated protection against increased right ventricular systolic pressure, indirect measurements of pulmonary artery pressure, and RV hypertrophy. Vascular remodeling was assessed by Ki67 staining to detect vascular cell proliferation, α-smooth muscle actin staining to analyze small vessel muscularization, and hyaluronan (HA) measurements to assess extracellular matrix modulation. Activation of the NALP3 inflammasome pathway was measured by NALP3 expression, caspase-1 activation, and interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β) and IL-18 production. Hypoxic exposure increased PH, vascular remodeling, and NALP3 inflammasome activation in PBS-treated mice, while mice treated with MnTE-2-PyP showed an attenuation in each of these endpoints. Innovation: This study is the first to demonstrate activation of the NALP3 inflammasome with cleavage of caspase-1 and release of active IL-1 β and IL-18 in chronic hypoxic PH, as well as its attenuation by the SOD mimetic, MnTE-2-PyP. Conclusion: The ability of the SOD mimetic to scavenge extracellular O2•− supports our previous observations in EC-SOD-overexpressing mice that implicate extracellular oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in hypoxic PH

  3. Inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by preventing TGF-β1/Smad signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chai, S.D.; Liu, T.; Dong, M.F.; Li, Z.K.; Tang, P.Z.; Wang, J.T.; Ma, S.J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the common colonizing bacteria of the human body and is an opportunistic pathogen frequently associated with respiratory infections. Inactivated P. aeruginosa (IPA) have a variety of biological effects against inflammation and allergy. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling plays a critical role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and development in a wide range of biological systems. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of IPA on TGF-β/Smad signaling in vivo, using a hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) rat model. Sprague Dawley rats (n=40) were exposed to 10% oxygen for 21 days to induce PH. At the same time, IPA was administered intravenously from day 1 to day 14. Mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) and the right ventricle (RV) to left ventricle plus the interventricular septum (LV+S) mass ratio were used to evaluate the development of PH. Vessel thickness and density were measured using immunohistochemistry. Primary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were isolated and the proliferation of PASMCs was assayed by flow cytometry. The production of TGF-β1 in cultured supernatant of PASMCs was assayed by ELISA. The expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), TGF-β1 and phospho-Smad 2/3 in PASMCs were assayed by western blot. Our data indicated that IPA attenuated PH, RV hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular remodeling in rats, which was probably mediated by restraining the hypoxia-induced overactive TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In conclusion, IPA is a promising protective treatment in PH due to the inhibiting effects on TGF-β1/Smad 2/3 signaling. PMID:27580007

  4. Murine candidate bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis susceptibility genes identified by gene expression and sequence analysis of linkage regions

    PubMed Central

    Haston, C; Tomko, T; Godin, N; Kerckhoff, L; Hallett, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary fibrosis is a complex disease for which the predisposing genetic variants remain unknown. In a prior study, susceptibility to bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis was mapped to loci Blmpf1 and Blmpf2 on chromosomes 17 and 11, respectively, in a C57BL/6J (B6, susceptible) and C3Hf/KAM (C3H, resistant) mouse cross. Methods: Herein, the genetic basis of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis was investigated in an approach combining gene expression and sequencing data with previously mapped linkage intervals. Results: In this study, gene expression analysis with microarrays revealed 1892 genes or ESTs (expressed sequence tags) to be differentially expressed between bleomycin treated B6 and C3H mice and 67 of these genetic elements map to Blmpf1 or Blmpf2. This group included genes involved in an oxidative stress response, in apoptosis, and in immune regulation. A comparison of the B6 and C3H sequence, for Blmpf1 and Blmpf2, made using the NCBI database and available C3H sequence, revealed approximately 35% of the genes in these regions contain non-synonymous coding sequence changes. An assessment of genotype/phenotype correlation among other inbred strains revealed 36% of these B6/C3H sequence variations predict for the known bleomycin induced fibrosis susceptibility of the DBA (susceptible) and A/J (resistant) mouse strains. Conclusions: Combining genomics approaches of differential gene expression and sequence variation potentially identifies approximately 5% the linked genes as fibrosis susceptibility candidate genes in this mouse cross. PMID:15937080

  5. Inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by preventing TGF-β1/Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Chai, S D; Liu, T; Dong, M F; Li, Z K; Tang, P Z; Wang, J T; Ma, S J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the common colonizing bacteria of the human body and is an opportunistic pathogen frequently associated with respiratory infections. Inactivated P. aeruginosa (IPA) have a variety of biological effects against inflammation and allergy. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling plays a critical role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and development in a wide range of biological systems. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of IPA on TGF-β/Smad signaling in vivo, using a hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) rat model. Sprague Dawley rats (n=40) were exposed to 10% oxygen for 21 days to induce PH. At the same time, IPA was administered intravenously from day 1 to day 14. Mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) and the right ventricle (RV) to left ventricle plus the interventricular septum (LV+S) mass ratio were used to evaluate the development of PH. Vessel thickness and density were measured using immunohistochemistry. Primary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were isolated and the proliferation of PASMCs was assayed by flow cytometry. The production of TGF-β1 in cultured supernatant of PASMCs was assayed by ELISA. The expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), TGF-β1 and phospho-Smad 2/3 in PASMCs were assayed by western blot. Our data indicated that IPA attenuated PH, RV hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular remodeling in rats, which was probably mediated by restraining the hypoxia-induced overactive TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In conclusion, IPA is a promising protective treatment in PH due to the inhibiting effects on TGF-β1/Smad 2/3 signaling. PMID:27580007

  6. NADPH oxidases and reactive oxygen species at different stages of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Kathleen E; Aschner, J L; Milatovic, D; Schmidt, J W; Aschner, M; Kaplowitz, M R; Zhang, Y; Fike, Candice D

    2009-10-01

    Recently, we reported that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by NADPH oxidase (NOX) contribute to aberrant responses in pulmonary resistance arteries (PRAs) of piglets exposed to 3 days of hypoxia (Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 295: L881-L888, 2008). An objective of the present study was to determine whether NOX-derived ROS also contribute to altered PRA responses at a more advanced stage of pulmonary hypertension, after 10 days of hypoxia. We further wished to advance knowledge about the specific NOX and antioxidant enzymes that are altered at early and later stages of pulmonary hypertension. Piglets were raised in room air (control) or hypoxia for 3 or 10 days. Using a cannulated artery technique, we found that treatments with agents that inhibit NOX (apocynin) or remove ROS [an SOD mimetic (M40403) + polyethylene glycol-catalase] diminished responses to ACh in PRAs from piglets exposed to 10 days of hypoxia. Western blot analysis showed an increase in expression of NOX1 and the membrane fraction of p67phox. Expression of NOX4, SOD2, and catalase were unchanged, whereas expression of SOD1 was reduced, in arteries from piglets raised in hypoxia for 3 or 10 days. Markers of oxidant stress, F(2)-isoprostanes, measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were increased in PRAs from piglets raised in hypoxia for 3 days, but not 10 days. We conclude that ROS derived from some, but not all, NOX family members, as well as alterations in the antioxidant enzyme SOD1, contribute to aberrant PRA responses at an early and a more progressive stage of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets. PMID:19592458

  7. Cetrimide-chlorhexidine-induced multiorgan failure in surgery of pulmonary hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Swagata; Sasmal, Prakash; Rao, P Bhaskar; Mishra, Tushar S; Nayak, Sukdev

    2016-01-01

    Savlon (0.5% cetrimide/0.05% chlorhexidine) is used as a scolicidal during surgery of hydatid cysts. It is considered a safe and effective agent. However, there are no recommendations for the appropriate concentration or dosage of these agents. Previously reported to cause severe metabolic acidosis, its effects on the pulmonary system have not been explored. We present a case of acute lung injury and respiratory distress along with acute cardiopulmonary distress, severe metabolic acidosis, and renal failure following its use during surgical removal of pulmonary hydatid cyst. The agent may act as a chemical sclerosant causing pulmonary parenchymal damage through bronchial openings present in the pericyst. Till safe dose limits are known, use of this agent should be limited, especially in large or multiple cyst surgery. PMID:27397471

  8. Cardiomyopathy Induced by Pulmonary Sequestration in a 50-Year-Old Man

    PubMed Central

    Chatelain, Shaun; Comp, Robert A.; Grace, R. Randal

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old black man presented at the emergency department with midsternal, nonradiating chest pressure and chronic dyspnea on exertion. Four years before the current admission, he had been diagnosed with nonischemic cardiomyopathy at another facility. After our complete evaluation, we suspected that his symptoms arose from left-to-left shunting in association with pulmonary sequestration, a congenital malformation. Our preliminary diagnosis of secondary dilated cardiomyopathy was confirmed by normalization of the patient's ventricular size and function after lobectomy. To our knowledge, this patient is the oldest on record to present with cardiomyopathy consequent to pulmonary sequestration. His case is highly unusual because of his age and the rapid resolution of his symptoms after lobectomy. We believe that pulmonary sequestration should be included in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:25873803

  9. Cetrimide-chlorhexidine-induced multiorgan failure in surgery of pulmonary hydatid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Swagata; Sasmal, Prakash; Rao, P. Bhaskar; Mishra, Tushar S.; Nayak, Sukdev

    2016-01-01

    Savlon (0.5% cetrimide/0.05% chlorhexidine) is used as a scolicidal during surgery of hydatid cysts. It is considered a safe and effective agent. However, there are no recommendations for the appropriate concentration or dosage of these agents. Previously reported to cause severe metabolic acidosis, its effects on the pulmonary system have not been explored. We present a case of acute lung injury and respiratory distress along with acute cardiopulmonary distress, severe metabolic acidosis, and renal failure following its use during surgical removal of pulmonary hydatid cyst. The agent may act as a chemical sclerosant causing pulmonary parenchymal damage through bronchial openings present in the pericyst. Till safe dose limits are known, use of this agent should be limited, especially in large or multiple cyst surgery. PMID:27397471

  10. Cardiomyopathy induced by pulmonary sequestration in a 50-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Shaun; Comp, Robert A; Grace, R Randal; Sabbath, Adam M

    2015-02-01

    A 50-year-old black man presented at the emergency department with midsternal, nonradiating chest pressure and chronic dyspnea on exertion. Four years before the current admission, he had been diagnosed with nonischemic cardiomyopathy at another facility. After our complete evaluation, we suspected that his symptoms arose from left-to-left shunting in association with pulmonary sequestration, a congenital malformation. Our preliminary diagnosis of secondary dilated cardiomyopathy was confirmed by normalization of the patient's ventricular size and function after lobectomy. To our knowledge, this patient is the oldest on record to present with cardiomyopathy consequent to pulmonary sequestration. His case is highly unusual because of his age and the rapid resolution of his symptoms after lobectomy. We believe that pulmonary sequestration should be included in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  11. Nano zerovalent iron particles induce pulmonary and cardiovascular toxicity in an in vitro human co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhelin; Yang, Lingyan; Chen, Ku-Fan; Chen, Guan-Wen; Peng, Yen-Ping; Chen, Jen-Kun; Suo, Guangli; Yu, Jiantao; Wang, Wen-Cheng; Lin, Chia-Hua

    2016-09-01

    Despite promising environmental applications for nano zerovalent iron (nZVI), concerns remain about the potential accumulation and toxic effects of nZVI particles. Here, we use an alveolar-capillary co-culture model to investigate a possible link between low-level epithelial exposure to nZVI and pulmonary and cardiovascular toxicity. While nZVI was unable to pass through the epithelial barrier into the endothelium, nZVI exposure did cause oxidative and inflammatory responses in both epithelial and endothelial cells. Therefore, toxic effects induced by nZVI are not restricted to epithelial cells but can be transferred into the endothelium. Communication between A549 and EA.hy926 cells is responsible for amplification of nZVI-induced toxic responses. Decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance and zonula occludens proteins after epithelial exposure to nZVI impaired epithelial barrier integrity. Increases in oxidized α1-antitrypsin and oxidized low-density lipoprotein in the co-culture model suggest that nZVI exposure increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and atherosclerosis. Therefore, inhalation of nZVI has the potential to induce cardiovascular disease through oxidative and inflammatory mediators produced from the damaged lung epithelium in chronic lung diseases. PMID:26694701

  12. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F.; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M.; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S.; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N.; Thorneloe, Kevin S.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  13. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N; Thorneloe, Kevin S; Bradshaw, Heather B; Matalon, Sadis; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2014-07-15

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  14. MicroRNA profiling implicates the insulin-like growth factor pathway in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a disease characterized by alveolar epithelial cell injury, inflammatory cell infiltration and deposition of extracellular matrix in lung tissue. As mouse models of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis display many of the same phenotypes observed in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, they have been used to study various aspects of the disease, including altered expression of microRNAs. Results In this work, microRNA expression profiling of the lungs from treated C57BL/6J mice, relative to that of untreated controls, was undertaken to determine which alterations in microRNAs could in part regulate the fibrosis phenotype induced by bleomycin delivered through mini-osmotic pumps. We identified 11 microRNAs, including miR-21 and miR-34a, to be significantly differentially expressed (P < 0.01) in lungs of bleomycin treated mice and confirmed these data with real time PCR measurements. In situ hybridization of both miR-21 and miR-34a indicated that they were expressed in alveolar macrophages. Using a previously reported gene expression profile, we identified 195 genes to be both predicted targets of the 11 microRNAs and of altered expression in bleomycin-induced lung disease of C57BL/6J mice. Pathway analysis with these 195 genes indicated that altered microRNA expression may be associated with hepatocyte growth factor signaling, cholecystokinin/gastrin-mediated signaling, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) signaling, among others, in fibrotic lung disease. The relevance of the IGF-1 pathway in this model was then demonstrated by showing lung tissue of bleomycin treated C57BL/6J mice had increased expression of Igf1 and that increased numbers of Igf-1 positive cells, predominantly in macrophages, were detected in the lungs. Conclusions We conclude that altered microRNA expression in macrophages is a feature which putatively influences the insulin-like growth factor signaling component of bleomycin-induced

  15. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of niobium pentoxide deposited on layered carbide-derived carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanfang (John); Maloney, Ryan; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Beidaghi, Majid; Dyatkin, Boris; Perre, Emilie; Long, Donghui; Qiao, Wenming; Dunn, Bruce; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-01-01

    Herein we report on the hydrothermal synthesis of niobium pentoxide on carbide-derived carbon (Nb2O5/CDC) with a layered structure. The presence of phenylphosphonic acid guides the deposition during preparation, leading to the formation of amorphous Nb2O5 particles which are 4-10 nm in diameter and homogeneously distributed on the CDC framework. Electrochemical testing of the Nb2O5/CDC electrode indicated that the highest capacitance and Coulombic efficiency occurred using an electrolyte comprised of 1 M lithium perchlorate in ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate. Subsequent heat treatment of Nb2O5/CDC in CO2 environment led to crystallization of the Nb2O5, allowing reversible Li+ intercalation/de-intercalation. For sweep rates corresponding to charging and discharging in under 3 min, a volumetric charge of 180 C cm-3 and Coulombic efficiency of 99.2% were attained.

  16. Dissociative electron attachment to dinitrogen pentoxide, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Cicman, P.; Buchanan, G.A.; Marston, G.; Gulejova, B.; Skalny, J.D.; Mason, N.J.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T.D.

    2004-11-22

    Electron attachment was studied in gaseous dinitrogen pentoxide, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, for incident electron energies between a few meV and 10 eV. No stable parent anion N{sub 2}O{sub 5}{sup -} was observed but several anionic fragments (NO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}{sup -}, NO{sup -}, O{sup -}, and O{sub 2}{sup -}) were detected using quadrupole mass spectrometry. Many of these dissociative pathways were found to be coupled and provide detailed information on the dynamics of N{sub 2}O{sub 5} fragmentation. Estimates of the cross sections for production of each of the anionic fragments were made and suggest that electron attachment to N{sub 2}O{sub 5} is amongst the most efficient attachment reactions recorded for nonhalogenated polyatomic systems.

  17. Production of large-scale, freestanding vanadium pentoxide nanobelt porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yong Ju; Kim, Byung Hoon; Hong, Won G.; Kim, Chang Hee; Kim, Yark Yeon; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Jang, Won Ick; Yu, Han Young

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale, freestanding, porous structures of vanadium pentoxide nanobelts (VPNs) were successfully prepared using the template-free freeze-drying method. The porous and multi-layered VPN macrostructures are composed of randomly oriented long nanobelts (over 100 μm) and their side length can be controlled up to a few tens of centimetres. Also, the bulk density and surface area of these macrostructures are 3-5 mg cm-3 and 40-80 m2 g-1, respectively, which are similar to those of the excellent adsorbents. In addition, the removal efficiency measurements of ammonia molecules revealed that the VPN porous structures can adsorb the ammonia molecules with the combinations of van der Waals forces and strong chemical bonding by functional groups on the VPN surface.

  18. Production of large-scale, freestanding vanadium pentoxide nanobelt porous structures.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yong Ju; Kim, Byung Hoon; Hong, Won G; Kim, Chang Hee; Kim, Yark Yeon; Jeong, Eun-ju; Jang, Won Ick; Yu, Han Young

    2012-03-01

    Large-scale, freestanding, porous structures of vanadium pentoxide nanobelts (VPNs) were successfully prepared using the template-free freeze-drying method. The porous and multi-layered VPN macrostructures are composed of randomly oriented long nanobelts (over 100 μm) and their side length can be controlled up to a few tens of centimetres. Also, the bulk density and surface area of these macrostructures are 3-5 mg cm(-3) and 40-80 m(2) g(-1), respectively, which are similar to those of the excellent adsorbents. In addition, the removal efficiency measurements of ammonia molecules revealed that the VPN porous structures can adsorb the ammonia molecules with the combinations of van der Waals forces and strong chemical bonding by functional groups on the VPN surface.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and reactivity of early transition metal neo-pentoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Alam, T.M.; Scott, B.; Ziller, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    Titanium neo-pentoxide was isolated by the alcoholysis exchange between Ti(OCHMe{sub 2}){sub 4} and ONep. The molecule, [Ti(ONep){sub 4}]{sub 2}, was characterized using X-ray analysis and solution {sup 17}O, and {sup 47},{sup 49}Ti NMR spectroscopy. This dinuclear complex is the smallest Ti(OR){sub 4} isolated wherein each metal center is 5-coordinated. The molecule is highly soluble in standard solvents and volatile. The reactivity of this compound has been undertaken to compare with the ubiquitous Ti(O-I-Pr){sub 4}. The various compounds isolated and further NMR studies will be reported. Analogous routes to other M(ONep){sub n} will be reported as well.

  20. Prenatal programming of pulmonary hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia or ductal ligation in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension of the newborn is caused by a spectrum of functional and structural abnormalities of the cardiopulmonary circuit. The existence of multiple etiologies and an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of disease progression have hindered the development of effective therapies. Animal models offer a means of gaining a better understanding of the fundamental basis of the disease. To that effect, a number of experimental animal models are being used to generate pulmonary hypertension in the fetus and newborn. In this review, we compare the mechanisms associated with pulmonary hypertension caused by two such models: in utero ligation of the ductus arteriosus and chronic perinatal hypoxia in sheep fetuses and newborns. In this manner, we make direct comparisons between ductal ligation and chronic hypoxia with respect to the associated mechanisms of disease, since multiple studies have been performed with both models in a single species. We present evidence that the mechanisms associated with pulmonary hypertension are dependent on the type of stress to which the fetus is subjected. Such an analysis allows for a more thorough evaluation of the disease etiology, which can help focus clinical treatments. The final part of the review provides a clinical appraisal of current treatment strategies and lays the foundation for developing individualized therapies that depend on the causative factors. PMID:25006393

  1. Aryl radical involvement in amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity: Investigation of protection by spin-trapping nitrones

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolescu, Adrian C.; Comeau, Jeannette L.; Hill, Bruce C.; Bedard, Leanne L.; Takahashi, Takashi; Brien, James F.; Racz, William J.; Massey, Thomas E. . E-mail: masseyt@post.queensu.ca

    2007-04-01

    Amiodarone (AM), an antidysrrhythmic drug, can produce serious adverse effects, including potentially fatal AM-induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT). AM-induced cytotoxicity and pulmonary fibrosis are well recognized, but poorly understood mechanistically. The hypothesis of aryl radical involvement in AM toxicity was tested in non-biological and biological systems. Photolysis of anaerobic aqueous solutions of AM, or N-desethylamiodarone (DEA) resulted in the formation of an aryl radical, as determined by spin-trapping and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy experiments. The non-iodinated AM analogue, didesiodoamiodarone (DDIA), did not form aryl radicals under identical conditions. The toxic susceptibility of human lung epithelioid HPL1A cells to AM, DEA, and DDIA showed time- and concentration-dependence. DEA had a more rapid and potent toxic effect (LC{sub 50} = 8 {mu}M) than AM (LC{sub 50} = 146 {mu}M), whereas DDIA cytotoxicity was intermediate (LC{sub 50} = 26 {mu}M) suggesting a minor contribution of the iodine atoms. Incubation of human lung epithelial cells with the spin-trapping nitrones {alpha}-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN, 10 mM) or {alpha}-(4-pyridyl N-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (POBN, 5.0 mM) did not significantly protect against AM, DEA, or DDIA cytotoxicity. Intratracheal administration of AM to hamsters produced pulmonary fibrosis at day 21, which was not prevented by 4 days of treatment with 150 mg/kg/day PBN or 164 mg/kg/day POBN. However, the body weight loss in AM-treated animals was counteracted by PBN. These results suggest that, although AM can generate an aryl radical photochemically, its in vivo formation may not be a major contributor to AM toxicity, and that spin-trapping reagents do not halt the onset of AM toxicity.

  2. Acute pulmonary toxicity and inflammation induced by combined exposure to didecyldimethylammonium chloride and ethylene glycol in rats.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Do Young; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Eunji; Lim, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee; Kwon, Jung-Taek

    2016-02-01

    Didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), an antimicrobial agent, has been reported to induce pulmonary toxicity in animal studies. DDAC is frequently used in spray-form household products in combination with ethylene glycol (EG). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxic interaction between DDAC and EG in the lung. DDAC at a sub-toxic dose (100 μg/kg body weight) was mixed with a non-toxic dose of EG (100 or 200 μg/kg body weight), and was administrated to rats via intratracheal instillation. Lactate dehydrogenase activity and total protein content in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were not changed by singly treated DDAC or EG, but significantly enhanced at 1 d after treatment with the mixture, with the effect dependent on the dose of EG. Total cell count in BALF was largely increased and polymorphonuclear leukocytes were predominantly recruited to the lung in rats administrated with the mixture. Inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 also appeared to be increased by the mixture of DDAC and EG (200 μg/kg body weight) at 1 d post-exposure, which might be associated with the increase in inflammatory cells in lung. BALF protein content and inflammatory cell recruitment in the lung still remained elevated at 7 d after the administration of DDAC with the higher dose of EG. These results suggest that the combination of DDAC and EG can synergistically induce pulmonary cytotoxicity and inflammation, and EG appears to amplify the harmful effects of DDAC on the lung. Therefore pulmonary exposure to these two chemicals commonly found in commercial products can be a potential hazard to human health. PMID:26763389

  3. Comparison of Serum Adiponectin in Smoke-induced Pulmonary Emphysema Rats Fed Different Diets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui-Ying; Liu, Hu; Ma, Li-Juan; Xu, Jian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Smoking and body mass index (BMI) are the key risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Adiponectin with both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory properties is a vital modulator of inflammatory processes, which is expressed in epithelial cells in the airway in COPD-emphysema. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of adiponectin on tobacco smoke-induced emphysema in rats, which were fed different diets. Methods: Seventy-six adult (6–8 weeks old) male Sprague-Dawley rats (average weight 220 ± 20 g) were exposed to smoke or smoke-free room atmosphere and fed different diets (regular, high-fat, or low-fat diets) for 6 months. The rats were randomly divided into six groups. They are nonsmoke-exposed regular diet (n = 10), nonsmoke-exposed high-fat diet (n = 14), nonsmoke-exposed low-fat diet (n = 14), smoke-exposed regular diet (n = 10), smoke-exposed high-fat diet (n = 14), and smoke-exposed low-fat diet groups (n = 14). A full 23 factorial design was used to evaluate the effect of independent variables on smoke exposure and different rearing methods. Serum adiponectin and inflammatory cytokines were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Serum adiponectin levels in rats fed low-fat and regular diets exposed to smoke exposure were remarkably higher than that of rats exposed to room air while serum adiponectin levels of fat-rich diet rats exposed to tobacco smoke were lower than that of rats exposed to room air. Compared with regular diet or low-fat diet group, serum adiponectin levels in high-fat diet rats exposed to tobacco smoke were lower (t = 6.932, 11.026; all P < 0.001). BMI was inversely correlated with serum adiponectin levels (r = −0.751, P = 0.012). Serum interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and 4-hydroxy 2-nonenal (HNE) levels in rats exposed to low-fat or fat-rich diets were remarkably higher than that of rats exposed to normal diets (IL-6, t = 4.196, 3

  4. Pulmonary transcriptome analysis in the surgically induced rabbit model of diaphragmatic hernia treated with fetal tracheal occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Alexander C.; Brady, Paul D.; Kammoun, Molka; Finalet Ferreiro, Julio; DeKoninck, Philip; Endo, Masayuki; Toelen, Jaan; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Deprest, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a malformation leading to pulmonary hypoplasia, which can be treated in utero by fetal tracheal occlusion (TO). However, the changes of gene expression induced by TO remain largely unknown but could be used to further improve the clinically used prenatal treatment of this devastating malformation. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the pulmonary transcriptome changes caused by surgical induction of diaphragmatic hernia (DH) and additional TO in the fetal rabbit model. Induction of DH was associated with 378 upregulated genes compared to controls when allowing a false-discovery rate (FDR) of 0.1 and a fold change (FC) of 2. Those genes were again downregulated by consecutive TO. But DH+TO was associated with an upregulation of 157 genes compared to DH and controls. When being compared to control lungs, 106 genes were downregulated in the DH group and were not changed by TO. Therefore, the overall pattern of gene expression in DH+TO is more similar to the control group than to the DH group. In this study, we further provide a database of gene expression changes induced by surgical creation of DH and consecutive TO in the rabbit model. Future treatment strategies could be developed using this dataset. We also discuss the most relevant genes that are involved in CDH. PMID:26744354

  5. Effects of hesperetin on platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li; Deng, Wei; Cheng, Zhihong; Guo, Haipeng; Wang, Shihong; Zhang, Xiao; He, Yiyu; Tang, Qizhu

    2016-01-01

    Hesperetin is a natural flavonoid, which has been reported to exert various biological activities and positive health effects on mammalian cells. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of hesperetin on the proliferation of primary cultured rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), and to elucidate the possible underlying molecular mechanisms. The results of the present study indicated that hesperetin was able to inhibit the proliferation and DNA synthesis of platelet‑derived growth factor‑BB (PDGF‑BB)‑induced PASMCs in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner, without exerting cell cytotoxicity. In addition, hesperetin blocked the progression of the cell cycle from G0/G1 to S phase, which was correlated with the decreased mRNA expression levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin‑dependent kinase (CDK)2 and CDK4, and the increased mRNA expression levels of p27. Furthermore, the anti‑proliferative effects of hesperetin were associated with suppression of the AKT/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3β and p38 signaling pathway, but were not associated with the extracellular signal‑regulated kinases 1/2 and c‑Jun N‑terminal kinases signaling pathways. These results suggested that hesperetin may inhibit PDGFa‑BB‑induced PASMC proliferation via the AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway, and that it may possess therapeutic potential for the treatment of pulmonary vascular remodeling diseases.

  6. Adipose-derived stromal cell autologous transplantation ameliorates pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by shunt flow in rat models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Ruifang; Cao, Guangqing; Sun, Hourong; Wang, Xuping; Wu, Shuming

    2011-06-01

    Hyperkinetic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) severely influences the success of operation for congenital heart disease and deteriorates the prognosis of disease. Adipose-derived stromal cell (ADSC) is a good alternative multipotent stem cell for regeneration medicine. PAH rat models were established by arteriovenous shunt and ADSCs were isolated, cultured, and labeled in vitro. Twelve weeks after shunt operation, rats received an injection of 5 × 10(7) ADSCs. Two weeks after transplantation, hemodynamic abnormality induced by the shunt flow and the hypertrophy of right ventricle were reversed, which was confirmed by invasive measurement and echocardiography examination. The PAH rats receiving cell transplantation demonstrated decreased remodeling of small arteries in the lung; immunohistochemistry analysis showed augmented expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and increased number of pulmonary small arteries. Western blot and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction indicated that the protein and mRNA levels of HGF and endothelial nitric oxide synthase increased, respectively, in the lung after cell transplantation. Our results suggested that ADSC transplantation can ameliorate PAH induced by shunt flow by enhancing the expression of HGF and subsequently promoting angiogenesis in the injured lung tissue. PMID:20828291

  7. Overexpression of α1-protease Inhibitor and Galectin-1 in Radiation-induced Early Phase of Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Im, Hee-Soon; Kim, Hyung-Doo; Song, Jie-Young; Han, Youngsoo; Lee, Do-Youn; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2006-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIF) is a significant complication of radiotherapy for lung cancer. Despite the large number of studies, the molecular mechanisms of RIF are poorly understood. Therefore, the complex protein expression pattern in RIF was characterized by identifying the proteins with an altered expression level after thorax irradiation using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry. Materials and Methods A mouse model of RIF was used to examine the alteration of the lung proteome because of availability of murine data related to human cases and the abundance of murine fibrotic lung samples. A mouse model of RIF was induced in radiosensitive C57BL/6 mice. Twenty-one weeks after 25 Gy irradiation, hematoxylin-eosin staining and hydroxyproline assay confirmed the early-phase pulmonary fibrosis. Results Lung samples from the irradiated and age-matched control mice were used to generate 16 high quality 2-DE gels containing approximately 1,000 spots. Of the 31 significantly up- or down-regulated protein spots, 17 were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS. Conclusions Two important upregulated proteins were found, the α1-protease inhibitor and galectin-1, which might be used as potential markers for the early phase of RIF. PMID:19771266

  8. Variability in ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation in healthy and cardiovascular-compromised rat models.

    PubMed

    Kodavanti, Urmila P; Ledbetter, Allen D; Thomas, Ronald F; Richards, Judy E; Ward, William O; Schladweiler, Mette C; Costa, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure dependent on the type and severity of disease. Healthy male 12-14-week-old Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Wistar (WS) and Sprague Dawley (SD); and CVD-compromised spontaneously hypertensive (SH), Fawn-Hooded hypertensive (FHH), stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHSP), obese spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) and obese JCR (JCR) rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm ozone for 4 h; pulmonary injury and inflammation were analyzed immediately following (0-h) or 20-h later. Baseline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein was higher in CVD strains except for FHH when compared to healthy. Ozone-induced increases in protein and inflammation were concentration-dependent within each strain but the degree of response varied from strain to strain and with time. Among healthy rats, SD were least affected. Among CVD strains, lean rats were more susceptible to protein leakage from ozone than obese rats. Ozone caused least neutrophilic inflammation in SH and SHHF while SHSP and FHH were most affected. BALF neutrophils and protein were poorly correlated when considering the entire dataset (r = 0.55). The baseline and ozone-induced increases in cytokine mRNA varied markedly between strains and did not correlate with inflammation. These data illustrate that the degree of ozone-induced lung injury/inflammation response is likely influenced by both genetic and physiological factors that govern the nature of cardiovascular compromise in CVD models.

  9. Compromised peroxisomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a vicious cycle inducing a higher fibrotic response via TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Oruqaj, Gani; Karnati, Srikanth; Vijayan, Vijith; Kotarkonda, Lakshmi Kanth; Boateng, Eistine; Zhang, Wenming; Ruppert, Clemens; Günther, Andreas; Shi, Wei; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2015-04-21

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating disease, and its pathogenic mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Peroxisomes are known to be important in ROS and proinflammatory lipid degradation, and their deficiency induces liver fibrosis. However, altered peroxisome functions in IPF pathogenesis have never been investigated. By comparing peroxisome-related protein and gene expression in lung tissue and isolated lung fibroblasts between human control and IPF patients, we found that IPF lungs exhibited a significant down-regulation of peroxisomal biogenesis and metabolism (e.g., PEX13p and acyl-CoA oxidase 1). Moreover, in vivo the bleomycin-induced down-regulation of peroxisomes was abrogated in transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) receptor II knockout mice indicating a role for TGF-β signaling in the regulation of peroxisomes. Furthermore, in vitro treatment of IPF fibroblasts with the profibrotic factors TGF-β1 or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was found to down-regulate peroxisomes via the AP-1 signaling pathway. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms by which reduced peroxisomal functions contribute to enhanced fibrosis were further studied. Direct down-regulation of PEX13 by RNAi induced the activation of Smad-dependent TGF-β signaling accompanied by increased ROS production and resulted in the release of cytokines (e.g., IL-6, TGF-β) and excessive production of collagen I and III. In contrast, treatment of fibroblasts with ciprofibrate or WY14643, PPAR-α activators, led to peroxisome proliferation and reduced the TGF-β-induced myofibroblast differentiation and collagen protein in IPF cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that compromised peroxisome activity might play an important role in the molecular pathogenesis of IPF and fibrosis progression, possibly by exacerbating pulmonary inflammation and intensifying the fibrotic response in the patients.

  10. Administration of antioxidant peptide SS-31 attenuates transverse aortic constriction-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hung-i; Huang, Tien-hung; Sung, Pei-hsun; Chen, Yung-lung; Chua, Sarah; Chai, Han-yan; Chung, Sheng-ying; Liu, Chu-feng; Sun, Cheuk-kwan; Chang, Hsueh-wen; Zhen, Yen-yi; Lee, Fan-yen; Yip, Hon-kan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Antioxidant peptide SS-31 is a class of cell-permeable small peptides, which selectively resides on the inner mitochondrial membrane and possesses intrinsic mitochondrial protective capacities. In this study we investigated the therapeutic effects of antioxidant peptide SS-31 on transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in a murine model. Methods: Adult male mice were divided into 3 groups: sham-operated mice, TAC mice, and TAC+SS-31 mice that underwent TAC surgery and received SS-31 (2 mg/d, ip) for 60 d. The right ventricular systolic blood pressure (RVSBP) was measured on d 60 prior to sacrificing the mice; then their right heart and lung tissues were collected for histological and biochemical examinations. Lung injury scores were defined by the increased crowded area and decreased number of alveolar sacs. Results: TAC mice showed significantly higher RVSBP compared with sham-operated mice, the elevation was substantially suppressed in TAC+SS-31 mice. The same pattern of changes was found in pulmonary levels of oxidative stress proteins (NOX-1/NOX-2/oxidized proteins), cytosolic cytochrome c, biomarkers related to inflammation (MMP-9/TNF-α/iNOS), calcium overload index (TRPC1, 2, 4, 6), apoptosis (mitochondrial BAX, cleaved caspase 3/PARP), fibrosis (Smad3/TGF-β), hypoxic (HIF-1α), DNA damage (γ-H2AX) and endothelial function (eNOS/ET-1R), as well as in lung injury score, number of muscularized vessels in lungs, number of TRPC1+ and HIF-1α+ cells in pulmonary artery, and number of γ-H2AX+ and Ki-67+ cells in lung parenchyma. An opposite pattern of changes was observed in pulmonary anti-fibrotic markers (Smad1/5, BMP-2), number of small vessels, and number of alveolar sacs. In contrast, the levels of antioxidant proteins (HO-1/NQO-1/GR/GPx) in lung parenchyma were progressively and significantly increased from sham-operated mice, TAC mice to TAC+SS-31 mice. Conclusion: Antioxidant peptide SS-31 administration

  11. Nicardipine-induced acute pulmonary edema: a rare but severe complication of tocolysis.

    PubMed

    Serena, Claire; Begot, Emmanuelle; Cros, Jérôme; Hodler, Charles; Fedou, Anne Laure; Nathan-Denizot, Nathalie; Clavel, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We report four cases of acute pulmonary edema that occurred during treatment by intravenous tocolysis using nicardipine in pregnancy patients with no previous heart problems. Clinical severity justified hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) each time. Acute dyspnea has begun at an average of 63 hours after initiation of treatment. For all patients, the first diagnosis suspected was pulmonary embolism. The patients' condition improved rapidly with appropriate diuretic treatment and by modifying the tocolysis. The use of intravenous nicardipine is widely used for tocolysis in France even if its prescription does not have a marketing authorization. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this complication remain unclear. The main reported risk factors are spontaneous preterm labor, multiple pregnancy, concomitant obstetrical disease, association with beta-agonists, and fetal lung maturation corticotherapy. A better knowledge of this rare but serious adverse event should improve the management of patients. Nifedipine or atosiban, the efficiency of which tocolysis was also studied, could be an alternative. PMID:25215245

  12. TRP channels and traffic-related environmental pollution-induced pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Akopian, Armen N; Fanick, E Robert; Brooks, Edward G

    2016-05-01

    Environmental pollutant exposures are major risk factors for adverse health outcomes, with increased morbidity and mortality in humans. Diesel exhaust (DE) is one of the major harmful components of traffic-related air pollution. Exposure to DE affects several physiological systems, including the airways, and pulmonary diseases are increased in highly populated urban areas. Hence, there are urgent needs to (1) create newer and lesser polluting fuels, (2) improve exhaust aftertreatments and reduce emissions, and (3) understand mechanisms of actions for toxic effects of both conventional and cleaner diesel fuels on the lungs. These steps could aid the development of diagnostics and interventions to prevent the negative impact of traffic-related air pollution on the pulmonary system. Exhaust from conventional, and to a lesser extent, clean fuels, contains particulate matter (PM) and more than 400 additional chemical constituents. The major toxic constituents are nitrogen oxides (NOx) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PM and PAHs could potentially act via transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. In this review, we will first discuss the associations between DE from conventional as well as clean fuel technologies and acute and chronic airway inflammation. We will then review possible activation and/or potentiation of TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels by PM and PAHs. Finally, we will discuss and summarize recent findings on the mechanisms whereby TRPs could control the link between DE and airway inflammation, which is a primary determinant leading to pulmonary disease.

  13. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity--a fatal case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Range, Felix T; Hilker, Ekkehard; Breithardt, Günter; Buerke, Boris; Lebiedz, Pia

    2013-06-01

    Amiodarone is a widely used and very potent antiarrhythmic substance. Among its adverse effects, pulmonary toxicity is the most dangerous without a causal treatment option. Due to a very long half-life, accumulation can only be prevented by strict adherence to certain dosage patterns. In this review, we outline different safe and proven dosing schemes of amiodarone and compare the incidence and description of pulmonary toxicity. Reason for this is a case of fatal pulmonary toxicity due to a subacute iatrogenic overdosing of amiodarone in a 74-year-old male patient with known severe coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and ectopic atrial tachycardia with reduced function of kidneys and liver but without preexisting lung disease. Within 30 days, the patient received 32.2 g of amiodarone instead of 15.6 g as planned. Despite early corticosteroid treatment after fast exclusion of all other differential diagnoses, the patient died another month later in our intensive care unit from respiratory failure due to bipulmonal pneumonitis. PMID:23397327

  14. TRP channels and traffic-related environmental pollution-induced pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Akopian, Armen N.; Fanick, E. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutant exposures are major risk factors for adverse health outcomes, with increased morbidity and mortality in humans. Diesel exhaust (DE) is one of the major harmful components of traffic-related air pollution. Exposure to DE affects several physiological systems, including the airways, and pulmonary diseases are increased in highly populated urban areas. Hence, there are urgent needs to (1) create newer and lesser polluting fuels, (2) improve exhaust aftertreatments and reduce emissions, and (3) understand mechanisms of actions for toxic effects of both conventional and cleaner diesel fuels on the lungs. These steps could aid the development of diagnostics and interventions to prevent the negative impact of traffic-related air pollution on the pulmonary system. Exhaust from conventional, and to a lesser extent, clean fuels, contains particulate matter (PM) and more than 400 additional chemical constituents. The major toxic constituents are nitrogen oxides (NOx) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PM and PAHs could potentially act via transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. In this review, we will first discuss the associations between DE from conventional as well as clean fuel technologies and acute and chronic airway inflammation. We will then review possible activation and/or potentiation of TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels by PM and PAHs. Finally, we will discuss and summarize recent findings on the mechanisms whereby TRPs could control the link between DE and airway inflammation, which is a primary determinant leading to pulmonary disease. PMID:26837756

  15. TRP channels and traffic-related environmental pollution-induced pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Akopian, Armen N; Fanick, E Robert; Brooks, Edward G

    2016-05-01

    Environmental pollutant exposures are major risk factors for adverse health outcomes, with increased morbidity and mortality in humans. Diesel exhaust (DE) is one of the major harmful components of traffic-related air pollution. Exposure to DE affects several physiological systems, including the airways, and pulmonary diseases are increased in highly populated urban areas. Hence, there are urgent needs to (1) create newer and lesser polluting fuels, (2) improve exhaust aftertreatments and reduce emissions, and (3) understand mechanisms of actions for toxic effects of both conventional and cleaner diesel fuels on the lungs. These steps could aid the development of diagnostics and interventions to prevent the negative impact of traffic-related air pollution on the pulmonary system. Exhaust from conventional, and to a lesser extent, clean fuels, contains particulate matter (PM) and more than 400 additional chemical constituents. The major toxic constituents are nitrogen oxides (NOx) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PM and PAHs could potentially act via transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. In this review, we will first discuss the associations between DE from conventional as well as clean fuel technologies and acute and chronic airway inflammation. We will then review possible activation and/or potentiation of TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels by PM and PAHs. Finally, we will discuss and summarize recent findings on the mechanisms whereby TRPs could control the link between DE and airway inflammation, which is a primary determinant leading to pulmonary disease. PMID:26837756

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ attenuates serotonin-induced pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation and apoptosis inhibition involving ERK1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Xinyuan; Chen, Chunyan; Cheng, Gong; Liang, Lei; Yao, Xiaowei; Yang, Guang; You, Penghua; Shou, Xiling

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been shown to be involved in pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by inducing pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) proliferation and inhibiting PASMC apoptosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) plays a crucial role in regulating proliferation and apoptosis of many cell types. Moreover, recently, loss of PPARγ has also been reported to be associated with the development of PAH. The present study is aimed to assess whether PPARγ is involved in 5-HT induced PASMC proliferation and apoptosis inhibition and the possible mechanism. We found that 5-HT could induce PASMC proliferation and inhibit PASMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that 5-HT negatively regulated PPARγ expression and gene promoter activity in PASMCs and 5-HT induced PASMC proliferation and apoptosis resistance could be abolished by PPARγ agonists and enhanced by PPARγ inhibitor. In addition, we found that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway mediated the 5-HT-induced inhibition of PPARγ expression. Our results might provide novel insights into the mechanisms for the pro-remodeling action of 5-HT in pulmonary vasculature.

  17. Annexin V decreases PS-mediated macrophage efferocytosis and deteriorates elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Minematsu, N; Chubachi, S; Nakamura, H; Miyazaki, M; Tsuduki, K; Takahashi, S; Miyasho, T; Iwabuchi, T; Takamiya, R; Tateno, H; Mouded, M; Shapiro, S D; Asano, K; Betsuyaku, T

    2012-11-15

    Efferocytosis is believed to be a key regulator for lung inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this study we pharmacologically inhibited efferocytosis with annexin V and attempted to determine its impact on the progression of pulmonary emphysema in mouse. We first demonstrated in vitro and in vivo efferocytosis experiments using annexin V, an inhibitor for phosphatidylserine-mediated efferocytosis. We then inhibited efferocytosis in porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE)-treated mice. PPE-treated mice were instilled annexin V intranasally starting from day 8 until day 20. Mean linear intercept (Lm) was measured, and cell apoptosis was assessed in lung specimen obtained on day 21. Cell profile, apoptosis, and mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and growth factors were evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells on day 15. Annexin V attenuated macrophage efferocytosis both in vitro and in vivo. PPE-treated mice had a significant higher Lm, and annexin V further increased that by 32%. More number of macrophages was found in BAL fluid in this group. Interestingly, cell apoptosis was not increased by annexin V treatment both in lung specimens and BAL fluid, but macrophages from mice treated with both PPE and annexin V expressed higher MMP-2 mRNA levels and had a trend for higher MMP-12 mRNA expression. mRNA expression of keratinocyte growth factor tended to be downregulated. We showed that inhibited efferocytosis with annexin V worsened elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice, which was, at least partly, attributed to a lack of phenotypic change in macrophages toward anti-inflammatory one.

  18. Experimental extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary angiitis induced by intratracheal or intravenous challenge with Corynebacterium parvum in sensitized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Yi, E. S.; Lee, H.; Suh, Y. K.; Tang, W.; Qi, M.; Yin, S.; Remick, D. G.; Ulich, T. R.

    1996-01-01

    Extrinsic allergic alveolitis and pulmonary sarcoidosis are granulomatous diseases of the lung for which clinical presentation and anatomic site of granuloma formation differ. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis is caused by inhaled antigens, whereas the nature and source of the inciting antigen in sarcoidosis is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the route via which antigen is introduced to the lung contributes to the clinicopathological presentation of pulmonary granulomatous disease, rats immunized with intravenous (i.v.) Corynebacterium parvum were challenged after 2 weeks with either intratracheal (i.t.) or i.v. C. parvum. The granulomatous inflammation elicited by i.t. challenge predominantly involved alveolar spaces and histologically simulated extrinsic allergic alveolitis. In contrast, the inflammation induced by i.v. challenge was characterized by granulomatous angiitis and interstitial inflammation simulating sarcoidosis. Elevations of leukocyte counts and TNF levels in bronchoalveolar fluid, which reflect inflammation in the intra-alveolar compartment, were much more pronounced after i.t. than after i.v. challenge. Tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, CC chemokine, CXC chemokine, and adhesion molecule mRNA and protein expression occurred in each model. In conclusion, i.t. or i.v. challenge with C. parvum in sensitized rats caused pulmonary granulomatous inflammation that was histologically similar to human extrinsic allergic alveolitis and sarcoidosis, respectively. Although the soluble and cellular mediators of granulomatous inflammation were qualitatively similar in both disease models, the differing anatomic source of the same antigenic challenge was responsible for differing clinicopathological presentations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 11 Figure 13 Figure 12 Figure 14 PMID:8863677

  19. Decreased creatine kinase is linked to diastolic dysfunction in rats with right heart failure induced by pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Ewan D; Benoist, David; Drinkhill, Mark J; Stones, Rachel; Helmes, Michiel; Wüst, Rob C I; Stienen, Ger J M; Steele, Derek S; White, Ed

    2015-09-01

    Our objective was to investigate the role of creatine kinase in the contractile dysfunction of right ventricular failure caused by pulmonary artery hypertension. Pulmonary artery hypertension and right ventricular failure were induced in rats by monocrotaline and compared to saline-injected control animals. In vivo right ventricular diastolic pressure-volume relationships were measured in anesthetized animals; diastolic force-length relationships in single enzymatically dissociated myocytes and myocardial creatine kinase levels by Western blot. We observed diastolic dysfunction in right ventricular failure indicated by significantly steeper diastolic pressure-volume relationships in vivo and diastolic force-length relationships in single myocytes. There was a significant reduction in creatine kinase protein expression in failing right ventricle. Dysfunction also manifested as a shorter diastolic sarcomere length in failing myocytes. This was associated with a Ca(2+)-independent mechanism that was sensitive to cross-bridge cycling inhibition. In saponin-skinned failing myocytes, addition of exogenous creatine kinase significantly lengthened sarcomeres, while in intact healthy myocytes, inhibition of creatine kinase significantly shortened sarcomeres. Creatine kinase inhibition also changed the relatively flat contraction amplitude-stimulation frequency relationship of healthy myocytes into a steeply negative, failing phenotype. Decreased creatine kinase expression leads to diastolic dysfunction. We propose that this is via local reduction in ATP:ADP ratio and thus to Ca(2+)-independent force production and diastolic sarcomere shortening. Creatine kinase inhibition also mimics a definitive characteristic of heart failure, the inability to respond to increased demand. Novel therapies for pulmonary artery hypertension are needed. Our data suggest that cardiac energetics would be a potential ventricular therapeutic target.

  20. Changes of Gene Expression after Bone Marrow Cell Transfusion in Rats with Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwan Chang; Lee, Hae Ryun; Kim, Sung Jin; Cho, Min-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) causes right ventricular failure and possibly even death by a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy has provided an alternative treatment for ailments of various organs by promoting cell regeneration at the site of pathology. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of pulmonary haemodynamics, pathology and expressions of various genes, including ET (endothelin)-1, ET receptor A (ERA), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP), interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH rat models after bone marrow cell (BMC) transfusion. The rats were grouped as the control (C) group, monocrotaline (M) group, and BMC transfusion (B) group. M and B groups received subcutaneous (sc) injection of MCT (60 mg/kg). BMCs were transfused by intravenous injection at the tail 1 week after MCT injection in B group. Results showed that the average RV pressure significantly decreased in the B group compared with the M group. RV weight and the ratio of RH/LH+septum significantly decreased in the B group compared to the M group. Gene expressions of ET-1, ERA, NOS 3, MMP 2, TIMP, IL-6, and TNF-α significantly decreased in week 4 in the B group compared with the M group. In conclusion, BMC transfusion appears to improve survival rate, RVH, and mean RV pressure, and decreases gene expressions of ET-1, ERA, NOS 3, MMP 2, TIMP, IL-6, and TNF-α. PMID:22690090

  1. Pentoxifylline inhibits pulmonary inflammation induced by infrarenal aorticcross-clamping dependent of adenosine receptor A2A

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hali; Tan, Gang; Tong, Liquan; Han, Peng; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Bing; Sun, Xueying

    2016-01-01

    Infrarenal aortic cross-clamping (IAC) is commonly used during infrarenal vascular operations. Prolonged IAC causes ischemia-reperfusion injury to local tissues, resulting in the release of inflammatory cytokines and acute lung injury (ALI). Pentoxifylline (PTX) is a clinically used drug for chronic occlusive arterial diseases and exerts protective effects against ALI induced by various factors in experimental models. In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of PTX in a rat model of IAC. Wistar rats underwent IAC for 2 h, followed by 4 h reperfusion. PTX alone, or in combination with ZM-241385 (an adenosine receptor A2A antagonist) or CGS-21680 (an A2A agonist), was pre-administered to rats 1 h prior to IAC, and the severity of lung injury and inflammation were examined. Administration of PTX significantly attenuated ALI induced by IAC, evidenced by reduced histological scores and wet lung contents, improved blood gas parameters, decreased cell counts and protein amounts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and inhibition of MPO activity and ICAM-1 expression in lung tissues, and lower plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and soluble ICAM-1. ZM-241385 significantly abrogated, while CGS-21680 slightly enhanced, the effects of PTX in ameliorating ALI and inhibiting pulmonary inflammation. In exploration of the mechanisms, we found that PTX stimulated IL-10 production through the phosphorylation of STAT3, and A2A receptor participated in this regulation. The study indicates PTX plays a protective role in IAC-induced ALI in rats by inhibiting pulmonary inflammation through A2A signaling pathways. PMID:27347328

  2. Structural and Mechanical Adaptations of Right Ventricular Free Wall Myocardium to Pulmonary-Hypertension Induced Pressure Overload

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Michael R.; Simon, Marc A.; Valdez-Jasso, Daniela; Zhang, Will; Champion, Hunter C.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure in response to pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe disease that remains poorly understood. PH-induced pressure overload leads to changes in the RV free wall (RVFW) that eventually results in RV failure. While the development of computational models can benefit our understanding of the onset and progression of PH-induced pressure overload, detailed knowledge of the underlying structural and biomechanical events remains limited. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the structural and biomechanical adaptations of RV myocardium subjected to sustained pressure overload in a rat model. Hemodynamically confirmed severe chronic RV pressure overload was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats via pulmonary artery banding. Extensive tissue-level biaxial mechanical and histomorphological analyses were conducted to assess the remodeling response in the RV free wall. Simultaneous myofiber hypertrophy and longitudinal re-orientation of myo- and collagen fibers was observed, with both fiber types becoming more highly aligned. Transmural myo- and collagen fiber orientations were co-aligned in both the normal and diseased state. The overall tissue stiffness increased, with larger increases in longitudinal versus circumferential stiffness. Interestingly, estimated myofiber stiffness increased while the collagen fiber stiffness remained unchanged. The latter was attributed to longitudinal fiber re-orientation, which increased the degree of anisotropy. Increased mechanical coupling between the two axes was attributed to the increased fiber alignment. The increased myofiber stiffness was consistent with clinical results showing titin-associated increased sarcomeric stiffening observed in PH patients. These results further our understanding of the underlying adaptive and maladaptive remodeling mechanisms and may lead to improved techniques for prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment for PH. PMID:25164124

  3. Early Macrophage Recruitment and Alternative Activation Are Critical for the Later Development of Hypoxia-induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Vergadi, Eleni; Chang, Mun Seog; Lee, Changjin; Liang, Olin; Liu, Xianlan; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2011-01-01

    Background Lung inflammation precedes the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH); however its role in the pathogenesis of HPH is poorly understood. We sought to characterize the hypoxic inflammatory response and elucidate its role in the development of HPH. We also aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an anti-inflammatory enzyme, is protective in HPH. Methods and Results We generated bitransgenic mice that overexpress human HO-1 under doxycycline (dox) control in an inducible, lung-specific manner. Hypoxic exposure of mice in the absence of dox resulted in early transient accumulation of monocytes/macrophages in the bronchoalveolar lavage. Alveolar macrophages acquired an alternatively activated phenotype (M2) in response to hypoxia, characterized by the expression of Found in Inflammatory Zone-1, Arginase-1 and Chitinase-3-like-3. A brief, two-day pulse of dox delayed but did not prevent the peak of hypoxic inflammation, and could not protect from HPH. In contrast, a seven-day dox treatment sustained high HO-1 levels during the entire period of hypoxic inflammation, inhibited macrophage accumulation and activation, induced macrophage IL-10 expression, and prevented the development of HPH. Supernatants from hypoxic M2 macrophages promoted proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells while treatment with carbon monoxide, a HO-1 enzymatic product, abrogated this effect. Conclusions Early recruitment and alternative activation of macrophages in hypoxic lungs is critical for the later development of HPH. HO-1 may confer protection from HPH by effectively modifing macrophage activation state in hypoxia. PMID:21518986

  4. Interleukin 13- and interleukin 17A-induced pulmonary hypertension phenotype due to inhalation of antigen and fine particles from air pollution.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Chen, Wen-Chi; Esmaeil, Nafiseh; Lucas, Benjamin; Marsh, Leigh M; Reibman, Joan; Grunig, Gabriele

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension has a marked detrimental effect on quality of life and life expectancy. In a mouse model of antigen-induced pulmonary arterial remodeling, we have recently shown that coexposure to urban ambient particulate matter (PM) significantly increased the thickening of the pulmonary arteries and also resulted in significantly increased right ventricular systolic pressures. Here we interrogate the mechanism and show that combined neutralization of interleukin 13 (IL-13) and IL-17A significantly ameliorated the increase in right ventricular systolic pressure, the circumferential muscularization of pulmonary arteries, and the molecular change in the right ventricle. Surprisingly, our data revealed a protective role of IL-17A for the antigen- and PM-induced severe thickening of pulmonary arteries. This protection was due to the inhibition of the effects of IL-13, which drove this response, and the expression of metalloelastase and resistin-like molecule α. However, the latter was redundant for the arterial thickening response. Anti-IL-13 exacerbated airway neutrophilia, which was due to a resulting excess effect of IL-17A, confirming concurrent cross inhibition of IL-13- and IL-17A-dependent responses in the lungs of animals exposed to antigen and PM. Our experiments also identified IL-13/IL-17A-independent molecular reprogramming in the lungs induced by exposure to antigen and PM, which indicates a risk for arterial remodeling and protection from arterial constriction. Our study points to IL-13- and IL-17A-coinduced inflammation as a new template for biomarkers and therapeutic targeting for the management of immune response-induced pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25610601

  5. Interleukin 13- and interleukin 17A-induced pulmonary hypertension phenotype due to inhalation of antigen and fine particles from air pollution.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Chen, Wen-Chi; Esmaeil, Nafiseh; Lucas, Benjamin; Marsh, Leigh M; Reibman, Joan; Grunig, Gabriele

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension has a marked detrimental effect on quality of life and life expectancy. In a mouse model of antigen-induced pulmonary arterial remodeling, we have recently shown that coexposure to urban ambient particulate matter (PM) significantly increased the thickening of the pulmonary arteries and also resulted in significantly increased right ventricular systolic pressures. Here we interrogate the mechanism and show that combined neutralization of interleukin 13 (IL-13) and IL-17A significantly ameliorated the increase in right ventricular systolic pressure, the circumferential muscularization of pulmonary arteries, and the molecular change in the right ventricle. Surprisingly, our data revealed a protective role of IL-17A for the antigen- and PM-induced severe thickening of pulmonary arteries. This protection was due to the inhibition of the effects of IL-13, which drove this response, and the expression of metalloelastase and resistin-like molecule α. However, the latter was redundant for the arterial thickening response. Anti-IL-13 exacerbated airway neutrophilia, which was due to a resulting excess effect of IL-17A, confirming concurrent cross inhibition of IL-13- and IL-17A-dependent responses in the lungs of animals exposed to antigen and PM. Our experiments also identified IL-13/IL-17A-independent molecular reprogramming in the lungs induced by exposure to antigen and PM, which indicates a risk for arterial remodeling and protection from arterial constriction. Our study points to IL-13- and IL-17A-coinduced inflammation as a new template for biomarkers and therapeutic targeting for the management of immune response-induced pulmonary hypertension.

  6. Interleukin 13– and interleukin 17A–induced pulmonary hypertension phenotype due to inhalation of antigen and fine particles from air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Chen, Wen-Chi; Esmaeil, Nafiseh; Lucas, Benjamin; Marsh, Leigh M.; Reibman, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension has a marked detrimental effect on quality of life and life expectancy. In a mouse model of antigen-induced pulmonary arterial remodeling, we have recently shown that coexposure to urban ambient particulate matter (PM) significantly increased the thickening of the pulmonary arteries and also resulted in significantly increased right ventricular systolic pressures. Here we interrogate the mechanism and show that combined neutralization of interleukin 13 (IL-13) and IL-17A significantly ameliorated the increase in right ventricular systolic pressure, the circumferential muscularization of pulmonary arteries, and the molecular change in the right ventricle. Surprisingly, our data revealed a protective role of IL-17A for the antigen- and PM-induced severe thickening of pulmonary arteries. This protection was due to the inhibition of the effects of IL-13, which drove this response, and the expression of metalloelastase and resistin-like molecule α. However, the latter was redundant for the arterial thickening response. Anti-IL-13 exacerbated airway neutrophilia, which was due to a resulting excess effect of IL-17A, confirming concurrent cross inhibition of IL-13- and IL-17A-dependent responses in the lungs of animals exposed to antigen and PM. Our experiments also identified IL-13/IL-17A-independent molecular reprogramming in the lungs induced by exposure to antigen and PM, which indicates a risk for arterial remodeling and protection from arterial constriction. Our study points to IL-13- and IL-17A-coinduced inflammation as a new template for biomarkers and therapeutic targeting for the management of immune response–induced pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25610601

  7. Micro-computed tomography of pulmonary fibrosis in mice induced by adenoviral gene transfer of biologically active transforming growth factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a novel tool for monitoring acute and chronic disease states in small laboratory animals. Its value for assessing progressive lung fibrosis in mice has not been reported so far. Here we examined the importance of in vivo micro-CT as non-invasive tool to assess progression of pulmonary fibrosis in mice over time. Methods Pulmonary fibrosis was induced in mice by intratracheal delivery of an adenoviral gene vector encoding biologically active TGF-ß1 (AdTGF-ß1). Respiratory gated and ungated micro-CT scans were performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks post pulmonary adenoviral gene or control vector delivery, and were then correlated with respective histopathology-based Ashcroft scoring of pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Visual assessment of image quality and consolidation was performed by 3 observers and a semi-automated quantification algorithm was applied to quantify aerated pulmonary volume as an inverse surrogate marker for pulmonary fibrosis. Results We found a significant correlation between classical Ashcroft scoring and micro-CT assessment using both visual assessment and the semi-automated quantification algorithm. Pulmonary fibrosis could be clearly detected in micro-CT, image quality values were higher for respiratory gated exams, although differences were not significant. For assessment of fibrosis no significant difference between respiratory gated and ungated exams was observed. Conclusions Together, we show that micro-CT is a powerful tool to assess pulmonary fibrosis in mice, using both visual assessment and semi-automated quantification algorithms. These data may be important in view of pre-clinical pharmacologic interventions for the treatment of lung fibrosis in small laboratory animals. PMID:21176193

  8. Increased oxidative stress and severe arterial remodeling induced by permanent high-flow challenge in experimental pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Involvement of inflammation in pulmonary hypertension (PH) has previously been demonstrated and recently, immune-modulating dendritic cells (DCs) infiltrating arterial lesions in patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and in experimental monocrotaline-induced PH have been reported. Occurrence of perivascular inflammatory cells could be linked to local increase of oxidative stress (OS), as it has been shown for systemic atherosclerosis. The impact of OS on vascular remodeling in PH is still to be determined. We hypothesized, that augmented blood-flow could increase OS and might thereby contribute to DC/inflammatory cell-recruitment and smooth-muscle-cell-proliferation. Methods We applied a monocrotaline-induced PH-model and combined it with permanent flow-challenge. Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to following groups: control, monocrotaline-exposure (MCT), monocrotaline-exposure/pneumonectomy (MCT/PE). Results Hemodynamic exploration demonstrated most severe effects in MCT/PE, corresponding in histology to exuberant medial and adventitial remodeling of pulmonary muscular arteries, and intimal remodeling of smaller arterioles; lung-tissue PCR evidenced increased expression of DCs-specific fascin, CD68, proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, RANTES, fractalkine) in MCT/PE and to a lesser extent in MCT. Major OS enzyme NOX-4 was maximal in MCT/PE. Antioxidative stress enzymes Mn-SOD and glutathion-peroxidase-1 were significantly elevated, while HO-1 showed maximal expression in MCT with significant decrease in MCT/PE. Catalase was decreased in MCT and MCT/PE. Expression of NOX-4, but also of MN-SOD in MCT/PE was mainly attributed to a highly increased number of interstitial and perivascular CXCR4/SDF1 pathway-recruited mast-cells. Stress markers malonedialdehyde and nitrotyrosine were produced in endothelial cells, medial smooth muscle and perivascular leucocytes of hypertensive vasculature. Immunolabeling for OX62, CD68

  9. Rat lung phospholipid fatty acid composition in prepregnant, pregnant, and lactating rats: relationship to ozone-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gunnison, A F; Finkelstein, I

    1997-01-01

    Our laboratory has demonstrated recently that pulmonary inflammation induced by acute ozone exposure is much more severe in late stage pregnant and lactating rats than in postlactating rats or age-matched virgin females. It is currently widely believed that such pulmonary damage results, at least in part, from the reaction of ozone at sites of unsaturation in phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) molecules located in the epithelial fluid layer lining the lung surfaces and/or the plasma membranes of epithelial cells underlying this fluid layer. The objective of this study was to compare the PLFA composition of lung tissue and surfactant from ozone-sensitive late stage pregnant and lactating rats with comparable tissue from relatively ozone-insensitive age-matched prepregnant (virgin female) rats to explore the possibility that changes in lung PLFA composition during pregnancy and/or lactation contribute to the enhanced sensitivity of these physiologic states to ozone. In addition, the correlation of changes in plasma PLFA composition with those in lung was investigated. There were minor differences in the composition of lung tissue and surfactant PLFAs between prepregnant rats and pregnant rats at day 17 of gestation and only slightly greater differences between prepregnant and lactating rats. Changes from the prepregnant state in the PLFA composition of lung tissue, but not surfactant, correlated with changes in the plasma only in lactating rats and not in pregnant rats. Overall, the double bond index of PLFAs in surfactant and lung tissue was decreased in pregnant and lactating rats compared with prepregnant rats. Thus, the increased sensitivity of pregnant and lactating rats to ozone-induced lung injury cannot be attributed to an increased availability of unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the arachidonic acid composition of phospholipids did not appear to explain differences between prepregnant rats and pregnant or lactating rats in their inflammatory response to

  10. Differences in correlation of mRNA gene expression in mice sensitive and resistant to radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, C.J.; Piedboeuf, B.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Baggs, R.; Rubin, P.

    1995-05-01

    Fibrosis, characterized by the accumulation of collagen, is a late result of thoracic irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix protein and transforming growth factor {beta} mRNA expression are altered late in the course of pulmonary fibrosis after irradiation, and then to determine if these changes differ between two strains of mice which vary in their sensitivity to radiation. Radiation-sensitive (C57BL/6) and radiation-resistant (C3H/HeJ) mice were irradiated with a single dose of 5 or 12.5 Gy to the thorax. Total lung RNA was prepared and immobilized by Northern and slot blotting and hybridized with radiolabeled cDNA probes for collagens I, III and IV, fibronectin, and transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} and {beta}{sub 3}. Autoradiographic data were quantified by video densitometry and results normalized to a control probe encoding for glyceralde-hyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Alterations in mRNA abundance were observed in the sensitive mice at all times, while levels in the resistant mice were unaffected until 26 weeks after irradiation. The relationship between extracellular matrix protein per se and increased mRNA abundance suggests that late matrix protein accumulation may be a function of gene expression. Differences in levels of transforming growth factor {beta}mRNA may lead to strain-dependent variation in fibrotic response and may also contribute to the radiation-induced component of pulmonary fibrosis. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide induced relaxation in porcine pulmonary arteries in vitro is mediated by EDRF and cyclic GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Zellers, T.; McCormick, J. )

    1991-03-15

    Xanthine and xanthine oxidase induced relaxations in porcine pulmonary arteries in vitro are augmented in the presence of the endothelium and abolished by catalase, implicating hydrogen peroxide as an endothelium-dependent effector. To determine the mechanism whereby H{sub 2}O{sub 2} causes relaxations, isolated rings of fifth order porcine pulmonary artery, with (E{sup +}) and without (E{sup {minus}}) endothelium, were suspended in organ baths filled with buffer, and isometric tension was recorded. Hydrogen peroxide caused concentration-dependent, endothelium-augmented relaxations which were abolished by catalase and hydroquinone and reversed by L-nitroarginine and methylene blue. Prostacyclin (PGI{sub 2}) levels, measured after a two minute exposure to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in rings with endothelium were comparable to controls. This concentration of PGI{sub 2} does not cause relaxations in these rings. These data suggest that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulates the release of an EDRF, causing relaxations mediated by cyclic GMP, which is independent of prostacyclin.

  12. [Anesthetic Management of a Parturient with Eclampsia, Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Pulmonary Edema due to Pregnancy-induced Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Aida, Junko; Okutani, Hiroai; Oda, Yutaka; Okutani, Ryu

    2015-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman with mental retardation was admitted to a nearby hospital for an abrupt onset of seizure. Physical examination revealed remarkable hypertension and pregnancy with estimated gestational age of 28th week. Severe pulmonary edema and hypoxia led to a diagnosis of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) accompanied by eclampsia. She was orotracheally intubated because of refractory seizure and hypoxemia, and transferred to our hospital for further treatment. Besides severe hypoxia and hypercapnea, an enhanced lesion was detected in the left posterior cerebrum by brain MRI. No abnormal findings were detected in the fetus, with heart rate of 150 beats x min. She was diagnosed with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) caused by PIH and emergency cesarean section under general anesthesia was scheduled. A male newborn was delivered with Apgar score of 1/4 (1/5 min), followed by starting continuous infusion of nicardipine for controlling hypertension. Chest X-P on completion of surgery revealed remarkably alleviated pulmonary edema. She received intensive treatment and continued positive pressure ventilation for four days after delivery. She recovered with no neurological deficits and her child was well without any complications. PMID:26442424

  13. Amelioration of Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis by a Water-Soluble Bifunctional Sulfoxide Radiation Mitigator (MMS350)

    PubMed Central

    Kalash, Ronny; Epperly, Michael W.; Goff, Julie; Dixon, Tracy; Sprachman, Melissa M.; Zhang, Xichen; Shields, Donna; Cao, Shaonan; Franicola, Darcy; Wipf, Peter; Berhane, Hebist; Wang, Hong; Au, Jeremiah; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    A water-soluble ionizing radiation mitigator would have considerable advantages for the management of acute and chronic effects of ionizing radiation. We report that a novel oxetanyl sulfoxide (MMS350) is effective both as a protector and a mitigator of clonal mouse bone marrow stromal cell lines in vitro, and is an effective in vivo mitigator when administered 24 h after 9.5 Gy (LD100/30) total-body irradiation of C57BL/6NHsd mice, significantly improving survival (P =0.0097). Furthermore, MMS350 (400 μM) added weekly to drinking water after 20 Gy thoracic irradiation significantly decreased: expression of pulmonary inflammatory and profibrotic gene transcripts and proteins; migration into the lungs of bone marrow origin luciferase+/GFP+ (luc+/GFP+) fibroblast progenitors (in both luc+ marrow chimeric and luc+ stromal cell line injected mouse models) and decreased radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (P < 0.0001). This nontoxic and orally administered small molecule may be an effective therapeutic in clinical radiotherapy and as a counter measure against the acute and chronic effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:24125487

  14. Amelioration of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis by a water-soluble bifunctional sulfoxide radiation mitigator (MMS350).

    PubMed

    Kalash, Ronny; Epperly, Michael W; Goff, Julie; Dixon, Tracy; Sprachman, Melissa M; Zhang, Xichen; Shields, Donna; Cao, Shaonan; Franicola, Darcy; Wipf, Peter; Berhane, Hebist; Wang, Hong; Au, Jeremiah; Greenberger, Joel S

    2013-11-01

    A water-soluble ionizing radiation mitigator would have considerable advantages for the management of acute and chronic effects of ionizing radiation. We report that a novel oxetanyl sulfoxide (MMS350) is effective both as a protector and a mitigator of clonal mouse bone marrow stromal cell lines in vitro, and is an effective in vivo mitigator when administered 24 h after 9.5 Gy (LD100/30) total-body irradiation of C57BL/6NHsd mice, significantly improving survival (P = 0.0097). Furthermore, MMS350 (400 μM) added weekly to drinking water after 20 Gy thoracic irradiation significantly decreased: expression of pulmonary inflammatory and profibrotic gene transcripts and proteins; migration into the lungs of bone marrow origin luciferase+/GFP+ (luc+/GFP+) fibroblast progenitors (in both luc+ marrow chimeric and luc+ stromal cell line injected mouse models) and decreased radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (P < 0.0001). This nontoxic and orally administered small molecule may be an effective therapeutic in clinical radiotherapy and as a counter measure against the acute and chronic effects of ionizing radiation.

  15. Impaired mitophagy leads to cigarette smoke stress-induced cellular senescence: implications for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Sundar, Isaac K; Lerner, Chad A; Gerloff, Janice; Tormos, Ana M; Yao, Hongwei; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-07-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS)-induced cellular senescence is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The molecular mechanism by which CS induces cellular senescence is unknown. Here, we show that CS stress (exposure of primary lung cells to CS extract 0.2-0.75% with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ∼0.5%) led to impaired mitophagy and perinuclear accumulation of damaged mitochondria associated with cellular senescence in both human lung fibroblasts and small airway epithelial cells (SAECs). Impaired mitophagy was attributed to reduced Parkin translocation to damaged mitochondria, which was due to CS-induced cytoplasmic p53 accumulation and its interaction with Parkin. Impaired Parkin translocation to damaged mitochondria was also observed in mouse lungs with emphysema (6 months CS exposure, 100 mg TPM/m(3)) as well as in lungs of chronic smokers and patients with COPD. Primary SAECs from patients with COPD also exhibited impaired mitophagy and increased cellular senescence via suborganellar signaling. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant (Mito-Tempo) restored impaired mitophagy, decreased mitochondrial mass accumulation, and delayed cellular senescence in Parkin-overexpressing cells. In conclusion, defective mitophagy leads to CS stress-induced lung cellular senescence, and restoring mitophagy delays cellular senescence, which provides a promising therapeutic intervention in chronic airway diseases.

  16. Liraglutide prevents and reverses monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing ET-1 and enhancing eNOS/sGC/PKG pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Yeh, Jwu-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, is widely used to treat diabetes. However, its effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. In this study, we investigated its effects on rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH and mechanisms on rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Liraglutide was investigated for both prevention and treatment of MCT-induced PAH. The hemodynamic and body weight changes, right heart hypertrophy, lung morphology, immune-reactivity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, protein expressions of eNOS, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGCα), protein kinase G (PKG) and Rho kinase (ROCK) II pathway were measured in both in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration and cell cycle were also determined. Liraglutide both prevented and reversed MCT-induced PAH, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular wall remodeling. Protein expression of ROCK II was increased while eNOS, sGC and PKG were decreased. Pretreatment with liraglutide inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulated PASMCs migration, which were associated with cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Liraglutide may have both preventive and therapeutic effects on MCT-induced PAH, through the eNOS/sGC/PKG and Rho kinase pathways. Thus, liraglutide may have a therapeutic role in pulmonary vascular remodelling. PMID:27581840

  17. Acute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II Diabetes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract for Society of Toxicology, March 22-25, 2015, San Diego, CAAcute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II DiabetesS.J. Snow1,3, D. Miller2, V. Bass2, M. Schladweiler3, A. Ledbetter3, J. Richards3, C...

  18. Liraglutide prevents and reverses monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing ET-1 and enhancing eNOS/sGC/PKG pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Yeh, Jwu-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, is widely used to treat diabetes. However, its effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. In this study, we investigated its effects on rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH and mechanisms on rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Liraglutide was investigated for both prevention and treatment of MCT-induced PAH. The hemodynamic and body weight changes, right heart hypertrophy, lung morphology, immune-reactivity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, protein expressions of eNOS, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGCα), protein kinase G (PKG) and Rho kinase (ROCK) II pathway were measured in both in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration and cell cycle were also determined. Liraglutide both prevented and reversed MCT-induced PAH, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular wall remodeling. Protein expression of ROCK II was increased while eNOS, sGC and PKG were decreased. Pretreatment with liraglutide inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulated PASMCs migration, which were associated with cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Liraglutide may have both preventive and therapeutic effects on MCT-induced PAH, through the eNOS/sGC/PKG and Rho kinase pathways. Thus, liraglutide may have a therapeutic role in pulmonary vascular remodelling. PMID:27581840

  19. Liraglutide prevents and reverses monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing ET-1 and enhancing eNOS/sGC/PKG pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Yeh, Jwu-Lai

    2016-09-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, is widely used to treat diabetes. However, its effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. In this study, we investigated its effects on rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH and mechanisms on rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Liraglutide was investigated for both prevention and treatment of MCT-induced PAH. The hemodynamic and body weight changes, right heart hypertrophy, lung morphology, immune-reactivity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, protein expressions of eNOS, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGCα), protein kinase G (PKG) and Rho kinase (ROCK) II pathway were measured in both in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration and cell cycle were also determined. Liraglutide both prevented and reversed MCT-induced PAH, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular wall remodeling. Protein expression of ROCK II was increased while eNOS, sGC and PKG were decreased. Pretreatment with liraglutide inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulated PASMCs migration, which were associated with cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Liraglutide may have both preventive and therapeutic effects on MCT-induced PAH, through the eNOS/sGC/PKG and Rho kinase pathways. Thus, liraglutide may have a therapeutic role in pulmonary vascular remodelling.

  20. Renal responses of normal and preascitic broilers to systemic hypotension induced by unilateral pulmonary artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Forman, M F; Wideman, R F

    1999-12-01

    During the pathophysiological progression of pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS; ascites), broilers concurrently develop systemic hypotension (low mean systemic arterial pressure) that may initiate renal retention of water and solute, contributing to fluid accumulation in the abdominal cavity (ascites). In male Single Comb White Leghorns, glomerular filtration is autoregulated over a systemic arterial pressure range of 110 to 60 mm Hg, and corresponding reductions in urine flow are attributed to a phenomenon known as pressure natriuresis. Acute unilateral pulmonary artery occlusion was used in the present study to reduce systemic arterial pressure toward the lower autoregulatory limit for glomerular filtration, and to evaluate kidney function in normal and preascitic broilers. Preascitic broilers characteristically exhibited lower (P < or = 0.05) values for mean systemic arterial pressure (91 vs 100 mm Hg) and percentage saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen (73 vs 84%), higher hematocrits (35 vs 30%), heavier right ventricles (3.44 vs 2.32 g), and higher right:total ventricular weight ratios (0.32 vs 0.24) than normal broilers. Body weights (2,445 vs 2,429 g, respectively), left ventricle plus septum weights (7.16 vs 7.19 g), and heart rates (349 vs 341 beats/min) were similar. Preascitic broilers exhibited larger (P < or = 0.05) dependent reductions in glomerular filtration, urine flow, osmolal clearance, and solute excretion and had a higher free water clearance than normal broilers in response to pulmonary artery occlusion. The differences observed between normal and preascitic broilers demonstrate that systemic hypotension can trigger renal mechanisms contributing to fluid and solute retention during development of PHS.

  1. Radiation-induced pulmonary endothelial dysfunction and hydroxyproline accumulation in four strains of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.; Sharplin, J.; Franko, A.J.; Hinz, J.M. )

    1989-10-01

    C57BL mice exposed to 14 Gy of whole-thorax irradiation develop significant histologic lung fibrosis within 52 weeks, whereas CBA and C3H mice do not exhibit substantial fibrosis during this time. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether this strain-dependent difference in radiation histopathology is associated with genetic differences in pulmonary endothelial metabolic activity or in endothelial radioresponsiveness. C57BL/6J, C57BL/10J, CBA/J, and C3H/HeJ mice were sacrificed 12 weeks after exposure to 0 or 14 Gy of 300-kV X rays to the whole thorax. Lung angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity and plasminogen activator (PLA) activity were measured as indices of pulmonary endothelial function; and lung hydroxyproline (HP) content served as an index of pulmonary fibrosis. Lung ACE and PLA activities in sham-irradiated C57BL/6J and CB57BL/10J mice were only half as high as those in sham-irradiated CBA/J and C3H/HeJ mice. Exposure to 14 Gy of X rays produced a slight but nonsignificant reduction in lung ACE and PLA activity in the C57BL strains, and a significant reduction in the CBA/J and C3H/HeJ mice. Even after 14 Gy, however, lung ACE and PLA activities in CBA/J and C3H/HeJ mice were higher than those in sham-irradiated C57BL/6J and C57BL/10J mice. Lung HP content in all four strains increased significantly after irradiation, but this increase was accompanied by an increase in lung wet weight. As a result, HP concentration (per milligram wet weight) remained constant or increased slightly in both C57BL strains and actually decreased in the CBA/J and C3H/HeJ mice. These data demonstrate significant genetic differences in both intrinsic pulmonary endothelial enzyme activity and endothelial radioresponsiveness among the four strains of mice.

  2. Chest wall shrapnel-induced beryllium-sensitization and associated pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Fireman, E; Shai, A Bar; Lerman, Y; Topilsky, M; Blanc, P D; Maier, L; Li, L; Chandra, S; Abraham, J M; Fomin, I; Aviram, G; Abraham, J L

    2012-10-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is an exposure-related granulomatous disease mimicking sarcoidosis. Beryllium exposure-associated disease occurs mainly via inhalation, but skin may also be a source of sensitization. A 65-year-old male with a history of war-related shrapnel wounds was initially diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Twenty years later, the possibility of a metal-related etiology for the lung disease was raised. A beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test, elemental analysis of removed shrapnel, and genetic studies were consistent with a diagnosis of CBD. This case demonstrates that retained beryllium-containing foreign bodies can be linked to a pathophysiologic response in the lung consistent with CBD.

  3. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease - pulmonary atresia; Cyanotic heart disease - pulmonary atresia; Valve - disorder pulmonary atresia ... septum may also have a poorly developed tricuspid valve. They may also have an underdeveloped right ventricle ...

  4. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...

  5. Leukotriene B4 mediates macrophage influx and pulmonary hypertension in bleomycin-induced chronic neonatal lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ee, Mong Tieng; Kantores, Crystal; Ivanovska, Julijana; Wong, Mathew J; Jain, Amish; Jankov, Robert P

    2016-08-01

    Systemically-administered bleomycin causes inflammation, arrested lung growth, and pulmonary hypertension (PHT) in the neonatal rat, similar to human infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Leukotrienes (LTs) are inflammatory lipid mediators produced by multiple cell types in the lung. The major LTs, LTB4 and cysteinyl LTs, are suggested to contribute to BPD, but their specific roles remain largely unexplored in experimental models. We hypothesized that LTs are increased in bleomycin-induced BPD-like injury, and that inhibition of LT production would prevent inflammatory cell influx and thereby ameliorate lung injury. Rat pups were exposed to bleomycin (1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ip) or vehicle (control) from postnatal days 1-14 and were treated with either zileuton (5-lipoxygenase inhibitor), montelukast (cysteinyl LT1 receptor antagonist), or SC57461A (LTA4 hydrolase inhibitor) 10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ip. Bleomycin led to increased lung content of LTB4, but not cysteinyl LTs. Bleomycin-induced increases in tissue neutrophils and macrophages and lung contents of LTB4 and tumor necrosis factor-α were all prevented by treatment with zileuton. Treatment with zileuton or SC57461A also prevented the hemodynamic and structural markers of chronic PHT, including raised pulmonary vascular resistance, increased Fulton index, and arterial wall remodeling. However, neither treatment prevented impaired alveolarization or vascular hypoplasia secondary to bleomycin. Treatment with montelukast had no effect on macrophage influx, PHT, or on abnormal lung structure. We conclude that LTB4 plays a crucial role in lung inflammation and PHT in experimental BPD. Agents targeting LTB4 or LTB4-mediated signaling may have utility in infants at risk of developing BPD-associated PHT. PMID:27317685

  6. Icariin Inhibits Pulmonary Hypertension Induced by Monocrotaline through Enhancement of NO/cGMP Signaling Pathway in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-sheng; Luo, Yun-mei; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Yu; Fu, Xiao-xia; Yang, Dan-li

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that icariin (ICA) increased contents of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by improving expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5). In addition, dysfunction of the NO/cGMP pathway may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). In this study, the potential protective effects of ICA on PH induced by monocrotaline (MCT, 50 mg/kg) singly subcutaneous injection were investigated and the possible mechanisms involved in NO/cGMP pathway were explored in male Sprague Dawley rats. The results showed that ICA (20, 40, and 80 mg/kg/d) treatment by intragastric administration could significantly ameliorate PH and upregulate the expression of eNOS gene and downregulate the expression of PDE5 gene in MCT-treated rats. Both ICA (40 mg/kg/d) and L-arginine (200 mg/kg/d), a precursor of NO as positive control, notably increased the contents of NO and cGMP in lung tissue homogenate, which were inversed by treatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), a NOS inhibitor, and L-NAME-treatment could also inhibit the protective effects of ICA (40 mg/kg/d) on mean pulmonary artery pressure and artery remodeling and tends to inhibit right ventricle hypertrophy index. In summary, ICA is effective in protecting against MCT-induced PH in rats through enhancement of NO/cGMP signaling pathway in rats. PMID:27366192

  7. Early-onset obesity dysregulates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling and induces asthma-like disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dinger, Katharina; Kasper, Philipp; Hucklenbruch-Rother, Eva; Vohlen, Christina; Jobst, Eva; Janoschek, Ruth; Bae-Gartz, Inga; van Koningsbruggen-Rietschel, Silke; Plank, Christian; Dötsch, Jörg; Alejandre Alcázar, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but the molecular mechanisms linking both remain elusive. Since obesity leads to chronic low-grade inflammation and affects metabolic signaling we hypothesized that postnatal hyperalimentation (pHA) induced by maternal high-fat-diet during lactation leads to early-onset obesity and dysregulates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling, resulting in metabolic programming of asthma-like disease in adult mice. Offspring with pHA showed at postnatal day 21 (P21): (1) early-onset obesity, greater fat-mass, increased expression of IL-1β, IL-23, and Tnf-α, greater serum leptin and reduced glucose tolerance than Control (Ctrl); (2) less STAT3/AMPKα-activation, greater SOCS3 expression and reduced AKT/GSK3β-activation in the lung, indicative of leptin resistance and insulin signaling, respectively; (3) increased lung mRNA of IL-6, IL-13, IL-17A and Tnf-α. At P70 body weight, fat-mass, and cytokine mRNA expression were similar in the pHA and Ctrl, but serum leptin and IL-6 were greater, and insulin signaling and glucose tolerance impaired. Peribronchial elastic fiber content, bronchial smooth muscle layer, and deposition of connective tissue were not different after pHA. Despite unaltered bronchial structure mice after pHA exhibited significantly increased airway reactivity. Our study does not only demonstrate that early-onset obesity transiently activates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling and induces airway hyperreactivity in mice, but also provides new insights into metabolic programming of childhood obesity-related asthma. PMID:27087690

  8. Enhanced Depolarization-Induced Pulmonary Vasoconstriction Following Chronic Hypoxia Requires EGFR-Dependent Activation of NAD(P)H Oxidase 2

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Charles E.; Broughton, Brad R.S.; Jernigan, Nikki L.; Walker, Benjimen R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Chronic hypoxia (CH) enhances depolarization-induced myofilament Ca2+ sensitization and resultant pulmonary arterial constriction through superoxide (O2−)-dependent stimulation of RhoA. Because NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX) has been implicated in the development of pulmonary hypertension, we hypothesized that vascular smooth muscle (VSM) depolarization increases NOX-derived O2− production leading to myofilament Ca2+ sensitization and augmented vasoconstrictor reactivity following CH. As epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediates Rac1-dependent NOX activation in renal mesangial cells, we further sought to examine the role EGFR plays in this response. Results: Vasoconstrictor responses to depolarizing concentrations of KCl were greater in lungs isolated from CH (4 wk, 0.5 atm) rats compared to normoxic controls, and this effect of CH was abolished by the general NOX inhibitor, apocynin. CH similarly augmented KCl-induced vasoconstriction and O2− generation (assessed using the fluorescent indicator, dihydroethidium) in Ca2+-permeabilized, pressurized small pulmonary arteries. These latter responses to CH were prevented by general inhibition of NOX isoforms (apocynin, diphenylene iodonium), and by selective inhibition of NOX 2 (gp91ds-tat), Rac1 (NSC 23766), and EGFR (AG 1478). Consistent with these observations, CH increased KCl-induced EGFR phosphorylation, and augmented depolarization-induced Rac1 activation in an EGFR-dependent manner. Innovation: This study establishes a novel signaling axis in VSM linking membrane depolarization to contraction that is independent of Ca2+ influx, and which mediates myofilament Ca2+ sensitization in the hypertensive pulmonary circulation. Conclusion: CH augments membrane depolarization-induced pulmonary VSM Ca2+ sensitization and vasoconstriction through EGFR-dependent stimulation of Rac1 and NOX 2. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1777–1788. PMID:22966991

  9. Losartan attenuates chronic cigarette smoke exposure-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats: Possible involvement of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2

    SciTech Connect

    Han Suxia; He Guangming; Wang Tao; Chen Lei; Ning Yunye; Luo Feng; An Jin; Yang Ting; Dong Jiajia; Liao Zenglin; Xu Dan; Wen Fuqiang

    2010-05-15

    Chronic cigarette smoking induces pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by largely unknown mechanisms. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to function in the development of PAH. Losartan, a specific angiotensin II receptor antagonist, is a well-known antihypertensive drug with a potential role in regulating angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), a recently found regulator of RAS. To determine the effect of losartan on smoke-induced PAH and its possible mechanism, rats were daily exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months in the absence and in the presence of losartan. Elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), thickened wall of pulmonary arteries with apparent medial hypertrophy along with increased angiotensin II (Ang II) and decreased ACE2 levels were observed in smoke-exposed-only rats. Losartan administration ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling, inhibited the smoke-induced RVSP and Ang II elevation and partially reversed the ACE2 decrease in rat lungs. In cultured primary pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from 3- and 6-month smoke-exposed rats, ACE2 levels were significantly lower than in those from the control rats. Moreover, PASMCs from 6-month exposed rats proliferated more rapidly than those from 3-month exposed or control rats, and cells grew even more rapidly in the presence of DX600, an ACE2 inhibitor. Consistent with the in vivo study, in vitro losartan pretreatment also inhibited cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cell proliferation and ACE2 reduction in rat PASMCs. The results suggest that losartan may be therapeutically useful in the chronic smoking-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH and ACE2 may be involved as part of its mechanism. Our study might provide insight into the development of new therapeutic interventions for PAH smokers.

  10. In-situ synthesis of vanadium pentoxide nanofibre/exfoliated graphene nanohybrid and its supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Arup; Bonso, Jeliza S.; Wunch, Melissa; Yang, Kap Seung; Ferraris, John P.; Yang, Duck J.

    2015-08-01

    A novel nanohybrid material composed of vanadium pentoxide nanofibres (VNFs) and exfoliated graphene were prepared by in-situ growth of VNFs onto graphene nanosheets, and explicated as electrode material for supercapacitor applications. The existence of non-covalent interactions between VNFs and graphene surfaces was confirmed by Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopes. Morphological analysis of the nanohybrid revealed that the VNF layer uniformly grown on the graphene surfaces, producing high specific surface area and good electronic or ionic conducing path. High crystalline structure with small d-spacing of the VNFs on graphene was observed in X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Compared to pristine VNF, the VNF/graphene nanohybrid exhibited higher specific capacitance of 218 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1, higher energy density of 22 Wh kg-1 and power density of 3594 W kg-1. Asymmetric supercapacitor devices were prepared using the Spectracarb 2225 activated carbon cloth and VNF/graphene nanohybrid as positive and negative electrode, respectively. The asymmetric device exhibited capacitance of 279 F g-1 at 1 A g-1, energy density of 37.2 Wh kg-1 and power density of 3743 W kg-1, which are comparable and or superior to reported asymmetric devices consisting of carbon material and metal oxide as electrode components.

  11. Oxidation state and interfacial effects on oxygen vacancies in tantalum pentoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bondi, Robert J. Marinella, Matthew J.

    2015-02-28

    First-principles density-functional theory calculations are used to study the atomistic structure, structural energetics, and electron density near the O monovacancy (V{sub O}{sup n}; n = 0,1+,2+) in both bulk, amorphous tantalum pentoxide (a-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and also at vacuum and metallic Ta interfaces. We calculate multivariate vacancy formation energies to evaluate stability as a function of oxidation state, distance from interface plane, and Fermi energy. V{sub O}{sup n} of all oxidation states preferentially segregates at both Ta and vacuum interfaces, where the metallic interface exhibits global formation energy minima. In a-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, V{sub O}{sup 0} is characterized by structural contraction and electron density localization, while V{sub O}{sup 2+} promotes structural expansion and is depleted of electron density. In contrast, interfacial V{sub O}{sup 0} and V{sub O}{sup 2+} show nearly indistinguishable ionic and electronic signatures indicative of a reduced V{sub O} center. Interfacial V{sub O}{sup 2+} extracts electron density from metallic Ta, indicating that V{sub O}{sup 2+} is spontaneously reduced at the expense of the metal. This oxidation/reduction behavior suggests careful selection and processing of both oxide layer and metal electrodes for engineering memristor device operation.

  12. A search for the ground state structure and the phase stability of tantalum pentoxide.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Walton, S; Valencia-Balvín, C; Padilha, A C M; Dalpian, G M; Osorio-Guillén, J M

    2016-01-27

    Tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) is a wide-gap semiconductor that presents good catalytic and dielectric properties, conferring to this compound promising prospective use in a variety of technological applications. However, there is a lack of understanding regarding the relations among its crystalline phases, as some of them are not even completely characterized and there is currently no agreement about which models better explain the crystallographic data. Additionally, its phase diagram is unknown. In this work we performed first-principles density functional theory calculations to study the structural properties of the different phases and models of Ta2O5, the equation of state and the zone-centered vibrational frequencies. From our results, we conclude that the phases that are built up from only distorted octahedra instead of combinations with pentagonal and/or hexagonal bipyramids are energetically more favorable and dynamically stable. More importantly, this study establishes that, given the pressure range considered, the B-phase is the most favorable structure and there is no a crystallographic phase transition to another phase at high-pressure. Additionally, for the equilibrium volume of the B-phase and the λ-model, the description of the electronic structure and optical properties were performed using semi-local and hybrid functionals.

  13. Oxidation state and interfacial effects on oxygen vacancies in tantalum pentoxide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bondi, Robert J.; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2015-02-28

    First-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to study the atomistic structure, structural energetics, and electron density near the O monovacancy (VOn; n=0,1+,2+) in both bulk, amorphous tantalum pentoxide (a-Ta2O5) and also at vacuum and metallic Ta interfaces. We calculate multivariate vacancy formation energies to evaluate stability as a function of oxidation state, distance from interface plane, and Fermi energy. VOn of all oxidation states preferentially segregate at both Ta and vacuum interfaces, where the metallic interface exhibits global formation energy minima. In a-Ta2O5, VO0 are characterized by structural contraction and electron density localization, while VO2+ promote structural expansion andmore » are depleted of electron density. In contrast, interfacial VO0 and VO2+ show nearly indistinguishable ionic and electronic signatures indicative of a reduced VO center. Interfacial VO2+ extract electron density from metallic Ta indicating VO2+ is spontaneously reduced at the expense of the metal. This oxidation/reduction behavior suggests careful selection and processing of both oxide layer and metal electrodes for engineering memristor device operation.« less

  14. Electronic structure of Vanadium pentoxide: An efficient hole injector for organic electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Jens; Zilberberg, K; Riedl, T.; Kahn, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure of Vanadium pentoxide (V₂O₅), a transition metal oxide with an exceedingly large work function of 7.0 eV, is studied via ultraviolet, inverse and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Very deep lying electronic states with electron affinity and ionization energy (IE) of 6.7 eV and 9.5 eV, respectively, are found. Contamination due to air exposure changes the electronic structure due to the partial reduction of vanadium to V⁺⁴ state. It is shown that V₂O₅ is a n-type material that can be used for efficient hole-injection into materials with an IE larger than 6 eV, such as 4,4'-Bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1'-bipheny (CBP). The formation of an interface dipole and band bending is found to lead to a very small energy barrier between the transport levels at the V₂O₅/CBP interface.

  15. Oxidation state and interfacial effects on oxygen vacancies in tantalum pentoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bondi, Robert J.; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2015-02-28

    First-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to study the atomistic structure, structural energetics, and electron density near the O monovacancy (VOn; n=0,1+,2+) in both bulk, amorphous tantalum pentoxide (a-Ta2O5) and also at vacuum and metallic Ta interfaces. We calculate multivariate vacancy formation energies to evaluate stability as a function of oxidation state, distance from interface plane, and Fermi energy. VOn of all oxidation states preferentially segregate at both Ta and vacuum interfaces, where the metallic interface exhibits global formation energy minima. In a-Ta2O5, VO0 are characterized by structural contraction and electron density localization, while VO2+ promote structural expansion and are depleted of electron density. In contrast, interfacial VO0 and VO2+ show nearly indistinguishable ionic and electronic signatures indicative of a reduced VO center. Interfacial VO2+ extract electron density from metallic Ta indicating VO2+ is spontaneously reduced at the expense of the metal. This oxidation/reduction behavior suggests careful selection and processing of both oxide layer and metal electrodes for engineering memristor device operation.

  16. Reduced graphene oxide enwrapped vanadium pentoxide nanorods as cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dezhi; Quan, Hongying; Luo, Shenglian; Luo, Xubiao; Deng, Fang; Jiang, Hualin

    2014-02-01

    Novel reduced graphene oxide/vanadium pentoxide (rGO/V2O5) nanocomposites were fabricated by coassembly between negatively charged graphene oxide and positively charged oxide nanorods. A series of characterization including X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicated that the V2O5 nanorods with the width of about 50 nm and the length from a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers were enwrapped by rGO layers to form core-shell nanostructures. Compared with the pristine V2O5 nanorods, the as-prepared rGO/V2O5 nanocomposites with 13 wt% rGO showed a significantly enhanced electrochemical performance with high reversible capacities, good cycling stabilities and excellent rate capabilities as a cathode material for lithium batteries. The rGO/V2O5 nanocomposites electrodes delivered a stable discharge capacity around 140 mA h g-1 at a current density of 150 mA g-1 for 100 cycles in the voltage range of 2.5-4.0 V. Furthermore, the nanocomposites electrodes delivered discharge capacities of 287 mA h g-1 and 207 mA h g-1 during the first and 50th cycles in the voltage range of 2.0-4.0 V at a current density of 100 mA g-1, respectively. The as-synthesized nanocomposites are promising candidates for electrical energy storage applications.

  17. A search for the ground state structure and the phase stability of tantalum pentoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Walton, S.; Valencia-Balvín, C.; Padilha, A. C. M.; Dalpian, G. M.; Osorio-Guillén, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) is a wide-gap semiconductor that presents good catalytic and dielectric properties, conferring to this compound promising prospective use in a variety of technological applications. However, there is a lack of understanding regarding the relations among its crystalline phases, as some of them are not even completely characterized and there is currently no agreement about which models better explain the crystallographic data. Additionally, its phase diagram is unknown. In this work we performed first-principles density functional theory calculations to study the structural properties of the different phases and models of Ta2O5, the equation of state and the zone-centered vibrational frequencies. From our results, we conclude that the phases that are built up from only distorted octahedra instead of combinations with pentagonal and/or hexagonal bipyramids are energetically more favorable and dynamically stable. More importantly, this study establishes that, given the pressure range considered, the B-phase is the most favorable structure and there is no a crystallographic phase transition to another phase at high-pressure. Additionally, for the equilibrium volume of the B-phase and the λ-model, the description of the electronic structure and optical properties were performed using semi-local and hybrid functionals.

  18. Hierarchical Vanadium Pentoxide Spheres as High-Performance Anode Materials for Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Su, Dawei; Dou, Shixue; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-09-01

    We report the synthesis of hierarchical vanadium pentoxide (V2 O5 ) spheres as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries (Na-ion batteries). Through field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy characterizations, it was found that the as-prepared V2 O5 spheres are composed of primary nanoparticles with pores between them. The as-prepared hierarchical V2 O5 spheres achieved a discharge capacity of 271 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 40 mA g(-1) , and 177 mA h g(-1) discharge capacity after 100 cycles. Even at high current densities, V2 O5 spheres still delivered high capacity and superior cyclability (179 and 140 mA h g(-1) discharge capacities at 640 and 1280 mA g(-1) current densities, respectively). The promising electrochemical performances of V2 O5 spheres should be ascribed to the unique architecture of hierarchical spheres and the predominant exposed (110) facets, which provides open interlayers for facile sodium ion intercalation. Each nanoparticle contains predominantly exposed (110) crystal planes. The ex situ FESEM analysis revealed that the pores formed by the primary nanocrystals effectively buffer volume changes in the electrode during cycling, contributing to the excellent cycling performance.

  19. Anti-asthmatic agents alleviate pulmonary edema by upregulating AQP1 and AQP5 expression in the lungs of mice with OVA-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chunling; Wang, Guifang; Li, Bo; Xiao, Kui; Ma, Zhongsen; Huang, Hua; Wang, Xiangdong; Bai, Chunxue

    2012-04-15

    Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma in mouse lungs causes changes in the mRNA and protein levels of aquaporins (AQPs). AQP expression was examined in the presence of various anti-asthmatic agents, including dexamethasone, ambroxol, and terbutaline. The influence of these agents on OVA-induced airway inflammation was also evaluated. The mRNA expression levels of AQP1, 4, and 5 were significantly reduced and that of AQP3 was significantly increased 24h after the last OVA exposure. The protein levels of AQP1, 3, and 5 mirrored the mRNA expression profiles, but AQP4 did not exhibit any changes. Only the mRNA and protein expression levels of AQP1 and AQP5 were significantly increased by these three anti-asthmatic agents. Dexamethasone and ambroxol improved the eosinophil infiltration, mucus secretion, and pulmonary edema caused by OVA, but terbutaline only alleviated pulmonary edema. These results indicate that AQP1 and AQP5 are closely related to pulmonary edema but not to eosinophil infiltration or mucus secretion during asthma. Anti-asthmatic agents could alleviate pulmonary edema through upregulating the expression of AQP1 and AQP5 in mouse lungs that have OVA-induced asthma. PMID:22226856

  20. Bone morphogenic protein-2 regulates the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs in CBDL rat serum-induced pulmonary microvascular remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chang; Chen, Lin; Zeng, Jing; Cui, Jian; Ning, Jiao-nin; Wang, Guan-song; Belguise, Karine; Wang, Xiaobo; Qian, Gui-sheng; Lu, Kai-zhi; Yi, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is characterized by an arterial oxygenation defect induced by intrapulmonary vasodilation (IPVD) that increases morbidity and mortality. In our previous study, it was determined that both the proliferation and the myogenic differentiation of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) play a key role in the development of IPVD. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the relationship between IPVD and the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs remains unknown. Additionally, it has been shown that bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP2), via the control of protein expression, may regulate cell differentiation including cardiomyocyte differentiation, neuronal differentiation and odontoblastic differentiation. In this study, we observed that common bile duct ligation (CBDL)-rat serum induced the upregulation of the expression of several myogenic proteins (SM-α-actin, calponin, SM-MHC) and enhanced the expression levels of BMP2 mRNA and protein in PMVECs. We also observed that both the expression levels of Smad1/5 and the activation of phosphorylated Smad1/5 were significantly elevated in PMVECs following exposure to CBDL-rat serum, which was accompanied by the down-regulation of Smurf1. The blockage of the BMP2/Smad signaling pathway with Noggin inhibited the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs, a process that was associated with relatively low expression levels of both SM-α-actin and calponin in the setting of CBDL-rat serum exposure, although SM-MHC expression was not affected. These findings suggested that the BMP2/Smad signaling pathway is involved in the myogenic differentiation of the PMVECs. In conclusion, our data highlight the pivotal role of BMP2 in the CBDL-rat serum-induced myogenic differentiation of PMVECs via the activation of both Smad1 and Smad5 and the down-regulation of Smurf1, which may represent a potential therapy for HPS-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. - Highlights: • CBDL-rat serum promotes the myogenic

  1. Omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS through suppressing pulmonary inflammation and promoting endothelial barrier via an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Di; Tang, Xumao; He, Jing; Wang, Daoxin; Zhao, Yan; Deng, Wang; Deng, Xinyu; Zhou, Guoqi; Xia, Jing; Zhong, Xi; Pu, Shenglan

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by increased pulmonary inflammation and endothelial barrier permeability. Omentin has been shown to benefit obesity-related systemic vascular diseases; however, its effects on ARDS are unknown. In the present study, the level of circulating omentin in patients with ARDS was assessed to appraise its clinical significance in ARDS. Mice were subjected to systemic administration of adenoviral vector expressing omentin (Ad-omentin) and one-shot treatment of recombinant human omentin (rh-omentin) to examine omentin's effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS. Pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) were treated with rh-omentin to further investigate its underlying mechanism. We found that a decreased level of circulating omentin negatively correlated with white blood cells and procalcitonin in patients with ARDS. Ad-omentin protected against LPS-induced ARDS by alleviating the pulmonary inflammatory response and endothelial barrier injury in mice, accompanied by Akt/eNOS pathway activation. Treatment of pulmonary ECs with rh-omentin attenuated inflammatory response and restored adherens junctions (AJs), and cytoskeleton organization promoted endothelial barrier after LPS insult. Moreover, the omentin-mediated enhancement of EC survival and differentiation was blocked by the Akt/eNOS pathway inactivation. Therapeutic rh-omentin treatment also effectively protected against LPS-induced ARDS via the Akt/eNOS pathway. Collectively, these data indicated that omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS by suppressing inflammation and promoting the pulmonary endothelial barrier, at least partially, through an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism. Therapeutic strategies aiming to restore omentin levels may be valuable for the prevention or treatment of ARDS. PMID:27607575

  2. Omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS through suppressing pulmonary inflammation and promoting endothelial barrier via an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qi, Di; Tang, Xumao; He, Jing; Wang, Daoxin; Zhao, Yan; Deng, Wang; Deng, Xinyu; Zhou, Guoqi; Xia, Jing; Zhong, Xi; Pu, Shenglan

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by increased pulmonary inflammation and endothelial barrier permeability. Omentin has been shown to benefit obesity-related systemic vascular diseases; however, its effects on ARDS are unknown. In the present study, the level of circulating omentin in patients with ARDS was assessed to appraise its clinical significance in ARDS. Mice were subjected to systemic administration of adenoviral vector expressing omentin (Ad-omentin) and one-shot treatment of recombinant human omentin (rh-omentin) to examine omentin's effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS. Pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) were treated with rh-omentin to further investigate its underlying mechanism. We found that a decreased level of circulating omentin negatively correlated with white blood cells and procalcitonin in patients with ARDS. Ad-omentin protected against LPS-induced ARDS by alleviating the pulmonary inflammatory response and endothelial barrier injury in mice, accompanied by Akt/eNOS pathway activation. Treatment of pulmonary ECs with rh-omentin attenuated inflammatory response and restored adherens junctions (AJs), and cytoskeleton organization promoted endothelial barrier after LPS insult. Moreover, the omentin-mediated enhancement of EC survival and differentiation was blocked by the Akt/eNOS pathway inactivation. Therapeutic rh-omentin treatment also effectively protected against LPS-induced ARDS via the Akt/eNOS pathway. Collectively, these data indicated that omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS by suppressing inflammation and promoting the pulmonary endothelial barrier, at least partially, through an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism. Therapeutic strategies aiming to restore omentin levels may be valuable for the prevention or treatment of ARDS. PMID:27607575

  3. Pleural effusion: An uncommon manifestation of nitrofurantoin-induced pulmonary injury.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jared W; Jones, Lynn S

    2016-01-01

    Nitrofurantoin has been documented as a cause of acute, sub-acute, and chronic pulmonary injury. This is a case of an 82 year-old female who presented with multiple episodes of respiratory symptoms due to recurrent pleural effusions after beginning nitrofurantoin therapy for urinary tract infection prophylaxis. Due to the rarity of pleural effusion as an adverse reaction to nitrofurantoin, the diagnosis was overlooked at first. This led to the patient undergoing multiple invasive procedures and accruing unnecessary healthcare cost before the diagnosis was made. This case demonstrates the need for physicians to remain mindful of rare adverse reactions from medications and maintain a high index of clinical suspicion with any patient presenting with a respiratory complaint while taking nitrofurantoin. PMID:27625984

  4. Hypoxia induces voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel expression in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Zhao, Ning; Xia, Cheng-kun; Du, Li-li; Fu, Xiao-xing; Du, Yi-mei

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) regulates the expression of hypoxia-inducible genes by binding erythropoietin (EPO) enhancer fragments. Of these genes, HIF-1 upregulates voltage-gated K+1.2 channels (Kv1.2) in rat PC12 cells. Whether HIF-1 regulates hypoxia-induced Kv channel expression in cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), however, has not been determined. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia on the expression of Kv1.2 Kv1.5, Kv2.1, and Kv9.3 channels in PASMCs and examined the direct role of HIF-1 by transfecting either wild type or mutant EPO enhancer fragments. Our results showed that 18 h exposure to hypoxia significantly increased the expression of Kv1.2, Kv1.5, Kv2.1, and Kv9.3; and this hypoxia-induced upregulation was completely inhibited after transfection with the wild type but not mutant EPO enhancer fragment. These results indicate that HIF-1 regulates hypoxia-stimulated induction of Kv1.2, Kv1.5, Kv2.1, and Kv9.3 channels in cultured PASMCs. PMID:22938542

  5. Morphometric analysis of oleic acid-induced permeability pulmonary edema: correlation with gravimetric lung water.

    PubMed

    Darien, B J; Saban, M R; Hart, A P; MacWilliams, P S; Clayton, M K; Kruse-Elliott, K T

    1997-07-01

    The technique used most commonly to quantitate pulmonary edema in in vivo animal models is postmortem gravimetric analysis (wet:dry) ratio. To determine whether lung water can be quantitated morphometrically, as accurately as by the commonly used gravimetric analysis, perivascular edema (cuff) area to vessel area ratio was correlated to wet:dry ratio. Anesthetized pigs were given either oleic acid (20 mg/kg/h, intravenously) or physiologic saline. At 4 h, lungs were excised and cuff:vessel and wet:dry ratio analysis was performed. The intermediate lobe was clamped across its main stem bronchus to maintain peak inspiratory inflation, excised, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and stored at -70 degrees C until cryostat sectioning and quantification of perivascular interstitial edema (cuff) area. Gravimetric analysis (wet:dry ratio) was performed on the remaining lung. Mean cuff:vessel and wet:dry analyzes showed that lung water increased significantly (p < .01) in the oleic-acid treated group (4.9 +/- .22 and 6.78 +/- .47, respectively), compared with the saline group (.03 +/- .02 and 2.55 +/- .27, respectively). The correlation coefficient between mean cuff:vessel and wet:dry ratios was .86 (p = .0016). This study demonstrates that cuff:vessel ratio analysis can be used to identify the distribution of edema fluid versus vessel diameter, and seems to be as effective a technique as gravimetric analysis to quantitate lung water changes in acute lung injury models. Moreover cuff:vessel ratio analysis can differentiate modest changes in pulmonary edema by direct quantitation, an important end-point not provided by wet:dry analysis. Therefore, it may be a more sensitive technique when investigating therapeutic interventions in in vivo models of acute lung injury.

  6. Wood smoke exposure induces a pulmonary and systemic inflammatory response in firefighters.

    PubMed

    Swiston, J R; Davidson, W; Attridge, S; Li, G T; Brauer, M; van Eeden, S F

    2008-07-01

    Epidemiological studies report an association between exposure to biomass smoke and cardiopulmonary morbidity. The mechanisms for this association are unclear. The aim of the present study was to characterise the acute pulmonary and systemic inflammatory effects of exposure to forest fire smoke. Seasonal forest firefighters (n = 52) were recruited before and/or after a day of fire-fighting. Exposure was assessed by questionnaires and measurement of carbon monoxide levels (used to estimate respirable particulate matter exposure). The pulmonary response was assessed by questionnaires, spirometry and sputum induction. Peripheral blood cell counts and inflammatory cytokines were measured to define the systemic response. Estimated respirable particulate matter exposure was high (peak levels >2 mg x m(-3)) during fire-fighting activities. Respiratory symptoms were reported by 65% of the firefighters. The percentage sputum granulocytes increased significantly from 6.5 to 10.9% following fire-fighting shifts, with concurrent increases in circulating white blood cells (5.55x10(9) to 7.06x10(9) cells x L(-1)) and band cells (0.11x10(9) to 0.16x10(9) cells x L(-1)). Serum interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels significantly increased following fire-fighting. There were no changes in band cells, IL-6, and IL-8 following strenuous physical exertion without fire-fighting. There was a significant association between changes in sputum macrophages containing phagocytosed particles and circulating band cells. In conclusion, acute exposure to air pollution from forest fire smoke elicits inflammation within the lungs, as well as a systemic inflammatory response.

  7. Alteration in Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Aerosolized Model Compounds Due to Disruption of the Alveolar Epithelial Barriers Following Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Tada, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a lethal lung disease that is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix and a change in lung structure. In this study, intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of aerosolized model compounds were evaluated using rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Aerosol formulations of indocyanine green, 6-carboxyfluorescein (6-CF), and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FD; 4.4, 10, 70, and 250 kDa) were administered to rat lungs using a MicroSprayer. Indocyanine green fluorescence signals were significantly weaker in fibrotic lungs than in control lungs and 6-CF and FD concentrations in the plasma of pulmonary fibrotic animals were markedly higher than in the plasma of control animals. Moreover, disrupted epithelial tight junctions, including claudins-1, -3, and -5, were observed in pulmonary fibrotic lesions using immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, destruction of tight junctions on model alveolar epithelial cells (NCI-H441) by transforming growth factor-β1 treatment enhanced the permeability of 6-CF and FDs through NCI-H441 cell monolayers. These results indicate that aerosolized drugs are easily distributed into the plasma after leakage through damaged tight junctions of alveolar epithelium. Therefore, the development of delivery systems for anti-fibrotic agents to improve intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics may be necessary for effective idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis therapy.

  8. Reduction of endoplasmic reticulum stress by 4-phenylbutyric acid prevents the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Masayuki; Furuhashi, Masato; Ishimura, Shutaro; Mita, Tomohiro; Fuseya, Takahiro; Okazaki, Yusuke; Yoshida, Hideaki; Tsuchihashi, Kazufumi; Miura, Tetsuji

    2014-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling of the pulmonary artery (PA). Recently, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inappropriate adaptation through the unfolded protein response (UPR) have been disclosed in various types of diseases. Here we examined whether ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of PAH. Four weeks of chronic normobaric hypoxia increased right ventricular (RV) systolic pressure by 63% compared with that in normoxic controls and induced RV hypertrophy and medial thickening of the PA in C57BL/6J mice. Treatment with 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), a chemical chaperone, significantly reduced RV systolic pressure by 30%, attenuated RV hypertrophy and PA muscularization, and increased total running distance in a treadmill test by 70% in hypoxic mice. The beneficial effects of 4-PBA were associated with suppressed expression of inflammatory cytokines and ER stress markers, including Grp78 and Grp94 in the activating transcription factor-6 branch, sXbp1 and Pdi in the inositol-requiring enzyme-1 branch and Atf4 in the PKR-like ER kinase branch, and reduced phosphorylation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2α in the lung. The pattern of changes in ER stress and inflammatory markers by 4-PBA in the lung of the PAH model was reproduced in PA smooth muscle cells by chronic stimulation of platelet-derived growth factor-BB or hypoxia. Furthermore, knockdown of each UPR branch sensor activated other branches and promoted proliferation of PA smooth muscle cells. The findings indicate that activation of all branches of the UPR and accompanying inflammation play a major role in the pathogenesis of PAH, and that chemical chaperones are potentially therapeutic agents for PAH.

  9. CARDIOVASCULAR AND BLOOD COAGULATION EFFECTS OF PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cardiovascular damage induced by pulmonary exposure to environmental chemicals can result from direct action or, secondarily, from pulmonary injury. We have developed a rat model of pulmonary exposure to zinc to demonstrate cardiac, coagulative, and fibrinolytic alterations. Mal...

  10. The protective effect of recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor on radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Liguang; Brizel, David M.; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Samulski, Thaddeus V.; Farrell, Catherine L.; Larrier, Nicole; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko . E-mail: vujas@radonc.duke.edu

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced lung toxicity is a significant dose-limiting side effect of radiotherapy for thoracic tumors. Recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (rHuKGF) has been shown to be a mitogen for type II pneumocytes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether rHuKGF prevents or ameliorates the severity of late lung damage from fractionated irradiation in a rat model. Methods and materials: Female Fisher 344 rats were irradiated to the right hemithorax with a dose of 40 Gy/5 fractions/5 days. rHuKGF at dose of 5 mg/kg or 15 mg/kg was given via a single intravenous injection 10 min after the last fraction of irradiation. Animals were followed for 6 months after irradiation. Results: The breathing rate increased beginning at 6 weeks and reached a peak at 14 weeks after irradiation. The average breathing frequencies in the irradiated groups with rHuKGF (5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg) treatment were significantly lower than that in the group receiving radiation without rHuKGF (116.5 {+-} 1.0 and 115.2 {+-} 0.8 vs 123.5 {+-} 1.2 breaths/min, p < 0.01). The severity of lung fibrosis and the level of immunoreactivity of integrin {alpha}v{beta}6, TGF{beta}1, type II TGF{beta} receptor, Smad3, and phosphorylated Smad2/3 were significantly decreased only in the group receiving irradiation plus high-dose rHuKGF treatment compared with irradiation plus vehicle group, suggesting a dose response for the effect of rHuKGF. Conclusions: This study is the first to demonstrate that rHuKGF treatment immediately after irradiation protects against late radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity. These results suggest that restoration of the integrity of the pulmonary epithelium via rHuKGF stimulation may downregulate the TGF-{beta}-mediated fibrosis pathway. These data also support the use of rHuKGF in a clinical trial designed to prevent radiation-induced lung injury.

  11. Heat stress prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells by blocking calpain/p38 MAPK signalling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-feng; Zheng, Dong; Fan, Guo-chang; Peng, Tianqing; Su, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMECs) injury including apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury during sepsis. Our recent study has demonstrated that calpain activation contributes to apoptosis in PMECs under septic conditions. This study investigated how calpain activation mediated apoptosis and whether heat stress regulated calpain activation in lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated PMECs. In cultured mouse primary PMECs, incubation with LPS (1 µg/ml, 24 h) increased active caspase-3 fragments and DNA fragmentation, indicative of apoptosis. These effects of LPS were abrogated by pre-treatment with heat stress (43 °C for 2 h). LPS also induced calpain activation and increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Inhibition of calpain and p38 MAPK prevented apoptosis induced by LPS. Furthermore, inhibition of calpain blocked p38 MAPK phosphorylation in LPS-stimulated PMECs. Notably, heat stress decreased the protein levels of calpain-1/2 and calpain activities, and blocked p38 MAPK phosphorylation in response to LPS. Additionally, forced up-regulation of calpain-1 or calpain-2 sufficiently induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation and apoptosis in PMECs, both of which were inhibited by heat stress. In conclusion, heat stress prevents LPS-induced apoptosis in PMECs. This effect of heat stress is associated with down-regulation of calpain expression and activation, and subsequent blockage of p38 MAPK activation in response to LPS. Thus, blocking calpain/p38 MAPK pathway may be a novel mechanism underlying heat stress-mediated inhibition of apoptosis in LPS-stimulated endothelial cells. PMID:27325431

  12. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces peripheral metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for ozone-induced systemic metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wis...

  13. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats#

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces metabolic alterations in animals and humans. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for both ozone-induced metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats ...

  14. Caveolin-1 Regulates Rac1 Activation and Rat Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Hyperpermeability Induced by TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Geng-Yun; You, Qing-Hai; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Dan

    2013-01-01

    A multiplicity of vital cellular and tissue level functions are controlled by caveolin-1 and it is considered to be an important candidate for targeted therapeutics. Rac1-cortactin signaling plays an important role in maintaining the functions of the endothelial barrier in microvascular endothelial cells. The activity of Rac1 has been shown to be regulated by caveolin-1. Therefore, the present study investigated the consequences of down-regulating caveolin-1 and the subsequent changes in activity of Rac1 and the endothelial barrier functions in primary rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (RPMVECs). RPMVECs were transfected with a small hairpin RNA duplex to down-regulate caveolin-1 expression. This procedure significantly increased the activity of Rac1. Moreover, down-regulation of caveolin-1 attenuated TNF-α-induced decrease in TER, increase in the flux of FITC-BSA and the disappearance of cortactin from the cell periphery in RPMVEC. Rac1 inhibitors significantly abolished this barrier-protective effect induced by down-regulation of caveolin-1 in response to TNF-α in RPMVECs. In conclusion, our data suggest a mechanism for the regulation of Rac1 activity by caveolin-1, with consequences for activation of endothelial cells in response to TNF-α. PMID:23383114

  15. Smoking-induced CXCL14 expression in the human airway epithelium links chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Sackrowitz, Rachel; Fukui, Tomoya; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Chao, Ion Wa; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Downey, Robert J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-09-01

    CXCL14, a recently described epithelial cytokine, plays putative multiple roles in inflammation and carcinogenesis. In the context that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are both smoking-related disorders associated with airway epithelial disorder and inflammation, we hypothesized that the airway epithelium responds to cigarette smoking with altered CXCL14 gene expression, contributing to the disease-relevant phenotype. Using genome-wide microarrays with subsequent immunohistochemical analysis, the data demonstrate that the expression of CXCL14 is up-regulated in the airway epithelium of healthy smokers and further increased in COPD smokers, especially within hyperplastic/metaplastic lesions, in association with multiple genes relevant to epithelial structural integrity and cancer. In vitro experiments revealed that the expression of CXCL14 is induced in the differentiated airway epithelium by cigarette smoke extract, and that epidermal growth factor mediates CXCL14 up-regulation in the airway epithelium through its effects on the basal stem/progenitor cell population. Analyses of two independent lung cancer cohorts revealed a dramatic up-regulation of CXCL14 expression in adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma. High expression of the COPD-associated CXCL14-correlating cluster of genes was linked in lung adenocarcinoma with poor survival. These data suggest that the smoking-induced expression of CXCL14 in the airway epithelium represents a novel potential molecular link between smoking-associated airway epithelial injury, COPD, and lung cancer.

  16. Klotho Reduction in Alveolar Macrophages Contributes to Cigarette Smoke Extract-induced Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingling; Wang, Yujie; Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Sini; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Mao; Yao, Xin

    2015-11-13

    Abnormal inflammation and accelerated decline in lung function occur in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Klotho, an anti-aging protein, has an anti-inflammatory function. However, the role of Klotho has never been investigated in COPD. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible role of Klotho by alveolar macrophages in airway inflammation in COPD. Klotho levels were assessed in the lung samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of non-smokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. The regulation of Klotho expression by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) was studied in vitro, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) and recombinant Klotho were employed to investigate the role of Klotho on CSE-induced inflammation. Klotho expression was reduced in alveolar macrophages in the lungs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of COPD patients. CSE decreased Klotho expression and release from MH-S cells. Knockdown of endogenous Klotho augmented the expression of the inflammatory mediators, such as MMP-9, IL-6, and TNF-α, by MH-S cells. Exogenous Klotho inhibited the expression of CSE-induced inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, we showed that Klotho interacts with IκBα of the NF-κB pathway. Dexamethasone treatment increased the expression and release level of Klotho in MH-S cells. Our findings suggest that Klotho plays a role in sustained inflammation of the lungs, which in turn may have therapeutic implications in COPD.

  17. Gamma irradiation induces acetylcholine-evoked, endothelium-independent relaxation and activatesk-channels of isolated pulmonary artery of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, Veronique . E-mail: eder@med.univ-tours.fr; Gautier, Mathieu; Boissiere, Julien; Girardin, Catherine; Rebocho, Manuel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To test the effects of irradiation (R*) on the pulmonary artery (PA). Methods and materials: Isolated PA rings were submitted to gamma irradiation (cesium, 8 Gy/min{sup -1}) at doses of 20 Gy-140 Gy. Rings were placed in an organ chamber, contracted with serotonin (10{sup -4} M 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]), then exposed to acetylcholine (ACh) in incremental concentrations. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) membrane potential was measured with microelectrodes. Results: A high dose of irradiation (60 Gy) increased 5HT contraction by 20%, whereas lower (20 Gy) doses slightly decreased it compared with control. In the absence of the endothelium, 5-HT precontracted rings exposed to 20 Gy irradiation developed a dose-dependent relaxation induced by acetylcholine (EI-ACh) with maximal relaxation of 60 {+-} 17% (n = 13). This was totally blocked by L-NAME (10{sup -4} M), partly by 7-nitro indazole; it was abolished by hypoxia and iberiotoxin, decreased by tetra-ethyl-ammonium, and not affected by free radical scavengers. In irradiated rings, hypoxia induced a slight contraction which was never observed in control rings. No differences in SMC membrane potential were observed between irradiated and nonirradiated PA rings. Conclusion: Irradiation mediates endothelium independent relaxation by a mechanism involving the nitric oxide pathway and K-channels.

  18. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Gene Electroporation into Skeletal Muscle as a Novel Gene Therapeutic Approach for Elastase-Induced Pulmonary Emphysema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tobinaga, Shuichi; Matsumoto, Keitaro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Furukawa, Katsuro; Abo, Takafumi; Yamasaki, Naoya; Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Miyazaki, Takuro; Koji, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a progressive disease with airspace destruction and an effective therapy is needed. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) promotes pulmonary epithelial proliferation and has the potential to induce lung regeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the possibility of using KGF gene therapy for treatment of a mouse emphysema model induced by porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE). Eight-week-old BALB/c male mice treated with intra-tracheal PPE administration were transfected with 80 μg of a recombinant human KGF (rhKGF)-expressing FLAG-CMV14 plasmid (pKGF-FLAG gene), or with the pFLAG gene expressing plasmid as a control, into the quadriceps muscle by electroporation. In the lung, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was augmented, and surfactant protein A (SP-A) and KGF receptor (KGFR) were co-expressed in PCNA-positive cells. Moreover, endogenous KGF and KGFR gene expression increased significantly by pKGF-FLAG gene transfection. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed that the PaO2 level was not significantly reduced on day 14 after PPE instillation with pKGF-FLAG gene transfection compared to that of normal mice. These results indicated that KGF gene therapy with electroporation stimulated lung epithelial proliferation and protected depression of pulmonary function in a mouse emphysema model, suggesting a possible method of treating pulmonary emphysema. PMID:26160987

  19. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chunxia; Yi, Bin; Bai, Li; Xia, Yongzhi; Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng; Feng, Hua

    2010-07-02

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  20. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Gene Electroporation into Skeletal Muscle as a Novel Gene Therapeutic Approach for Elastase-Induced Pulmonary Emphysema in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tobinaga, Shuichi; Matsumoto, Keitaro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Furukawa, Katsuro; Abo, Takafumi; Yamasaki, Naoya; Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Miyazaki, Takuro; Koji, Takehiko

    2015-06-29

    Pulmonary emphysema is a progressive disease with airspace destruction and an effective therapy is needed. Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) promotes pulmonary epithelial proliferation and has the potential to induce lung regeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the possibility of using KGF gene therapy for treatment of a mouse emphysema model induced by porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE). Eight-week-old BALB/c male mice treated with intra-tracheal PPE administration were transfected with 80 μg of a recombinant human KGF (rhKGF)-expressing FLAG-CMV14 plasmid (pKGF-FLAG gene), or with the pFLAG gene expressing plasmid as a control, into the quadriceps muscle by electroporation. In the lung, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was augmented, and surfactant protein A (SP-A) and KGF receptor (KGFR) were co-expressed in PCNA-positive cells. Moreover, endogenous KGF and KGFR gene expression increased significantly by pKGF-FLAG gene transfection. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed that the PaO2 level was not significantly reduced on day 14 after PPE instillation with pKGF-FLAG gene transfection compared to that of normal mice. These results indicated that KGF gene therapy with electroporation stimulated lung epithelial proliferation and protected depression of pulmonary function in a mouse emphysema model, suggesting a possible method of treating pulmonary emphysema.

  1. Therapeutic Benefits of Young, But Not Old, Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Chronic Mouse Model of Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Jun; Elliot, Sharon J.; Gerth, David J.; Xia, Xiaomei; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Choi, Rhea; Catanuto, Paola; Shahzeidi, Shahriar; Toonkel, Rebecca L.; Shah, Rahil H.; El Salem, Fadi; Glassberg, Marilyn K.

    2016-01-01

    The observation that pulmonary inflammatory lesions and bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis spontaneously resolve in young mice, while remaining irreversible in aged mice, suggests that impairment of pulmonary regeneration and repair is associated with aging. Since mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may promote repair following injury, we postulated that differences in MSCs from aged mice may underlie post-injury fibrosis in aging. The potential for young-donor MSCs to inhibit BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in aged male mice (>22 months) has not been studied. Adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) from young (4-month) and old (22-month) male mice were infused 1-day following intratracheal BLM administration. At 21-day sacrifice, aged BLM mice demonstrated lung fibrosis by Ashcroft score, collagen content, and αv-integrin mRNA expression. Lung tissue from aged BLM mice receiving young ASCs exhibited decreased fibrosis, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity, oxidative stress, and markers of apoptosis vs. BLM controls. Lung mRNA expression of TNFα was also decreased in aged BLM mice receiving young-donor ASCs vs. BLM controls. In contrast, old-donor ASC treatment in aged BLM mice did not reduce fibrosis and related markers. On examination of the cells, young-donor ASCs had decreased mRNA expression of MMP-2, insulin-like growth factor receptor, and AKT activation compared to old-donor ASCs. These results show that the BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in aged mice could be blocked by young-donor ASCs and that the mechanisms involve changes in collagen turnover and markers of inflammation. PMID:26432923

  2. Exposure to particulate 1-->3-beta-glucans induces greater pulmonary toxicity than soluble 1-->3-beta-glucans in rats.

    PubMed

    Young, Shih-Houng; Robinson, Victor A; Barger, Mark; Whitmer, Michael; Porter, Dale W; Frazer, David G; Castranova, Vincent

    2003-01-10

    1-->3-beta-Glucans, derived from the inner cell wall of yeasts and fungi, are commonly found in indoor air dust samples and have been implicated in organic dust toxic syndrome. In a previous study, it was reported that 1-->3-beta-glucan (zymosan A) induced acute pulmonary inflammation in rats. This study investigates which form of 1-->3-beta-glucans, particulate or soluble, is more potent in inducing pulmonary inflammation. Zymosan A was suspended in 0.25 N NaOH for 30 min, neutralized, dialyzed for 2 d using deionized water, and particulate and soluble fractions were collected. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed via intratracheal instillation to NaOH-soluble or NaOH-insoluble zymosan A. At 18 h postexposure, various indicators of pulmonary response were monitored, including indicators of lung damage, such as serum albumin concentration and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in acellular bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Inflammation was characterized by an increase in lavageable polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). Pulmonary irritation (breathing frequency increase) and oxidant production (nitric oxide and chemiluminescence, CL) were also monitored. Exposure to the particulate form of NaOH-treated zymosan produced a significant increase in all these indicators. In contrast, rats exposed to the NaOH-soluble fraction were not markedly affected except for LDH, PMN, and CL. However, these increases were significantly less than with exposure to NaOH-insoluble zymosan. Therefore, results demonstrate that particulate zymosan A is more potent in inducing pulmonary inflammation and damage in rats than the soluble form of this beta-glucan. PMID:12587289

  3. Prostaglandin E₂ protects murine lungs from bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis and lung dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dackor, Ryan T; Cheng, Jennifer; Voltz, James W; Card, Jeffrey W; Ferguson, Catherine D; Garrett, Ryan C; Bradbury, J Alyce; DeGraff, Laura M; Lih, Fred B; Tomer, Kenneth B; Flake, Gordon P; Travlos, Gregory S; Ramsey, Randle W; Edin, Matthew L; Morgan, Daniel L; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2011-11-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is a lipid mediator that is produced via the metabolism of arachidonic acid by cyclooxygenase enzymes. In the lung, PGE(2) acts as an anti-inflammatory factor and plays an important role in tissue repair processes. Although several studies have examined the role of PGE(2) in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis in rodents, results have generally been conflicting, and few studies have examined the therapeutic effects of PGE(2) on the accompanying lung dysfunction. In this study, an established model of pulmonary fibrosis was used in which 10-12-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were administered a single dose (1.0 mg/kg) of bleomycin via oropharyngeal aspiration. To test the role of prostaglandins in this model, mice were dosed, via surgically implanted minipumps, with either vehicle, PGE(2) (1.32 μg/h), or the prostacyclin analog iloprost (0.33 μg/h) beginning 7 days before or 14 days after bleomycin administration. Endpoints assessed at 7 days after bleomycin administration included proinflammatory cytokine levels and measurement of cellular infiltration into the lung. Endpoints assessed at 21 days after bleomycin administration included lung function assessment via invasive (FlexiVent) analysis, cellular infiltration, lung collagen content, and semiquantitative histological analysis of the degree of lung fibrosis (Ashcroft method). Seven days after bleomycin administration, lymphocyte numbers and chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 expression were significantly lower in PGE(2)- and iloprost-treated animals compared with vehicle-treated controls (P < 0.05). When administered 7 days before bleomycin challenge, PGE(2) also protected against the decline in lung static compliance, lung fibrosis, and collagen production that is associated with 3 wk of bleomycin exposure. However, PGE(2) had no therapeutic effect on these parameters when administered 14 days after bleomycin challenge. In summary, PGE(2) prevented the decline in lung static compliance and

  4. Reactive oxygen species scavengers improve voltage-gated K+ channel function in pulmonary arteries of newborn pigs with progressive hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aschner, Judy L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Changes in voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel function contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Yet the mechanisms underlying Kv channel impairments in the pulmonary circulation remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROSs) contribute to the Kv channel dysfunction that develops in resistance-level pulmonary arteries (PRAs) of piglets exposed to chronic in vivo hypoxia. Piglets were raised in either room air (control) or hypoxia for 3 or 10 days. To evaluate Kv channel function, responses to the Kv channel antagonist 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) were measured in cannulated PRAs. To assess the influence of ROSs, PRAs were treated with the ROS-removing agent M40403 (which dismutates superoxide to hydrogen peroxide), plus polyethylene glycol catalase (which converts hydrogen peroxide to water). Responses to 4-AP were diminished in PRAs from both groups of hypoxic piglets. ROS-removing agents had no impact on 4-AP responses in PRAs from piglets exposed to 3 days of hypoxia but significantly increased the response to 4-AP in PRAs from piglets exposed to 10 days of hypoxia. Kv channel function is impaired in PRAs of piglets exposed to 3 or 10 days of in vivo hypoxia. ROSs contribute to Kv channel dysfunction in PRAs from piglets exposed to hypoxia for 10 days but are not involved with the Kv channel dysfunction that develops within 3 days of exposure to hypoxia. Therapies to remove ROSs might improve Kv channel function and thereby ameliorate the progression, but not the onset, of pulmonary hypertension in chronically hypoxic newborn piglets. PMID:24618540

  5. Alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide double alkoxide precursors to alkali metal yttrium oxide nanomaterials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Neville, Michael L.; Sears, Jeremiah Matthew; Cramer, Roger

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a series of alkali metal yttrium neo-pentoxide ([AY(ONep)4]) compounds were developed as precursors to alkali yttrium oxide (AYO2) nanomaterials. The reaction of yttrium amide ([Y(NR2)3] where R=Si(CH3)3) with four equivalents of H-ONep followed by addition of [A(NR2)] (A=Li, Na, K) or Ao (Ao=Rb, Cs) led to the formation of a complex series of AnY(ONep)3+n species, crystallographically identified as [Y2Li3(μ3-ONep)(μ3-HONep)(μ-ONep)5(ONep)3(HONep)2] (1), [YNa2(μ3-ONep)4(ONep)]2 (2), {[Y2K3(μ3-ONep)3(μ-ONep)4(ONep)2(ηξ-tol)2][Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4]•ηx-tol]} (3), [Y4K2(μ4-O)(μ3-ONep)8(ONep)4] (3a), [Y2Rb3(μ4-ONep)3(μ-ONep)6] (4), and [Y2Cs4(μ6-O)(μ3-ONep)6(μ3-HONep)2(ONep)2(ηx-tol)4]•tol (5). Compounds 1–5 were investigated as single source precursors to AYOx nanomaterials following solvothermal routes (pyridine, 185 °C for 24h). The final products after thermal processing weremore » found by powder X-ray diffraction experiments to be Y2O3 with variable sized particles based on transmission electron diffraction. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies indicated that the heavier alkali metal species were present in the isolated nanomaterials.« less

  6. Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis resolves spontaneously if dense scars are not formed

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, J.A.; Diel, J.H.; Slauson, D.O.; Halliwell, W.H.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1983-02-01

    The relation of static compliance of excised lungs to collagen accumulation and histologic fibrosis was examined in Syrian hamsters inhaling sufficient /sup 238/PuO2 particles to achieve initial lung burdens of 50 or 100 nCi. Control animals were exposed to nonradioactive aerosols. Irradiated lungs from hamsters at both dose levels had compliance reduced to the same extent at point of maximal reduction. However, collagen accumulation was more closely related to /sup 238/Pu exposure level than the compliance measurements. Histologic examination revealed both diffuse alveolar thickening and some dense fibrous scars, the former predominating at low